Science.gov

Sample records for metal reduction activities

  1. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  2. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  3. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  4. The Origin of the Catalytic Activity of a Metal Hydride in CO2 Reduction.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Matam, Santhosh Kumar; Kerger, Philipp; Bernard, Laetitia; Battaglia, Corsin; Vogel, Dirk; Rohwerder, Michael; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Atomic hydrogen on the surface of a metal with high hydrogen solubility is of particular interest for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. In a mixture of hydrogen and carbon dioxide, methane was markedly formed on the metal hydride ZrCoHx in the course of the hydrogen desorption and not on the pristine intermetallic. The surface analysis was performed by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy and near-ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, for the in situ analysis. The aim was to elucidate the origin of the catalytic activity of the metal hydride. Since at the initial stage the dissociation of impinging hydrogen molecules is hindered by a high activation barrier of the oxidised surface, the atomic hydrogen flux from the metal hydride is crucial for the reduction of carbon dioxide and surface oxides at interfacial sites. PMID:27061237

  5. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  6. Trend in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium

    SciTech Connect

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton Jr, William Allison; Xu, Ye

    2012-01-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O{sub 2} on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  7. Trends in the Catalytic Activity of Transition Metals for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction by Lithium.

    PubMed

    Dathar, Gopi Krishna Phani; Shelton, William A; Xu, Ye

    2012-04-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the intrinsic activity of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Ir, and Ru for the oxygen reduction reaction by Li (Li-ORR) forms a volcano-like trend with respect to the adsorption energy of oxygen, with Pt and Pd being the most active. The trend is based on two mechanisms: the reduction of molecular O2 on Au and Ag and of atomic O on the remaining metals. Step edges are found to be more active for catalyzing the Li-ORR than close-packed surfaces. Our findings identify important considerations in the design of catalyst-promoted air cathodes for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

  8. Screening of catalytic oxygen reduction reaction activity of metal-doped graphene by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Chen, Shuangjing; Wang, Jinyu

    2016-08-01

    Graphene doping is a promising direction for developing effective oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts. In this paper, we computationally investigated the ORR performance of 10 kinds of metal-doped graphene (M-G) catalysts, namely, Al-, Si-, Mn-, Fe-, Co-, Ni-, Pd-, Ag-, Pt-, and Au-G. The results shown that the binding energies of the metal atoms incorporated into the graphene vacancy are higher than their bulk cohesive energies, indicating the formed M-G catalysts are even more stable than the corresponding bulk metal surfaces, and thus avoid the metals dissolution in the reaction environment. We demonstrated that the linear relation among the binding energies of the ORR intermediates that found on metal-based materials does not hold for the M-G catalysts, therefore a single binding energy of intermediate alone is not sufficient to evaluate the ORR activity of an arbitrary catalyst. By analysis of the detailed ORR processes, we predicted that the Au-, Co-, and Ag-G materials can be used as the ORR catalysts.

  9. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability.

  10. Isolated metal active site concentration and stability control catalytic CO2 reduction selectivity.

    PubMed

    Matsubu, John C; Yang, Vanessa N; Christopher, Phillip

    2015-03-01

    CO2 reduction by H2 on heterogeneous catalysts is an important class of reactions that has been studied for decades. However, atomic scale details of structure-function relationships are still poorly understood. Particularly, it has been suggested that metal particle size plays a unique role in controlling the stability of CO2 hydrogenation catalysts and the distribution of active sites, which dictates reactivity and selectivity. These studies often have not considered the possible role of isolated metal active sites in the observed dependences. Here, we utilize probe molecule diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) with known site-specific extinction coefficients to quantify the fraction of Rh sites residing as atomically dispersed isolated sites (Rhiso), as well as Rh sites on the surface of Rh nanoparticles (RhNP) for a series of TiO2 supported Rh catalysts. Strong correlations were observed between the catalytic reverse water gas shift turn over frequency (TOF) and the fraction of Rhiso sites and between catalytic methanation TOF and the fraction of RhNP sites. Furthermore, it was observed that reaction condition-induced disintegration of Rh nanoparticles, forming Rhiso active sites, controls the changing reactivity with time on stream. This work demonstrates that isolated atoms and nanoparticles of the same metal on the same support can exhibit uniquely different catalytic selectivity in competing parallel reaction pathways and that disintegration of nanoparticles under reaction conditions can play a significant role in controlling stability. PMID:25671686

  11. Electrocatalytic Activity of Transition Metal Oxide-Carbon Composites for Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Batteries and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Malkhandi, S; Trinh, P; Manohar, AK; Jayachandrababu, KC; Kindler, A; Prakash, GKS; Narayanan, SR

    2013-06-07

    Conductive transition metal oxides (perovskites, spinels and pyrochlores) are attractive as catalysts for the air electrode in alkaline rechargeable metal-air batteries and fuel cells. We have found that conductive carbon materials when added to transition metal oxides such as calcium-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide, nickel cobalt oxide and calcium-doped lanthanum manganese cobalt oxide increase the electrocatalytic activity of the oxide for oxygen reduction by a factor of five to ten. We have studied rotating ring-disk electrodes coated with (a) various mass ratios of carbon and transition metal oxide, (b) different types of carbon additives and (c) different types of transition metal oxides. Our experiments and analysis establish that in such composite catalysts, carbon is the primary electro- catalyst for the two-electron electro-reduction of oxygen to hydroperoxide while the transition metal oxide decomposes the hydroperoxide to generate additional oxygen that enhances the observed current resulting in an apparent four-electron process. These findings are significant in that they change the way we interpret previous reports in the scientific literature on the electrocatalytic activity of various transition metal oxide- carbon composites for oxygen reduction, especially where carbon is assumed to be an additive that just enhances the electronic conductivity of the oxide catalyst. (C) 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  13. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  14. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  15. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  16. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  17. Bio-inspired electron-delivering system for reductive activation of dioxygen at metal centres towards artificial flavoenzymes

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Yoann; Ricoux, Rémy; Avenier, Frédéric; Mahy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Development of artificial systems, capable of delivering electrons to metal-based catalysts for the reductive activation of dioxygen, has been proven very difficult for decades, constituting a major scientific lock for the elaboration of environmentally friendly oxidation processes. Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of a flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in a water-soluble polymer, bearing a locally hydrophobic microenvironment, allows the efficient reduction of the FMN by NADH. This supramolecular entity is then capable of catalysing a very fast single-electron reduction of manganese(III) porphyrin by splitting the electron pair issued from NADH. This is fully reminiscent of the activity of natural reductases such as the cytochrome P450 reductases with kinetic parameters, which are three orders of magnitude faster compared with other artificial systems. Finally, we show as a proof of concept that the reduced manganese porphyrin activates dioxygen and catalyses the oxidation of organic substrates in water. PMID:26419885

  18. Oxygen reduction and evolution at single-metal active sites: Comparison between functionalized graphitic materials and protoporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calle-Vallejo, F.; Martínez, J. I.; García-Lastra, J. M.; Abad, E.; Koper, M. T. M.

    2013-01-01

    A worldwide spread of clean technologies such as low-temperature fuel cells and electrolyzers depends strictly on their technical reliability and economic affordability. Currently, both conditions are hardly fulfilled mainly due to the same reason: the oxygen electrode, which has large overpotentials and is made of precious materials. A possible solution is the use of non-noble electrocatalysts with single-metal active sites. Here, on the basis of DFT calculations of adsorbed intermediates and a thermodynamic analysis, we compare the oxygen reduction (ORR) and evolution (OER) activities of functionalized graphitic materials and gas-phase porphyrins with late transition metals. We find that both kinds of materials follow approximately the same activity trends, and active sites with transition metals from groups 7 to 9 may be good ORR and OER electrocatalysts. However, spin analyses show more flexibility in the possible oxidation states of the metal atoms in solid electrocatalysts, while in porphyrins they must be + 2. These observations reveal that the catalytic activity of these materials is mainly due to nearest-neighbor interactions. Based on this, we propose that this class of electrocatalysts may be improved by careful selections of the support and the ligand properties close to the active sites and/or the ramifications near them, so that charge is transferred back and forth during adsorption and selective hydrogen bonds are formed.

  19. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  20. How a redox-innocent metal promotes the formal reductive elimination of biphenyl using redox-active ligands.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Daniel Charles; Baik, Mu-Hyun

    2015-03-01

    One of the most compelling strategies for utilizing redox-active ligands is to perform redox events at the ligands to avoid accessing prohibitively high energy oxidation states at the metal center. This has been demonstrated experimentally in many systems, yet there is little understanding of the fundamental electronic structures involved with these transformations or how to control them. Here, the reductive elimination of biphenyl from [M(isq)2Ph2] (M = Ti, Zr, and Hf and isq = 2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-tert-butyliminosemiquinone) was studied computationally. It was found that the metal remains in the +IV oxidation state and all redox chemistry was mediated by the redox-active ligands. Two types of electron-transfer mechanisms were identified, an asymmetric unpaired electron transfer (UET) and a symmetric pairwise electron transfer (PET), the former always being lower in energy. The energetic differences between these two mechanisms were explained through simple molecular orbital theory arguments. Despite the metal's redox-inactivity, it still has a marked influence on the calculated energetics of the reaction, with the Ti systems being much more reactive than the Zr/Hf systems. This primarily originates from the shorter Ti-Ph bond, which leads to a stronger filled-filled interaction between these ligands at the reactant state. This greater reactant destabilization leads to the lower activation energies.

  1. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  2. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH boundmore » structures have the highest calculated activity to date.« less

  3. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-03-19

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O₂ bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H₂O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date.

  4. Activity of N-coordinated multi-metal-atom active site structures for Pt-free oxygen reduction reaction catalysis: Role of *OH ligands

    PubMed Central

    Holby, Edward F.; Taylor, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    We report calculated oxygen reduction reaction energy pathways on multi-metal-atom structures that have previously been shown to be thermodynamically favorable. We predict that such sites have the ability to spontaneously cleave the O2 bond and then will proceed to over-bind reaction intermediates. In particular, the *OH bound state has lower energy than the final 2 H2O state at positive potentials. Contrary to traditional surface catalysts, this *OH binding does not poison the multi-metal-atom site but acts as a modifying ligand that will spontaneously form in aqueous environments leading to new active sites that have higher catalytic activities. These *OH bound structures have the highest calculated activity to date. PMID:25788358

  5. Elucidating Oxygen Reduction Active Sites in Pyrolyzed Metal–Nitrogen Coordinated Non-Precious-Metal Electrocatalyst Systems

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Detailed understanding of the nature of the active centers in non-precious-metal-based electrocatalyst, and their role in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) mechanistic pathways will have a profound effect on successful commercialization of emission-free energy devices such as fuel cells. Recently, using pyrolyzed model structures of iron porphyrins, we have demonstrated that a covalent integration of the Fe–Nx sites into π-conjugated carbon basal plane modifies electron donating/withdrawing capability of the carbonaceous ligand, consequently improving ORR activity. Here, we employ a combination of in situ X-ray spectroscopy and electrochemical methods to identify the various structural and functional forms of the active centers in non-heme Fe/N/C catalysts. Both methods corroboratively confirm the single site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in alkaline media on the primary Fe2+–N4 centers and the dual-site 2e– × 2e– mechanism in acid media with the significant role of the surface bound coexisting Fe/FexOy nanoparticles (NPs) as the secondary active sites. PMID:24817921

  6. Lithium metal reduction of plutonium oxide to produce plutonium metal

    DOEpatents

    Coops, Melvin S.

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for the chemical reduction of plutonium oxides to plutonium metal by the use of pure lithium metal. Lithium metal is used to reduce plutonium oxide to alpha plutonium metal (alpha-Pu). The lithium oxide by-product is reclaimed by sublimation and converted to the chloride salt, and after electrolysis, is removed as lithium metal. Zinc may be used as a solvent metal to improve thermodynamics of the reduction reaction at lower temperatures. Lithium metal reduction enables plutonium oxide reduction without the production of huge quantities of CaO--CaCl.sub.2 residues normally produced in conventional direct oxide reduction processes.

  7. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, J.

    1984-01-01

    Active Noise Reduction (ANR) techniques, singly and in combination with passive hearing protectors, offer the potential for increased sound protection, enhanced voice communications and improved wearability features for personnel exposed to unacceptable noise conditions. An enhanced closed loop active noise reduction system was miniaturized and incorporated into a standard Air Force flight helmet (HGU-26/P). This report describes the theory of design and operation, prototype configuration and operation, and electroacoustic performance and specifications for the ANR system. This system is theoretically capable of producing in excess of 30 decibels of active noise reduction. Electroacoustic measurements on a flat plate coupler demonstrated approximately 20 decibels of active noise reduction with the prototype unit. A performance evaluation of the integrated ANR unit will be conducted under laboratory and field conditions by government personnel to determine the feasibility of the system for use in military applications.

  8. A Discussion on the Activity Origin in Metal-Free Nitrogen-Doped Carbons For Oxygen Reduction Reaction and their Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang-Sheng; Gentle, Ian R

    2015-09-01

    The origin of oxygen reduction reaction activity in metal-free N-doped carbons has been a stimulating, yet unsolved issue for the rational design of cost-effective electrocatalysts for fuel cells and metal-air batteries. At present, there are several inconsistent opinions on the materials chemistry and the mechanism of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performed on this type of materials. This article provides a brief review of the current understanding of ORR processes and the history of electrocatalyst development. With special attention, the focus of the discussion is on the major contentions of the current opinions towards metal-free N-doped carbon chemistry and the arguments for the probable ORR mechanisms. By clarifying the fundamental aspects of each opinion, a converging consensus on N-doped carbon electrocatalysts can be established and thus facilitate the substantial development of large-capacity energy devices.

  9. Direct electrochemical reduction of metal-oxides

    DOEpatents

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Gourishankar, Karthick

    2003-01-01

    A method of controlling the direct electrolytic reduction of a metal oxide or mixtures of metal oxides to the corresponding metal or metals. A non-consumable anode and a cathode and a salt electrolyte with a first reference electrode near the non-consumable anode and a second reference electrode near the cathode are used. Oxygen gas is produced and removed from the cell. The anode potential is compared to the first reference electrode to prevent anode dissolution and gas evolution other than oxygen, and the cathode potential is compared to the second reference electrode to prevent production of reductant metal from ions in the electrolyte.

  10. Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ramana Reddy

    2012-04-12

    A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode

  11. Reductive mobilization of oxide-bound metals

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, A.T.

    1991-01-01

    We have completed a large number of experiments which examine the release of MnO{sub 2}-bound Co, Ni, and Cu. Our work has focused upon the following areas: (1) competitive adsorption among the three toxic metals and Mn(II); (2) toxic metal release upon addition of low MW organic reductants and complexants; and (3) toxic metal release upon addition of natural organic matter-rich surface waters and IHSS organic matter reference material.

  12. Active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Carolyn R.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) techniques are described with reference to their application to crewmembers during aircraft operation to enhance productivity and safety. ANR concepts and theory are explained, and the development of protective ANR systems for direct implementation are described. Sound attenuation testing was conducted to study the feasibility of aircraft-powered ANR systems, and the positive results spurred their development for compatibility with flight helmets. The Helmets Limited ANR system uses a bypass mode at times of limited available power and complements the use of passive sound attenuation. Subjective testing results show that the device is effective, and a planned program of intensive evaluation is discussed. The aircraft that require an ANR system are listed, and key areas of implementation include battery power and the combination of ANR circuitry and helmet oxygen masks. It is suggested that ANR techniques can positively impact the efficiency and performance of crewmembers in high-noise-level aircraft.

  13. PRODUCTION OF URANIUM METAL BY CARBON REDUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Holden, R.B.; Powers, R.M.; Blaber, O.J.

    1959-09-22

    The preparation of uranium metal by the carbon reduction of an oxide of uranium is described. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a charge composed of carbon and uranium oxide is heated to a solid mass after which it is further heated under vacuum to a temperature of about 2000 deg C to produce a fused uranium metal. Slowly ccoling the fused mass produces a dendritic structure of uranium carbide in uranium metal. Reacting the solidified charge with deionized water hydrolyzes the uranium carbide to finely divide uranium dioxide which can be separated from the coarser uranium metal by ordinary filtration methods.

  14. Effects of transition metal doping in Pt/M-TiO2 (M = V, Cr, and Nb) on oxygen reduction reaction activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jun-Hyuk; Kwon, Gihan; Lim, Hankwon; Zhu, Chenhui; You, Hoydoo; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-07-01

    High cost and low durability are unresolved issues that impede the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). To overcome these limitations, Pt/TiO2 is reported as an alternative electrocatalyst for enhancing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity and/or durability of the system. However, the low electrical conductivity of TiO2 is a drawback that may be addressed by doping. To date, most reports related to Pt/doped-TiO2 focus on changes in the catalyst activity caused by the Pt-TiO2 interaction (metal-support interaction), instead of the effect of doping itself; doping is merely considered to enhance the electrical conductivity of TiO2. In this study, we discuss the variation in the electronic fine structure of Pt caused by the dopant, and its correlation with the ORR activity. More extensive contraction of the Pt lattice in Pt/M-TiO2 (M = V, Cr, and Nb) relative to Pt/TiO2 and Pt/C leads to outstanding ORR specific activity of Pt/M-TiO2. Notably, a fourfold increase of the specific activity is achieved with Pt/V-TiO2 relative to Pt/C. Furthermore, an accelerated durability test (ADT) of Pt/V-TiO2 demonstrates that this system is three times more durable than conventional Pt/C due to the metal-support interaction.

  15. REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

    1960-08-30

    A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

  16. MADR: metal artifact detection and reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaiswal, Sunil Prasad; Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Metal in CT-imaged objects drastically reduces the quality of these images due to the severe artifacts it can cause. Most metal artifacts reduction (MAR) algorithms consider the metal-affected sinogram portions as the corrupted data and replace them via sophisticated interpolation methods. While these schemes are successful in removing the metal artifacts, they fail to recover some of the edge information. To address these problems, the frequency shift metal artifact reduction algorithm (FSMAR) was recently proposed. It exploits the information hidden in the uncorrected image and combines the high frequency (edge) components of the uncorrected image with the low frequency components of the corrected image. Although this can effectively transfer the edge information of the uncorrected image, it also introduces some unwanted artifacts. The essential problem of these algorithms is that they lack the capability of detecting the artifacts and as a result cannot discriminate between desired and undesired edges. We propose a scheme that does better in these respects. Our Metal Artifact Detection and Reduction (MADR) scheme constructs a weight map which stores whether a pixel in the uncorrected image belongs to an artifact region or a non-artifact region. This weight matrix is optimal in the Linear Minimum Mean Square Sense (LMMSE). Our results demonstrate that MADR outperforms the existing algorithms and ensures that the anatomical structures close to metal implants are better preserved.

  17. Reductive dissolution and metal transport in lake coeur d alenesediments

    SciTech Connect

    Sengor, Sevinc.S.; Spycher, Nicolas.F.; Ginn, Timothy.R.; Moberly, James; Peyton, B.; Sani, Rajesh.K.

    2007-04-27

    The benthic sediments in Lake Coeur d Alene, northern Idaho,have been contaminated by metals (primarily Zn, Pb, and Cu) from decadesof upstream mining activities. As part of ongoing research on thebiogeo-chemical cycling of metals in this area, a diffusivereactive-transport model has been developed to simulate metal transportin the lake sediments. The model includes 1-D inorganic diffusivetransport coupled to a biotic reaction network with multiple terminalelectron acceptors under redox disequilibrium conditions. Here, the modelis applied to evaluate the competing effects of heavy-metal mobilizationthrough biotic reductive dissolution of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, andimmobilization as biogenic sulfide minerals. Results indicate that therelative rates of Fe and sulfate reduction could play an important rolein metal transport through the envi-ronment, and that the formation of(bi)sulfide complexes could significantly enhance metal solubility, aswell as desorption from Fe hydroxides.

  18. Edge-preserving metal artifact reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Esther; Raupach, Rainer; Lell, Michael; Schmidt, Bernhard; Kachelriess, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Metal implants in the field of measurement lead to strong artifacts in CT images and reduce the image quality and the diagnostic value severely. We introduce frequency split metal artifact reduction (FSMAR), a conceptually new MAR method which is designed to reduce metal artifacts and preserve details and edges of structures even close to metal implants. There are many MAR methods which simply replace unreliable parts of the projection data by inpainting. FSMAR is a combination of an inpainting-based MAR method with a frequency split approach. Normalized metal artifact reduction (NMAR) is chosen as the inpainting-based MAR method in this work. The high frequencies of the original image, where all rawdata were used for the reconstruction, are combined with an NMAR-corrected image. NMAR uses a normalization step to reduce metal artifacts without introducing severe new artifacts. Algorithms using a frequency split were already used in CT for example to reduce cone-beam artifacts. FSMAR is tested for patient datasets with different metal implants. The study includes patients with hip prostheses, a neuro coil, and a spine fixation. All datasets were scanned with modern clinical dual source CT scanners. In contrast to other MAR methods, FSMAR yields images without the usual blurring close to metal implants.

  19. Anaerobes into heavy metal: Dissimilatory metal reduction in anoxic environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Within the last decade, a novel form of microbial metabolism of major environmental significance has been elucidated. In this process, known as dissimilatory metal reduction, specialized microorganisms, living in anoxic aquatic sediments and ground water, oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide with metals serving as the oxidant. Recent studies have demonstrated that this metabolism explains a number of important geochemical phenomena in ancient and modern sedimentary environments, affecting not only the cycling of metals but also the fate of organic matter. Furthermore, this metabolism may have practical application in remediation of environments contaminated with toxic metals and/or organics.

  20. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Senkov, Oleg N.

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  1. Metal fiber - carbon electrodes for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert Fendlay

    An investigation was carried out to determine activities for oxygen reduction and current efficiencies to hydrogen peroxide of commercially available nickel fibers, carbon fibers, and carbon powders. The activities and current efficiencies were determined by conducting Rotating Ring Disk Electrode Experiments (RRDE) on porous electrodes that utilize an interlocking network of metal fibers with carbon fibers and/or powders. Experimentation was also done using PTFE - carbon powder and PTFE - nickel fiber paste electrodes to remove any porosity and symbiotic effects of the nickel - carbon electrodes. Results of the traditional flat plate PTFE electrodes were compared to the porous electrodes to verify the proposed mathematical viability of porous electrode RRDE. RRDE experiments showed that the most active carbons for oxygen reduction have a surface area to volume ratio of 1000 m2/g, and current rent efficiency to hydrogen peroxide was increased as the average pore size increased. A mathematical model and half-cell polarization experiments were used to characterize and optimize oxygen reduction in gas diffusion electrodes consisting of carbon fibers and/or powders entrapped in a sinter-locked network of nickel microfibers. Important electrode physical parameters, such as nickel fiber loading (0.005 to 0.01 g/cm2) , nickel fiber diameter (2 to 12 mum), void volume (73 to 96%), distance of the active layer from the gas supply (0 to 0.005 cm), and addition of a peroxide decomposition catalyst (0 to 0.004 g/cm2) were systematically varied to determine their effects on electrode performance. Experimentally determined total currents and current efficiencies to hydrogen peroxide were compared to calculated values for model verification. Other important parameters, including intra-electrode oxygen and hydrogen peroxide concentrations, overpotentials, and reaction rates, were simulated to help optimize the electrode. Fabricated metal fiber-carbon electrodes were compared to a

  2. Facile synthesis of amino-functionalized titanium metal-organic frameworks and their superior visible-light photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Xiaohong; Leng, Lijian; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Li, Hui

    2015-04-01

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been arousing a great interest in exploring the application of MOFs as photocatalyst in environment remediation. In this work, two different MOFs, Ti-benzenedicarboxylate (MIL-125(Ti)) and amino-functionalized Ti-benzenedicarboxylate (NH2-MIL-125(Ti)) were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. The MIL-125(Ti) and NH2-MIL-125(Ti) were well characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, N2 adsorption-desorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). It is revealed that the NH2-MIL-125(Ti) has well crystalline lattice, large surface area and mesoporous structure, chemical and thermal stability, and enhanced visible-light absorption up to 520 nm, which was associated with the chromophore (amino group) in the organic linker. Compared with MIL-125(Ti), NH2-MIL-125(Ti) exhibited more efficient photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction from aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. The addition of hole scavenger, the hole scavenger concentration and the pH value of the reaction solution played important roles in the photo-catalytic reduction of Cr(VI). The presence of Ti(3+)-Ti(4+) intervalence electron transfer was the main reason for photo-excited electrons transportation from titanium-oxo clusters to Cr(VI), facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction under the acid condition. It was demonstrated that amino-functionalized Ti(IV)-based MOFs could be promising visible-light photocatalysts for the treatment of Cr(VI)-contained wastewater. PMID:25585267

  3. Facile synthesis of amino-functionalized titanium metal-organic frameworks and their superior visible-light photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Xiaohong; Leng, Lijian; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Li, Hui

    2015-04-01

    Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been arousing a great interest in exploring the application of MOFs as photocatalyst in environment remediation. In this work, two different MOFs, Ti-benzenedicarboxylate (MIL-125(Ti)) and amino-functionalized Ti-benzenedicarboxylate (NH2-MIL-125(Ti)) were successfully synthesized via a facile solvothermal method. The MIL-125(Ti) and NH2-MIL-125(Ti) were well characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS, N2 adsorption-desorption measurements, thermogravimetric analysis and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). It is revealed that the NH2-MIL-125(Ti) has well crystalline lattice, large surface area and mesoporous structure, chemical and thermal stability, and enhanced visible-light absorption up to 520 nm, which was associated with the chromophore (amino group) in the organic linker. Compared with MIL-125(Ti), NH2-MIL-125(Ti) exhibited more efficient photocatalytic activity for Cr(VI) reduction from aqueous solution under visible-light irradiation. The addition of hole scavenger, the hole scavenger concentration and the pH value of the reaction solution played important roles in the photo-catalytic reduction of Cr(VI). The presence of Ti(3+)-Ti(4+) intervalence electron transfer was the main reason for photo-excited electrons transportation from titanium-oxo clusters to Cr(VI), facilitating the Cr(VI) reduction under the acid condition. It was demonstrated that amino-functionalized Ti(IV)-based MOFs could be promising visible-light photocatalysts for the treatment of Cr(VI)-contained wastewater.

  4. Activity of double wash-coat monolith catalyst with noble metals and zeolites in selective catalytic reduction of NO(x) with C3H6.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Dae; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kim, Yong-Hwa; Jeon, Gyung-Soo; Choi, Young-Key; Ahn, Ho-Geun

    2008-10-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO(x) with C3H6 was studied in the presence of oxygen. The double wash-coat monolith catalysts for SCR comprised a lower layer of Au (or Pt)/Al2O3 and a upper layer of zeolites. The catalytic performance of the double wash-coated catalyst was remarkably improved to broaden the temperature window. The Au and Pt particles were dispersed uniformly on the monolith with particle sizes range of 3 approximately 5 nm and 5 approximately 10 nm, respectively. The catalyst binders used were colloidal silica, potassium silicate and tetraethyl orthosilicate, and the best catalyst activity was achieved with using colloidal silica as a binder. The zeolites used for the catalyst upper layer were MCM-41, FER, Y5.3-Zeolite and ZSM5, among which the NH4-ZSM5-coated catalyst showed the highest activity. The experimental results confirmed the promising potential of the double wash-coat, monolith catalyst for SCR of NO(x) with C3H6 due to the effective combination of noble metal monolith catalyst with zeolite for the removal of NO(x) by SCR with hydrocarbons.

  5. Size control of noble metal clusters and metallic heterostructures through the reduction kinetics of metal precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevonkaev, Igor V.; Herein, Daniel; Jeske, Gerald; Goia, Dan V.

    2014-07-01

    Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties.Eight precious metal salts/complexes were reduced in propylene glycol at temperatures ranging between 110 and 170 °C. We found that the reduction temperature and the size of precipitated metallic nanoparticles formed were significantly affected by the structure and reactivity of the metal precursors. The choice of noble metal precursor offers flexibility for designing, fabricating and controlling the size of metallic heterostructures with tunable properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03045a

  6. Mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired oxidative-reduction activity, degeneration, and death in human neuronal and fetal cells induced by low-level exposure to thimerosal and other metal compounds

    PubMed Central

    Geier, D.A.; King, P.G.; Geier, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    Thimerosal (ethylmercurithiosalicylic acid), an ethylmercury (EtHg)-releasing compound (49.55% mercury (Hg)), was used in a range of medical products for more than 70 years. Of particular recent concern, routine administering of Thimerosal-containing biologics/childhood vaccines have become significant sources of Hg exposure for some fetuses/infants. This study was undertaken to investigate cellular damage among in vitro human neuronal (SH-SY-5Y neuroblastoma and 1321N1 astrocytoma) and fetal (nontransformed) model systems using cell vitality assays and microscope-based digital image capture techniques to assess potential damage induced by Thimerosal and other metal compounds (aluminum (Al) sulfate, lead (Pb)(II) acetate, methylmercury (MeHg) hydroxide, and mercury (Hg)(II) chloride) where the cation was reported to exert adverse effects on developing cells. Thimerosal-associated cellular damage was also evaluated for similarity to pathophysiological findings observed in patients diagnosed with autistic disorders (ADs). Thimerosal-induced cellular damage as evidenced by concentration- and time-dependent mitochondrial damage, reduced oxidative–reduction activity, cellular degeneration, and cell death in the in vitro human neuronal and fetal model systems studied. Thimerosal at low nanomolar (nM) concentrations induced significant cellular toxicity in human neuronal and fetal cells. Thimerosal-induced cytoxicity is similar to that observed in AD pathophysiologic studies. Thimerosal was found to be significantly more toxic than the other metal compounds examined. Future studies need to be conducted to evaluate additional mechanisms underlying Thimerosal-induced cellular damage and assess potential co-exposures to other compounds that may increase or decrease Thimerosal-mediated toxicity. PMID:24532866

  7. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda.

  8. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda. PMID:17285944

  9. Identification of proteins capable of metal reduction from the proteome of the Gram-positive bacterium Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 using an NADH-based activity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Otwell, Annie E.; Sherwood, Roberts; Zhang, Sheng; Nelson, Ornella D.; Li, Zhi; Lin, Hening; Callister, Stephen J.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Metal reduction capability has been found in numerous species of environmentally abundant Gram-positive bacteria. However, understanding of microbial metal reduction is based almost solely on studies of Gram-negative organisms. In this study, we focus on Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1, a Gram-positive metal reducer whose genome lacks genes with similarity to any characterized metal reductase. D. reducens has been shown to reduce not only Fe(III), but also the environmentally important contaminants U(VI) and Cr(VI). By extracting, separating, and analyzing the functional proteome of D. reducens, using a ferrozine-based assay in order to screen for chelated Fe(III)-NTA reduction with NADH as electron donor, we have identified proteins not previously characterized as iron reductases. Their function was confirmed by heterologous expression in E. coli. These are the protein NADH:flavin oxidoreductase (Dred_2421) and a protein complex composed of oxidoreductase FAD/NAD(P)-binding subunit (Dred_1685) and dihydroorotate dehydrogenase 1B (Dred_1686). Dred_2421 was identified in the soluble proteome and is predicted to be a cytoplasmic protein. Dred_1685 and Dred_1686 were identified in both the soluble as well as the insoluble (presumably membrane) protein fraction, suggesting a type of membrane-association, although PSORTb predicts both proteins are cytoplasmic. Furthermore, we show that these proteins have the capability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) and U(VI) with NADH as electron donor. This study is the first functional proteomic analysis of D. reducens, and one of the first analyses of metal and radionuclide reduction in an environmentally relevant Gram-positive bacterium.

  10. Metal artifact reduction sequence: early clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Olsen, R V; Munk, P L; Lee, M J; Janzen, D L; MacKay, A L; Xiang, Q S; Masri, B

    2000-01-01

    Artifact arising from metal hardware remains a significant problem in orthopedic magnetic resonance imaging. The metal artifact reduction sequence (MARS) reduces the size and intensity of susceptibility artifacts from magnetic field distortion. The sequence, which is based on view angle tilting in combination with increased gradient strength, can be conveniently used in conjunction with any spin-echo sequence and requires no additional imaging time. In patients with persistent pain after femoral neck fracture, the MARS technique allows visualization of marrow adjacent to hip screws, thus enabling diagnosis or exclusion of avascular necrosis. Other applications in the hip include assessment of periprosthetic soft tissues after hip joint replacement surgery, postoperative assessment after resection of bone tumors and reconstruction, and localization of unopacified methyl methacrylate cement prior to hip arthroplasty revision surgery. In the knee, the MARS technique allows visualization of structures adjacent to implanted metal staples, pins, or screws. The technique can significantly improve visualization of periprosthetic bone and soft-tissue structures even in patients who have undergone total knee arthroplasty. In patients with spinal fixation hardware, the MARS technique frequently allows visualization of the vertebral bodies and spinal canal contents. The technique can be helpful after wrist fusion or screw fixation of scaphoid fractures.

  11. Measuring Substantial Reductions in Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Charles; Evans, Meredyth; Jason, Leonard A.; So, Suzanna; Brown, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    The case definitions for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS), Myalgic Encephalomyelitis (ME), and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) each include a disability criterion requiring substantial reductions in activity in order to meet diagnostic criteria. Difficulties have been encountered in defining and operationalizing the substantial reduction disability criterion within these various illness definitions. The present study sought to relate measures of past and current activities in several domains including the SF-36, an objective measure of activity (e.g. actigraphy), a self-reported quality of life scale, and measures of symptom severity. Results of the study revealed that current work activities had the highest number of significant associations with domains such as the SF-36 subscales, actigraphy, and symptom scores. As an example, higher self-reported levels of current work activity were associated with better health. This suggests that current work related activities may provide a useful domain for helping operationalize the construct of substantial reductions in activity. PMID:25584524

  12. Magnesium-zinc reduction is effective in preparation of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knighton, J. B.; Steuneberg, R. K.

    1967-01-01

    Uranium, thorium, and plutonium are effectively prepared by magnesium-zinc reduction, using uranium oxides, thorium dioxide, and plutonium dioxide as starting materials. This technique is also useful in performing reduction of metals such as zirconium and titanium.

  13. Flavin reduction activates Drosophila cryptochrome

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Anand T.; Top, Deniz; Manahan, Craig C.; Tokuda, Joshua M.; Zhang, Sheng; Pollack, Lois; Young, Michael W.; Crane, Brian R.

    2013-01-01

    Entrainment of circadian rhythms in higher organisms relies on light-sensing proteins that communicate to cellular oscillators composed of delayed transcriptional feedback loops. The principal photoreceptor of the fly circadian clock, Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY), contains a C-terminal tail (CTT) helix that binds beside a FAD cofactor and is essential for light signaling. Light reduces the dCRY FAD to an anionic semiquinone (ASQ) radical and increases CTT proteolytic susceptibility but does not lead to CTT chemical modification. Additional changes in proteolytic sensitivity and small-angle X-ray scattering define a conformational response of the protein to light that centers at the CTT but also involves regions remote from the flavin center. Reduction of the flavin is kinetically coupled to CTT rearrangement. Chemical reduction to either the ASQ or the fully reduced hydroquinone state produces the same conformational response as does light. The oscillator protein Timeless (TIM) contains a sequence similar to the CTT; the corresponding peptide binds dCRY in light and protects the flavin from oxidation. However, TIM mutants therein still undergo dCRY-mediated degradation. Thus, photoreduction to the ASQ releases the dCRY CTT and promotes binding to at least one region of TIM. Flavin reduction by either light or cellular reductants may be a general mechanism of CRY activation. PMID:24297896

  14. Reductive activation in periplasmic nitrate reductase involves chemical modifications of the Mo-cofactor beyond the first coordination sphere of the metal ion.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Julien G J; Fourmond, Vincent; Arnoux, Pascal; Sabaty, Monique; Etienne, Emilien; Grosse, Sandrine; Biaso, Frédéric; Bertrand, Patrick; Pignol, David; Léger, Christophe; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Burlat, Bénédicte

    2014-02-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides periplasmic nitrate reductase NapAB, the major Mo(V) form (the "high g" species) in air-purified samples is inactive and requires reduction to irreversibly convert into a catalytically competent form (Fourmond et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2008). In the present work, we study the kinetics of the activation process by combining EPR spectroscopy and direct electrochemistry. Upon reduction, the Mo (V) "high g" resting EPR signal slowly decays while the other redox centers of the protein are rapidly reduced, which we interpret as a slow and gated (or coupled) intramolecular electron transfer between the [4Fe-4S] center and the Mo cofactor in the inactive enzyme. Besides, we detect spin-spin interactions between the Mo(V) ion and the [4Fe-4S](1+) cluster which are modified upon activation of the enzyme, while the EPR signatures associated to the Mo cofactor remain almost unchanged. This shows that the activation process, which modifies the exchange coupling pathway between the Mo and the [4Fe-4S](1+) centers, occurs further away than in the first coordination sphere of the Mo ion. Relying on structural data and studies on Mo-pyranopterin and models, we propose a molecular mechanism of activation which involves the pyranopterin moiety of the molybdenum cofactor that is proximal to the [4Fe-4S] cluster. The mechanism implies both the cyclization of the pyran ring and the reduction of the oxidized pterin to give the competent tricyclic tetrahydropyranopterin form.

  15. Induction slag reduction process for purifying metals

    DOEpatents

    Traut, Davis E.; Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Dennis A.

    1991-01-01

    A continuous method is provided for purifying and recovering transition metals such as neodymium and zirconium that become reactive at temperatures above about 500.degree. C. that comprises the steps of contacting the metal ore with an appropriate fluorinating agent such as an alkaline earth metal fluosilicate to form a fluometallic compound, and reducing the fluometallic compound with a suitable alkaline earth or alkali metal compound under molten conditions, such as provided in an induction slag metal furnace. The method of the invention is advantageous in that it is simpler and less expensive than methods used previously to recover pure metals, and it may be employed with a wide range of transition metals that were reactive with enclosures used in the prior art methods and were hard to obtain in uncontaminated form.

  16. Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ying; Crawford, Oakly H.; Xu, Dong; Larimer, Frank W.; Uberbacher, Edward C.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-09-02

    In this project, we proposed (i) identification of metal-reduction genes, (ii) development of new threading techniques and (iii) fold recognition and structure prediction of metal-reduction proteins. However, due to the reduction of the budget, we revised our plan to focus on two specific aims of (i) developing a new threading-based protein structure prediction method, and (ii) developing an expert system for protein structure prediction.

  17. Microbial Links between Sulfate Reduction and Metal Retention in Uranium- and Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil▿

    PubMed Central

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M.; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E.; Scheinost, Andreas C.; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the 35SO42− radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of ≤142 ± 20 nmol cm−3 day−1. Concentrations of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that ∼80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [13C]acetate- and [13C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined ≤100% during anoxic soil incubations. In contrast to results in other studies, soluble uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching ≤1,407 nM in solution. Our results suggest that (i) ongoing sulfate reduction in contaminated soil resulted in in situ metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems. PMID:20363796

  18. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E; Scheinost, Andreas C; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the (35)SO(4)(2-) radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of < or =142 +/- 20 nmol cm(-3) day(-1). Concentrations of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that approximately 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined < or =100% during anoxic soil incubations. In contrast to results in other studies, soluble uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching < or =1,407 nM in solution. Our results suggest that (i) ongoing sulfate reduction in contaminated soil resulted in in situ metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems.

  19. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E; Scheinost, Andreas C; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the (35)SO(4)(2-) radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of < or =142 +/- 20 nmol cm(-3) day(-1). Concentrations of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that approximately 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined < or =100% during anoxic soil incubations. In contrast to results in other studies, soluble uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching < or =1,407 nM in solution. Our results suggest that (i) ongoing sulfate reduction in contaminated soil resulted in in situ metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems. PMID:20363796

  20. Three-Electrode Metal Oxide Reduction Cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2005-06-28

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  1. Three-electrode metal oxide reduction cell

    DOEpatents

    Dees, Dennis W.; Ackerman, John P.

    2008-08-12

    A method of electrochemically reducing a metal oxide to the metal in an electrochemical cell is disclosed along with the cell. Each of the anode and cathode operate at their respective maximum reaction rates. An electrolyte and an anode at which oxygen can be evolved, and a cathode including a metal oxide to be reduced are included as is a third electrode with independent power supplies connecting the anode and the third electrode and the cathode and the third electrode.

  2. Reduction of N2 by Fe2+ via Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reactions Part 2: The Role of Metal Binding in Activating N2 for Reduction; a Requirement for Both Pre-biotic and Biological Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wander, Matthew C. F.; Kubicki, James D.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2008-06-01

    Nitrogen reduction by ferrous iron has been suggested as an important mechanism in the formation of ammonia on pre-biotic Earth. This paper examines the effects of adsorption of ferrous iron onto a goethite (α-FeOOH) substrate on the thermodynamic driving force and rate of a ferrous iron-mediated reduction of N2 as compared with the homogeneous aqueous reaction. Utilizing density functional theory and Marcus Theory of proton coupled electron transfer reactions, the following two reactions were studied: {text{Fe}}^{2 + } _{left( {{text{aq}}} right)} + {text{N}}_{2left( {{text{aq}}} right)} + {text{H}}_2 {text{O}}_{left( {{text{aq}}} right)} to {text{N}}_2 {text{H}}^ bullet + {text{FeOH}}^{2 + } _{left( {{text{aq}}} right)} and equiv {text{Fe}}^{2 + } _{left( {{text{ads}}} right)} + {text{N}}_{2left( {{text{aq}}} right)} + 2{text{H}}_2 {text{O}}_{left( {{text{aq}}} right)} to {text{N}}_2 {text{H}}^ bullet + α - {text{FeOOH}}_{left( {text{s}} right)} + 2{text{H}}^ + _{left( {{text{aq}}} right)} Although the rates of both reactions were calculated to be approximately zero at 298 K, the model results suggest that adsorption alters the thermodynamic driving force for the reaction but has no other effect on the direct electron transfer kinetics. Given that simply altering the thermodynamic driving force will not reduce dinitrogen, we can make mechanistic connections between possible prebiotic pathways and biological N2 reduction. The key to reduction in both cases is N2 adsorption to multiple transition metal centers with competitive H2 production.

  3. Influence of sp(3)-sp(2) Carbon Nanodomains on Metal/Support Interaction, Catalyst Durability, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Campos-Roldán, Carlos A; Ramos-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Huerta, Rosa G; Vargas García, Jorge R; Balbuena, Perla B; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, platinum nanoparticles were impregnated by two different techniques, namely the carbonyl chemical route and photodeposition, onto systematically surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The different interactions between platinum nanoparticles with sp(2)-sp(3) carbon nanodomains were investigated. The oxidation of an adsorbed monolayer of carbon monoxide, used to probe electronic catalytic modification, suggests a selective nucleation of platinum nanoparticles onto sp(2) carbon nanodomains when photodeposition synthesis is carried out. XPS attests the catalytic center electronic modification obtained by photodeposition. DFT calculations were used to determine the interaction energy of a Pt cluster with sp(2) and sp(3) carbon surfaces as well as with oxidized ones. The interaction energy and electronic structure of the platinum cluster presents dramatic changes as a function of the support surface chemistry, which also modifies its catalytic properties evaluated by the interaction with CO. The interaction energy was calculated to be 8-fold higher on sp(3) and oxidized surfaces in comparison to sp(2) domains. Accelerated Stability Test (AST) was applied only on the electronic-modified materials to evaluate the active phase degradation and their activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The stability of photodeposited materials is correlated with the surface chemical nature of supports indicating that platinum nanoparticles supported onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the highest sp(2) character show the higher stability and activity toward ORR. PMID:27494283

  4. Influence of sp(3)-sp(2) Carbon Nanodomains on Metal/Support Interaction, Catalyst Durability, and Catalytic Activity for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Campos-Roldán, Carlos A; Ramos-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Gonzalez-Huerta, Rosa G; Vargas García, Jorge R; Balbuena, Perla B; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2016-09-01

    In this work, platinum nanoparticles were impregnated by two different techniques, namely the carbonyl chemical route and photodeposition, onto systematically surface-modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The different interactions between platinum nanoparticles with sp(2)-sp(3) carbon nanodomains were investigated. The oxidation of an adsorbed monolayer of carbon monoxide, used to probe electronic catalytic modification, suggests a selective nucleation of platinum nanoparticles onto sp(2) carbon nanodomains when photodeposition synthesis is carried out. XPS attests the catalytic center electronic modification obtained by photodeposition. DFT calculations were used to determine the interaction energy of a Pt cluster with sp(2) and sp(3) carbon surfaces as well as with oxidized ones. The interaction energy and electronic structure of the platinum cluster presents dramatic changes as a function of the support surface chemistry, which also modifies its catalytic properties evaluated by the interaction with CO. The interaction energy was calculated to be 8-fold higher on sp(3) and oxidized surfaces in comparison to sp(2) domains. Accelerated Stability Test (AST) was applied only on the electronic-modified materials to evaluate the active phase degradation and their activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The stability of photodeposited materials is correlated with the surface chemical nature of supports indicating that platinum nanoparticles supported onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes with the highest sp(2) character show the higher stability and activity toward ORR.

  5. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide on post-transition metal and metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, James L.

    The electroreduction of carbon dioxide to liquid products is an important component in the utilization of CO2 and in the high-density storage of intermittent renewable energy in the form of chemical bonds. Materials based on indium and tin, which yield predominantly formic acid, have been investigated in order to gain a greater understanding of the electrochemically active species and the mechanism of CO2 reduction on these heavy post-transition metals, since prior studies on the bulk metals did not provide thermodynamically sensible reaction pathways. Nanoparticles of the oxides and hydroxides of tin and indium have been prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and various electrochemical methods in order to obtain structural information and analyze the role of various surface species on the CO2 reduction pathway. On both indium and tin, metastable surface-bound hydroxides bound CO2 and formed metal carbonates, which can then be reduced electrochemically. The relevant oxidation state of tin was suggested to be SnII rather than SnIV, necessitating a pre reduction to generate the CO2-binding species. Metallic indium nanoparticles partially oxidized in air and became highly efficient CO2 reduction electrocatalysts. Unit Faradaic efficiencies for formate, much higher than on bulk indium, were achieved with only 300 mV of overpotential on these particles, which possessed an oxyhydroxide shell surrounding a conductive metallic core. Alloys and mixed-metal oxide and hydroxide particles of tin and indium have also been studied for their carbon dioxide electrocatalytic capabilities, especially in comparison to the pure metal species. Additionally, a solar-driven indium-based CO2 electrolyzer was developed to investigate the overall efficiency for intermittent energy storage. The three flow cells were powered by a commercial photovoltaic array and had a maximum conversion efficiency of incident

  6. Carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon core-sheath nanostructures as highly active, metal-free oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for alkaline fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sa, Young Jin; Park, Chiyoung; Jeong, Hu Young; Park, Seok-Hee; Lee, Zonghoon; Kim, Kyoung Taek; Park, Gu-Gon; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2014-04-14

    A facile, scalable route to new nanocomposites that are based on carbon nanotubes/heteroatom-doped carbon (CNT/HDC) core-sheath nanostructures is reported. These nanostructures were prepared by the adsorption of heteroatom-containing ionic liquids on the walls of CNTs, followed by carbonization. The design of the CNT/HDC composite allows for combining the electrical conductivity of the CNTs with the catalytic activity of the heteroatom-containing HDC sheath layers. The CNT/HDC nanostructures are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction and displayed one of the best performances among heteroatom-doped nanocarbon catalysts in terms of half-wave potential and kinetic current density. The four-electron selectivity and the exchange current density of the CNT/HDC nanostructures are comparable with those of a Pt/C catalyst, and the CNT/HDC composites were superior to Pt/C in terms of long-term durability and poison tolerance. Furthermore, an alkaline fuel cell that employs a CNT/HDC nanostructure as the cathode catalyst shows very high current and power densities, which sheds light on the practical applicability of these new nanocomposites.

  7. Metallocorroles as Nonprecious-Metal Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Levy, Naomi; Mahammed, Atif; Kosa, Monica; Major, Dan T; Gross, Zeev; Elbaz, Lior

    2015-11-16

    The future of affordable fuel cells strongly relies on the design of earth-abundant (non-platinum) catalysts for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the bottleneck in the overall process occurs therein. We have examined herein trivalent Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu complexes of β-pyrrole-brominated corrole as ORR catalysts. The adsorption of these complexes on a high-surface-area carbon powder (BP2000) created a unique composite material, used for electrochemical measurements in acidic aqueous solutions. These experiments disclosed a clear dependence of the catalytic activity on the metal center of the complexes, in the order of Co>Fe>Ni>Mn>Cu. The best catalytic performance was obtained for the Co(III) corrole, whose onset potential was as positive as 0.81 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). Insight into the properties of these systems was gained by spectroscopic and computational characterization of the reduced and oxidized forms of the metallocorroles.

  8. Identifying active surface phases for metal oxide electrocatalysts: a study of manganese oxide bi-functional catalysts for oxygen reduction and water oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Su, Hai-Yan; Gorlin, Yelena; Man, Isabela C; Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Nørskov, Jens K; Jaramillo, Thomas F; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2012-10-28

    Progress in the field of electrocatalysis is often hampered by the difficulty in identifying the active site on an electrode surface. Herein we combine theoretical analysis and electrochemical methods to identify the active surfaces in a manganese oxide bi-functional catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). First, we electrochemically characterize the nanostructured α-Mn(2)O(3) and find that it undergoes oxidation in two potential regions: initially, between 0.5 V and 0.8 V, a potential region relevant to the ORR and, subsequently, between 0.8 V and 1.0 V, a potential region between the ORR and the OER relevant conditions. Next, we perform density function theory (DFT) calculations to understand the changes in the MnO(x) surface as a function of potential and to elucidate reaction mechanisms that lead to high activities observed in the experiments. Using DFT, we construct surface Pourbaix and free energy diagrams of three different MnO(x) surfaces and identify 1/2 ML HO* covered Mn(2)O(3) and O* covered MnO(2), as the active surfaces for the ORR and the OER, respectively. Additionally, we find that the ORR occurs through an associative mechanism and that its overpotential is highly dependent on the stabilization of intermediates through hydrogen bonds with water molecules. We also determine that OER occurs through direct recombination mechanism and that its major source of overpotential is the scaling relationship between HOO* and HO* surface intermediates. Using a previously developed Sabatier model we show that the theoretical predictions of catalytic activities match the experimentally determined onset potentials for the ORR and the OER, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Consequently, the combination of first-principles theoretical analysis and experimental methods offers an understanding of manganese oxide oxygen electrocatalysis at the atomic level, achieving fundamental insight that can potentially be

  9. Nanostructured nonprecious metal catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gang; Zelenay, Piotr

    2013-08-20

    Platinum-based catalysts represent a state of the art in the electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) from the point of view of their activity and durability in harnessing the chemical energy via direct electrochemical conversion. However, because platinum is both expensive and scarce, its widespread implementation in such clean energy applications is limited. Recent breakthroughs in the synthesis of high-performance nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) make replacement of Pt in ORR electrocatalysts with earth-abundant elements, such as Fe, Co, N, and C, a realistic possibility. In this Account, we discuss how we can obtain highly promising M-N-C (M: Fe and/or Co) catalysts by simultaneously heat-treating precursors of nitrogen, carbon, and transition metals at 800-1000 °C. The activity and durability of resulting catalysts depend greatly on the selection of precursors and synthesis chemistry. In addition, they correlate quite well with the catalyst nanostructure. While chemists have presented no conclusive description of the active catalytic site for this class of NPMCs, they have developed a designed approach to making active and durable materials, focusing on the catalyst nanostructure. The approach consists of nitrogen doping, in situ carbon graphitization, and the usage of graphitic structures (possibly graphene and graphene oxides) as carbon precursors. Various forms of nitrogen, particularly pyridinic and quaternary, can act as n-type carbon dopants in the M-N-C catalysts, assisting in the formation of disordered carbon nanostructures and donating electrons to the carbon. The CNx structures are likely a crucial part of the ORR active site(s). Noteworthy, the ORR activity is not necessarily governed by the amount of nitrogen, but by how the nitrogen is incorporated into the nanostructures. Apart from the possibility of a direct participation in the active site, the transition metal often plays an important role in the in situ formation of various

  10. Method for Reduction of Silver Biocide Plating on Metal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, John; Nalette, Timothy; Beringer, Durwood

    2013-01-01

    Silver ions in aqueous solutions (0.05 to 1 ppm) are used for microbial control in water systems. The silver ions remain in solution when stored in plastic containers, but the concentration rapidly decreases to non-biocidal levels when stored in metal containers. The silver deposits onto the surface and is reduced to non-biocidal silver metal when it contacts less noble metal surfaces, including stainless steel, titanium, and nickel-based alloys. Five methods of treatment of contact metal surfaces to deter silver deposition and reduction are proposed: (1) High-temperature oxidation of the metal surface; (2) High-concentration silver solution pre-treatment; (3) Silver plating; (4) Teflon coat by vapor deposition (titanium only); and (5) A combination of methods (1) and (2), which proved to be the best method for the nickel-based alloy application. The mechanism associated with surface treatments (1), (2), and (5) is thought to be the development of a less active oxide layer that deters ionic silver deposition. Mechanism (3) is an attempt to develop an equilibrium ionic silver concentration via dissolution of metallic silver. Mechanism (4) provides a non-reactive barrier to deter ionic silver plating. Development testing has shown that ionic silver in aqueous solution was maintained at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 15 months with method (5) (a combination of methods (1) and (2)), before the test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Method (1) resulted in the maintenance of a biocidal level (approximately 0.05 ppm) for up to 10 months before that test was discontinued for nickel-based alloys. Methods (1) and (2) used separately were able to maintain ionic silver in aqueous solution at essentially the same level of addition (0.4 ppm) for up to 10 months before the test was discontinued for stainless steel alloys. Method (3) was only utilized for titanium alloys, and was successful at maintaining ionic silver in aqueous solution at

  11. Leidenfrost point reduction on micropatterned metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    del Cerro, Daniel Arnaldo; Marín, Alvaro G; Römer, Gertwillem R B E; Pathiraj, B; Lohse, Detlef; Huis in 't Veld, Albertus J

    2012-10-23

    Droplets are able to levitate when deposited over a hot surface exceeding a critical temperature. This is known as the Leidenfrost effect. This phenomenon occurs when the surface is heated above the so-called Leidenfrost point (LFP), above which the vapor film between the droplet and hot surface is able to levitate the droplet. Such a critical temperature depends on several factors. One of the most studied parameters has been the surface roughness. Almost all of the experimental studies in the literature have concluded that the LFP increases with the roughness. According to these results, it seems that the roughness is detrimental for the stability of the vapor film. In contrast with these results, we present here a micropatterned surface that significantly reduces the LFP. The temperature increase, relative to the boiling point, required to reach the LFP is 70% lower than that on the flat surface. The reasons for such an effect are qualitatively and quantitatively discussed with a simple semiempirical model. This result can be relevant to save energy in applications that take advantage of the Leidenfrost effect for drop control or drag reduction.

  12. Microbial metal-ion reduction and Mars: extraterrestrial expectations?

    PubMed

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Cox, B Lea

    2002-06-01

    Dissimilatory metal-ion-reducing bacteria (DMRB) can couple the reduction of a variety of different metal ions to cellular respiration and growth. The excitement of this metabolic group lies not only in the elucidation of a new type of metabolism, but also in the potential use of these abilities for the removal of toxic organics, and in their ability to reduce (and thus, detoxify) other toxic metals, such as U(VI) and Cr(VI). This review focuses on recent advances in the study of DMRB, including the use of external electron shuttles to enhance rates of metal reduction; genome sequencing and consequent genomic and proteomic analyses; new imaging approaches for high resolution analysis of both cells and chemical components; the demonstration of fractionation of stable isotopes of iron during iron reduction; and the elucidation of the types and patterns of secondary mineral formation during metal reduction. One of the secondary minerals is magnetite, the subject of intense controversy regarding the possibility of evidence for life from the Martian meteorite ALH84001. This review thus ends with a short consideration of the evidence for magnetic 'proof' of the existence of past life on Mars. PMID:12057684

  13. Microbial metal-ion reduction and Mars: extraterrestrial expectations?

    PubMed

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Cox, B Lea

    2002-06-01

    Dissimilatory metal-ion-reducing bacteria (DMRB) can couple the reduction of a variety of different metal ions to cellular respiration and growth. The excitement of this metabolic group lies not only in the elucidation of a new type of metabolism, but also in the potential use of these abilities for the removal of toxic organics, and in their ability to reduce (and thus, detoxify) other toxic metals, such as U(VI) and Cr(VI). This review focuses on recent advances in the study of DMRB, including the use of external electron shuttles to enhance rates of metal reduction; genome sequencing and consequent genomic and proteomic analyses; new imaging approaches for high resolution analysis of both cells and chemical components; the demonstration of fractionation of stable isotopes of iron during iron reduction; and the elucidation of the types and patterns of secondary mineral formation during metal reduction. One of the secondary minerals is magnetite, the subject of intense controversy regarding the possibility of evidence for life from the Martian meteorite ALH84001. This review thus ends with a short consideration of the evidence for magnetic 'proof' of the existence of past life on Mars.

