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Sample records for metal removal final

  1. Enhanced NO{sub x} removal in wet scrubbers using metal chelates. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, K.; Lani, B.; Berisko, D.; Schultz, C.; Carlson, W.; Benson, L.B.

    1992-12-01

    Successful pilot plant tests of simultaneous removal of S0{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a wet lime flue gas desulfurization system were concluded in December. The tests, at up to 1.5 MW(e) capacity, were conducted by the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company and Dravo Lime Company for the US Department of Energy at a pilot facility at the Miami Fort station of CG&E near Cincinnati, Ohio. The pilot plant scrubbed a slipstream of flue gas from Unit 7, a 530 MW coal-fired electric generating unit. Tests were conducted in three phases between April and December. The technology tested was wet scrubbing with Thiosorbic{reg_sign} magnesium-enhanced lime for S0{sub 2} removal and simultaneous NO scrubbing with ferrous EDTA, a metal chelate. Magnesium-enhanced lime-based wet scrubbing is used at 20 full-scale high-sulfur coal-fired electric generating units with a combined capacity of 8500 NW. Ferrous EDTA reacts with nitric oxide, NO, which comprises about 95% of NO{sub x} from coal-fired boilers. In this report, although not precise, NO and NO{sub x} are used interchangably. A major objective of the tests was to combine NO{sub x} removal using ferrous EDTA, a developing technology, with SO{sub 2} removal using wet lime FGD, already in wide commercial use. If successful, this could allow wide application of this NO{sub x} removal technology.

  2. Enhanced NO{sub x} removal in wet scrubbers using metal chelates. Final report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    Successful pilot plant tests of simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in a wet lime flue gas desulfurization system were concluded in December. The test, at up to 1.5 MW(e) capacity, were conducted by the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company and Dravo Lime Company for the US Department of Energy at a pilot plant facility at the Miami Fort station of CG&E near Cincinnati, Ohio. The pilot plant scrubbed a slipstream of flue gas from Unit 7 a 530 MW coal-fired electric generating unit. Tests were conducted in three phases between April and December. The technology tested was wet scrubbing with Thiosorbic{reg_sign} magnesium-enhanced lime for SO{sub 2} removal and simultaneous NO scrubbing with ferrous EDTA, a metal chelate. Magnesium-enhanced lime-based wet scrubbing is used at 20 full-scale high-sulfur coal-fired electric generating units with a combined capacity of 8500 MW. Ferrous EDTA reacts with nitric oxide, NO, which comprises about 96% of NO{sub x} from coal-fired boilers. In this report, although not precise, NO and NO{sub x} are used interchangeably. A major objective of the tests was to combine NO{sub x} removal using ferrous EDTA, a developing technology, with SO{sub 2} removal using wet lime FGD, already in wide commercial use. If successful, this could allow wide application of this NO{sub x} removal technology. Volume 2 covers: description and results of NO{sub x} removal tests; and description and results of waste characterization studies.

  3. Removal of Technetium, Carbon Tetrachloride, and Metals from DOE Properties - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, Thomas E.

    2000-09-01

    This research is a three year project involving close collaboration between chemists at Pennsylvania State University and materials scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The goal of the project is the development and characterization of supported reducing agents, and solid waste forms derived from them, which will be effective in remediation of aqueous wastes. The work follows the recent discovery that zero-valent metals, such as iron, are effective decontaminants for waste streams containing chlorinated hydrocarbons. Preliminary data, obtained at Penn State and elsewhere, have shown that the same strategy will be effective in reducing soluble compounds containing toxic metals (technetium, lead, mercury, and chromium) to insoluble forms. The Penn State group has prepared a new class of powerful reducing agents, called Ferragels, which consist of finely divided zero-valent metals on high surface area supports. Because the rate of the surface oxidation-reduction reaction depends on available surface area, Ferragels are more effective in every case tested to date than unsupported metals. The project will further develop and investigate the application of these composite materials to problems relevant to the DOE-EM mission, namely the detoxification of waste streams containing technetium, carbon tetrachloride, and toxic metal ions. The Penn State group will work closely with the PNNL group to prepare materials that are compatible with the highly corrosive liquid fraction of Hanford site tank waste, to conduct tests with waste simulants containing technetium, and to formulate and characterize vitrified waste forms derived from these materials.

  4. Removal of heteroatoms and metals from heavy oils by bioconversion processes. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kaufman, E N; Borole, A P

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this Cooperative research and Development Agreement project between Oak Ridge National Laboratory ( O W ) and Baker Performance Chemicals (BPC), Chevron, Energy BioSystems, Exxon, UNOCAL and Texaco is to investigate the biological desukrization of crude oil. Biological removal of organic s&%r fiom crude oil offers an attractive alternative to conventional thermochemical treatment due to the mild operating conditions afforded by the biocatalyst. In order for biodesulfbrization to realize commercial success, reactors must be designed which allow for sufficient liquid / liquid and gas / liquid mass transfer while simultaneously reducing operating costs. To this end we have been developing advanced bioreactors for biodesufirization and have been studying their performance using both actual crude oil as well as more easily characterized model systems.

  5. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  6. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, Lamar T.

    1988-01-01

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  7. Extraction process for removing metallic impurities from alkalide metals

    SciTech Connect

    Royer, L.T.

    1987-03-20

    A development is described for removing metallic impurities from alkali metals by employing an extraction process wherein the metallic impurities are extracted from a molten alkali metal into molten lithium metal due to the immiscibility of the alkali metals in lithium and the miscibility of the metallic contaminants or impurities in the lithium. The purified alkali metal may be readily separated from the contaminant-containing lithium metal by simple decanting due to the differences in densities and melting temperatures of the alkali metals as compared to lithium.

  8. Metals removal and recovery from municipal sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, R.L.; Scheybeler, B.J.; Smith, M.L.; Baird, R.; Lo, M.P.; Haug, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of metals removal from municipal sludges that may be disposed of on agricultural land was studied. Heavy metal accumulation in such vegetables as lettuce and heavy metal toxicity to such crops as oats, beans, corn, and radishes is of concern. The purpose of the study was to assess metal removal systems for sludges obtained from the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant, Carson, Calif. Primary sludge, waste activated sludge, and their anaerobically digested counterparts were dosed with sulfuric acid and the chelating agent, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), to effect metal solubilization. Seven metals were examined for removal from sludge: Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Ni, and Zn. Recovery of metals from the sludges was also examined. Using an acid dosage to effect pH decrease to pH 2 and a-stirring time of 24 hours, the removal efficiencies for Fe, Zn, Ni, and Cr were found to be upwards of 75%. Removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were less, at about 30 to 70%. At less than 10%, Cu was hardly removed. Metal extraction using EDTA gave slightly higher removal efficiencies for Cd, Pb, and Cu. The recovery of solubilized metals from solution with lime was very successful at greater than 90% efficiencies. Examination of the dewaterability of the acid-treated sludge found no significant difference between treated and untreated. Preliminary estimates indicated that about 0.5 metric ton of acid would be required for each dry metric ton of sludge solids to effect significant metal removal of better than 50% of the cadmium and 33% of the lead. To precipitate the metals from the acid filtrate, 1 metric ton of lime per dry metric ton of sludge would be needed. Considering the chemical costs and metal removal efficiency by sludge acidification, it would seem that industrial source control would be a more practical approach, although its full economic impact on the industries has not been estimated.

  9. Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.

    1984-01-01

    Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

  10. Removal of metals in constructed wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Crites, R.W.; Watson, R.C.; Williams, C.R.

    1996-12-31

    Trace metals are difficult to remove from municipal wastewater by conventional wastewater treatment methods. Constructed wetlands have the potential to trap and remove metals from the water column. Long term removal is expected to occur by accumulation and burial in the plant detritus in a manner similar to the removal of phosphorus. Few data are available in the literature on removal of metals by constructed wetlands. A free water surface constructed wetland at Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant treating secondary municipal effluent has been operating since the spring of 1994. Removal data for 13 metals are presented for the period from August 1994 to May 1995. About 3,785 m{sup 3}/d (1 mgd) of pure oxygen activated sludge effluent, disinfected using UV light, is further treated through a 8 ha (20 acre) constructed wetlands Ten separate, parallel treatment cells are available to demonstrate the effects of detention time, vegetation management, and application frequency on the removal of metals, organics and ammonia. Detention time can be varied from 3 to 13 days by varying the flow and the water depth. The vegetation, primarily bulrush with some cattails, will be managed by different techniques to minimize mosquito production. Application frequency varies from continuous flow to batch flow (1 to 2 days of loading with 1 day of discharge).

  11. Process for removing metals from water

    DOEpatents

    Napier, John M.; Hancher, Charles M.; Hackett, Gail D.

    1989-01-01

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a flocculating agent, separating precipitate-containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions.

  12. Process for removing metals from water

    DOEpatents

    Napier, J.M.; Hancher, C.M.; Hackett, G.D.

    1987-06-29

    A process for removing metals from water including the steps of prefiltering solids from the water, adjusting the pH to between about 2 and 3, reducing the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water, increasing the pH to between about 6 and 8, adding water-soluble sulfide to precipitate insoluble sulfide- and hydroxide-forming metals, adding a containing floc, and postfiltering the resultant solution. The postfiltered solution may optionally be eluted through an ion exchange resin to remove residual metal ions. 2 tabs.

  13. Metal removal by thermally activated clay marl.

    PubMed

    Stefanova, R Y

    2001-01-01

    A sorption active product has been obtained from Bulgarian clay marl by thermal activation at 750 degrees C. The modified aluminosilicate material is characterized, as well as its use for the removal of metal ions. The effect of the initial metal ion concentration, the contact time, pH, the solution temperature and the ionic strength on the uptake of lead, copper and zinc ions from aqueous solutions were studied in batch experiments. The kinetics of removal of metal ions on modified clay marl appears dependent on the sorbate/sorbent ratio. At low cation concentrations sorption follows a Langmuir isotherm, while at higher sorbate/sorbent ratios the sorption isotherms of metal ions are described by Freundlich's equation. At the pH region of the sorption edge the removal of metal ions by surface complexation and surface precipitation mechanisms is indistinguishable. It is observed that the influence of temperature on the uptake ability of the clay marl is most considerable up to 40 degrees C. These studies show that the thermally modified clay marl can be successfully used for removal of metal ions from water solutions in a wide range of concentrations.

  14. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W. ); Benemann, J.R. , Pinole, CA )

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  15. Material Removes Heavy Metal Ions From Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W.; Hill, Carol; Savino, Joseph M.

    1995-01-01

    New high capacity ion-exchange polymer material removes toxic metal cations from contaminated water. Offers several advantages. High sensitivities for such heavy metals as lead, cadmium, and copper and capable of reducing concentrations in aqueous solutions to parts-per-billion range. Removes cations even when calcium present. Material made into variety of forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As result, adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water, usually hard wherever found, whether in wastewater-treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or homes. Another important feature that adsorbed metals easily reclaimed by either destructive or nondestructive process. Other tests show ion-exchange polymer made inexpensively; easy to use; strong, flexible, not easily torn; and chemically stable in storage, in aqueous solutions, and in acidic or basic solution.

  16. Removal of Retired Alkali Metal Test Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brehm, W. F.; Church, W. R.; Biglin, J. W.

    2003-02-26

    This paper describes the successful effort to remove alkali metals, alkali metal residues, and piping and structures from retired non-radioactive test systems on the Hanford Site. These test systems were used between 1965 and 1982 to support the Fast Flux Test Facility and the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. A considerable volume of sodium and sodium-potassium alloy (NaK) was successfully recycled to the commercial sector; structural material and electrical material such as wiring was also recycled. Innovative techniques were used to safely remove NaK and its residues from a test system that could not be gravity-drained. The work was done safely, with no environmental issues or significant schedule delays.

  17. 7 CFR 3201.104 - Metal cleaners and corrosion removers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metal cleaners and corrosion removers. 3201.104... FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.104 Metal cleaners and corrosion removers. (a... from metal surfaces. (2) Metal cleaners and corrosion removers for which Federal preferred...

  18. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  19. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  20. Removal of metallic iron on oxide slags

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon, G.N.; Fruehan, R.J.; Sridhar, S.

    2009-10-15

    It is possible, in some cases, for ground coal particles to react with gasifier gas during combustion, allowing the ash material in the coal to form phases besides the expected slag phase. One of these phases is metallic iron, because some gasifiers are designed to operate under a reducing atmosphere (pO{sub 2}) of approximately 10{sup -4} atm). Metallic iron can become entrained in the gas stream and deposit on, and foul, downstream equipment. To improve the understanding of the reaction between different metallic iron particles and gas, which eventually oxidizes them, and the slag that the resulting oxide dissolves in, the kinetics of iron reaction on slag were predicted using gas-phase mass-transfer limitations for the reaction and were compared with diffusion in the slag; the reaction itself was observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. The expected rates for iron droplet removal are provided based on the size and effective partial pressure of oxygen, and it is found that decarburization occurs before iron reaction, leading to an extra 30- to 100-second delay for carbon-saturated particles vs pure iron particles. A pure metallic iron particle of 0.5 mg should be removed in about 220 seconds at 1400{sup o}C and in 160 seconds at 1600{sup o}C.