  14. Direct chemical reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium and calcium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squires, Leah N.; Lessing, Paul

    2016-04-01

    A process of direct reduction of neptunium oxide to neptunium metal using calcium metal as the reducing agent is discussed. After reduction of the oxide to metal, the metal is separated by density from the other components of the reaction mixture and can be easily removed upon cooling. The direct reduction technique consistently produces high purity (98%-99% pure) neptunium metal.

  15. Metal artifact reduction in CT by identifying missing data hidden in metals.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyoung Suk; Choi, Jae Kyu; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Kyung Sang; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Ye, Jong Chul; Seo, Jin Keun

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing demand in the field of dental and medical radiography for effective metal artifact reduction (MAR) in computed tomography (CT) because artifact caused by metallic objects causes serious image degradation that obscures information regarding the teeth and/or other biological structures. This paper presents a new MAR method that uses the Laplacian operator to reveal background projection data hidden in regions containing data from metal. In the proposed method, we attempted to decompose the projection data into two parts: data from metal only (metal data), and background data in the absence of metal. Removing metal data from the projections enables us to perform sparsity-driven reconstruction of the metal component and subsequent removal of the metal artifact. The results of clinical experiments demonstrated that the proposed MAR algorithm improves image quality and increases the standard of 3D reconstruction images of the teeth and mandible. PMID:24004866

  16. Metal artifact reduction in CT via ray profile correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sungsoo; Mueller, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal implants increase the inconsistencies between the measured data and the linear assumption made by the analytical CT reconstruction algorithm. The inconsistencies appear in the form of dark and bright bands and streaks in the reconstructed image, collectively called metal artifacts. The standard method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) replaces the inconsistent data with the interpolated data. However, sinogram interpolation not only introduces new artifacts but it also suffers from the loss of detail near the implanted metals. With the help of a prior image that is usually estimated from the metal artifact-degraded image via computer vision techniques, improvements are feasible but still no MAR method exists that is widely accepted and utilized. We propose a technique that utilizes a prior image from a CT scan taken of the patient before implanting the metal objects. Hence there is a sufficient amount of structural similarity to cover the loss of detail around the metal implants. Using the prior scan and a segmentation or model of the metal implant our method then replaces sinogram interpolation with ray profile matching and estimation which yields much more reliable data estimates for the affected sinogram regions. As preliminary work, we built a new MAR framework on fan-beam geometry and tested it to remove simulated metal artifacts on a thorax phantom. The comparison with two representative sinogram correction based MAR methods shows very promising results.

  17. Elevated sulfate reduction in metal-contaminated freshwater lake sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, H.L.; Dahl, A.L.; Tribou, E.; Noble, P.A.; Gaillard, J.-F.; Stahl, D.A.

    2009-01-06

    Although sulfate-reducing prokaryotes have long been studied as agents of metals bioremediation, impacts of long-term metals exposure on biologically mediated sulfur cycling in natural systems remains poorly understood. The effects of long-term exposure to metal stress on the freshwater sulfur cycle were studied, with a focus on biologic sulfate reduction using a combination of microbial and chemical methods. To examine the effects after decades of adaptation time, a field-based experiment was conducted using multiple study sites in a natural system historically impacted by a nearby zinc smelter (Lake DePue, Illinois). Rates were highest at the most metals-contaminated sites (-35 {mu}mol/cm{sup 3}/day) and decreased with decreased pore water zinc and arsenic contamination levels, while other environmental characteristics (i.e., pH, nutrient concentrations and physical properties) showed little between-site variation. Correlations were established using an artificial neural network to evaluate potentially non-linear relationships between sulfate reduction rates (SRR) and measured environmental variables. SRR in Lake DePue were up to 50 times higher than rates previously reported for lake sediments and the chemical speciation of Zn was dominated by the presence of ZnS as shown by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). These results suggest that long-term metal stress of natural systems might alter the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur by contributing to higher rates of sulfate reduction.

  18. Actively convected liquid metal divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Michiya; Hirooka, Yoshi

    2014-12-01

    The use of actively convected liquid metals with j × B force is proposed to facilitate heat handling by the divertor, a challenging issue associated with magnetic fusion experiments such as ITER. This issue will be aggravated even more for DEMO and power reactors because the divertor heat load will be significantly higher and yet the use of copper would not be allowed as the heat sink material. Instead, reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel alloys with heat conductivities substantially lower than that of copper, will be used as the structural materials. The present proposal is to fill the lower part of the vacuum vessel with liquid metals with relatively low melting points and low chemical activities including Ga and Sn. The divertor modules, equipped with electrodes and cooling tubes, are immersed in the liquid metal. The electrode, placed in the middle of the liquid metal, can be biased positively or negatively with respect to the module. The j × B force due to the current between the electrode and the module provides a rotating motion for the liquid metal around the electrodes. The rise in liquid temperature at the separatrix hit point can be maintained at acceptable levels from the operation point of view. As the rotation speed increases, the current in the liquid metal is expected to decrease due to the v × B electromotive force. This rotating motion in the poloidal plane will reduce the divertor heat load significantly. Another important benefit of the convected liquid metal divertor is the fast recovery from unmitigated disruptions. Also, the liquid metal divertor concept eliminates the erosion problem.

  19. Chromium Isotope Behaviour During Aerobic Microbial Reduction Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Q.; Amor, K.; Porcelli, D.; Thompson, I.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial activity is a very important, and possibly even the dominant, reduction mechanism for many metals in natural water systems. Isotope fractionations during microbial metal reduction can reflect one major mechanism in metal cycling in the environment, and isotopic signatures can be used to identify and quantify reduction processes during biogeochemical cycling in the present environment as well as in the past. There are many Cr (VI)-reducing bacteria that have been discovered and isolated from the environment, and Cr isotopes were found to be fractionated during microbial reduction processes. In this study, Cr reduction experiments have been undertaken to determine the conditions under which Cr is reduced and the corresponding isotope signals that are generated. The experiments have been done with a facultative bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens LB 300, and several parameters that have potential impact on reduction mechanisms have been investigated. Electron donors are important for bacteria growth and metabolism. One factor that can control the rate of Cr reduction is the nature of the electron donor. The results show that using citrate as an electron donor can stimulate bacteria reduction activity to a large extent; the reduction rate is much higher (15.10 mgˑL-1hour-1) compared with experiments using glucose (6.65 mgˑL-1ˑhour-1), acetate (4.88 mgˑL-1hour-1) or propionate (4.85 mgˑL-1hour-1) as electron donors. Groups with higher electron donor concentrations have higher reduction rates. Chromium is toxic, and when increasing Cr concentrations in the medium, the bacteria reduction rate is also higher, which reflects bacteria adapting to the toxic environment. In the natural environment, under different pH conditions, bacteria may metabolise in different ways. In our experiments with pH, bacteria performed better in reducing Cr (VI) when pH = 8, and there are no significant differences between groups with pH = 4 or pH = 6. To investigate this further, Cr

  20. Reductive Precipitation of Metals Photosensitized by Tin Protoporphyrin

    SciTech Connect

    ABDELOUAS,A.; GONG,W.L.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.

    2000-01-18

    For the first time, we show that redox-sensitive metals, which are highly soluble in the oxidized state can be reduced and precipitated from aqueous solution using tin protoporphyrin and light in the presence of an electron donor. Hg{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} were reduced to the metallic state, and Ub{sup 6+} precipitated as oxide with very low volubility, suggesting that removal of these metals via reductive photoreduction and precipitation may be an innovative way for wastewater treatment. Ag{sup 2+} and Au{sup 2+} were reduced to the metallic state and precipitated as nanoparticles. Finally, using tin porphyrins and light for a variety of purposes involving reactions that require a low redox potential may be a good step toward energy conservation and environmentally benign processing.

  1. Active{sup 3} noise reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Holzfuss, J.

    1996-06-01

    Noise reduction is a problem being encountered in a variety of applications, such as environmental noise cancellation, signal recovery and separation. Passive noise reduction is done with the help of absorbers. Active noise reduction includes the transmission of phase inverted signals for the cancellation. This paper is about a threefold active approach to noise reduction. It includes the separation of a combined source, which consists of both a noise and a signal part. With the help of interaction with the source by scanning it and recording its response, modeling as a nonlinear dynamical system is achieved. The analysis includes phase space analysis and global radial basis functions as tools for the prediction used in a subsequent cancellation procedure. Examples are given which include noise reduction of speech. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  3. Metallocorroles as Nonprecious-Metal Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Levy, Naomi; Mahammed, Atif; Kosa, Monica; Major, Dan T; Gross, Zeev; Elbaz, Lior

    2015-11-16

    The future of affordable fuel cells strongly relies on the design of earth-abundant (non-platinum) catalysts for the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the bottleneck in the overall process occurs therein. We have examined herein trivalent Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu complexes of β-pyrrole-brominated corrole as ORR catalysts. The adsorption of these complexes on a high-surface-area carbon powder (BP2000) created a unique composite material, used for electrochemical measurements in acidic aqueous solutions. These experiments disclosed a clear dependence of the catalytic activity on the metal center of the complexes, in the order of Co>Fe>Ni>Mn>Cu. The best catalytic performance was obtained for the Co(III) corrole, whose onset potential was as positive as 0.81 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE). Insight into the properties of these systems was gained by spectroscopic and computational characterization of the reduced and oxidized forms of the metallocorroles. PMID:26429211

  4. Studying Activity Series of Metals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoon, Tien-Ghun; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Presents teaching strategies that illustrate the linking together of numerous chemical concepts involving the activity of metals (quantitative analysis, corrosion, and electrolysis) through the use of deep-level processing strategies. Concludes that making explicit links in the process of teaching chemistry can lead effectively to meaningful…

  5. Sulfate Reduction Remediation of a Metals Plume Through Organic Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Phifer, M.A.

    2003-03-11

    Laboratory testing and a field-scale demonstration for the sulfate reduction remediation of an acidic/metals/sulfate groundwater plume at the Savannah River Site has been conducted. The laboratory testing consisted of the use of anaerobic microcosms to test the viability of three organic substrates to promote microbially mediated sulfate reduction. Based upon the laboratory testing, soybean oil and sodium lactate were selected for injection during the subsequent field-scale demonstration. The field-scale demonstration is currently ongoing. Approximately 825 gallons (3,123 L) of soybean oil and 225 gallons (852 L) of 60 percent sodium lactate have been injected into an existing well system within the plume. Since the injections, sulfate concentrations in the injection zone have significantly decreased, sulfate-reducing bacteria concentrations have significantly increased, the pH has increased, the Eh has decreased, and the concentrations of many metals have decreased. Microbially mediated sulfate reduction has been successfully promoted for the remediation of the acidic/metals/sulfate plume by the injection of soybean oil and sodium lactate within the plume.

  6. Open framework metal chalcogenides as efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel.

    PubMed

    Sasan, Koroush; Lin, Qipu; Mao, Chengyu; Feng, Pingyun

    2016-06-01

    Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity. PMID:27186825

  7. Role of metalloporphyrin core metals in the mediated reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Dror, Ishai; Schlautman, Mark A

    2003-03-01

    A promising approach to abiotically dechlorinate a variety of chlorinated organic contaminants under reducing conditions is to utilize porphyrins or other tetrapyrrole macrocycles as electron transfer mediators/shuttles for catalyzing their reduction. In this study, various experimental approaches were used to elucidate the role of porphyrin core metals in the reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The importance of specific core metals for the reactivity of a porphyrin and its mediated reaction mechanisms was demonstrated by inserting different metals into metallo tetrakis (N-methyl-4-4 pyridiniumyl) porphyrin (TMPyP). No PCE dechlorination was observed when the free-base (i.e., no core metal) and iron core metal forms of TMPyP were utilized. When using nickel or cobalt TMPyP, reductive dechlorination of PCE occurred but appeared to follow different pathways for the two metals based on product analyses. Physical (e.g., steric) considerations suggest that direct contact between a porphyrin core metal and PCE may be limited and therefore that the entire metalloporphyrin molecule should be viewed as a functional system in which the organic macrocycle has an active part in reductive dechlorination reactions. This view is supported by the fact that slight changes in the functional groups on a porphyrin macrocycle, particularly those far removed from the core metal itself, greatly affected the reactivity and mechanism of the porphyrin. Solution conditions also had a major effect on porphyrin reactivities, to the extent that a nonreactive metalloporphyrin could be activated merely by adjusting the pH of the solution or by adding a small amount of cosolvent. The collective results of this study suggest that fine tuning of naturally occurring metalloporphyrin complexes and/or their environments can enhance the catalyzed detoxification of chlorinated contaminants in many natural and engineered environmental systems.

  8. Metal molybdate nanorods as non-precious electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tian; Zhang, Lieyu

    2015-12-01

    Development of non-precious electrocatalysts with applicable electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to fulfill broad-based and large-scale applications of metal/air batteries and fuel cells. Herein, nickel and cobalt molybdates with uniform nanorod morphology are synthesized using a facile one-pot hydrothermal method. The ORR activity of the prepared metal molybdate nanorods in alkaline media are investigated by using cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and chronoamperomety in rotating disk electrode (RDE) techniques. The present study suggests that the prepared metal molybdate nanorods exhibit applicable electrocatalytic activities towards the ORR in alkaline media, promising the applications as non-precious cathode in fuel cells and metal-air batteries.

  9. Ab initio investigation of the oxygen reduction reaction activity on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, for Lisbnd O2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, Shrihari; Singh, Nikhilendra; Mizuno, Fuminori; Prakash, Jai

    2016-07-01

    First principles, density functional theory (DFT) modelling of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, was carried out. Periodic models of close-packed (111) surfaces were constructed, their geometry was optimized and the most stable geometric surface configuration was identified. The correlation between the intermediate species binding energy and the favored reaction pathway from amongst 1e-, 2e-, and 4e- mechanisms were studied by calculating the binding energies of a 1/4 monolayer of O, O2, LiO, LiO2, Li2O2, and Li2O on various sites and orientations. The reaction free energies (ΔGrxn) were calculated and used to compute the catalytic activity of the surfaces using molecular kinetics theory. Plots of the catalytic activity vs. Oxygen binding energy (EBinding (O)) showed a typical "volcano" profile. The insights gained from this study can be used to guide the choice of cathode catalysts in Lisbnd O2 cells.

  10. Annual waste reduction activities report. Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    1991-03-18

    This report discusses the waste minimization activities for the Pinellas Plant. The Pinellas Plant deals with low-level radioactive wastes, solvents, scrap metals and various other hazardous materials. This program has realized cost savings through recycling and reuse of materials.

  11. Analog VLSI system for active drag reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, B.; Goodman, R.; Jiang, F.; Tai, Y.C.; Tung, S.; Ho, C.M.

    1996-10-01

    In today`s cost-conscious air transportation industry, fuel costs are a substantial economic concern. Drag reduction is an important way to reduce costs. Even a 5% reduction in drag translates into estimated savings of millions of dollars in fuel costs. Drawing inspiration from the structure of shark skin, the authors are building a system to reduce drag along a surface. Our analog VLSI system interfaces with microfabricated, constant-temperature shear stress sensors. It detects regions of high shear stress and outputs a control signal to activate a microactuator. We are in the process of verifying the actual drag reduction by controlling microactuators in wind tunnel experiments. We are encouraged that an approach similar to one that biology employs provides a very useful contribution to the problem of drag reduction. 9 refs., 21 figs.

  12. Synthesis of uranium metal using laser-initiated reduction of uranium tetrafluoride by calcium metal

    SciTech Connect

    West, M.H.; Martinez, M.M.; Nielsen, J.B.; Court, D.C.; Appert, Q.D.

    1995-09-01

    Uranium metal has numerous uses in conventional weapons (armor penetrators) and nuclear weapons. It also has application to nuclear reactor designs utilizing metallic fuels--for example, the former Integral Fast Reactor program at Argonne National Laboratory. Uranium metal also has promise as a material of construction for spent-nuclear-fuel storage casks. A new avenue for the production of uranium metal is presented that offers several advantages over existing technology. A carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) laser is used to initiate the reaction between uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}) and calcium metal. The new method does not require induction heating of a closed system (a pressure vessel) nor does it utilize iodine (I{sub 2}) as a chemical booster. The results of five reductions of UF{sub 4}, spanning 100 to 200 g of uranium, are evaluated, and suggestions are made for future work in this area.

  13. Upgrading Metals Via Direct Reduction from Poly-metallic Titaniferous Magnetite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Saikat; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Dey, Rajib

    2015-02-01

    Pre-reduction is the thermo-chemical beneficiation process which is very useful technique for upgradation of metal values from complex low grade ore. The isothermal reduction behaviour of eastern Indian titaniferous magnetite lump ore without pre-treatment, pre-treated and ore-coke composite briquettes has been investigated in the present study. During pre-reduction of lump ore at 1473 K, magnetite and some part of ilmenite are transformed to metallic iron but most of the ilmenite has not reduced. Pre-treatment by multiple heating to high temperature (1373 K and 1473 K, respectively) and subsequently sudden cooling to room temperature by water successfully increase the porosity as well as many fissures in dense grain, which significantly enhance the degree of reduction. Ilmenite and magnetite phases are transformed to pseudobrookite and hematite during high temperature air soaking, and metallic iron is the dominant phase after reduction. Metallic iron and titanium dioxide are the major phases after reduction at 1373 K, but treatments above 1413 K lead to the formation of ferrous pseudobrookite (FeTi2O5). Finally, the different constitutes are separated by magnetic separation. The phases of reduced pre-treated and briquettes samples cannot be separated by magnetic separation, whereas reduced lump ore is separated successfully. The cause is perhaps due to association and interlocking of high intensity magnetic metallic iron with titanium oxide. Fe:TiO2 is upgraded about to 7.06:1 in the magnetic fraction of reduced lump ore which is formerly 2.14:1 in the case of raw ore. Vanadium is simultaneously distributed at a 3.81:1 ratio in magnetic and non-magnetic fraction.

  14. Photon-driven reduction of Zn2+ to Zn metal.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Anthony C; Basore, Katherine; Bernhard, Stefan

    2013-05-20

    Easily oxidized metals are of interest as a means of storing solar energy in the form of fuels. While their efficient metal/air batteries make them attractive solar fuel candidates, the photoreduction of the corresponding metal ions remains difficult. Accordingly, this work describes the photon driven reduction of Zn(2+) by an iridium(III) photosensitizer (PS) and catalyst. [Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)](PF6) (ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, dtbbpy = 4,4'-di-tert-butyl-2,2'-bipyridine) was found to be the most robust photocatalyst, and the use of ZnCl2 as the Zn(2+) starting material and acetonitrile as the solvent afforded the highest yield of Zn metal product. Under these conditions, a maximum of 430 catalyst turnover numbers were achieved. Cyclic voltammetry of ZnCl2 in different solvents and of different zinc salts in acetonitrile (MeCN) demonstrated the roles of MeCN and Cl(-) in the photoreduction mechanism. Kinetics measurements revealed a first order dependence of the initial rate on both [Ir(ppy)2(dtbbpy)](PF6) and ZnCl2. A first order decay of the reaction rate was also observed.

  15. Evaluation of volatile organic compound reduction technologies for metal coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Huang, E.W.

    1997-12-31

    Under the sponsorship of California Air Resources Board, AeroVironment Environmental Services, Inc. (AVES) is currently conducting a study to demonstrate a new zero-VOC Industrial Maintenance Metal Coating. This new technology can help the coating industry reduce emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and hazardous air pollutants (HAPs). In a previous study conducted by AVES, current VOCs technologies available on the market for metal parts and product coatings were evaluated for compliance with the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) proposed Rule 1107 (Metal Parts and Product Coatings). There are low-VOC coating products available for industries of interest. For general metal coating applications, certain coating products can comply with current SCAQMD Rule 1107 VOC limits. Some of the low-VOC products that are considered as a substitute or an alternative to high-VOC petroleum-based products are summarized. The current available emerging technologies offer a great opportunity for emission reduction through a gradual shift from high to low/no VOC coatings. By phasing in low/no VOC coatings, industries will be able to reduce energy use and air emissions without installation of add-on controls.

  16. Open framework metal chalcogenides as efficient photocatalysts for reduction of CO2 into renewable hydrocarbon fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasan, Koroush; Lin, Qipu; Mao, Chengyu; Feng, Pingyun

    2016-05-01

    Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity.Open framework metal chalcogenides are a family of porous semiconducting materials with diverse chemical compositions. Here we show that these materials containing covalent three-dimensional superlattices of nanosized supertetrahedral clusters can function as efficient photocatalysts for the reduction of CO2 to CH4. Unlike dense semiconductors, metal cations are successfully incorporated into the channels of the porous semiconducting materials to further tune the physical properties of the materials such as electrical conductivity and band gaps. In terms of the photocatalytic properties, the metal-incorporated porous chalcogenides demonstrated enhanced solar energy absorption and higher electrical conductivity and improved photocatalytic activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The synthetic procedure, facilities information, EDX patterns and UV-Vis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02525k

  17. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  18. Metal artifact reduction and image quality evaluation of lumbar spine CT images using metal sinogram segmentation.

    PubMed

    Kaewlek, Titipong; Koolpiruck, Diew; Thongvigitmanee, Saowapak; Mongkolsuk, Manus; Thammakittiphan, Sastrawut; Tritrakarn, Siri-on; Chiewvit, Pipat

    2015-01-01

    Metal artifacts often appear in the images of computed tomography (CT) imaging. In the case of lumbar spine CT images, artifacts disturb the images of critical organs. These artifacts can affect the diagnosis, treatment, and follow up care of the patient. One approach to metal artifact reduction is the sinogram completion method. A mixed-variable thresholding (MixVT) technique to identify the suitable metal sinogram is proposed. This technique consists of four steps: 1) identify the metal objects in the image by using k-mean clustering with the soft cluster assignment, 2) transform the image by separating it into two sinograms, one of which is the sinogram of the metal object, with the surrounding tissue shown in the second sinogram. The boundary of the metal sinogram is then found by the MixVT technique, 3) estimate the new value of the missing data in the metal sinogram by linear interpolation from the surrounding tissue sinogram, 4) reconstruct a modified sinogram by using filtered back-projection and complete the image by adding back the image of the metal object into the reconstructed image to form the complete image. The quantitative and clinical image quality evaluation of our proposed technique demonstrated a significant improvement in image clarity and detail, which enhances the effectiveness of diagnosis and treatment.

  19. Humic substances as a mediator for microbially catalyzed metal reduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Fraga, J.L.; Blunt-Harris, E. L.; Hayes, L.A.; Phillips, E.J.P.; Coates, J.D.

    1998-01-01

    The potential for humic substances to serve as a terminal electron acceptor in microbial respiration and to function as an electron shuttle between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and insoluble Fe(III) oxides was investigated. The Fe(III)-reducing microorganism Geobacter metallireducens conserved energy to support growth from electron transport to humics as evidenced by continued oxidation of acetate to carbon dioxide after as many as nine transfers in a medium with acetate as the electron donor and soil humic acids as the electron acceptor. Growth of G. metallireducens with poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide as the electron acceptor was greatly stimulated by the addition of as little as 100 ??M of the humics analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate. Other quinones investigated, including lawsone, menadione, and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate, also stimulated Fe(III) oxide reduction. A wide phylogenetic diversity of microorganisms capable of Fe(III) reduction were also able to transfer electrons to humics. Microorganisms which can not reduce Fe(III) could not reduce humics. Humics stimulated the reduction of structural Fe(III) in clay and the crystalline Fe(III) forms, goethite and hematite. These results demonstrate that electron shuttling between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and Fe(III) via humics not only accelerates the microbial reduction of poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide, but also can facilitate the reduction of Fe(III) forms that are not typically reduced by microorganisms in the absence of humics. Addition of humic substances to enhance electron shuttling between Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms and Fe(III) oxides may be a useful strategy to stimulate the remediation of soils and sediments contaminated with organic or metal pollutants.

  20. Alloys of platinum and early transition metals as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Greeley, J; Stephens, I E L; Bondarenko, A S; Johansson, T P; Hansen, H A; Jaramillo, T F; Rossmeisl, J; Chorkendorff, I; Nørskov, J K

    2009-10-01

    The widespread use of low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells for mobile applications will require significant reductions in the amount of expensive Pt contained within their cathodes, which drive the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Although progress has been made in this respect, further reductions through the development of more active and stable electrocatalysts are still necessary. Here we describe a new set of ORR electrocatalysts consisting of Pd or Pt alloyed with early transition metals such as Sc or Y. They were identified using density functional theory calculations as being the most stable Pt- and Pd-based binary alloys with ORR activity likely to be better than Pt. Electrochemical measurements show that the activity of polycrystalline Pt(3)Sc and Pt(3)Y electrodes is enhanced relative to pure Pt by a factor of 1.5-1.8 and 6-10, respectively, in the range 0.9-0.87 V. PMID:21378936

  1. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy. PMID:26351175

  2. Transition Metal Oxides for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction: Influence of the Oxidation States of the Metal and its Position on the Periodic Table.

    PubMed

    Toh, Rou Jun; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2015-11-16

    Electrocatalysts have been developed to meet the needs and requirements of renewable energy applications. Metal oxides have been well explored and are promising for this purpose, however, many reports focus on only one or a few metal oxides at once. Herein, thirty metal oxides, which were either commercially available or synthesized by a simple and scalable method, were screened for comparison with regards to their electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We show that although manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel oxides generally displayed the ability to enhance the kinetics of oxygen reduction under alkaline conditions compared with bare glassy carbon, there is no significant correlation between the position of a metal on the periodic table and the electrocatalytic performance of its respective metal oxides. Moreover, it was also observed that mixed valent (+2, +3) oxides performed the poorest, compared with their respective pure metal oxides. These findings may be of paramount importance in the field of renewable energy.

  3. Nitrate reduction by green rusts modified with trace metals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongyun; Batchelor, Bill; Won, Chanhee; Chung, Jinwook

    2012-02-01

    A kinetic study of nitrate reduction by green rust (GR), a group of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide solids, was performed using a batch reactor system. The reduction rate of nitrate by GRs was affected by the anion content in the interlayer of GRs. GR containing F(-) (GR-F) showed the fastest reduction rate while GR-SO(4) showed 9 times slower reaction rate than GR-F. The addition of 1mM Pt or Cu to GR that contained 85 mM Fe(II) improved the reduction kinetics of nitrate by up to 200 times. Pt was an effective activating agent for all GRs. The sequential step reaction model that we proposed appropriately simulated the experimental data. The fastest nitrate reduction by GR-F with Pt was achieved at pH 9 among 7.5 to 11. At that condition, 1mM nitrate transformed completely into ammonium within 23 min. PMID:22154340

  4. Nitrate reduction by green rusts modified with trace metals.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeongyun; Batchelor, Bill; Won, Chanhee; Chung, Jinwook

    2012-02-01

    A kinetic study of nitrate reduction by green rust (GR), a group of layered Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxide solids, was performed using a batch reactor system. The reduction rate of nitrate by GRs was affected by the anion content in the interlayer of GRs. GR containing F(-) (GR-F) showed the fastest reduction rate while GR-SO(4) showed 9 times slower reaction rate than GR-F. The addition of 1mM Pt or Cu to GR that contained 85 mM Fe(II) improved the reduction kinetics of nitrate by up to 200 times. Pt was an effective activating agent for all GRs. The sequential step reaction model that we proposed appropriately simulated the experimental data. The fastest nitrate reduction by GR-F with Pt was achieved at pH 9 among 7.5 to 11. At that condition, 1mM nitrate transformed completely into ammonium within 23 min.

  5. Unifying the 2e(-) and 4e(-) Reduction of Oxygen on Metal Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens K

    2012-10-18

    Understanding trends in selectivity is of paramount importance for multi-electron electrochemical reactions. The goal of this work is to address the issue of 2e(-) versus 4e(-) reduction of oxygen on metal surfaces. Using a detailed thermodynamic analysis based on density functional theory calculations, we show that to a first approximation an activity descriptor, ΔGOH*, the free energy of adsorbed OH*, can be used to describe trends for the 2e(-) and 4e(-) reduction of oxygen. While the weak binding of OOH* on Au(111) makes it an unsuitable catalyst for the 4e(-) reduction, this weak binding is optimal for the 2e(-) reduction to H2O2. We find quite a remarkable agreement between the predictions of the model and experimental results spanning nearly 30 years. PMID:26292231

  6. Reduction of bromate by granular activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Kirisits, M.J.; Snoeyink, V.L.; Kruithof, J.C.

    1998-07-01

    Ozonation of waters containing bromide can lead to the formation of bromate, a probable human carcinogen. Since bromate will be regulated at 10 {micro}g/L by the Stage 1 Disinfectants/Disinfection By-Products Rule, there is considerable interest in finding a suitable method of bromate reduction. Granular activated carbon (GAC) can be used to chemically reduce bromate to bromide, but interference from organic matter and anions present in natural water render this process inefficient. In an effort to improve bromate reduction by GAC, several modifications were made to the GAC filtration process. The use of a biologically active carbon (BAC) filter ahead of a fresh GAC filter with and without preozonation, to remove the biodegradable organic matter, did not substantially improve the bromate removal of the GAC filter. The use of the BAC filter for biological bromate reduction proved to be the most encouraging experiment. By lowering the dissolved oxygen in the influent to the BAC from 8.0 mg/L to 2.0 mg/L, the percent bromate removal increased from 42% to 61%.

  7. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  8. A theoretical evaluation of possible transition metal electro-catalysts for N2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Skúlason, Egill; Bligaard, Thomas; Gudmundsdóttir, Sigrídur; Studt, Felix; Rossmeisl, Jan; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Vegge, Tejs; Jónsson, Hannes; Nørskov, Jens K

    2012-01-21

    Theoretical studies of the possibility of forming ammonia electrochemically at ambient temperature and pressure are presented. Density functional theory calculations were used in combination with the computational standard hydrogen electrode to calculate the free energy profile for the reduction of N(2) admolecules and N adatoms on several close-packed and stepped transition metal surfaces in contact with an acidic electrolyte. Trends in the catalytic activity were calculated for a range of transition metal surfaces and applied potentials under the assumption that the activation energy barrier scales with the free energy difference in each elementary step. The most active surfaces, on top of the volcano diagrams, are Mo, Fe, Rh, and Ru, but hydrogen gas formation will be a competing reaction reducing the faradaic efficiency for ammonia production. Since the early transition metal surfaces such as Sc, Y, Ti, and Zr bind N-adatoms more strongly than H-adatoms, a significant production of ammonia compared with hydrogen gas can be expected on those metal electrodes when a bias of -1 V to -1.5 V vs. SHE is applied. Defect-free surfaces of the early transition metals are catalytically more active than their stepped counterparts. PMID:22146855

  9. A theoretical evaluation of possible transition metal electro-catalysts for N2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Skúlason, Egill; Bligaard, Thomas; Gudmundsdóttir, Sigrídur; Studt, Felix; Rossmeisl, Jan; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Vegge, Tejs; Jónsson, Hannes; Nørskov, Jens K

    2012-01-21

    Theoretical studies of the possibility of forming ammonia electrochemically at ambient temperature and pressure are presented. Density functional theory calculations were used in combination with the computational standard hydrogen electrode to calculate the free energy profile for the reduction of N(2) admolecules and N adatoms on several close-packed and stepped transition metal surfaces in contact with an acidic electrolyte. Trends in the catalytic activity were calculated for a range of transition metal surfaces and applied potentials under the assumption that the activation energy barrier scales with the free energy difference in each elementary step. The most active surfaces, on top of the volcano diagrams, are Mo, Fe, Rh, and Ru, but hydrogen gas formation will be a competing reaction reducing the faradaic efficiency for ammonia production. Since the early transition metal surfaces such as Sc, Y, Ti, and Zr bind N-adatoms more strongly than H-adatoms, a significant production of ammonia compared with hydrogen gas can be expected on those metal electrodes when a bias of -1 V to -1.5 V vs. SHE is applied. Defect-free surfaces of the early transition metals are catalytically more active than their stepped counterparts.

  10. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-01

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions.

  11. A Study of Different Doped Metal Cations on the Physicochemical Properties and Catalytic Activities of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) Composite Oxides for Nitric Oxide Reduction by Carbon Monoxide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Changshun; Li, Min; Qian, Junning; Hu, Qun; Huang, Meina; Lin, Qingjin; Ruan, Yongshun; Dong, Lihui; Li, Bin; Fan, Minguang

    2016-08-01

    This work is mainly focused on investigating the effects of different doped metal cations on the formation of Ce20 M1 Ox (M=Zr, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Sn) composite oxides and their physicochemical and catalytic properties for NO reduction by CO as a model reaction. The obtained samples were characterized by using N2 physisorption, X-ray diffraction, laser Raman spectroscopy, UV/Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, temperature-programmed reduction by hydrogen and by oxygen (H2 -TPR and O2 -TPD), in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, and the NO+CO model reaction. The results imply that the introduction of M(x+) into the lattice of CeO2 increases the specific surface area and pore volume, especially for variable valence metal cations, and enhances the catalytic performance to a great extent. In this regard, increases in the oxygen vacancies, reduction properties, and chemisorbed O2 (-) (and/or O(-) ) species of these Ce20 M1 Ox composite oxides (M refers to variable valence metals) play significant roles in this reaction. Among the samples, Ce20 Cr1 Ox exhibited the best catalytic performance, mainly because it has the best reducibility and more chemisorbed oxygen, and significant reasons for these attributes may be closely related to favorable synergistic interactions of the vacancies and near-surface Ce(3+) and Cr(3+) . Finally, a possible reaction mechanism was tentatively proposed to understand the reactions. PMID:27435470

  12. Reduction of Heavy Metals by Cytochrome c(3)

    SciTech Connect

    ABDELOUAS,A.; GONG,W.L.; LUTZE,W.; NUTTALL,E.H.; SPRAGUE,F.; SHELNUTT,JOHN A.; STRIETELMEIER,B.A.; FRANCO,R.; MOURA,I.; MOURA,J.J.G.

    2000-01-18

    We report on reduction and precipitation of Se(VI), Pb(II), CU(II), U(VI), Mo(VI), and Cr(VI) in water by cytochrome c{sub 3} isolated from Desulfomicrobium baczdatum [strain 9974]. The tetraheme protein cytochrome c{sub 3} was reduced by sodium dithionite. Redox reactions were monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy of cytochrome c{sub 3}. Analytical electron microscopy work showed that Se(VI), Pb(II), and CU(II) were reduced to the metallic state, U(W) and Mo(W) to U(IV) and Mo(IV), respectively, and Cr(VI) probably to Cr(III). U(IV) and Mo(W) precipitated as oxides and Cr(III) as an amorphous hydroxide. Cytochrome c{sub 3} was used repeatedly in the same solution without loosing its effectiveness. The results suggest usage of cytochrome c{sub 3} to develop innovative and environmentally benign methods to remove heavy metals from waste- and groundwater.

  13. Dosimetric Evaluation of Metal Artefact Reduction using Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) Algorithm and Dual-energy Computed Tomography (CT) Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laguda, Edcer Jerecho

    Purpose: Computed Tomography (CT) is one of the standard diagnostic imaging modalities for the evaluation of a patient's medical condition. In comparison to other imaging modalities such as Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), CT is a fast acquisition imaging device with higher spatial resolution and higher contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for bony structures. CT images are presented through a gray scale of independent values in Hounsfield units (HU). High HU-valued materials represent higher density. High density materials, such as metal, tend to erroneously increase the HU values around it due to reconstruction software limitations. This problem of increased HU values due to metal presence is referred to as metal artefacts. Hip prostheses, dental fillings, aneurysm clips, and spinal clips are a few examples of metal objects that are of clinical relevance. These implants create artefacts such as beam hardening and photon starvation that distort CT images and degrade image quality. This is of great significance because the distortions may cause improper evaluation of images and inaccurate dose calculation in the treatment planning system. Different algorithms are being developed to reduce these artefacts for better image quality for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. However, very limited information is available about the effect of artefact correction on dose calculation accuracy. This research study evaluates the dosimetric effect of metal artefact reduction algorithms on severe artefacts on CT images. This study uses Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based MAR algorithm, projection-based Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithm, and the Dual-Energy method. Materials and Methods: The Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI)-based and SMART Metal Artefact Reduction (MAR) algorithms are metal artefact reduction protocols embedded in two different CT scanner models by General Electric (GE), and the Dual-Energy Imaging Method was developed at Duke University. All three

  14. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications. PMID:25280707

  15. Photosensitized Reduction of Carbon Dioxide in Solution Using Noble-Metal Clusters for Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshima, Naoki; Yamaji, Yumi; Teranishi, Toshiharu; Yonezawa, Tetsu

    1995-03-01

    Carbon dioxide was reduced to methane by visible-light irradiation of a solution composed of tris(bipyridine)ruthenium(III) as photosensitizer, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium salt as sacrificial reagent, methyl viologen as electron relay, and a colloidal dispersion of polymer-protected noble-metal clusters, prepared by alcohol-reduction, as catalyst. Among the noble-metal clusters examined, Pt clusters showed the highest activity for the formation of methane as well as hydrogen. In order to improve the activity, oxidized clusters and bimetallic clusters were also applied. For example, the CH4 yield in 3-h irradiation increased from 51 x 10-3 μmol with unoxidized Pt clusters to 72 x 10-3 μmol with partially oxidized ones. In the case of Pt/Ru bimetalic systems, the improvement of the catalytic activity by air treatment was much greater than in case of monometallic clusters.

  16. A bifunctional nonprecious metal catalyst for oxygen reduction and water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Gorlin, Yelena; Jaramillo, Thomas F

    2010-10-01

    There is a growing interest in oxygen electrochemistry as conversions between O(2) and H(2)O play an important role in a variety of renewable energy technologies. The goal of this work is to develop active bifunctional catalyst materials for water oxidation and oxygen reduction. Drawing inspiration from a cubane-like CaMn(4)O(x), the biological catalyst found in the oxygen evolving center (OEC) in photosystem II, nanostructured manganese oxide surfaces were investigated for these reactions. Thin films of nanostructured manganese oxide were found to be active for both oxygen reduction and water oxidation, with similar overall oxygen electrode activity to the best known precious metal nanoparticle catalysts: platinum, ruthenium, and iridium. Physical and chemical characterization of the nanostructured Mn oxide bifunctional catalyst reveals an oxidation state of Mn(III), akin to one of the most commonly observed Mn oxidation states found in the OEC. PMID:20839797

  17. Synthesis of transition-metal phosphides from oxidic precursors by reduction in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Guan Jie; Wang Yao; Qin Minglei; Yang Ying; Li Xiang; Wang Anjie

    2009-06-15

    A series of transition metal phosphides, including MoP, WP, CoP, Co{sub 2}P, and Ni{sub 2}P, were synthesized from their oxidic precursors by means of hydrogen plasma reduction under mild conditions. The effects of reduction conditions, such as metal to phosphorus molar ratio, power input, and reduction time, on the synthesis of metal phosphides were investigated. The products were identified by means of XRD characterization. It is indicated that metal phosphides were readily synthesized stoichiometrically from their oxides in hydrogen plasma under mild conditions. - Graphical abstract: Metal phosphides were obtained stoichiometrically from their oxidic precursors by hydrogen plasma reaction under mild conditions.

  18. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  19. Reductive alkylation of active methylene compounds with carbonyl derivatives, calcium hydride and a heterogeneous catalyst.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Carole; Duclos, Marie-Christine; Sutter, Marc; Métay, Estelle; Lemaire, Marc

    2015-07-01

    A one-pot two-step reaction (Knoevenagel condensation - reduction of the double bond) has been developed using calcium hydride as a reductant in the presence of a supported noble metal catalyst. The reaction between carbonyl compounds and active methylene compounds such as methylcyanoacetate, 1,3-dimethylbarbituric acid, dimedone and the more challenging dimethylmalonate, affords the corresponding monoalkylated products in moderate to good yields (up to 83%) with minimal reduction of the starting carbonyl compounds. PMID:26053131

  20. Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) Programme - 12397

    SciTech Connect

    Pether, Colin; Carrol, Phil; Birkett, Eddie; Kibble, Matthew

    2012-07-01

    Waste material from the reprocessing of irradiated fuel has been stored under water for several decades leading to the water becoming highly radioactive. As a critical enabler to the decommissioning strategy for the Sellafield site, the Liquor Activity Reduction (LAR) programme has been established to provide a processing route for this highly radioactive liquor. This paper reviews the progress that has been made since the start of routine LAR transfer cycles (July 2010) and follows on from the earlier paper presented at WM2011. The paper focuses on the learning from the first full year of routine LAR transfer cycles and the application of this learning to the wider strategies for the treatment of further radioactive liquid effluents on the Sellafield site. During this period over 100,000 Curies of radioactivity has been safely removed and treated. The past year has witnessed the very successful introduction of the LAR programme. This has lead to hazard reduction at MSSS and demonstration that the SIXEP facility can meet the significantly increased challenge that the LAR programme represents. Part of the success has been the ability to predict and deliver a realistic production schedule with the availability of the MSSS, EDT and SIXEP facilities being central to this. Most importantly, the LAR programme has been successful in bringing together key stakeholders to deliver this work while integrating with the existing, day to day, demands of the Sellafield site. (authors)

  1. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Gelger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water, The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles.

  2. Zero-Valent Metal Emulsion for Reductive Dehalogenation of DNAPLS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reinhart, Debra R. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Quinn, Jacqueline (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A zero-valent metal emulsion is used to dehalogenate solvents, such as pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs), including trichloroethylene (TCE). The zero-valent metal emulsion contains zero-valent metal particles, a surfactant, oil and water. The preferred zero-valent metal particles are nanoscale and microscale zero-valent iron particles

  3. Assessing the efficacy of active noise reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylands, Julia M.

    Active noise reduction (ANR) is an electronic technique, based on reverse phase cancellation, for reducing low frequency noise reaching an operators ears. This report discussed the basic concept, its capabilities and some approaches to assessing its efficacy. The technique provides a great enhancement to hearing protection and also enhances signal detection and communications capabilities. Tests of detectibility of pure tones at frequencies ranging up to 1750 Hz using ANR systems which had maximum noise attenuation between 300 and 600 Hz and masking noise typical of the SeaKing helicopter showed that improvements in detection performance extend up to 1000 Hz. ANR systems also offer improved speech intelligibility in high noise environments by reducing the upward spread of masking and adding speech pre-emphasis.

  4. International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fodroci, Michael

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the ISS requirements and initial design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to reduce risk -- given the determination and commitment to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS. While decades of work went into developing the ISS requirements, there are many things in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: (1) Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) (2) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity Level 4 materials, emergency hardware and procedures) (3) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards) Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of nearly a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery.

  5. Topotactic Solid-State Metal Hydride Reductions of Sr2MnO4.

    PubMed

    Hernden, Bradley C; Lussier, Joey A; Bieringer, Mario

    2015-05-01

    We report novel details regarding the reactivity and mechanism of the solid-state topotactic reduction of Sr2MnO4 using a series of solid-state metal hydrides. Comprehensive details describing the active reducing species are reported and comments on the reductive mechanism are provided, where it is shown that more than one electron is being donated by H(-). Commonly used solid-state hydrides LiH, NaH, and CaH2, were characterized in terms of reducing power. In addition the unexplored solid-state hydrides MgH2, SrH2, and BaH2 are evaluated as potential solid-state reductants and characterized in terms of their reductive reactivities. These 6 group I and II metal hydrides show the following trend in terms of reactivity: MgH2 < SrH2 < LiH ≈ CaH2 ≈ BaH2 < NaH. The order of the reductants are discussed in terms of metal electronegativity and bond strengths. NaH and the novel use of SrH2 allowed for targeted synthesis of reduced Sr2MnO(4-x) (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.37) phases. The enhanced control during synthesis demonstrated by this soft chemistry approach has allowed for a more comprehensive and systematic evaluation of Sr2MnO(4-x) phases than previously reported phases prepared by high temperature methods. Sr2MnO3.63(1) has for the first time been shown to be monoclinic by powder X-ray diffraction and the oxidative monoclinic to tetragonal transition occurs at 450 °C. PMID:25894860

  6. MR-driven metal artifact reduction in PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Delso, G; Wollenweber, S; Lonn, A; Wiesinger, F; Veit-Haibach, P

    2013-04-01

    Among the proposed system architectures capable of delivering positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance (PET/MR) datasets, tri-modality systems open an interesting field in which the synergies between these modalities can be exploited to address some of the problems encountered in standalone systems. In this paper we present a feasibility study of the correction of dental streak artifacts in computed tomography (CT)-based attenuation correction images using complementary MR data. The frequency and severity of metal artifacts in oncology patients was studied by inspecting the CT scans of 152 patients examined at our hospital. A prospective correction algorithm using CT and MR information to automatically locate and edit the region affected by metal artifacts was developed and tested retrospectively on data from 15 oncology patients referred for a PET/CT scan. In datasets without malignancies, the activity in Waldeyer's ring was used to measure the maximum uptake variation when the proposed correction was applied. The measured bias ranged from 10% to 30%. In datasets with malignancies on the slices affected by artifacts, the correction led to lesion uptake variations of 6.1% for a lesion 3 cm away from the implant, 1.5% for a lesion 7 cm away and <1% for a lesion 8 cm away.

  7. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts. PMID:25334050

  8. Tuning the catalytic activity of graphene nanosheets for oxygen reduction reaction via size and thickness reduction.

    PubMed

    Benson, John; Xu, Qian; Wang, Peng; Shen, Yuting; Sun, Litao; Wang, Tanyuan; Li, Meixian; Papakonstantinou, Pagona

    2014-11-26

    Currently, the fundamental factors that control the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of graphene itself, in particular, the dependence of the ORR activity on the number of exposed edge sites remain elusive, mainly due to limited synthesis routes of achieving small size graphene. In this work, the synthesis of low oxygen content (<2.5±0.2 at. %), few layer graphene nanosheets with lateral dimensions smaller than a few hundred nanometers were achieved using a combination of ionic liquid assisted grinding of high purity graphite coupled with sequential centrifugation. We show for the first time that the graphene nanosheets possessing a plethora of edges exhibited considerably higher electron transfer numbers compared to the thicker graphene nanoplatelets. This enhanced ORR activity was accomplished by successfully exploiting the plethora of edges of the nanosized graphene as well as the efficient electron communication between the active edge sites and the electrode substrate. The graphene nanosheets were characterized by an onset potential of -0.13 V vs Ag/AgCl and a current density of -3.85 mA/cm2 at -1 V, which represent the best ORR performance ever achieved from an undoped carbon based catalyst. This work demonstrates how low oxygen content nanosized graphene synthesized by a simple route can considerably impact the ORR catalytic activity and hence it is of significance in designing and optimizing advanced metal-free ORR electrocatalysts.

  9. Fluidized reduction of oxides on fine metal powders without sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayashi, T.

    1985-01-01

    In the process of reducing extremely fine metal particles (av. particle size or = 1000 angstroms) covered with an oxide layer, the metal particles are fluidized by a gas flow contg. H, heated, and reduced. The method uniformly and easily reduces surface oxide layers of the extremely fine metal particles without causing sintering. The metal particles are useful for magnetic recording materials, conductive paste, powder metallurgy materials, chem. reagents, and catalysts.

  10. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome c3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D.

    2003-06-01

    The project, ''Reduction of U(VI) and toxic metals by Desulfovibrio cytochrome c3'', is designed to obtain spectroscopic information for or against a functional interaction of cytochrome c3 and uranium in the whole cells. That is, is the cytochrome c3 the uranium reductase? Our approach has been to start with purified cytochrome and determine any unique spectral disturbances during electron flow to U(VI). Then we will attempt to identify these signals emanating from cells actively reducing uranium. This project is being carried out in collaboration with Dr. William Woodruff at the Los Alamos National Laboratory where the spectral experiments are being carried out.

  11. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  12. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations. PMID:27380719

  13. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-01-01

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations. PMID:27380719

  14. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S; Kumta, Prashant N

    2016-07-06

    Identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Herein we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM based systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.

  15. Noble metal-free bifunctional oxygen evolution and oxygen reduction acidic media electro-catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Patel, Prasad Prakash; Datta, Moni Kanchan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Kuruba, Ramalinga; Damodaran, Krishnan; Jampani, Prashanth; Gattu, Bharat; Shanthi, Pavithra Murugavel; Damle, Sameer S.; Kumta, Prashant N.

    2016-07-06

    We report that identification of low cost, highly active, durable completely noble metal-free electro-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in PEM based water electrolysis and metal air batteries remains one of the major unfulfilled scientific and technological challenges of PEM based acid mediated electro-catalysts. In contrast, several non-noble metals based electro-catalysts have been identified for alkaline and neutral medium water electrolysis and fuel cells. Furthermore, we report for the very first time, F doped Cu1.5Mn1.5O4, identified by exploiting theoretical first principles calculations for ORR and OER in PEM basedmore » systems. The identified novel noble metal-free electro-catalyst showed similar onset potential (1.43 V for OER and 1 V for ORR vs RHE) to that of IrO2 and Pt/C, respectively. The system also displayed excellent electrochemical activity comparable to IrO2 for OER and Pt/C for ORR, respectively, along with remarkable long term stability for 6000 cycles in acidic media validating theory, while also displaying superior methanol tolerance and yielding recommended power densities in full cell configurations.« less

  16. Nitrogen-doped graphdiyne as a metal-free catalyst for high-performance oxygen reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rongji; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang; Yi, Yuanping; Shang, Xinke; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Suojiang; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Guangjin

    2014-10-01

    Fuel cells and metal-air batteries will only become widely available in everyday life when the expensive platinum-based electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reactions are replaced by other efficient, low-cost and stable catalysts. We report here the use of nitrogen-doped graphdiyne as a metal-free electrode with a comparable electrocatalytic activity to commercial Pt/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline fuel cells. Nitrogen-doped graphdiyne has a better stability and increased tolerance to the cross-over effect than conventional Pt/C catalysts. PMID:25141067

  17. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells.

    PubMed

    Peña, Karina A; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-08-15

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  18. Transition metals activate TFEB in overexpressing cells

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Karina A.; Kiselyov, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal toxicity is an important factor in the pathogenesis of numerous human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Lysosomes have emerged as important factors in transition metal toxicity because they handle transition metals via endocytosis, autophagy, absorption from the cytoplasm and exocytosis. Transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal biogenesis and the expression of lysosomal proteins in response to lysosomal and/or metabolic stresses. Since transition metals cause lysosomal dysfunction, we proposed that TFEB may be activated to drive gene expression in response to transition metal exposure and that such activation may influence transition metal toxicity. We found that transition metals copper (Cu) and iron (Fe) activate recombinant TFEB and stimulate the expression of TFEB-dependent genes in TFEB-overexpressing cells. In cells that show robust lysosomal exocytosis, TFEB was cytoprotective at moderate levels of Cu exposure, decreasing oxidative stress as reported by the expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX1) gene. However, at high levels of Cu exposure, particularly in cells with low levels of lysosomal exocytosis, activation of overexpressed TFEB was toxic, increasing oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage. Based on these data, we conclude that TFEB-driven gene network is a component of the cellular response to transition metals. These data suggest limitations and disadvantages of TFEB overexpression as a therapeutic approach. PMID:26251447

  19. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  20. 29 CFR 4043.23 - Active participant reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Active participant reduction. 4043.23 Section 4043.23 Labor... Active participant reduction. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the number of active participants under a plan is reduced to less than 80 percent of the number of active participants at...

  1. Estimating the aquatic ecological benefits of reductions in metals` concentrations in streams impacted by mining

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhurst, B.R.; Warren-Hicks, W.; Etchison, T. |

    1994-12-31

    The authors demonstrate how the Water Environment Research Foundation`s (WERF) Methodology for Aquatic Ecological Risk Assessment can be used to estimate the aquatic ecological benefits of reductions in metals` concentrations in streams impacted by mining. Ecological benefits are estimated as the reduction risk to the aquatic community that should result from the predicted decrease in concentrations of metals from wastewater treatment or site-remediation. The methodology has two tiers: Tier 1 identifies candidate chemicals of potential concern and their relative risk, and Tier 2 quantifies the risk of those chemicals at the community-level with respect to the percent of species affected by acute and chronic toxicity. Both Tier 1 and Tier 2 can assess risks for single chemicals or the combined effects of multiple chemicals. The case study example is a segment of Clear Creek, CO, which has been affected by historical mining activities. The authors apply the methodology to Clear Creek and evaluate how well it estimates risks by comparing the estimate to instream data on benthic macroinvertebrates. Ecological benefits are estimated for two scenarios. The first is for clean-up to background concentrations of metals, the second is for clean-up to concentrations equal to EPA`s water quality criteria. The methodology is shown to provide realistic estimates of actual effects.

  2. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    PubMed

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated. PMID:26717720

  3. [Influence of Dissimilatory Iron Reduction on the Speciation and Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Soil].

    PubMed

    Si, You-bin; Wang, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction by microbes is an important process of producing energy in the oxidation of organic compounds under anaerobic condition with Fe(III) as the terminal electron acceptor and Fe(II) as the reduction product. This process is of great significance in element biogeochemical cycle. Iron respiration has been described as one of the most ancient forms of microbial metabolism on the earth, which is bound up with material cycle in water, soil and sediments. Dissimilatory iron reduction plays important roles in heavy metal form transformation and the remediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils. In this paper, we summarized the research progress of iron reduction in the natural environment, and discussed the influence and the mechanism of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The effects of dissimilatory iron reduction on the speciation of heavy metals may be attributed to oxidation and reduction, methytation and immobilization of heavy metals in relation to their bioavailability in soils. The mechanisms of Fe(III) dissimilatory reduction on heavy metal form transformation contain biological and chemical interactions, but the mode of interaction remains to be further investigated.

  4. Metaproteomics Identifies the Protein Machinery Involved in Metal and Radionuclide Reduction in Subsurface Microbiomes and Elucidates Mechanisms and U(VI) Reduction Immobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Pfiffner, Susan M.; Löffler, Frank; Ritalahti, Kirsti; Sayler, Gary; Layton, Alice; Hettich, Robert

    2015-08-31

    The overall goal for this funded project was to develop and exploit environmental metaproteomics tools to identify biomarkers for monitoring microbial activity affecting U speciation at U-contaminated sites, correlate metaproteomics profiles with geochemical parameters and U(VI) reduction activity (or lack thereof), elucidate mechanisms contributing to U(VI) reduction, and provide remediation project managers with additional information to make science-based site management decisions for achieving cleanup goals more efficiently. Although significant progress has been made in elucidating the microbiology contribution to metal and radionuclide reduction, the cellular components, pathway(s), and mechanisms involved in U trans-formation remain poorly understood. Recent advances in (meta)proteomics technology enable detailed studies of complex samples, including environmental samples, which differ between sites and even show considerable variability within the same site (e.g., the Oak Ridge IFRC site). Additionally, site-specific geochemical conditions affect microbial activity and function, suggesting generalized assessment and interpretations may not suffice. This research effort integrated current understanding of the microbiology and biochemistry of U(VI) reduction and capitalize on advances in proteomics technology made over the past few years. Field-related analyses used Oak Ridge IFRC field ground water samples from locations where slow-release substrate biostimulation has been implemented to accelerate in situ U(VI) reduction rates. Our overarching hypothesis was that the metabolic signature in environmental samples, as deciphered by the metaproteome measurements, would show a relationship with U(VI) reduction activity. Since metaproteomic and metagenomic characterizations were computationally challenging and time-consuming, we used a tiered approach that combines database mining, controlled laboratory studies, U(VI) reduction activity measurements, phylogenetic

  5. Density functional studies of functionalized graphitic materials with late transition metals for Oxygen Reduction Reactions.

    PubMed

    Calle-Vallejo, Federico; Martínez, José Ignacio; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-09-14

    Low-temperature fuel cells are appealing alternatives to the conventional internal combustion engines for transportation applications. However, in order for them to be commercially viable, effective, stable and low-cost electrocatalysts are needed for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) at the cathode. In this contribution, on the basis of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations, we show that graphitic materials with active sites composed of 4 nitrogen atoms and transition metal atoms belonging to groups 7 to 9 in the periodic table are active towards ORR, and also towards Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER). Spin analyses suggest that the oxidation state of those elements in the active sites should in general be +2. Moreover, our results verify that the adsorption behavior of transition metals is not intrinsic, since it can be severely altered by changes in the local geometry of the active site, the chemical nature of the nearest neighbors, and the oxidation states. Nonetheless, we find that these catalysts trend-wise behave as oxides and that their catalytic activity is limited by exactly the same universal scaling relations. PMID:21796295

  6. Hazardous waste reduction checklist and assessment manual for the metal finishing industry

    SciTech Connect

    Garza, D.Q.

    1995-08-01

    This publication is a checklist and assessment manual to assist metal finishing shops in evaluating waste reduction opportunities. The first section of the report provides a checklist along with tables to summarize the potential of waste reduction options. Section 2 provides the methods for evaluating the implementations potential of the options and Section 3 contains an economics worksheet for estimating costs, savings and payback periods. A waste reduction opportunities table is contained in the Appendix to prioritize waste reduction options.

  7. Metal reduction at point-of-use filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umeda, Toru; Daikoku, Shusaku; Varanasi, Rao; Tsuzuki, Shuichi

    2016-03-01

    We explored the metal removal efficiency of Nylon 6,6 and HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) membrane based filters, in solvents of varying degree of polarity such as Cyclohexanone and 70:30 mixture of PGME (Propylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether) and PGMEA (Propylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether), In all the solvents tested, Nylon 6,6 membrane filtration was found to be significantly more effective in removing metals than HDPE membranes, regardless of their respective membrane pore sizes. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) mechanism was invoked to rationalize metal removal efficiency dependence on solvent hydrophobicity.

  8. Supported transition-metal oxide catalysts for reduction of sulfur dioxide with hydrogen to elemental sulfur.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Wang, Ching-Huei; Weng, Hung-Shan

    2004-08-01

    This work is for the purpose to find a high performance catalyst for the catalytic reduction of SO2 with H2 as a reducing agent. NiO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst was found to be the most active catalyst among the seven gamma-Al2O3-supported metal-oxide catalysts tested. With NiO as the active species, of the supports tested, gamma-Al2O3 was the most suitable one and the optimal Ni content was 16 wt%. Using this NiO/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst, we found that the optimal feed ratio of H2/SO2 is 2:1 and the catalyst presulfided with H2 + H2S exhibits a higher performance than that pretreated with H2 or He. XRD patterns reveal that the nickel oxide experienced a transformation to Ni3S2 and NiS, and then to NiS2, the most active nickel sulfide, during the reaction process. The reason for the highest catalyst activity of 16 wt% Ni was attributed to the largest amount of NiS2. Water vapor in the feed gas reactant caused inhibition of catalyst activity, whereas H2S promoted the reduction of SO2. These phenomena were rationalized with the aid of Claus reaction. PMID:15212907

  9. Self-Supplied Nano-Fusing and Transferring Metal Nanostructures via Surface Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jaeho; Seo, Ji-Won; Kim, Jong Yun; Lee, Jaemin; Cho, Changsoon; Kang, Juhoon; Choi, Sung-Yool; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2016-01-20

    Here, we demonstrate that chemical reduction of oxide layers on metal nanostructures fuses junctions at nanoscale to improve the opto-electrical performance, and to ensure environmental stability of the interconnected nanonetwork. In addition, the reducing reaction lowers the adhesion force between metal nanostructures and substrates, facilitating the detachment of them from substrates. Detached metal nanonetworks can be easily floated on water and transferred onto various substrates including hydrophobic, floppy, and curved surfaces. Utilizing the detached metal nanostructures, semitransparent organic photovoltaics is fabricated, presenting the applicability of proposed reduction treatment in the device applications. PMID:26700597

  10. [Breast dose reduction in female CT screening for lung cancer using various metallic shields].

    PubMed

    Takada, Kenta; Kaneko, Junichi; Aoki, Kiyoshi

    2009-12-20

    We evaluated the effectiveness of metallic shields that were used for reduction of the breast dose in thoracic computed tomography(CT). For the evaluation, we measured breast surface dose and image standard deviation(SD)in the lung area. The metallic shields were made from bismuth, zinc, copper, and iron. The bismuth shield has been marketed and used for dose reduction. The other three metallic shields were chosen because they have lower atomic numbers and a lower yield of characteristic X-rays. As a result, use of the metallic shields showed a lower breast dose than the decrement of the tube current in the same image SD. The insertion of a thin aluminum sheet between the shield and a phantom was also effective in reducing breast surface dose. We calculated the dose reduction rate to evaluate the effectiveness of these metallic shields. This dose reduction rate was defined as the ratio of the decrease in breast surface dose by metallic shields to the breast surface dose measured with the tube current decrement in the same image SD. The maximum dose reduction rate was 6.4% for the bismuth shield, and 12.0-13.3% for the other shields. These results indicate that the shields made from zinc, copper, and iron are more effective for dose reduction than the shield made form bismuth. The best dose reduction rate, 13.3%, has been achieved when the zinc shield placed 20 mm apart from a phantom with 0.2 mm aluminum was used.

  11. Nitrogen-doped graphdiyne as a metal-free catalyst for high-performance oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rongji; Liu, Huibiao; Li, Yuliang; Yi, Yuanping; Shang, Xinke; Zhang, Shuangshuang; Yu, Xuelian; Zhang, Suojiang; Cao, Hongbin; Zhang, Guangjin

    2014-09-01

    Fuel cells and metal-air batteries will only become widely available in everyday life when the expensive platinum-based electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reactions are replaced by other efficient, low-cost and stable catalysts. We report here the use of nitrogen-doped graphdiyne as a metal-free electrode with a comparable electrocatalytic activity to commercial Pt/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline fuel cells. Nitrogen-doped graphdiyne has a better stability and increased tolerance to the cross-over effect than conventional Pt/C catalysts.Fuel cells and metal-air batteries will only become widely available in everyday life when the expensive platinum-based electrocatalysts used for the oxygen reduction reactions are replaced by other efficient, low-cost and stable catalysts. We report here the use of nitrogen-doped graphdiyne as a metal-free electrode with a comparable electrocatalytic activity to commercial Pt/C catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline fuel cells. Nitrogen-doped graphdiyne has a better stability and increased tolerance to the cross-over effect than conventional Pt/C catalysts. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed RDE and RRDE experiments, additional tables and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03185g

  12. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-06-21

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction.

  13. Recovery of Multi-Metallic Components from Bottom Ash by Smelting Reduction Under Plasma Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Arup Kumar; Sinha, Om Prakash

    2016-02-01

    A new concept for maintaining inert atmosphere with high temperature ~1973 K (1700 °C) inside the furnace during smelting reduction was described, in which recovery of metallic values from wastes was done in the presence of metal bath which acts as a solvent. Nitrogen plasma arc was generated by passing current and nitrogen gas through a hollow graphite electrode. In this way, the heat for reduction reactions and melting of metal and slag phases under inert atmosphere was maintained. The mixture of bottom ash and carbonaceous reducing agent was fed in the form of pellets near the plasma zone above the liquid iron bath, used for the absorption of reduced metals after reduction of oxides present in the wastes. Percent recovery of metallic values and different consumption parameters were calculated. It was observed that aluminum, iron, and silicon could be recovered effectively from the wastes.

  14. Photocatalytic water reduction with copper-based photosensitizers: a noble-metal-free system.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shu-Ping; Mejía, Esteban; Friedrich, Aleksej; Pazidis, Alexandra; Junge, Henrik; Surkus, Annette-Enrica; Jackstell, Ralf; Denurra, Stefania; Gladiali, Serafino; Lochbrunner, Stefan; Beller, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Of noble descent: a fully noble-metal-free system for the photocatalytic reduction of water at room temperature has been developed. This system consists of Cu(I) complexes as photosensitizers and [Fe(3)(CO)(12)] as the water-reduction catalyst. The novel Cu-based photosensitizers are relatively inexpensive, readily available from commercial sources, and stable to ambient conditions, thus making them an attractive alternative to the widely used noble-metal based systems. PMID:23047871

  15. Reductive precipitation of metals photosensitized by tin and antimony porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Gong, Weiliang; Abdelouas, Abdesselam; Lutze, Werner

    2003-09-30

    A method for reducing metals using a tin or antimony porphyrin by forming an aqueous solution of a tin or antimony porphyrin, an electron donor, such as ethylenediaminetetraaceticacid, triethylamine, triethanolamine, and sodium nitrite, and at least one metal compound selected from a uranium-containing compound, a mercury-containing compound, a copper-containing compound, a lead-containing compound, a gold-containing compound, a silver-containing compound, and a platinum-containing compound through irradiating the aqueous solution with light.

  16. Efficient selective catalytic reduction of NO by novel carbon-doped metal catalysts made from electroplating sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jia; Zhang, Jingyi; Xu, Yunfeng; Su, Huimin; Li, Xiaoman; Zhou, Ji Zhi; Qian, Guangren; Li, Li; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2014-10-01

    Electroplating sludges, once regarded as industrial wastes, are precious resources of various transition metals. This research has thus investigated the recycling of an electroplating sludge as a novel carbon-doped metal (Fe, Ni, Mg, Cu, and Zn) catalyst, which was different from a traditional carbon-supported metal catalyst, for effective NO selective catalytic reduction (SCR). This catalyst removed >99.7% NO at a temperature as low as 300 °C. It also removed NO steadily (>99%) with a maximum specific accumulative reduced amount (MSARA) of 3.4 mmol/g. Gas species analyses showed that NO removal was accompanied by evolving N2 and CO2. Moreover, in a wide temperature window, the sludge catalyst showed a higher CO2 selectivity (>99%) than an activated carbon-supported metal catalyst. Structure characterizations revealed that carbon-doped metal was transformed to metal oxide in the sludge catalyst after the catalytic test, with most carbon (2.33 wt %) being consumed. These observations suggest that NO removal over the sludge catalyst is a typical SCR where metals/metal oxides act as the catalytic center and carbon as the reducing reagent. Therefore, our report probably provides an opportunity for high value-added utilizations of heavy-metal wastes in mitigating atmospheric pollutions.

  17. An active noise reduction system for aircrew helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, P. D.; Rawlinson, D.; Pelc, S. F.; Dorey, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    An active noise reduction system was developed for use in aircrew flying helmets in which the acoustic noise field inside the ear defender is detected using a miniature microphone and an antiphase signal is fed back to a communications telephone within the ear defender. Performance of the active noise reduction system in a laboratory trial simulating flight conditions is shown to be satisfactory.

  18. Periplasmic Cytochrome c(3) of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Is Directly Involved in H2-Mediated Metal but Not Sulfate Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Suflita, Joseph M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Krumholz, Lee R.

    2004-01-01

    Kinetic parameters and the role of cytochrome c3 in sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) reduction were investigated in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. While sulfate reduction followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics (Km 220 uM), loss of Fe(III) and U(VI) was first-order at all concentrations tested. Initial reduction rates of all electron acceptors were similar for cells grown with H2 and sulfate, while cultures grown using lactate and sulfate had similar rates of metal loss but lower sulfate reduction activities. The similarities in metal, but not sulfate, reduction with H2 and lactate suggest divergent pathways. Respiration assays and reduced minus oxidized spectra were carried out to determine c-type cytochrome involvement in electron acceptor reduction. c-type cytochrome oxidation was immediate with Fe(III) and U(VI) in the presence of H2, lactate, or pyruvate. Sulfidogenesis occurred with all three electron donors and effectively oxidized the c-type cytochrome in lactate or pyruvate-reduced, but not H2-reduced cells. Correspondingly, electron acceptor competition assays with lactate or pyruvate as electron donors showed that Fe(III) inhibited U(VI) reduction, and U(VI) inhibited sulfate loss. However, sulfate reduction was slowed but not halted when H2 was the electron donor in the presence of Fe(III) or U(VI). U(VI) loss was still impeded by Fe(III) when H2 was used. Hence, we propose a modified pathway for the reduction of sulfate, Fe(III), and U(VI) which helps explain why these bacteria cannot grow using these metals. We further propose that cytochrome c3 is an electron carrier involved in lactate and pyruvate oxidation and is the reductase for alternate electron acceptors with higher redox potentials than sulfate.

  19. Reductive Cleavage of CO2 by Metal-Ligand-Cooperation Mediated by an Iridium Pincer Complex.

    PubMed

    Feller, Moran; Gellrich, Urs; Anaby, Aviel; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Milstein, David

    2016-05-25

    A unique mode of stoichiometric CO2 activation and reductive splitting based on metal-ligand-cooperation is described. The novel Ir hydride complexes [((t)Bu-PNP*)Ir(H)2] (2) ((t)Bu-PNP*, deprotonated (t)Bu-PNP ligand) and [((t)Bu-PNP)Ir(H)] (3) react with CO2 to give the dearomatized complex [((t)Bu-PNP*)Ir(CO)] (4) and water. Mechanistic studies have identified an adduct in which CO2 is bound to the ligand and metal, [((t)Bu-PNP-COO)Ir(H)2] (5), and a di-CO2 iridacycle [((t)Bu-PNP)Ir(H)(C2O4-κC,O)] (6). DFT calculations confirm the formation of 5 and 6 as reversibly formed side products, and suggest an η(1)-CO2 intermediate leading to the thermodynamic product 4. The calculations support a metal-ligand-cooperation pathway in which an internal deprotonation of the benzylic position by the η(1)-CO2 ligand leads to a carboxylate intermediate, which further reacts with the hydride ligand to give complex 4 and water. PMID:27124097

  20. Carbonized nanoscale metal-organic frameworks as high performance electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shenlong; Yin, Huajie; Du, Lei; He, Liangcan; Zhao, Kun; Chang, Lin; Yin, Geping; Zhao, Huijun; Liu, Shaoqin; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-23

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the key steps in clean and efficient energy conversion techniques such as in fuel cells and metal-air batteries; however, several disadvantages of current ORRs including the kinetically sluggish process and expensive catalysts hinder mass production of these devices. Herein, we develop carbonized nanoparticles, which are derived from monodisperse nanoscale metal organic frameworks (MIL-88B-NH3), as the high performance ORR catalysts. The onset potential and the half-wave potential for the ORR at these carbonized nanoparticles is up to 1.03 and 0.92 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH solution, respectively, which represents the best ORR activity of all the non-noble metal catalysts reported so far. Furthermore, when used as the cathode of the alkaline direct fuel cell, the power density obtained with the carbonized nanoparticles reaches 22.7 mW/cm2, 1.7 times higher than the commercial Pt/C catalysts. PMID:25426850

  1. Alloyed 2D Metal-Semiconductor Heterojunctions: Origin of Interface States Reduction and Schottky Barrier Lowering.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yonghun; Kim, Ah Ra; Yang, Jin Ho; Chang, Kyoung Eun; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Jucheol; Lee, Kang Eun; Kim, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sung Mook; Lee, Kyu Hwan; Lee, Byoung Hun; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Cho, Byungjin

    2016-09-14

    The long-term stability and superior device reliability through the use of delicately designed metal contacts with two-dimensional (2D) atomic-scale semiconductors are considered one of the critical issues related to practical 2D-based electronic components. Here, we investigate the origin of the improved contact properties of alloyed 2D metal-semiconductor heterojunctions. 2D WSe2-based transistors with mixed transition layers containing van der Waals (M-vdW, NbSe2/WxNb1-xSe2/WSe2) junctions realize atomically sharp interfaces, exhibiting long hot-carrier lifetimes of approximately 75,296 s (78 times longer than that of metal-semiconductor, Pd/WSe2 junctions). Such dramatic lifetime enhancement in M-vdW-junctioned devices is attributed to the synergistic effects arising from the significant reduction in the number of defects and the Schottky barrier lowering at the interface. Formation of a controllable mixed-composition alloyed layer on the 2D active channel would be a breakthrough approach to maximize the electrical reliability of 2D nanomaterial-based electronic applications. PMID:27552187

  2. Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals

    DOEpatents

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

    1991-09-10

    A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

  3. Reductive mobilization of oxide-bound metals. Progress report, November 1, 1990--September 15, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, A.T.

    1991-12-31

    We have completed a large number of experiments which examine the release of MnO{sub 2}-bound Co, Ni, and Cu. Our work has focused upon the following areas: (1) competitive adsorption among the three toxic metals and Mn(II); (2) toxic metal release upon addition of low MW organic reductants and complexants; and (3) toxic metal release upon addition of natural organic matter-rich surface waters and IHSS organic matter reference material.

  4. Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals

    DOEpatents

    Francis, Arokiasamy J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solutin and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal.

  5. Metal removal by thermally activated clay marl.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, R Y

    2001-01-01

    A sorption active product has been obtained from Bulgarian clay marl by thermal activation at 750 degrees C. The modified aluminosilicate material is characterized, as well as its use for the removal of metal ions. The effect of the initial metal ion concentration, the contact time, pH, the solution temperature and the ionic strength on the uptake of lead, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solutions were studied in batch experiments. The kinetics of removal of metal ions on modified clay marl appears dependent on the sorbate/sorbent ratio. At low cation concentrations sorption follows a Langmuir isotherm, while at higher sorbate/sorbent ratios the sorption isotherms of metal ions are described by Freundlich's equation. At the pH region of the sorption edge the removal of metal ions by surface complexation and surface precipitation mechanisms is indistinguishable. It is observed that the influence of temperature on the uptake ability of the clay marl is most considerable up to 40 degrees C. These studies show that the thermally modified clay marl can be successfully used for removal of metal ions from water solutions in a wide range of concentrations.

  6. Metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electro- and photochemical reduction of water to hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Zee, David Z; Chantarojsiri, Teera; Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J

    2015-07-21

    Climate change, rising global energy demand, and energy security concerns motivate research into alternative, sustainable energy sources. In principle, solar energy can meet the world's energy needs, but the intermittent nature of solar illumination means that it is temporally and spatially separated from its consumption. Developing systems that promote solar-to-fuel conversion, such as via reduction of protons to hydrogen, could bridge this production-consumption gap, but this effort requires invention of catalysts that are cheap, robust, and efficient and that use earth-abundant elements. In this context, catalysts that utilize water as both an earth-abundant, environmentally benign substrate and a solvent for proton reduction are highly desirable. This Account summarizes our studies of molecular metal-polypyridyl catalysts for electrochemical and photochemical reduction of protons to hydrogen. Inspired by concept transfer from biological and materials catalysts, these scaffolds are remarkably resistant to decomposition in water, with fast and selective electrocatalytic and photocatalytic conversions that are sustainable for several days. Their modular nature offers a broad range of opportunities for tuning reactivity by molecular design, including altering ancillary ligand electronics, denticity, and/or incorporating redox-active elements. Our first-generation complex, [(PY4)Co(CH3CN)2](2+), catalyzes the reduction of protons from a strong organic acid to hydrogen in 50% water. Subsequent investigations with the pentapyridyl ligand PY5Me2 furnished molybdenum and cobalt complexes capable of catalyzing the reduction of water in fully aqueous electrolyte with 100% Faradaic efficiency. Of particular note, the complex [(PY5Me2)MoO](2+) possesses extremely high activity and durability in neutral water, with turnover frequencies at least 8500 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst per hour and turnover numbers over 600 000 mol of H2 per mole of catalyst over 3 days at an

  7. Supporting palladium metal on gold nanoparticles improves its catalysis for nitrite reduction.

    PubMed

    Qian, Huifeng; Zhao, Zhun; Velazquez, Juan C; Pretzer, Lori A; Heck, Kimberly N; Wong, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    Nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) anions are often found in groundwater and surface water as contaminants globally, especially in agricultural areas due to nitrate-rich fertilizer use. One popular approach to studying the removal of nitrite/nitrate from water has been their degradation to dinitrogen via Pd-based reduction catalysis. However, little progress has been made towards understanding how the catalyst structure can improve activity. Focusing on the catalytic reduction of nitrite in this study, we report that Au NPs supporting Pd metal ("Pd-on-Au NPs") show catalytic activity that varies with volcano-shape dependence on Pd surface coverage. At room temperature, in CO2-buffered water, and under H2 headspace, the NPs were maximally active at a Pd surface coverage of 80%, with a first-order rate constant (k(cat) = 576 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)) that was 15x and 7.5x higher than monometallic Pd NPs (~4 nm; 40 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)) and Pd/Al2O3 (1 wt% Pd; 76 L g(Pd)(-1) min(-1)), respectively. Accounting only for surface Pd atoms, these NPs (576 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)) were 3.6x and 1.6x higher than monometallic Pd NPs (160 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)) and Pd/Al2O3 (361 L g(surface-Pd)(-1) min(-1)). These NPs retained ~98% of catalytic activity at a chloride concentration of 1 mM, whereas Pd/Al2O3 lost ~50%. The Pd-on-Au nanostructure is a promising approach to improve the catalytic reduction process for nitrite and, with further development, also for nitrate anions.

  8. A Class of High Performance Metal-Free Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts based on Cheap Carbon Blacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiujuan; Song, Ping; Zhang, Yuwei; Liu, Changpeng; Xu, Weilin; Xing, Wei

    2013-08-01

    For the goal of practical industrial development of fuel cells, cheap, sustainable and high performance electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) which rival those based on platinum (Pt) and other rare materials are highly desirable. In this work, we report a class of cheap and high-performance metal-free oxygen reduction electrocatalysts obtained by co-doping carbon blacks with nitrogen and fluorine (CB-NF).The CB-NF electrocatalysts are highly active and exhibit long-term operation stability and tolerance to poisons during oxygen reduction process in alkaline medium. The alkaline direct methanol fuel cell with the best CB-NF as cathode (3 mg/cm2) outperforms the one with commercial platinum-based cathode (3 mg Pt/cm2). To the best of our knowledge, these are among the most efficient non-Pt based electrocatalysts. Since carbon blacks are 10,000 times cheaper than Pt, these CB-NF electrocatalysts possess the best price/performance ratio for ORR, and are the most promising alternatives to Pt-based ones to date.

  9. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    PubMed Central

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction. PMID:24071657

  10. Method of thermal strain hysteresis reduction in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dries, Gregory A. (Inventor); Tompkins, Stephen S. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for treating graphite reinforced metal matrix composites so as to eliminate thermal strain hysteresis and impart dimensional stability through a large thermal cycle. The method is applied to the composite post fabrication and is effective on metal matrix materials using graphite fibers manufactured by both the hot roll bonding and diffusion bonding techniques. The method consists of first heat treating the material in a solution anneal oven followed by a water quench and then subjecting the material to a cryogenic treatment in a cryogenic oven. This heat treatment and cryogenic stress reflief is effective in imparting a dimensional stability and reduced thermal strain hysteresis in the material over a -250.degree. F. to +250.degree. F. thermal cycle.

  11. Strong Casimir force reduction through metallic surface nanostructuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Koev, Stephan; Jung, Il Woong; Talin, A. Alec; Davids, Paul S.; Decca, Ricardo S.; Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; López, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The Casimir force between bodies in vacuum can be understood as arising from their interaction with an infinite number of fluctuating electromagnetic quantum vacuum modes, resulting in a complex dependence on the shape and material of the interacting objects. Becoming dominant at small separations, the force has a significant role in nanomechanics and object manipulation at the nanoscale, leading to a considerable interest in identifying structures where the Casimir interaction behaves significantly different from the well-known attractive force between parallel plates. Here we experimentally demonstrate that by nanostructuring one of the interacting metal surfaces at scales below the plasma wavelength, an unexpected regime in the Casimir force can be observed. Replacing a flat surface with a deep metallic lamellar grating with sub-100 nm features strongly suppresses the Casimir force and for large inter-surfaces separations reduces it beyond what would be expected by any existing theoretical prediction.

  12. Renewable and metal-free carbon nanofibre catalysts for carbon dioxide reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Bijandra; Asadi, Mohammad; Pisasale, Davide; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Rosen, Brian A.; Haasch, Richard; Abiade, Jeremiah; Yarin, Alexander L.; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2013-12-01

    The development of an efficient catalyst system for the electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide into energy-rich products is a major research topic. Here we report the catalytic ability of polyacrylonitrile-based heteroatomic carbon nanofibres for carbon dioxide reduction into carbon monoxide, via a metal-free, renewable and cost-effective route. The carbon nanofibre catalyst exhibits negligible overpotential (0.17 V) for carbon dioxide reduction and more than an order of magnitude higher current density compared with the silver catalyst under similar experimental conditions. The carbon dioxide reduction ability of carbon nanofibres is attributed to the reduced carbons rather than to electronegative nitrogen atoms. The superior performance is credited to the nanofibrillar structure and high binding energy of key intermediates to the carbon nanofibre surfaces. The finding may lead to a new generation of metal-free and non-precious catalysts with much greater efficiency than the existing noble metal catalysts.

  13. Developments of metal artifact reduction methods of cone-beam computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Kun-Long; Jin, Shih-Chun D.; Chen, Jyh-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    While clinical applications of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) have expanded, current CBCT technology has limitations due to the streak artifacts caused by metallic objects. The aim of this work was to develop an efficient and accurate metal data interpolation in sinogram domain to achieve artifact suppression and to improve CT image quality. In this study, we propose three interpolation methods for the metal projection data. Metal objects are segmented in raw data and replacement of the segmented regions by new values is done using three interpolation schemes, (1) replacing the raw data by the simple threshold value (thresholding method), (2) reducing the raw data to half of the value which is over threshold value (modification method), (3) using the inpainting interpolation (inpainting method). Our references are the CBCT images of the phantoms without the metal implants. The performance was evaluated by comparing the differences of root mean square error (RMSE) before and after metal artifact reduction (MAR). All the metal artifacts were reduced effectively. Metal artifacts reduction using method (1) performs the best, which improve the differences of RMSE more than 60%. This study indicates that metal artifacts can be reduced effectively by manipulating metal projection data.

  14. Highly active Pd-In/mesoporous alumina catalyst for nitrate reduction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Yonggang; Li, Deyi; Werth, Charles J; Zhang, Yalei; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-04-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitrate is a promising technology for groundwater purification because it transforms nitrate into nitrogen and water. Recent studies have mainly focused on new catalysts with higher activities for the reduction of nitrate. Consequently, metal nanoparticles supported on mesoporous metal oxides have become a major research direction. However, the complex surface chemistry and porous structures of mesoporous metal oxides lead to a non-uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles, thereby resulting in a low catalytic efficiency. In this paper, a method for synthesizing the sustainable nitrate reduction catalyst Pd-In/Al2O3 with a dimensional structure is introduced. The TEM results indicated that Pd and In nanoparticles could efficiently disperse into the mesopores of the alumina. At room temperature in CO2-buffered water and under continuous H2 as the electron donor, the synthesized material (4.9 wt% Pd) was the most active at a Pd-In ratio of 4, with a first-order rate constant (k(obs) = 0.241 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)) that was 1.3× higher than that of conventional Pd-In/Al2O3 (5 wt% Pd; 0.19 L min(-1) g(cata)(-1)). The Pd-In/mesoporous alumina is a promising catalyst for improving the catalytic reduction of nitrate. PMID:25600582

  15. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-05-22

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (-0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm(-2) at -0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries.

  16. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (-0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm(-2) at -0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries. PMID:25997590

  17. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (−0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm−2 at −0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries. PMID:25997590

  18. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-05-01

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (-0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm-2 at -0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries.

  19. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jessie Y; Kerns, James R; Nute, Jessica L; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A; Stingo, Francesco C; Followill, David S; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2015-01-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE's monochromatic Gemstone Spectral Imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings, and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios. PMID:25585685

  20. An evaluation of three commercially available metal artifact reduction methods for CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jessie Y.; Kerns, James R.; Nute, Jessica L.; Liu, Xinming; Balter, Peter A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Followill, David S.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.

    2015-02-01

    Three commercial metal artifact reduction methods were evaluated for use in computed tomography (CT) imaging in the presence of clinically realistic metal implants: Philips O-MAR, GE’s monochromatic gemstone spectral imaging (GSI) using dual-energy CT, and GSI monochromatic imaging with metal artifact reduction software applied (MARs). Each method was evaluated according to CT number accuracy, metal size accuracy, and streak artifact severity reduction by using several phantoms, including three anthropomorphic phantoms containing metal implants (hip prosthesis, dental fillings and spinal fixation rods). All three methods showed varying degrees of success for the hip prosthesis and spinal fixation rod cases, while none were particularly beneficial for dental artifacts. Limitations of the methods were also observed. MARs underestimated the size of metal implants and introduced new artifacts in imaging planes beyond the metal implant when applied to dental artifacts, and both the O-MAR and MARs algorithms induced artifacts for spinal fixation rods in a thoracic phantom. Our findings suggest that all three artifact mitigation methods may benefit patients with metal implants, though they should be used with caution in certain scenarios.

  1. CT metal artifact reduction by soft inequality constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukalina, Marina; Nikolaev, Dmitry; Sokolov, Valerii; Ingacheva, Anastasiya; Buzmakov, Alexey; Prun, Victor

    2015-12-01

    The artifacts (known as metal-like artifacts) arising from incorrect reconstruction may obscure or simulate pathology in medical applications, hide or mimic cracks and cavities in the scanned objects in industrial tomographic scans. One of the main reasons caused such artifacts is photon starvation on the rays which go through highly absorbing regions. We indroduce a way to suppress such artifacts in the reconstructions using soft penalty mimicing linear inequalities on the photon starved rays. An efficient algorithm to use such information is provided and the effect of those inequalities on the reconstruction quality is studied.

  2. Reductive electrosynthesis of crystalline metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Li, Minyuan; Dincă, Mircea

    2011-08-24

    Electroreduction of oxoanions affords hydroxide equivalents that induce selective deposition of crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) on conductive surfaces. The method is illustrated by cathodic electrodeposition of Zn(4)O(BDC)(3) (MOF-5; BDC = 1,4-benzenedicarboxylate), which is deposited at room temperature in only 15 min under cathodic potential. Although many crystalline phases are known in the Zn(2+)/BDC(2-) system, MOF-5 is the only observed crystalline MOF phase under these conditions. This fast and mild method of synthesizing MOFs is amenable to direct surface functionalization and could impact applications requiring conformal coatings of microporous MOFs, such as gas separation membranes and electrochemical sensors.

  3. Thermodynamics and kinetics of CO2, CO, and H+ binding to the metal centre of CO2 reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jacob; Jia, Hongfei; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2012-03-21

    In our developing world, carbon dioxide has become one of the most abundant greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It is a stable, inert, small molecule that continues to present significant challenges toward its chemical activation as a useful carbon end product. This tutorial review describes one approach to the reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon fuels, using cobalt and nickel molecular catalysts, with particular focus on studying the thermodynamics and kinetics of CO(2) binding to metal catalytic sites.

  4. Photochemical carbon dioxide reduction with metal complexes: Differences between cobalt and nickel macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Etsuko; Brunschwig, B.S.; Cabelli, D.; Renner, M.W.; Furenlid, L.R.; Ogata, Tomoyuki |; Wada, Yuji; Yanagida, Shozo

    1997-12-31

    Problems related to increases of green house gases in the atmosphere and the depletion of fossil fuels have made the conversion of CO{sub 2} into useful chemicals and fuels an important area of research. However, CO{sub 2} reduction poses many scientific challenges. Despite intense interest in photochemical and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction, the kinetics and mechanism of the reduction remain unclear in many systems. This research focuses on mechanistic and kinetic studies of photochemical and electrochemical CO{sub 2} reduction that involves metal complexes as catalysts. This work makes use of UV-vis, NMR, and FTIR spectroscopy, flash photolysis, pulse radiolysis, X-ray diffraction, XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure). Here the authors summarize their research on photochemical carbon dioxide reduction with metal macrocycles.

  5. A metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jintao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out with noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO2 and MnO2) as catalysts, respectively. However, these metal-based catalysts often suffer from multiple disadvantages, including high cost, low selectivity, poor stability and detrimental environmental effects. Here, we describe a mesoporous carbon foam co-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus that has a large surface area of ˜1,663 m2 g-1 and good electrocatalytic properties for both ORR and OER. This material was fabricated using a scalable, one-step process involving the pyrolysis of a polyaniline aerogel synthesized in the presence of phytic acid. We then tested the suitability of this N,P-doped carbon foam as an air electrode for primary and rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Primary batteries demonstrated an open-circuit potential of 1.48 V, a specific capacity of 735 mAh gZn-1 (corresponding to an energy density of 835 Wh kgZn-1), a peak power density of 55 mW cm-2, and stable operation for 240 h after mechanical recharging. Two-electrode rechargeable batteries could be cycled stably for 180 cycles at 2 mA cm-2. We also examine the activity of our carbon foam for both OER and ORR independently, in a three-electrode configuration, and discuss ways in which the Zn-air battery can be further improved. Finally, our density functional theory calculations reveal that the N,P co-doping and graphene edge effects are essential for the bifunctional electrocatalytic activity of our material.

  6. A metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out with noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO₂ and MnO₂) as catalysts, respectively. However, these metal-based catalysts often suffer from multiple disadvantages, including high cost, low selectivity, poor stability and detrimental environmental effects. Here, we describe a mesoporous carbon foam co-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus that has a large surface area of ∼1,663 m(2) g(-1) and good electrocatalytic properties for both ORR and OER. This material was fabricated using a scalable, one-step process involving the pyrolysis of a polyaniline aerogel synthesized in the presence of phytic acid. We then tested the suitability of this N,P-doped carbon foam as an air electrode for primary and rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Primary batteries demonstrated an open-circuit potential of 1.48 V, a specific capacity of 735 mAh gZn(-1) (corresponding to an energy density of 835 Wh kgZn(-1)), a peak power density of 55 mW cm(-2), and stable operation for 240 h after mechanical recharging. Two-electrode rechargeable batteries could be cycled stably for 180 cycles at 2 mA cm(-2). We also examine the activity of our carbon foam for both OER and ORR independently, in a three-electrode configuration, and discuss ways in which the Zn-air battery can be further improved. Finally, our density functional theory calculations reveal that the N,P co-doping and graphene edge effects are essential for the bifunctional electrocatalytic activity of our material.

  7. A metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Zhao, Zhenghang; Xia, Zhenhai; Dai, Liming

    2015-05-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are traditionally carried out with noble metals (such as Pt) and metal oxides (such as RuO₂ and MnO₂) as catalysts, respectively. However, these metal-based catalysts often suffer from multiple disadvantages, including high cost, low selectivity, poor stability and detrimental environmental effects. Here, we describe a mesoporous carbon foam co-doped with nitrogen and phosphorus that has a large surface area of ∼1,663 m(2) g(-1) and good electrocatalytic properties for both ORR and OER. This material was fabricated using a scalable, one-step process involving the pyrolysis of a polyaniline aerogel synthesized in the presence of phytic acid. We then tested the suitability of this N,P-doped carbon foam as an air electrode for primary and rechargeable Zn-air batteries. Primary batteries demonstrated an open-circuit potential of 1.48 V, a specific capacity of 735 mAh gZn(-1) (corresponding to an energy density of 835 Wh kgZn(-1)), a peak power density of 55 mW cm(-2), and stable operation for 240 h after mechanical recharging. Two-electrode rechargeable batteries could be cycled stably for 180 cycles at 2 mA cm(-2). We also examine the activity of our carbon foam for both OER and ORR independently, in a three-electrode configuration, and discuss ways in which the Zn-air battery can be further improved. Finally, our density functional theory calculations reveal that the N,P co-doping and graphene edge effects are essential for the bifunctional electrocatalytic activity of our material. PMID:25849787

  8. Carrier effects of active carbon for methanol carbonylation with supported transition metal catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, K.; Omata, K.; Yagita, H.

    1996-10-01

    Transition metals such as nickel or noble metals showed excellent catalytic activities for the vapor phase carbonylation of methanol to acetic acid. Reaction proceeded via the carbonylation of methanol to methyl acetate and its successive carbonylation to acetic acid anhydride followed by the hydrolysis. Under slightly pressurized conditions and at around 250{degrees}C methanol was completely carbonylated to acetic acid with the selectivity of 97% or higher. Also, other group 8 metals including noble metals showed excellent catalytic activity only when they were supported on active carbon, whose activity, ordered by strength of metal-halogen bonding showed a volcano-shape relationship with the peak at Rh. The role of active carbon as the active carrier was clarified by kinetics and catalyst characterization which showed that active carbon promoted the reductive elimination of intermediate for acetic acid formation by donating electron from carbon to nickel species.

  9. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  10. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm-2) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst.

  11. Hierarchically porous carbons with optimized nitrogen doping as highly active electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Wei; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Brüller, Sebastian; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Development of efficient, low-cost and stable electrocatalysts as the alternative to platinum for the oxygen reduction reaction is of significance for many important electrochemical devices, such as fuel cells, metal-air batteries and chlor-alkali electrolysers. Here we report a highly active nitrogen-doped, carbon-based, metal-free oxygen reduction reaction electrocatalyst, prepared by a hard-templating synthesis, for which nitrogen-enriched aromatic polymers and colloidal silica are used as precursor and template, respectively, followed by ammonia activation. Our protocol allows for the simultaneous optimization of both porous structures and surface functionalities of nitrogen-doped carbons. Accordingly, the prepared catalysts show the highest oxygen reduction reaction activity (half-wave potential of 0.85 V versus reversible hydrogen electrode with a low loading of 0.1 mg cm(-2)) in alkaline media among all reported metal-free catalysts. Significantly, when used for constructing the air electrode of zinc-air battery, our metal-free catalyst outperforms the state-of the-art platinum-based catalyst. PMID:25229121

  12. REPEATED REDUCTIVE AND OXIDATIVE TREATMENTS ON GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fenton oxidation and Fenton oxidation preceded by reduction solutions were applied to granular activated carbon (GAC) to chemically regenerate the adsorbent. No adsorbate was present on the GAC so physicochemical effects from chemically aggressive regeneration of the carbon coul...

  13. Metal artifacts reduction in x-ray CT based on segmentation and forward-projection.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Shoukat; Fu, Jian; Fan, Dekai

    2014-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a powerful clinical diagnosis tool and has been used widely in many clinical and biological settings. Metal artifacts, caused by high density implants, are commonly encountered in clinical CT applications, thereby affecting the detection of abnormal structures and undermining CT's diagnostic value. In this paper, we developed a metal artifact reduction approach based on image segmentation and forward-projection. We further demonstrate the usefulness of our approach by using a biomedical specimen consisting of muscles, bones and metals. Our aim is to remove the inaccurate metal artifact pixels in the original CT slices and exactly reconstruct the soft-tissue using the forward projections with no metal information. During the reconstruction, artifacts are reduced by replacing the metal projection using the forward projection. The presented work is of interest for CT biomedical applications.

  14. Ph(i-PrO)SiH2: An Exceptional Reductant for Metal-Catalyzed Hydrogen Atom Transfers.

    PubMed

    Obradors, Carla; Martinez, Ruben M; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2016-04-13

    We report the discovery of an outstanding reductant for metal-catalyzed radical hydrofunctionalization reactions. Observations of unexpected silane solvolysis distributions in the HAT-initiated hydrogenation of alkenes reveal that phenylsilane is not the kinetically preferred reductant in many of these transformations. Instead, isopropoxy(phenyl)silane forms under the reaction conditions, suggesting that alcohols function as important silane ligands to promote the formation of metal hydrides. Study of its reactivity showed that isopropoxy(phenyl)silane is an exceptionally efficient stoichiometric reductant, and it is now possible to significantly decrease catalyst loadings, lower reaction temperatures, broaden functional group tolerance, and use diverse, aprotic solvents in iron- and manganese-catalyzed hydrofunctionalizations. As representative examples, we have improved the yields and rates of alkene reduction, hydration, hydroamination, and conjugate addition. Discovery of this broadly applicable, chemoselective, and solvent-versatile reagent should allow an easier interface with existing radical reactions. Finally, isotope-labeling experiments rule out the alternative hypothesis of hydrogen atom transfer from a redox-active β-diketonate ligand in the HAT step. Instead, initial HAT from a metal hydride to directly generate a carbon-centered radical appears to be the most reasonable hypothesis. PMID:26984323

  15. Immunologically active metallic ion-containing polysaccharides of Achyrocline satureioides.

    PubMed

    Puhlmann, J; Knaus, U; Tubaro, L; Schaefer, W; Wagner, H

    1992-08-01

    Two homogeneous, metallic ion-containing pectic polysaccharides with mean M(r)s of 7600 and 15,000 were isolated from dried aerial parts of Achyrocline satureioides by anion exchange column chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B and gel filtration column chromatography on Fractogel TSK HW-50 (S). The structures, as determined by methylation analysis, carboxyl reduction, and partial acid hydrolysis, were shown to be rhamnogalacturonans. Both pectins show a pronounced anticomplementary effect in vitro. The larger carbohydrate AS 4 of higher M(r) exerts anti-inflammatory activity and a strong enhancement of phagocytosis in vivo.

  16. Porous silicon based anode material formed using metal reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Masarapu, Charan; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbong; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Sujeet; Lopez, Herman A.

    2015-09-22

    A porous silicon based material comprising porous crystalline elemental silicon formed by reducing silicon dioxide with a reducing metal in a heating process followed by acid etching is used to construct negative electrode used in lithium ion batteries. Gradual temperature heating ramp(s) with optional temperature steps can be used to perform the heating process. The porous silicon formed has a high surface area from about 10 m.sup.2/g to about 200 m.sup.2/g and is substantially free of carbon. The negative electrode formed can have a discharge specific capacity of at least 1800 mAh/g at rate of C/3 discharged from 1.5V to 0.005V against lithium with in some embodiments loading levels ranging from about 1.4 mg/cm.sup.2 to about 3.5 mg/cm.sup.2. In some embodiments, the porous silicon can be coated with a carbon coating or blended with carbon nanofibers or other conductive carbon material.

  17. MR Image Based Approach for Metal Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For decades, computed tomography (CT) images have been widely used to discover valuable anatomical information. Metallic implants such as dental fillings cause severe streaking artifacts which significantly degrade the quality of CT images. In this paper, we propose a new method for metal-artifact reduction using complementary magnetic resonance (MR) images. The method exploits the possibilities which arise from the use of emergent trimodality systems. The proposed algorithm corrects reconstructed CT images. The projected data which is affected by dental fillings is detected and the missing projections are replaced with data obtained from a corresponding MR image. A simulation study was conducted in order to compare the reconstructed images with images reconstructed through linear interpolation, which is a common metal-artifact reduction technique. The results show that the proposed method is successful in reducing severe metal artifacts without introducing significant amount of secondary artifacts. PMID:24302860

  18. Partial and complete reduction of O2 by hydrogen on transition metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, Denise; Nilekar, Anand Udaykumar; Xu, Ye; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2010-01-01

    The metal-catalyzed reduction of di-oxygen (O{sub 2}) by hydrogen is at the heart of direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) and power generation by proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Despite its apparent simplicity, how the reaction proceeds on different metals is not yet well understood. We present a systematic study of O{sub 2} reduction on the (111) facets of eight transition metals (Rh, Ir, Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au) based on periodic density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations. Analysis of ten surface elementary reaction steps suggests three selectivity regimes as a function of the binding energy of atomic oxygen (BEO), delineated by the opposite demands to catalyze O-O bond scission and O-H bond formation: The dissociative adsorption of O{sub 2} prevails on Ni, Rh, Ir, and Cu; the complete reduction to water via associative (peroxyl, peroxide, and aquoxyl) mechanisms prevails on Pd, Pt, and Ag; and HOOH formation prevails on Au. The reducing power of hydrogen is decreased electrochemically by increasing the electrode potential. This hinders the hydrogenation of oxygen species and shifts the optimal selectivity for water to less reactive metals. Our results point to the important role of the intrinsic reactivity of metals in the selectivity of O{sub 2} reduction, provide a unified basis for understanding the metal-catalyzed reduction of O{sub 2} to H{sub 2}O and HOOH, and offer useful insights for identifying new catalysts for desired oxygen reduction products.

  19. N,P-Codoped Carbon Networks as Efficient Metal-free Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Qu, Liangti; Shi, Gaoquan; Liu, Jiangyong; Chen, Jianfeng; Dai, Liming

    2016-02-01

    The high cost and scarcity of noble metal catalysts, such as Pt, have hindered the hydrogen production from electrochemical water splitting, the oxygen reduction in fuel cells and batteries. Herein, we developed a simple template-free approach to three-dimensional porous carbon networks codoped with nitrogen and phosphorus by pyrolysis of a supermolecular aggregate of self-assembled melamine, phytic acid, and graphene oxide (MPSA/GO). The pyrolyzed MPSA/GO acted as the first metal-free bifunctional catalyst with high activities for both oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution. Zn-air batteries with the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO air electrode showed a high peak power density (310 W g(-1) ) and an excellent durability. Thus, the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO is a promising bifunctional catalyst for renewable energy technologies, particularly regenerative fuel cells. PMID:26709954

  20. N,P-Codoped Carbon Networks as Efficient Metal-free Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jintao; Qu, Liangti; Shi, Gaoquan; Liu, Jiangyong; Chen, Jianfeng; Dai, Liming

    2016-02-01

    The high cost and scarcity of noble metal catalysts, such as Pt, have hindered the hydrogen production from electrochemical water splitting, the oxygen reduction in fuel cells and batteries. Herein, we developed a simple template-free approach to three-dimensional porous carbon networks codoped with nitrogen and phosphorus by pyrolysis of a supermolecular aggregate of self-assembled melamine, phytic acid, and graphene oxide (MPSA/GO). The pyrolyzed MPSA/GO acted as the first metal-free bifunctional catalyst with high activities for both oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution. Zn-air batteries with the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO air electrode showed a high peak power density (310 W g(-1) ) and an excellent durability. Thus, the pyrolyzed MPSA/GO is a promising bifunctional catalyst for renewable energy technologies, particularly regenerative fuel cells.

  1. Solid state reduction of chromium (VI) pollution for Al2O3-Cr metal ceramics application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hekai; Fang, Minghao; Huang, Zhaohui; Liu, Yangai; Tang, Hao; Min, Xin; Wu, Xiaowen

    2016-04-01

    Reduction of chromium (VI) from Na2CrO4 through aluminothermic reaction and fabrication of metal-ceramic materials from the reduction products have been investigated in this study. Na2CrO4 could be successfully reduced into micrometer-sized Cr particles in a flowing Ar atmosphere in presence of Al powder. The conversion ratio of Na2CrO4 to metallic Cr attained 96.16% efficiency. Al2O3-Cr metal-ceramic with different Cr content (5 wt%, 10 wt%, 15 wt%, 20 wt%) were further prepared from the reduction product Al2O3-Cr composite powder, and aluminum oxide nanopowder via pressure-less sintering. The phase composition, microstructure and mechanical properties of metal-ceramic composites were characterized to ensure the potential of the Al2O3-Cr composite powder to form ceramic materials. The highest relative density and bending strength can reach 93.4% and 205 MP, respectively. The results indicated that aluminothermic reduction of chromium (VI) for metal-ceramics application is a potential approach to remove chromium (VI) pollutant from the environment.

  2. Assessment of Soft Vane and Metal Foam Engine Noise Reduction Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michael G.; Parrott, Tony L.; Sutliff, Daniel L.; Hughes, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Two innovative fan-noise reduction concepts developed by NASA are presented - soft vanes and over-the-rotor metal foam liners. Design methodologies are described for each concept. Soft vanes are outlet guide vanes with internal, resonant chambers that communicate with the exterior aeroacoustic environment via a porous surface. They provide acoustic absorption via viscous losses generated by interaction of unsteady flows with the internal solid structure. Over-the-rotor metal foam liners installed at or near the fan rotor axial plane provide rotor noise absorption. Both concepts also provide pressure-release surfaces that potentially inhibit noise generation. Several configurations for both concepts are evaluated with a normal incidence tube, and the results are used to guide designs for implementation in two NASA fan rigs. For soft vanes, approximately 1 to 2 dB of broadband inlet and aft-radiated fan noise reduction is achieved. For over-the-rotor metal foam liners, up to 3 dB of fan noise reduction is measured in the low-speed fan rig, but minimal reduction is measured in the high-speed fan rig. These metal foam liner results are compared with a static engine test, in which inlet sound power level reductions up to 5 dB were measured. Brief plans for further development are also provided.

  3. Sulfur-doped graphene as an efficient metal-free cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi; Yao, Zhen; Li, Guifa; Fang, Guoyong; Nie, Huagui; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Xuemei; Chen, Xi'an; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-01-24

    Tailoring the electronic arrangement of graphene by doping is a practical strategy for producing significantly improved materials for the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells (FCs). Recent studies have proven that the carbon materials doped with the elements, which have the larger (N) or smaller (P, B) electronegative atoms than carbon such as N-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs), P-doped graphite layers and B-doped CNTs, have also shown pronounced catalytic activity. Herein, we find that the graphenes doped with the elements, which have the similar electronegativity with carbon such as sulfur and selenium, can also exhibit better catalytic activity than the commercial Pt/C in alkaline media, indicating that these doped graphenes hold great potential for a substitute for Pt-based catalysts in FCs. The experimental results are believed to be significant because they not only give further insight into the ORR mechanism of these metal-free doped carbon materials, but also open a way to fabricate other new low-cost NPMCs with high electrocatalytic activity by a simple, economical, and scalable approach for real FC applications. PMID:22201338

  4. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  5. Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Activity In Acid By Tin-Oxide Supported Au Nanoparticle Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Baker,W.; Pietron, J.; Teliska, M.; Bouwman, P.; Ramaker, D.; Swider-Lyons, K.

    2006-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on hydrous tin-oxide (Au-SnO{sub x}) are active for the four-electron oxygen reduction reaction in an acid electrolyte. The unique electrocatalytic of the Au-SnO is confirmed by the low amount of peroxide detected with rotating ring-disk electrode voltammetry and Koutecky-Levich analysis. In comparison, 10 wt % Au supported on Vulcan carbon and SnO{sub x} catalysts both produce significant peroxide in the acid electrolyte, indicating only a two-electron reduction reaction. Characterization of the Au-SnO{sub x} catalyst reveals a high-surface area, amorphous support with 1.7 nm gold metal particles. The high catalytic activity of the Au-SnO is attributed to metal support interactions. The results demonstrate a possible path to non-Pt catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes.

  6. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    PubMed Central

    Church, Clinton D; Wilkin, Richard T; Alpers, Charles N; Rye, Robert O; McCleskey, R Blaine

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2–3 ‰ heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. PMID:17956615

  7. Microbial sulfate reduction and metal attenuation in pH 4 acid mine water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, C.D.; Wilkin, R.T.; Alpers, C.N.; Rye, R.O.; Blaine, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    Sediments recovered from the flooded mine workings of the Penn Mine, a Cu-Zn mine abandoned since the early 1960s, were cultured for anaerobic bacteria over a range of pH (4.0 to 7.5). The molecular biology of sediments and cultures was studied to determine whether sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) were active in moderately acidic conditions present in the underground mine workings. Here we document multiple, independent analyses and show evidence that sulfate reduction and associated metal attenuation are occurring in the pH-4 mine environment. Water-chemistry analyses of the mine water reveal: (1) preferential complexation and precipitation by H2S of Cu and Cd, relative to Zn; (2) stable isotope ratios of 34S/32S and 18O/16O in dissolved SO4 that are 2-3 ??? heavier in the mine water, relative to those in surface waters; (3) reduction/oxidation conditions and dissolved gas concentrations consistent with conditions to support anaerobic processes such as sulfate reduction. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analyses of sediment show 1.5-micrometer, spherical ZnS precipitates. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analyses of Penn Mine sediment show a high biomass level with a moderately diverse community structure composed primarily of iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Cultures of sediment from the mine produced dissolved sulfide at pH values near 7 and near 4, forming precipitates of either iron sulfide or elemental sulfur. DGGE coupled with sequence and phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA gene segments showed populations of Desulfosporosinus and Desulfitobacterium in Penn Mine sediment and laboratory cultures. ?? 2007 Church et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. In-plane graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiao; Sun, Caixia; Du, Aijun; Dou, Shixue; Li, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Exploiting metal-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and understanding their catalytic mechanisms are vital for the development of fuel cells (FCs). Our study has demonstrated that in-plane heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride (G/BN) can serve as an efficient metal-free catalyst for the ORR, in which the C-N interfaces of G/BN heterostructures act as reactive sites. The formation of water at the heterointerface is both energetically and kinetically favorable via a four-electron pathway. Moreover, the water formed can be easily released from the heterointerface, and the catalytically active sites can be regenerated for the next cycle. Since G/BN heterostructures with controlled domain sizes have been successfully synthesized in recent reports (e.g. Nat. Nanotechnol., 2013, 8, 119), our results highlight the great potential of such heterostructures as a promising metal-free catalyst for the ORR in FCs. PMID:27396486

  9. Breast milk metal ion levels in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nelis, Raymond; de Waal Malefijt, Jan; Gosens, Taco

    2013-01-01

    Metal-on-metal resurfacing arthroplasty of the hip has been used increasingly over the last 10 years in younger active patients. The dissolution of the metal wear particles results in measurable increases in cobalt and chromium ions in the serum and urine of patients with a metal-on-metal bearing. We measured the cobalt, chromium, and molybdenum ion levels in urine; serum; and breast milk in a young and active patient with a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis after a pathologic fracture of the femoral neck. Metal-on-metal hip prosthesis leads to increasing levels of molybdenum in breast milk in the short-term follow-up. There are no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt ions in breast milk. Besides the already known elevated concentrations in serum of chromium and cobalt after implantation of a metal-on-metal hip prosthesis, we found no increasing levels of chromium and cobalt in urine. PMID:22868068

  10. In-plane graphene/boron-nitride heterostructures as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiao; Sun, Caixia; Du, Aijun; Dou, Shixue; Li, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Exploiting metal-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and understanding their catalytic mechanisms are vital for the development of fuel cells (FCs). Our study has demonstrated that in-plane heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride (G/BN) can serve as an efficient metal-free catalyst for the ORR, in which the C-N interfaces of G/BN heterostructures act as reactive sites. The formation of water at the heterointerface is both energetically and kinetically favorable via a four-electron pathway. Moreover, the water formed can be easily released from the heterointerface, and the catalytically active sites can be regenerated for the next cycle. Since G/BN heterostructures with controlled domain sizes have been successfully synthesized in recent reports (e.g. Nat. Nanotechnol., 2013, 8, 119), our results highlight the great potential of such heterostructures as a promising metal-free catalyst for the ORR in FCs.Exploiting metal-free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and understanding their catalytic mechanisms are vital for the development of fuel cells (FCs). Our study has demonstrated that in-plane heterostructures of graphene and boron nitride (G/BN) can serve as an efficient metal-free catalyst for the ORR, in which the C-N interfaces of G/BN heterostructures act as reactive sites. The formation of water at the heterointerface is both energetically and kinetically favorable via a four-electron pathway. Moreover, the water formed can be easily released from the heterointerface, and the catalytically active sites can be regenerated for the next cycle. Since G/BN heterostructures with controlled domain sizes have been successfully synthesized in recent reports (e.g. Nat. Nanotechnol., 2013, 8, 119), our results highlight the great potential of such heterostructures as a promising metal-free catalyst for the ORR in FCs. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03288e

  11. Metal artifact reduction in x-ray computed tomography (CT) by constrained optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaomeng; Wang Jing; Xing Lei

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: The streak artifacts caused by metal implants have long been recognized as a problem that limits various applications of CT imaging. In this work, the authors propose an iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm based on constrained optimization. Methods: After the shape and location of metal objects in the image domain is determined automatically by the binary metal identification algorithm and the segmentation of ''metal shadows'' in projection domain is done, constrained optimization is used for image reconstruction. It minimizes a predefined function that reflects a priori knowledge of the image, subject to the constraint that the estimated projection data are within a specified tolerance of the available metal-shadow-excluded projection data, with image non-negativity enforced. The minimization problem is solved through the alternation of projection-onto-convex-sets and the steepest gradient descent of the objective function. The constrained optimization algorithm is evaluated with a penalized smoothness objective. Results: The study shows that the proposed method is capable of significantly reducing metal artifacts, suppressing noise, and improving soft-tissue visibility. It outperforms the FBP-type methods and ART and EM methods and yields artifacts-free images. Conclusions: Constrained optimization is an effective way to deal with CT reconstruction with embedded metal objects. Although the method is presented in the context of metal artifacts, it is applicable to general ''missing data'' image reconstruction problems.

  12. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds.

  13. Antischistosomal Activity of Oxindolimine-Metal Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dario, Bruno S.; Couto, Ricardo A. A.; Pinto, Pedro L. S.; da Costa Ferreira, Ana M.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of oxindole-copper and -zinc complex derivatives have been reported as compounds with efficient proapoptotic activity toward different tumor cells (e.g., neuroblastomas, melanomas, monocytes). Here we assessed the efficacy of synthesized oxindole-copper(II), -zinc(II), and -vanadyl (VO2+) complexes against adult Schistosoma mansoni worms. The copper(II) complexes (50% inhibitory concentrations of 30 to 45 μM) demonstrated greater antischistosomal properties than the analogous zinc and vanadyl complexes regarding lethality, reduction of motor activity, and oviposition. PMID:26239976

  14. Binding of carbon dioxide to metal macrocycles: Toward a mechanistic understanding of electrochemical and photochemical carbon dioxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, E.

    1993-07-01

    Efforts were made to find effective catalysts for photochemical and electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}. We are studying the factors controlling excited-state lifetimes, electron-transfer rates to mediators/catalysts, properties of reduced mediators, binding of small molecules to reduced mediators, and reactivity of the mediators to yield the desired products. This document describes some of the results of binding on CO{sub 2} to metal macrocycles. The electrocatalytic activity of cobalt macrocycle complexes in reduction of CO{sub 2} in CO{sub 2}-saturated water at the Hg electrode is being studied. We are ready to study the mechanism and kinetics of the photochemical CO{sub 2} reduction in order to design more efficient photo-energy conversion systems. 19 refs.

  15. Binding of carbon dioxide to metal macrocycles: Toward a mechanistic understanding of electrochemical and photochemical carbon dioxide reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, E.

    1993-01-01

    Efforts were made to find effective catalysts for photochemical and electrochemical reduction of CO[sub 2]. We are studying the factors controlling excited-state lifetimes, electron-transfer rates to mediators/catalysts, properties of reduced mediators, binding of small molecules to reduced mediators, and reactivity of the mediators to yield the desired products. This document describes some of the results of binding on CO[sub 2] to metal macrocycles. The electrocatalytic activity of cobalt macrocycle complexes in reduction of CO[sub 2] in CO[sub 2]-saturated water at the Hg electrode is being studied. We are ready to study the mechanism and kinetics of the photochemical CO[sub 2] reduction in order to design more efficient photo-energy conversion systems. 19 refs.

  16. RISK REDUCTION VIA GREENER SYNTHESIS OF NOBLE METAL NANOSTRUCTURES AND NANOCOMPOSITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aqueous preparation of nanoparticles using vitamins B2 and C which can function both as reducing and capping agents are described. Bulk and shape-controlled synthesis of noble nanostructures via microwave (MW)-assisted spontaneous reduction of noble metal salts using a-D-glucose,...