  1. A process for containment removal and waste volume reduction to remediate groundwater containing certain radionuclides, toxic metals and organics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, L.P.; Killey, D.R.W.; Vijayan, S.; Wong, P.C.F.

    1992-09-01

    A project to remove groundwater contaminants by an improved treatment process was performed during 1990 October--1992 March by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the United States Department of Energy, managed by Argonne National Laboratory. The goal was to generate high-quality effluent while minimizing secondary waste volume. Two effluent target levels, within an order of magnitude, or less than the US Drinking Water Limit, were set to judge the process effectiveness. The program employed mixed waste feeds containing cadmium, uranium, lead, iron, calcium, strontium-85-90, cesium-137, benzene and trichlorethylene in simulated and actual groundwater and soil leachate solutions. A combination of process steps consisting of sequential chemical conditioning, cross-flow microfiltration and dewatering by low temperature-evaporation, or filter pressing were effective for the treatment of mixed waste having diverse physico-chemical properties. A simplified single-stage version of the process was implemented to treat ground and surface waters contaminated with strontium-90 at the Chalk River Laboratories site. Effluent targets and project goals were met successfully.

  2. Modeling heavy metal removal in wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Lung, W.S.; Light, R.N.

    1994-12-31

    Although the use of wetland ecosystems to purify water has gained increased attention only recently, it has been recognized as a wastewater treatment technique for centuries. While considerable research has occurred to quantify the nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) removal mechanisms of wetlands, relatively few investigators have focused on the mechanisms of heavy metal removal and uptake by wetland sediments and plants. The quantification of the assimilative capacity of heavy metals by wetland ecosystems is a critical component in the design and use of wetlands for this purpose. A computer model has been developed to simulate the fate and transport of heavy metals introduced to a wetland ecosystem. Modeled water quality variables include phytoplankton biomass and productivity; macrophyte (Nulumbo lutea) biomass; total phosphorus in the water column; dissolved copper in the water column and sediments; particulate copper in the water column and sediments; and suspended solids. These variables directly affect the calculated rate of copper uptake by macrophytes, and the rate of copper recycling as a function of the decomposition of copper-laden biomass litter. The model was calibrated using total phosphorus and chlorophyll a data from the Old Woman Creek Wetland in Ohio. Verification of the model was achieved using data on the copper content of the macrophyte Nelumbo lutea.

  3. Compositions and methods for removal of toxic metals and radionuclides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuero, Raul G. (Inventor); McKay, David S. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for the removal of toxic metals or radionuclides from source materials. Toxic metals may be removed from source materials using a clay, such as attapulgite or highly cationic bentonite, and chitin or chitosan. Toxic metals may also be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan. Radionuclides may be removed using volcanic ash alone or in combination with chitin or chitosan.

  4. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium. PMID:20362390

  5. Etchback smear removal process characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    A study evaluated variable limits for each chemical solution used in etchback smear removal on multilayer printed wiring boards (MLPWBs) to determine variables' influence on etchback behavior. Etchback smear removal is essential to fabricate about 40 different multilayer parts. However, erratic etchback behavior contributes to reduced yields among multilayer parts. The study, conducted on 172 multilayer printed wiring boards in 43 test runs, indicated that chemical interaction may not be a principal influence on etchback behavior. Study results also indicated that slight changes in process variables did not influence the presence of recessed conductors. The results verified the adequacy of existing tolerances on main process variables to produce uniformly etched holes.

  6. Final report on solid ferrous scrap copper removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, A.D.; Williamson, C.A.; Davis. D.L.

    1996-08-01

    Research has shown that physically distinct impurities in shredded ferrous scrap can be removed, and that metallic values can be recovered from the removed impurities. Although the closing of the U.S. Bureau of Mines terminated this research, it should be continued by others. Areas for continued research consideration could include further scrap testing to optimize process parameters, among others.

  7. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2

  8. Removal of regulations on black lung benefits. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-03-30

    This final rule removes regulations on the Black Lung program from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) chapter of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). The Black Lung Consolidation of Administrative Responsibility Act transferred the responsibility for administering Part B of the Black Lung benefits program from SSA to the Department of Labor (DOL), and we are removing the regulations in recognition of the fact that we are no longer responsible for administering any aspect of the Part B Black Lung program. DOL concurs with this final rule removing the regulations.

  9. Metal-metal multiply bonded complexes of technetium. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cotton, F.A.; Haefner, S.C.

    1995-03-30

    The primary objective of this project was to explore and develop the area of technetium metal-metal multiple bond chemistry. At the outset of the project, examples of metal-metal multiply bonded complexes of technetium were primarily limited to those supported by halide and carboxylate ligands. As a result, we intended to significantly expand the number of complexes containing Tc-Tc multiple bonds using ligands other than carboxylates or halides. In order to achieve this goal, the results obtained from years of dirhenium research was used as a guide for the development of new technetium compounds. Our emphasis, however, was on pursuing unanticipated results and exploiting the inherent differences between technetium and rhenium in order to develop chemistry beyond that which exists for rhenium. We have focused our attention on the preparation of dinuclear complexes with ligand sets that are known to support dinuclear metal-metal bonded cores in a variety of different metal oxidation states. Investigation of the consequences of electron addition and removal from metal-metal bonding manifold on the structural and physical properties of such dinuclear species will provide vital information regarding the electronic structure of Tc-Tc multiply bonded compounds.

  10. Method for removing metals from a cleaning solution

    DOEpatents

    Deacon, Lewis E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing accumulated metals from a cleaning solution is provided. After removal of the metals, the cleaning solution can be discharged or recycled. The process manipulates the pH levels of the solution as a means of precipitating solids. Preferably a dual phase separation at two different pH levels is utilized.

  11. Simultaneous heavy metal removal mechanism by dead macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Miretzky, Patricia; Saralegui, Andrea; Fernández Cirelli, Alicia

    2006-01-01

    The use of dead, dried aquatic plants, for water removal of metals derived from industrial activities as a simple biosorbent material has been increasing in the last years. The mechanism of simultaneous metal removal (Cd2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Pb2+) by 3 macrophytes biomass (Spirodela intermedia, Lemna minor and Pistia stratiotes) was investigated. L. minor biomass presented the highest mean removal percentage and P. stratiotes the lowest for all metals tested. Pb2+ and Cd2+ were more efficiently removed by the three of them. The simultaneous metal sorption data were analysed according to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Data fitted the Langmuir model only for Ni and Cd, but Freundlich isotherm for all metals tested, as it was expected. The K(F) values showed that Pb was the metal more efficiently removed from water solution. The adsorption process for the three species studied followed first order kinetics. The mechanism involved in biosorption resulted ion exchange between monovalent metals as counter ions present in the macrophytes biomass and heavy metal ions and protons taken up from water. No significant differences were observed in the metal exchange amounts while using multi-metal or individual metal solutions.

  12. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency.

  13. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency.

  14. Removal of trace metal contaminants from potable water by electrocoagulation

    PubMed Central

    Heffron, Joe; Marhefke, Matt; Mayer, Brooke K.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of four operational and environmental variables on the removal of trace metal contaminants from drinking water by electrocoagulation (EC). Removal efficiencies for five metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead and nickel) were compared under varying combinations of electrode material, post-treatment, water composition and pH. Iron electrodes out-performed aluminum electrodes in removing chromium and arsenic. At pH 6.5, aluminum electrodes were slightly more effective at removing nickel and cadmium, while at pH 8.5, iron electrodes were more effective for these metals. Regardless of electrode, cadmium and nickel removal efficiencies were higher at pH 8.5 than at pH 6.5. Post-EC treatment using membrane filtration (0.45 μm) enhanced contaminant removal for all metals but nickel. With the exception of lead, all metals exhibited poorer removal efficiencies as the ionic strength of the background electrolyte increased, particularly in the very high-solids synthetic groundwaters. Residual aluminum concentrations were lowest at pH 6.5, while iron residuals were lowest in low ionic strength waters. Both aluminum and iron residuals required post-treatment filtration to meet drinking water standards. EC with post-treatment filtration appears to effectively remove trace metal contaminants to potable water standards, but both reactor and source water parameters critically impact removal efficiency. PMID:27324564

  15. Multiple heavy metal removal using an entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Gola, Deepak; Dey, Priyadarshini; Bhattacharya, Arghya; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Namburath, Maneesh; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2016-10-01

    Towards the development of a potential remediation technology for multiple heavy metals [Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Cr(VI) and Ni(II)] from contaminated water, present study examined the growth kinetics and heavy metal removal ability of Beauveria bassiana in individual and multi metals. The specific growth rate of B. bassiana varied from 0.025h(-1) to 0.039h(-1) in presence of individual/multi heavy metals. FTIR analysis indicated the involvement of different surface functional groups in biosorption of different metals, while cellular changes in fungus was reflected by various microscopic (SEM, AFM and TEM) analysis. TEM studies proved removal of heavy metals via sorption and accumulation processes, whereas AFM studies revealed increase in cell surface roughness in fungal cells exposed to heavy metals. Present study delivers first report on the mechanism of bioremediation of heavy metals when present individually as well as multi metal mixture by entomopathogenic fungi.

  16. Multiple heavy metal removal using an entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Gola, Deepak; Dey, Priyadarshini; Bhattacharya, Arghya; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Namburath, Maneesh; Ahammad, Shaikh Ziauddin

    2016-10-01

    Towards the development of a potential remediation technology for multiple heavy metals [Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Cr(VI) and Ni(II)] from contaminated water, present study examined the growth kinetics and heavy metal removal ability of Beauveria bassiana in individual and multi metals. The specific growth rate of B. bassiana varied from 0.025h(-1) to 0.039h(-1) in presence of individual/multi heavy metals. FTIR analysis indicated the involvement of different surface functional groups in biosorption of different metals, while cellular changes in fungus was reflected by various microscopic (SEM, AFM and TEM) analysis. TEM studies proved removal of heavy metals via sorption and accumulation processes, whereas AFM studies revealed increase in cell surface roughness in fungal cells exposed to heavy metals. Present study delivers first report on the mechanism of bioremediation of heavy metals when present individually as well as multi metal mixture by entomopathogenic fungi. PMID:27387415

  17. Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-04-11

    A process is described for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to expose additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal. 2 figures.

  18. Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A process for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to expose additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal.

  19. Process for removing cadmium from scrap metal

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    A process for the recovery of a metal, in particular, cadmium contained in scrap, in a stable form. The process comprises the steps of mixing the cadmium-containing scrap with an ammonium carbonate solution, preferably at least a stoichiometric amount of ammonium carbonate, and/or free ammonia, and an oxidizing agent to form a first mixture so that the cadmium will react with the ammonium carbonate to form a water-soluble ammine complex; evaporating the first mixture so that ammine complex dissociates from the first mixture leaving carbonate ions to react with the cadmium and form a second mixture that includes cadmium carbonate; optionally adding water to the second mixture to form a third mixture; adjusting the pH of the third mixture to the acid range whereby the cadmium carbonate will dissolve; and adding at least a stoichiometric amount of sulfide, preferably in the form of hydrogen sulfide or an aqueous ammonium sulfide solution, to the third mixture to precipitate cadmium sulfide. This mixture of sulfide is then preferably digested by heating to facilitate precipitation of large particles of cadmium sulfide. The scrap may be divided by shredding or breaking up to exposure additional surface area. Finally, the precipitated cadmium sulfide can be mixed with glass formers and vitrified for permanent disposal.

  20. Tribological properties of silicon carbide in metal removal process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    Material properties are considered as they relate to adhesion, friction, and wear of single crystal silicon carbide in contact with metals and alloys that are likely to be involved in a metal removal process such as grinding. Metal removal from adhesion between sliding surfaces in contact and metal removal as a result of the silicon carbide sliding against a metal, indenting into it, and plowing a series of grooves or furrows are discussed. Fracture and deformation characteristics of the silicon carbide surface are also covered. The adhesion, friction, and metal transfer to silicon carbide is related to the relative chemical activity of the metals. The more active the metal, the higher the adhesion and friction, and the greater the metal transfer to silicon carbide. Atomic size and content of alloying elements play a dominant role in controlling adhesion, friction, and abrasive wear properties of alloys. The friction and abrasive wear (metal removal) decrease linearly as the shear strength of the bulk metal increases. They decrease as the solute to solvent atomic radius ratio increases or decreases linearly from unity, and with an increase of solute content. The surface fracture of silicon carbide is due to cleavages of 0001, 10(-1)0, and/or 11(-2)0 planes.

  1. Removal of sulfur fumes by metal sulfide sorbents.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Bin; Ziang, Zhidong; Chung, Jong Shik

    2002-07-01

    Removal of sulfur by a transition metal is studied at temperatures of 300-350 degrees C. Among various metal sulfides tested, only metal sulfides of iron, cobalt, and nickel can remove sulfur fumes as they are transformed into disulfides in the presence of sulfur vapor. The disulfide form can be regenerated into FeS, Co9S8, and Ni3S2, respectively, using hydrogen gas at 350-400 degrees C. These two reactions of deep sulfidation with sulfur and reduction with hydrogen can be utilized for the removal of sulfur fumes in a process stream and an emission gas.