  17. Method for Synthesizing Metal Nanowires in Anodic Alumina Membranes Using Solid State Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez-Inesta, Maria M (Inventor); Feliciano, Jennie (Inventor); Quinones-Fontalvo, Leonel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The invention proposes a novel method for the fabrication of regular arrays of MNWs using solid-state reduction (SSR). Using this method copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and palladium (Pd) nanowire (NWs) arrays were synthesized using anodic alumina membranes (AAMs) as templates. Depending on the metal loading used the NWs reached different diameters.

  18. The effect of carbon on phosphate reduction. [in lunar soil and breccia metal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friel, J. J.; Goldstein, J. I.; Romig, A. D., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Several experiments were performed in order to evaluate the effect of carbon on phosphate reduction in synthetic systems. It was attempted to simulate in the experiments conditions occurring during lunar impact processes, but without shock pressure. Temperature, oxygen fugacity, and bulk chemistry were evaluated separately in order to determine the conditions which are suitable for carbon reduction. It appears on the basis of the results of the reported investigation that carbon can be an effective reducing agent during reheating events such as those encountered by lunar soils and breccias. Phosphate reduction may be viewed as a two-step process in which carbon is mobilized as CO during heating and preferentially dissolved in the metal phase. It then acts as a reducing agent on cooling. Gas phase transport and diffusion of carbon in metal are sufficiently rapid to allow uniform carbon distribution both within and between metal grains. The availability of metal from meteorites and carbon from the solar wind is probably sufficient to make reduction by carbon a significant process on the lunar surface.

  19. MASS TRANSPORT EFFECTS ON THE KINETICS OF NITROBENZENE REDUCTION BY IRON METAL. (R827117)

    EPA Science Inventory

    To evaluate the importance of external mass transport on the overall rates of
    contaminant reduction by iron metal (Fe0), we have compared measured
    rates of surface reaction for nitrobenzene (ArNO2) to estimated rates
    of external mass transport...

  20. Removal of oxides from alkali metal melts by reductive titration to electrical resistance-change end points

    DOEpatents

    Tsang, Floris Y.

    1980-01-01

    Alkali metal oxides dissolved in alkali metal melts are reduced with soluble metals which are converted to insoluble oxides. The end points of the reduction is detected as an increase in electrical resistance across an alkali metal ion-conductive membrane interposed between the oxide-containing melt and a material capable of accepting the alkali metal ions from the membrane when a difference in electrical potential, of the appropriate polarity, is established across it. The resistance increase results from blocking of the membrane face by ions of the excess reductant metal, to which the membrane is essentially non-conductive.

  1. Metal-free Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin as oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gyutae; Park, Joohyuk; Kim, Sun Tai; Shin, Dong-bin; Park, Noejung; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysts facilitating oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital components in advanced fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Here we report Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin and apply these easily scalable materials as metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR. These carbon nanosheets demonstrate highly comparable catalytic activity for ORR as well as better durability than commercial Vulcan carbon supported Pt catalysts in alkaline media. Physico-chemical characterization and theoretical calculations suggest that proper combination of graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen species with more exposed edge sites effectively facilitates a formation of superoxide, [O2(ad)](-), via one-electron transfer, thus increasing catalytic activities for ORR. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to expose more nitrogen doped edge sites by irregular stacked small sheets in developing better electrocatalysts for Zn-air batteries. These desirable architectures are embodied by an amphiphlilic gelatin mediated compatible synthetic strategy between hydrophobic carbon and aqueous water.

  2. Metal-free Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin as oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gyutae; Park, Joohyuk; Kim, Sun Tai; Shin, Dong-bin; Park, Noejung; Kim, Youngsik; Lee, Jang-Soo; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysts facilitating oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are vital components in advanced fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Here we report Ketjenblack incorporated nitrogen-doped carbon sheets derived from gelatin and apply these easily scalable materials as metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR. These carbon nanosheets demonstrate highly comparable catalytic activity for ORR as well as better durability than commercial Vulcan carbon supported Pt catalysts in alkaline media. Physico-chemical characterization and theoretical calculations suggest that proper combination of graphitic and pyridinic nitrogen species with more exposed edge sites effectively facilitates a formation of superoxide, [O2(ad)](-), via one-electron transfer, thus increasing catalytic activities for ORR. Our results demonstrate a novel strategy to expose more nitrogen doped edge sites by irregular stacked small sheets in developing better electrocatalysts for Zn-air batteries. These desirable architectures are embodied by an amphiphlilic gelatin mediated compatible synthetic strategy between hydrophobic carbon and aqueous water. PMID:24635744

  3. Tailorable chiroptical activity of metallic nanospiral arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Junhong; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-02-01

    The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation together with LC circuit theory illustrates that the UV irradiation is mainly adsorbed in the metal and the visible is preferentially scattered by the AgNSs, accounting for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction. This work contributes to broadening the horizons in understanding and engineering chiroptical responses, primarily desired for developing a wide range of potential chiroplasmonic applications.The engineering of the chiroptical activity of the emerging chiral metamaterial, metallic nanospirals, is in its infancy. We utilize glancing angle deposition (GLAD) to facilely sculpture the helical structure of silver nanospirals (AgNSs), so that the scope of chiroptical engineering factors is broadened to include the spiral growth of homochiral AgNSs, the combination of left- and right-handed helical chirality to create heterochiral AgNSs, and the coil-axis alignment of the heterochiral AgNSs. It leads to flexible control over the chiroptical activity of AgNS arrays with respect to the sign, resonance wavelength and amplitude of circular dichroism (CD) in the UV and visible regime. The UV chiroptical mode has a distinct response from the visible mode. Finite element simulation

  4. Selenite reduction by the obligate aerobic bacterium Comamonas testosteroni S44 isolated from a metal-contaminated soil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in most organisms but has to be carefully handled since there is a thin line between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Many bacteria have the ability to reduce selenite (Se(IV)) and (or) selenate (Se(VI)) to red elemental selenium that is less toxic. Results A strictly aerobic bacterium, Comamonas testosteroni S44, previously isolated from metal(loid)-contaminated soil in southern China, reduced Se(IV) to red selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 200 nm. Both energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX or EDS) and EDS Elemental Mapping showed no element Se and SeNPs were produced inside cells whereas Se(IV) was reduced to red-colored selenium in the cytoplasmic fraction in presence of NADPH. Tungstate inhibited Se(VI) but not Se(IV) reduction, indicating the Se(IV)-reducing determinant does not contain molybdenum as co-factor. Strain S44 was resistant to multiple heavy and transition metal(loid)s such as Se(IV), As(III), Cu(II), and Cd(II) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 100 mM, 20 mM, 4 mM, and 0.5 mM, respectively. Disruption of iscR encoding a transcriptional regulator negatively impacted cellular growth and subsequent resistance to multiple heavy metal(loid)s. Conclusions C. testosteroni S44 could be very useful for bioremediation in heavy metal(loid) polluted soils due to the ability to both reduce toxic Se(VI) and Se(IV) to non-toxic Se (0) under aerobic conditions and to tolerate multiple heavy and transition metals. IscR appears to be an activator to regulate genes involved in resistance to heavy or transition metal(loid)s but not for genes responsible for Se(IV) reduction. PMID:25098921

  5. Metal-Organic Framework Derived Hierarchically Porous Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanostructures as Novel Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhou, Yazhou; Yang, Guohai; Jeon, Ju Won; Lemmon, John P.; Du, Dan; Nune, Satish K.; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-10-01

    The hierarchically porous nitrogen-doped carbon materials, derived from nitrogen-containing isoreticular metal-organic framework-3 (IRMOF-3) through direct carbonization, exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity in alkaline solution for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This high activity is attributed to the 10 presence of high percentage of quaternary and pyridinic nitrogen, the high surface area as well as good conductivity. When IRMOF-3 was carbonized at 950 °C (CIRMOF-3-950), it showed four-electron reduction pathway for ORR and exhibited better stability (about 78.5% current density was maintained) than platinum/carbon (Pt/C) in the current durability test. In addition, CIRMOF-3-950 presented high selectivity to cathode reactions compared to commercial Pt/C.

  6. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site.

    PubMed

    Buss, Joshua A; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  7. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, Joshua A.; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  8. Four-electron deoxygenative reductive coupling of carbon monoxide at a single metal site.

    PubMed

    Buss, Joshua A; Agapie, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of the fossil fuels that are both central to modern life and problematic: their use increases atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases, and their availability is geopolitically constrained. Using carbon dioxide as a feedstock to produce synthetic fuels might, in principle, alleviate these concerns. Although many homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts convert carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, further deoxygenative coupling of carbon monoxide to generate useful multicarbon products is challenging. Molybdenum and vanadium nitrogenases are capable of converting carbon monoxide into hydrocarbons under mild conditions, using discrete electron and proton sources. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon monoxide on copper catalysts also uses a combination of electrons and protons, while the industrial Fischer-Tropsch process uses dihydrogen as a combined source of electrons and electrophiles for carbon monoxide coupling at high temperatures and pressures. However, these enzymatic and heterogeneous systems are difficult to probe mechanistically. Molecular catalysts have been studied extensively to investigate the elementary steps by which carbon monoxide is deoxygenated and coupled, but a single metal site that can efficiently induce the required scission of carbon-oxygen bonds and generate carbon-carbon bonds has not yet been documented. Here we describe a molybdenum compound, supported by a terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, that activates and cleaves the strong carbon-oxygen bond of carbon monoxide, enacts carbon-carbon coupling, and spontaneously dissociates the resulting fragment. This complex four-electron transformation is enabled by the terphenyl-diphosphine ligand, which acts as an electron reservoir and exhibits the coordinative flexibility needed to stabilize the different intermediates involved in the overall reaction sequence. We anticipate that these design elements might help in the development of efficient catalysts for

  9. The potential for metal release by reductive dissolution of weathered mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeta, I.; Ptacek, C. J.; Blowes, D. W.; Jambor, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Remediation programs proposed for decommissioned sulphide tailings may include the addition of a cover layer rich in organic-carbon material such as sewage sludge or composted municipal waste. These covers are designed to consume oxygen and prevent the oxidation of underlying sulphide minerals. The aerobic and anaerobic degradation of such organic-carbon-rich waste can release soluble organic compounds to infiltrating precipitation water. In laboratory experiments, and in natural settings, biotic and abiotic interactions between similar dissolved organic compounds and ferric-bearing secondary minerals have been observed to result in the reductive dissolution of ferric (oxy)hydroxides and the release of ferrous iron to pore waters. In weathered tailings, oxidation of sulphide minerals typically results in the formation of abundant ferric-bearing secondary precipitates near the tailings surface. These secondary precipitates may contain high concentrations of potentially toxic metals, either coprecipitated with or adsorbed onto ferric (oxy)hydroxides. Reductive dissolution reactions, resulting from the addition of the organic-carbon covers, may remobilize metals previously attenuated near the tailings surface. To assess the potential for metal release to tailings pore water by reductive dissolution reactions, a laboratory study was conducted on weathered tailings collected from the Nickel Rim mine tailings impoundment near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. This site was selected for study because it is representative of many tailings sites. Mineralogical study indicates that sulphide minerals originally present in the vadose zone at the time of tailings deposition have been replaced by a series of secondary precipitates. The most abundant secondary minerals are goethite, gypsum and jarosite. Scanning electron microscopy, coupled with elemental analyses by X-ray energy dispersion analysis, and electron microprobe analysis indicate that trace metals including Ni, Cr and Cu are

  10. Silage supports sulfate reduction in the treatment of metals- and sulfate-containing waste waters.

    PubMed

    Wakeman, Kathryn D; Erving, Leena; Riekkola-Vanhanen, Marja L; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2010-09-01

    Silage was used as source of carbon and electrons for enrichment of silage-degrading and sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) from boreal, acidic, metals-containing peat-bog samples and to support their use in batch and semi-batch systems in treatment of synthetic waste water. Sulfidogenic silage utilization resulted in a rapid decrease in lactate concentrations; concentrations of acetate, butyrate and propionate increased concomitantly. Synthetic waste water consisting of Mn, Mg and Fe (II) ions inhibited sulfate reduction at concentrations of 6 g/l, 8 g/l and 1 g/l respectively. During treatment, Mn and Mg ions remained in solution while Fe ions partially precipitated. Up to 87 mg sulfate was reduced per gram of silage. Sulfate reduction rates of 34, 22 and 6 mg/l/day were obtained at temperatures of 30, 20 and 9 °C respectively. In semi-batch reactors operated at low pH, the iron precipitation capacity was controlled by sulfate reduction rates and by partial loss of hydrogen sulfide to the gas phase. Passive reactor systems should, therefore, be operated at neutral pH. Metals tolerant, silage-fermenting (predominantly species belonging to genus Clostridium) and sulfate reducing bacteria (including a species similar to the psychrotolerant Desulfovibrio arcticus) were obtained from the peat bog samples. This work demonstrates that silage supports sulfate reduction and can be used as a low cost carbon and electron source for SRB in treatment of metals-containing waste water.

  11. Drag reduction using metallic engineered surfaces with highly ordered hierarchical topographies: nanostructures on micro-riblets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taekyung; Shin, Ryung; Jung, Myungki; Lee, Jinhyung; Park, Changsu; Kang, Shinill

    2016-03-01

    Durable drag-reduction surfaces have recently received much attention, due to energy-saving and power-consumption issues associated with harsh environment applications, such as those experienced by piping infrastructure, ships, aviation, underwater vehicles, and high-speed ground vehicles. In this study, a durable, metallic surface with highly ordered hierarchical structures was used to enhance drag-reduction properties, by combining two passive drag-reduction strategies: an air-layer effect induced by nanostructures and secondary vortex generation by micro-riblet structures. The nanostructures and micro-riblet structures were designed to increase slip length. The top-down fabrication method used to form the metallic hierarchical structures combined laser interference lithography, photolithography, thermal reflow, nanoimprinting, and pulse-reverse-current electrochemical deposition. The surfaces were formed from nickel, which has high hardness and corrosion resistance, making it suitable for use in harsh environments. The drag-reduction properties of various metal surfaces were investigated based on the surface structure: a bare surface, a nanostructured surface, a micro-riblet surface, and a hierarchically structured surface of nanostructures on micro-riblets.

  12. Engineering MerR for Sequestration and MerA for Reduction of Toxic Metals and Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Anne O. Summers

    2008-12-15

    The objectives of this project were (1) to alter a metalloregulatory protein (MerR) so that it would bind other toxic metals or radionuclides with similar affinity so that the engineered protein itself and/or bacteria expressing it could be deployed in the environment to specifically sequester such metals and (2) to alter the mercuric reductase, MerA, to reduce radionuclides and render them less mobile. Both projects had a basic science component. In the first case, such information about MerR illuminates how proteins discriminate very similar metals/elements. In the second case, information about MerA reveals the criteria for transmission of reducing equivalents from NADPH to redox-active metals. The work involved genetic engineering of all or parts of both proteins and examination of their resultant properties both in vivo and in vitro, the latter with biochemical and biophysical tools including equilibrium and non-equilibrium dialysis, XAFS, NMR, x-ray crystallography, and titration calorimetry. We defined the basis for metal specificity in MerR, devised a bacterial strain that sequesters Hg while growing, characterized gold reduction by MerA and the role of the metallochaperone domain of MerA, and determined the 3-D structure of MerB, the organomercurial lyase.

  13. Active flow control for Aeolian tone noise reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardin, Jay C.; Pope, D. Stuart

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the use of active flow control for the purpose of noise reduction. As a simple demonstration of such techniques, several methods for controlling the wake and resulting noise production by a cylinder in a uniform stream are evaluated numerically.

  14. Mechanochemical processing for metals and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Froes, Francis H.; Eranezhuth, Baburaj G.; Prisbrey, Keith

    2001-01-01

    A set of processes for preparing metal powders, including metal alloy powders, by ambient temperature reduction of a reducible metal compound by a reactive metal or metal hydride through mechanochemical processing. The reduction process includes milling reactants to induce and complete the reduction reaction. The preferred reducing agents include magnesium and calcium hydride powders. A process of pre-milling magnesium as a reducing agent to increase the activity of the magnesium has been established as one part of the invention.

  15. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits.

  16. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Kiana L.; Rogers, Karyn L.; Rogers, Daniel R.; Johnston, David T.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, SO42−, DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  17. Key Factors Influencing Rates of Heterotrophic Sulfate Reduction in Active Seafloor Hydrothermal Massive Sulfide Deposits.

    PubMed

    Frank, Kiana L; Rogers, Karyn L; Rogers, Daniel R; Johnston, David T; Girguis, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are thermally and geochemically dynamic habitats, and the organisms therein are subject to steep gradients in temperature and chemistry. To date, the influence of these environmental dynamics on microbial sulfate reduction has not been well constrained. Here, via multivariate experiments, we evaluate the effects of key environmental variables (temperature, pH, H2S, [Formula: see text], DOC) on sulfate reduction rates and metabolic energy yields in material recovered from a hydrothermal flange from the Grotto edifice in the Main Endeavor Field, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Sulfate reduction was measured in batch reactions across a range of physico-chemical conditions. Temperature and pH were the strongest stimuli, and maximum sulfate reduction rates were observed at 50°C and pH 6, suggesting that the in situ community of sulfate-reducing organisms in Grotto flanges may be most active in a slightly acidic and moderate thermal/chemical regime. At pH 4, sulfate reduction rates increased with sulfide concentrations most likely due to the mitigation of metal toxicity. While substrate concentrations also influenced sulfate reduction rates, energy-rich conditions muted the effect of metabolic energetics on sulfate reduction rates. We posit that variability in sulfate reduction rates reflect the response of the active microbial consortia to environmental constraints on in situ microbial physiology, toxicity, and the type and extent of energy limitation. These experiments help to constrain models of the spatial contribution of heterotrophic sulfate reduction within the complex gradients inherent to seafloor hydrothermal deposits. PMID:26733984

  18. Molybdenum carbide as alternative catalysts to precious metals for highly selective reduction of CO2 to CO.

    PubMed

    Porosoff, Marc D; Yang, Xiaofang; Boscoboinik, J Anibal; Chen, Jingguang G

    2014-06-23

    Rising atmospheric CO2 is expected to have negative effects on the global environment from its role in climate change and ocean acidification. Utilizing CO2 as a feedstock to make valuable chemicals is potentially more desirable than sequestration. A substantial reduction of CO2 levels requires a large-scale CO2 catalytic conversion process, which in turn requires the discovery of low-cost catalysts. Results from the current study demonstrate the feasibility of using the non-precious metal material molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) as an active and selective catalyst for CO2 conversion by H2.

  19. Rapid and scalable reduction of dense surface-supported metal-oxide catalyst with hydrazine vapor.

    PubMed

    Pint, Cary L; Kim, Seung Min; Stach, Eric A; Hauge, Robert H

    2009-07-28

    An efficient technique using hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) vapor as an agent for the rapid reduction of high-density layers of catalytic nanoparticles is demonstrated. With as little as 10 mTorr hydrazine bled into a thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) apparatus, efficient reduction of metal-oxide catalyst particles is achieved more rapidly than when using atomic hydrogen as the reducing agent. Postreduction catalyst imaging emphasizes the differences in nanoparticle formation under different reduction environments, with the most uniform and compact catalyst size distribution observed following hydrazine exposure. Low-temperature reduction studies suggest that as little as 15 s N(2)H(4) exposure at temperatures of 350 °C can yield a reduced catalyst layer preceding the synthesis of dense, aligned arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with uniform height. This work demonstrates a simple route toward scalable, vapor transport reduction of metal-oxide catalyst relevant to a number of catalytic applications, including the synthesis and selective synthesis of aligned SWNT arrays.

  20. Reduction of hexavalent chromium by Sphaerotilus natans a filamentous micro-organism present in activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Giannuzzi, Leda; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2008-08-15

    Wastewaters produced by various industries may contain undesirable amounts of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)), as chromate and dichromate, a hazardous metal affecting flora and animals of aquatic ecosystems as well as human health. One removal strategy comprises the microbial reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III), a less soluble chemical species that is less toxic than Cr(VI). In this work, the ability to reduce Cr(VI) of Sphaerotilus natans, a filamentous bacterium usually found in activated sludge systems, was evaluated. In aerobic conditions, S. natans was able to efficiently reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) from dichromate solutions ranging between 4.5 and 80 mg Cr(VI)l(-1) in the presence of a carbonaceous source. A simultaneous evaluation of the microbial respiratory activity inhibition was also carried out to analyze the toxic effect of Cr(VI). Cr(VI) reduction by S. natans was mathematically modeled; chromium(VI) reduction rate depended on both Cr(VI) concentration and active biomass concentration. Although it is known that S. natans removes heavy metal cations such as Cr(III) by biosorption, the ability of this micro-organism to reduce Cr(VI), which behaves as an oxyanion in aqueous solutions, is a novel finding. The distinctive capacity to reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) than remain soluble or precipitated becomes S. natans a potential micro-organism to decontaminate wastewaters.

  1. Suppression of oxygen reduction reaction activity on Pt-based electrocatalysts from ionomer incorporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinozaki, Kazuma; Morimoto, Yu; Pivovar, Bryan S.; Kocha, Shyam S.

    2016-09-01

    The impact of Nafion on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is studied for Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C catalysts using thin-film rotating disk electrode (TF-RDE) methods in 0.1 M HClO4. Ultrathin uniform catalyst layers and standardized activity measurement protocols are employed to obtain accurate and reproducible ORR activity. Nafion lowers the ORR activity which plateaus with increasing loading on Pt catalysts. Pt particle size is found not to have significant influence on the extent of the SA decrease upon Nafion incorporation. Catalysts using high surface area carbon (HSC) support exhibit attenuated activity loss resulting from lower ionomer coverage on catalyst particles located within the deep pores. The impact of metallic composition on the activity loss due to Nafion incorporation is also discussed.

  2. Response Behaviour of a Hydrogen Sensor Based on Ionic Conducting Polymer-metal Interfaces Prepared by the Chemical Reduction Method

    PubMed Central

    Sakthivel, Mariappan; Weppner, Werner

    2006-01-01

    A solid-state amperometric hydrogen sensor based on a protonated Nafion membrane and catalytic active electrode operating at room temperature was fabricated and tested. Ionic conducting polymer-metal electrode interfaces were prepared chemically by using the impregnation-reduction method. The polymer membrane was impregnated with tetra-ammine platinum chloride hydrate and the metal ions were subsequently reduced by using either sodium tetrahydroborate or potassium tetrahydroborate. The hydrogen sensing characteristics with air as reference gas is reported. The sensors were capable of detecting hydrogen concentrations from 10 ppm to 10% in nitrogen. The response time was in the range of 10-30 s and a stable linear current output was observed. The thin Pt films were characterized by XRD, Infrared Spectroscopy, Optical Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and EDAX.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of platinum-group-metal nanoparticles by using HEPES as a reductant and stabilizer.

    PubMed

    So, Man-Ho; Ho, Chi-Ming; Chen, Rong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Platinum-group-metal (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir, Pd and Pt) nanoparticles are synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) (200 mM, pH 7.4) under hydrothermal conditions (180 degrees C). Monodispersed (monodispersity: 11-15%) metal nanoparticles were obtained with an average particle size of less than 5 nm (Ru: 1.8+/-0.2, Os: 1.6+/-0.2, Rh: 4.5+/-0.5, Ir: 2.0+/-0.3, Pd: 3.8+/-0.4, Pt: 1.9+/-0.2 nm). The size, monodispersity, and stability of the as-obtained metal nanoparticles were affected by the HEPES concentration, pH of the HEPES buffer solution, and reaction temperature. HEPES with two tertiary amines (piperazine groups) and terminal hydroxyl groups can act as a reductant and stabilizer. The HEPES molecules can bind to the surface of metal nanoparticles to prevent metal nanoparticles from aggregation. These platinum-group-metal nanoparticles could be deposited onto the surface of graphite, which catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes. PMID:20512785

  4. GPU-accelerated metal artifact reduction (MAR) in FD-CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beister, M.; Prell, D.; Kyriakou, Y.; Kalender, W. A.

    2010-04-01

    Metallic implants are responsible for various artifacts in flat-detector computed tomography visible as streaks and dark areas in the reconstructed volumetric images. In this paper a novel method for a fast reduction of these metal artifacts is presented using a three-step correction procedure to approximate the missing parts of the raw data. In addition to image quality aspects, this paper deals with the problem of high correction latencies by proposing a reconstruction and correction framework, that utilizes the massive computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs). An initial volume is reconstructed, followed by a 3-dimensional metal voxel segmentation algorithm. These metal voxels allow us to identify metal-influenced detector elements by using a simplified geometric forward projection. Consequently, these areas are corrected using a 3D interpolation scheme in the raw data domain, followed by a second reconstruction. This volume is then segmented into three materials with respect to bone structures using a threshold-based algorithm. A forward projection of the obtained tissueclass model substitutes missing or corrupted attenuation values for each detector element affected by metal and is followed by a final reconstruction. The entire process including the initial reconstruction, takes less than a minute (5123 volume with 496 projections of size 1240x960) and offers significant improvements of image quality. The method was evaluated with data from two FD-CT C-arm systems (Artis Zee and Artis Zeego, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany).

  5. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens and implications for respiratory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Hans K.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Gorur, Amita; Yeo, Boon Siang; Tran, Rosalie; Melnyk, Ryan A.; Mathies, Richard A.; Auer, Manfred; Coates, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they may be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), an analog of the redox active components of humic substances. The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin-shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS, and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants, suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results provide unique direct evidence for cell wall-associated cytochromes and support MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium. PMID:22307634

  6. An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.

    2006-06-01

    Our current research represents a joint effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the University of Tennessee (UT), and Florida State University (FSU). ORNL serves as the lead institution with Dr. A.V. Palumbo responsible for project coordination, integration, and deliverables. This project is in its second year. The overall goal of our project is to provide an improved understanding of the relationships between microbial community structure, geochemistry, and metal reduction rates.

  7. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments.

  8. Metal-Catalyzed β-Functionalization of Michael Acceptors through Reductive Radical Addition Reactions.

    PubMed

    Streuff, Jan; Gansäuer, Andreas

    2015-11-23

    Transition-metal-catalyzed radical reactions are becoming increasingly important in modern organic chemistry. They offer fascinating and unconventional ways for connecting molecular fragments that are often complementary to traditional methods. In particular, reductive radical additions to α,β-unsaturated compounds have recently gained substantial attention as a result of their broad applicability in organic synthesis. This Minireview critically discusses the recent landmark achievements in this field in context with earlier reports that laid the foundation for today's developments. PMID:26471460

  9. A Highly Efficient Metal-Free Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalyst Assembled from Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jia; Sun, Haiyan; Liang, Haiyi; Ji, Hengxing; Song, Li; Gao, Chao; Xu, Hangxun

    2016-06-01

    A novel carbon-nanotube-graphene hybrid nanostructure is developed using an aerosol-assisted assembly approach. After doping with nitrogen and phosphorus, the prepared hybrid nanomaterials exhibit excellent electrocatalytic performance for oxygen reduction in both alkaline and acidic media. This research presents a continuous and low-cost route to prepare high-performance metal-free electrocatalysts while replacing Pt-based materials. PMID:27062506

  10. Photoactive Metal-Organic Framework and Its Film for Light-Driven Hydrogen Production and Carbon Dioxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pengyan; Guo, Xiangyang; Cheng, Linjuan; He, Cheng; Wang, Jian; Duan, Chunying

    2016-08-15

    The design of a new photocatalytic system and integrating the essential components in a structurally controlled manner to create artificially photosynthetic systems is high desirable. By incorporating a photoactive triphenylamine moiety to assemble a Gd-based metal-organic framework as a heterogeneous photosensitizer, new artificial systems were constructed for the proton and carbon dioxide reduction under irradiation. The assembled MOFs exhibited a one-dimensional metal-oxygen pillar that was connected together by the depronated TCA(3-) ligands to form a three-dimensional noninterpenetrating porous framework. The combining of proton reduction and/or the carbon dioxide reduction catalysts, i.e., the Fe-Fe hydrogenase active site models and the Ni(Cyclam) complexes, initiated a photoinduced single electron transfer from its excited state to the substrate. The system exhibited an initial TOF of 320 h(-1) of hydrogen per catalyst and an overall quantum yield of about 0.21% and is able to reduce carbon dioxide under irradiation. The deposit of the photoactive Gd-TCA into the film of an α-Al2O3 plate provided a platform for the practical applications through prolonging the lifetime of the artifical system and allowed the easily operated devices being recyclable as a promising photocatalytic system. PMID:27479135

  11. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid. PMID:25793858

  12. Active Viscoelastic Matter: From Bacterial Drag Reduction to Turbulent Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemingway, E. J.; Maitra, A.; Banerjee, S.; Marchetti, M. C.; Ramaswamy, S.; Fielding, S. M.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  13. Active viscoelastic matter: from bacterial drag reduction to turbulent solids.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, E J; Maitra, A; Banerjee, S; Marchetti, M C; Ramaswamy, S; Fielding, S M; Cates, M E

    2015-03-01

    A paradigm for internally driven matter is the active nematic liquid crystal, whereby the equations of a conventional nematic are supplemented by a minimal active stress that violates time-reversal symmetry. In practice, active fluids may have not only liquid-crystalline but also viscoelastic polymer degrees of freedom. Here we explore the resulting interplay by coupling an active nematic to a minimal model of polymer rheology. We find that adding a polymer can greatly increase the complexity of spontaneous flow, but can also have calming effects, thereby increasing the net throughput of spontaneous flow along a pipe (a "drag-reduction" effect). Remarkably, active turbulence can also arise after switching on activity in a sufficiently soft elastomeric solid.

  14. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jack W.; Edic, Peter M.; FitzGerald, Paul F.; Torres, Andrew S.; Yeh, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration. PMID:26839905

  15. Complementary contrast media for metal artifact reduction in dual-energy computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Jack W; Edic, Peter M; FitzGerald, Paul F; Torres, Andrew S; Yeh, Benjamin M

    2015-07-01

    Metal artifacts have been a problem associated with computed tomography (CT) since its introduction. Recent techniques to mitigate this problem have included utilization of high-energy (keV) virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images, produced via dual-energy CT (DECT). A problem with these high-keV images is that contrast enhancement provided by all commercially available contrast media is severely reduced. Contrast agents based on higher atomic number elements can maintain contrast at the higher energy levels where artifacts are reduced. This study evaluated three such candidate elements: bismuth, tantalum, and tungsten, as well as two conventional contrast elements: iodine and barium. A water-based phantom with vials containing these five elements in solution, as well as different artifact-producing metal structures, was scanned with a DECT scanner capable of rapid operating voltage switching. In the VMS datasets, substantial reductions in the contrast were observed for iodine and barium, which suffered from contrast reductions of 97% and 91%, respectively, at 140 versus 40 keV. In comparison under the same conditions, the candidate agents demonstrated contrast enhancement reductions of only 20%, 29%, and 32% for tungsten, tantalum, and bismuth, respectively. At 140 versus 40 keV, metal artifact severity was reduced by 57% to 85% depending on the phantom configuration. PMID:26839905

  16. [Deactivation by SO2 of transition metal oxides modified low-temperature SCR catalyst for NOx reduction with NH3].

    PubMed

    Shen, Bo-xiong; Liu, Ting; Yang, Ting-ting; Xiong, Li-xian; Wang, Jing

    2009-08-15

    MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, which exhibited high activity for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx over the temperature range 110-230 degrees C. Experiments results indicated that the catalyst yielded 80% NO conversion at 150 degrees C and 90% at 230 degrees C. The Oxides of Fe,Cu and V were added to the catalysts based on MnOx-CeOx/ACF. The additions of these transition metal oxides had a negative effect on the activity of the catalysts. Compared with MnOx-CeOx/ACF and Cu and V modified catalysts, NO conversion for Fe-MnOx-CeOx/ACF catalyst leveled off at nearly 75% in the first 6 h in the presence of SO2. Two mechanisms of catalyst deactivation by SO2 were discovered by the methods of X-ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR), indicating that the catalysts were covered by ammonium sulfates and the metal oxides, acting as active components, were also sulfated by SO2 to form metal sulfates.

  17. Size-Reduction Template Stripping of Smooth Curved Metallic Tips for Adiabatic Nanofocusing of Surface Plasmons.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Timothy W; Klemme, Daniel J; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2016-06-01

    We present a new technique to engineer metallic interfaces to produce sharp tips with smooth curved surfaces and variable tip angles, as well as ridges with arbitrary contour shapes, all of which can be integrated with grating couplers for applications in plasmonics and nanophotonics. We combine template stripping, a nanofabrication scheme, with atomic layer deposition (ALD) to produce the ultrasharp nanoscale tips and wedges using only conventional photolithography. Conformal ALD coating of insulators over silicon trench molds of various shapes reduces their widths to make nanoscale features without high-resolution lithography. Along with a metal deposition and template stripping, this size-reduction scheme can mass-produce narrow and ultrasharp (<10 nm radius of curvature) metallic wedges and tips over an entire 4 in. wafer. This size-reduction scheme can create metallic tips out of arbitrary trench patterns that have smooth curved surfaces to facilitate efficient adiabatic nanofocusing which will benefit applications in near-field optical spectroscopy, plasmonic waveguides, particle trapping, hot-electron plasmonics, and nonlinear optics. PMID:27156522

  18. Enhanced electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiuli; Zhang, Peng; Li, Shuang; Liu, Wei

    2016-08-17

    Developing inexpensive and non-precious metal electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is among the major goals in fuel cells. Herein, by using density-functional theory calculations, we show that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids exhibit unexpectedly high ORR catalytic activity-even comparable to that of the Pt(111) surface. Both graphitic-type and pyridine-type N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrids are highly active for the ORR and have good CO tolerance. The formation of the second H2O molecule is the rate-determining step for the ORR with the graphitic-type hybrid, whereas on the pyridine-type hybrid, it is the formation of OOH. Note that N-doped olympicene/graphene hybrid materials combine the high reactivity of olympicene and the high electrical conductivity of graphene, which allows them to be potentially used as low-cost and non-precious-metal ORR catalysts.

  19. An algorithm for efficient metal artifact reductions in permanent seed implants

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chen; Verhaegen, Frank; Laurendeau, Denis; Enger, Shirin A.; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: In permanent seed implants, 60 to more than 100 small metal capsules are inserted in the prostate, creating artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging. The goal of this work is to develop an automatic method for metal artifact reduction (MAR) from small objects such as brachytherapy seeds for clinical applications. Methods: The approach for MAR is based on the interpolation of missing projections by directly using raw helical CT data (sinogram). First, an initial image is reconstructed from the raw CT data. Then, the metal objects segmented from the reconstructed image are reprojected back into the sinogram space to produce a metal-only sinogram. The Steger method is used to determine precisely the position and edges of the seed traces in the raw CT data. By combining the use of Steger detection and reprojections, the missing projections are detected and replaced by interpolation of non-missing neighboring projections. Results: In both phantom experiments and patient studies, the missing projections have been detected successfully and the artifacts caused by metallic objects have been substantially reduced. The performance of the algorithm has been quantified by comparing the uniformity between the uncorrected and the corrected phantom images. The results of the artifact reduction algorithm are indistinguishable from the true background value. Conclusions: An efficient algorithm for MAR in seed brachytherapy was developed. The test results obtained using raw helical CT data for both phantom and clinical cases have demonstrated that the proposed MAR method is capable of accurately detecting and correcting artifacts caused by a large number of very small metal objects (seeds) in sinogram space. This should enable a more accurate use of advanced brachytherapy dose calculations, such as Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Why is silver catalytically active for NO reduction? A unique pathway via an inverted (NO)2 dimer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Pan; Jenkins, Stephen J; King, David A

    2004-06-16

    NO reduction on the noble metal Ag has been studied using density functional theory calculations. It was found that monomeric NO dissociation is subject to prohibitive barriers on Ag metal and is thus unlikely to account for the experimental observations for NO reduction over Ag-based catalysts. For the first time, a mechanism via an inverted (NO)(2) dimer is identified, which can explain both the high activity and the selectivity of this catalytic system. N(2)O is the major reduction product of the inverted (NO)(2) dimer, in accord with experiment. The physical origin of the Ag metallic state as a good catalyst is furthermore identified: Ag surfaces, including small clusters, have little or no covalent bonding ability but can bond ionically with adsorbates. We conclude that the variation of the ionic bonding strength of Ag toward different reactants determines its catalytic selectivity.

  1. Extraction of metallic lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass by thermal reduction with metallic iron.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xingwen; Shih, Kaimin; Liu, Chengshuai; Wang, Fei

    2013-09-01

    A novel and effective process of thermal reduction treatment with the addition of metallic iron (Fe(0)) to recover lead from cathode ray tube (CRT) funnel glass is introduced. The key technological breakthrough of this process is the use of a relatively lower temperature and an inexpensive reducing agent to extract the metallic lead. The influences of temperature, the reducing agent content, and the holding time for lead reduction were examined to determine the optimal extraction efficiency. The lead extraction efficiency first increased and then decreased with increasing temperature. The maximum lead extraction efficiency occurred at 700 °C. The growth of crystalline lead first increased significantly with an increase in the Fe content, reaching maximum growth at an Fe addition of 50 wt %. The most effective treatment time was determined to be 30 min, as the vitrification of lead back to the glass matrix occurred under longer treatment times. The experimentally derived results indicate that a 58 wt % lead extraction can be achieved with the optimized operational parameters (50 wt % Fe addition, heating at 700 °C for 30 min) in a single extraction operation.

  2. Synthesis of Iron Nanoparticles Using Azadirachta indica Extract and Its Catalytic Activity Toward Nitrophenol Reduction.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, C; Ranjani, M; Kim, Ae Rhan; Yoo, Dong Jin; Kumar, G Gnana

    2016-03-01

    A simple, hasty and eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of iron nanoparticles has been developed using the medicinally important Azadirachta indica extract, which act as both reducing and stabilizing agent. The formation and morphological properties of iron nanoparticles as a function of metallic precursor and Azadirachta indica extract concentration have been investigated. The influence of solvent over the size and texture of iron nanoparticles has also been evaluated in detail. The thermal behavior of prepared nanoparticles was identified from thermogravimetric analysis. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of prepared iron nanoparticles toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol was analyzed and the reduction process was occurred within 30 sec. The cost and time efficient biosynthesis process and excellent catalytic activity of the prepared iron nanoparticles construct this protocol attractive.

  3. Metal artifact reduction in CT using tissue-class modeling and adaptive prefiltering

    SciTech Connect

    Bal, Matthieu; Spies, Lothar

    2006-08-15

    High-density objects such as metal prostheses, surgical clips, or dental fillings generate streak-like artifacts in computed tomography images. We present a novel method for metal artifact reduction by in-painting missing information into the corrupted sinogram. The information is provided by a tissue-class model extracted from the distorted image. To this end the image is first adaptively filtered to reduce the noise content and to smooth out streak artifacts. Consecutively, the image is segmented into different material classes using a clustering algorithm. The corrupted and missing information in the original sinogram is completed using the forward projected information from the tissue-class model. The performance of the correction method is assessed on phantom images. Clinical images featuring a broad spectrum of metal artifacts are studied. Phantom and clinical studies show that metal artifacts, such as streaks, are significantly reduced and shadows in the image are eliminated. Furthermore, the novel approach improves detectability of organ contours. This can be of great relevance, for instance, in radiation therapy planning, where images affected by metal artifacts may lead to suboptimal treatment plans.

  4. Surface multiheme c-type cytochromes from Thermincola potens: Implications for dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, H. K.; Iavarone, A. T.; Gorur, A.; Yeo, B. S.; Tran, R.; Melnyk, R. A.; Mathies, R. A.; Auer, M.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Almost nothing is known about the mechanisms of dissimilatory metal reduction by Gram-positive bacteria, although they have been shown to be the dominant species in some environments. Thermincola potens strain JR was isolated from the anode of a microbial fuel cell inoculated with anaerobic digester sludge and operated at 55 °C. Preliminary characterization revealed that T. potens coupled acetate oxidation to the reduction of hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) or the humic substances analog, anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). The genome of T. potens was recently sequenced, and the abundance of multiheme c-type cytochromes (MHCs) is unusual for a Gram-positive bacterium. We present evidence from trypsin shaving LC-MS/MS experiments and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) that indicates the expression of a number of MHCs during T. potens growth on either HFO or AQDS and that several MHCs are localized to the cell wall or cell surface of T. potens. Furthermore, one of the MHCs can be extracted from cells with low pH or denaturants suggesting a loose association with the cell wall or cell surface. Electron microscopy does not reveal an S-layer, and the precipitation of silver metal on the cell surface is inhibited by cyanide, supporting the involvement of surface-localized redox-active heme proteins in dissimilatory metal reduction. These results are the first direct evidence for cell-wall associated cytochromes and MHC involvement in conducting electrons across the cell envelope of a Gram-positive bacterium.

  5. Reductive activation of mitomycins A and C by vitamin C.

    PubMed

    Paz, Manuel M

    2013-06-01

    The anticancer drug mitomycin C produces cytotoxic effects after being converted to a highly reactive bis-electrophile by a reductive activation, a reaction that a number of 1-electron or 2-electron oxidoreductase enzymes can perform in cells. Several reports in the literature indicate that ascorbic acid can modulate the cytotoxic effects of mitomycin C, either potentiating or inhibiting its effects. As ascorbic acid is a reducing agent that is known to be able to reduce quinones, it could be possible that the observed modulatory effects are a consequence of a direct redox reduction between mitomycin C and ascorbate. To determine if this is the case, the reaction between mitomycin C and ascorbate was studied using UV/Vis spectroscopy and LC/MS. We also studied the reaction of ascorbate with mitomycin A, a highly toxic member of the mitomycin family with a higher redox potential than mitomycin C. We found that ascorbate is capable to reduce mitomycin A efficiently, but it reduces mitomycin C rather inefficiently. The mechanisms of activation have been elucidated based on the kinetics of the reduction and on the analysis of the mitosene derivatives formed after the reaction. We found that the activation occurs by the interplay of three different mechanisms that contribute differently, depending on the pH of the reaction. As the reduction of mitomycin C by ascorbate is rather inefficiently at physiologically relevant pH values we conclude that the modulatory effect of ascorbate on the cytotoxicity of mitomycin C is not the result of a direct redox reaction and therefore this modulation must be the consequence of other biochemical mechanisms.

  6. Effect of reduction treatment on copper modified activated carbons on NO(x) adsorption at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Levasseur, Benoit; Gonzalez-Lopez, Eugene; Rossin, Joseph A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2011-05-01

    Activated carbon was impregnated with copper salt and then exposed to reductive environment using hydrazine hydrate or heat treatment under nitrogen at 925 °C. On the obtained samples, adsorption of NO(2) was carried out at dynamic conditions at ambient temperature. The adsorbents before and after exposure to nitrogen dioxide were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis, scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), N(2)-sorption at -196 °C, and potentiometric titration. Copper loading improved the adsorption capacity of NO(2) as well as the retention of NO formed in the process of NO(2) reduction on the carbon surface. That improvement is linked to the presence of copper metal and its high dispersion on the surface. Even though both reduction methods lead to the reduction of copper, different reactions with the carbon surface take place. Heat treatment results in a significant percentage of metallic copper and a reduction of oxygen functional groups of the carbon matrix, whereas hydrazine, besides reduction of copper, leads to an incorporation of nitrogen. The results suggest that NO(2) mainly is converted to copper nitrates although the possibility to its reduction to N(2) is not ruled out. A high capacity on hydrazine treated samples is linked to the high dispersion of metallic copper on the surface of this carbon.

  7. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the ‘nanocasting’ technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C.

  8. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the 'nanocasting' technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C.

  9. Surface-nitrogen-rich ordered mesoporous carbon as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunhui; Chen, Xu; Fan, Zhaoyang; Liang, Jin; Zhang, Bo; Ding, Shujiang

    2016-11-01

    Exploring efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) will have a great impact on the field of fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this paper, we report a simple and efficient routine to coat ordered mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) with nitrogen-doped carbon via pyrolysis of the surface-self-polymerized polydopamine. The optimized CMK-3 catalyst with a coating of nitrogen-doped carbon demonstrates excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR in alkaline media. The coating procedure under optimized conditions lowers the ORR half-wave-potential by 80 mV, giving a genuine metal-free catalyst with an onset ORR potential of 0.96 V (vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) and half-wave potential of 0.83 V (vs RHE) in 0.1 M KOH, which is much better than other carbon material-based catalysts (such as carbon nanotubes and their composites). The performance of this surface-nitrogen-rich CMK-3 catalyst is also superior to that of N-doped ordered mesoporous carbon synthesized by means of the 'nanocasting' technique. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst performs comparably in terms of activity, superior durability, and higher tolerance to methanol compared with commercially available Pt/C. PMID:27668508

  10. A hybrid of titanium nitride and nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon supported on SiC as a noble metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yingdan; Wang, Yanhui; Dong, Liang; Huang, Junjie; Zhang, Yan; Su, Jing; Zang, Jianbing

    2015-02-14

    A novel noble metal-free catalyst, with nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon and titanium nitride particles supported on SiC (NC-TiN/SiC), was synthesized. The NC-TiN/SiC catalyst exhibited excellent oxygen reduction reaction activities as well as superior stability and methanol tolerance. The catalytic activities were attributed to the synergistic effect of TiN and NC. PMID:25574526

  11. Lightning strike fusion: extreme reduction and metal-silicate liquid immiscibility.

    PubMed

    Essene, E J; Fisher, D C

    1986-10-10

    A glassy fulgurite, formed recently on a morainal ridge in southeastern Michigan, contains micrometer- to centimeter-sized metallic globules rich in native silicon, which unmixed from a silica-rich liquid. The unusual character of these globules and their potential for elucidating conditions of fulgurite formation prompted further study. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that temperatures in excess of 2000 K and reducing conditions approaching those of the SiO(2)-Si buffer were needed to form the coexisting metallic and silicate liquids. The phases produced are among the most highly reduced naturally occurring materials known. Some occurrences of other highly reduced minerals may also be due to lightning strike reduction. Extreme reduction and volatilization may also occur during high-temperature events such as lightning strikes in presolar nebulae and impacts of extraterrestrial bodies. As a result of scavenging of platinum-group elements by highly reduced metallic liquids, geochemical anomalies associated with the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary may have a significant terrestrial component even if produced through bolide impact. PMID:17746479

  12. Biological removal of heavy metals by sulfate reduction using a submerged packed tower

    SciTech Connect

    Neserke, G.; Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.

    1994-12-31

    The Coors Brewing Co. owns and operates two wastewater treatment plants which handle the combined waste of the City of Golden and the Brewery. The discharge permit for Coors contains very strict limits for metals. Silver and mercury are prohibited from discharge at all and copper and zinc are both at low limits. The copper and zinc limits cannot be achieved with the present plant configuration and several programs are underway to reduce the source concentrations to meet the respective limits. Most of the programs are either very expensive or unlikely to produce the needed results soon enough. One possible treatment alternative that has been described in literature is sulfate reduction leading to the generation of hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide in turn can precipitate most divalent metals that are available, though there are limits on the precipitation process. The purpose of this research has been to investigate the use of sulfate reduction to remove metals from the effluent of the Coors` Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP).

  13. Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons as metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solution.

    PubMed

    Bo, Xiangjie; Guo, Liping

    2013-02-21

    Ordered mesoporous boron-doped carbons (BOMCs) were prepared by co-impregnation and carbonization of sucrose and 4-hydroxyphenylboronic acid into SBA-15 silica template. Nitrogen sorption, small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals that BOMCs possess highly ordered mesoporous structure, uniform pore size distribution, and high surface area. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis demonstrates that B atoms can be successfully doped into the framework of OMCs. Due to the desirable characteristics of BOMCs, BOMCs are highly active, cheap, and selective metal-free electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline solution. Although B content is a key factor in determining ORR activity, the ORR activity of BOMCs is also dependent on the surface area. The high surface area of BOMCs facilitates the exposure of the active sites for ORR. BOMCs may be further exploited as potentially efficient and inexpensive metal-free ORR catalysts with good long-term stability in alkaline solution. PMID:23318553

  14. Treatment of halogenated phenolic compounds by sequential tri-metal reduction and laccase-catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunrong; Song, Yonghui; Wang, Siyu; Yuan, Yu

    2015-03-15

    Halogenated phenolic compounds (HPCs) are exerting negative effects on human beings and ecological health. Zero-valence metal reduction can dehalogenate HPCs rapidly but cannot mineralize them. Enzymatic catalysis can oxidize phenolic compounds but fails to dehalogenate efficiently, and sometimes even produces more toxic products. In this study, [Fe|Ni|Cu] tri-metallic reduction (TMR) and laccase-catalytic oxidation (LCO) processes were combined to sequentially remove HPCs, including triclosan, tetrabromobisphenol A, and 2-bromo-4-fluorophenol in water. The kinetics, pH and temperature dependences of TMR and LCO were obtained. The detailed TMR, LCO, and TMR-LCO transformation pathways of three HPCs were well described based on the identification of intermediate products and frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) theory. The results showed that the two-stage process worked synergically: TMR that reductively dehalogenated HPCs followed by LCO that completely removed dehalogenated products. TMR was proven to not only improve biodegradability of HPCs but also reduce the yield of potential carcinogenic by-products. Furthermore, a TMR-LCO flow reactor was assembled and launched for 256 h, during which >95% HPCs and >75% TOC were removed. Meanwhile, monitored by microorganism indicators, 83.2%-92.7% acute toxicity of HPCs was eliminated, and the genotoxicity, produced by LCO, was also avoided by using TMR as pretreatment process. PMID:25596562

  15. Distinct Metal Isoforms Underlie Promiscuous Activity Profiles of Metalloenzymes.

    PubMed

    Baier, Florian; Chen, John; Solomonson, Matthew; Strynadka, Natalie C J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2015-07-17

    Within a superfamily, functionally diverged metalloenzymes often favor different metals as cofactors for catalysis. One hypothesis is that incorporation of alternative metals expands the catalytic repertoire of metalloenzymes and provides evolutionary springboards toward new catalytic functions. However, there is little experimental evidence that incorporation of alternative metals changes the activity profile of metalloenzymes. Here, we systematically investigate how metals alter the activity profiles of five functionally diverged enzymes of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. Each enzyme was reconstituted in vitro with six different metals, Cd(2+), Co(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+), and assayed against eight catalytically distinct hydrolytic reactions (representing native functions of MBL enzymes). We reveal that each enzyme metal isoform has a significantly different activity level for native and promiscuous reactions. Moreover, metal preferences for native versus promiscuous activities are not correlated and, in some cases, are mutually exclusive; only particular metal isoforms disclose cryptic promiscuous activities but often at the expense of the native activity. For example, the L1 B3 β-lactamase displays a 1000-fold catalytic preference for Zn(2+) over Ni(2+) for its native activity but exhibits promiscuous thioester, phosphodiester, phosphotriester, and lactonase activity only with Ni(2+). Furthermore, we find that the five MBL enzymes exist as an ensemble of various metal isoforms in vivo, and this heterogeneity results in an expanded activity profile compared to a single metal isoform. Our study suggests that promiscuous activities of metalloenzymes can stem from an ensemble of metal isoforms in the cell, which could facilitate the functional divergence of metalloenzymes.

  16. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction.

  17. Management of hypertension by reduction in sympathetic activity.

    PubMed

    Mathias, C J

    1991-04-01

    The sympathetic nervous system may initiate or maintain hypertension, and a range of approaches that reduce sympathetic activity is often of value in management. These may include nonpharmacological methods, such as the various forms of behavioral therapy (e.g., meditation, relaxation, and biofeedback techniques); weight reduction and avoidance of particular foods and agents that stimulate sympathetic activity (including caffeine and alcohol), and regular physical exercise. Pharmacological therapy includes centrally acting drugs such as alpha-methyldopa, clonidine, and reserpine; ganglionic blockers such as hexamethonium; agents acting on sympathetic nerve terminals such as guanethidine and debrisoquine; and drugs that may act at multiple sites, such as the beta-adrenergic blockers. The role of reducing sympathetic activity in the current management of hypertension and its complications is considered in this overview.

  18. Pharmacological activity of metal binding agents that alter copper bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Helsel, Marian E.

    2015-01-01

    Iron, copper and zinc are required nutrients for many organisms but also potent toxins if misappropriated. An overload of any of these metals can be cytotoxic and ultimately lead to organ failure, whereas deficiencies can result in anemia, weakened immune system function, and other medical conditions. Cellular metal imbalances have been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, cancer and infection. It is therefore critical for living organisms to maintain careful control of both the total levels and subcellular distributions of these metals to maintain healthy function. This perspective explores several strategies envisioned to alter the bioavailability of metal ions by using synthetic metal-binding agents targeted for diseases where misappropriated metal ions are suspected of exacerbating cellular damage. Specifically, we discuss chemical properties that influence the pharmacological outcome of a subset of metal-binding agents known as ionophores, and review several examples that have shown multiple pharmacological activities in metal-related diseases, with a specific focus on copper. PMID:25797044

  19. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-15

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  20. Microbial metal reduction by members of the genus Shewanella: novel strategies for anaerobic respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Dichristina, Thomas; Bates, David J.; Burns, Justin L.; Dale, Jason R.; Payne, Amanda N.

    2006-01-01

    Metal-reducing members of the genus Shewanella are important components of the microbial community residing in redox-stratified freshwater and marine environments. Metal-reducing gram-negative bacteria such as Shewanella, however, are presented with a unique physiological challenge: they are required to respire anaerobically on terminal electron acceptors which are either highly insoluble (Fe(III)- and Mn(IV)-oxides) and reduced to soluble end-products or highly soluble (U(VI) and Tc(VII)) and reduced to insoluble end-products. To overcome physiological problems associated with metal solubility, metal-respiring Shewanella are postulated to employ a variety of novel respiratory strategies not found in other gram-negative bacteria which respire on soluble electron acceptors such as O2, NO3 and SO4. The following chapter highlights the latest findings on the molecular mechanism of Fe(III), U(VI) and Tc(VII) reduction by Shewanella, with particular emphasis on electron transport chain physiology.

  1. A prior-based metal artifact reduction algorithm for x-ray CT.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Zheng, Jian; Zhang, Tao; Guan, Yihui; Xu, Pin; Sun, Mingshan

    2015-01-01

    In computed tomography (CT), metal objects in the scanning filed are accompanied by physical phenomenon that causes projections to be inconsistent. These inconsistencies produce bright and dark shadows or streaks in analytically reconstructed images. Interpolation-based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms usually replace the inconsistent projection data by estimating surrogate data based on the surrounding uncorrupted projections. In such cases, secondary artifacts will be generated when the data estimates are inaccurate. Therefore, better projection estimation is critical. This paper proposes an image post-processing strategy to create an intermediate image, named the prior image and better estimates of the surrogate data by forward projecting this prior image. The proposed method consists of three steps based on the forward projection MAR framework. First, metallic implants in the uncorrected images are segmented using a Markov random field model (MRF). Then a prior image is generated via an edge-preserving filter and a recovery procedure of the adjacent anatomical structures. Finally, the projection is completed via forward projecting this prior image and the corrected image is reconstructed by the filtered backprojection (FBP) method. Studies on both phantom and clinical data are carried out to verify the performance of the proposed method. The comparisons with other previous MAR algorithms demonstrate that the proposed MAR method performs better in metal artifact suppression and anatomical structure preservation. PMID:25882733

  2. Metal artifact reduction strategies for improved attenuation correction in hybrid PET/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Mehrsima; Dierckx, Rudi A J O; Zaidi, Habib

    2012-06-01

    Metallic implants are known to generate bright and dark streaking artifacts in x-ray computed tomography (CT) images, which in turn propagate to corresponding functional positron emission tomography (PET) images during the CT-based attenuation correction procedure commonly used on hybrid clinical PET/CT scanners. Therefore, visual artifacts and overestimation and/or underestimation of the tracer uptake in regions adjacent to metallic implants are likely to occur and as such, inaccurate quantification of the tracer uptake and potential erroneous clinical interpretation of PET images is expected. Accurate quantification of PET data requires metal artifact reduction (MAR) of the CT images prior to the application of the CT-based attenuation correction procedure. In this review, the origins of metallic artifacts and their impact on clinical PET/CT imaging are discussed. Moreover, a brief overview of proposed MAR methods and their advantages and drawbacks is presented. Although most of the presented MAR methods are mainly developed for diagnostic CT imaging, their potential application in PET/CT imaging is highlighted. The challenges associated with comparative evaluation of these methods in a clinical environment in the absence of a gold standard are also discussed.

  3. Seismic design or retrofit of buildings with metallic structural fuses by the damage-reduction spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gang; Jiang, Yi; Zhang, Shuchuan; Zeng, Yan; Li, Qiang

    2015-03-01

    Recently, the structural fuse has become an important issue in the field of earthquake engineering. Due to the trilinearity of the pushover curve of buildings with metallic structural fuses, the mechanism of the structural fuse is investigated through the ductility equation of a single-degree-of-freedom system, and the corresponding damage-reduction spectrum is proposed to design and retrofit buildings. Furthermore, the controlling parameters, the stiffness ratio between the main frame and structural fuse and the ductility factor of the main frame, are parametrically studied, and it is shown that the structural fuse concept can be achieved by specific combinations of the controlling parameters based on the proposed damage-reduction spectrum. Finally, a design example and a retrofit example, variations of real engineering projects after the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed design procedures using buckling restrained braces as the structural fuses.

  4. Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, Frank E.

    2005-06-01

    Towards a More Complete Picture: Dissimilatory Metal Reduction by Anaeromyxobacter Species The overarching goal of this 3-year project is to explore uranium reduction in Anaeromyxobacter species. Specifically, we explore the physiological requirements of available Anaeromyxobacter isolates, design molecular biology tools to detect and quantify Anaeromyxobacter in pure cultures, consortia, and environmental samples, assess their diversity, distribution, and abundance in the environment, including DOE sites, and attempt the isolation of additional Anaeromyxobacter species from the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (FRC). The performers on this project include Frank Loeffler (PI), Robert Sanford (Co-PI), Qingzhong Wu (postdoc), Sara Henry (graduate student with fellowship, no charges to NABIR project), Ivy Thomson (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project), and Ryan Wagner (''Special Topics'' bioinformatics undergraduate student, no charges to NABIR project). Exploratory MALDI-TOF MS experiments for the specific detection of Anaeromyxobacter species were performed by Kerry Preston (graduate student, no charges to NABIR project).

  5. The physical limits of metal reduction by long-range extracellular electron transfer, and the role of cytochrome-bound flavins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, K.; Sanford, R. A.; Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals and radionuclides in the subsurface plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycling of micronutrients and the remediation of contaminated groundwater. While recent advances in the field have improved our ability to understand and predict bioreduction in these environments, the contribution of long-range extracellular electron transfer (EET) by electron shuttling or reduction along conductive pili remains elusive. Long-range EET is implicated in the reduction of radionuclides like uranium that are reversibly sorbed in clay nanopores and exist as persistant sources of contamination. In regions of low hydraulic conductivity, electron shuttles and conductive pili may increase physical mixing beyond what is possible by advection and diffusion, resulting in reduction over a larger area than predicted by current models. We present a novel microfluidic platform that allows us to study long-range EET to the exclusion of other mechanisms, directly observe these phenomena under a controlled environment representative of groundwater conditions, monitor the metabolic activity and redox state of bacteria, and determine the presence of reduced products in-situ. Using Geobacter sulfurreducens as a model metal-reducing bacteria, insoluble manganese dioxide as an electron acceptor, and Escherichia coli K-12 as a reductant and redox buffer, we demonstate that 1) long-range EET by conductive pili requires the presence of flavins 2) Reduction by direct contact only requires the presence of a lowered electric potential 3) The limit of reduction by conductive pili is on the order of 15-20 microns. We are actively exploring the influence of hydrological conditions on the expression of different mechanisms of long-range EET, and the importance of extracellular cytochromes and pili conductivity on metal reduction.

  6. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOEpatents

    Iton, Lennox E.; Maroni, Victor A.

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  7. Metal-Organic Coordination Networks: Prussian Blue and Its Synergy with Pt Nanoparticles to Enhance Oxygen Reduction Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Du, Lei; Du, Chunyu; Chen, Guangyu; Kong, Fanpeng; Yin, Geping; Wang, Yong

    2016-06-22

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is the cornerstone in the electrochemical energy conversion devices such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. It remains a great challenge to develop the ORR electrocatalysts with fast kinetics and high durability. Herein, we report the synthesis of a novel metal-organic coordination networks material, prussian blue crystalline nanograins mosaicked within amorphous membrane (PB CNG-M-AM). Such unique PB CNG-M-AM is designed to enhance the electrocatalysis of Pt toward the ORR by the electrostatic self-assembly. Thus, obtained Pt-PB/C catalysts form numerous Pt-PB-gas three-phase boundaries and present rather high intrinsic activity, four-electron selectivity and superior stability. Moreover, a completely new synergetic mechanism between PB and Pt is discovered, which delicately alters the ORR route and significantly enhances the ORR kinetics. This work provides not only a new strategy and mechanism for developing highly efficient ORR electrocatalysts, but also an alternative way to utilize metal-organic coordination networks materials. PMID:27253719

  8. Highly efficient nonprecious metal catalysts towards oxygen reduction reaction based on three-dimensional porous carbon nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, He; Fu, Shaofang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Developing a low cost, highly active, durable cathode towards an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the high-priority research directions for commercialization of low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). However, the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs is still hindered by the high cost and insufficient durability of the traditional Pt-based cathode catalysts. Under these circumstances, the search for efficient alternatives to replace Pt for constructing highly efficient nonprecious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has been growing intensively and has received great interest. Combining with the compositional effects, the accurate design of NPMCs with 3D porous nanostructures plays a significant role in further enhancing ORR performance. These 3D porous architectures are able to provide higher specific surface areas and larger pore volumes, not only maximizing the availability of electron transfer within the nanosized electrocatalyst surface area but also providing better mass transport of reactants to the electrocatalyst. In this Tutorial Review, we focus on the rational design and synthesis of different 3D porous carbon-based nanomaterials, such as heteroatom-doped carbon, metal-nitrogen-carbon nanostructures and a series of carbon/nonprecious metal-based hybrids. More importantly, their enhanced ORR performances are also demonstrated by virtue of their favorably porous morphologies and compositional effects. Finally, the future trends and perspectives for the highly efficient porous NPMCs regarding the material design are discussed, with an emphasis on substantial development of advanced carbon-based NPMCs for ORR in the near future.

  9. Oxygen reduction activity of N-doped carbon-based films prepared by pulsed laser deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakoda, Teruyuki; Yamamoto, Shunya; Kawaguchi, Kazuhiro; Yamaki, Tetsuya; Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Yoshikawa, Masahito

    2010-12-01

    Carbon-based films with nitrogen species on their surface were prepared on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate for application as a non-platinum cathode catalyst for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Cobalt and carbon were deposited in the presence of N 2 gas using a pulsed laser deposition method and then the metal Co was removed by HCl-washing treatment. Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity was electrochemically determined using a rotating disk electrode system in which the film samples on the GC substrate were replaceable. The ORR activity increased with the temperature of the GC substrate during deposition. A carbon-based film prepared at 600 °C in the presence of N 2 at 66.7 Pa showed the highest ORR activity among the tested samples (0.66 V vs. NHE). This film was composed of amorphous carbons doped with pyridine type nitrogen atoms on its surface.

  10. Long-Term International Space Station (ISS) Risk Reduction Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forroci, Michael P.; Gafka, George K.; Lutomski, Michael G.; Maher, Jacilyn S.

    2011-01-01

    As the assembly of the ISS nears completion, it is worthwhile to step back and review some of the actions pursued by the Program in recent years to reduce risk and enhance the safety and health of ISS crewmembers, visitors, and space flight participants. While the initial ISS requirements and design were intended to provide the best practicable levels of safety, it is always possible to further reduce risk given the determination, commitment, and resources to do so. The following is a summary of some of the steps taken by the ISS Program Manager, by our International Partners, by hardware and software designers, by operational specialists, and by safety personnel to continuously enhance the safety of the ISS, and to reduce risk to all crewmembers. While years of work went into the development of ISS requirements, there are many things associated with risk reduction in a Program like the ISS that can only be learned through actual operational experience. These risk reduction activities can be divided into roughly three categories: Areas that were initially noncompliant which have subsequently been brought into compliance or near compliance (i.e., Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris [MMOD] protection, acoustics) Areas where initial design requirements were eventually considered inadequate and were subsequently augmented (i.e., Toxicity hazard level-4 materials, emergency procedures, emergency equipment, control of drag-throughs) Areas where risks were initially underestimated, and have subsequently been addressed through additional mitigation (i.e., Extravehicular Activity [EVA] sharp edges, plasma shock hazards). Due to the hard work and cooperation of many parties working together across the span of more than a decade, the ISS is now a safer and healthier environment for our crew, in many cases exceeding the risk reduction targets inherent in the intent of the original design. It will provide a safe and stable platform for utilization and discovery for years to come.

  11. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Non-Toxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for non-toxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of non-toxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of non-toxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of non-toxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that non-toxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  12. Propulsion Risk Reduction Activities for Nontoxic Cryogenic Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Klem, Mark D.; Fisher, Kenneth L.

    2010-01-01

    The Propulsion and Cryogenics Advanced Development (PCAD) Project s primary objective is to develop propulsion system technologies for nontoxic or "green" propellants. The PCAD project focuses on the development of nontoxic propulsion technologies needed to provide necessary data and relevant experience to support informed decisions on implementation of nontoxic propellants for space missions. Implementation of nontoxic propellants in high performance propulsion systems offers NASA an opportunity to consider other options than current hypergolic propellants. The PCAD Project is emphasizing technology efforts in reaction control system (RCS) thruster designs, ascent main engines (AME), and descent main engines (DME). PCAD has a series of tasks and contracts to conduct risk reduction and/or retirement activities to demonstrate that nontoxic cryogenic propellants can be a feasible option for space missions. Work has focused on 1) reducing the risk of liquid oxygen/liquid methane ignition, demonstrating the key enabling technologies, and validating performance levels for reaction control engines for use on descent and ascent stages; 2) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for liquid oxygen/liquid methane ascent engines; and 3) demonstrating the key enabling technologies and validating performance levels for deep throttling liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen descent engines. The progress of these risk reduction and/or retirement activities will be presented.

  13. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis supports Dehalococcoides mccartyi reductive dechlorination activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Im, Jeongdae; Yang, Yi; Löffler, Frank E.

    2013-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are corrinoid-auxotrophic Bacteria and axenic cultures that require vitamin B12 (CN-Cbl) to conserve energy via organohalide respiration. Cultures of D. mccartyi strains BAV1, GT and FL2 grown with limiting amounts of 1 µg l−1 CN-Cbl quickly depleted CN-Cbl, and reductive dechlorination of polychlorinated ethenes was incomplete leading to vinyl chloride (VC) accumulation. In contrast, the same cultures amended with 25 µg l−1 CN-Cbl exhibited up to 2.3-fold higher dechlorination rates, 2.8–9.1-fold increased growth yields, and completely consumed growth-supporting chlorinated ethenes. To explore whether known cobamide-producing microbes supply Dehalococcoides with the required corrinoid cofactor, co-culture experiments were performed with the methanogen Methanosarcina barkeri strain Fusaro and two acetogens, Sporomusa ovata and Sporomusa sp. strain KB-1, as Dehalococcoides partner populations. During growth with H2/CO2, M. barkeri axenic cultures produced 4.2 ± 0.1 µg l−1 extracellular cobamide (factor III), whereas the Sporomusa cultures produced phenolyl- and p-cresolyl-cobamides. Neither factor III nor the phenolic cobamides supported Dehalococcoides reductive dechlorination activity suggesting that M. barkeri and the Sporomusa sp. cannot fulfil Dehalococcoides' nutritional requirements. Dehalococcoides dechlorination activity and growth occurred in M. barkeri and Sporomusa sp. co-cultures amended with 10 µM 5′,6′-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB), indicating that a cobalamin is a preferred corrinoid cofactor of strains BAV1, GT and FL2 when grown with chlorinated ethenes as electron acceptors. Even though the methanogen and acetogen populations tested did not produce cobalamin, the addition of DMB enabled guided biosynthesis and generated a cobalamin that supported Dehalococcoides' activity and growth. Guided cobalamin biosynthesis may offer opportunities to sustain and enhance Dehalococcoides activity in contaminated

  14. 15N solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance study of pyrolyzed metal-polyaniline cathode catalysts for oxygen reduction in fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroki, Shigeki; Hosaka, Yo; Yamauchi, Chiharu; Nagata, Shinsuke; Sonoda, Mayu

    2015-09-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of pyrolyzed metal-free and metal (Mn, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu)-containing polyaniline (PANI) in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) was studied. The metal-free PANI800 shows quite poor ORR catalytic activity, whilst the metal-containing PANIMe800 display a better ORR activity. The 15N CP/MAS NMR spectra of PANINi800 and PANICu800 show one weak peak at 118 ppm and there is no peak observed in PANIFe800, against that of PANI800, PANIMn800, PANICo800 and PANINi800 show two peaks at 273 and 118 ppm assigned to the pyridinic and pyridinium nitrogens. It is because of the paramagnetic effect of metal ions. The 15N spin-echo NMR spectra of PANIMe800 with fast recycle delay show the peaks at 140 and 270 ppm assigned to the graphitic and pyridinic nitrogens, against that of PANI800 shows no peak. The spectra of PANIMn800, PANICo800, PANINi800 and PANICu600 also contain a very broaden peak at 430 ppm assigned to the nitrogen with Fermi-contact effect from metal ions. The spectra of PANIFe800 show some spinning side bands and the average Fe3+-15N distance can be calculated. The some amount of iron ion are relieved and average Fe3+-15N distance increase after acid washing and the ORR activity decreases.

  15. Synthesis-Structure-Performance Correlation for Polyaniline-Me-C Non-Precious Metal Cathode Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction in Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Gang; Johnston, Christina; Mack, Nathan; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ferrandon, Magali; Nelson, Mark; Lezama-pacheco, Juan; Conradson, Steven; More, Karren Leslie; Myers, Deborah; Zelenay, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    In this report, we present the systematic preparation of active and durable non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) for the oxygen reduction reaction in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) based on the heat treatment of polyaniline/metal/carbon precursors. Variation of the synthesis steps, heat-treatment temperature, metal loading, and the metal type in the synthesis leads to markedly different catalyst activity, speciation, and morphology. Microscopy studies demonstrate notable differences in the carbon structure as a function of these variables. Balancing the need to increase the catalyst's degree of graphitization through heat treatment versus the excessive loss of surface area that occurs at higher temperatures is a key to preparing an active catalyst. XPS and XAFS spectra are consistent with the presence of Me-N{sub x} structures in both the Co and Fe versions of the catalyst, which are often proposed to be active sites. The average speciation and coordination environment of nitrogen and metal, however, depends greatly on the choice of Co or Fe. Taken together, the data indicate that better control of the metal-catalyzed transformations of the polymer into new graphitized carbon forms in the heat-treatment step will allow for even further improvement of this class of catalysts.

  16. Nitrogen oxides reduction by carbonaceous materials and carbon dioxide separation using regenerative metal oxides from fossil fuel based flue gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Himanshu

    The ever-growing energy demands due to rising global population and continuing lifestyle improvements has placed indispensable emphasis on fossil fuels. Combustion of fossil fuels leads to the emission of harmful gaseous pollutants such as oxides of sulfur (SOx) and nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2), mercury, particulate matter, etc. Documented evidence has proved that this air pollution leads to adverse environmental health. This dissertation focuses on the development of technologies for the control of NOx and CO2 emissions. The first part of the thesis (Chapters 2--6) deals with the development of carbon based post combustion NOx reduction technology called CARBONOX process. High temperature combustion oxidizes both atmospheric nitrogen and organic nitrogen in coal to nitric oxide (NO). The reaction rate between graphite and NO is slow and requires high temperature (>900°C). The presence of metallic species in coal char catalyzes the reaction. The reaction temperature is lowered in the presence of oxygen to about 600--850°C. Chemical impregnation, specifically sodium compounds, further lowers the reaction temperature to 350--600°C. Activated high sodium lignite char (HSLC) provided the best performance for NO reduction. The requirement of char for NOx reduction is about 8--12 g carbon/g NO reduced in the presence of 2% oxygen in the inlet gas. The second part of this dissertation (chapter 7--8) focuses on the development of a reaction-based process for the separation of CO2 from combustion flue gas. Certain metal oxides react with CO2 forming metal carbonates under flue gas conditions. They can be calcined separately to yield CO2. Calcium oxide (CaO) has been identified as a viable metal oxide for the carbonation-calcination reaction (CCR) scheme. CaO synthesized from naturally occurring precursors (limestone and dolomite) attained 45--55% of their stoichiometric conversion due to the susceptibility of their microporous structure. High surface area

  17. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  18. Reduction of aqueous transition metal species on the surfaces of Fe(II)-containing oxides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental studies demonstrate that structural Fe(II) in magnetite and ilmenite heterogeneously reduce aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate, and chromate ions at the oxide surfaces over a pH range of 1-7 at 25??C. For an aqueous transition metal m, such reactions are 3[Fe2+Fe3+2]O4(magnetite) + 2/nmz ??? 4[Fe3+2]O3(maghemite) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n and 3[Fe2+Ti]O3(ilmenite) + 2/nmz ??? Fe3+2Ti3O9(pseudorutile) + Fe2+ + 2/nmz-n, where z is the valance state and n is the charge transfer number. The half cell potential range for solid state oxidation [Fe(II)] ??? [Fe(III)] is -0.34 to -0.65 V, making structural Fe(II) a stronger reducing agent than aqueous Fe2+ (-0.77 V). Reduction rates for aqueous metal species are linear with time (up to 36 h), decrease with pH, and have rate constants between 0.1 and 3.3 ?? 10-10 mol m-2 s-1. Iron is released to solution both from the above reactions and from dissolution of the oxide surface. In the presence of chromate, Fe2+ is oxidized homogeneously in solution to Fe3+. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) denotes a Fe(III) oxide surface containing reduced Cr(III) and V(IV) species. Magnetite and ilmenite electrode potentials are insensitive to increases in divalent transition metals including Zn(II), Co(II), Mn(II), and Ni(II) and reduced V(IV) and Cr(III) but exhibit a log-linear concentration-potential response to Fe(III) and Cu(II). Complex positive electrode responses occur with increasing Cr(VI) and V(V) concentrations. Potential dynamic scans indicate that the high oxidation potential of dichromate is capable of suppressing the cathodic reductive dissolution of magnetite. Oxide electrode potentials are determined by the Fe(II)/Fe(III) composition of the oxide surface and respond to aqueous ion potentials which accelerate this oxidation process. Natural magnetite sands weathered under anoxic conditions are electrochemically reactive as demonstrated by rapid chromate reduction and the release of aqueous Fe(III) to experimental

  19. Enhancement of oxygen reduction reaction activities by Pt nanoclusters decorated on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons

    DOE PAGES

    Sun-Mi Hwang; Choi, YongMan; Kim, Min Gyu; Sohn, Young-Jun; Cheon, Jae Yeong; Joo, Sang Hoon; Yim, Sung-Dae; Kuttiyiel, Kurian A.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Adzic, Radoslav R.; et al

    2016-03-08

    The high cost of Pt-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is a critical hurdle for the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). Recently, non-precious metal-based catalysts (NPMCs) have demonstrated much enhanced activity but their oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity is still inferior to that of Pt-based catalysts resulting in a much thicker electrode in the MEA. For the reduction of mass transport and ohmic overpotential we adopted a new concept of catalyst that combines an ultra-low amount of Pt nanoclusters with metal–nitrogen (M–Nx) doped ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbon (FeCo–OMPC(L)). The 5 wt% Pt/FeCo–OMPC(L) showed a 2-fold enhancement in activities comparedmore » to a higher loading of Pt. Our experimental results supported by first-principles calculations indicate that a trace amount of Pt nanoclusters on FeCo–OMPC(L) significantly enhances the ORR activity due to their electronic effect as well as geometric effect from the reduced active sites. Finally, in terms of fuel cell commercialization, this class of catalysts is a promising candidate due to the limited use of Pt in the MEA.« less

  20. The Reduction of Aqueous Metal Species on the Surfaces of Fe(II)-Containing Oxides: The Role of Surface Passivation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, A.F.; Peterson, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The reduction of aqueous transition metal species at the surfaces of Fe(II)- containing oxides has important ramifications in predicting the transport behavior in ground water aquifers. Experimental studies using mineral suspensions and electrodes demonstrate that structural Fe(II) heterogeneously reduces aqueous ferric, cupric, vanadate and chromate ions on magnetite and ilmenite surfaces. The rates of metal reduction on natural oxides is strongly dependent on the extent of surface passivation and redox conditions in the weathering environment. Synchrotron studies show that surface oxidation of Fe(II)-containing oxide minerals decreases their capacity for Cr(VI) reduction at hazardous waste disposal sites.

  1. Metal-support interaction in platinum and palladium nanoparticles loaded on nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Perini, Lorenzo; Durante, Christian; Favaro, Marco; Perazzolo, Valentina; Agnoli, Stefano; Schneider, Oliver; Granozzi, Gaetano; Gennaro, Armando

    2015-01-21

    Mesoporous carbons are highly porous materials, which show large surface area, chemical inertness and electrochemical performances superior to traditional carbon material. In this study, we report the preparation of nitrogen-doped and undoped mesoporous carbons by an optimized hard template procedure employing silica as template, sucrose and ammonia as carbon and nitrogen source, respectively. Surface area measurements assert a value of 900 and 600 m(2) g(-1) for the best doped and undoped samples, respectively. Such supports were then thoroughly characterized by surface science and electron microscopy tools. Afterward, they were decorated with Pt and Pd nanoparticles, and it was found that the presence of nitrogen defects plays a significant role in improving the metal particles dimension and dispersion. In fact, when doped supports are used, the resulting metal nanoparticles are smaller (2-4 nm) and less prone to aggregation. Photoemission measurements give evidence of a binding energy shift, which is consistent with the presence of an electronic interaction between nitrogen atoms and the metal nanoparticles, especially in the case of Pd. The catalytic properties of electrodes decorated with such catalyst/support systems were investigated by linear sweep voltammetry and by rotating disk electrode measurements, revealing excellent stability and good activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In particular, although Pd nanoparticles always result in lower activity than Pt ones, both Pt and Pd electrodes based on the N-doped supports show an increased activity toward ORR with respect to the undoped ones. At the same mass loading, the Tafel slope and the stability test of the Pt@N-doped electrocatalysts indicate superior performances to that of a commercial Pt@C catalysts (30 wt % Pt on Vulcan XC-72, Johnson Matthey). PMID:25525718

  2. Heat-resistant organic molecular layer as a joint interface for metal reduction on plastics surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sang, Jing; Aisawa, Sumio; Hirahara, Hidetoshi; Kudo, Takahiro; Mori, Kunio

    2016-04-01

    Heat-resistant organic molecular layers have been fabricated by triazine-based silane coupling agent for metal reduction on plastic surfaces using adsorption method. These molecular layers were used as an interfacial layer between polyamide (PA6) and metal solution to reduce Ag+ ion to Ag0. The interfacial behaviors of triazine molecular layer at the interfaces between PA6 and Ag solution were investigated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The kinetics of molecular adsorption on PA6 was investigated by using triazine-based silane coupling agent solutions at different pH and concentration. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscope (AFM), and local nano thermal analysis were employed to characterize the surfaces and interfaces. The nano thermal analysis results show that molecular layers of triazine-based silane coupling agent greatly improved heat resistance of PA6 resin from 170 °C up to 230 °C. This research developed an in-depth insight for molecular behaviors of triazine-based silane coupling agent at the PA6 and Ag solution interfaces and should be of significant value for interfacial research between plastics and metal solution in plating industry.

  3. Highly efficient metal-free growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes on plasma-etched substrates for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Zhang, Qiang; Dai, Liming

    2010-11-01

    We have for the first time developed a simple plasma-etching technology to effectively generate metal-free particle catalysts for efficient metal-free growth of undoped and/or nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Compared with undoped CNTs, the newly produced metal-free nitrogen-containing CNTs were demonstrated to show relatively good electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an acidic medium. Owing to the highly generic nature of the plasma etching technique, the methodology developed in this study can be applied to many other substrates for efficient growth of metal-free CNTs for various applications, ranging from energy related to electronic and to biomedical systems.

  4. Alkali metal poisoning of a CeO2-WO3 catalyst used in the selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Chen, Liang; Chen, Jinghuan; Han, Jian; Zhang, He; Han, Wei

    2012-03-01

    The alkali metal-induced deactivation of a novel CeO(2)-WO(3) (CeW) catalyst used for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) was investigated. The CeW catalyst could resist greater amounts of alkali metals than V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2). At the same molar concentration, the K-poisoned catalyst exhibited a greater loss in activity compared with the Na-poisoned catalyst below 200 °C. A combination of experimental and theoretical methods, including NH(3)-TPD, DRIFTS, H(2)-TPR, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, were used to elucidate the mechanism of the alkali metal deactivation of the CeW catalyst in SCR reaction. Experiments results indicated that decreases in the reduction activity and the quantity of Brønsted acid sites rather than the acid strength were responsible for the catalyst deactivation. The DFT calculations revealed that Na and K could easily adsorb on the CeW (110) surface and that the surface oxygen could migrate to cover the active tungsten, and then inhibit the SCR of NO(x) with ammonia. Hot water washing is a convenient and effective method to regenerate alkali metal-poisoned CeW catalysts, and the catalytic activity could be recovered 90% of the fresh catalyst.

  5. Metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated IR pyrolized polyacrylonitrile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimov, Mikhail N.; Zhilyaeva, Natalya A.; Vasilyev, Andrey A.; Muratov, Dmitriy G.; Zemtsov, Lev M.; Karpacheva, Galina P.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we report about new approach to preparation of metal-carbon nanocomposites based on activated carbon. Polyacrylonitrile is suggested as a precursor for Co, Pd and Ru nanoparticles carbon support which is prepared under IR pyrolysis conditions of a precursor. The first part of the paper is devoted to study activated carbon structural characteristics dependence on activation conditions. In the second part the effect of type of metal introduced in precursor on metal-carbon nanocomposite structural characteristics is shown. Prepared AC and nanocomposite samples are characterized by BET, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction.

  6. Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 at Metal Electrodes in a Distillable Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lu; Guo, Si-Xuan; Li, Fengwang; Bentley, Cameron; Horne, Mike; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The electroreduction of CO2 in the distillable ionic liquid dimethylammonium dimethylcarbamate (dimcarb) has been investigated with 17 metal electrodes. Analysis of the electrolysis products reveals that aluminum, bismuth, lead, copper, nickel, palladium, platinum, iron, molybdenum, titanium and zirconium electroreduce the available protons in dimcarb to hydrogen rather than reducing CO2 . Conversely, indium, tin, zinc, silver and gold are able to catalyze the reduction of CO2 to predominantly carbon monoxide (CO) and to a lesser extent, formate ([HCOO](-) ). In all cases, the applied potential was found to have a minimal influence on the distribution of the reduction products. Overall, indium was found to be the best electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction in dimcarb, with faradaic efficiencies of approximately 45 % and 40 % for the generation of CO and [HCOO](-) , respectively, at a potential of -1.34 V versus Cc(+/0) (Cc(+) =cobaltocenium) employing a dimethylamine to CO2 ratio of less than 1.8:1. PMID:27164263

  7. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process. PMID:26351196

  8. Contribution of microbial activity to virus reduction in saturated soil.

    PubMed

    Nasser, A M; Glozman, R; Nitzan, Y

    2002-05-01

    Application of wastewater to soil may result in the contamination of groundwater and soil with pathogenic microorganisms and other biological and chemical agents. This study was performed to determine the antiviral microbial activity of soil saturated with secondary effluent. Low concentrations (0.05mg/ml) of protease pronase resulted in the inactivation of more than 90% of seeded Cox-A9 virus, whereas Poliovirus type 1, Hepatitis A virus (HAV) and MS2 bacteriophages were found to be insensitive to the enzyme activity. Exposure of Cox A9 virus to P. aeruginosa extracellular enzymes resulted in 99% inactivation of the seeded virus. Hepatitis A virus was found to be as sensitive as the Cox A9 virus, whereas Poliovirus 1 and MS2 were found to be insensitive to P. aeruginosa extracellular enzymatic activity. Furthermore, the time required for 99% reduction (T99) of Cox A9 and MS-2 Bacteriophage, at 15 degrees C, in soil saturated with secondary effluent was found to be 7 and 21 days, respectively. Faster inactivation was observed for MS2 and Cox A9 in soil saturated with secondary effluent incubated at 30 degrees C, T99 of 2 and 0.3 days, respectively. Although the concentration of the total bacterial count in the soil samples increased from 10(3) cfu/g to 10(5) cfu/g after 20 days of incubation at 30 degrees C, the proteolytic activity was below the detection level. The results of this study indicate that the virucidal effect of microbial activity is virus type dependent. Furthermore microbial activity in the soil material can be enhanced by the application of secondary effluent at higher temperature. The results also showed that MS2 bacteriophage can be used to predict viral contamination of soil and groundwater.

  9. Reduction of selenite to elemental selenium nanoparticles by activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohan; Matassa, Silvio; Singh, Satyendra; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Esposito, Giovanni; Lens, Piet N L

    2016-01-01

    Total selenium removal by the activated sludge process, where selenite is reduced to colloidal elemental selenium nanoparticles (BioSeNPs) that remain entrapped in the activated sludge flocs, was studied. Total selenium removal efficiencies with glucose as electron donor (2.0 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1)) at neutral pH and 30 °C gave 2.9 and 6.8 times higher removal efficiencies as compared to the electron donors lactate and acetate, respectively. Total selenium removal efficiencies of 79 (±3) and 86 (±1) % were achieved in shake flasks and fed batch reactors, respectively, at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations above 4.0 mg L(-1) and 30 °C when fed with 172 mg L(-1) (1 mM) Na2SeO3 and 2.0 g L(-1) COD of glucose. Continuously operated reactors operating at neutral pH, 30 °C and a DO >3 mg L(-1) removed 33.98 and 36.65 mg of total selenium per gram of total suspended solids (TSS) at TSS concentrations of 1.3 and 3.0 g L(-1), respectively. However, selenite toxicity to the activated sludge led to failure of a continuously operating activated sludge reactor at the applied loading rates. This suggests that a higher hydraulic retention time (HRT) or different reactor configurations need to be applied for selenium-removing activated sludge processes. Graphical Abstract Scheme representing the possible mechanisms of selenite reduction at high and low DO levels in the activated sludge process.

  10. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  11. Magnesiothermic synthesis of sulfur-doped graphene as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiacheng; Ma, Ruguang; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Qian

    2015-01-01

    Efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highly expected in future low-cost energy systems. We have successfully prepared crumpled, sheet-like, sulfur-doped graphene by magnesiothermic reduction of easily available, low-cost, nontoxic CO2 (in the form of Na2CO3) and Na2SO4 as the carbon and sulfur sources, respectively. At high temperature, Mg can reduce not only carbon in the oxidation state of +4 in CO32− to form graphene, but also sulfur in SO42− from its highest (+6) to lowest valence which was hybridized into the carbon sp2 framework. Various characterization results show that sulfur-doped graphene with only few layers has an appropriate sulfur content, hierarchically robust porous structure, large surface area/pore volume, and highly graphitized textures. The S-doped graphene samples exhibit not only a high activity for ORR with a four-electron pathway, but also superior durability and tolerance to MeOH crossover to 40% Pt/C. This is mainly ascribed to the combination of sulfur-related active sites and hierarchical porous textures, facilitating fast diffusion of oxygen molecules and electrolyte to catalytic sites and release of products from the sites. PMID:25790856

  12. Magnesiothermic synthesis of sulfur-doped graphene as an efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiacheng; Ma, Ruguang; Zhou, Zhenzhen; Liu, Guanghui; Liu, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are highly expected in future low-cost energy systems. We have successfully prepared crumpled, sheet-like, sulfur-doped graphene by magnesiothermic reduction of easily available, low-cost, nontoxic CO2 (in the form of Na2CO3) and Na2SO4 as the carbon and sulfur sources, respectively. At high temperature, Mg can reduce not only carbon in the oxidation state of +4 in CO32- to form graphene, but also sulfur in SO42- from its highest (+6) to lowest valence which was hybridized into the carbon sp2 framework. Various characterization results show that sulfur-doped graphene with only few layers has an appropriate sulfur content, hierarchically robust porous structure, large surface area/pore volume, and highly graphitized textures. The S-doped graphene samples exhibit not only a high activity for ORR with a four-electron pathway, but also superior durability and tolerance to MeOH crossover to 40% Pt/C. This is mainly ascribed to the combination of sulfur-related active sites and hierarchical porous textures, facilitating fast diffusion of oxygen molecules and electrolyte to catalytic sites and release of products from the sites.

  13. Facile preparation of nitrogen-doped graphene as a metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ziyin; Song, Min-kyu; Ding, Yong; Liu, Yan; Liu, Meilin; Wong, Ching-ping

    2012-03-14

    Nitrogen-doped graphene (nG) is a promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode of fuel cells. Here we report a facile preparation of nG via pyrolysis of graphene oxide with melamine. The morphology of the nG is revealed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy while the successful N doping is confirmed by electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting nG shows high electrocatalytic activity toward ORR in an alkaline solution with an onset potential of -0.10 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode. The nG catalyzed oxygen reduction exhibits a favorable formation of water via a four-electron pathway. Good stability and anti-crossover property are also observed, which are advantageous over the Pt/C catalyst. Furthermore, the effect of pyrolysis temperature on the structure and activity of nG is systematically studied to gain some insights into the chemical reactions during pyrolysis. PMID:22307527

  14. Evaluation of a metal artifact reduction algorithm in CT studies used for proton radiotherapy treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karin M; Ahnesjö, Anders; Vallhagen Dahlgren, Christina

    2014-09-08

    Metal objects in the body such as hip prostheses cause artifacts in CT images. When CT images degraded by artifacts are used for treatment planning of radiotherapy, the artifacts can yield inaccurate dose calculations and, for particle beams, erroneous penetration depths. A metal artifact reduction software (O-MAR) installed on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore CT has been tested for applications in treatment planning of proton radiotherapy. Hip prostheses mounted in a water phantom were used as test objects. Images without metal objects were acquired and used as reference data for the analysis of artifact-affected regions outside of the metal objects in both the O-MAR corrected and the uncorrected images. Water equivalent thicknesses (WET) based on proton stopping power data were calculated to quantify differences in the calculated proton beam penetration for the different image sets. The WET to a selected point of interest between the hip prostheses was calculated for several beam directions of clinical relevance. The results show that the calculated differences in WET relative to the reference case were decreased when the O-MAR algorithm was applied. WET differences up to 2.0 cm were seen in the uncorrected case while, for the O-MAR corrected case, the maximum difference was decreased to 0.4 cm. The O-MAR algorithm can significantly improve the accuracy in proton range calculations. However, there are some residual effects, and the use of proton beam directions along artifact streaks should only be used with caution and appropriate margins.

  15. Clinical evaluation of the iterative metal artifact reduction algorithm for CT simulation in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Axente, Marian; Von Eyben, Rie; Hristov, Dimitre; Paidi, Ajay; Bani-Hashemi, Ali; Zeng, Chuan; Krauss, Andreas

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To clinically evaluate an iterative metal artifact reduction (IMAR) algorithm prototype in the radiation oncology clinic setting by testing for accuracy in CT number retrieval, relative dosimetric changes in regions affected by artifacts, and improvements in anatomical and shape conspicuity of corrected images. Methods: A phantom with known material inserts was scanned in the presence/absence of metal with different configurations of placement and sizes. The relative change in CT numbers from the reference data (CT with no metal) was analyzed. The CT studies were also used for dosimetric tests where dose distributions from both photon and proton beams were calculated. Dose differences and gamma analysis were calculated to quantify the relative changes between doses calculated on the different CT studies. Data from eight patients (all different treatment sites) were also used to quantify the differences between dose distributions before and after correction with IMAR, with no reference standard. A ranking experiment was also conducted to analyze the relative confidence of physicians delineating anatomy in the near vicinity of the metal implants. Results: IMAR corrected images proved to accurately retrieve CT numbers in the phantom study, independent of metal insert configuration, size of the metal, and acquisition energy. For plastic water, the mean difference between corrected images and reference images was −1.3 HU across all scenarios (N = 37) with a 90% confidence interval of [−2.4, −0.2] HU. While deviations were relatively higher in images with more metal content, IMAR was able to effectively correct the CT numbers independent of the quantity of metal. Residual errors in the CT numbers as well as some induced by the correction algorithm were found in the IMAR corrected images. However, the dose distributions calculated on IMAR corrected images were closer to the reference data in phantom studies. Relative spatial difference in the dose

  16. Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Surface-Loaded Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Oxidative Degradation of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yoon; Yun, Eun-Tae; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Changha; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jaesang

    2016-09-20

    This study demonstrates the capability of noble metal nanoparticles immobilized on Al2O3 or TiO2 support to effectively activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and degrade select organic compounds in water. The noble metals outperformed a benchmark PMS activator such as Co(2+) (water-soluble) for PMS activation and organic compound degradation at acidic pH and showed the comparable activation capacity at neutral pH. The efficiency was found to depend on the type of noble metal (following the order of Pd > Pt ≈ Au ≫ Ag), the amount of noble metal deposited onto the support, solution pH, and the type of target organic substrate. In contrast to common PMS-activated oxidation processes that involve sulfate radical as a main oxidant, the organic compound degradation kinetics were not affected by sulfate radical scavengers and exhibited substrate dependency that resembled the PMS activated by carbon nanotubes. The results presented herein suggest that noble metals can mediate electron transfer from organic compounds to PMS to achieve persulfate-driven oxidation, rather than through reductive conversion of PMS to reactive sulfate radical. PMID:27564590

  17. Activation of Peroxymonosulfate by Surface-Loaded Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Oxidative Degradation of Organic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yong-Yoon; Yun, Eun-Tae; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Changha; Kim, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Jaesang

    2016-09-20

    This study demonstrates the capability of noble metal nanoparticles immobilized on Al2O3 or TiO2 support to effectively activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) and degrade select organic compounds in water. The noble metals outperformed a benchmark PMS activator such as Co(2+) (water-soluble) for PMS activation and organic compound degradation at acidic pH and showed the comparable activation capacity at neutral pH. The efficiency was found to depend on the type of noble metal (following the order of Pd > Pt ≈ Au ≫ Ag), the amount of noble metal deposited onto the support, solution pH, and the type of target organic substrate. In contrast to common PMS-activated oxidation processes that involve sulfate radical as a main oxidant, the organic compound degradation kinetics were not affected by sulfate radical scavengers and exhibited substrate dependency that resembled the PMS activated by carbon nanotubes. The results presented herein suggest that noble metals can mediate electron transfer from organic compounds to PMS to achieve persulfate-driven oxidation, rather than through reductive conversion of PMS to reactive sulfate radical.

  18. Understanding Iron-based catalysts with efficient Oxygen reduction activity from first-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Hasnain; Barbiellini, B.; Jia, Q.; Tylus, U.; Strickland, K.; Bansil, A.; Mukerjee, S.

    2015-03-01

    Catalysts based on Fe/N/C clusters can support the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) without the use of expensive metals such as platinum. These systems can also prevent some poisonous species to block the active sites from the reactant. We have performed spin-polarized calculations on various Fe/N/C fragments using the Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) code. Some results are compared to similar calculations obtained with the Gaussian code. We investigate the partial density of states (PDOS) of the 3d orbitals near the Fermi level and calculate the binding energies of several ligands. Correlations of the binding energies with the 3d electronic PDOS's are used to propose electronic descriptors of the ORR associated with the 3d states of Fe. We also suggest a structural model for the most active site with a ferrous ion (Fe2+) in the high spin state or the so-called Doublet 3 (D3).

  19. One-Pot Fabrication of Mesoporous Core-Shell Au@PtNi Ternary Metallic Nanoparticles and Their Enhanced Efficiency for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Shi, Qiurong; Zhu, Chengzhou; Fu, Shaofang; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-01

    Currently, Pt-based nanomaterials with tailorable shapes, structures, and morphologies are the most popular electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction, which is a significant cathode reaction in fuel cells for renewable energy applications. We have successfully synthesized mesoporous core-shell Au@PtNi ternary metallic nanoparticles through a one-pot reduction method for cathodic materials used as oxygen reduction reaction catalysts. The as-synthesized nanoparticles exhibited superior catalytic activities and long-term stabilities compared with mesoporous core-shell Au@Pt nanoparticles and commercial Pt/C. The unique mesoporous core-shell structures as well as the alloy shells enable the enhanced electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction performances of the Pt-based materials via the electronic effect and geometric effect, holding great promise in fuel cell application.

  20. The effect of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity.

    PubMed

    Phelan, Nigel; Kelly, John C; Moore, David P; Kenny, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    The recall of the articular surface replacement (ASR) hip prosthesis in 2010 represents one of the most controversial areas in orthopaedic surgery in recent years. The aim of this study was to compare the impact of the metal-on-metal hip controversy on Internet search activity in four different regions and determine whether the number of related news reports affected Internet search activity. The Google Trends, Keywords and News applications were used to record the number of news articles and Internet search activity for the terms "hip recall", "metal-on-metal hip" and "ASR hip" from October 2009 to October 2012 in the USA, the UK, Australia and Ireland. There was a large increase in search activity following the official recall in August 2010 in all countries. There was significantly greater search activity after the recall in Ireland compared with the UK for the search term "hip recall" (P = 0.004). For the term "metal-on-metal hip", the UK had significantly more search activity (P = 0.0009). There was a positive correlation between the number of news stories in UK and Ireland with Internet search activity but not in the USA or Australia. Differences between countries affected by the same recall highlight the complex effects of the media on public awareness. The data demonstrates a window of opportunity prior to the official recall for the development of an awareness campaign to provide patients with accurate information.

  1. How absorbed hydrogen affects the catalytic activity of transition metals.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Hristiyan A; Kozlov, Sergey M; Schauermann, Swetlana; Vayssilov, Georgi N; Neyman, Konstantin M

    2014-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis is commonly governed by surface active sites. Yet, areas just below the surface can also influence catalytic activity, for instance, when fragmentation products of catalytic feeds penetrate into catalysts. In particular, H absorbed below the surface is required for certain hydrogenation reactions on metals. Herein, we show that a sufficient concentration of subsurface hydrogen, H(sub) , may either significantly increase or decrease the bond energy and the reactivity of the adsorbed hydrogen, H(ad) , depending on the metal. We predict a representative reaction, ethyl hydrogenation, to speed up on Pd and Pt, but to slow down on Ni and Rh in the presence of H(sub) , especially on metal nanoparticles. The identified effects of subsurface H on surface reactivity are indispensable for an atomistic understanding of hydrogenation processes on transition metals and interactions of hydrogen with metals in general.

  2. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils.

  3. Abundance, composition and activity of denitrifier communities in metal polluted paddy soils

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Liu, Yongzhuo; Zhou, Huimin; Li, Lianqing; Zheng, Jinwei; Zhang, Xuhui; Zheng, Jufeng; Pan, Genxing

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is one of the most important soil microbial processes leading to the production of nitrous oxide (N2O). The potential changes with metal pollution in soil microbial community for N2O production and reduction are not well addressed. In this study, topsoil samples were collected both from polluted and non-polluted rice paddy fields and denitrifier communities were characterized with molecular fingerprinting procedures. All the retrieved nirK sequences could be grouped into neither α- nor β- proteobacteria, while most of the nosZ sequences were affiliated with α-proteobacteria. The abundances of the nirK and nosZ genes were reduced significantly in the two polluted soils. Thus, metal pollution markedly affected composition of both nirK and nosZ denitrifiers. While the total denitrifying activity and N2O production rate were both reduced under heavy metal pollution of the two sites, the N2O reduction rate showed no significant change. These findings suggest that N2O production activity could be sensitive to heavy metal pollution, which could potentially lead to a decrease in N2O emission in polluted paddies. Therefore, metal pollution could have potential impacts on soil N transformation and thus on N2O emission from paddy soils. PMID:26739424

  4. Efficiency of metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization

    SciTech Connect

    Duchacek, V.; Kuta, A.; Pribyl, P. )

    1993-01-20

    The effects of copper, mercury, nickel, zinc, cadmium, indium, magnesium, and calcium stearates on the course of N-cyclohexyl-2-benzthiazylsulphenamide-accelerated sulfur vulcanization of natural rubber have been investigated on the basis of curemeter measurements at 145 C. The differences in the efficiencies of these metal activators of accelerated sulfur vulcanization have been discussed from the points of view of the electron configurations of the metals and their affinities to sulfur. The authors attempted to determine why zinc oxide is generally accepted as the best metal vulcanization activator.

  5. Post-Harvest Processing Methods for Reduction of Silica and Alkali Metals in Wheat Straw

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David Neal; Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Shaw, Peter Gordon

    2002-04-01

    Silica and alkali metals in wheat straw limit its use for bioenergy and gasification. Slag deposits occur via the eutectic melting of SiO2 with K2O, trapping chlorides at surfaces and causing corrosion. A minimum melting point of 950°C is desirable, corresponding to SiO2:K2O of about 3:1. Mild chemical treatments were used to reduce Si, K, and Cl, while varying temperature, concentration, %-solids, and time. Dilute acid was more effective at removing K and Cl, while dilute alkali was more effective for Si. Reduction of minerals in this manner may prove economical for increasing utilization of the straw for combustion or gasification.

  6. Current Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants.

    SciTech Connect

    Bretschger, Orianna; Obraztsova, Anna; Sturm, Carter A.; Chang, In Seop; Gorby, Yuri A.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Barua, Soumitra; Romine, Margaret F.; Zhou, Jizhong; Beliaev, Alex S.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Saffarini, Daad; Mansfeld, Florian; Kim, Byung Hong; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2007-11-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a Gram negative facultative anaerobe capable of utilizing a broad range of electron acceptors, including several solid substrates. S. oneidensis MR-1 can reduce Mn(IV) and Fe(III) oxides, and can produce current in microbial fuel cells. The mechanisms that are employed by S. oneidensis MR-1 to execute these processes have not yet been fully elucidated. Several different S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants were generated and tested for current production and metal-oxide reduction. The results showed that a few key cytochromes play a role in all of the processes but that their degree of participation in each process is very different. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of electron transfer to solid and soluble substrates by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  7. Electrochemical activation of commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haibo; Xia, Guangsen; Liu, Haining; Xia, Shuwei; Lu, Yonghong

    2015-03-28

    Nitrogen (N)-doped carbon and its non-noble metal composite replacing platinum-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysts still have some fundamental problems that remain. Here the micron-sized commercial polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber (PAN-CF) electrode was modified using an electrochemical method, converting its inherent pyridinic-N into 2-pyridone (or 2-hydroxyl pyridine) functional group existing in three-dimensional active layers with remarkable ORR catalytic activity and stability. The carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen and oxygen atoms is prone to act as an active site to efficiently catalyze a two-electron ORR process. However, after coordinating pyridone to the Cu(2+) ion, together with the electrochemical reaction, the chemical redox between Cu(+) and ORR intermediates synergistically tends towards a four-electron pathway in alkaline solution. In different medium, the complexation and dissociation can induce the charge transfer and reconstruction among proton, metal ion and pyridone functionalities, eventually leading to the changes of ORR performance. PMID:25712410

  8. Facile synthesis of nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon from ionic liquid as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    She, Yiyi; Lu, Zhouguang; Ni, Meng; Li, Li; Leung, Michael K H

    2015-04-01

    Developing metal-free catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a great challenge in the development of fuel cells. Nitrogen and sulfur codoped carbon with remarkably high nitrogen content up to 13.00 at % was successfully fabricated by pyrolysis of homogeneous mixture of exfoliated graphitic flakes and ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Bimi][Tf2N]). The exfoliated graphite flakes served as a structure-directing substance as well as additional carbon source in the fabrication. It was demonstrated that the use of graphite flakes increased the nitrogen doping level, optimized the composition of active nitrogen configurations, and enlarged the specific surface area of the catalysts. Electrochemical characterizations revealed that the N and S codoped carbon fabricated by this method exhibited superior catalytic activities toward ORR under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Particularly in alkaline solution, the current catalyst compared favorably to the conventional 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst via four-electron transfer pathway with better ORR selectivity. The excellent catalytic activity was mainly ascribed to high nitrogen doping content, appropriate constitution of active nitrogen configurations, large specific surface area, and synergistic effect of N and S codoping. PMID:25781628

  9. CT metal artefact reduction of total knee prostheses using angled gantry multiplanar reformation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Mark; Toms, Andoni P; Reid, Karen; Bugg, William

    2010-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether or not acquiring CT images of total knee prostheses by using an angled gantry and multiplanar reformation can reduce beam hardening artefact. A CT phantom was created with a total knee prosthesis suspended in gelatine with a known attenuation. CT data was acquired with a gantry angled at 0 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 15 degrees in both craniocaudal oblique planes. Axial images where then reformatted from these datasets. Two independent observers selected regions of interest to measure the mean and standard deviation (SD) of attenuation in the gelatine for all reformatted axial images. Artefact was measured as SD of the background attenuation and areas under the curve of SD for each gantry angle acquisition were compared. Inter-observer reliability was excellent (ICC=0.89, CI 0.875-0.908). The most accurate mean attenuation values for tissues around a TKR were obtained with a CT gantry using 10 degrees to 15 degrees anteroinferior to posterosuperior angulation. The smallest area under the curve for SD of attenuation for the whole prosthesis, and the femoral component in isolation, was obtained with a 5 degrees gantry angle in the same direction. The smallest area under the curve for the tibial component in isolation occurred with a gantry angle of 15 degrees. We conclude that acquiring CT data with a gantry angle can reduce metal artefact around a TKR. Optimal overall metal artefact reduction can be achieved with a small angle from anteroinferior to posterosuperior. Further selective artefact reduction around the tibial component can be achieved with larger angles.

  10. Theoretical investigations on SiC2 siligraphene as promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Huilong; Lin, Bin; Gilmore, Keith; Hou, Tingjun; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Li, Youyong

    2015-12-01

    The design and discovery of high-performance metal-free catalytic materials for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis is vital for the development of fuel cells. By performing density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigate the potential applications of SiC2 siligraphene (g-SiC2) as metal-free ORR catalyst. The g-SiC2 exhibits higher adsorption affinity for the O2 molecule and other ORR intermediates than the traditional Pt (111), and shows good tolerance against CO poisoning. The detailed LH and ER mechanisms in catalyzing ORR by g-SiC2 are simulated and discussed, both in acidic and alkaline environment. We find that, in alkaline environment, the g-SiC2 presents a very low activation barrier (0.16 eV) for the rate determining step (RDS) and shows no overpotential at the equilibrium potential. Our theoretical simulations validate that the siligraphene with alternatively arranged Si and C atoms holds great potential as ORR catalyst in alkaline environment.

  11. Assessment of metal artefact reduction around dental titanium implants in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, N; Hassan, B; Syriopoulos, K; van der Stelt, P

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate if the metal artefact reduction (MAR) tool used in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH® OP300 (Instrumentarium Dental, Tuusula, Finland) can improve the gray value levels in post-operative implant scans. Methods: 20 potential implant sites were selected from 5 edentulous human dry mandibles. Each mandible was scanned by a CBCT scanner, and images were produced under three different conditions: implant sites drilled but no implants inserted, implants inserted without application of MAR and implants inserted with application of MAR. Using Geomagic® Studio 2012 (Geomagic, Morrisville, NC) and 3Diagnosys® v. 5.3.1 (3Diemme® SRL, Cantù, Italy) software, three scans of each mandible were superimposed. The mean gray value of identical regions of bone around the implants was derived for each condition. The differences between gray value measurements at implant sites derived from different conditions were assessed. Results: A significant difference was found between mean gray values from the scans with no implants inserted and with implants inserted (with and without MAR) (p = 0.012). No significant difference was revealed for gray values measured from scans with and without MAR (p = 0.975). Conclusions: The MAR tool in the software of the ORTHOPANTOMOGRAPH OP300 CBCT scanner does not significantly correct the voxel gray values affected by the metal artefact in the vicinity of an implant in human dry mandibles. PMID:25135316

  12. Hot electron-induced reduction of small molecules on photorecycling metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wei; Schlücker, Sebastian

    2015-07-01

    Noble metals are important photocatalysts due to their ability to convert light into chemical energy. Hot electrons, generated via the non-radiative decay of localized surface plasmons, can be transferred to reactants on the metal surface. Unfortunately, the number of hot electrons per molecule is limited due to charge-carrier recombination. In addition to the reduction half-reaction with hot electrons, also the corresponding oxidation counter-half-reaction must take place since otherwise the overall redox reaction cannot proceed. Here we report on the conceptual importance of promoting the oxidation counter-half-reaction in plasmon-mediated catalysis by photorecycling in order to overcome this general limitation. A six-electron photocatalytic reaction occurs even in the absence of conventional chemical reducing agents due to the photoinduced recycling of Ag atoms from hot holes in the oxidation half-reaction. This concept of multi-electron, counter-half-reaction-promoted photocatalysis provides exciting new opportunities for driving efficient light-to-energy conversion processes.

  13. Recovery of metallic copper by integrated chemical reduction and high gradient magnetic separation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wan-I; Panchangam, Sri Chandana; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Hong, Andy P K; Lin, Cheng-Fang

    2011-01-01

    The recovery of metals from waste effluents is necessary for pollution prevention and sustainable practice. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) is seen as a viable method. We investigated the capture of valence copper from aqueous copper ion by HGMS in combination with a chemical reduction process. When a copper solution (3.9 or 15.6 mM) was exposed to excess of dithionite (mole ratio of 1:3) in the presence of ammonia (mole ratio of 4) and amended with MnCl2 (2.5 g/L) and the mixture passed through a flow reactor under a strong magnetic field (10000 Gauss), valence copper was obtained and captured in the reactor with well over 95% yields. The chemical reduction reactions were unaffected by the presence of MnCl2 while the amount of MnCl2 (0, 20 and 32 mM) has significantly varied the copper recovery efficiency, especially in the case of high initial copper ion concentration (15.6 mM). Formation of MnO2 flocs was found to have a detrimental effect on copper removal efficiency. The HGMS method offers a tool of resource recovery for copper from waste effluents.

  14. Reduction of benzophenone with metal hydrides. Kinetic isotope effect and substituent effect study

    SciTech Connect

    Yamataka, H.; Hanafusa, T.

    1988-02-19

    Carbonyl carbon kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) have been determined for the reduction of benzophenone-7-/sup 14/C with various metal hydrides at 25/degrees/C. The observed KIEs are as follows: BH/sub 3//THF, /sup 12/k//sup 14/k = 1.035 /plus minus/ 0.002; AlH/sub 3//Et/sub 2/O, 1.021 /plus minus/ 0.004; 9-BBN/THF, 1.027 /plus minus/ 0.004; DIBAL/hexane, 1.000 /plus minus/ 0.003; LiAlH/sub 4//THF, 1.017 /plus minus/ 0.007. The relative reactivities of ortho-, meta-, and para-substituted benzophenones with these reagents were also determined by the composition experiments. The absence of /sup 14/C KIE, the small sigma value (0.5), and the absence of steric rate retardation due to ortho substituents in the reduction of the ketone with DIBAL suggest that the reaction goes through the rate-determining electron transfer from DIBAL to the ketone. The reactions of other reducing agents showed positive KIE as well as a variable extent of steric effect and are concluded to proceed via a polar mechanism. The difference in the nature of the transition state is discussed on the basis of these results. 32 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic, and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Steven D. Brown; Robert L. Hettich; Nathan VerBerkmoes; Jizhong Zhou

    2004-03-17

    The mediation of metal reduction by microorganisms has been investigated intensively from physiological and biochemical perspectives; however, little is known about the genetic basis and regulatory mechanisms underlying the ability of certain bacteria to transform or immobilize a wide array of heavy metals contaminating DOE field sites. Chromium(VI), for example, is one of several risk-driving contaminants at DOE sites and has been targeted by the DOE for bioremediation research. The bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can potentially be used to immobilize chromium, a toxic and mutagenic metal, by reducing soluble Cr(VI) to the insoluble and less bioavailable form of Cr(III), thus facilitating its removal from contained-storage and natural sites. The overall goal of this study is to integrate targeted biochemical and proteomic analyses with genome-wide gene expression profiling to examine the molecular basis and regulation of chromium(VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Towards this goal, we will (1) isolate and identify the terminal chromium(VI) reductase and the gene(s) encoding this activity using whole-genome sequence information for MR-1 and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in conjunction with conventional protein purification and characterization techniques; (2) verify the function of the gene(s) encoding the terminal Cr(VI) reductase and compare whole transcriptome data with whole proteome data in order to understand the regulation of chromium reduction; and (3) investigate the molecular stress response and adaptation of S. oneidensis to toxic levels of soluble Cr(VI) and other heavy metals. This research will provide important information on the functional components and regulatory mechanisms of microbial metal reduction, which should prove valuable in developing effective assessment strategies for in situ bioremediation and genetically engineering desired bacteria for enhanced bioremediation.

  16. Sulfur-doped graphene derived from cycled lithium-sulfur batteries as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhaoling; Dou, Shuo; Shen, Anli; Tao, Li; Dai, Liming; Wang, Shuangyin

    2015-02-01

    Heteroatom-doped carbon materials have been extensively investigated as metal-free electrocatalysts to replace commercial Pt/C catalysts in oxygen reduction reactions in fuel cells and Li-air batteries. However, the synthesis of such materials usually involves high temperature or complicated equipment. Graphene-based sulfur composites have been recently developed to prolong the cycling life of Li-S batteries, one of the most attractive energy-storage devices. Given the high cost of graphene, there is significant demand to recycle and reuse graphene from Li-S batteries. Herein, we report a green and cost-effective method to prepare sulfur-doped graphene, achieved by the continuous charge/discharge cycling of graphene-sulfur composites in Li-S batteries. This material was used as a metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction and shows better electrocatalytic activity than pristine graphene and better methanol tolerance durability than Pt/C.