  2. Predicting As removal during metal hydroxide precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    McNeill, L.S.; Edwards, M.

    1997-01-01

    A simplified isotherm is described that can predict the extent of arsenate removal at drinking water utilities practicing coagulation or iron-manganese (Fe-Mn) removal. If all possible sources of particulate iron and aluminum hydroxide present in the system are accounted for, the model predicts arsenic (As) removal to within {+-}13 percent (90 percent confidence) for Fe coagulation at pH 6.5--8 and alum coagulation at pH < 7.6. Analysis of full-scale treatment data suggests that colloidal aluminum (Al) flocs with sorbed arsenate [As(V)] may pass through filters, thereby decreasing overall As removal efficiency. Thus, Al solubility and particle stability must be minimized to improve As removal. If stability and solubility of aluminum hydroxide flocs are not a problem, alum and Fe coagulants have nearly equal capacity for sorbing As(V). Survey results also demonstrate the importance of particulate As.

  3. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, Robert J.; Mayer, Steven T.; Tarte, Lisa A.

    1996-01-01

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment.

  4. Removal of field and embedded metal by spin spray etching

    DOEpatents

    Contolini, R.J.; Mayer, S.T.; Tarte, L.A.

    1996-01-23

    A process of removing both the field metal, such as copper, and a metal, such as copper, embedded into a dielectric or substrate at substantially the same rate by dripping or spraying a suitable metal etchant onto a spinning wafer to etch the metal evenly on the entire surface of the wafer. By this process the field metal is etched away completely while etching of the metal inside patterned features in the dielectric at the same or a lesser rate. This process is dependent on the type of chemical etchant used, the concentration and the temperature of the solution, and also the rate of spin speed of the wafer during the etching. The process substantially reduces the metal removal time compared to mechanical polishing, for example, and can be carried out using significantly less expensive equipment. 6 figs.

  5. Removal of dissolved heavy metals and radionuclides by microbial spores

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; Hadden, C.T.; Edenborn, H.

    1997-11-01

    Microbial systems have been shown to remove specific heavy metals from contaminated aqueous waste to levels acceptable to EPA for environmental release. However, systems capable of removing a variety of heavy metals from aqueous waste to environmentally acceptable levels remain to be reported. The present studies were performed to determine the specificity of spores of the bacterium Bacillus megaterium for the adsorption of dissolved metals and radionuclides from aqueous waste. The spores effectively adsorbed eight heavy metals from a prepared metal mix and from a plating rinse waste to EPA acceptable levels for waste water. These results suggest that spores have multiple binding sites for the adsorption of heavy metals. Spores were also effective in adsorbing the radionuclides {sup 85}strontium and {sup 197}cesium. The presence of multiple sites in spores for the adsorption of heavy metals and radionuclides makes this biosorbent a good candidate for the treatment of aqueous wastes associated with the plating and nuclear industries. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    WORKER REMOVING SLAG FROM THE MOLTEN METAL BATH IN THE ELECTRIC FURNACE AFTER ADDING A CHEMICAL COAGULANT TO FORCE IT TO THE SURFACE. - Southern Ductile Casting Company, Melting, 2217 Carolina Avenue, Bessemer, Jefferson County, AL

  7. Individual and competitive removal of heavy metals using capacitive deionization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhe; Lu, Lu; Cai, Zhenxiao; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2016-01-25

    This study presents the viability and preference of capacitive deionization (CDI) for removing different heavy metal ions in various conditions. The removal performance and mechanisms of three ions, cadmium (Cd(2+)), lead (Pb(2+)) and chromium (Cr(3+)) were investigated individually and as a mixture under different applied voltages and ion concentrations. It was found that CDI could effectively remove these metals, and the performance was positively correlated with the applied voltage. When 1.2 V was applied into solution containing 0.5mM individual ions, the Cd(2+), Pb(2+), and Cr(3+) removal was 32%, 43%, and 52%, respectively, and the electrosorption played a bigger role in Cd(2+) removal than for the other two ions. Interestingly, while the removal of Pb(2+) and Cr(3+) remained at a similar level of 46% in the mixture of three ions, the Cd(2+) removal significantly decreased to 14%. Similar patterns were observed when 0.05 mM was used to simulate natural contaminated water condition, but the removal efficiencies were much higher, with the removal of Pb(2+), Cr(3+), and Cd(2+) increased to 81%, 78%, and 42%, respectively. The low valence charge and lack of physical sorption of Cd(2+) were believed to be the reason for the removal behavior, and advanced microscopic analysis showed clear deposits of metal ions on the cathode surface after operation.

  8. Metals removal and recovery in bioelectrochemical systems: A review.

    PubMed

    Nancharaiah, Y V; Venkata Mohan, S; Lens, P N L

    2015-11-01

    Metal laden wastes and contamination pose a threat to ecosystem well being and human health. Metal containing waste streams are also a valuable resource for recovery of precious and scarce elements. Although biological methods are inexpensive and effective for treating metal wastewaters and in situ bioremediation of metal(loid) contamination, little progress has been made towards metal(loid) recovery. Bioelectrochemical systems are emerging as a new technology platform for removal and recovery of metal ions from metallurgical wastes, process streams and wastewaters. Biodegradation of organic matter by electroactive biofilms at the anode has been successfully coupled to cathodic reduction of metal ions. Until now, leaching of Co(II) from LiCoO2 particles, and removal of metal ions i.e. Co(III/II), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Hg(II), Ag(I), Se(IV), and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions has been demonstrated. This article reviews the state of art research of bioelectrochemical systems for removal and recovery of metal(loid) ions and pertaining removal mechanisms.

  9. Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Chang Y.; Boysen, John E.; Branthaver, Jan F.

    1991-01-01

    A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

  10. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals.

  11. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals. PMID:25603034

  12. Solid materials for removing metals and fabrication method

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Reynolds, John G.; Coleman, Sabre J.

    2004-10-19

    Solid materials have been developed to remove contaminating metals and organic compounds from aqueous media. The contaminants are removed by passing the aqueous phase through the solid materials which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The solid materials adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous stream. The materials are sol-gel and or sol-gel and granulated activated carbon (GAC) mixtures. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific chemical modifications of the solids tailored towards the contaminant(s). The contaminated solid materials can then be disposed of or the contaminant can be removed and the solids recycled.

  13. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  14. Process for removing metal contaminants from used lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.B.

    1980-05-27

    A process is provided for removing metal contaminants from used lubricating oil. The used oil is contacted with an aqueous solution of aluminum sulphate and ammonium sulphate at elevated temperature to form compounds of the metal contaminants in an aqueous phase which is phase separable from the oil. An oil product reduced in metal contaminants is thereby produced which is suitable as a cheap fuel or lubricant.

  15. Behavior and removal of associated metals in the secondary metallurgy of copper

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, K.; Bussmann, H.

    1995-12-31

    Copper in recycling material is accompanied by various groups of metals: (1) Metals which are much more negative than copper, such as Fe, Al, Si, P, Be. They are mainly removed by fire refining during the recovery of copper and leave the process in form of slag. (2) Metals which are more positive than copper or difficult to separate by fire refining and which are partly reduced together with the copper. These metals are for example As, Sb, Ni, Ag, Pb, Zn, Sn. They are enriched in intermediate products and recovered from these or remain for their major part in the fire-refined copper and can be separated by electrolytic refining and recovered from the electrolyte or anode slime. This report describes the process of Huettenwerke Kayser AG in Germany and illustrates how considerable returns of material are partly required to separate or recover associated metals. They are finally removed in saleable products.

  16. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.

    2006-12-26

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  17. Magnetic process for removing heavy metals from water employing magnetites

    DOEpatents

    Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D.; Padilla, Dennis D.; Wingo, Robert M.; Worl, Laura A.; Johnson, Michael D.

    2003-07-22

    A process for removing heavy metals from water is provided. The process includes the steps of introducing magnetite to a quantity of water containing heavy metal. The magnetite is mixed with the water such that at least a portion of, and preferably the majority of, the heavy metal in the water is bound to the magnetite. Once this occurs the magnetite and absorbed metal is removed from the water by application of a magnetic field. In most applications the process is achieved by flowing the water through a solid magnetized matrix, such as steel wool, such that the magnetite magnetically binds to the solid matrix. The magnetized matrix preferably has remnant magnetism, but may also be subject to an externally applied magnetic field. Once the magnetite and associated heavy metal is bound to the matrix, it can be removed and disposed of, such as by reverse water or air and water flow through the matrix. The magnetite may be formed in-situ by the addition of the necessary quantities of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions, or pre-formed magnetite may be added, or a combination of seed and in-situ formation may be used. The invention also relates to an apparatus for performing the removal of heavy metals from water using the process outlined above.

  18. Electrochemical removal of material from metallic work

    DOEpatents

    Csakvary, Tibor; Fromson, Robert E.

    1980-05-13

    Deburring, polishing, surface forming and the like are carried out by electrochemical machining with conformable electrode means including an electrically conducting and an insulating web. The surface of the work to be processed is covered by a deformable electrically insulating web or cloth which is perforated and conforms with the work. The web is covered by a deformable perforated electrically conducting screen electrode which also conforms with, and is insulated from, the work by the insulating web. An electrolyte is conducted through the electrode and insulating web and along the work through a perforated elastic member which engages the electrode under pressure pressing the electrode and web against the work. High current under low voltage is conducted betwen the electrode and work through the insulator, removing material from the work. Under the pressure of the elastic member, the electrode and insulator continue to conform with the work and the spacing between the electrode and work is maintained constant.

  19. Removal of heavy metals by hybrid electrocoagulation and microfiltration processes.

    PubMed

    Keerthi; Vinduja, V; Balasubramanian, N

    2013-01-01

    This study is based on the investigation of the performance of electrocoagulation (EC), followed by the microfiltration process for heavy metal removal in synthetic model waste water containing Zn2+, Ni2+ and Cd2+ ions. Effects of initial concentration, current density and pH on metal removal were analysed to optimize the EC process. The optimized EC process was then integrated with dead-end microfiltration (MF) and was found that the hybrid process was capable of 99% removal of heavy metals. The cake layer formed over the membrane by the hybrid process was analysed through scanning electron microscope-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size analysis of the sludge formed during EC was done to investigate the fouling caused during the process.

  20. Enhanced arsenic removal using mixed metal oxide impregnated chitosan beads.

    PubMed

    Yamani, Jamila S; Miller, Sarah M; Spaulding, Matthew L; Zimmerman, Julie B

    2012-09-15

    Mixed metal oxide impregnated chitosan beads (MICB) containing nanocrystalline Al₂O₃ and nanocrystalline TiO₂ were successfully developed. This adsorbent exploits the high capacity of Al₂O₃ for arsenate and the photocatalytic activity of TiO₂ to oxidize arsenite to arsenate, resulting in a removal capacity higher than that of either metal oxide alone. The composition of the beads was optimized for maximum arsenite removal in the presence of UV light. The mechanism of removal was investigated and a mode of action was proposed wherein TiO₂ oxidizes arsenite to arsenate which is then removed from solution by Al₂O₃. Pseudo-second order kinetics were used to validate the proposed mechanism. MICB is a more efficient and effective adsorbent for arsenic than TiO₂-impregnated chitosan beads (TICB), previously reported on, yet maintains a desirable life cycle, free of complex synthesis processes, toxic materials, and energy inputs. PMID:22743162

  1. Chitosan removes toxic heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Xu, Ying; Wang, Dongfeng; Zhou, Shilu

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated the removal of heavy metal ions from cigarette mainstream smoke using chitosan. Chitosan of various deacetylation degrees and molecular weights were manually added to cigarette filters in different dosages. The mainstream smoke particulate matter was collected by a Cambridge filter pad, digested by a microwave digestor, and then analyzed for contents of heavy metal ions, including As(III/V), Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The results showed that chitosan had a removal effect on Pb(II), Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II). Of these, the percent removal of Ni(II) was elevated with an increasing dosage of chitosan. Chitosan of a high deace tylation degree exhibited good binding performance toward Cd(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II), though with poor efficiency for Pb(II). Except As(III/V), all the tested metal ions showed similar tendencies in the growing contents with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Nonetheless, the percent removal of Cr(III/VI) peaked with a chitosan molecular weight of 200 kDa, followed by a dramatic decrease with an increasing chitosan molecular weight. Generally, chitosan had different removal effects on four out of five tested metal ions, and the percent removal of Cd(II), Pb(II), Cr(III/VI) and Ni(II) was approximately 55%, 45%, 50%, and 16%, respectively. In a word, chitosan used in cigarette filter can remove toxic heavy metal ions in the mainstream smoke, improve cigarette safety, and reduce the harm to smokers.