  17. Biologically active compounds of semi-metals.

    PubMed

    Rezanka, Tomás; Sigler, Karel

    2008-02-01

    Semi-metals (boron, silicon, arsenic and selenium) form organo-metal compounds, some of which are found in nature and affect the physiology of living organisms. They include, e.g., the boron-containing antibiotics aplasmomycin, borophycin, boromycin, and tartrolon or the silicon compounds present in "silicate" bacteria, relatives of the genus Bacillus, which release silicon from aluminosilicates through the secretion of organic acids. Arsenic is incorporated into arsenosugars and arsenobetaines by marine algae and invertebrates, and fungi and bacteria can produce volatile methylated arsenic compounds. Some prokaryotes can use arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor while others can utilize arsenite as an electron donor to generate energy. Selenium is incorporated into selenocysteine that is found in some proteins. Biomethylation of selenide produces methylselenide and dimethylselenide. Selenium analogues of amino acids, antitumor, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, anti-infective drugs are often used as analogues of important pharmacological sulfur compounds. Other metalloids, i.e. the rare and toxic tellurium and the radioactive short-lived astatine, have no biological significance. PMID:17991498

  18. Segregated Pt on Pd nanotubes for enhanced oxygen reduction activity in alkaline electrolyte.

    PubMed

    St John, Samuel; Atkinson, Robert W; Dyck, Ondrej; Sun, Cheng-Jun; Zawodzinski, Thomas A; Papandrew, Alexander B

    2015-12-01

    Nanoscaled Pt domains were integrated with Pd nanotubes via vapor deposition to yield a highly active electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media. The surface-area-normalized ORR activity of these bi-metallic Pt-on-Pd nanotubes (PtPdNTs) was nearly 6× the corresponding carbon-supported Pt nanoparticle (Pt/C) activity at 0.9 V vs. RHE (1.5 vs. 0.24 mA cmmetal(-2), respectively). Furthermore, the high specific activity of the PtPdNTs was achieved without sacrificing mass-normalized activity, which is more than twice that of Pt/C (0.333 A mgPtPdNT(-1)vs. 0.141 A mgPt/C(-1)) and also greater than that of Pd/C (0.221 A mgPd/C(-1)). We attribute the enhancements in specific and mass activity to modifications of the segregated Pt electronic structure and to nanoscale porosity, respectively. PMID:26553367

  19. ADVANCES IN BIOTREATMENT OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE AND BIORECOVERY OF METALS: 2. MEMBRANE BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR SULFATE REDUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acid-mine drainage (AMD) is a severe pollution problem attributed to past mining activities. AMD is an acidic, metal-bearing wastewater generated by the oxidation of metal sulfides to sulfates by Thiobacillus bacteria in both the active and abandoned mining operations. The wastew...

  20. Activities of Combined TiO2 Semiconductor Nanocatalysts Under Solar Light on the Reduction of CO2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfang; Dao, Anh Quang; Fu, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    The materials based on TiO2 semiconductors are a promising option for electro-photocatalytic systems working as solar energy low-carbon fuels exchanger. These materials' structures are modified by doping metals and metal oxides, by metal sulfides sensitization, or by graphene supported membrane, enhancing their catalytic activity. The basic phenomenon of CO2 reduction to CH4 on Pd modified TiO2 under UV irradiation could be enhanced by Pd, or RuO2 co-doped TiO2. Sensitization with metal sulfide QDs is effective by moving of photo-excited electron from QDs to TiO2 particles. Based on characteristics of the catalysts various combinations of catalysts are proposed in order to creat catalyst systems with good CO2 reduction efficiency. From this critical review of the CO2 reduction to organic compounds by converting solar light and CO2 to storable fuels it is clear that more studies are still attractive and needed. PMID:27451648

  1. Treatment of activated carbon to enhance catalytic activity for reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Ku, B.J.; Rhee, H.K. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Lee, J.K.; Park, D. )

    1994-11-01

    Catalytic activity of activated carbon treated with various techniques was examined in a fixed bed reactor for the reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia at 150 C. Activated carbon derived from coconut shell impregnated with an aqueous solution of ammonium sulfate, further treated with sulfuric acid, dried at 120 C, and then heated in an inert gas stream at 400 C, showed the highest catalytic activity within the range of experimental conditions. The enhancement of catalytic activity of modified activated carbon could be attributed to the increase in the amount of oxygen function groups which increased the adsorption site for ammonia. Catalytic activity of activated carbons depended on the surface area and the oxygen content as well.

  2. Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide: A favorable metal-free catalyst for the N2O reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Sharifi, Fahimeh; Nematollahi, Parisa

    2016-11-01

    The structural and catalytic properties of Al- or Si-decorated graphene oxide (Al-/Si-GO) are studied by means of density functional theory calculations. The relatively large adsorption energy together with the small Alsbnd O or Sisbnd O binding distances indicate that the epoxy groups over the GO surface can strongly stabilize the single Al or Si atom. Hence, Al-GO and Si-GO are stable enough to be utilized in catalytic reduction of N2O by CO molecule. It is found that the adsorption and decomposition of N2O molecule over Si-GO is more favorable than over Al-GO, due to its larger adsorption energy (Eads) and charge transfer (qCT) values. On the other hand, the CO molecule is physically adsorbed over both surfaces, with relatively small Eads and qCT values. Therefore, at the presence of N2O and CO molecules as the reaction gas, the Al or Si atom of the surface should be dominantly covered by N2O molecule. Our results indicate that the N2O decomposition process can take place with a negligible activation energy over Al-/Si-GO surface, where the N2 molecule can be easily released from the surface. Then, the activated oxygen atom (Oads) which remains over the surface reacts with the CO molecule to form the CO2 molecule via the reaction Oads + CO → CO2. Based on the calculated activation energies, it is suggested that both Al-GO and Si-GO can be used as an efficient metal-free catalyst for the reduction of N2O molecule at ambient conditions.

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of active noise reduction in flight helmets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forshaw, S. E.; Rylands, J. M.; Crabtree, R. B.

    1988-08-01

    The advent of high powered fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft and tracked armoured fighting vehicles has increased the level of noise to which crews are exposed. Active noise reduction (ANR) offers a means of increasing the attenuation at low and mid frequencies. It relies on sensing the sound inside a circumaural device and cancelling it by means of negative feedback through a miniature speaker inside the enclosed volume. This study was carried out to investigate laboratory procedures appropriate for measuring the effectiveness of ANR devices. The procedures were: ear-canal measurements using an acoustic test fixture (an objective procedure), and masked threshold and loudness balance tests (psycho-physical procedures). In addition, the effect of ANR on signal detection and speech reception was investigated. The results do not clearly permit one procedure to be recommended for the evaluation of ANR systems. Signal detection performance and speech intelligibility may be used, but the results are specific to the acoustic environment of the listener and the detection task or speech-system parameters of the evaluation. When the attenuation of the ANR system is measured objectively with a transducer inside the earmuff/ear-canal volume, the location of the transducer affects the observed ANR attenuations.

  4. Ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons with very high electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jae Yeong; Kim, Taeyoung; Choi, YongMan; Jeong, Hu Young; Kim, Min Gyu; Sa, Young Jin; Kim, Jaesik; Lee, Zonghoon; Yang, Tae-Hyun; Kwon, Kyungjung; Terasaki, Osamu; Park, Gu-Gon; Adzic, Radoslav R.; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    The high cost of the platinum-based cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has impeded the widespread application of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We report on a new family of non-precious metal catalysts based on ordered mesoporous porphyrinic carbons (M-OMPC; M = Fe, Co, or FeCo) with high surface areas and tunable pore structures, which were prepared by nanocasting mesoporous silica templates with metalloporphyrin precursors. The FeCo-OMPC catalyst exhibited an excellent ORR activity in an acidic medium, higher than other non-precious metal catalysts. It showed higher kinetic current at 0.9 V than Pt/C catalysts, as well as superior long-term durability and MeOH-tolerance. Density functional theory calculations in combination with extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed a weakening of the interaction between oxygen atom and FeCo-OMPC compared to Pt/C. This effect and high surface area of FeCo-OMPC appear responsible for its significantly high ORR activity. PMID:24056308

  5. Nitrogen and sulfur co-doped carbon with three-dimensional ordered macroporosity: An efficient metal-free oxygen reduction catalyst derived from ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui; Shi, Liang; Lei, Jiaheng; Liu, Dan; Qu, Deyu; Xie, Zhizhong; Du, Xiaodi; Yang, Peng; Hu, Xiaosong; Li, Junsheng; Tang, Haolin

    2016-08-01

    The development of efficient and durable catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is critical for the practical application of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A novel imidazole based ionic liquid is synthesized in this study and used subsequently for the preparation of a N and S co-doped metal-free catalyst with three dimensional ordered microstructure. The catalyst prepared at 1100 °C showed improved ORR catalytic performance and stability compared to commercial Pt/C catalyst. We demonstrate that the high graphitic N content and high degree of graphitization of the synthesized catalyst is responsible for its superb ORR activity. Our results suggest that the N and S co-doped metal-free catalyst reported here is a promising alternative to traditional ORR catalyst based on noble metal. Furthermore, the current study also demonstrate that importance of morphology engineering in the development of high performance ORR catalyst.

  6. Decontamination of heavy metal laden sewage sludge with simultaneous solids reduction using thermophilic sulfur and ferrous oxidizing species.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, A; Kundu, K; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2016-02-01

    A possibility of using simultaneous sewage sludge digestion and metal leaching (SSDML) process at the thermophilic temperature to remove heavy metals and suspended solids from sewage sludge is explored in this study. Though thermophilic sludge digestion efficiently produces a stable sludge, its inability to remove heavy metals requires it to be used in tandem with another process like bioleaching for metal reduction. Previously, different temperature optima were known for the heterotrophs (thermophilic) responsible for the sludge digestion and the autotrophs involved in bioleaching (mesophilic), because of which the metal concentration was brought down separately in a different reactor. In our study, SSDML process was carried out at 50 °C (thermophilic) by using ferrous sulfate (batch-1) and sulfur (batch-2) as the energy source in two reactors. The concentration of volatile suspended solids reduced by >40% in both batches, while that of heavy metals zinc, copper, chromium, cadmium and nickel decreased by >50% in both batch-1 and batch-2. Lead got leached out only in batch-1. Using 16S rRNA gene-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, Alicyclobacillus tolerans was found to be the microorganism responsible for lowering the pH in both the reactors at thermophilic temperature. The indicator organism count was also below the maximum permissible limit making sludge suitable for agricultural use. Our results indicate that SSDML at thermophilic temperature can be effectively used for reduction of heavy metals and suspended solids from sewage sludge.

  7. Decontamination of heavy metal laden sewage sludge with simultaneous solids reduction using thermophilic sulfur and ferrous oxidizing species.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, A; Kundu, K; Sreekrishnan, T R

    2016-02-01

    A possibility of using simultaneous sewage sludge digestion and metal leaching (SSDML) process at the thermophilic temperature to remove heavy metals and suspended solids from sewage sludge is explored in this study. Though thermophilic sludge digestion efficiently produces a stable sludge, its inability to remove heavy metals requires it to be used in tandem with another process like bioleaching for metal reduction. Previously, different temperature optima were known for the heterotrophs (thermophilic) responsible for the sludge digestion and the autotrophs involved in bioleaching (mesophilic), because of which the metal concentration was brought down separately in a different reactor. In our study, SSDML process was carried out at 50 °C (thermophilic) by using ferrous sulfate (batch-1) and sulfur (batch-2) as the energy source in two reactors. The concentration of volatile suspended solids reduced by >40% in both batches, while that of heavy metals zinc, copper, chromium, cadmium and nickel decreased by >50% in both batch-1 and batch-2. Lead got leached out only in batch-1. Using 16S rRNA gene-based PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis, Alicyclobacillus tolerans was found to be the microorganism responsible for lowering the pH in both the reactors at thermophilic temperature. The indicator organism count was also below the maximum permissible limit making sludge suitable for agricultural use. Our results indicate that SSDML at thermophilic temperature can be effectively used for reduction of heavy metals and suspended solids from sewage sludge. PMID:26686075

  8. 77 FR 38397 - Agency Information Collection (Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet) Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet) Activities....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Interest Rate Reduction Refinancing Loan Worksheet, VA Form 26-8923....

  9. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair.

    PubMed

    Flache, Lucie; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Kierdorf, Uwe; Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Encarnação, Jorge A

    2016-03-15

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats. PMID:26780144

  10. Reduction of metal exposure of Daubenton's bats (Myotis daubentonii) following remediation of pond sediment as evidenced by metal concentrations in hair.

    PubMed

    Flache, Lucie; Ekschmitt, Klemens; Kierdorf, Uwe; Czarnecki, Sezin; Düring, Rolf-Alexander; Encarnação, Jorge A

    2016-03-15

    Transfer of contaminants from freshwater sediments via aquatic insects to terrestrial predators is well documented in spiders and birds. Here, we analyzed the metal exposure of Myotis daubentonii using an urban pond as their preferred foraging area before and after a remediation measure (sediment dredging) at this pond. Six metal elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Cd, Pb and Ni) were measured in the sediment of the pond, in EDTA extracts of the sediment and in hair samples of M. daubentonii foraging at the pond. Samples were taken before remediation in 2011 and after remediation in 2013. Metal concentrations were quantified by ICP-OES after miniaturized microwave assisted extraction. In 2011, the pond sediment exhibited a high contamination with nickel, a moderate contamination with copper and chromium and low contents of zinc, cadmium and lead. While sediment metal contents declined only weakly after remediation, a much more pronounced reduction in the concentrations of zinc, copper, chromium and lead concentrations was observed in bat hair. Our results suggest a marked decline in metal exposure of the bats foraging at the pond as a consequence of the remediation measure. It is concluded that Daubenton's bats are suitable bioindicators of metal contamination in aquatic environments, integrating metal exposure via prey insects over their entire foraging area. We further suggest that bat hair is a useful monitoring unit, allowing a non-destructive and non-invasive assessment of metal exposure in bats.

  11. Reduction of Fe(III), Mn(IV), and Toxic Metals at 100°C by Pyrobaculum islandicum

    PubMed Central

    Kashefi, Kazem; Lovley, Derek R.

    2000-01-01

    It has recently been noted that a diversity of hyperthermophilic microorganisms have the ability to reduce Fe(III) with hydrogen as the electron donor, but the reduction of Fe(III) or other metals by these organisms has not been previously examined in detail. When Pyrobaculum islandicum was grown at 100°C in a medium with hydrogen as the electron donor and Fe(III)-citrate as the electron acceptor, the increase in cell numbers of P. islandicum per mole of Fe(III) reduced was found to be ca. 10-fold higher than previously reported. Poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide could also serve as the electron acceptor for growth on hydrogen. The stoichiometry of hydrogen uptake and Fe(III) oxide reduction was consistent with the oxidation of 1 mol of hydrogen resulting in the reduction of 2 mol of Fe(III). The poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxide was reduced to extracellular magnetite. P. islandicum could not effectively reduce the crystalline Fe(III) oxide minerals goethite and hematite. In addition to using hydrogen as an electron donor for Fe(III) reduction, P. islandicum grew via Fe(III) reduction in media in which peptone and yeast extract served as potential electron donors. The closely related species P. aerophilum grew via Fe(III) reduction in a similar complex medium. Cell suspensions of P. islandicum reduced the following metals with hydrogen as the electron donor: U(VI), Tc(VII), Cr(VI), Co(III), and Mn(IV). The reduction of these metals was dependent upon the presence of cells and hydrogen. The metalloids arsenate and selenate were not reduced. U(VI) was reduced to the insoluble U(IV) mineral uraninite, which was extracellular. Tc(VII) was reduced to insoluble Tc(IV) or Tc(V). Cr(VI) was reduced to the less toxic, less soluble Cr(III). Co(III) was reduced to Co(II). Mn(IV) was reduced to Mn(II) with the formation of manganese carbonate. These results demonstrate that biological reduction may contribute to the speciation of metals in hydrothermal environments and could

  12. Moving metal artifact reduction in cone-beam CT scans with implanted cylindrical gold markers

    SciTech Connect

    Toftegaard, Jakob Fledelius, Walther; Worm, Esben S.; Poulsen, Per R.; Seghers, Dieter; Huber, Michael; Brehm, Marcus; Elstrøm, Ulrik V.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Implanted gold markers for image-guided radiotherapy lead to streaking artifacts in cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans. Several methods for metal artifact reduction (MAR) have been published, but they all fail in scans with large motion. Here the authors propose and investigate a method for automatic moving metal artifact reduction (MMAR) in CBCT scans with cylindrical gold markers. Methods: The MMAR CBCT reconstruction method has six steps. (1) Automatic segmentation of the cylindrical markers in the CBCT projections. (2) Removal of each marker in the projections by replacing the pixels within a masked area with interpolated values. (3) Reconstruction of a marker-free CBCT volume from the manipulated CBCT projections. (4) Reconstruction of a standard CBCT volume with metal artifacts from the original CBCT projections. (5) Estimation of the three-dimensional (3D) trajectory during CBCT acquisition for each marker based on the segmentation in Step 1, and identification of the smallest ellipsoidal volume that encompasses 95% of the visited 3D positions. (6) Generation of the final MMAR CBCT reconstruction from the marker-free CBCT volume of Step 3 by replacing the voxels in the 95% ellipsoid with the corresponding voxels of the standard CBCT volume of Step 4. The MMAR reconstruction was performed retrospectively using a half-fan CBCT scan for 29 consecutive stereotactic body radiation therapy patients with 2–3 gold markers implanted in the liver. The metal artifacts of the MMAR reconstructions were scored and compared with a standard MAR reconstruction by counting the streaks and by calculating the standard deviation of the Hounsfield units in a region around each marker. Results: The markers were found with the same autosegmentation settings in 27 CBCT scans, while two scans needed slightly changed settings to find all markers automatically in Step 1 of the MMAR method. MMAR resulted in 15 scans with no streaking artifacts, 11 scans with 1–4 streaks, and 3 scans

  13. Rapid Rather than Gradual Weight Reduction Impairs Hemorheological Parameters of Taekwondo Athletes through Reduction in RBC-NOS Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Woo Hwi; Heine, Oliver; Pauly, Sebastian; Kim, Pilsang; Bloch, Wilhelm; Mester, Joachim; Grau, Marijke

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Rapid weight reduction is part of the pre-competition routine and has been shown to negatively affect psychological and physiological performance of Taekwondo (TKD) athletes. This is caused by a reduction of the body water and an electrolyte imbalance. So far, it is unknown whether weight reduction also affects hemorheological properties and hemorheology-influencing nitric oxide (NO) signaling, important for oxygen supply to the muscles and organs. Methods For this purpose, ten male TKD athletes reduced their body weight by 5% within four days (rapid weight reduction, RWR). After a recovery phase, athletes reduced body weight by 5% within four weeks (gradual weight reduction, GWR). Each intervention was preceded by two baseline measurements and followed by a simulated competition. Basal blood parameters (red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean cellular hemoglobin and mean cellular hemoglobin concentration), RBC-NO synthase activation, RBC nitrite as marker for NO synthesis, RBC deformability and aggregation parameters were determined on a total of eight investigation days. Results Basal blood parameters were not affected by the two interventions. In contrast to GWR, RWR decreased activation of RBC-NO synthase, RBC nitrite, respective NO concentration and RBC deformability. Additionally, RWR increased RBC aggregation and disaggregation threshold. Conclusion The results point out that a rapid weight reduction negatively affects hemorheological parameters and NO signaling in RBC which might limit performance capacity. Thus, GWR should be preferred to achieve the desired weight prior to a competition to avoid these negative effects. PMID:25875585

  14. Design of Laccase-Metal Organic Framework-Based Bioelectrodes for Biocatalytic Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Patra, Snehangshu; Sene, Saad; Mousty, Christine; Serre, Christian; Chaussé, Annie; Legrand, Ludovic; Steunou, Nathalie

    2016-08-10

    Laccase in combination with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as a mediator is a well-known bioelectrocatalyst for the 4-electron oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The present work deals with the first exploitation of mesoporous iron(III) trimesate-based metal organic frameworks (MOF) MIL-100(Fe) (MIL stands for materials from Institut Lavoisier) as a new and efficient immobilization matrix of laccase for the building up of biocathodes for ORR. First, the immobilization of ABTS in the pores of the MOF was studied by combining micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and N2 porosimetry. The ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-based modified electrode presents excellent properties in terms of charge transfer kinetics and ionic conductivity as well as a very stable and reproducible electrochemical response, showing that MIL-100(Fe) provides a suitable and stabilizing microenvironment for electroactive ABTS molecules. In a second step, laccase was further immobilized on the MIL-100(Fe)-ABTS matrix. The Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-CIE bioelectrode presents a high electrocatalytic current density of oxygen reduction and a reproducible electrochemical response characterized by a high stability over a long period of time (3 weeks). These results constitute a significant advance in the field of laccase-based bioelectrocatalysts for ORR. According to our work, it appears that the high catalytic efficiency of Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe) for ORR may result from a synergy of chemical and catalytic properties of MIL-100(Fe) and laccase.

  15. Design of Laccase-Metal Organic Framework-Based Bioelectrodes for Biocatalytic Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Patra, Snehangshu; Sene, Saad; Mousty, Christine; Serre, Christian; Chaussé, Annie; Legrand, Ludovic; Steunou, Nathalie

    2016-08-10

    Laccase in combination with 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) as a mediator is a well-known bioelectrocatalyst for the 4-electron oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The present work deals with the first exploitation of mesoporous iron(III) trimesate-based metal organic frameworks (MOF) MIL-100(Fe) (MIL stands for materials from Institut Lavoisier) as a new and efficient immobilization matrix of laccase for the building up of biocathodes for ORR. First, the immobilization of ABTS in the pores of the MOF was studied by combining micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and N2 porosimetry. The ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-based modified electrode presents excellent properties in terms of charge transfer kinetics and ionic conductivity as well as a very stable and reproducible electrochemical response, showing that MIL-100(Fe) provides a suitable and stabilizing microenvironment for electroactive ABTS molecules. In a second step, laccase was further immobilized on the MIL-100(Fe)-ABTS matrix. The Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe)-CIE bioelectrode presents a high electrocatalytic current density of oxygen reduction and a reproducible electrochemical response characterized by a high stability over a long period of time (3 weeks). These results constitute a significant advance in the field of laccase-based bioelectrocatalysts for ORR. According to our work, it appears that the high catalytic efficiency of Lac-ABTS-MIL-100(Fe) for ORR may result from a synergy of chemical and catalytic properties of MIL-100(Fe) and laccase. PMID:27447023

  16. Selective CO{sub 2} reduction conjugated with H{sub 2}O oxidation utilizing semiconductor/metal-complex hybrid photocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, T. Sato, S. Arai, T. Uemura, K. Yamanaka, K. I. Suzuki, T. M. Kajino, T. Motohiro, T.

    2013-12-10

    We developed a new hybrid photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction, which is composed of a semiconductor and a metal complex. In the hybrid photocatalyst, ΔG between the position of conduction band minimum (E{sub CBM}) of the semiconductor and the CO{sub 2} reduction potential of the complex is an essential factor for realizing fast electron transfer from the conduction band of semiconductor to metal complex leading to high photocatalytic activity. On the basis of this concept, the hybrid photocatalyst InP/Ru-complex, which functions in aqueous media, was developed. The photoreduction of CO{sub 2} to formate using water as an electron donor and a proton source was successfully achieved as a Z-scheme system by functionally conjugating the InP/Ru-complex photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction with a TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst for water oxidation. The conversion efficiency from solar energy to chemical energy was ca. 0.04%, which approaches that for photosynthesis in a plant. Because this system can be applied to many other inorganic semiconductors and metal-complex catalysts, the efficiency and reaction selectivity can be enhanced by optimization of the electron transfer process including the energy-band configurations, conjugation conformations, and catalyst structures. This electrical-bias-free reaction is a huge leap forward for future practical applications of artificial photosynthesis under solar irradiation to produce organic species.

  17. The Extension-Reduction Strategy: Activating Prior Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloyer, Cliff W.

    2004-01-01

    A mathematical problem is solved using the extension-reduction or build it up-tear it down tactic. This technique is implemented in reviving students' earlier knowledge to enable them to apply this knowledge to solving new problems.

  18. Clinical evaluation of a commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction tool for CT simulations in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Li Hua; Noel, Camille; Chen, Haijian; Harold Li, H.; Low, Daniel; Moore, Kevin; Klahr, Paul; Michalski, Jeff; Gay, Hiram A.; Thorstad, Wade; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Severe artifacts in kilovoltage-CT simulation images caused by large metallic implants can significantly degrade the conspicuity and apparent CT Hounsfield number of targets and anatomic structures, jeopardize the confidence of anatomical segmentation, and introduce inaccuracies into the radiation therapy treatment planning process. This study evaluated the performance of the first commercial orthopedic metal artifact reduction function (O-MAR) for radiation therapy, and investigated its clinical applications in treatment planning. Methods: Both phantom and clinical data were used for the evaluation. The CIRS electron density phantom with known physical (and electron) density plugs and removable titanium implants was scanned on a Philips Brilliance Big Bore 16-slice CT simulator. The CT Hounsfield numbers of density plugs on both uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images were compared. Treatment planning accuracy was evaluated by comparing simulated dose distributions computed using the true density images, uncorrected images, and O-MAR corrected images. Ten CT image sets of patients with large hip implants were processed with the O-MAR function and evaluated by two radiation oncologists using a five-point score for overall image quality, anatomical conspicuity, and CT Hounsfield number accuracy. By utilizing the same structure contours delineated from the O-MAR corrected images, clinical IMRT treatment plans for five patients were computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images, respectively, and compared. Results: Results of the phantom study indicated that CT Hounsfield number accuracy and noise were improved on the O-MAR corrected images, especially for images with bilateral metal implants. The {gamma} pass rates of the simulated dose distributions computed on the uncorrected and O-MAR corrected images referenced to those of the true densities were higher than 99.9% (even when using 1% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement criterion), suggesting that dose

  19. [Chromate reduction by Pseudomonas sp. str. 10 in the presence of some heavy metals and alternative electron acceptors].

    PubMed

    Smirnova, G F; Podgorskiĭ, V S

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. str. 10 reduces chromate with a rate of 0.54 mg / L.h. The availability of Cd2+ and Zn2+ in the medium has no noticeable effect on the rate or slightly increases it. The presence of nickel and copper in the ionic form in the medium resulted in a decrease of chromate reduction rate 2.4 and 4.2 times, respectively. Change of these metals into hydroxide form significantly lowers their negative influence. Iron (III) both in ionic and hydroxide form inhibits the reduction of chromate by Pseudomonas sp. 10. Joint presence of all studied metals decreases their negative impact on chromate reduction, therefore these metals may be neutralized together without a significant lowering of the process efficacy on condition that copper-containing drain will be cleaned separately. The presence of alternative acceptors of electrons inhibited the reduction of chromate. Sulfate and oxyanions of chlorine - chlorate and perchlorate have the highest inhibitory effect on chromate reduction. PMID:24006778

  20. Diverse metal reduction and nano- mineral formation by metal-reducing bacteria enriched from inter-tidal flat sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Park, B.; Seo, H.; Roh, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria utilize diverse metal oxides as electron acceptors and couple this microbial metal reduciton to growth. However, the microbe-metal interactions playing important roles in the metal geochemistry and organic matter degradation in the tidal flat sediments have not been uncovered enough to employ in various environmental and industrial applications. The objective of this study was to examine biomineralization and bioremediation by the facultative metal-reducing bacteria isolated from the inter-tidal flat sediments in southwestern of Korea. 16S-rRNA analysis showed bacterial consortium mainly consists of genus of Clostridium sp. The enriched bacteria were capable of reducing diverse metals such as iron oxide, maganese oxide, Cr(VI) and Se(VI) during glucose fermentation process at room temperature. The bacteria reduced highly toxic and reactive elements such as Cr(VI) and Se(VI) to Cr(III) and Se(0). The results showed that microbial processes induced transformation from toxic states of heavy metals to less toxic and mobile states in natural environments. Andthe bacteria also reduced iron oxyhydroxide such as ferrihydrite and akaganeite (β-FeOOH) and formed nanometer-sized magnetite (Fe3O4). This study indicates microbial processes not only can be used for bioremediation of inorganic contaminants existing in the marine environments, but also form the magnetite nanoparticles which are exhibit superparamagnetic properties that can be useful for relevant medical and industrial applications.

  1. Transition metal/nitrogen dual-doped mesoporous graphene-like carbon nanosheets for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaobo; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Liu, Shaojun; Cheng, Kun; Mu, Shichun

    2016-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been considered as a key step in energy conversion processes. Here, a novel and simple Mg(OH)2 nanocasting method is adopted to fabricate Co and N co-doped porous graphene-like carbon nanosheets (Co@N-PGCS) by using chitosan as both carbon and N sources. The as-obtained Co@N-PGCS shows a mesopore-dominated structure as well as a high specific surface area (1716 cm2 g-1). As a bifunctional electrocatalyst towards both the ORR and OER, it shows favorable ORR performance compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst with an onset potential of -0.075 V and a half-wave potential of -0.151 V in 0.1 M KOH solutions. Furthermore, it also displays considerable OER properties compared with commercial IrO2. The effective catalytic activity could originate from the introduction of transition metal species and few-layer mesoporous carbon structures.The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) have been considered as a key step in energy conversion processes. Here, a novel and simple Mg(OH)2 nanocasting method is adopted to fabricate Co and N co-doped porous graphene-like carbon nanosheets (Co@N-PGCS) by using chitosan as both carbon and N sources. The as-obtained Co@N-PGCS shows a mesopore-dominated structure as well as a high specific surface area (1716 cm2 g-1). As a bifunctional electrocatalyst towards both the ORR and OER, it shows favorable ORR performance compared with the commercial Pt/C catalyst with an onset potential of -0.075 V and a half-wave potential of -0.151 V in 0.1 M KOH solutions. Furthermore, it also displays considerable OER properties compared with commercial IrO2. The effective catalytic activity could originate from the introduction of transition metal species and few-layer mesoporous carbon structures. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The XPS fitted results, SEM and TEM images, the K-L equation, and some of the electrochemical

  2. Partially Hydrogenated Graphene Materials Exhibit High Electrocatalytic Activities Related to Unintentional Doping with Metallic Impurities.

    PubMed

    Jankovský, Ondřej; Libánská, Alena; Bouša, Daniel; Sedmidubský, David; Matějková, Stanislava; Sofer, Zdeněk

    2016-06-13

    Partially hydrogenated graphene materials, synthesized by the chemical reduction/hydrogenation of two different graphene oxides using zinc powder in acidic environment or aluminum powder in alkaline environment, exhibit high electrocatalytic activities, as well as electrochemical sensing properties. The starting graphene oxides and the resultant hydrogenated graphenes were characterized in detail. Their electrocatalytic activity was examined in the oxygen reduction reaction, whereas sensing properties towards explosives were tested by using picric acid as a redox probe. Findings indicate that the high electrocatalytic performance originates not only from the hydrogenation of graphene, but also from unintentional contamination of graphene with manganese and other metals during synthesis. A careful evaluation of the obtained data and a detailed chemical analysis are necessary to identify the origin of this anomalous electrocatalytic activity. PMID:27167069

  3. Separation and Recovery of Uranium Metal from Spent Light Water Reactor Fuel via Electrolytic Reduction and Electrorefining

    SciTech Connect

    S. D. Herrmann; S. X. Li

    2010-09-01

    A series of bench-scale experiments was performed in a hot cell at Idaho National Laboratory to demonstrate the separation and recovery of uranium metal from spent light water reactor (LWR) oxide fuel. The experiments involved crushing spent LWR fuel to particulate and separating it from its cladding. Oxide fuel particulate was then converted to metal in a series of six electrolytic reduction runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl – 1 wt% Li2O at 650 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrolytic reduction runs identified the diffusion of select fission products from the spent fuel to the molten salt electrolyte. The extents of metal oxide conversion in the post-test fuel were also quantified, including a nominal 99.7% conversion of uranium oxide to metal. Uranium metal was then separated from the reduced LWR fuel in a series of six electrorefining runs that were performed in succession with a single salt loading of molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3 at 500 °C. Analysis of salt samples following the series of electrorefining runs identified additional partitioning of fission products into the molten salt electrolyte. Analyses of the separated uranium metal were performed, and its decontamination factors were determined.

  4. Metals in the active site of native protein phosphatase-1.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Rip, Jens; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; De Gendt, Stefan; Bollen, Mathieu

    2015-08-01

    Protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) is a major protein Ser/Thr phosphatase in eukaryotic cells. Its activity depends on two metal ions in the catalytic site, which were identified as manganese in the bacterially expressed phosphatase. However, the identity of the metal ions in native PP1 is unknown. In this study, total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) was used to detect iron and zinc in PP1 that was purified from rabbit skeletal muscle. Metal exchange experiments confirmed that the distinct substrate specificity of recombinant and native PP1 is determined by the nature of their associated metals. We also found that the iron level associated with native PP1 is decreased by incubation with inhibitor-2, consistent with a function of inhibitor-2 as a PP1 chaperone. PMID:25890482

  5. Development, implementation and evaluation of a dedicated metal artefact reduction method for interventional flat-detector CT.

    PubMed

    Prell, D; Kalender, W A; Kyriakou, Y

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop, implement and evaluate a dedicated metal artefact reduction (MAR) method for flat-detector CT (FDCT). The algorithm uses the multidimensional raw data space to calculate surrogate attenuation values for the original metal traces in the raw data domain. The metal traces are detected automatically by a three-dimensional, threshold-based segmentation algorithm in an initial reconstructed image volume, based on twofold histogram information for calculating appropriate metal thresholds. These thresholds are combined with constrained morphological operations in the projection domain. A subsequent reconstruction of the modified raw data yields an artefact-reduced image volume that is further processed by a combining procedure that reinserts the missing metal information. For image quality assessment, measurements on semi-anthropomorphic phantoms containing metallic inserts were evaluated in terms of CT value accuracy, image noise and spatial resolution before and after correction. Measurements of the same phantoms without prostheses were used as ground truth for comparison. Cadaver measurements were performed on complex and realistic cases and to determine the influences of our correction method on the tissue surrounding the prostheses. The results showed a significant reduction of metal-induced streak artefacts (CT value differences were reduced to below 22 HU and image noise reduction of up to 200%). The cadaver measurements showed excellent results for imaging areas close to the implant and exceptional artefact suppression in these areas. Furthermore, measurements in the knee and spine regions confirmed the superiority of our method to standard one-dimensional, linear interpolation.

  6. Development of a new metal artifact reduction algorithm by using an edge preserving method for CBCT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Juhye; Nam, Haewon; Lee, Rena

    2015-07-01

    CT (computed tomography) images, metal materials such as tooth supplements or surgical clips can cause metal artifact and degrade image quality. In severe cases, this may lead to misdiagnosis. In this research, we developed a new MAR (metal artifact reduction) algorithm by using an edge preserving filter and the MATLAB program (Mathworks, version R2012a). The proposed algorithm consists of 6 steps: image reconstruction from projection data, metal segmentation, forward projection, interpolation, applied edge preserving smoothing filter, and new image reconstruction. For an evaluation of the proposed algorithm, we obtained both numerical simulation data and data for a Rando phantom. In the numerical simulation data, four metal regions were added into the Shepp Logan phantom for metal artifacts. The projection data of the metal-inserted Rando phantom were obtained by using a prototype CBCT scanner manufactured by medical engineering and medical physics (MEMP) laboratory research group in medical science at Ewha Womans University. After these had been adopted the proposed algorithm was performed, and the result were compared with the original image (with metal artifact without correction) and with a corrected image based on linear interpolation. Both visual and quantitative evaluations were done. Compared with the original image with metal artifacts and with the image corrected by using linear interpolation, both the numerical and the experimental phantom data demonstrated that the proposed algorithm reduced the metal artifact. In conclusion, the evaluation in this research showed that the proposed algorithm outperformed the interpolation based MAR algorithm. If an optimization and a stability evaluation of the proposed algorithm can be performed, the developed algorithm is expected to be an effective tool for eliminating metal artifacts even in commercial CT systems.

  7. L-Malate dehydrogenase activity in the reductive arm of the incomplete citric acid cycle of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Deutch, Charles E

    2013-11-01

    The autotrophic nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea does not synthesize 2-oxoglutarate (α-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase under aerobic conditions and so has an incomplete citric acid cycle. L-malate (S-malate) dehydrogenase (MDH) from N. europaea was predicted to show similarity to the NADP(+)-dependent enzymes from chloroplasts and was separated from the NAD(+)-dependent proteins from most other bacteria or mitochondria. MDH activity in a soluble fraction from N. europaea ATCC 19718 was measured spectrophotometrically and exhibited simple Michaelis-Menten kinetics. In the reductive direction, activity with NADH increased from pH 6.0 to 8.5 but activity with NADPH was consistently lower and decreased with pH. At pH 7.0, the K m for oxaloacetate was 20 μM; the K m for NADH was 22 μM but that for NADPH was at least 10 times higher. In the oxidative direction, activity with NAD(+) increased with pH but there was very little activity with NADP(+). At pH 7.0, the K m for L-malate was 5 mM and the K m for NAD(+) was 24 μM. The reductive activity was quite insensitive to inhibition by L-malate but the oxidative activity was very sensitive to oxaloacetate. MDH activity was not strongly activated or inhibited by glycolytic or citric acid cycle metabolites, adenine nucleotides, NaCl concentrations, or most metal ions, but increased with temperature up to about 55 °C. The reductive activity was consistently 10-20 times higher than the oxidative activity. These results indicate that the L-malate dehydrogenase in N. europaea is similar to other NAD(+)-dependent MDHs (EC 1.1.1.37) but physiologically adapted for its role in a reductive biosynthetic sequence.

  8. Microalloying of transition metal silicides by mechanical activation and field-activated reaction

    DOEpatents

    Munir, Zuhair A.; Woolman, Joseph N.; Petrovic, John J.

    2003-09-02

    Alloys of transition metal suicides that contain one or more alloying elements are fabricated by a two-stage process involving mechanical activation as the first stage and densification and field-activated reaction as the second stage. Mechanical activation, preferably performed by high-energy planetary milling, results in the incorporation of atoms of the alloying element(s) into the crystal lattice of the transition metal, while the densification and field-activated reaction, preferably performed by spark plasma sintering, result in the formation of the alloyed transition metal silicide. Among the many advantages of the process are its ability to accommodate materials that are incompatible in other alloying methods.

  9. Tuned by metals: the TET peptidase activity is controlled by 3 metal binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Matteo; Girard, Eric; Franzetti, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    TET aminopeptidases are dodecameric particles shared in the three life domains involved in various biological processes, from carbon source provider in archaea to eye-pressure regulation in humans. Each subunit contains a dinuclear metal site (M1 and M2) responsible for the enzyme catalytic activity. However, the role of each metal ion is still uncharacterized. Noteworthy, while mesophilic TETs are activated by Mn2+, hyperthermophilic TETs prefers Co2+. Here, by means of anomalous x-ray crystallography and enzyme kinetics measurements of the TET3 aminopeptidase from the hyperthermophilic organism Pyrococcus furiosus (PfTET3), we show that M2 hosts the catalytic activity of the enzyme, while M1 stabilizes the TET3 quaternary structure and controls the active site flexibility in a temperature dependent manner. A new third metal site (M3) was found in the substrate binding pocket, modulating the PfTET3 substrate preferences. These data show that TET activity is tuned by the molecular interplay among three metal sites. PMID:26853450

  10. Redox-activated MRI contrast agents based on lanthanide and transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Tsitovich, Pavel B; Burns, Patrick J; McKay, Adam M; Morrow, Janet R

    2014-04-01

    The reduction/oxidation (redox) potential of tissue is tightly regulated in order to maintain normal physiological processes, but is disrupted in disease states. Thus, the development of new tools to map tissue redox potential may be clinically important for the diagnosis of diseases that lead to redox imbalances. One promising area of chemical research is the development of redox-activated probes for mapping tissue through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we summarize several strategies for the design of redox-responsive MRI contrast agents. Our emphasis is on both lanthanide(III) and transition metal(II/III) ion complexes that provide contrast either as T1 relaxivity MRI contrast agents or as paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST) contrast agents. These agents are redox-triggered by a variety of chemical reactions or switches including redox-activated thiol groups, and heterocyclic groups that interact with the metal ion or influence properties of other ancillary ligands. Metal ion centered redox is an approach which is ripe for development by coordination chemists. Redox-triggered metal ion approaches have great potential for creating large differences in magnetic properties that lead to changes in contrast. An attractive feature of these agents is the ease of fine-tuning the metal ion redox potential over a biologically relevant range.

  11. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Poston, James A.

    1997-01-01

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  12. Reduction of spalling in mixed metal oxide desulfurization sorbents by addition of a large promoter metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Poston, J.A.

    1997-12-02

    Mixed metal oxide pellets for removing hydrogen sulfide from fuel gas mixes derived from coal are stabilized for operation over repeated cycles of desulfurization and regeneration reactions by addition of a large promoter metal oxide such as lanthanum trioxide. The pellets, which may be principally made up of a mixed metal oxide such as zinc titanate, exhibit physical stability and lack of spalling or decrepitation over repeated cycles without loss of reactivity. The lanthanum oxide is mixed with pellet-forming components in an amount of 1 to 10 weight percent.

  13. Changes realized from extended bit-depth and metal artifact reduction in CT

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Chen, D.; Zhong, H.; Chetty, I. J.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: High-Z material in computed tomography (CT) yields metal artifacts that degrade image quality and may cause substantial errors in dose calculation. This study couples a metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithm with enhanced 16-bit depth (vs standard 12-bit) to quantify potential gains in image quality and dosimetry. Methods: Extended CT to electron density (CT-ED) curves were derived from a tissue characterization phantom with titanium and stainless steel inserts scanned at 90-140 kVp for 12- and 16-bit reconstructions. MAR was applied to sinogram data (Brilliance BigBore CT scanner, Philips Healthcare, v.3.5). Monte Carlo simulation (MC-SIM) was performed on a simulated double hip prostheses case (Cerrobend rods embedded in a pelvic phantom) using BEAMnrc/Dosxyz (400 000 0000 histories, 6X, 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} beam traversing Cerrobend rod). A phantom study was also conducted using a stainless steel rod embedded in solid water, and dosimetric verification was performed with Gafchromic film analysis (absolute difference and gamma analysis, 2% dose and 2 mm distance to agreement) for plans calculated with Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm (AAA, Eclipse v11.0) to elucidate changes between 12- and 16-bit data. Three patients (bony metastases to the femur and humerus, and a prostate cancer case) with metal implants were reconstructed using both bit depths, with dose calculated using AAA and derived CT-ED curves. Planar dose distributions were assessed via matrix analyses and using gamma criteria of 2%/2 mm. Results: For 12-bit images, CT numbers for titanium and stainless steel saturated at 3071 Hounsfield units (HU), whereas for 16-bit depth, mean CT numbers were much larger (e.g., titanium and stainless steel yielded HU of 8066.5 {+-} 56.6 and 13 588.5 {+-} 198.8 for 16-bit uncorrected scans at 120 kVp, respectively). MC-SIM was well-matched between 12- and 16-bit images except downstream of the Cerrobend rod, where 16-bit dose was {approx}6

  14. Synthesis of highly active and dual-functional electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qi; Zhang, Geng; Xu, Guangran; Li, Yingjun; Liu, Baocang; Gong, Xia; Zheng, Dafang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Qin

    2016-12-01

    The promising Pt-based ternary catalyst is crucial for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to improving catalytic activity and durability for both methanol oxidation reaction and oxygen reduction reaction. In this work, a facile strategy is used for the synthesis ternary RuMPt (M = Fe, Co, Ni, and Cu) nanodendrities catalysts. The ternary RuMPt alloys exhibit enhanced specific and mass activity, positive half-wave potential, and long-term stability, compared with binary Pt-based alloy and the commercial Pt/C catalyst, which is attributed to the high electron density and upshifting of the d-band center for Pt atoms, and synergistic catalytic effects among Pt, M, and Ru atoms by introducing a transition metal. Impressively, the ternary RuCoPt catalyst exhibits superior mass activity (801.59 mA mg-1) and positive half-wave potential (0.857 V vs. RHE) towards MOR and ORR, respectively. Thus, the RuMPt nanocomposite is a very promising material to be used as dual electrocatalyst in the application of PEMFCs.

  15. [An adaptive scaling hybrid algorithm for reduction of CT artifacts caused by metal objects].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Luo, Hai; Zhou, He-qin

    2009-03-01

    A new adaptively hybrid filtering algorithm is proposed to reduce the artifacts caused by metal in CT image. Firstly, the method is used to preprocess the projection data of metal region and is reconstruct by filtered back projection (FBP) method. Then the expectation maximization algorithm (EM) is performed on the iterative original metal project data. Finally, a compensating procedure is applied to the reconstructed metal region. The simulation result has demonstrated that the proposed algorithm can remove the metal artifacts and keep the structure information of metal object effectively. It ensures that the tissues around the metal will not be distorted. The method is also computational efficient and effective for the CT images which contains several metal objects.

  16. Anticancer Activity of Metal Complexes: Involvement of Redox Processes

    PubMed Central

    Jungwirth, Ute; Kowol, Christian R.; Keppler, Bernhard K.; Hartinger, Christian G.; Berger, Walter; Heffeter, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Cells require tight regulation of the intracellular redox balance and consequently of reactive oxygen species for proper redox signaling and maintenance of metal (e.g., of iron and copper) homeostasis. In several diseases, including cancer, this balance is disturbed. Therefore, anticancer drugs targeting the redox systems, for example, glutathione and thioredoxin, have entered focus of interest. Anticancer metal complexes (platinum, gold, arsenic, ruthenium, rhodium, copper, vanadium, cobalt, manganese, gadolinium, and molybdenum) have been shown to strongly interact with or even disturb cellular redox homeostasis. In this context, especially the hypothesis of “activation by reduction” as well as the “hard and soft acids and bases” theory with respect to coordination of metal ions to cellular ligands represent important concepts to understand the molecular modes of action of anticancer metal drugs. The aim of this review is to highlight specific interactions of metal-based anticancer drugs with the cellular redox homeostasis and to explain this behavior by considering chemical properties of the respective anticancer metal complexes currently either in (pre)clinical development or in daily clinical routine in oncology. PMID:21275772

  17. Thermodynamic control of microbial sulfate reduction rates and consequences for the form and distribution of metal sulfide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Q.; Banfield, J.

    2004-12-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria are widespread in natural environment. They derive energy for growth by reducing sulfate to sulfide. In the presence of metal ions, the sulfide byproduct precipitates as metal sulfide nanoparticles. Microorganisms can reduce sulfate through two metabolic pathways, i.e., an incomplete and a complete pathway. In the former case, microorganisms, such as Desulfovibrio sp., oxidize lactate, butyrate, ethanol, etc. to acetate, whereas in the latter, microorganisms, such as Desulfobacter sp., oxidize acetate to bicarbonate. It is important to study the kinetics of microbial sulfate reduction because microbial metabolic rates may influence the form, mobility, and reactivity of biogenic minerals. The rate of sulfate reduction is controlled not only by substrate concentrations in environments, but also by the thermodynamic driving force. The driving force is the difference between the energy available from environment and the energy conserved. The amount of energy conserved is about 80 kJ/mol lactate and 90 kJ/mol acetate for incomplete and complete pathway, respectively. Where the energy available from environments is much higher than the energy conserved, the driving force is large and sulfate reduction proceeds at high rate. The particle size of metal sulfide minerals precipitated under such conditions is extremely small. However, where the energy available is close to the energy conserved, the driving force is small and the rate of sulfate reduction is small. These conditions could favor nanoparticle transport because particle advection and dispersion may be strong enough to remove nanoparticles before large immobile aggregates can form.

  18. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-01

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω-+|1 mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω--|1 mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω-+|1 and ω--|1 modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag-SiO2-Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  19. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstrated in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.

  20. Highly active non-PGM catalysts prepared from metal organic frameworks

    DOE PAGES

    Barkholtz, Heather M.; Chong, Lina; Kaiser, Zachary B.; Xu, Tao; Liu, Di -Jia

    2015-06-11

    Finding inexpensive alternatives to platinum group metals (PGMs) is essential for reducing the cost of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Numerous materials have been investigated as potential replacements of Pt, of which the transition metal and nitrogen-doped carbon composites (TM/Nx/C) prepared from iron doped zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs) are among the most active ones in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction based on recent studies. In this report, we demonstrate that the catalytic activity of ZIF-based TM/Nx/C composites can be substantially improved through optimization of synthesis and post-treatment processing conditions. Ultimately, oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalytic activity must be demonstratedmore » in membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) of fuel cells. The process of preparing MEAs using ZIF-based non-PGM electrocatalysts involves many additional factors which may influence the overall catalytic activity at the fuel cell level. Evaluation of parameters such as catalyst loading and perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer to catalyst ratio were optimized. Our overall efforts to optimize both the catalyst and MEA construction process have yielded impressive ORR activity when tested in a fuel cell system.« less

  1. Catalytic Activity-d-Band Center Correlation for the O2 Reduction on Platinum in Alkaline Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima,F.; Zhang, J.; Shao, M.; Sasaki, K.; Vukmirovic, M.; Ticianelli, E.; Adzic, R.

    2007-01-01

    We determined, by the rotating disk electrode technique, the kinetics of the oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) on the surfaces of single crystals of Au(111), Ag(111), Pd(111), Rh(111), Ir(111), and Ru(0001), on Pt monolayers deposited on their surfaces, and also on nanoparticles of these metals dispersed on high-surface-area carbon. Plotting the correlation between the experimentally determined activities of these three types of electrocatalysts with the calculated metal d-band center energies,{var_epsilon}{sub d}, revealed a volcano-type dependence. In all cases, the electronic properties of the metal electrocatalysts, represented by the {var_epsilon}{sub d} value, were used for elucidating the metal-dependent catalytic activities, and establishing their electronic properties-the ORR kinetics relationship. Pt(111), Pt/C, and Pt/Pd(111) were found to top their corresponding volcano plots. Pd in alkaline solutions showed particularly high activity, suggesting it may offer potential replacement for Pt in fuel cells.

  2. A metal-organic tetrahedron as a redox vehicle to encapsulate organic dyes for photocatalytic proton reduction.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xu; He, Cheng; Yang, Yang; Duan, Chunying

    2015-03-25

    The design of artificial systems that mimic highly evolved and finely tuned natural photosynthetic systems is a subject of intensive research. We report herein a new approach to constructing supramolecular systems for the photocatalytic generation of hydrogen from water by encapsulating an organic dye molecule into the pocket of a redox-active metal-organic polyhedron. The assembled neutral Co4L4 tetrahedron consists of four ligands and four cobalt ions that connect together in alternating fashion. The cobalt ions are coordinated by three thiosemicarbazone NS chelators and exhibit a redox potential suitable for electrochemical proton reduction. The close proximity between the redox site and the photosensitizer encapsulated in the pocket enables photoinduced electron transfer from the excited state of the photosensitizer to the cobalt-based catalytic sites via a powerful pseudo-intramolecular pathway. The modified supramolecular system exhibits TON values comparable to the highest values reported for related cobalt/fluorescein systems. Control experiments based on a smaller tetrahedral analogue of the vehicle with a filled pocket and a mononuclear compound resembling the cobalt corner of the tetrahedron suggest an enzymatic dynamics behavior. The new, well-elucidated reaction pathways and the increased molarity of the reaction within the confined space render these supramolecular systems superior to other relevant systems.

  3. Graphene quantum dot hybrids as efficient metal-free electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Wu, Peiyi

    2013-04-24

    The doping of heteroatoms into graphene quantum dot nanostructures provides an efficient way to tune the electronic structures and make more active sites for electro-catalysis, photovoltaic, or light emitting applications. Other than the modification of chemical composition, novel architecture is very desirable to enrich the research area and provides a wide range of choices for the diverse applications. Herein, we show a novel lotus seedpod surface-like pattern of zero-dimension (0D) seed-like N-GODs of ca.3 nm embedded on the surface of a two-dimension (2D) N-GQD sheet of ca.35 nm. It is demonstrated that different photoluminescence (PL) could be tuned easily, and the novel multidimensional structure displays excellent performance toward oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline solutions. Thus, the fabricated N-GQD hybrids show bright perspective in biomedical imaging, biosensors, and conversion and storage of energy.

  4. Order of Activity of Nitrogen, Iron Oxide, and FeNx Complexes towards Oxygen Reduction in Alkaline Medium.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yansong; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Da-Wei; Su, Dang Sheng

    2015-12-01

    In alkaline medium, it seems that both metal-free and iron-containing carbon-based catalysts, such as nitrogen-doped nanocarbon materials, FeOx -doped carbon, and Fe/N/C catalysts, are active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the order of activity of these different active compositions has not been clearly determined. Herein, we synthesized nitrogen-doped carbon black (NCB), Fe3 O4 /CB, Fe3 O4 /NCB, and FeN4 /CB. Through the systematic study of the ORR catalytic activity of these four catalysts in alkaline solution, we confirmed the difference in the catalytic activity and catalytic mechanism for nitrogen, iron oxides, and Fe-N complexes, respectively. In metal-free NCB, nitrogen can improve the ORR catalytic activity with a four-electron pathway. Fe3 O4 /CB catalyst did not exhibit improved activity over that of NCB owing to the poor conductivity and spinel structure of Fe3 O4 . However, FeN4 coordination compounds as the active sites showed excellent ORR catalytic activity.

  5. Reactivity of CO2 Activated on Transition Metals and Sulfur Ligands.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuaki; Tanaka, Koji

    2015-06-01

    Dicationic dicarbonyl [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) (bpy = 2,2'- bipyridyl) exists as equilibrium mixtures with [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(COOH)](+) and [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(CO2)](0) depending on the pH in H2O. Those three complexes work as the precursors to CO, HCOOH production, and CO2 carrier, respectively, in electro- and photochemical CO2 reduction in aqueous solutions. However, [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) loses the catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction under aprotic conditions because [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+) is not regenerated from [Ru(bpy)2(CO)(CO2)](0) in the absence of proton sources. Analogous monocarbonylruthenium complexes such as [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(CO)](2+) and [Ru(bpy)2(qu)(CO)](2+) catalyze CO2 reduction in the absence and presence of proton sources. Both complexes are reproduced through oxide transfer from the corresponding Ru-CO2 to CO2 in CO2 reduction and produce the same amount of CO and CO3(2-) in the absence of proton donors. The reduction of CO2 catalyzed by polypyridylrhenium complexes in the presence of proton sources takes place via essentially the similar mechanism as that in the case of ruthenium complexes. On the other hand, CO evolution in CO2 reduction under aprotic conditions is ascribed to the dissociation of CO from a dimeric Re-C(O)OC(O)O-Re scaffold. Visible-light irradiation to a catalytic system composed of [Ru(bpy)2(CO)2](2+)/[Ru(bpy)3](2+)/Me2NH2(+)/Me2NH as the catalyst, photosensitizer, proton donor, and nucleophile in addition to the electron donor, respectively, in CO2-saturated CH3CN selectively produces N,N-dimethylformamide without concomitant CO and HCOOH formation. Structurally robust μ3-S of reduced metal-sulfur clusters provides a suitable site for reductive activation of CO2 with retention of the framework. Indeed, CO2 activated on μ3-S of [Fe6Mo2S8(SEt)3](5-) is fixed at the carbonyl carbon of thioesters trapped on a neighboring iron of the cluster, and α-keto acids are produced catalytically. Furthermore, two-electron reduction of [(CpMen)3M3S3](2+) (n

  6. High-valent metal-oxo intermediates in energy demanding processes: from dioxygen reduction to water splitting.

    PubMed

    Ray, Kallol; Heims, Florian; Schwalbe, Matthias; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-01

    Four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water and splitting of water to dioxygen are extremely important processes in the context of attaining clean renewable energy sources. High-valent metal-oxo cores are proposed as reactive intermediates in these vital processes, although they have only been isolated in extremely rare cases in the biological systems thereby making the mechanism ambiguous. Recent biomimetic studies have, however, aided in our understanding of the fundamental reactivity of the high-valent metal-oxo species in various reactions relevant to energy conversion. All these studies are summarized in the present review.

  7. Molecular Catalysis of the Electrochemical and Photochemical Reduction of CO2 with Earth-Abundant Metal Complexes. Selective Production of CO vs HCOOH by Switching of the Metal Center.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingjing; Guo, Zhenguo; Wei, Xi-Guang; Gallenkamp, Charlotte; Bonin, Julien; Anxolabéhère-Mallart, Elodie; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu; Robert, Marc

    2015-09-01

    Molecular catalysis of carbon dioxide reduction using earth-abundant metal complexes as catalysts is a key challenge related to the production of useful products--the "solar fuels"--in which solar energy would be stored. A direct approach using sunlight energy as well as an indirect approach where sunlight is first converted into electricity could be used. A Co(II) complex and a Fe(III) complex, both bearing the same pentadentate N5 ligand (2,13-dimethyl-3,6,9,12,18-pentaazabicyclo[12.3.1]octadeca-1(18),2,12,14,16-pentaene), were synthesized, and their catalytic activity toward CO2 reduction was investigated. Carbon monoxide was formed with the cobalt complex, while formic acid was obtained with the iron-based catalyst, thus showing that the catalysis product can be switched by changing the metal center. Selective CO2 reduction occurs under electrochemical conditions as well as photochemical conditions when using a photosensitizer under visible light excitation (λ > 460 nm, solvent acetonitrile) with the Co catalyst. In the case of the Fe catalyst, selective HCOOH production occurs at low overpotential. Sustained catalytic activity over long periods of time and high turnover numbers were observed in both cases. A catalytic mechanism is suggested on the basis of experimental results and preliminary quantum chemistry calculations.

  8. Diagnostics of metal inert gas and metal active gas welding processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhrlandt, D.

    2016-08-01

    The paper gives a review on studies on metal inert gas (MIG) and metal active gas (MAG) welding processes with the focus on diagnostics of the arc, the material transfer, and the temporal process behaviour in welding experiments. Recent findings with respect to an improved understanding of the main mechanisms in the welding arc and the welding process are summarized. This is linked to actual developments in welding arc and welding process modelling where measurements are indispensable for validation. Challenges of forthcoming studies are illustrated by means of methods under development for welding process control as well as remaining open questions with respect to arc-surface interaction and arc power balance.

  9. Reduction of beta activity from depleted derbies, ingots and crucibles

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, G.G.; Schonegg, E.; Kato, T.R.

    1984-09-01

    The reduction of beta radiation on uranium ingot and crucible surfaces was demonstrated in the production casting operation by adding a mixture of slag liner material (MgF/sub 2/) and calcium fluoride to the remelt charge. The beta emitters (/sup 234/Th and /sup 234/Pa) are largely discharged with the fluorides into drums during a remote crucible burnout operation; thereby, reducing operator exposure to beta radiation. A production test showed that very low beta radiation from uranium flat castings can be achieved by using derbies recently prepared by reduction. Plant tests with fluoride addition indicate that pickling of derbies may not be necessary for casting uranium flats from a plasma sprayed (ZrO/sub 2/) crucible. Also, ingots produced with fluoride additions had less pipe as compared to standard production technique. 2 references, 5 tables.

  10. Sulfur isotope fractionation as an early indicator of microbial sulfate reduction under conditions of stimulated subsurface metal bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druhan, J. L.; Conrad, M. E.; Williams, K. H.; Steefel, C.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    Sustained in situ metal remediation presents a challenge in quantifying the onset, extent and overlap of each major chemical transition, as well as the evolution of physical, chemical and microbial parameters over multiple amendments. These parameters define a biogeochemically dynamic system requiring numerical reactive transport modeling to accurately predict cumulative contaminant stabilization. The use of novel monitoring tools to improve input parameters for numerical models is an essential component of the remediation strategy. Here we present aqueous geochemical data from three consecutive years of amended uranium bioremediation in a single well gallery from the US Department of Energy’s Environmental Remediation Science Program field site in Rifle, Colorado. Uranium bioremediation at the Rifle site is achieved through introduction of acetate at mM concentrations to stimulate first ferric iron reducers and subsequently sulfate reducers both naturally occurring in the aquifer. The factors controlling the onset of sulfate reduction and the extent to which iron and sulfate reduction can proceed concurrently are not well understood, and the initiation of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) activity must be closely monitored through aqueous geochemical data. Average background sulfate concentration in the aquifer is 9.6 mM with a 2σ standard deviation of 2.3, meaning that a 25% decrease in sulfate is necessary in order to identify sulfate reduction beyond background variation. Detection of aqueous sulfide should provide a more sensitive indicator of sulfate reduction, but the presence of ferrous iron in solution precipitates sulfides from the aqueous phase, causing a decline in measured sulfide concentrations and a lag in the onset of measurable sulfides up to 18 days after sulfate concentrations decrease. Sulfur isotopes present a means of overcoming this limitation. SRB fractionation factors are >10‰ even in open systems, meaning a 10% decrease in sulfate

  11. Direct Reduction of Waste through Refining of DOE Metal Assets - 13632

    SciTech Connect

    Hargett, Michael C.; Terekhov, Dimitri; Khozan, Kamran M.

    2013-07-01

    CVMR{sup R} presents a technology for refining nickel from the enrichment barrier materials of the DOE that is proven through 100 years of use by the metals industry. CVMR{sup R} applies modern controls, instrumentation for process and monitoring of the system, and innovative production methods to produce a wide spectrum of products that generate new technology applications and improvements to our society and economy. CVMR{sup R} will receive barrier materials as a secure operation and size reduce the metal to a shred that is fed to a carbonylation reactor where nickel is reacted with carbon monoxide and generate nickel carbonyl. The carbonyl will be filtered and decomposed with heat to form a variety of products that include high value nano powders, coated substrates, net shapes and pure nickel. The residue from the reactor will retain radionuclides from enrichment activities. The carbon monoxide will only react and extract nickel under the operating conditions to leave volumetric contamination in the unreacted residue. A demonstration plant was designed and built by CVMR{sup R} and operated by BWXT, to demonstrate the systems capabilities to DOE in 2006. A pilot plant operation precedes the detailed design of the nickel refinery and provides essential data for design, safe work practices, waste characterizations and system kinetics and confirms the project feasibility. CVMR{sup R} produces nickel products that are cleaner than the nickel in U.S. commerce and used by industry today. The CVMR{sup R} process and systems for nickel refining is well suited for DOE materials and will provide value through environmental stewardship, recovery of high value assets, and support of the DOE environmental remediation programs as the refined nickel generates additional long term benefits to local communities. (authors)

  12. Reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene by mackinawite (FeS) in the presence of metals: reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hoon Y; Hayes, Kim F

    2007-09-15

    Reductive dechlorination by mackinawite (FeS) is an important transformation pathway for chloroethylenes in anoxic environments. Yet, the impact of metals on reductive dechlorination is not well understood, despite their frequent cooccurrence with chloroethylenes. Fe(II), Co(II), Ni(II), and Hg(II) were evaluated for their impact on the dechlorination rates of PCE and TCE by FeS. Compared with unamended FeS batches, the dechlorination rates of both chloroethylenes decreased by addition of 0.01 M Fe(II). Relative to 0.01 M Fe(II)-added FeS batches, the dechlorination rates increased in FeS batches amended with 0.01 M of Co(II) and Hg(II), whereas the rates decreased in 0.01 M Ni(II)-added batches. While significantly impacting the dechlorination rates, the amended metals were quantitatively sequestered by FeS mainly because of formation of metal sulfides. Comparison of the dechlorination rates between metal-added FeS batches and metal sulfide batches suggests that discrete metal sulfides do not form in metal-added FeS batches. The observed exceptionally high reactivity of CoS suggests that it may be useful in reactive permeable barrier applications because of its stability in anoxic waters. The dechlorination rates of PCE and TCE significantly varied with Fe(ll) amendment concentrations (Fe(II)0), indicating the presence of different types of solid-bound Fe phases with Fe(II)o.

  13. Formation of lithium fluoride/metal nanocomposites for energy storage through solid state reduction of metal fluorides

    SciTech Connect

    Amatucci, GG; Pereira, N; Badway, F; Sina, M; Cosandey, F; Ruotolo, M; Cao, C

    2011-12-01

    In order to utilize high energy metal fluoride electrode materials as direct replacement electrode materials for lithium ion batteries in the future, a methodology to prelithiate the cathode or anode must be developed. Herein, we introduce the use of a solid state Li(3)N route to achieve the lithiation and mechanoreduction of metal fluoride based nanocomposites. The resulting prelithiation was found to be effective with the formation of xLiF:Me structures of very fine nanodimensions analogous to what is found by electrochemical lithiation. Physical and electrochemical properties of these nanocomposites for the bismuth and iron lithium fluoride systems are reported. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mobility of Source Zone Heavy Metals and Radionuclides: The Mixed Roles of Fermentative Activity on Fate and Transport of U and Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Apel, William; Peyton, Brent; Gerlach, Robin; Lee, Brady

    2006-06-01

    Predicting the potential migration of metals and radionuclides from waste pits and trenches will require understanding the effects of carbon and electron flow through these environments. Important aspects of this flow include the physiological activity of cellulolytic and non-cellulolytic fermentative microbial populations, as well as the subsequent activity of metal and radionuclide reducing bacteria. The activity of subsurface fermentative microbial populations is significantly understudied even though these organisms can affect contaminant migration by at least two mechanisms. In the first mechanism, products of the fermentation process can act as chelators for metals and radionuclides increasing their transport through underlying geological media. The second mechanism is the reduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides since some fermentative bacteria have been shown to directly reduce metals and radionuclides, while their fermentation products can provide carbon and energy for respiratory metal reducing bacteria that can also reduce oxidized metals and radionuclides.

  15. Bifunctional fluorescent carbon nanodots: green synthesis via soy milk and application as metal-free electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengzhou; Zhai, Junfeng; Dong, Shaojun

    2012-09-28

    We demonstrated a facile and green approach to synthesize bifunctional fluorescent carbon nanodots via soy milk, which not only showed favorable photoluminescent properties, but also exhibited good electrocatalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction.

  16. Twelve Year Study of Underground Corrosion of Activated Metals

    SciTech Connect

    M. Kay Adler Flitton; Timothy S. Yoder

    2012-03-01

    The subsurface radioactive disposal facility located at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho site contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel nuclear-reactor-core components. A long-term corrosion study is being conducted to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements in an arid vadose zone environment. The study uses non-radioactive metal coupons representing the prominent neutron-activated material buried at the disposal location, namely, two types of stainless steels, welded stainless steel, welded nickel-chromium steel alloy, zirconium alloy, beryllium, and aluminum. Additionally, carbon steel (the material used in cask disposal liners and other disposal containers) and duplex stainless steel (high-integrity containers) are also included in the study. This paper briefly describes the test program and presents the corrosion rate results through twelve years of underground exposure.

  17. Anticancer activity of Arkeshwara Rasa - A herbo-metallic preparation

    PubMed Central

    Nafiujjaman, Md; Nurunnabi, Md; Saha, Samir Kumar; Jahan, Rownak; Lee, Yong-kyu; Rahmatullah, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Though metal based drugs have been prescribed in Ayurveda for centuries to treat various diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis and cancer, toxicity of these drugs containing heavy metal is a great drawback for practical application. So, proper scientific validation of herbo-metallic drugs like Arkeshwara Rasa (AR) have become one of the focused research arena of new drugs against cancers. Aim: To investigate the in vitro anticancer effects of AR. Materials and Methods: Anticancer activity of AR was investigated on two human cancer cell lines, which represent two different tissues (pancreas and skin). Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay for enzyme activity and trypan blue assay for cell morphology were performed for further confirmation. Results: AR showed potent activity against pancreatic cancer cells (MIA-PaCa-2). LDH activity confirmed that AR was active against pancreatic cancer cells. Finally, it was observed that AR exhibited significant effects on cancer cells due to synergistic effects of different compounds of AR. Conclusion: The study strongly suggests that AR has the potential to be an anticancer drug against pancreatic cancer. PMID:27313425

  18. Activated metallic gold as an agent for direct methoxycarbonylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingjun; Madix, Robert J; Friend, Cynthia M

    2011-12-21

    We have discovered that metallic gold is a highly effective vehicle for the low-temperature vapor-phase carbonylation of methanol by insertion of CO into the O-H bond to form methoxycarbonyl. This reaction contrasts sharply to the carbonylation pathway well known for homogeneously catalyzed carbonylation reactions, such as the synthesis of acetic acid. The methoxycarbonyl intermediate can be further employed in a variety of methoxycarbonylation reactions, without the use or production of toxic chemicals. More generally we observe facile, selective methoxycarbonylation of alkyl and aryl alcohols and secondary amines on metallic gold well below room temperature. A specific example is the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, which has extensive use in organic synthesis. This work establishes a unique framework for using oxygen-activated metallic gold as a catalyst for energy-efficient, environmentally benign production of key synthetic chemical agents. PMID:22035206

  19. Electrocatalytic activity of various types of h-BN for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Elumalai, Ganesan; Noguchi, Hidenori; Uosaki, Kohei

    2014-07-21

    The electrocatalytic activities of various types of h-BN, i.e., spin coated BN nanotubes (BNNTs) and BN nanosheets (BNNSs) and sputter deposited BN, on Au electrodes as well as those of BNNS modified glassy carbon (GC) and Pt electrodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) were examined in O2 saturated 0.5 M H2SO4 solution based on the theoretical prediction that monolayered BN on a metal substrate may act as an electrocatalyst for ORR even though bulk BN is an insulator with a wide band gap. The overpotential for ORR at Au electrodes was reduced by ca. 100, ca. 270, and ca. 150 mV by spin coating of the dispersion of BNNT and liquid exfoliated BNNS, and sputter deposition of BN, respectively, proving the theoretical prediction. On the other hand, no change in the overpotential was observed at the glassy carbon electrode with BNNS modification and the overpotential even increased at the Pt electrode, suggesting that the interaction between BN and Au plays an important role in BN becoming ORR active.

  20. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  1. Influence of Humic Acid Complexation with Metal Ions on Extracellular Electron Transfer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Shanshan; Yuan, Yong; Lu, Qin

    2015-01-01

    Humic acids (HAs) can act as electron shuttles and mediate biogeochemical cycles, thereby influencing the transformation of nutrients and environmental pollutants. HAs commonly complex with metals in the environment, but few studies have focused on how these metals affect the roles of HAs in extracellular electron transfer (EET). In this study, HA-metal (HA-M) complexes (HA-Fe, HA-Cu, and HA-Al) were prepared and characterized. The electron shuttle capacities of HA-M complexes were experimentally evaluated through microbial Fe(III) reduction, biocurrent generation, and microbial azoreduction. The results show that the electron shuttle capacities of HAs were enhanced after complexation with Fe but were weakened when using Cu or Al. Density functional theory calculations were performed to explore the structural geometry of the HA-M complexes and revealed the best binding sites of the HAs to metals and the varied charge transfer rate constants (k). The EET activity of the HA-M complexes were in the order HA-Fe > HA-Cu > HA-Al. These findings have important implications for biogeochemical redox processes given the ubiquitous nature of both HAs and various metals in the environment. PMID:26593782

  2. Influence of the artefact reduction algorithm of Picasso Trio CBCT system on the diagnosis of vertical root fractures in teeth with metal posts

    PubMed Central

    Bezerra, I S Q; Neves, F S; Vasconcelos, T V; Ambrosano, G M B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the influence of the artefact reduction algorithm (AR) available on the Picasso Trio 3D® imaging system (Vatech, Hwaseong, Republic of Korea) on image quality [greyscale values, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and artefact formation] and diagnosis of vertical root fractures (VRFs) in the teeth with intracanal metal posts. Methods: 30 uniradicular teeth had their crowns removed and their roots endodontically treated to receive intracanal metal posts. In 20 teeth, both complete (n = 10) and incomplete (n = 10) VRFs were created. Each tooth was scanned twice, with and without AR activation. The mean and variation of greyscale values, as well as CNR, were calculated for all images. Subsequently, an evaluator compared the amount of artefact (cupping, white streaks and dark bands) in all images. Five evaluators rated for VRF presence using a five-point scale. Results: Mean greyscale values and CNR were significantly decreased in images acquired with the AR. The usage of the algorithm promoted an overall reduction of image artefacts. Regarding the diagnosis of complete and incomplete VRFs, the use of the AR had an overall negative impact on specificity and accuracy. Conclusions: While indeed reducing artefact formation, the use of the AR, instead of improving the impact on the diagnosis of VRFs in teeth with intracanal metal posts, had a negative impact on the diagnosis. PMID:25764360

  3. Efficient metal-free oxygen reduction in alkaline medium on high-surface-area mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbons made from ionic liquids and nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wen; Fellinger, Tim-Patrick; Antonietti, Markus

    2011-01-19

    Mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon materials with high surface areas up to 1500 m(2) g(-1) were conveniently made by the carbonization of nucleobases dissolved in an all-organic ionic liquid (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide). Using hard templating with silica nanoparticles, this process yields high-surface-area nitrogen-doped carbon materials with nitrogen contents as high as 12 wt %, narrow mesopore size distribution of ca. 12 nm diameter, and local graphitic carbon structure. It is demonstrated that the resulting nitrogen-doped carbons show very high catalytic activity, even in the metal-free case in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for fuel cells. Specifically, the as-prepared materials exhibit a low onset voltage for ORR in alkaline medium and a high methanol tolerance, compared with those of commercial 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst. We regard this as a first step toward an all-sustainable fuel cell, avoiding noble metals. PMID:21155583

  4. Reduction of heavy metals in residues from the dismantling of waste electrical and electronic equipment before incineration.

    PubMed

    Long, Yu-Yang; Feng, Yi-Jian; Cai, Si-Shi; Hu, Li-Fang; Shen, Dong-Sheng

    2014-05-15

    Residues disposal from the dismantling of waste electrical and electronic equipment are challenging because of the large waste volumes, degradation-resistance, low density and high heavy metal content. Incineration is advantageous for treating these residues but high heavy metal contents may exist in incinerator input and output streams. We have developed and studied a specialized heavy metal reduction process, which includes sieving and washing for treating residues before incineration. The preferable screen aperture for sieving was found to be 2.36mm (8 meshes) in this study; using this screen aperture resulted in the removal of approximately 47.2% Cu, 65.9% Zn, 26.5% Pb, 55.4% Ni and 58.8% Cd from the residues. Subsequent washing further reduces the heavy metal content in the residues larger than 2.36mm, with preferable conditions being 400rpm rotation speed, 5min washing duration and liquid-to-solid ratio of 25:1. The highest cumulative removal efficiencies of Cu, Zn, Pb, Ni and Cd after sieving and washing reached 81.1%, 61.4%, 75.8%, 97.2% and 72.7%, respectively. The combined sieving and washing process is environmentally friendly, can be used for the removal of heavy metals from the residues and has benefits in terms of heavy metal recycling.

  5. Synthesis of 2-Alkenylquinoline by Reductive Olefination of Quinoline N-Oxide under Metal-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hong; Liu, Yuanhong; Zhao, Peng; Gou, Shaohua; Wang, Jun

    2016-04-15

    Synthesis of 2-alkenylquinoline by reductive olefination of quinoline N-oxide under metal-free conditions is disclosed. Practically, the reaction could be performed with quinoline as starting material via a one-pot, two-step process. A possible mechanism is proposed that involves a sequential 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and acid-assisted ring opening followed by a dehydration process. PMID:26987040

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  7. An adaptive approach to metal artifact reduction in helical computed tomography for radiation therapy treatment planning: Experimental and clinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdia, Mehran; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc . E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: In this article, an approach to metal artifact reduction is proposed that is practical for clinical use in radiation therapy. It is based on a new interpolation scheme of the projections associated with metal implants in helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. Methods and Materials: A three-step approach was developed consisting of an automatic algorithm for metal implant detection, a correction algorithm for helical projections, and a new, efficient algorithm for projection interpolation. The modified raw projection data are transferred back to the CT scanner device where CT slices are regenerated using the built-in reconstruction operator. The algorithm was tested on a CT calibration phantom in which the density of inserted objects are known and on clinical prostate cases with two hip prostheses. The results are evaluated using the CT number and shape of the objects. Results: The validations on a CT calibration phantom with various inserts of known densities show that the algorithm improved the overall image quality by restoring the shape and the representative CT number of the objects in the image. For the clinical hip replacement cases, a large fraction of the bladder, rectum, and prostate that were not visible on the original CT slices were recovered using the algorithm. Precise contouring of the target volume was thus feasible. Without this enhancement, physicians would have drawn bigger margins to be sure to include the target and, at the same time, could have prescribed a lower dose to keep the same level of normal tissue toxicity. Conclusions: In both phantom experiment and patient studies, the algorithm resulted in significant artifact reduction with increases in the reliability of planning procedure for the case of metallic hip prostheses. This algorithm is now clinically used as a preprocessing before treatment planning for metal artifact reduction.

  8. Iran’s Activities on Prevention, Treatment and Harm Reduction of Drug Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Saberi Zafarghandi, Mohammad Bagher; Jadidi, Mohsen; Khalili, Narjes

    2015-01-01

    Context: In the present review study, authors investigated Iran’s activities regarding prevention, abuse and harm reduction of drugs nationwide. The issue appears to be important in order to show the trend of activities in the country. Evidence Acquisition: In this report, authors gathered data from different Farsi/English peer review journals issued both in printed and online versions. These journals have been indexed in PubMed, ISI, ISC, SID, Magiran, UN, etc. These are among the most referred and cited databases. Results: Summarizing the data led to three distinguished sections: 1) drug supply reduction activities; 2) drug demand reduction activities; 3) harm reduction activities. Conclusions: As the results showed, the trend of activities was encouraging and some additional activities could be included to future programs relying on early-onset preventions. PMID:26870709

  9. Metal hydrides as electrode/catalyst materials for oxygen evolution/reduction in electrochemical devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor); Fultz, Brent (Inventor); Witham, Charles K. (Inventor); Bowman, Robert C. (Inventor); Hightower, Adrian (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    An at least ternary metal alloy of the formula, AB.sub.(5-Y)X(.sub.y), is claimed. In this formula, A is selected from the rare earth elements, B is selected from the elements of groups 8, 9, and 10 of the periodic table of the elements, and X includes at least one of the following: antimony, arsenic, and bismuth. Ternary or higher-order substitutions, to the base AB.sub.5 alloys, that form strong kinetic interactions with the predominant metals in the base metal hydride are used to form metal alloys with high structural integrity after multiple cycles of hydrogen sorption.

  10. Reduction experiment of FeO-bearing amorphous silicate: application to origin of metallic iron in GEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuno, Junya; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Miyake, Akira; Noguchi, Ryo; Ichikawa, Satoshi

    2014-09-10

    Glass with embedded metal and sulfides (GEMS) are amorphous silicates included in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and can provide information about material evolution in our early solar system. Several formation processes for GEMS have been proposed so far, but these theories are still being debated. To investigate a possible GEMS origin by reduction of interstellar silicates, we synthesized amorphous silicates with a mean GEMS composition and performed heating experiments in a reducing atmosphere. FeO-bearing amorphous silicates were heated at 923 K and 973 K for 3 hr, and at 1023 K for 1-48 hr at ambient pressure in a reducing atmosphere. Fe grains formed at the interface between the silicate and the reducing gas through a reduction. In contrast, TEM observations of natural GEMS show that metallic grains are uniformly embedded in amorphous silicates. Therefore, the present study suggests that metallic inclusions in GEMS could not form as reduction products and that other formation process such as condensation or irradiation are more likely.

  11. Identification of catalytic sites for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in N-doped graphene materials: Development of highly efficient metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong Bin; Miao, Jianwei; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Jiazang; Tao, Hua Bing; Wang, Xizu; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Rong; Gao, Jiajian; Chen, Hao Ming; Dai, Liming; Liu, Bin

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are critical to renewable energy conversion and storage technologies. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have been reported to be efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in fuel cells for energy conversion, as well as ORR and OER in metal-air batteries for energy storage. We reported that metal-free three-dimensional (3D) graphene nanoribbon networks (N-GRW) doped with nitrogen exhibited superb bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for both ORR and OER, with an excellent stability in alkaline electrolytes (for example, KOH). For the first time, it was experimentally demonstrated that the electron-donating quaternary N sites were responsible for ORR, whereas the electron-withdrawing pyridinic N moieties in N-GRW served as active sites for OER. The unique 3D nanoarchitecture provided a high density of the ORR and OER active sites and facilitated the electrolyte and electron transports. As a result, the as-prepared N-GRW holds great potential as a low-cost, highly efficient air cathode in rechargeable metal-air batteries. Rechargeable zinc-air batteries with the N-GRW air electrode in a two-electrode configuration exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 1.46 V, a specific capacity of 873 mAh g(-1), and a peak power density of 65 mW cm(-2), which could be continuously charged and discharged with an excellent cycling stability. Our work should open up new avenues for the development of various carbon-based metal-free bifunctional electrocatalysts of practical significance. PMID:27152333

  12. Identification of catalytic sites for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution in N-doped graphene materials: Development of highly efficient metal-free bifunctional electrocatalyst

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong Bin; Miao, Jianwei; Hung, Sung-Fu; Chen, Jiazang; Tao, Hua Bing; Wang, Xizu; Zhang, Liping; Chen, Rong; Gao, Jiajian; Chen, Hao Ming; Dai, Liming; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are critical to renewable energy conversion and storage technologies. Heteroatom-doped carbon nanomaterials have been reported to be efficient metal-free electrocatalysts for ORR in fuel cells for energy conversion, as well as ORR and OER in metal-air batteries for energy storage. We reported that metal-free three-dimensional (3D) graphene nanoribbon networks (N-GRW) doped with nitrogen exhibited superb bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for both ORR and OER, with an excellent stability in alkaline electrolytes (for example, KOH). For the first time, it was experimentally demonstrated that the electron-donating quaternary N sites were responsible for ORR, whereas the electron-withdrawing pyridinic N moieties in N-GRW served as active sites for OER. The unique 3D nanoarchitecture provided a high density of the ORR and OER active sites and facilitated the electrolyte and electron transports. As a result, the as-prepared N-GRW holds great potential as a low-cost, highly efficient air cathode in rechargeable metal-air batteries. Rechargeable zinc-air batteries with the N-GRW air electrode in a two-electrode configuration exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 1.46 V, a specific capacity of 873 mAh g−1, and a peak power density of 65 mW cm−2, which could be continuously charged and discharged with an excellent cycling stability. Our work should open up new avenues for the development of various carbon-based metal-free bifunctional electrocatalysts of practical significance. PMID:27152333

  13. Sulfur and Nitrogen Codoped Carbon Tubes as Bifunctional Metal-Free Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Hydrogen Evolution in Acidic Media.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Wu, Qiang; Jiang, Yufei; Zhang, Zhiqi; Du, Lingyu; Yang, Lijun; Wang, Xizhang; Hu, Zheng

    2016-07-18

    The technological combination of fuel cells with water electrolysis is an ideal approach to address the problems of growing energy needs and environmental pollution, in which exploring cheap and stable electrocatalysts is the main challenge. Sulfur and nitrogen codoped carbon tubes (SNCTs), prepared by annealing the mixture of amorphous carbonaceous tubes and cysteine, are found to be active bifunctional metal-free electrocatalysts for both oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution in acidic medium. The optimized SNCT catalyst exhibits a record high onset potential of 851 mV (vs. RHE) for oxygen reduction and concurrent a low overpotential of 76 mV for hydrogen evolution, with superior stability and low cost. The SNCT electrocatalyst could have great potential in proton exchange membrane fuel cells and water splitting devices. PMID:27150558

  14. Ligational behavior of Schiff bases towards transition metal ion and metalation effect on their antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Jai; Batra, Nisha; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2012-11-01

    New Schiff bases pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (phenyl-pyridin-2-yl-methylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-bp) HL1 and pyrazine-2-carboxylicacid (pyridin-2-ylmethylene)-hydrazide (Hpch-pc) HL2 derived from condensation of pyrazine carboxylic hydrazide (Hpch) with 2-benzoyl pyridine (bp) or pyridine 2-carbaldehyde (pc) and their transition metal complexes of type ML(1-2)2 have been synthesized, where M = Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II). Characterization of ligands and their metal complexes was carried out by elemental analysis, conductimetric studies, magnetic susceptibility, spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-VIS, NMR, ESR, Mass) and thermogravimetric analysis. The physico-chemical studies revealed octahedral geometry or distorted octahedral geometry around metal ion. These azomethine Schiff base ligands acted as tridentate ? coordinating through carbonyl, azomethine and pyridine nitrogen present in the ligand. The thermodynamic and thermal properties of the complexes have been investigated and it was observed on the basis of these studies that thermal stability of complexes follows the order Mn < Zn < Cu < Co < Ni. The ligands and their complexes were tested for in vitro antibacterial activity at different concentrations against bacteria viz. Gram positive Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas mendocina. A marked enhancement in biocidal activity of the ligands under similar experimental conditions was observed as a consequence of coordination with metal ions. The trend of growth inhibition in the complexes was found to be in the order: Cu > Mn > Ni > Co > Zn.

  15. Chiral magnetic effect and natural optical activity in (Weyl) metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, Dmytro; Ma, Jing

    We consider the phenomenon of natural optical activity, and related chiral magnetic effect in metals with low carrier concentration. To reveal the correspondence between the two phenomena, we compute the optical conductivity of a noncentrosymmetric metal to linear order in the wave vector of the light wave, specializing to the low-frequency regime. We show that it is the orbital magnetic moment of quasiparticles that is responsible for the natural optical activity, and thus the chiral magnetic effect. While for purely static magnetic fields the chiral magnetic effect is known to have a topological origin and to be related to the presence of Berry curvature monopoles (Weyl points) in the band structure, we show that the existence of Berry monopoles is not required for the dynamic chiral magnetic effect to appear; the latter is thus not unique to Weyl metals. The magnitude of the dynamic chiral magnetic effect in a material is related to the trace of its gyrotropic tensor. We discuss the conditions under which this trace is non-zero; in noncentrosymmetric Weyl metals it is found to be proportional to the energy-space dipole moment of Berry curvature monopoles. The calculations are done within both the semiclassical kinetic equation, and Kubo linear response formalisms. This work was supported by NSF Grant No. DMR-1409089.

  16. Can soaked-in scavengers protect metalloprotein active sites from reduction during data collection?

    PubMed

    Macedo, Sofia; Pechlaner, Maria; Schmid, Walther; Weik, Martin; Sato, Katsuko; Dennison, Christopher; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina

    2009-03-01

    One of the first events taking place when a crystal of a metalloprotein is exposed to X-ray radiation is photoreduction of the metal centres. The oxidation state of a metal cannot always be determined from routine X-ray diffraction experiments alone, but it may have a crucial impact on the metal's environment and on the analysis of the structural data when considering the functional mechanism of a metalloenzyme. Here, UV-Vis microspectrophotometry is used to test the efficacy of selected scavengers in reducing the undesirable photoreduction of the iron and copper centres in myoglobin and azurin, respectively, and X-ray crystallography to assess their capacity of mitigating global and specific radiation damage effects. UV-Vis absorption spectra of native crystals, as well as those soaked in 18 different radioprotectants, show dramatic metal reduction occurring in the first 60 s of irradiation with an X-ray beam from a third-generation synchrotron source. Among the tested radioprotectants only potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) seems to be capable of partially mitigating the rate of metal photoreduction at the concentrations used, but not to a sufficient extent that would allow a complete data set to be recorded from a fully oxidized crystal. On the other hand, analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data confirms ascorbate as an efficient protecting agent against radiation damage, other than metal centre reduction, and suggests further testing of HEPES and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphtoquinone as potential scavengers.

  17. Can Soaked-in Scavengers Protect Metalloprotein Active Sites from Reduction During Data Collection?

    SciTech Connect

    Macedo, S.; Pechlaner, M; Schmid, W; Weik, M; Sato, K; Dennison, C; Djinovic-Carugo, K

    2009-01-01

    One of the first events taking place when a crystal of a metalloprotein is exposed to X-ray radiation is photoreduction of the metal centres. The oxidation state of a metal cannot always be determined from routine X-ray diffraction experiments alone, but it may have a crucial impact on the metal's environment and on the analysis of the structural data when considering the functional mechanism of a metalloenzyme. Here, UV-Vis microspectrophotometry is used to test the efficacy of selected scavengers in reducing the undesirable photoreduction of the iron and copper centres in myoglobin and azurin, respectively, and X-ray crystallography to assess their capacity of mitigating global and specific radiation damage effects. UV-Vis absorption spectra of native crystals, as well as those soaked in 18 different radioprotectants, show dramatic metal reduction occurring in the first 60 s of irradiation with an X-ray beam from a third-generation synchrotron source. Among the tested radioprotectants only potassium hexacyanoferrate(III) seems to be capable of partially mitigating the rate of metal photoreduction at the concentrations used, but not to a sufficient extent that would allow a complete data set to be recorded from a fully oxidized crystal. On the other hand, analysis of the X-ray crystallographic data confirms ascorbate as an efficient protecting agent against radiation damage, other than metal centre reduction, and suggests further testing of HEPES and 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphtoquinone as potential scavengers.

  18. Reduction of front-metallization grid shading in concentrator cells through laser micro-grooved cover glass

    SciTech Connect

    García-Linares, Pablo Voarino, Philippe; Besson, Pierre; Baudrit, Mathieu; Dominguez, César; Dellea, Olivier; Fugier, Pascal

    2015-09-28

    Concentrator solar cell front-grid metallizations are designed so that the trade-off between series resistance and shading factor (SF) is optimized for a particular irradiance. High concentrator photovoltaics (CPV) typically requires a metallic electrode pattern that covers up to 10% of the cell surface. The shading effect produced by this front electrode results in a significant reduction in short-circuit current (I{sub SC}) and hence, in a significant efficiency loss. In this work we present a cover glass (originally meant to protect the cell surface) that is laser-grooved with a micrometric pattern that redirects the incident solar light towards interfinger regions and away from the metallic electrodes, where they would be wasted in terms of photovoltaic generation. Quantum efficiency (QE) and current (I)-voltage (V) characterization under concentration validate the proof-of-concept, showing great potential for CPV applications.

  19. Anaerobic bioleaching of metals from waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Meulepas, Roel J W; Gonzalez-Gil, Graciela; Teshager, Fitfety Melese; Witharana, Ayoma; Saikaly, Pascal E; Lens, Piet N L

    2015-05-01

    Heavy metal contamination of anaerobically digested waste activated sludge hampers its reuse as fertilizer or soil conditioner. Conventional methods to leach metals require aeration or the addition of leaching agents. This paper investigates whether metals can be leached from waste activated sludge during the first, acidifying stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion without the supply of leaching agents. These leaching experiments were done with waste activated sludge from the Hoek van Holland municipal wastewater treatment plant (The Netherlands), which contained 342 μg g(-1) of copper, 487 μg g(-1) of lead, 793 μg g(-1) of zinc, 27 μg g(-1) of nickel and 2.3 μg g(-1) of cadmium. During the anaerobic acidification of 3 gdry weight L(-1) waste activated sludge, 80-85% of the copper, 66-69% of the lead, 87% of the zinc, 94-99% of the nickel and 73-83% of the cadmium were leached. The first stage of two-stage anaerobic digestion can thus be optimized as an anaerobic bioleaching process and produce a treated sludge (i.e., digestate) that meets the land-use standards in The Netherlands for copper, zinc, nickel and cadmium, but not for lead.

  20. Biologically active metal-independent superoxide dismutase mimics

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.B.; Samuni, A.; Krishna, M.C.; DeGraff, W.G.; Ahn, M.S.; Samuni, U.; Russo, A. )

    1990-03-20

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is an enzyme that detoxifies superoxide (O2.-), a potentially toxic oxygen-derived species. Attempts to increase intracellular concentrations of SOD by direct application are complicated because SOD, being a relatively large molecule, does not readily cross cell membranes. We have identified a set of stable nitroxides that possess SOD-like activity, have the advantage of being low molecular weight, membrane permeable, and metal independent, and at pH 7.0 have reaction rate constants with O2.- ranging from 1.1 x 10(3) to 1.3 x 10(6) M-1 s-1. These SOD mimics protect mammalian cells from damage induced by hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, although they exhibit no catalase-like activity. In addition, the nitroxide SOD mimics rapidly oxidize DNA-FeII and thus may interrupt the Fenton reaction and prevent formation of deleterious OH radicals and/or higher oxidation states of metal ions. Whether by SOD-like activity and/or interception of an electron from redox-active metal ions they protect cells from oxidative stress and may have use in basic and applied biological studies.

  1. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticle-Carbon Nanofiber Composite as an Efficient Metal-Free Cathode Catalyst for Oxygen Reduction Reaction.

    PubMed

    Panomsuwan, Gasidit; Saito, Nagahiro; Ishizaki, Takahiro

    2016-03-23

    Metal-free nitrogen-doped carbon materials are currently considered at the forefront of potential alternative cathode catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cell technology. Despite numerous efforts in this area over the past decade, rational design and development of a new catalyst system based on nitrogen-doped carbon materials via an innovative approach still present intriguing challenges in ORR catalysis research. Herein, a new kind of nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticle-carbon nanofiber (NCNP-CNF) composite with highly efficient and stable ORR catalytic activity has been developed via a new approach assisted by a solution plasma process. The integration of NCNPs and CNFs by the solution plasma process can lead to a unique morphological feature and modify physicochemical properties. The NCNP-CNF composite exhibits a significantly enhanced ORR activity through a dominant four-electron pathway in an alkaline solution. The enhancement in ORR activity of NCNP-CNF composite can be attributed to the synergistic effects of good electron transport from highly graphitized CNFs as well as abundance of exposed catalytic sites and meso/macroporosity from NCNPs. More importantly, NCNP-CNF composite reveals excellent long-term durability and high tolerance to methanol crossover compared with those of a commercial 20 wt % supported on Vulcan XC-72. We expect that NCNP-CNF composite prepared by this synthetic approach can be a promising metal-free cathode catalyst candidate for ORR in fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:26908214

  2. Strongly coupled Pd nanotetrahedron/tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids with enhanced catalytic activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaodan; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-20

    The design and synthesis of highly active oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts with strong durability at low cost is extremely desirable but still remains a significant challenge. Here we develop an efficient strategy that utilizes organopalladium(I) complexes containing palladium-palladium bonds as precursors for the synthesis of strongly coupled Pd tetrahedron-tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids (Pd/W18O49) to improve the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd nanocrystals. The hybrid materials are synthesized by direct nucleation, growth, and anchoring of Pd tetrahedral nanocrystals on the in situ-synthesized W18O49 nanosheets. Compared to supportless Pd nanocrystals and W18O49, their hybrids exhibited not only surprisingly high activity but also superior stability to Pt for the ORR in alkaline solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical analyses indicated that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability are associated with the increased number and improved catalytic activity of active sites, which is induced by the strong interaction between the Pd tetrahedrons and W18O49 nanosheet supports. The present study provides a novel strategy for synthesizing hybrid catalysts with strong chemical attachment and electrical coupling between nanocatalysts and supports. The strategy is expected to open up exciting opportunities for developing a novel class of metal-support hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts with improved ORR activity and durability for both fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25054583

  3. Active-passive gradient shielding for MRI acoustic noise reduction.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, William A; Kidane, Tesfaye K; Taracila, Victor; Baig, Tanvir N; Eagan, Timothy P; Cheng, Yu-Chung N; Brown, Robert W; Mallick, John A

    2005-05-01

    An important source of MRI acoustic noise-magnet cryostat warm-bore vibrations caused by eddy-current-induced forces-can be mitigated by a passive metal shield mounted on the outside of a vibration-isolated, vacuum-enclosed shielded gradient set. Finite-element (FE) calculations for a z-gradient indicate that a 2-mm-thick Cu layer wrapped on the gradient assembly can decrease mechanical power deposition in the warm bore and reduce warm-bore acoustic noise production by about 25 dB. Eliminating the conducting warm bore and other magnet parts as significant acoustic noise sources could lead to the development of truly quiet, fully functioning MRI systems with noise levels below 70 dB.

  4. Highly active PtAu alloy nanoparticle catalysts for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianming; Chen, Guozhu; Guay, Daniel; Chaker, Mohamed; Ma, Dongling

    2014-02-21

    To enhance the catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the hydrogenation of nitro-aromatic chemicals, Pt was introduced into AuNPs to form "bare" PtAu alloy NPs using a physical approach, pulsed laser ablation in liquid (PLAL), on single metal-mixture targets. These PLAL-NPs are deemed to favor catalysis due to the absence of any surfactant molecules on their unique "bare and clean" surface. The PLAL-NPs were facilely assembled onto CeO2 nanotubes (NTs) by simply mixing them without conducting any surface functionalization, representing another advantage of these NPs. Their catalytic activity was assessed in 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) hydrogenation. The reaction catalyzed by alloy-NP/CeO2-NT catalysts demonstrates a remarkably higher reaction rate in comparison with that catalyzed by pure Au and Pt NPs, and other similar Au and Pt containing catalysts reported recently. A "volcano-like" catalytic activity dependence of the alloy NPs on their chemical composition suggests a strong synergistic effect between Au and Pt in the 4-NP reduction, far beyond the simple sum of their individual contributions. It leads to the significantly enhanced catalytic activity of Pt30Au70 and Pt50Au50 alloy NPs, outperforming not only each single constituent, but also their physical mixtures and most recently reported AuNP based nanocatalysts. The favorable d-band center shift of Pt after alloying, and co-operative actions between Pt clusters and nearby Au (or mixed PtAu) sites were proposed as possible mechanisms to explain such a strong synergistic effect on catalysis.

  5. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO₄, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO₂ hydrogenation

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo₂C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu₃(MoO₄)₂(OH)₂, a-NiMoO₄ and CoMoO₄•nH₂O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was β-Mo₂C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²⁺, Ni²⁺ and Co²⁺ cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo₂C, Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C catalysts were highlymore » active for the hydrogenation of CO₂. The metal/Mo₂C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo₂C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO₂, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).« less

  6. The carburization of transition metal molybdates (MxMoO₄, M= Cu, Ni or Co) and the generation of highly active metal/carbide catalysts for CO₂ hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Jose A.; Xu, Wenqian; Ramirez, Pedro J.; Stachiola, Dario; Brito, Joaquin L.

    2015-05-06

    A new approach has been tested for the preparation of metal/Mo₂C catalysts using mixed-metal oxide molybdates as precursors. Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction was used to study the reduction and carburization processes of Cu₃(MoO₄)₂(OH)₂, a-NiMoO₄ and CoMoO₄•nH₂O by thermal treatment under mixtures of hydrogen and methane. In all cases, the final product was β-Mo₂C and a metal phase (Cu, Ni, or Co), but the transition sequence varied with the different metals, and it could be related to the reduction potential of the Cu²⁺, Ni²⁺ and Co²⁺ cations inside each molybdate. The synthesized Cu/Mo₂C, Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C catalysts were highly active for the hydrogenation of CO₂. The metal/Mo₂C systems exhibited large variations in the selectivity towards methanol, methane and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons depending on the nature of the supported metal and its ability to cleave C-O bonds. Cu/Mo₂C displayed a high selectivity for CO and methanol production. Ni/Mo₂C and Co/Mo₂C were the most active catalysts for the activation and full decomposition of CO₂, showing high selectivity for the production of methane (Ni case) and CnH₂n₊₂ (n > 2) hydrocarbons (Co case).

  7. Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination

    SciTech Connect

    Sang-Hoon, Kim; Hardzman, Christina; Davis, John k.; Hutcheson, Rachel; Broderick, Joan B.; Marsh, Terence L.; Tiedje, James M.

    2012-09-27

    Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

  8. Synthesis of metal-metal oxide catalysts and electrocatalysts using a metal cation adsorption/reduction and adatom replacement by more noble ones

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Sasaki, Kotaro

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to platinum-metal oxide composite particles and their use as electrocatalysts in oxygen-reducing cathodes and fuel cells. The invention particularly relates to methods for preventing the oxidation of the platinum electrocatalyst in the cathodes of fuel cells by use of these platinum-metal oxide composite particles. The invention additionally relates to methods for producing electrical energy by supplying such a fuel cell with an oxidant, such as oxygen, and a fuel source, such as hydrogen. The invention also relates to methods of making the metal-metal oxide composites.

  9. Control and reduction of post-metal etch corrosion effects due to airborne molecular contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morilla, Carmen; Prieto, Pilar; Barbado, Francisco

    2001-04-01

    Ionic contamination in microelectronic circuitry can have a detrimental effect on device reliability and yield. Post- aluminum etch corrosion has been considered a critical issue in dry plasma etching of aluminum. In this work, we review the actions taken to reduce the amount of defects due to Cl- induced corrosion in the metal lines at our manufacturing line in Lucent Technologies Madrid. Two approaches were followed in a parallel way: on one side manufacturing procedures were modified to reduce at the minimum the exposure of the unprotected metal lines to the clean room environment thus it is avoided any metal corrosion caused by a possible environmental contamination. The second working line was to improve the resistance to corrosion of the post-etched metal. With this aim, our efforts were focused on the passivation step just after the metal etch and prior the photoresist strip. The influence of several parameter settings of the passivation plasma on the resistance of the etched metal to corrosion has been studied. Accelerated corrosion tests were used to monitor the intrinsic metallization susceptibility of corrosion and chlorine and fluorine residuals content in the wafer were measured using ion-chromatography. It was found that a modification in the pressure, plasma power or duration of the passivation step could have a beneficial impact on the amount of chlorine residues left on the metal lines after etch and consequently an enhancement of their resistance to corrosion.

  10. REDUCTION OF COAL-BASED METAL EMISSIONS BY FURNACE SORBENT INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of sorbent injection technology to reduce the potential for trace metal emissions from coal combustion was researched. Pilot scale tests of high-temperature furnace sorbent injection were accompanied by stack sampling for coal-based, metallic air toxics. Tested sorben...

  11. Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activities of PtCuCoNi Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Quaternary Alloys for Oxygen Reduction and Methanol Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-03-01

    Control of morphology and composition could precisely and efficiently alter the catalytic properties of Pt-based materials, improving the electrocatalytic activity and durability. Here we proposed a rapid, controllable synthesis of three-dimensional PtCuCoNi quaternary alloys with low Pt-group metal, which were directly synthesized by reducing metal precursors in aqueous solution. The resultant quaternary alloys show excellent oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction activities in acid solution. By rational tuning of the composition of PtCuCoNi alloys, they achieved a mass activity of 0.72 A/mgPt on the basis of Pt mass for oxygen reduction reaction. Moreover, the durability is also higher than that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. These PtCuCoNi quaternary alloys characterized by three-dimensional porous nanostructures hold attractive promise as substitutes for carbon-supported Pt catalysts with improved activity and stability.

  12. Metal and alloy nanoparticles by amine-borane reduction of metal salts by solid-phase synthesis: atom economy and green process.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Udishnu; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2012-12-01

    A new solid state synthetic route has been developed toward metal and bimetallic alloy nanoparticles from metal salts employing amine-boranes as the reducing agent. During the reduction, amine-borane plays a dual role: acts as a reducing agent and reduces the metal salts to their elemental form and simultaneously generates a stabilizing agent in situ which controls the growth of the particles and stabilizes them in the nanosize regime. Employing different amine-boranes with differing reducing ability (ammonia borane (AB), dimethylamine borane (DMAB), and triethylamine borane (TMAB)) was found to have a profound effect on the particle size and the size distribution. Usage of AB as the reducing agent provided the smallest possible size with best size distribution. Employment of TMAB also afforded similar results; however, when DMAB was used as the reducing agent it resulted in larger sized nanoparticles that are polydisperse too. In the AB mediated reduction, BNH(x) polymer generated in situ acts as a capping agent whereas, the complexing amine of the other amine-boranes (DMAB and TMAB) play the same role. Employing the solid state route described herein, monometallic Au, Ag, Cu, Pd, and Ir and bimetallic CuAg and CuAu alloy nanoparticles of <10 nm were successfully prepared. Nucleation and growth processes that control the size and the size distribution of the resulting nanoparticles have been elucidated in these systems.

  13. In situ assembly of well-dispersed Ni nanoparticles on silica nanotubes and excellent catalytic activity in 4-nitrophenol reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenghuan; Gai, Shili; He, Fei; Ding, Shujiang; Li, Lei; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-10-01

    The easy aggregation nature of ferromagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by conventional routes usually leads to a large particle size and low loading, which greatly limits their applications to the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). Herein, we developed a novel in situ thermal decomposition and reduction strategy to prepare Ni nanoparticles/silica nanotubes (Ni/SNTs), which can markedly prevent the aggregation and growth of Ni NPs, resulting in an ultra-small particle size (about 6 nm), good dispersion and especially high loading of Ni NPs. It was found that Ni/SNTs, which have a high specific surface area (416 m(2) g(-1)), exhibit ultra-high catalytic activity in the 4-NP reduction (complete reduction of 4-NP within only 60 s at room temperature), which is superior to most noble metal (Au, Pt, and Pd) supported catalysts. Ni/SNTs still showed high activity even after re-use for several cycles, suggesting good stability. In particular, the magnetic property of Ni/SNTs makes it easy to recycle for reuse.

  14. Activity and Stability of Nanoscale Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2015-07-28

    Design of highly active and stable nanoscale catalysts for electro-oxidation of small organic molecules is of great importance to the development of efficient fuel cells. The amount and instability of Pt-based catalysts in the cathode limits the cost, efficiency and lifetime of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. We developed a microscopic understanding of the factors governing activity and stability in Pt and PtM alloys. Experimental efforts were focused on probing the size and shape dependence of ORR activity of Pt-based nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes. A microscopic understanding of the activity was achieved by correlating voltammetry and rotating ring disk electrodes to surface atomic and electronic structures, which were elucidated predominantly by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS).

  15. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by metal-ligand complexes decreases levels of extracellular amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Price, Katherine A; Filiz, Gulay; Caragounis, Aphrodite; Du, Tai; Laughton, Katrina M; Masters, Colin L; Sharples, Robyn A; Hill, Andrew F; Li, Qiao-Xin; Donnelly, Paul S; Barnham, Kevin J; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2008-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in a range of tissues and cell-types. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by a number of ligands induces downstream signalling that modulates critical cell functions including growth, survival and differentiation. Abnormal epidermal growth factor receptor expression and activation is also involved in a number of cancers. In addition to its cognate ligands, the epidermal growth factor receptor can be activated by metals such as zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu). Due to the important role of these metals in a number of diseases including neurodegenerative disorders, therapeutic approaches are being developed based on the use of lipid permeable metal-complexing molecules. While these agents are showing promising results in animal models and clinical trials, little is known about the effects of metal-ligand complexes on cell signalling pathways. In this study, we investigated the effects of clioquinol (CQ)-metal complexes on activation of epidermal growth factor receptor. We show here that CQ-Cu complexes induced potent epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation resulting in downstream activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. Similar levels of epidermal growth factor receptor activation were observed with alternative lipid permeable metal-ligands including neocuproine and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. We found that CQ-Cu complexes induced a significant reduction in the level of extracellular Abeta1-40 in cell culture. Inhibition of epidermal growth factor receptor activation by PD153035 blocked extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and restored Abeta1-40 levels. Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor by CQ-Cu was mediated through up-regulation of src kinase activity by a cognate ligand-independent process involving membrane integrins. These findings provide the first evidence that metal-ligand complexes can activate the epidermal growth

  16. Integration of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration and chemical reduction for metal-containing wastewater treatment and metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jui-Hsuan; Chou, Yi-Hsuan; Liang, Yang-Min; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-01-01

    Chemical reduction was firstly employed to treat synthetic wastewaters of various compositions prepared to simulate the retentate stream of polyelectrolyte enhanced ultrafiltration (PEUF). With fixed Cu:polyethylenimine (PEI) monomer:dithionite molar ratio, increasing copper concentration increases copper removal efficiency. Under fixed Cu:dithionite molar ratio and fixed Cu concentration, increasing PEI monomer:copper molar ratio decreases copper removal efficiency. The formation of nano-sized copper particles, which readily pass through 0.45 μm filter used for sample pretreatment before residual copper analysis, might be the reason behind the decreasing copper removal efficiency observed. Particle size analysis shows that the size of copper particles, which are formed through reduction reaction, increases with decreasing pH value and increasing reaction time. As ultrafiltration is capable of removing these nano-sized particles, integration of chemical reduction and PEUF is proposed to simultaneously achieve regeneration of polyelectrolyte and recovery of copper in one process. Results show that the proposed process could achieve almost complete copper removal without being affected by reaction pH. PMID:26398024

  17. Effects of sorption, sulphate reduction, and Phragmites australis on the removal of heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lesage, E; Rousseau, D P L; Van de Moortel, A; Tack, F M G; De Pauw, N; Verloo, M G

    2007-01-01

    The removal of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn from synthetic industrial wastewater was studied in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms filled with gravel or a gravel/straw mixture. Half of the microcosms were planted with Phragmites australis and half were left unplanted. All microcosms received low-strength wastewater (1 mg L(-1) of Co, Ni, and Zn, 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu, 2,000mg L(-1) SO4) during seven 14-day incubation batches. The pore water was regularly monitored at two depths for heavy metals, sulphate, organic carbon and redox potential. Sorption properties of gravel and straw were assessed in a separate experiment. A second series of seven incubation batches with high-strength wastewater (10 mg L(-1) of each metal, 2,000 mg L(-1) SO4) was then applied to saturate the substrate. Glucose was added to the gravel microcosms together with the high-strength wastewater. Sorption processes were responsible for metal removal during start-up, with the highest removal efficiencies in the gravel microcosms. The lower initial efficiencies in the gravel/straw microcosms were presumably caused by the decomposition of straw. However, after establishment of anaerobic conditions (Eh approximately -200 mV), precipitation as metal sulphides provided an additional removal pathway in the gravel/straw microcosms. The addition of glucose to gravel microcosms enhanced sulphate reduction and metal removal, although Phragmites australis negatively affected these processes in the top-layer of all microcosms.

  18. Electrolytic reduction of liquid metal oxides and its application to reconfigurable structured devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinqi; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Nahata, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Structured metallic patterns are routinely used for a wide variety of applications, ranging from electronic circuits to plasmonics and metamaterials. Numerous techniques have been developed for the fabrication of these devices, in which the metal patterns are typically formed using conventional metals. While this approach has proven very successful, it does generally limit the ability to reconfigure the geometry of the overall device. Here, we demonstrate the ability to create artificially structured metallic devices using liquid metals, in which the configuration can be altered via the electrolysis of saline solutions or deionized water. We accomplish this using an elastomeric mold with two different sets of embedded microfluidic channels that are patterned and injected with EGaIn and water, respectively. The electrochemical reaction is then used to etch the thin oxide layer that forms on eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) in a controlled reproducible manner. Once the oxide layer is dissolved locally, the underlying liquid metal retracts away from the original position to a position where a new stable oxide layer can reform, which is equivalent to erasing a section of the liquid metal. To allow for full reconfigurability, the entire device can be reset by refilling all of the microchannels with EGaIn.

  19. Electrolytic reduction of liquid metal oxides and its application to reconfigurable structured devices

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinqi; Appusamy, Kanagasundar; Guruswamy, Sivaraman; Nahata, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Structured metallic patterns are routinely used for a wide variety of applications, ranging from electronic circuits to plasmonics and metamaterials. Numerous techniques have been developed for the fabrication of these devices, in which the metal patterns are typically formed using conventional metals. While this approach has proven very successful, it does generally limit the ability to reconfigure the geometry of the overall device. Here, we demonstrate the ability to create artificially structured metallic devices using liquid metals, in which the configuration can be altered via the electrolysis of saline solutions or deionized water. We accomplish this using an elastomeric mold with two different sets of embedded microfluidic channels that are patterned and injected with EGaIn and water, respectively. The electrochemical reaction is then used to etch the thin oxide layer that forms on eutectic gallium indium (EGaIn) in a controlled reproducible manner. Once the oxide layer is dissolved locally, the underlying liquid metal retracts away from the original position to a position where a new stable oxide layer can reform, which is equivalent to erasing a section of the liquid metal. To allow for full reconfigurability, the entire device can be reset by refilling all of the microchannels with EGaIn. PMID:25727894

  20. Electrical active defects in HfO2 based metal/oxide/metal devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Kamel, F.

    2016-01-01

    Dielectric as well as thermally stimulated current measurements were performed on metal/HfO2/Pt capacitors in order to study the electrical active defects in hafnia thin films. Two thermally activated relaxation processes have been carried out from both measurements. At low temperatures, the relaxation process can be ascribed to the shallow traps level localized at 0.65 eV and generally evidenced by the second ionization of oxygen vacancies. At high temperatures, the relaxation process arises from the diffusion of positively charged oxygen vacancies by overcoming an energetic barrier of about 1 eV.

  1. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis.

  2. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  3. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR ACTIVE CAPS - REMEDIATION OF METALS AND ORGANICS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M; Danny D. Reible, D; Xingmao Ma, X; Ioana G. Petrisor, I

    2007-05-10

    This research evaluated organoclays, zeolites, phosphates, and a biopolymer as sequestering agents for inorganic and organic contaminants. Batch experiments were conducted to identify amendments and mixtures of amendments for metal and organic contaminants removal and retention. Contaminant removal was evaluated by calculating partitioning coefficients. Metal retention was evaluated by desorption studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays, and the biopolymer, chitosan, were very effective sequestering agents for metals in fresh and salt water. Organoclays were very effective sorbents for phenanthrene, pyrene, and benzo(a)pyrene. Partitioning coefficients for the organoclays were 3000-3500 ml g{sup -1} for benzo(a)pyrene, 400-450 ml g{sup -1} for pyrene, and 50-70 ml g{sup -1} for phenanthrene. Remediation of sites with a mixture of contaminants is more difficult than sites with a single contaminant because metals and organic contaminants have different fate and transport mechanisms in sediment and water. Mixtures of amendments (e.g., organoclay and rock phosphate) have high potential for remediating both organic and inorganic contaminants under a broad range of environmental conditions, and have promise as components in active caps for sediment remediation.