  2. Removal of heavy metal from industrial effluents using Baker's yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdous, Anika; Maisha, Nuzhat; Sultana, Nayer; Ahmed, Shoeb

    2016-07-01

    Bioremediation of wastewater containing heavy metals is one of the major challenges in environmental biotechnology. Heavy metals are not degraded and as a result they remain in the ecosystem, and pose serious health hazards as it comes in contact with human due to anthropogenic activities. Biological treatment with various microorganisms has been practiced widely in recent past, however, accessing and maintaining the microorganisms have always been a challenge. Microorganisms like Baker's yeast can be very promising biosorbents as they offer high surface to volume ratio, large availability, rapid kinetics of adsorption and desorption and low cost. The main aim of this study is to evaluate the applicability of the biosorption process using baker's yeast. Here we present an experimental investigation of biosorption of Chromium (Cr) from water using commercial Baker's Yeast. It was envisaged that yeast, dead or alive, would adsorb heavy metals, however, operating parameters could play vital roles in determining the removal efficiency. Parameters, such as incubation time, pH, amount of biosorbent and heavy metal concentration were varied to investigate the impacts of those parameters on removal efficiency. Rate of removal was found to be inversely proportional to the initial Cr (+6) concentrations but the removal rate per unit biomass was a weakly dependent on initial Cr(+6) concentrations. Biosorption process was found to be more efficient at lower pH and it exhibited lower removal with the increase in solution pH. The optimum incubation time was found to be between 6-8 hours and optimum pH for the metal ion solution was 2. The effluents produced in leather industries are the major source of chromium pollution in Bangladesh and this study has presented a very cost effective yet efficient heavy metal removal approach that can be adopted for such kind of wastewater.

  3. A biosystem for removal of metal ions from water

    SciTech Connect

    Kilbane, J.J. II.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of heavy metal ions in ground and surface waters constitutes a potential health risk and is an environmental concern. Moreover, processes for the recovery of valuable metal ions are of interest. Bioaccumulation or biosorption is not only a factor in assessing the environmental risk posed by metal ions; it can also be used as a means of decontamination. A biological system for the removal and recovery of metal ions from contaminated water is reported here. Exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms, including a methanotrophic culture, are demonstrated to have superior metal binding ability, compared with other microbial cultures. This paper describes a biosorption process in which dried biomass obtained from exopolysaccharide-producing microorganisms is encapsulated in porous plastic beads and is used for metal ion binding and recovery. 22 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Two-stage anaerobic digestion enables heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Selling, Robert; Håkansson, Torbjörn; Björnsson, Lovisa

    2008-01-01

    To fully exploit the environmental benefits of the biogas process, the digestate should be recycled as biofertiliser to agriculture. This practice can however be jeopardized by the presence of unwanted compounds such as heavy metals in the digestate. By using two-stage digestion, where the first stage includes hydrolysis/acidification and liquefaction of the substrate, heavy metals can be transferred to the leachate. From the leachate, metals can then be removed by adsorption. In this study, up to 70% of the Ni, 40% of the Zn and 25% of the Cd present in maize was removed when the leachate from hydrolysis was circulated over a macroporous polyacrylamide column for 6 days. For Cu and Pb, the mobilization in the hydrolytic stage was lower which resulted in a low removal. A more efficient two-stage process with improved substrate hydrolysis would give lower pH and/or longer periods with low pH in the hydrolytic stage. This is likely to increase metal mobilisation, and would open up for an excellent opportunity of heavy metal removal. PMID:18359995

  5. New trends in removing heavy metals from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meihua; Xu, Ying; Zhang, Chaosheng; Rong, Hongwei; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-08-01

    With the development of researches, the treatments of wastewater have reached a certain level. Whereas, heavy metals in wastewater cause special concern in recent times due to their recalcitrance and persistence in the environment. Therefore, it is important to get rid of the heavy metals in wastewater. The previous studies have provided many alternative processes in removing heavy metals from wastewater. This paper reviews the recent developments and various methods for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater. It also evaluates the advantages and limitations in application of these techniques. A particular focus is given to innovative removal processes including adsorption on abiological adsorbents, biosorption, and photocatalysis. Because these processes have leaded the new trends and attracted more and more researches in removing heavy metals from wastewater due to their high efficency, pluripotency and availability in a copious amount. In general, the applicability, characteristic of wastewater, cost-effectiveness, and plant simplicity are the key factors in selecting the most suitable method for the contaminated wastewater. PMID:27318819

  6. Metal Removal Efficiency And Ecotoxicological Assessment Of Field-Scale Passive Treatment Biochemical Reactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biochemical reactors (BCRs) are useful for removing metals from mining-impacted water at remote sites. Removal processes include sorption and precipitation of metal sulfides, carbonates, and hydroxides. A question of interest is whether BCRs remove aquatic toxicity. ...

  7. Metal removal efficiency and ecotoxicological assessment of field-scale passive treatment biochemical reactors

    EPA Science Inventory

    Anaerobic biochemical reactors (BCRs) are useful for removing metals from mining-impacted water (MIW) at remote sites. Removal processes include sorption and precipitation of metal sulfides, carbonates and hydroxides. A question of interest is whether BCRs remove aquatic toxicit...

  8. Metal removal via particulate material in a lowland river system.

    PubMed

    Webster-Brown, J G; Dee, T J; Hegan, A F

    2012-01-01

    Twelve month surveys of acid-soluble and dissolved trace metal concentrations in the lower Waikato River (in 1998/9 and 2005/6) showed abnormally low particulate Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations and mass flux in autumn, when the suspended particulate material (SPM) had a relatively high diatom and organic carbon content, and low Fe and Al content. Dissolved Mn, Cu and Zn concentrations also decreased in autumn, while dissolved Fe and Pb concentrations were unaffected. While SPM settlement under the low river flow conditions present in autumn can explain the removal of particulate metals, it does not explain dissolved metal removal. SPM-metal interaction was therefore investigated using seasonal monitoring data, experimental adsorption studies, sequential extraction and geochemical modelling. Pb binding to SPM occurred predominantly via Fe-oxide surfaces, and could be reliably predicted using surface complexation adsorption modelling. Dissolved Mn concentrations were controlled by the solubility of Mn oxide, but enhanced removal during autumn could be attributed to uptake by diatoms. Zn and Cu were also adsorbed on Fe-oxide in the SPM, but removal from the water column in autumn appeared augmented by Zn adsorption onto Mn-oxide, and Cu adsorption onto the organic extracellular surfaces of the diatoms.

  9. Vanadium removal by metal (hydr)oxide adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Naeem, A; Westerhoff, P; Mustafa, S

    2007-04-01

    Vanadium is listed on the United States Environment Protection Agency (USEPA) candidate contaminant list # 2 (CCL2), and regulatory guidelines for vanadium exist in some US states. The USEPA requires treatability studies before making regulatory decisions on CCL2 contaminants. Previous studies have examined vanadium adsorption onto some metal hydroxides but not onto commercially available adsorbents. This paper briefly summarizes known vanadium occurrence in North American groundwater and assesses vanadium removal by three commercially available metal oxide adsorbents with different mineralogies. GTO (Dow) is TiO2 based and E-33 (Seven Trents) and GFH (US Filter) are iron based. Preliminary vanadate adsorption kinetics onto GFH, E-33 and GTO has been studied and the homogenous surface diffusion model (HSDM) is used to describe the adsorption kinetics data. The effects of pH, vanadium concentration, and volume/mass ratio are assessed. Vanadium adsorption decreases with increasing pH, with maximum adsorption capacities achieved in at pH 3-4. Results indicate that all adsorbents remove vanadium; GFH has the highest adsorption capacity, followed by GTO and E-33. Data are best fit with the Langmuir model rather than Freundlich isotherms. Both the sorption maxima (Xm) and binding energy constant (b) follow the trend GFH>GTO>E-33. Naturally occurring vanadium is also removed from Arizona ground water in rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs). Metal oxide adsorption technologies currently used for arsenic removal may also remove vanadium but not always with the same effectiveness.

  10. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger T.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO.sub.x and optionally SO.sub.2 from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe.sup.2+) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC' is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution.

  11. Metal chelate process to remove pollutants from fluids

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.T.

    1994-12-06

    The present invention relates to improved methods using an organic iron chelate to remove pollutants from fluids, such as flue gas. Specifically, the present invention relates to a process to remove NO[sub x] and optionally SO[sub 2] from a fluid using a metal ion (Fe[sup 2+]) chelate wherein the ligand is a dimercapto compound wherein the --SH groups are attached to adjacent carbon atoms (HS--C--C--SH) or (SH--C--CCSH) and contain a polar functional group so that the ligand of DMC chelate is water soluble. Alternatively, the DMC is covalently attached to a water insoluble substrate such as a polymer or resin, e.g., polystyrene. The chelate is regenerated using electroreduction or a chemical additive. The dimercapto compound bonded to a water insoluble substrate is also useful to lower the concentration or remove hazardous metal ions from an aqueous solution. 26 figures.

  12. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  13. Removal of heavy metals and arsenic from contaminated soils using bioremediation and chelant extraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Vaxevanidou, Katerina; Papassiopi, Nymphodora; Paspaliaris, Ioannis

    2008-02-01

    A combined chemical and biological treatment scheme was evaluated in this study aiming at obtaining the simultaneous removal of metalloid arsenic and cationic heavy metals from contaminated soils. The treatment involved the use of the iron reducing microorganism Desulfuromonas palmitatis, whose activity was combined with the chelating strength of EDTA. Taking into consideration that soil iron oxides are the main scavengers of As, treatment with iron reducing microorganisms aimed at inducing the reductive dissolution of soil oxides and thus obtaining the release of the retained As. The main objective of using EDTA was the removal of metal contaminants, such as Pb and Zn, through the formation of soluble metal chelates. Experimental results however indicated that EDTA was also indispensable for the biological reduction of Fe(III) oxides. The bacterial activity was found to have a pronounced positive effect on the removal of arsenic, which increased from the value of 35% obtained during the pure chemical treatment up to 90% in the presence of D. palmitatis. In the case of Pb, the major part, i.e. approximately 85%, was removed from soil with purely chemical mechanisms, whereas the biological activity slightly improved the extraction, increasing the final removal up to 90%. Co-treatment had negative effect only for Zn, whose removal was reduced from 80% under abiotic condition to approximately 50% in the presence of bacteria.

  14. Characterizations of realized metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal waveguides and nanochannel fabrication via insulator removal.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Min-Suk; Shin, Jin-Soo; Shin, Sang-Yung; Lee, Wan-Gyu

    2012-09-24

    We investigate experimentally metal-insulator-silicon-insulator-metal (MISIM) waveguides that are fabricated by using fully standard CMOS technology. They are hybrid plasmonic waveguides, and they have a feature that their insulator is replaceable with functional material. We explain a fabrication process for them and discuss fabrication results based on 8-inch silicon-on-insulator wafers. We measured the propagation characteristics of the MISIM waveguides that were actually fabricated to be connected to Si photonic waveguides through symmetric and asymmetric couplers. When incident light from an optical source has transverse electric (TE) polarization and its wavelength is 1318 or 1554 nm, their propagation losses are between 0.2 and 0.3 dB/μm. Excess losses due to the symmetric couplers are around 0.5 dB, which are smaller than those due to the asymmetric couplers. Additional measurement results indicate that the MISIM waveguide supports a TE-polarized hybrid plasmonic mode. Finally, we explain a process of removing the insulator without affecting the remaining MISIM structure to fabricate ~30-nm-wide nanochannels which may be filled with functional material.

  15. Application of aragonite shells for the removal of aqueous metals in polluted soils and wastewaters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucca, M.; Köhler, S. J.; Dietzel, M.

    2009-04-01

    In the present study the use of coupled precipitation/dissolution processes for metal (Me) removal from polluted soils and waters by biogenic carbonate (CaCO3) shell surfaces is proposed, according to the following overall reaction: CaCO3 + Me2+ = MeCO3 + Ca2+ This reaction has been investigated at fixed experimental conditions using synthetic model systems consisting in columns, batch, and reactors (e.g. lead, zinc, and cadmium artificial solutions mixed with aragonite shells) that allowed quantifying the kinetics of the process of metal carbonate formation. The above mentioned process has the potential of being used in three different areas of water treatment: a) use of shells as a cheap and effective geologic barrier for contaminated ground or surface waters, b) use as a material in filter beds or fluidized bed for selective cleaning of waste water with the potential of partial metal recovery and c) use as seed crystals during the elimination of metals through precipitation with soda (Na2CO3). Acidic wastewaters containing several pollutants, including heavy and trace metals, are created during production of pesticides, paper, lubricating oil, batteries, acid/alkali, or in ship repair manufacturing, mines drainage systems, metalworking and metal plating industries. Biogenic shells are a waste product in many coastal countries and may thus be more favorable than other solid phases such as clays or zeolithes from an economic viewpoint. Our metal elimination study aims at setting up a low-cost effective elimination system for various types of metal rich waste waters. A number of experimental techniques such as batch, column and flow through reactors were used to optimize the metal removal efficiency in both synthetic and waste waters from the metal finishing industry. Solid liquid ratio, initial and final pH, metal concentration and combination of metals have been varied. Measurements of pH, metal concentration, conductivity and alkalinity were recorded over the

  16. Bacteria immobilisation on hydroxyapatite surface for heavy metals removal.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, C; Pereira, S I A; Marques, A P G C; Pullar, R C; Tobaldi, D M; Pintado, M E; Castro, P M L

    2013-05-30

    Selected bacterial strains were immobilised on the surface of hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 - HAp) of natural origin (fish bones). The capacity of the material, alone and in combination with the bacterial strains to act as heavy metal removers from aqueous streams was assessed. Pseudomonas fluorescens (S3X), Microbacterium oxydans (EC29) and Cupriavidus sp. (1C2) were chosen based on their resistance to heavy metals and capacity of adsorbing the metals. These systems were tested using solutions of Zn(II), Cd(II) and in solutions containing both metals. A synergistic effect between the strains and HAp, which is effective in removing the target heavy metals on its own, was observed, as the combination of HAp with the bacterial strains led to higher adsorption capacity for both elements. For the solutions containing only one metal the synergistic effect was greater for higher metal concentrations; 1C2 and EC29 were the most effective strains for Zn(II) and Cd(II) respectively, while S3X was less effective. Overall, an almost four-fold increase was observed for the maximum adsorption capacity for Zn(II) when 1C2 was employed - 0.433 mmol/g in comparison of 0.121 mmol/g for the unmodified HAp. For Cd(II), on the other hand, an almost three-fold increase was registered with EC29 bacterial strain - 0.090 vs 0.036 mmol/g for the unmodified HAp. When the solutions containing both metals were tested, the effect was more marked for lower concentrations. PMID:23524400

  17. Removal of cadmium from metal processing wastewaters by reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Slater, C.W.; Ferrari, A.; Wisniewski, P.

    1987-01-01

    Reverse osmosis has effectively been utilized to remove cadmium from a metal processing waste stream. Experimentation with a thin-film composite membrane reduced cadmium concentrations from 165 to 0.003 mg/L under optional processing conditions. Concentrations of other metals and overall conductivity were rejected in excess of 98%. Rejection efficiency and production rate were increased by an increase in system operating pressure. Cadmium was effectively concentrated in a batch concentration study while generating high quality water for process reuse. Membrane fouling is a problem if proper in-line prefiltration is not utilized. Reverse osmosis appears to be an effective alternative to other more traditional treatment methodologies.

  18. Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

    2005-01-18

    A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

  19. Removal of Trichloroethylene and Heavy Metals by Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boparai, H. K.; O'Carroll, D. M.

    2009-05-01

    Heavy metals combined with chlorinated solvents are one class of mixed waste found at various hazardous waste sites in North America. Nano zerovalent iron (nZVI), an emerging technology, is being successfully used for treating chlorinated solvents and heavy metals independently, however comparatively little research has investigated the remediation of the wastes when they are present in the same mixture. The remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE)/heavy metal waste mixtures via nZVI has been investigated in the present study. Results suggest that some metals are reduced by nZVI to their zerovalent state and thus precipitate on nZVI particles. This improves the contaminant removal performance of nZVI by forming bimetallic iron nanoparticles. Other metals are directly precipitated or adsorbed on the nZVI particles in their original oxidation state and are rendered immobile. In some cases the presence of the heavy metals in the waste mixture enhanced the dechlorination of TCE while in other cases it did not. This study suggests that nano zerovalent iron particles can be effectively used for the remediation of mixed contamination of heavy metals and chlorinated solvents. Results have been supported by a variety of techniques including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis.

  20. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  1. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Parmar, Jemish; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-04-13

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots' structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals.

  2. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots’ structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals. PMID:26998896

  3. Graphene-Based Microbots for Toxic Heavy Metal Removal and Recovery from Water.

    PubMed

    Vilela, Diana; Parmar, Jemish; Zeng, Yongfei; Zhao, Yanli; Sánchez, Samuel

    2016-04-13

    Heavy metal contamination in water is a serious risk to the public health and other life forms on earth. Current research in nanotechnology is developing new nanosystems and nanomaterials for the fast and efficient removal of pollutants and heavy metals from water. Here, we report graphene oxide-based microbots (GOx-microbots) as active self-propelled systems for the capture, transfer, and removal of a heavy metal (i.e., lead) and its subsequent recovery for recycling purposes. Microbots' structure consists of nanosized multilayers of graphene oxide, nickel, and platinum, providing different functionalities. The outer layer of graphene oxide captures lead on the surface, and the inner layer of platinum functions as the engine decomposing hydrogen peroxide fuel for self-propulsion, while the middle layer of nickel enables external magnetic control of the microbots. Mobile GOx-microbots remove lead 10 times more efficiently than nonmotile GOx-microbots, cleaning water from 1000 ppb down to below 50 ppb in 60 min. Furthermore, after chemical detachment of lead from the surface of GOx-microbots, the microbots can be reused. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic control of the GOx-microbots inside a microfluidic system as a proof-of-concept for automatic microbots-based system to remove and recover heavy metals. PMID:26998896

  4. METALS REMOVED BY OUTFLOWS FROM MILKY WAY DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, Evan N.; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian

    2011-12-15

    The stars in the dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies (dSphs) of the Milky Way are significantly more metal-poor than would be expected from a closed box model of chemical evolution. Gas outflows likely carried away most of the metals produced by the dSphs. Based on previous Keck/DEIMOS observations and models, we calculate the mass in Mg, Si, Ca, and Fe expelled from each of eight dSphs. Essentially, these masses are the differences between the observed amount of metals present in the dSphs' stars today and the inferred amount of metals produced by supernovae. We conclude that the dSphs lost 96% to >99% of the metals their stars manufactured. We apply the observed mass function of Milky Way dSphs to the ejected mass function to determine that a single large dSph, like Fornax, lost more metals over 10 Gyr than all smaller dSphs combined. Therefore, small galaxies like dSphs are not significant contributors to the metal content of the intergalactic medium. Finally, we compare our ejected mass function to previous X-ray measurements of the metal content of the winds from the post-starburst dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 1569. Remarkably, the most recent starburst in that galaxy falls exactly on the ejected-mass-stellar-mass relation defined by the Milky Way dSphs.

  5. Effective Removal of Heavy Metals from Wastewater Using Modified Clay.

    PubMed

    Song, Mun-Seon; Vijayarangamuthu, K; Han, EunJi; Jeon, Ki-Joon

    2016-05-01

    We report an economical and eco-friendly way to remove the heavy metal pollutant using modified clay. The modification of clay was done by calcining the natural clay from Kyushu region in Japan. Further, the removal efficiency for various pH and contact time was evaluated. The morphology of the clays was studied using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The structural and chemical analyses of modified clay were done by using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and Energy dispersion analysis (EDAX) to understand the properties related to the removal of heavy metal pollutant. Further, we studied the absorption efficiency of clay for various pH and contacting time using Ni polluted water. The modified clays show better removal efficiency for all pH with different saturation time. The adsorption follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption capacity of modified clay is 1.5 times larger than that of natural clay. The increase in the adsorption efficiency of modified clay was correlated to the increase in hematite phase along with increase in surface area due to surface morphological changes.

  6. High efficiency particulate removal with sintered metal filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstein, B. E.; Paplawsky, W. J.; Pence, D. T.; Hedahl, T. G.

    Because of their particle removal efficiencies and durability, sintered metal filters have been chosen for high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter protection in the off gas treatment system for a proposed transuranic waste treatment facility. Process evaluation of sintered metal filters indicated a lack of sufficient process design data to ensure trouble free operation. Subsequence pilot scale testing was performed with flyash as the test particulate. The test results showed that the sintered metal filters can have an efficiency greater than 0.9999999 for the specific test conditions used. Stable pressure drop characteristics were observed in pulsed and reversed flow blowback modes of operation. Over 4900 hours of operation were obtained with operating conditions ranging up to approximately 90 C and 24 vol % water vapor in the gas stream.

  7. RETENTION TIME EFFECT ON METAL REMOVAL BY PEAT COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E

    2007-02-28

    The potential use of a peat bed to treat the H-12 Outfall discharge to bring it to new compliance limits was previously investigated and reported utilizing a 7 hour retention time. The influence of retention time (contact time) of water with peat moss on the removal of copper from the water was investigated under laboratory conditions using vertical flow peat moss columns. Reduction of the necessary retention time has a large influence on the design sizing of any peat bed that would be constructed to treat the H-12 discharge on a full scale basis. Retention times of 5 hours, 3 hours and 1 hour were tested to determine the copper removal by the peat columns using vertical flow. Water samples were collected after 4, 8, 12, and 16 water volumes had passed through the columns and analyzed for a suite of metals, with quantitative emphasis on copper. Laboratory results indicated that copper removal was very high at each of the 3 retention times tested, ranging from 99.6 % removal at 5 and 3 hours to 98.8% removal at 1 hour. All these values are much lower that the new compliance limit for the outfall. The results also indicated that most divalent metals were removed to their normal reporting detection limit for the analytical methods used, including zinc. Lead levels in the H-12 discharge used in this study were below PQL in all samples analyzed. While each of the retention times studied removed copper very well, there were indications that 1 hour is probably too short for an operational, long-term facility. At that retention time, there was about 6% compaction of the peat in the column due to the water velocity, and this may affect long term hydraulic conductivity of the peat bed. At that retention time, copper concentration in the effluent was higher than the other times tested, although still very low. Because of the potential compacting and somewhat reduced removal efficiency at a 1 hour retention time, it would be prudent to design to at least a 3 hour retention

  8. A new material for removing heavy metals from water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, Warren H., Jr.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center developed and is patenting a new high capacity ion exchange material (IEM) that removes toxic metals from contaminated water in laboratory tests. The IEM can be made into many forms, such as thin films, coatings, pellets, and fibers. As a result, it can be adapted to many applications to purify contaminated water wherever it is found, be it in waste water treatment systems, lakes, ponds, industrial plants, or in homes. Laboratory tests have been conducted on aqueous solutions containing only one of the following metal cations: lead, copper, mercury, cadmium, silver, chromium (III), nickel, zinc, and yttrium. Tests were also conducted with: (1) calcium present to determine its effects on the uptake of cadmium and copper, and (2) uranium and lanthanides which are stand-ins for other radioactive elements, (3) drinking water for the removal of copper and lead, and (3) others compositions. The results revealed that the IEM removes all these cations, even in the presence of the calcium. Of particular interest are the results of the tests with the drinking water: the lead concentration was reduced from 142 ppb down to 2.8 ppb (well below the accepted EPA standard).

  9. Improved method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1994-09-19

    This invention relates to a process for gas cleanup to remove one or more metallic contaminants present as vapor. More particularly, the invention relates to a gas cleanup process using mass transfer to control the saturation levels such that essentially no particulates are formed, and the vapor condenses on the gas passage surfaces. It addresses the need to cleanup an inert gas contaminated with cadmium which may escape from the electrochemical processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel in a hot cell. The IFR is a complete, self-contained, sodium-cooled, pool-type fast reactor fueled with a metallic alloy of uranium, plutonium and zirconium, and is equipped with a close-coupled fuel cycle. Tests with a model have shown that removal of cadmium from argon gas is in the order of 99.99%. The invention could also apply to the industrial cleanup of air or other gases contaminated with zinc, lead, or mercury. In addition, the invention has application in the cleanup of other gas systems contaminated with metal vapors which may be toxic or unhealthy.