  4. Activation of Autophagy by Metals in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Blaby-Haas, Crysten E; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Andrés-Garrido, Ascensión; Blaby, Ian K; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Crespo, José L

    2015-09-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular self-degradation pathway by which eukaryotic cells recycle their own material in response to specific stress conditions. Exposure to high concentrations of metals causes cell damage, although the effect of metal stress on autophagy has not been explored in photosynthetic organisms. In this study, we investigated the effect of metal excess on autophagy in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We show in cells treated with nickel an upregulation of ATG8 that is independent of CRR1, a global regulator of copper signaling in Chlamydomonas. A similar effect on ATG8 was observed with copper and cobalt but not with cadmium or mercury ions. Transcriptome sequencing data revealed an increase in the abundance of the protein degradation machinery, including that responsible for autophagy, and a substantial overlap of that increased abundance with the hydrogen peroxide response in cells treated with nickel ions. Thus, our results indicate that metal stress triggers autophagy in Chlamydomonas and suggest that excess nickel may cause oxidative damage, which in turn activates degradative pathways, including autophagy, to clear impaired components and recover cellular homeostasis. PMID:26163317

  5. Metal clad active fibres for power scaling and thermal management at kW power levels.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Jae M O; Simakov, Nikita; Hemming, Alexander; Clarkson, W Andrew; Haub, John

    2016-08-01

    We present a new approach to high power fibre laser design, consisting of a polymer-free all-glass optical fibre waveguide directly overclad with a high thermal conductivity metal coating. This metal clad active fibre allows a significant reduction in thermal resistance between the active fibre and the laser heat-sink as well as a significant increase in the operating temperature range. In this paper we show the results of a detailed thermal analysis of both polymer and metal coated active fibres under thermal loads typical of kW fibre laser systems. Through several different experiments we present the first demonstration of a cladding pumped aluminium-coated fibre laser and the first demonstration of efficient operation of a cladding-pumped fibre laser at temperatures of greater than 400 °C. Finally, we highlight the versatility of this approach through operation of a passively (radiatively) cooled ytterbium fibre laser head at an output power of 405 W in a compact and ultralight package weighing less than 100 g. PMID:27505822

  6. Appetite suppression and weight reduction by a centrally active aminosterol.

    PubMed

    Ahima, Rexford S; Patel, Hiralben R; Takahashi, Nobuhiko; Qi, Yong; Hileman, Stanley M; Zasloff, Michael A

    2002-07-01

    The rise in obesity and its complications has generated enormous interest in the regulation of feeding and body weight. We show that a spermine metabolite of cholesterol (MSI-1436) decreases body weight, specifically fat, by suppressing feeding and preventing the reduction in energy expenditure, hormonal changes, and patterns of neuropeptide expression normally associated with weight loss. MSI-1436 enters the brain after peripheral injection and is more potent when injected into the cerebral ventricle (intracerebroventricular [ICV]). Systemic or ICV MSI-1436 administration induced similar patterns of Fos immunoreactivity in the brain, especially the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). This brain region integrates neural signals from hypothalamic and brain stem nuclei and regulates feeding behavior, autonomic function, and neuroendocrine function. Microinjection of MSI-1436 into the PVN potently suppressed feeding and reduced body weight for several days. Unlike caloric restriction, MSI-1436 decreased mRNA levels of agouti-related peptide and neuropeptide Y in the hypothalamus. These findings indicate that MSI-1436 acts in the brain to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, likely through suppression of orexigenic hypothalamic pathways. PMID:12086938

  7. Reduction of U(VI) and Toxic Metals by Desulfovibrio Cytochrome C3

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, Judy D

    2013-04-11

    The central objective of our proposed research was twofold: 1) to investigate the structure-function relationship of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (now Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20) cytochrome c3 with uranium and 2) to elucidate the mechanism for uranium reduction in vitro and in vivo. Physiological analysis of a mutant of D. desulfuricans with a mutation of the gene encoding the type 1 tetraheme cytochrome c3 had demonstrated that uranium reduction was negatively impacted while sulfate reduction was not if lactate were the electron donor. This was thought to be due to the presence of a branched pathway of electron flow from lactate leading to sulfate reduction. Our experimental plan was to elucidate the structural and mechanistic details of uranium reduction involving cytochrome c3.

  8. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-08-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol-1s-1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells.

  9. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m(2) g(-1)) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications. PMID:26752043

  10. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolbov, Sergey; Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-01

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  11. Enhancing pyridinic nitrogen level in graphene to promote electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jiaguang; Wang, Lan; Song, Ranran; Yanga, Shubin

    2016-02-01

    We develop an efficient approach to fabricate nitrogen-doped graphene with tunable pyridinic nitrogen levels (from 1.1 to 1.8 at.%), abundant in-plane holes and high surface areas (623 m2 g-1) via a hydrothermal treatment of graphene oxide with hydrogen peroxide and subsequent annealing under ammonia gas. It is found that the chemical etching is beneficial to the formation of pyridinic nitrogen in graphene during the nitrogen-doping process, which is crucial to enhancing the electrocatalytic properties of graphene for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Hence, the optimized NG exhibits good electrocatalytic activity, more positive onset potential than Pt-C (-0.08 V versus -0.09 V), good durability, and high selectivity when it is employed as a metal-free catalyst for ORR. This approach may uncover a mechanism in escalation of pyridinic N atoms doped on the graphene basal edge and provide an efficient platform for the synthesis of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene with tunable heteroatom content for broad applications.

  12. Gold-doped graphene: A highly stable and active electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stolbov, Sergey Alcántara Ortigoza, Marisol

    2015-04-21

    In addressing the growing need of renewable and sustainable energy resources, hydrogen-fuel-cells stand as one of the most promising routes to transform the current energy paradigm into one that integrally fulfills environmental sustainability. Nevertheless, accomplishing this technology at a large scale demands to surpass the efficiency and enhance the cost-effectiveness of platinum-based cathodes, which catalyze the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In this work, our first-principles calculations show that Au atoms incorporated into graphene di-vacancies form a highly stable and cost-effective electrocatalyst that is, at the same time, as or more (dependently of the dopant concentration) active toward ORR than the best-known Pt-based electrocatalysts. We reveal that partial passivation of defected-graphene by gold atoms reduces the reactivity of C dangling bonds and increases that of Au, thus optimizing them for catalyzing the ORR and yielding a system of high thermodynamic and electrochemical stabilities. We also demonstrate that the linear relation among the binding energies of the reaction intermediates assumed in computational high-throughput material screening does not hold, at least for this non-purely transition-metal material. We expect Au-doped graphene to finally overcome the cathode-related challenge hindering the realization of hydrogen-fuel cells as the leading means of powering transportation and portable devices.

  13. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Charlette M.; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A.; Mudalige, Thilak K.; Biris, Alexandru S.; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material’s −0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 106 mol−1s−1 was observed for the polydopamine-coated material–over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  14. Polydopamine-Coated Manganese Complex/Graphene Nanocomposite for Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity Towards Oxygen Reduction.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Charlette M; Chhetri, Bijay; Brandt, Andrew; Watanabe, Fumiya; Nima, Zeid A; Mudalige, Thilak K; Biris, Alexandru S; Ghosh, Anindya

    2016-01-01

    Platinum electrodes are commonly used electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) in fuel cells. However, this material is not economical due to its high cost and scarcity. We prepared an Mn(III) catalyst supported on graphene and further coated with polydopamine, resulting in superior ORR activity compared to the uncoated PDA structures. During ORR, a peak potential at 0.433 V was recorded, which is a significant shift compared to the uncoated material's -0.303 V (both versus SHE). All the materials reduced oxygen in a wide pH range via a four-electron pathway. Rotating disk electrode and rotating ring disk electrode studies of the polydopamine-coated material revealed ORR occurring via 4.14 and 4.00 electrons, respectively. A rate constant of 6.33 × 10(6) mol(-1)s(-1) was observed for the polydopamine-coated material-over 4.5 times greater than the uncoated nanocomposite and superior to those reported for similar carbon-supported metal catalysts. Simply integrating an inexpensive bioinspired polymer coating onto the Mn-graphene nanocomposite increased ORR performance significantly, with a peak potential shift of over +730 mV. This indicates that the material can reduce oxygen at a higher rate but with lower energy usage, revealing its excellent potential as an ORR electrocatalyst in fuel cells. PMID:27528439

  15. SU-E-I-13: Evaluation of Metal Artifact Reduction (MAR) Software On Computed Tomography (CT) Images

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, V; Kohli, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A new commercially available metal artifact reduction (MAR) software in computed tomography (CT) imaging was evaluated with phantoms in the presence of metals. The goal was to assess the ability of the software to restore the CT number in the vicinity of the metals without impacting the image quality. Methods: A Catphan 504 was scanned with a GE Optima RT 580 CT scanner (GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI) and the images were reconstructed with and without the MAR software. Both datasets were analyzed with Image Owl QA software (Image Owl Inc, Greenwich, NY). CT number sensitometry, MTF, low contrast, uniformity, noise and spatial accuracy were compared for scans with and without MAR software. In addition, an in-house made phantom was scanned with and without a stainless steel insert at three different locations. The accuracy of the CT number and metal insert dimension were investigated as well. Results: Comparisons between scans with and without MAR algorithm on the Catphan phantom demonstrate similar results for image quality. However, noise was slightly higher for the MAR algorithm. Evaluation of the CT number at various locations of the in-house made phantom was also performed. The baseline HU, obtained from the scan without metal insert, was compared to scans with the stainless steel insert at 3 different locations. The HU difference between the baseline scan versus metal scan was improved when the MAR algorithm was applied. In addition, the physical diameter of the stainless steel rod was over-estimated by the MAR algorithm by 0.9 mm. Conclusion: This work indicates with the presence of metal in CT scans, the MAR algorithm is capable of providing a more accurate CT number without compromising the overall image quality. Future work will include the dosimetric impact on the MAR algorithm.

  16. The Enhancement of spin Hall torque efficiency and Reduction of Gilbert damping in spin Hall metal/normal metal/ferromagnetic trilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hai; Pai, Chi-Feng; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) in ferromagnet/heavy metal bilayer structures has been demonstrated to be a powerful means for producing pure spin currents and for exerting spin-orbit damping-like and field-like torques on the ferromagnetic layer. Large spin Hall (SH) angles have been reported for Pt, beta-Ta and beta-W films and have been utilized to achieve magnetic switching of in-plane and out-of-plane magnetized nanomagnets, spin torque auto-oscillators, and the control of high velocity domain wall motion. For many of the proposed applications of the SHE it is also important to achieve an effective Gilbert damping parameter that is as low as possible. In general the spin orbit torques and the effective damping are predicted to depend directly on the spin-mixing conductance of the SH metal/ferromagnet interface. This opens up the possibility of tuning these properties with the insertion of a very thin layer of another metal between the SH metal and the ferromagnet. Here we will report on experiments with such trilayer structures in which we have observed both a large enhancement of the spin Hall torque efficiency and a significant reduction in the effective Gilbert damping. Our results indicate that there is considerable opportunity to optimize the effectiveness and energy efficiency of the damping-like torque through engineering of such trilayer structures. Supported in part by NSF and Samsung Electronics Corporation.

  17. Photochemical synthesis of noble metal (Ag, Pd, Au, Pt) on graphene/ZnO multihybrid nanoarchitectures as electrocatalysis for H2O2 reduction.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hui; Yang, Yan; Tian, Jixiang; Shi, Guoyue

    2013-07-24

    For the first time, a series of noble metal (Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) based on new functional graphene were successfully achieved via UV-assisted photocatalytic reduction by ZnO nanorods. The whole preparation strategy for constructing noble metal deposited graphene sheets/ZnO (GS/ZnO) was elucidated in detail in this work. First, graphene oxide based two-dimensional carbon nanostructures served as a support to disperse ZnO nanorods through a hydrothermal route. The ZnO nanorods were self-assembled onto the surface of graphene sheets, forming GS/ZnO nanocomposite, and the graphene oxide was reduced, yielding reduced graphene sheets in this synthetic procedure. Second, the GS/ZnO films were further employed as supporting materials for the dispersion of metal nanoparticles. Photogenerated electrons from UV-irradiated ZnO were transported across GS to stepwise and respectively reduce v μL metal ions (Ag(+), Pd(2+), AuCl4(-), PtCl6(2-), 20 mg/mL) into metal (Ag, Pd, Au, Pt) NPs at a location distinct from the ZnO anchored site, forming five graphene-based hybrid nanocomposites designated as GS/ZnO, GS/ZnO@Agv, GS/ZnO@Pdv, GS/ZnO@Auv, GS/ZnO@Ptv, respectively. The obtained mutihybrid nanoarchitectured materials were clearly characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). According to the diameters and distribution, the four metal NPs on GS/ZnO were divided into two categories: Ag&Au and Pd&Pt. Their difference was rooted in the rival abilities of gathering electron between graphene and different metal islands in the photochemical reduction process. The electrochemical behaviors of the five resultant hybrid nanocomposites were investigated in H2O2 as well as in potassium ferricyanide (Fe(CN)6(3-/4-)) and displayed distinct electrocatalytic activity. PMID:23790187

  18. Easy conversion of protein-rich enoki mushroom biomass to a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial as a promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chaozhong; Liao, Wenli; Li, Zhongbin; Sun, Lingtao; Chen, Changguo

    2015-09-01

    The search for low-cost, highly active, and stable catalysts to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has recently become a topic of interest. Herein, we report a new strategy to design a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial for use as a metal-free ORR catalyst based on facile pyrolysis of protein-rich enoki mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) biomass at 900 °C with carbon nanotubes as a conductive agent and inserting matrix. We found that various forms of nitrogen (nitrile, pyrrolic and graphitic) were incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton of the product, which exhibited more excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity and better durability in alkaline medium than those in acidic medium. Remarkably, the ORR half-wave potential measured on our material was around 0.81 V in alkaline medium, slightly lower than that on the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst (0.86 V). Meanwhile, the ORR followed the desired 4-electron transfer mechanism involving the direct reduction pathway. The ORR performance was also markedly better than or at least comparable to the leading results in the literature based on biomass-derived carbon-based catalysts. Besides, we significantly proposed that the graphitic-nitrogen species that is most responsible for the ORR activity can function as the electrocatalytically active center for ORR, and the pyrrolic-nitrogen species can act as an effective promoter for ORR only. The results suggested a promising route based on economical and sustainable fungi biomass towards the large-scale production of valuable carbon nanomaterials as highly active and stable metal-free catalysts for ORR under alkaline conditions.The search for low-cost, highly active, and stable catalysts to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has recently become a topic of interest. Herein, we report a new strategy to design a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial for use as a metal-free ORR catalyst based on facile pyrolysis of

  19. A review of the stability and durability of non-precious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banham, Dustin; Ye, Siyu; Pei, Katie; Ozaki, Jun-ichi; Kishimoto, Takeaki; Imashiro, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    A major hurdle to the widespread commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is the high loading of noble metal (Pt/Pt-alloy) catalyst at the cathode, which is necessary to facilitate the inherently sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). To eliminate the use of Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts at the cathode of PEMFCs and thus significantly reduce the cost, extensive research on non-precious metal catalysts (NPMCs) has been carried out over the past decade. Major advances in improving the ORR activity of NPMCs, particularly Fe- and Co-based NPMCs, have elevated these materials to a level at which they can start to be considered as potential alternatives to Pt/Pt-alloy catalysts. Unfortunately, the stability (performance loss following galvanostatic experiments) of these materials is currently unacceptably low and the durability (performance loss following voltage cycling) remains uncertain. The three primary mechanisms of instability are: (a) Leaching of the metal site, (b) Oxidative attack by H2O2, and (c) Protonation followed by possible anion adsorption of the active site. While (a) has largely been solved, further work is required to understand and prevent losses from (b) and/or (c). Thus, this review is focused on historical progress in (and possible future strategies for) improving the stability/durability of NPMCs.

  20. GREENER PRODUCTION OF NOBLE METAL NANOSTRUCTURES AND NANOCOMPOSITES: RISK REDUCTION AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The synthesis of nanometal/nano metal oxide/nanostructured polymer and their stabilization (through dispersant, biodegradable polymer) involves the use of natural renewable resources such plant material extract, biodegradable polymers, sugars, vitamins and finally efficient and s...

  1. Reduction of suspended solids following hydroclassification of metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Williford, Clint W; Bricka, R Mark; Foster, Charles C

    2002-05-01

    Remediation of metals-contaminated soil typically uses solidification/stabilization and "dig and haul". Soil washing and physical separation have been applied to a much lesser extent to reduce soil volumes requiring aggressive treatment and to improve performance of follow-up treatments. In earlier work [J. Hazard. Mater. 66 (1999) 15], we used a simple, vertical-column hydroclassifier, to separate four soils contaminated with heavy metals, defining a "best case" performance for larger-scale (minerals processing) equipment. Such processes, using water-based slurries, generate substantial volumes of water with suspended solids. These typically contain disproportionately high concentrations of heavy metals. Here, we performed an initial screening of settling, coagulation, and centrifugation for reducing suspended solids, and thus suspended metals from soil slurries following processing. The four soils, previously hydroclassified, were sieved to <600 microm, slurried with a 4:1 weight ratio of water, and allowed to settle. Slurry samples were collected at settling times of 0, 0.0833, 1, 5, and 22-24h. Coagulant (alum) addition and centrifugation were investigated. The slurries were filtered, digested, and analyzed by atomic absorption for lead and chromium content. Two soil slurries clarified in <5 min. In all four cases, 90% of solids and metals settled within 5h. However, completion may require up to 24h, or other intervention, i.e. coagulants. The metal concentration in the residual suspended solids increased with settling time, implying an enrichment of metals in finer, suspended particles. Metals dissolved in the slurry water ranged from 3 to 5mg/l for chromium and lead. This screening study provides guidance for water treatment requirements and treatability studies for the integration of hydroclassification and solids removal. PMID:11975999

  2. Actively Controlled Landing Gear for Aircraft Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horta, Lucas G.; Daugherty, Robert H.; Martinson, Veloria J.

    1999-01-01

    Concepts for long-range air travel are characterized by airframe designs with long, slender, relatively flexible fuselages. One aspect often overlooked is ground induced vibration of these aircraft. This paper presents an analytical and experimental study of reducing ground-induced aircraft vibration loads using actively controlled landing gears. A facility has been developed to test various active landing gear control concepts and their performance. The facility uses a NAVY A6-intruder landing gear fitted with an auxiliary hydraulic supply electronically controlled by servo valves. An analytical model of the gear is presented including modifications to actuate the gear externally and test data is used to validate the model. The control design is described and closed-loop test and analysis comparisons are presented.

  3. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  4. The application of metal artifact reduction (MAR) in CT scans for radiation oncology by monoenergetic extrapolation with a DECT scanner.

    PubMed

    Schwahofer, Andrea; Bär, Esther; Kuchenbecker, Stefan; Grossmann, J Günter; Kachelrieß, Marc; Sterzing, Florian

    2015-12-01

    Metal artifacts in computed tomography CT images are one of the main problems in radiation oncology as they introduce uncertainties to target and organ at risk delineation as well as dose calculation. This study is devoted to metal artifact reduction (MAR) based on the monoenergetic extrapolation of a dual energy CT (DECT) dataset. In a phantom study the CT artifacts caused by metals with different densities: aluminum (ρ Al=2.7 g/cm(3)), titanium (ρ Ti=4.5 g/cm(3)), steel (ρ steel=7.9 g/cm(3)) and tungsten (ρ W=19.3g/cm(3)) have been investigated. Data were collected using a clinical dual source dual energy CT (DECT) scanner (Siemens Sector Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany) with tube voltages of 100 kV and 140 kV(Sn). For each tube voltage the data set in a given volume was reconstructed. Based on these two data sets a voxel by voxel linear combination was performed to obtain the monoenergetic data sets. The results were evaluated regarding the optical properties of the images as well as the CT values (HU) and the dosimetric consequences in computed treatment plans. A data set without metal substitute served as the reference. Also, a head and neck patient with dental fillings (amalgam ρ=10 g/cm(3)) was scanned with a single energy CT (SECT) protocol and a DECT protocol. The monoenergetic extrapolation was performed as described above and evaluated in the same way. Visual assessment of all data shows minor reductions of artifacts in the images with aluminum and titanium at a monoenergy of 105 keV. As expected, the higher the densities the more distinctive are the artifacts. For metals with higher densities such as steel or tungsten, no artifact reduction has been achieved. Likewise in the CT values, no improvement by use of the monoenergetic extrapolation can be detected. The dose was evaluated at a point 7 cm behind the isocenter of a static field. Small improvements (around 1%) can be seen with 105 keV. However, the dose uncertainty remains of the order of 10

  5. Metal artifact reduction in cone beam computed tomography using forward projected reconstruction information.

    PubMed

    Meilinger, Manuel; Schmidgunst, Christian; Schütz, Oliver; Lang, Elmar W

    2011-09-01

    In this work we present a new method to reduce artifacts, produced by high-density objects, especially metal implants, in X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). These artifacts influence clinical diagnostics and treatments using CT data, if metal objects are located in the field of view (FOV). Our novel method reduces metal artifacts by virtually replacing the metal objects with tissue objects of the same shape. First, the considered objects must be segmented in the original 2D projection data as well as in a reconstructed 3D volume. The attenuation coefficients of the segmented voxels are replaced with adequate attenuation coefficients of tissue (or water), then the required parts of the volume are projected onto the segmented 2D pixels, to replace the original information. This corrected 2D data can then be reconstructed with reduced artifacts, i. e. all metal objects virtually vanished. After the reconstruction, the segmented 3D metal objects were re-inserted into the corrected 3D volume. Our method was developed for mobile C-arm CBCTs; as it is necessary that they are of low weight, the C-arm results in unpredictable distortion. This misalignment between the original 2D data and the forward projection of the reconstructed 3D volume must be adjusted before the correction of the segmented 2D pixels. We applied this technique to clinical data and will now present the results.

  6. Easy conversion of protein-rich enoki mushroom biomass to a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial as a promising metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chaozhong; Liao, Wenli; Li, Zhongbin; Sun, Lingtao; Chen, Changguo

    2015-10-14

    The search for low-cost, highly active, and stable catalysts to replace the Pt-based catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has recently become a topic of interest. Herein, we report a new strategy to design a nitrogen-doped carbon nanomaterial for use as a metal-free ORR catalyst based on facile pyrolysis of protein-rich enoki mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) biomass at 900 °C with carbon nanotubes as a conductive agent and inserting matrix. We found that various forms of nitrogen (nitrile, pyrrolic and graphitic) were incorporated into the carbon molecular skeleton of the product, which exhibited more excellent ORR electrocatalytic activity and better durability in alkaline medium than those in acidic medium. Remarkably, the ORR half-wave potential measured on our material was around 0.81 V in alkaline medium, slightly lower than that on the commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst (0.86 V). Meanwhile, the ORR followed the desired 4-electron transfer mechanism involving the direct reduction pathway. The ORR performance was also markedly better than or at least comparable to the leading results in the literature based on biomass-derived carbon-based catalysts. Besides, we significantly proposed that the graphitic-nitrogen species that is most responsible for the ORR activity can function as the electrocatalytically active center for ORR, and the pyrrolic-nitrogen species can act as an effective promoter for ORR only. The results suggested a promising route based on economical and sustainable fungi biomass towards the large-scale production of valuable carbon nanomaterials as highly active and stable metal-free catalysts for ORR under alkaline conditions.

  7. Laser beam active brazing of metal ceramic joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haferkamp, Heinz; Bach, Friedrich W.; von Alvensleben, Ferdinand; Kreutzburg, K.

    1996-04-01

    The use of engineering ceramics is becoming more and more important. Reasons for this are the specific properties of these materials, such as high strength, corrosion resistance and wear resistance. To apply the advantages of ceramics, joining techniques of metal ceramic parts are required. In this paper, joining of metal ceramic joints by laser beam brazing is presented. This joining technique is characterized by local heat input, and the minimal thermal stress of the brazed components. During the investigations, an Nd:YAG laser and a vacuum chamber were applied. The advantages of Nd:YAG lasers are the simple mechanical construction, and laser beam guidance via quartz glass fibers, which leads to high handling flexibility. In addition, most of the materials show a high absorption rate for this kind of radiation. As materials, ceramic Al2O3 with a purity of 99.4% and metals such as X5CrNi189 and Fe54Ni29Co17 were used. As a filler material, commercially available silver and silver- copper brazes with chemically active elements like titanium were employed. During this study, the brazing wetting behavior and the formation of diffusion layers in dependence on processing parameters were investigated. The results have shown that high brazing qualities can be achieved by means of the laser beam brazing process. Crack-free joining of metal ceramic parts is currently only possible by the use of metals such as Fe54Ni29Co17 because of its low thermal expansion coefficient, which reduces thermal stresses within the joining zone.

  8. Real-Time Active Cosmic Neutron Background Reduction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray-induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory–Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the low-energy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of man-made neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  9. Real-time active cosmic neutron background reduction methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Maurer, Richard; Wolff, Ronald; Mitchell, Stephen; Guss, Paul

    2013-09-01

    Neutron counting using large arrays of pressurized 3He proportional counters from an aerial system or in a maritime environment suffers from the background counts from the primary cosmic neutrons and secondary neutrons caused by cosmic ray‒induced mechanisms like spallation and charge-exchange reaction. This paper reports the work performed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Andrews (RSL-A) and results obtained when using two different methods to reduce the cosmic neutron background in real time. Both methods used shielding materials with a high concentration (up to 30% by weight) of neutron-absorbing materials, such as natural boron, to remove the lowenergy neutron flux from the cosmic background as the first step of the background reduction process. Our first method was to design, prototype, and test an up-looking plastic scintillator (BC-400, manufactured by Saint Gobain Corporation) to tag the cosmic neutrons and then create a logic pulse of a fixed time duration (~120 μs) to block the data taken by the neutron counter (pressurized 3He tubes running in a proportional counter mode). The second method examined the time correlation between the arrival of two successive neutron signals to the counting array and calculated the excess of variance (Feynman variance Y2F)1 in the neutron count distribution from Poisson distribution. The dilution of this variance from cosmic background values ideally would signal the presence of manmade neutrons.2 The first method has been technically successful in tagging the neutrons in the cosmic-ray flux and preventing them from being counted in the 3He tube array by electronic veto—field measurement work shows the efficiency of the electronic veto counter to be about 87%. The second method has successfully derived an empirical relationship between the percentile non-cosmic component in a neutron flux and the Y2F of the measured neutron count distribution. By using shielding materials alone, approximately 55% of the neutron flux

  10. Metal concentration and antioxidant activity of edible mushrooms from Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Tepe, Bektas; Kocak, Mehmet Sefa; Uren, Mehmet Cemil

    2015-05-15

    This study presents information on the antioxidant activity and heavy metal concentrations of Polyporus sulphureus, Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon perlatum and Gomphus clavatus mushrooms collected from the province of Mugla in the South-Aegean Region of Turkey. Antioxidant activities of mushroom samples were evaluated by four complementary tests. All tests showed L. perlatum and G. clavatus to possess extremely high antioxidant potential. Antioxidant activity of the samples was strongly correlated with total phenolic-flavonoid content. In terms of heavy metal content, L. perlatum exceeded the legal limits for daily intake of Pb, Fe, Mn, Cr, Ni and Co contents (0.461, 738.00, 14.52, 1.27, 1.65, 0.417 mg/day, respectively) by a 60-kg consumer. Co contents of M. procera (0.026 mg/day) and P. sulphureus (0.030 mg/day) and Cd contents of G. clavatus (0.071 mg/day) were also above the legal limits. According to these results, L. perlatum should not be consumed, despite the potentially beneficial antioxidant activity. Additionally, M. procera and G. clavatus should not be consumed daily due to their high levels of Cd and Co.

  11. An active metallic nanomatryushka with two similar super-resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D. J.; Cheng, Y.; Wu, X. W.; Liu, X. J.

    2014-07-07

    The optical properties of a simple metallic nanomatryushka (nanosphere-in-a-nanoshell) with gain have been investigated theoretically. The spaser (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) phenomena can be observed at two critical wavelengths in the active metallic nanomatryushkas. With increasing the gain coefficient of the middle layer, a similar super surface plasmon (SP) resonance is first found at the ω₋⁺|₁ mode of the active nanoparticles and then breaks down. With further increasing the gain coefficient, another similar super-resonance occurs at the ω₋⁻|₁ mode. The near-field enhancements in the active nanomatryushkas also have been greatly amplified at the critical wavelengths for ω₋⁺|₊ and ω₋⁻|₁ modes. It is further found that the amplifications of SPs in the active Ag–SiO₂–Au nanoshell are strongest in four kinds of nanoshells and hence the largest near fields. The giant near-field enhancement can greatly enhance the Raman excitation and emission.

  12. Effect of the support and the reduction temperature on the formation of metallic nickel phase in Ni/silica gel precursors of vegetable oil hydrogenation catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabrovska, M.; Krstić, J.; Tzvetkov, P.; Tenchev, K.; Shopska, M.; Vukelić, N.; Jovanović, D.

    2011-12-01

    Ni/SiO2 materials with identical composition (SiO2/Ni = 1.0) have been synthesized by precipitation of Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O solution with Na2CO3 solution on the silica gel, obtained at three different pH values. The present investigation was undertaken in an endeavor to study the effects of the silica gel support type and the reduction temperature on the formation and dispersion of the metallic nickel phase in the reduced Ni/SiO2 precursors of the vegetable oil hydrogenation catalyst. The physicochemical characterization of the unreduced and reduced precursors has been accomplished appropriately by powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction and H2-chemisorption techniques. It can be stated that the texture peculiarities of the silica gels used as supports influence on the crystalline state and distribution of the deposited Ni-containing phases during the preparation of the precursors, on the reduction temperature of the investigated solids as well as on the bulk size and surface dispersion of the arising metallic nickel particles. It was shown that two types of Ni2+-species are formed during the synthesis procedure, namely basic nickel carbonate-like and Ni-phyllosilicate with different extent of presence, location and strength of interaction. The different location of these species is supposed to result in various strength of Ni-O and Ni-O-Si interaction, thus determining the overall reducibility of the precursors. It was specified that the Ni2+-species are strongly bonded to the surface of the silica gel obtained at neutral pH value and weakly bonded to the surface of those prepared in acidic and alkaline conditions. It was established that the precursor, derivates from the silica gel obtained at alkaline conditions, demonstrates both significant reduction of the Ni2+ ions at 430°C and finely dispersed metallic nickel particles on its surface. High dispersion of the metallic nickel might be the crucial reason for achieving of

  13. In vitro and in vivo effects of heavy metals on mussel digestive gland hexokinase activity: the role of glutathione.

    PubMed

    Canesi, L; Ciacci, C; Piccoli, G; Stocchi, V; Viarengo, A; Gallo, G

    1998-08-01

    Hexokinase (E.C. 2.7.1.1), the enzyme responsible for glucose phosphorylation to G-6P, is inactivated by SH reagents and oxyradicals, and its inhibition has been involved in heavy metal toxicity in mammalian systems. In this work, the possibility that hexokinase activity could be affected by both heavy metal binding and oxidative stress conditions also in mussel tissues (Mytilus galloprovincialis Lam.) was investigated. The results obtained in vitro demonstrate that heavy metals inhibited digestive gland hexokinase (with Cd2+ > Cu2+ > Hg2+ > Zn2+ > Pb2+) and suggest a role for GSH in the protection against the heavy metal effects. Hexokinase activity was also reduced by addition of iron/ascorbate, indicating a susceptibility of the enzyme to metal-mediated oxyradical production. The effects of Cu2+ treatment (3 days, 40 micrograms l-1 per animal) on hexokinase activity and on the GSH/GSSG status were then evaluated in mussels exposed to a cycle of air exposure/reimmersion. In Cu-exposed mussels, a significant decrease in hexokinase activity and a parallel reduction in tissue GSH levels were observed, suggesting that the two effects of metal treatment could be related; however, hexokinase activity progressively recovered during air exposure and reimmersion, whereas the level of GSH showed a further decrease during air exposure followed by recovery after reimmersion. The in vitro results therefore indicate that mussel digestive gland hexokinase is susceptible to inactivation by heavy metal binding and suggest a role for GSH in the protection against the effects of heavy metals. The effects of copper were confirmed by the results obtained in vivo. The possible relationship between hexokinase activity and the level of GSH in the digestive gland of control and Cu-exposed mussels during air exposure and reimmersion are discussed, taking into account the balance between pro-oxidant and antioxidant processes at different stages of exposure.

  14. Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2011-01-01

    This report is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) initial effort to provide information and analysis on the potential impacts on petroleum product markets from reductions in Northeast petroleum refining activity.

  15. Earth-Abundant Metal Pyrites (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and Their Alloys) for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Polysulfide Reduction Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Faber, Matthew S; Lukowski, Mark A; Ding, Qi; Kaiser, Nicholas S; Jin, Song

    2014-09-18

    Many materials have been explored as potential hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to generate clean hydrogen fuel via water electrolysis, but none so far compete with the highly efficient and stable (but cost prohibitive) noble metals. Similarly, noble metals often excel as electrocatalytic counter electrode materials in regenerative liquid-junction photoelectrochemical solar cells, such as quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) that employ the sulfide/polysulfide redox electrolyte as the hole mediator. Here, we systematically investigate thin films of the earth-abundant pyrite-phase transition metal disulfides (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and their alloys) as promising alternative electrocatalysts for both the HER and polysulfide reduction. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the HER is correlated to their composition and morphology. The emergent trends in their performance suggest that cobalt plays an important role in facilitating the HER, with CoS2 exhibiting highest overall performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the high activity of the transition metal pyrites toward polysulfide reduction and highlight the particularly high intrinsic activity of NiS2, which could enable improved QDSSC performance. Furthermore, structural disorder introduced by alloying different transition metal pyrites could increase their areal density of active sites for catalysis, leading to enhanced performance. PMID:25247028

  16. Earth-Abundant Metal Pyrites (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and Their Alloys) for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Polysulfide Reduction Electrocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Faber, Matthew S; Lukowski, Mark A; Ding, Qi; Kaiser, Nicholas S; Jin, Song

    2014-09-18

    Many materials have been explored as potential hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to generate clean hydrogen fuel via water electrolysis, but none so far compete with the highly efficient and stable (but cost prohibitive) noble metals. Similarly, noble metals often excel as electrocatalytic counter electrode materials in regenerative liquid-junction photoelectrochemical solar cells, such as quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) that employ the sulfide/polysulfide redox electrolyte as the hole mediator. Here, we systematically investigate thin films of the earth-abundant pyrite-phase transition metal disulfides (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and their alloys) as promising alternative electrocatalysts for both the HER and polysulfide reduction. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the HER is correlated to their composition and morphology. The emergent trends in their performance suggest that cobalt plays an important role in facilitating the HER, with CoS2 exhibiting highest overall performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the high activity of the transition metal pyrites toward polysulfide reduction and highlight the particularly high intrinsic activity of NiS2, which could enable improved QDSSC performance. Furthermore, structural disorder introduced by alloying different transition metal pyrites could increase their areal density of active sites for catalysis, leading to enhanced performance.

  17. Earth-Abundant Metal Pyrites (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and Their Alloys) for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution and Polysulfide Reduction Electrocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many materials have been explored as potential hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) electrocatalysts to generate clean hydrogen fuel via water electrolysis, but none so far compete with the highly efficient and stable (but cost prohibitive) noble metals. Similarly, noble metals often excel as electrocatalytic counter electrode materials in regenerative liquid-junction photoelectrochemical solar cells, such as quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) that employ the sulfide/polysulfide redox electrolyte as the hole mediator. Here, we systematically investigate thin films of the earth-abundant pyrite-phase transition metal disulfides (FeS2, CoS2, NiS2, and their alloys) as promising alternative electrocatalysts for both the HER and polysulfide reduction. Their electrocatalytic activity toward the HER is correlated to their composition and morphology. The emergent trends in their performance suggest that cobalt plays an important role in facilitating the HER, with CoS2 exhibiting highest overall performance. Additionally, we demonstrate the high activity of the transition metal pyrites toward polysulfide reduction and highlight the particularly high intrinsic activity of NiS2, which could enable improved QDSSC performance. Furthermore, structural disorder introduced by alloying different transition metal pyrites could increase their areal density of active sites for catalysis, leading to enhanced performance. PMID:25247028

  18. Biogeochemical Processes Related to Metal Removal and Toxicity Reduction in the H-02 Constructed Wetland, Savannah River Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, E. A.; Mills, G. L.; Harmon, M.; Samarkin, V.

    2011-12-01

    wetland showed biomarkers for sulfate-reducing bacteria. Sulfate-reduction and methane-oxidation rates in the sediments were determined using radiotracer techniques. Sulfate-reduction was detected in all depths of sediment cores, even in surface detritus layers. Gas measurements from H-02 sediments demonstrated that methane is available to support a methane oxidizing community, and active methane-oxidation was detected in the sediments and overlying water. Our results demonstrate that the H-02 wetlands are functioning successfully to remove Cu and Zn from influent waters. The continued success and long-term sustainability of the functioning H-02 system is predicated on maintaining in situ biogeochemistry. However, the relative importance of various biogeochemical cycles remains unclear. For example, the Cu and Zn deposited in the sediments are associated with organic detritus at the sediment surface; the extent and rate at which the metals will redistribute to more recalcitrant sulfide mineral phases remain to be determined. Thus, the H-02 wetland system is a valuable resource not only for metal removal at SRS, but also can further enhance the understanding of wetland function within the scientific and regulatory communities.

  19. SU-E-T-396: Dosimetric Accuracy of Proton Therapy for Patients with Metal Implants in CT Scans Using Metal Deletion Technique (MDT) Artifacts Reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X; Kantor, M; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Sahoo, N; Li, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric accuracy for proton therapy patients with metal implants in CT using metal deletion technique (MDT) artifacts reduction. Methods: Proton dose accuracies under CT metal artifacts were first evaluated using a water phantom with cylindrical inserts of different materials (titanium and steel). Ranges and dose profiles along different beam angles were calculated using treatment planning system (Eclipse version 8.9) on uncorrected CT, MDT CT, and manually-corrected CT, where true Hounsfield units (water) were assigned to the streak artifacts. In patient studies, the treatment plans were developed on manually-corrected CTs, then recalculated on MDT and uncorrected CTs. DVH indices were compared between the dose distributions on all the CTs. Results: For water phantom study with 1/2 inch titanium insert, the proton range differences estimated by MDT CT were with 1% for all beam angles, while the range error can be up to 2.6% for uncorrected CT. For the study with 1 inch stainless steel insert, the maximum range error calculated by MDT CT was 1.09% among all the beam angles compared with maximum range error with 4.7% for uncorrected CT. The dose profiles calculated on MDT CTs for both titanium and steel inserts showed very good agreements with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CTs, while large dose discrepancies calculated using uncorrected CTs were observed in the distal end region of the proton beam. The patient study showed similar dose distribution and DVHs for organs near the metal artifacts recalculated on MDT CT compared with the ones calculated on manually-corrected CT, while the differences between uncorrected and corrected CTs were much pronounced. Conclusion: In proton therapy, large dose error could occur due to metal artifact. The MDT CT can be used for proton dose calculation to achieve similar dose accuracy as the current clinical practice using manual correction.

  20. Reduction of interior sound fields in flexible cylinders by active vibration control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. D.; Fuller, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of interior sound reduction through active control of a thin flexible shell's vibrational response are presently evaluated in view of an analytical model. The noise source is a single exterior acoustic monopole. The active control model is evaluated for harmonic excitation; the results obtained indicate spatially-averaged noise reductions in excess of 20 dB over the source plane, for acoustic resonant conditions inside the cavity.

  1. ACTINIC MASK INSPECTION AT THE ALS: RISK REDUCTION ACTIVITIES FOR 2003

    SciTech Connect

    Barty, A; Levesque, R; Ayers, J; Liu, Y; Gullikson, E; Barale, P

    2004-01-05

    This document reports on risk reduction activities performed at the VNL during CY2003 as a part of the Lith-343 actinic inspection project funded by International SEMATECH. The risk reduction activities described in this document comprise deliverable items 3.1.3, 3.1.4, 3.1.5 and 3.1.6 of Amendment 6 to the VNL EUV mask blank technology transfer contract.

  2. Development of High Activity, Coal-Derived, Promoted Catalytic Systems for NOx Reduction at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Calo

    1998-05-01

    This project is directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction mechanisms on coal-derived, activated carbon supports at low temperatures. Promoted carbon systems offer some potentially significant advantages for heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction. These include: low cost; high activity at low temperatures, which minimizes carbon loss; oxygen resistance; and a support material which can be engineered with respect to porosity, transport and catalyst dispersion characteristics.

  3. Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets

    EIA Publications

    2012-01-01

    Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast Petroleum Product Markets is an update to a previous Energy Information Administration (EIA) report, Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets, released in December 2011. This update analyzes possible market responses and impacts in the event Sunoco's Philadelphia refinery closes this summer, in addition to the recently idled refineries on the East Coast and in the U.S. Virgin Islands.

  4. Graphene-supported ultrafine metal nanoparticles encapsulated by mesoporous silica: robust catalysts for oxidation and reduction reactions.

    PubMed

    Shang, Lu; Bian, Tong; Zhang, Baihui; Zhang, Donghui; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yin, Yadong; Zhang, Tierui

    2014-01-01

    Graphene nanosheet-supported ultrafine metal nanoparticles encapsulated by thin mesoporous SiO2 layers were prepared and used as robust catalysts with high catalytic activity and excellent high-temperature stability. The catalysts can be recycled and reused in many gas- and solution-phase reactions, and their high catalytic activity can be fully recovered by high-temperature regeneration, should they be deactivated by feedstock poisoning. In addition to the large surface area provided by the graphene support, the enhanced catalytic performance is also attributed to the mesoporous SiO2 layers, which not only stabilize the ultrafine metal nanoparticles, but also prevent the aggregation of the graphene nanosheets. The synthetic strategy can be extended to other metals, such as Pd and Ru, for preparing robust catalysts for various reactions.

  5. An experimental study of phosphate reduction and phosphorus-bearing lunar metal particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friel, J. J.; Goldstein, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for two sets of experiments conducted to investigate the distribution and origin of phosphorus in lunar metal particles. The first set measured the equilibrium oxygen fugacity as a function of temperature for synthesized Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-P alloys; the second set imposed various oxygen pressures so that the P distribution among the coexisting phases could be observed. The conditions of temperature, oxygen fugacity, and time necessary to produce P contents similar to those found in lunar metal particles are determined. The results show that: (1) the P distribution in lunar-type metal is controlled by oxygen fugacity, temperature, and bulk composition; (2) the P distribution is limited by the reaction rate at the metal surface and by the amount of phosphate in contact with the metal; (3) the nucleation and growth rate of phosphate controls the rate of P loss during oxidation; and (4) an oxygen fugacity of 10 to the -20th power atm at 950 C is required to saturate iron with P. It is concluded that a reducing species such as carbon may establish a local equilibrium and prevent oxygen communication with the surrounding rock.

  6. The effect of materials selection on metals reduction in propylene glycol methyl ether acetate, PGMEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entezarian, Majid; Geiger, Bob

    2016-03-01

    The trend in microelectronics fabrication is to produce nano-features measuring down to 10 nm and finer. The PPT levels of organic and inorganic contaminants in the photoresist, solvent and cleaning solutions are becoming a major processing variable affecting the process capability and defectivity. The photoresist usually contains gels, metals, and particulates that could interfere with the lithography process and cause microbridging defects. Nano filters of 5 nm polypropylene, 5 nm polyethylene, and 10 nm natural nylon were used to filter propylene glycol methyl ether acetate PGMEA containing 50 ppb of Na, Mg, Al, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Pb. All filters were effective in removing trivalent Al, Cr, and Fe metals indicating the mechanism for their removal as mechanical sieving. However, the nylon was also very effective in removing the divalent metals showing adsorptive properties. Furthermore, the metal removal of the nylon membrane was studied as a function of surface chemistry. Natural and charged 40 nm nylon membranes were tested and found that charged nylon is more effective for metal removal.

  7. Revealing the Origin of Activity in Nitrogen-Doped Nanocarbons towards Electrocatalytic Reduction of Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junyuan; Kan, Yuhe; Huang, Rui; Zhang, Bingsen; Wang, Bolun; Wu, Kuang-Hsu; Lin, Yangming; Sun, Xiaoyan; Li, Qingfeng; Centi, Gabriele; Su, Dangsheng

    2016-05-23

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are functionalized with nitrogen atoms for reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2 ). The investigation explores the origin of the catalyst's activity and the role of nitrogen chemical states therein. The catalysts show excellent performances, with about 90 % current efficiency for CO formation and stability over 60 hours. The Tafel analyses and density functional theory calculations suggest that the reduction of CO2 proceeds through an initial rate-determining transfer of one electron to CO2 , which leads to the formation of carbon dioxide radical anion (CO2 (.-) ). The initial reduction barrier is too high on pristine CNTs, resulting in a very high overpotentials at which the hydrogen evolution reaction dominates over CO2 reduction. The doped nitrogen atoms stabilize the radical anion, thereby lowering the initial reduction barrier and improving the intrinsic activity. The most efficient nitrogen chemical state for this reaction is quaternary nitrogen, followed by pyridinic and pyrrolic nitrogen.

  8. Elucidating the Molecular Basis and Regulation of Chromium(VI) Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Resistance to Metal Toxicity Using Integrated Biochemical, Genomic and Proteomic Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Dorothea K. Thompson; Robert Hettich

    2007-02-06

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a model environmental organism that possesses diverse respiratory capacities, including the ability to reduce soluble Cr(VI) to sparingly soluble, less toxic Cr(III). Chromate is a serious anthropogenic pollutant found in subsurface sediment and groundwater environments due to its widespread use in defense and industrial applications. Effective bioremediation of chromate-contaminated sites requires knowledge of the molecular mechanisms and regulation of heavy metal resistance and biotransformation by dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria. Towards this goal, our ERSP-funded work was focused on the identification and functional analysis of genes/proteins comprising the response pathways for chromate detoxification and/or reduction. Our work utilized temporal transcriptomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses to characterize the dynamic molecular response of MR-1 to an acute chromate shock (up to 90 min) as well as to a 24-h, low-dose exposure. In addition, we have examined the transcriptome of MR-1 cells actively engaged in chromate reduction. These studies implicated the involvement of a functionally undefined DNA-binding response regulator (SO2426) and a putative azoreductase (SO3585) in the chromate stress response of MR-1.

  9. Dissimilatory sulfate reduction in hypersaline coastal pans: Activity across a salinity gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Donovan; Roychoudhury, Alakendra N.; Cowan, Donald

    2007-11-01

    The impact of salinity on the metabolic activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in five highly saline to hypersaline coastal pans was studied using a radioactive tracer (35SO42-) technique. We recorded sulfate reduction at in situ porewater salinities of up to 422. Furthermore, enumeration of sulfate reduction rates in whole core incubations conducted under in situ conditions suggested a high variability in the activity of sulfate-reducers. Average reduction rates (27-3685 nmol cm -3 d -1) varied according to depth, season and site sampled. The highest reduction rates measured in the hypersaline pan were comparable to the highest reported rates from highly productive salt marsh and microbial mat ecosystems. Correspondingly, the depth-integrated rates (integrated to 12 cm) varied from 6 to 241 mmol m -2 d -1 and were also among the highest ever reported rates. The reduction rates decreased down-core and, surprisingly, were highest in the winter season when the lowest sediment temperatures were encountered. High salt concentrations did not inhibit sulfate reduction rates. Rather, higher rates were measured at pans with higher in situ salinities. In laboratory slurry incubation experiments, sediments from the saltpans were treated with increasing salt concentrations. Regression analysis suggested that the short term response of microbial consortia to up-shock was an increase in sulfate reduction activity up to salinities of 272-311 and 134-244, in hypersaline and highly saline pans, respectively. Beyond these salinities, the cells showed evidence of reduced activities.

  10. RFI Risk Reduction Activities Using New Goddard Digital Radiometry Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Damon; Kim, Ed; Young, Peter; Miles, Lynn; Wong, Mark; Morris, Joel

    2012-01-01

    The Goddard Radio-Frequency Explorer (GREX) is the latest fast-sampling radiometer digital back-end processor that will be used for radiometry and radio-frequency interference (RFI) surveying at Goddard Space Flight Center. The system is compact and deployable, with a mass of about 40 kilograms. It is intended to be flown on aircraft. GREX is compatible with almost any aircraft, including P-3, twin otter, C-23, C-130, G3, and G5 types. At a minimum, the system can function as a clone of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) ground-based development unit [1], or can be a completely independent system that is interfaced to any radiometer, provided that frequency shifting to GREX's intermediate frequency is performed prior to sampling. If the radiometer RF is less than 200MHz, then the band can be sampled and acquired directly by the system. A key feature of GREX is its ability to simultaneously sample two polarization channels simultaneously at up to 400MSPS, 14-bit resolution each. The sampled signals can be recorded continuously to a 23 TB solid-state RAID storage array. Data captures can be analyzed offline using the supercomputing facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center. In addition, various Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) - amenable radiometer signal processing and RFI detection algorithms can be implemented directly on the GREX system because it includes a high-capacity Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA prototyping system that is user customizable.

  11. Dislocation reduction of InAs nanofins prepared on Si substrate using metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    InAs nanofins were prepared on a nanopatterned Si (001) substrate by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. The threading dislocations, stacked on the lowest-energy-facet plane {111}, move along the SiO2 walls, resulting in a dislocation reduction, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The dislocations were trapped within a thin InAs epilayer. The obtained 90-nm-wide InAs nanofins with an almost etching-pit-free surface do not require complex intermediate-layer epitaxial growth processes and large thickness typically required for conventional epitaxial growth. PMID:23176442

  12. Single-step treatment of 2,4-dinitrotoluene via zero-valent metal reduction and chemical oxidation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J Mathew; Hernandez, Rafael; Kuo, Chiang-Hai

    2008-06-30

    Many nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) are considered toxic and potential carcinogens. The purpose of this study was to develop an integrated reductive/oxidative process for treating NACs contaminated waters. The process consists of the combination of zero-valent iron and an ozonation based treatment technique. Corrosion promoters are added to the contaminated water to minimize passivation of the metallic species. Water contaminated with 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT) was treated with the integrated process using a recirculated batch reactor. It was demonstrated that addition of corrosion promoters to the contaminated water enhances the reduction of 2,4-DNT with zero-valent iron. The addition of corrosion promoters resulted in 62% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration to 2,4-diaminotoluene. The data shows that iron reduced the 2,4-DNT and ozone oxidized these products resulting in a 73% removal of TOC and a 96% decrease in 2,4-DNT concentration.

  13. Combinatorial high-throughput screening for highly active Pd-Ir-Ce based ternary catalysts in electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Hyeon; Choi, Chang Hyuck; Koh, Jae Kang; Pak, Chanho; Jin, Seon-ah; Woo, Seong Ihl

    2013-11-11

    A combinatorial library having 66 different ternary compositions of Pd-Ir-Ce was prepared via the impregnation method to find the optimum ternary composition with the highest performance toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acid media. Its performance in ORR activity of the combinatorial array was evaluated through two different combinatorial high-throughput screening methods to gain validity: (1) multielectrode half-cell method and (2) optical screening method. From the combinatorial results, the spot at 79:12:9 for Pd-Ir-Ce (at. %) in the array showed the highest ORR activity. The electrochemical characterizations of the single catalyst demonstrates that the optimized Pd79Ir12Ce9/C catalyst shows 1.5 times the ORR activity compared to that of Pd/C catalyst at 0.85 V (vs. RHE). In the Pd-Ir-Ce based catalysts, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results reveal that Ir and Ce are present in the form of IrO2 and CeO2, respectively, and the electron configuration of Pd is effectively modified through the decoration with IrO2 and CeO2. From the results, we suggest that the electro-modification of Pd through strong metal-metal oxide interaction with IrO2-CeO2 was a reason for the enhanced ORR activity.

  14. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  15. Microbial Activity in Aquatic Environments Measured by Dimethyl Sulfoxide Reduction and Intercomparison with Commonly Used Methods

    PubMed Central

    Griebler, Christian; Slezak, Doris

    2001-01-01

    A new method to determine microbial (bacterial and fungal) activity in various freshwater habitats is described. Based on microbial reduction of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) to dimethyl sulfide (DMS), our DMSO reduction method allows measurement of the respiratory activity in interstitial water, as well as in the water column. DMSO is added to water samples at a concentration (0.75% [vol/vol] or 106 mM) high enough to compete with other naturally occurring electron acceptors, as determined with oxygen and nitrate, without stimulating or inhibiting microbial activity. Addition of NaN3, KCN, and formaldehyde, as well as autoclaving, inhibited the production of DMS, which proves that the reduction of DMSO is a biotic process. DMSO reduction is readily detectable via the formation of DMS even at low microbial activities. All water samples showed significant DMSO reduction over several hours. Microbially reduced DMSO is recovered in the form of DMS from water samples by a purge and trap system and is quantified by gas chromatography and detection with a flame photometric detector. The DMSO reduction method was compared with other methods commonly used for assessment of microbial activity. DMSO reduction activity correlated well with bacterial production in predator-free batch cultures. Cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rates did not differ significantly in batch cultures with different nutrient regimes but were different in different growth phases. Overall, a cell-production-specific DMSO reduction rate of 1.26 × 10−17 ± 0.12 × 10−17 mol of DMS per produced cell (mean ± standard error; R2 = 0.78) was calculated. We suggest that the relationship of DMSO reduction rates to thymidine and leucine incorporation is linear (the R2 values ranged from 0.783 to 0.944), whereas there is an exponential relationship between DMSO reduction rates and glucose uptake, as well as incorporation (the R2 values ranged from 0.821 to 0.931). Based on our results, we conclude that

  16. Development of structure-activity relationship for metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Rong; Zhang, Hai Yuan; Ji, Zhao Xia; Rallo, Robert; Xia, Tian; Chang, Chong Hyun; Nel, Andre; Cohen, Yoram

    2013-05-01

    Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were evaluated, based on an initial pool of thirty NP descriptors. The conduction band energy and ionic index (often correlated with the hydration enthalpy) were identified as suitable NP descriptors that are consistent with suggested toxicity mechanisms for metal oxide NPs and metal ions. The best performing nano-SAR with the above two descriptors, built with support vector machine (SVM) model and of validated robustness, had a balanced classification accuracy of ~94%. An applicability domain for the present data was established with a reasonable confidence level of 80%. Given the potential role of nano-SARs in decision making, regarding the environmental impact of NPs, the class probabilities provided by the SVM nano-SAR enabled the construction of decision boundaries with respect to toxicity classification under different acceptance levels of false negative relative to false positive predictions.Nanomaterial structure-activity relationships (nano-SARs) for metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) toxicity were investigated using metrics based on dose-response analysis and consensus self-organizing map clustering. The NP cellular toxicity dataset included toxicity profiles consisting of seven different assays for human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and murine myeloid (RAW 264.7) cells, over a concentration range of 0.39-100 mg L-1 and exposure time up to 24 h, for twenty-four different metal oxide NPs. Various nano-SAR building models were

  17. Virtual monochromatic spectral imaging with fast kilovoltage switching: reduction of metal artifacts at CT.

    PubMed

    Pessis, Eric; Campagna, Raphaël; Sverzut, Jean-Michel; Bach, Fabienne; Rodallec, Mathieu; Guerini, Henri; Feydy, Antoine; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    With arthroplasty being increasingly used to relieve joint pain, imaging of patients with metal implants can represent a significant part of the clinical work load in the radiologist's daily practice. Computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the postoperative evaluation of patients who are suspected of having metal prosthesis-related problems such as aseptic loosening, bone resorption or osteolysis, infection, dislocation, metal hardware failure, or periprosthetic bone fracture. Despite advances in detector technology and computer software, artifacts from metal implants can seriously degrade the quality of CT images, sometimes to the point of making them diagnostically unusable. Several factors may help reduce the number and severity of artifacts at multidetector CT, including decreasing the detector collimation and pitch, increasing the kilovolt peak and tube charge, and using appropriate reconstruction algorithms and section thickness. More recently, dual-energy CT has been proposed as a means of reducing beam-hardening artifacts. The use of dual-energy CT scanners allows the synthesis of virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images. Monochromatic images depict how the imaged object would look if the x-ray source produced x-ray photons at only a single energy level. For this reason, VMS imaging is expected to provide improved image quality by reducing beam-hardening artifacts.

  18. Assessment of toxicity reduction after metal removal in bioleached sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Renoux, A Y; Tyagi, R D; Samson, R

    2001-04-01

    Sewage sludge can be applied to land to supply and recycle organic matter and nutrients. Trace elements in sludge, however, may accumulate in the soil with repeated sludge applications. Reducing metal content may therefore reduce the adverse effects of sludge application. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of bioleaching technology in reducing metal content and toxicity as measured by a battery of terrestrial and liquid-phase bioassays. Sludge-soil mixtures simulating the application of sludge to land were tested by means of terrestrial bioassays, barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) seed germination (5 d) and sprout growth (14 d), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seed germination (5 d), and worm (Eisenia andrei) mortality (14 d). Liquid-phase bioassays, Microtox (Vibrio fischeri, 15 min), lettuce root elongation (L. sativa, 5 d), cladoceran mortality (Daphnia magna, 48 h), and SOS Chromotest (Escherichia coli) were used after elutriation of the sludge. Comparison of the bioassay results (except for D. magna) before and after treatment demonstrated that this bioleaching process reduced both sludge toxicity and metal content. In addition, lower Cu and Zn concentrations found in barley sprouts following treatment supported the assumption that the bioleaching process, by decreasing metal content and bioavailability, reduced sewage sludge toxicity. This study also emphasized the interest of using ecotoxicological bioassays for testing biosolids. In particular, the terrestrial bioassays after simulation of land application and the Microtox test after sludge elutriation proved to be the most appropriate procedures. PMID:11317888