  10. Metal MEMS Tools for Beating-heart Tissue Removal

    PubMed Central

    Gosline, Andrew H.; Vasilyev, Nikolay V.; Veeramani, Arun; Wu, MingTing; Schmitz, Greg; Chen, Rich; Arabagi, Veaceslav; del Nido, Pedro J.; Dupont, Pierre E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic tool is proposed to enable the surgical removal of tissue from inside the beating heart. The tool is manufactured using a unique metal MEMS process that provides the means to fabricate fully assembled devices that incorporate micron-scale features in a millimeter scale tool. The tool is integrated with a steerable curved concentric tube robot that can enter the heart through the vasculature. Incorporating both irrigation and aspiration, the tissue removal system is capable of extracting substantial amounts of tissue under teleoperated control by first morselizing it and then transporting the debris out of the heart through the lumen of the robot. Tool design and robotic integration are described and ex vivo experimental results are presented. PMID:24232076

  11. Removal of heavy metals from mine waters by natural zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Ulla Wingenfelder; Carsten Hansen; Gerhard Furrer; Rainer Schulin

    2005-06-15

    The study investigated the removal of Fe, Pb, Cd, and Zn from synthetic mine waters by a natural zeolite. The emphasis was given to the zeolite's behavior toward a few cations in competition with each other. Pb was removed efficiently from neutral as well as from acidic solutions, whereas the uptake of Zn and Cd decreased with low pH and high iron concentrations. With increasing Ca concentrations in solution, elimination of Zn and Cd became poorer while removal of Pb remained virtually unchanged. The zeolite was stable in acidic solutions. Disintegration was only observed below pH 2.0. Forward- and back-titration of synthetic acidic mine water were carried out in the presence and absence of zeolite to simulate the effects of a pH increase by addition of neutralizing agents and a re-acidification which can be caused by subsequent mixing with acidic water. The pH increase during neutralization causes precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides and decreased dissolved metal concentrations. Zeolite addition further diminished Pb concentrations but did not have an effect on Zn and Cd concentrations in solution. During re-acidification of the solution, remobilization of Pb was weaker in the presence than in the absence of zeolite. No substantial differences were observed for Fe, Cd, and Zn immobilization. The immobilization of the metals during pH increase and the subsequent remobilization caused by re-acidification can be well described by a geochemical equilibrium speciation model that accounts for metal complexation at hydrous ferric oxides, for ion exchange on the zeolite surfaces, as well as for dissolution and precipitation processes. 42 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Hybrid process for heavy metal removal from wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean-François; Mercier, Guy

    2005-01-01

    Bioleaching processes have been demonstrated to be effective technologies in removing heavy metals from wastewater sludge, but long hydraulic retention times are typically required to operate these bioprocesses. A hybrid process (coupling biological and chemical processes) has been explored in laboratory pilot-scale experiments for heavy metals (cadmium [Cd], copper [Cu], chromium [Cr], and zinc [Zn]) removal from three types of sludge (primary sludge, secondary activated sludge, and a mixture of primary and secondary sludge). The hybrid process consisted of producing a concentrate ferric ion solution followed by chemical treatment of sludges. Ferric iron solution was produced biologically via oxidation of ferrous iron by A. ferrooxidans in a continuous-flow stirred tank (5.2 L) reactor (CSTR). Wastewater sludge filtrate (WSF) containing nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) has been used as culture media to support the growth and activity of indigenous iron-oxidizing bacteria. Results showed that total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations of the culture media in excess of 235 mg/L were found to be inhibitory to bacterial growth. The oxidation rate increased as ferrous iron concentrations ranged from 10 to 40 g Fe2+/L. The percentage of ferrous iron (Fe2+) oxidized to ferric iron (Fe3+) increased as the hydraulic retention time (HRT) increased from 12 to 48 h. Successful and complete Fe2+ oxidation was recorded at a HRT of 48 h using 10 g Fe2+/L. Subsequently, ferric ion solution produced by A. ferrooxidans in sludge filtrate was used to solubilize heavy metals contained in wastewater sludge. The best solubilization was obtained with a mixture of primary and secondary sludge, demonstrating a removal efficiency of 63, 71, 49, and 80% for Cd, Cu, Cr, and Zn, respectively. PMID:16121505

  13. Mineral Adsorbents for Removal of Metals in Urban Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, Karin; Li, Loretta

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the capacity of four different soil minerals to adsorb metals frequently detected in urban runoff. These are low-cost, natural and commercially available soil minerals. Contaminated surface runoff from urban areas is a major cause of concern for water quality and aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Pollution in urban areas is generated by a wide array of non-point sources, including vehicular transportation and building materials. Some of the most frequently detected pollutants in urban runoff are metals. Exhaust gases, tire wear and brake linings are major sources of such metals as Pb, Zn and Cu, while impregnated wood, plastics and galvanized surfaces may release As, Cd, Cr and Zn. Many metals have toxic effects on aquatic plants and animals, depending on metal speciation and bioavailability. The removal efficiency of pollutants in stormwater depends on treatment practices and on the properties the pollutant. The distribution of metals in urban runoff has shown, for example, that Pb is predominantly particle-associated, whereas Zn and Cd are present mainly in dissolved form. Many metals are also attached to colloids, which may act as carriers for contaminants, thereby facilitating their transport through conventional water treatment processes. Filtration of stormwater is one of the most promising techniques for removal of particulates, colloidal and truly dissolved pollutants, provided that effective filtration and adsorption media are used. Filtration and infiltration are used in a wide array of stormwater treatment methods e.g. porous paving, infiltration drains and rain gardens. Several soil minerals were investigated for their potential as stormwater filter materials. Laboratory batch tests were conducted to determine the adsorption capacity of these minerals. A synthetic stormwater was tested, with spiked concentrations corresponding to levels reported in urban runoff, ranging from 50-1,500 µg/L for Zn; 5-250 µg/L for Cu

  14. Metallization of ferrite ceramic couplings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burden, J

    1992-06-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the optimum sputtering conditions for which the strongest metallization adherence could be achieved for the ferrite safing wheel assemblies. The conditions were varied through four separate test runs with a fifth verification run conducted using parameters selected from the first four runs. The parameters tested were the effects of etching, precleaning, chamber pressures, plating materials, plating thickness, soldering pressures, and cooling rates. The results increased the strength of the metallization to two pounds, well in excess of the required one pound minimum. It was also determined that the gold should be sputtered on and not thermally deposited, which caused cracking in the ferrite material.

  15. Eggshell: A green adsorbent for heavy metal removal in an MBR system.

    PubMed

    Pettinato, M; Chakraborty, S; Arafat, Hassan A; Calabro', V

    2015-11-01

    Presence of heavy metals as well as different metal ions in treated wastewater is a problem for the environment as well as human health. This paper aims to investigate the possibility to combine an MBR (membrane biological reactor) with an adsorption process onto powdered eggshell and eggshell membrane in order to improve metal removal from wastewater. The first step of the experimental analysis consists of the evaluation of the compatibility between the two processes. Then, a study about sorbent concentration and size effect on fouling was conducted, because the use of this kind of sorbent could affect membrane performance. The second step of the work concerns the check up of eggshell removal capacity as a function of sorbent size, achieved treating an aqueous solution containing Al(3+), Fe(2+) and Zn(2+) as water pollutants. Finally, synthetic wastewater, containing the metal species, was treated by two alternative process schemes: one of them performs the metal uptake in a dedicated adsorption unit, before the MBR. In the second, the two processes take place in the same unit. Results demonstrate that the optimization of the first option could be a solution to MBR upgrading.

  16. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Summary

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek metal coating removal system consists of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER(R), and VAC-PAC(R). The system is designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M ROTO-PEEN tungsten carbide cutters, while the CORNER-CUTTER(R) uses solid needles for descaling activities. These are used with the VAC-PAC(R) vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure was minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended, since the outdoor environment where the testing demonstration took place may skew the results. It is feasible that dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment. Other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body vibration, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  17. Economic feasibility of biochemical processes for the upgrading of crudes and the removal of sulfur, nitrogen, and trace metals from crude oil -- Benchmark cost establishment of biochemical processes on the basis of conventional downstream technologies. Final report FY95

    SciTech Connect

    Premuzic, E.T.

    1996-08-01

    During the past several years, a considerable amount of work has been carried out showing that microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is promising and the resulting biotechnology may be deliverable. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), systematic studies have been conducted which dealt with the effects of thermophilic and thermoadapted bacteria on the chemical and physical properties of selected types of crude oils at elevated temperatures and pressures. Current studies indicate that during the biotreatment several chemical and physical properties of crude oils are affected. The oils are (1) emulsified; (2) acidified; (3) there is a qualitative and quantitative change in light and heavy fractions of the crudes; (4) there are chemical changes in fractions containing sulfur compounds; (5) there is an apparent reduction in the concentration of trace metals; and (6) the qualitative and quantitative changes appear to be microbial species dependent; and (7) there is a distinction between biodegraded and biotreated oils. The downstream biotechnological crude oil processing research performed thus far is of laboratory scale and has focused on demonstrating the technical feasibility of downstream processing with different types of biocatalysts under a variety of processing conditions. Quantitative economic analysis is the topic of the present project which investigates the economic feasibility of the various biochemical downstream processes which hold promise in upgrading of heavy crudes, such as those found in California, e.g., Monterey-type, Midway Sunset, Honda crudes, and others.

  18. A feasibility study on bioelectrokinetics for the removal of heavy metals from tailing soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Kim, Hyun-A; Lee, Byung-Tae; Kim, Soon-Oh; Kwon, Young-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong

    2011-01-01

    The combination of bioremediation and electrokinetics, termed bioelectrokinetics, has been studied constantly to enhance the removal of organic and inorganic contaminants from soil. The use of the bioleaching process originating from Fe- and/or S-oxidizing bacteria may be a feasible technology for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. In this study, the bioleaching process driven by injection of S-oxidizing bacteria, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans, was evaluated as a pre-treatment step. The bioleaching process was sequentially integrated with the electrokinetic soil process, and the final removal efficiency of the combined process was compared with those of individual processes. Tailing soil, heavily contaminated with Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn, Co, and As, was collected from an abandoned mine area in Korea. The results of geochemical studies supported that this tailing soil contains the reduced forms of sulfur that can be an energy source for A. thiooxidans. From the result of the combined process, we could conclude that the bioleaching process might be a good pre-treatment step to mobilize heavy metals in tailing soil. Additionally, the electrokinetic process can be an effective technology for the removal of heavy metals from tailing soil. For the sake of generalizing the proposed bioelectrokinetic process, however, the site-specific differences in soil should be taken into account in future studies. PMID:21046430

  19. Ion exchangers as adsorbents for removing metals from aquatic media.

    PubMed

    Khan, Meraj A; Bushra, Rani; Ahmad, Anees; Nabi, Syed A; Khan, Dilwar A; Akhtar, Arshia

    2014-02-01

    A polyaniline-based composite cation-exchange material was synthesized by way of sol-gel method and studied to explore its analytical and environmental applications. It was characterized by using instrumental analyses [Fourier transform infrared (spectrometer), X-ray, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis, standard electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy]. Physicochemical studies, such as ion-exchange capacity, pH titrations, and chemical stability, along with effect of eluent concentration and elution, were also performed to exploit the ion-exchange capabilities. pH titration studies showed that the material presents monofunctional strong cation-exchange behavior. This nanocomposite material is semicrystalline in nature and exhibits improved thermal and chemical stability. The partition coefficient studies of different metal ions in the material were performed in demineralised water and different surfactant media, and it was found to be selective for Pb(II) and Hg(II) ions. To exploit the usefulness of the material as an adsorbent, some important quantitative binary separations of metal ions were performed on polyaniline Zr(IV) molybdophosphate columns. This composite cation exchanger can be applied for the treatment of polluted water to remove heavy metals. PMID:24292693

  20. Water treatment process and system for metals removal using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Paula A. W.; Krauter, Gordon W.

    2002-01-01

    A process and a system for removal of metals from ground water or from soil by bioreducing or bioaccumulating the metals using metal tolerant microorganisms Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is tolerant to the metals, able to bioreduce the metals to the less toxic state and to accumulate them. The process and the system is useful for removal or substantial reduction of levels of chromium, molybdenum, cobalt, zinc, nickel, calcium, strontium, mercury and copper in water.

  1. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One Li

  2. Heavy metal removal from wastewater using zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, S Y; Chen, W H; Shih, C J

    2008-01-01

    Because of having a high reduction potential, the zero-valent iron (ZVI) is often applied for the remediation of wastewater or groundwater with heavy metals. The purpose of this study was aimed to investigate the reaction behavior of heavy metals with ZVI nanoparticles in the wastewater. The affecting factors, such as initial pH, dosage of nanoscale ZVI and initial concentration of heavy metal, on the removal efficiency of heavy metals by ZVI in the wastewater were examined by the batch experiments in this study. It was found that the removal of heavy metals was affected by initial pH. The rate and efficiency of metal removal increased with decreasing initial pH. Greater than 90% of the heavy metals were removed when the initial pH was controlled at 2. In addition, the rate and efficiency of metal removal increased as the dosage of nanoscale ZVI increased. The removal efficiency of heavy metal was higher than 80% when 2.0 g/L of ZVI was added in the wastewater. On the other hand, the slow rate and low efficiency of metal removal from the wastewater treated by nanoscale ZVI was found in the wastewater with high concentration of heavy metal.

  3. Removal and recovery of toxic metal ions from aqueous waste sites using polymer pendant ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to investigate the use of polymer pendant ligand technology to remove and recover toxic metal ions from DOE aqueous waste sites. Polymer pendant lgiands are organic ligands, anchored to crosslinked, modified divinylbenzene-polystyrene beads, that can selectively complex metal ions. The metal ion removal step usually occurs through a complexation or ion exchange phenomena, thus recovery of the metal ions and reuse of the beads is readily accomplished.

  4. Biodegradable polymer based ternary blends for removal of trace metals from simulated industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Prakash, N; Arungalai Vendan, S

    2016-02-01

    The ternary blends consisting of Chitosan (CS), Nylon 6 (Ny 6) and Montmorillonite clay (MM clay) were prepared by the solution blending method with glutaraldehyde. The prepared ternary blends were characterization by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). The FTIR results showed that the strong intermolecular hydrogen bondings were established between chitosan, nylon 6 and montmorillonite clay. TGA showed the thermal stability of the blend is enhanced by glutaraldehyde as Crosslink agent. Results of XRD indicated that the relative crystalline of the pure chitosan film was reduced when the polymeric network was reticulated by glutaraldehyde. Finally, the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the morphology of the blend was rough and heterogenous. Further, it confirms the interaction between the functional groups of the blend components. The extent of removal of the trace metals was found to be almost the same. The removal of these metals at different pH was also done and the maximum removal of the metals was observed at pH 4.5 for both trace metals. Adsorption studies and kinetic analysis have also been made. Moreover, the protonation of amine groups is induced an electrostatic repulsion of cations. When the pH of the solution was more than 5.5, the sorption rate began to decrease. Besides, the quantity of adsorbate on absorbent was fitted as a function in Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. The sorption kinetics was tested for pseudo first order and pseudo second order reaction. The kinetic experimental data correlated with the second order kinetic model and rate constants of sorption for kinetic models were calculated and accordingly, the correlation coefficients were obtained.

  5. Composites for removing metals and volatile organic compounds and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Coronado, Paul R.; Coleman, Sabre J.; Reynolds, John G.

    2006-12-12

    Functionalized hydrophobic aerogel/solid support structure composites have been developed to remove metals and organic compounds from aqueous and vapor media. The targeted metals and organics are removed by passing the aqueous or vapor phase through the composite which can be in molded, granular, or powder form. The composites adsorb the metals and the organics leaving a purified aqueous or vapor stream. The species-specific adsorption occurs through specific functionalization of the aerogels tailored towards specific metals and/or organics. After adsorption, the composites can be disposed of or the targeted metals and/or organics can be reclaimed or removed and the composites recycled.

  6. Comparison of final irrigation techniques in removal of calcium hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Ali Çağın; Gürel, Melek; Güler, Eda; Karabucak, Bekir

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare new irrigation systems with a conventional irrigation technique for the removal of inter-appointment calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2 ]. Forty-seven extracted human single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and Ca(OH)2 paste was placed into root canals by using a lentulo spiral at the apical third. Teeth were randomly divided into three groups according to different irrigation protocols using a 30-gauge slot-tipped needle, EndoVac system and ProUltra® PiezoFlow™ ultrasonic irrigation system. Scanning electron microscopic images of the selected root canal surfaces (cervical, middle and apical third) were evaluated using a 5-grade scale. The influence of the irrigation system was evaluated using a two-way analysis of variance test and Tukey's test. The EndoVac and PiezoFlow groups demonstrated the lowest scale values (cleanest canals); however, there was no statistical difference between these two groups. The conventional irrigation group exhibited significantly higher scores (P < 0.05). The conventional needle irrigation was not sufficient to remove Ca(OH)2 from the root canal system. Irrigation with EndoVac and PiezoFlow™ ultrasonic irrigation systems improved the removal of the intracanal medicament resulting in cleaner root canal walls.

  7. Study of ammonia removal in coal gasification processes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, G.N.; Wood, B.J.; Tong, G.T.; McCarty, J.G.

    1988-09-01

    The objective of this program was to investigate the removal of fuel-bound nitrogen that appears as ammonia and hydrogen cyanide in coal gas in the temperature range 540/degree/ to 870/degree/C and the pressure range 1 to 20 atm. Following a comprehensive literature search, catalytic decomposition was selected as the most promising concept. Ten catalysts were tested at two temperatures in three different simulated coal gas streams containing ammonia and hydrogen sulfide impurities. A proprietary nickel catalyst (HTSR-1) exhibited high activity at 800/degree/C and excellent physical stability. An Ir-promoted nickel catalyst (G-65/star/) had significant activity for removing ammonia in the temperature range 550/degree/ to 600/degree/C but physically deteriorated at higher temperature. Other tested catalysts were inferior in performance to these two catalysts. Parametric studies were conducted with HTSR-1 and G-65/star/ catalysts to determine the rate of ammonia removal as a function of temperature, pressure, space velocity, and concentrations of ammonia, hydrogen, and steam. The influence of several other impurities commonly present in the hot gas was studied also. 27 refs., 24 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. A sinogram based technique for image correction and removal of metal clip artifacts in cone beam breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Shen, Y.; Zhong, Y.; Lai, C.-J.; Wang, J.; Shaw, C. C.

    2014-03-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) technique provides true three-dimensional (3D) images of a breast; however, metal clips and needles used for surgical planning can cause artifacts, which may extend to many adjacent slices, in the reconstructed images obtained by the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) filtered backprojection method,. In this paper, a sinogram based method to remove the metal clips in the projection image data is described and discussed for improving the quality of reconstructed breast images. First, the original projection data was reconstructed using the FDK algorithm to obtain a volumetric image with metal clips and artifacts. Second, the volumetric image was segmented by using the threshold method to obtain a 3D map of metal objects. Third, a forward projection algorithm is applied to the metal object map to obtain projection map of metal objects. Finally, the original projection images and projection map of metal objects are reorganized into sinograms for correction in the angular space on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Cone beam CT images of a mastectomy breast specimen are used to demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique for removal of metal object artifacts. Preliminary results have demonstrated that metal objects artifacts in 3D images were reduced and the image quality were improved.

  9. Heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions and wastewaters by using various byproducts.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; Gamal El-Din, Hala M; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2013-10-15

    Water contamination with heavy metals (HM) represents a potential threat to humans, animals and plants, and thus removal of these metals from contaminated waters has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to assess the efficiency of some low cost sorbents i.e., chitosan (CH), egg shell (ES), humate potassium (HK), and sugar beet factory lime (SBFL) for removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from wastewaters. For this purpose batch equilibrium experiments were conducted with aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of the metals and sorbents in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. Sorption isotherms were developed, and sorption parameters were determined. The potential applicability of the tested sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from contaminated wastewaters was also investigated by equilibrating different sorbents and water ratios. Chitosan expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by SBFL, ES, and HK. Nearly 100% of the metals were removed from aqueous solutions with the lowest initial metal concentrations by the sorbents especially CH and SBFL. However, the sorption efficiency decreased as the initial metal concentrations increased. Competition among the four metals changed significantly their distribution coefficient (Kd) values with the sorbents. The selectivity sequence of the metals was: Pb > Cu > Zn > Cd. The metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 72, 69, and 60 to nearly 100% for Cd, Cu and Zn, respectively. The efficiency of the studied byproducts in removing metals from the wastewaters differed based on the source of contamination and metal concentrations. Cadmium removal percentages by HK and CH were higher than SBFL and ES. The HK and CH exhibited the highest removal percentage of Cu from water with high concentrations. The SBFL and ES revealed the highest removal percentage of Zn from water with high concentrations. The results, demonstrate a high potential

  10. Heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions and wastewaters by using various byproducts.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; Gamal El-Din, Hala M; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2013-10-15

    Water contamination with heavy metals (HM) represents a potential threat to humans, animals and plants, and thus removal of these metals from contaminated waters has received increasing attention. The present study aimed to assess the efficiency of some low cost sorbents i.e., chitosan (CH), egg shell (ES), humate potassium (HK), and sugar beet factory lime (SBFL) for removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from wastewaters. For this purpose batch equilibrium experiments were conducted with aqueous solutions containing various concentrations of the metals and sorbents in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. Sorption isotherms were developed, and sorption parameters were determined. The potential applicability of the tested sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from contaminated wastewaters was also investigated by equilibrating different sorbents and water ratios. Chitosan expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by SBFL, ES, and HK. Nearly 100% of the metals were removed from aqueous solutions with the lowest initial metal concentrations by the sorbents especially CH and SBFL. However, the sorption efficiency decreased as the initial metal concentrations increased. Competition among the four metals changed significantly their distribution coefficient (Kd) values with the sorbents. The selectivity sequence of the metals was: Pb > Cu > Zn > Cd. The metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 72, 69, and 60 to nearly 100% for Cd, Cu and Zn, respectively. The efficiency of the studied byproducts in removing metals from the wastewaters differed based on the source of contamination and metal concentrations. Cadmium removal percentages by HK and CH were higher than SBFL and ES. The HK and CH exhibited the highest removal percentage of Cu from water with high concentrations. The SBFL and ES revealed the highest removal percentage of Zn from water with high concentrations. The results, demonstrate a high potential

  11. Final design of a space debris removal system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Erika; Casali, Steve; Chambers, Don; Geissler, Garner; Lalich, Andrew; Leipold, Manfred; Mach, Richard; Parry, John; Weems, Foley

    1990-01-01

    The objective is the removal of medium sized orbital debris in low Earth orbits. The design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium size debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 degrees inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. This data is unloaded to the transfer vehicle, and the transfer vehicle proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit, where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground, and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the system has the ability to capture 50 pieces of orbital debris. One mission will take about six months. The system is designed to allow for a 30 degree inclination change on the outgoing and incoming trips of the transfer vehicle.

  12. Final design of a space debris removal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Erika; Casali, Steve; Chambers, Don; Geissler, Garner; Lalich, Andrew; Leipold, Manfred; Mach, Richard; Parry, John; Weems, Foley

    1990-12-01

    The objective is the removal of medium sized orbital debris in low Earth orbits. The design incorporates a transfer vehicle and a netting vehicle to capture the medium size debris. The system is based near an operational space station located at 28.5 degrees inclination and 400 km altitude. The system uses ground based tracking to determine the location of a satellite breakup or debris cloud. This data is unloaded to the transfer vehicle, and the transfer vehicle proceeds to rendezvous with the debris at a lower altitude parking orbit. Next, the netting vehicle is deployed, tracks the targeted debris, and captures it. After expending the available nets, the netting vehicle returns to the transfer vehicle for a new netting module and continues to capture more debris in the target area. Once all the netting modules are expended, the transfer vehicle returns to the space station's orbit, where it is resupplied with new netting modules from a space shuttle load. The new modules are launched by the shuttle from the ground, and the expended modules are taken back to Earth for removal of the captured debris, refueling, and repacking of the nets. Once the netting modules are refurbished, they are taken back into orbit for reuse. In a typical mission, the system has the ability to capture 50 pieces of orbital debris. One mission will take about six months. The system is designed to allow for a 30 degree inclination change on the outgoing and incoming trips of the transfer vehicle.

  13. Simultaneous removal of oil and grease, and heavy metals from artificial bilge water using electro-coagulation/flotation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Guillermo J; La Motta, Enrique J

    2014-11-01

    US and international regulations pertaining to the control of bilge water discharges from ships have concentrated their attention to the levels of oil and grease rather than to the heavy metal concentrations. The consensus is that any discharge of bilge water (and oily water emulsion within 12 nautical miles from the nearest land cannot exceed 15 parts per million (ppm). Since there is no specific regulation for metal pollutants under the bilge water section, reference standards regulating heavy metal concentrations are taken from the ambient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life. The research herein presented discusses electro-coagulation (EC) as a method to treat bilge water, with a focus on oily emulsions and heavy metals (copper, nickel and zinc) removal efficiency. Experiments were run using a continuous flow reactor, manufactured by Ecolotron, Inc., and a synthetic emulsion as artificial bilge water. The synthetic emulsion contained 5000 mg/L of oil and grease, 5 mg/L of copper, 1.5 mg/L of nickel, and 2.5 mg/l of zinc. The experimental results demonstrate that EC is very efficient in removing oil and grease. For oil and grease removal, the best treatment and cost efficiency was obtained when using a combination of carbon steel and aluminum electrodes, at a detention time less than one minute, a flow rate of 1 L/min and 0.6 A/cm(2) of current density. The final effluent oil and grease concentration, before filtration, was always less than 10 mg/L. For heavy metal removal, the combination of aluminum and carbon steel electrodes, flow rate of 1 L/min, effluent recycling, and 7.5 amps produced 99% zinc removal efficiency. Copper and nickel are harder to remove, and a removal efficiency of 70% was achieved.

  14. Simultaneous removal of oil and grease, and heavy metals from artificial bilge water using electro-coagulation/flotation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Guillermo J; La Motta, Enrique J

    2014-11-01

    US and international regulations pertaining to the control of bilge water discharges from ships have concentrated their attention to the levels of oil and grease rather than to the heavy metal concentrations. The consensus is that any discharge of bilge water (and oily water emulsion within 12 nautical miles from the nearest land cannot exceed 15 parts per million (ppm). Since there is no specific regulation for metal pollutants under the bilge water section, reference standards regulating heavy metal concentrations are taken from the ambient water quality criteria to protect aquatic life. The research herein presented discusses electro-coagulation (EC) as a method to treat bilge water, with a focus on oily emulsions and heavy metals (copper, nickel and zinc) removal efficiency. Experiments were run using a continuous flow reactor, manufactured by Ecolotron, Inc., and a synthetic emulsion as artificial bilge water. The synthetic emulsion contained 5000 mg/L of oil and grease, 5 mg/L of copper, 1.5 mg/L of nickel, and 2.5 mg/l of zinc. The experimental results demonstrate that EC is very efficient in removing oil and grease. For oil and grease removal, the best treatment and cost efficiency was obtained when using a combination of carbon steel and aluminum electrodes, at a detention time less than one minute, a flow rate of 1 L/min and 0.6 A/cm(2) of current density. The final effluent oil and grease concentration, before filtration, was always less than 10 mg/L. For heavy metal removal, the combination of aluminum and carbon steel electrodes, flow rate of 1 L/min, effluent recycling, and 7.5 amps produced 99% zinc removal efficiency. Copper and nickel are harder to remove, and a removal efficiency of 70% was achieved. PMID:24908614

  15. In-situ electrochemical method for removing environmental pollutants. Final report on Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, F.W.; Morris, R.S.

    1983-04-01

    Research was undertaken to determine whether certain organometallics can be used as catalysts in the electrochemical hydroxylation of chlorinated organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenols (PCBs). The rate and extent of PCB homolog removal by catalyzed electrochemistry in aqueous solutions were studied. The effect of electrolyte pH, constituent ions, and oxygen content, as well as the metal center in the organometallic catalyst, on PCB removal was evaluated. Electrochemical removal of PCBs on catalyzed-carbon electrodes was found to be technically feasible with lower chlorination PCB homologs being rapidly removed by specific catalysts.

  16. UTILITY OF ZEOLITES IN HAZARDOUS METAL REMOVAL FROM WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zeolites are well known for their ion exchange, adsorption and acid catalysis properties. Different inorganic pollutants have been removed from water at room temperature by using synthetic zeolites. Zeolite Faujasite Y has been used to remove inorganic pollutants including arseni...

  17. Biotechnology for removal of carbon disulfide emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    Biological removal in a ``biofilter`` plant of carbon disulfide and hydrogen sulfide from the air effluent of a viscose plant at Teepak, Inc., is analyzed from process and economic standpoints by use of the Aspen Plus simulation program. The metabolic product from the biofilter, 3% sulfuric acid, must be transformed at the source into either a marketable or recyclable commodity (such as 95% sulfuric acid, high-quality sulfur, or high-quality gypsum) or a material with reasonable landfill costs (such as sulfur or gypsum). The simulations indicate that the total capital requirement for production of concentrated sulfuric acid is $48.9 million; for high-quality gypsum, $40.4 million; and for high-quality sulfur, $29.4 million. Production of concentrated sulfur for landfill is not economically practical. The process to neutralize the 3% acid effluent with limestone and landfill the resulting low-quality gypsum requires the lowest total investment of the processes simulated, $8.7 million, including the biofilter plant.

  18. To study the recovery of L-Cysteine using halloysite nanotubes after heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Juhi

    2016-04-01

    Industrial wastes are a major source of soil and water pollution that originate from mining industries, chemical industries, metal processing industries, etc. These wastes consist of a variety of chemicals including phenolics, heavy metals, etc. Use of industrial effluent and sewage sludge on agricultural land has become a common practice in the world which results in these toxic metals being transferred and ultimately concentrate in plant tissues from water and the soil. The metals that get accumulated, prove detrimental to plants themselves and may also cause damage to the healths of animals as well as man. This is because the heavy metals become toxins above certain concentrations, over a narrow range. As a further matter, these metals negatively affect the natural microbial populations as well, that leads to the disruption of fundamental ecological processes. However, many techniques and methods have been advanced to clear the heavy metal polluted soils and waters. One important method is by removing heavy metals with the help of amino acids like L-Cysteine and L-Penicillamine. But also, economy of removal of pollutant heavy metals from soils and waters is a major concern. Present study helps in decreasing the cost for large-scale removal of heavy metals from polluted water by recovering the amino acid (L-Cysteine) after removal of nickel (Ni+2) at a fixed pH, by binding the Ni+2 with halloysite nanotubes(HNT), so that L-Cysteine can be reused again for removal of heavy metals.

  19. Final Removal Action Report of the CPP-603A Basin Facility

    SciTech Connect

    D. V. Croson

    2007-01-04

    This Final Removal Action Report describes the actions that were taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Bason Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The Removal Action implemented consolidation and recording the location of debris objects containing radioactive cobalt (cobalt-60), removal and management of a small high-activity debris object (SHADO 1), the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) evaporation ponds, and filling the basins with grout/controlled low strength material.

  20. Physical removal of metallic carbon nanotubes from nanotube network devices using a thermal and fluidic process.

    PubMed

    Ford, Alexandra C; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M; Kane, Alexander A; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V; Krafcik, Karen L; Billups, W Edward; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François

    2013-03-15

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is versatile and is applied to devices post-fabrication.

  1. Triboelectrification-Enabled Self-Powered Detection and Removal of Heavy Metal Ions in Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaoling; Chen, Jun; Guo, Hengyu; Fan, Xing; Wen, Zhen; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Yu, Chongwen; Cao, Xia; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-04-20

    A fundamentally new working principle into the field of self-powered heavy-metal-ion detection and removal using the triboelectrification effect is introduced. The as-developed tribo-nanosensors can selectively detect common heavy metal ions. The water-driven triboelectric nanogenerator is taken as a sustainable power source for heavy-metal-ion removal by recycling the kinetic energy from flowing wastewater.

  2. Consolidated Incineration Facility metals partitioning test. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.

    1993-08-31

    Test burns were conducted at Energy and Environmental Research Corporation`s rotary kiln simulator, the Solid Waste Incineration Test Facility, using surrogate CIF wastes spiked with hazardous metals and organics. The primary objective for this test program was measuring heavy metals partition between the kiln bottom ash, scrubber blowdown solution, and incinerator stack gas. Also, these secondary waste streams were characterized to determine waste treatment requirements prior to final disposal. These tests were designed to investigate the effect of several parameters on metals partitioning: incineration temperature; waste chloride concentration; waste form (solid or liquid); and chloride concentration in the scrubber water. Tests were conducted at three kiln operating temperatures. Three waste simulants were burned, two solid waste mixtures (paper, plastic, latex, and one with and one without PVC), and a liquid waste mixture (containing benzene and chlorobenzene). Toxic organic and metal compounds were spiked into the simulated wastes to evaluate their fate under various combustion conditions. Kiln offgases were sampled for volatile organic compounds (VOC), semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC), polychlorinated dibenz[p]dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF), metals, particulate loading and size distribution, HCl, and combustion products. Stack gas sampling was performed to determine additional treatment requirements prior to final waste disposal. Significant test results are summarized below.

  3. Cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the removal of heavy metal mixtures from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Pengpeng; Calo, Joseph M; Hradil, George

    2011-11-15

    The description and operation of a novel cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the simultaneous removal of mixtures of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are presented. CEP combines the advantages of electrowinning in a spouted particulate electrode (SPE) with that of chemical precipitation and redissolution, to remove heavy metals at low concentrations as solid metal deposits on particulate cathode particles without exporting toxic metal precipitate sludges from the process. The overall result is very large volume reduction of the heavy metal contaminants as a solid metal deposit on particles that can either be safely discarded as such, or further processed to recover particular metals. The performance of this system is demonstrated with data on the removal of mixtures of copper, nickel, and cadmium from aqueous solutions.

  4. Cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the removal of heavy metal mixtures from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Grimshaw, Pengpeng; Calo, Joseph M.; Hradil, George

    2011-01-01

    The description and operation of a novel cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the simultaneous removal of mixtures of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are presented. CEP combines the advantages of electrowinning in a spouted particulate electrode (SPE) with that of chemical precipitation and redissolution, to remove heavy metals at low concentrations as solid metal deposits on particulate cathode particles without exporting toxic metal precipitate sludges from the process. The overall result is very large volume reduction of the heavy metal contaminants as a solid metal deposit on particles that can either be safely discarded as such, or further processed to recover particular metals. The performance of this system is demonstrated with data on the removal of mixtures of copper, nickel, and cadmium from aqueous solutions. PMID:22102792

  5. Cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the removal of heavy metal mixtures from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Grimshaw, Pengpeng; Calo, Joseph M; Hradil, George

    2011-11-15

    The description and operation of a novel cyclic electrowinning/precipitation (CEP) system for the simultaneous removal of mixtures of heavy metals from aqueous solutions are presented. CEP combines the advantages of electrowinning in a spouted particulate electrode (SPE) with that of chemical precipitation and redissolution, to remove heavy metals at low concentrations as solid metal deposits on particulate cathode particles without exporting toxic metal precipitate sludges from the process. The overall result is very large volume reduction of the heavy metal contaminants as a solid metal deposit on particles that can either be safely discarded as such, or further processed to recover particular metals. The performance of this system is demonstrated with data on the removal of mixtures of copper, nickel, and cadmium from aqueous solutions. PMID:22102792

  6. Comparative efficiency of final endodontic cleansing procedures in removing a radioactive albumin from root canal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cecic, P.A.; Peters, D.D.; Grower, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    Fifty-six teeth were initially instrumented, with the use of seven irrigants or irrigant combinations, and filled with radioactive albumin. The study then showed the relative ability of three final endodontic procedures (copious reirrigation with saline solution, drying with paper points, and reassuring patency of the canal with the final instrument) to remove the albumin. Even after copious irrigation, each additional procedure removed statistically significant amounts of albumin. Alternating an organic solvent and an inorganic solvent did appear to leave the canal system in the optimal condition for final cleansing procedures. The study then correlated the relative efficiency of irrigation alone versus instrumentation plus irrigation in removing the remaining albumin from the canal systems. Reinstrumentation plus copious irrigation removed significantly more albumin than copious irrigation alone.

  7. Removal of metal and organic pollutants from wastewater by a sequential selective technique.

    PubMed

    Cobas, M; Danko, A S; Pazos, M; Sanromán, M A

    2016-08-01

    In this study the application of a sequential selective system that combined biosorption with biodegradation was evaluated as a feasible process for the removal of Cr(VI) and m-cresol from effluents. Cr(VI) biosorption on pretreated chestnut shells showed 100% metal removal and modelling efforts demonstrated that the pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fit well the process behaviour. Thus, the treated stream was an appropriate environment for the biodegradation of m-cresol using a laccase-producer fungus, Phlebia radiata. Two bioreactor configurations, rotating drum and modified-airlift, were studied using the fungus grown on chestnut shells, which act as support-substrate as well as oxidative enzyme inductor increasing the laccase activity up to 1000UL(-1). The best bioreactor, rotating drum, reached 100% removal in 7days. Finally, the best configuration for the sequential selective system was modelled operating in continuous mode by the breakthrough curves generated using FASTv2.0 and the design bioreactor flow model. PMID:26897470

  8. [Removal of heavy metals from extract of Angelica sinensis by EDTA-modified chitosan magnetic adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Ren, Yong; Sun, Ming-Hui; Peng, Hong; Huang, Kai-Xun

    2013-11-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals in the extracting solutions of traditional Chinese medicine are usually very low. Furthermore, a vast number of organic components contained in the extracting solutions would be able to coordinate with heavy metals, which might lead to great difficulty in high efficient removal of them from the extracting solutions. This paper was focused on the removal of heavy metals of low concentrations from the extracting solution of Angelica sinensis by applying an EDTA-modified chitosan magnetic adsorbent (EDTA-modified chitosan/SiO2/Fe3O4, abbreviated as EDCMS). The results showed that EDCMS exhibited high efficiency for the removal of heavy metals, such as Cu, Cd and Pb, e.g. the removal percentage of Cd and Pb reached 90% and 94.7%, respectively. Besides, some amounts of other heavy metals like Zn and Mn were also removed by EDCMS. In addition, the total solid contents, the amount of ferulic acid and the HPLC fingerprints of the extracting solution were not changed significantly during the heavy metal removal process. These results indicate that EDCMS may act as an applicable and efficient candidate for the removal of heavy metals from the extracting solution of A. sinensis.

  9. New biosorbent in removing some metals from industrial wastewater in El Mex Bay, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdallah, Maha Ahmed Mohamed; Mahmoud, Mohamed E.; Osman, Maher M.; Ahmed, Somaia B.

    2015-12-01

    Biosorption is an extensive technology applied for the removal of heavy metal ions and other pollutants from aqueous solutions. In the present study, the biosorption of cadmium, lead, chromium and mercury ions from polluted surface seawater in El-Max Bay was determined using hybrid active carbon sorbents. These sorbents were treated chemically by acid, base and redox reaction followed by surface loading of baker's yeast biomass for increasing their biosorption capacity and the highest metal uptake values. The surface function and morphology of the hybrid immobilized sorbents were studied by Fourier Transform Infrared analysis and scanning electron microscope imaging. Metal removal values proved that the vital role of baker's yeast as a significant high removable due to functional groups at baker's yeast cell wall surface that have the ability to forming various coordination complexes with metal ions. A noticeable increase in the removal of all studied metals was observed and reached to 100 %.

  10. Removal of heavy metal ions by biogenic hydroxyapatite: Morphology influence and mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dandan; Guan, Xiaomei; Huang, Fangzhi; Li, Shikuo; Shen, Yuhua; Chen, Jun; Long, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    Based on the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HA) with different morphologies, such as nanorod-like, flower-like and sphere-like assembled HA nanorods, a new strategy has been developed for the removal of heavy metal ions such as Pb2+, Cu2+, Mn2+, Zn2+. The dependence of removal efficiency on the morphology and the suspended concentration of trapping agent, the removal time and selectivity were evaluated and discussed. The experimental results proved that the removal capacity of flower-like assembled HA nanorods (NAFL-HA) was the best, and the maximum removal ratio for Pb2+ ion was 99.97%. The mechanism of Pb2+ removal was studied in detail, noting that some metal ions were completely incorporated into hydroxyapatitie to produce Pb-HA. It reveals that the metal ions capture by HA is mainly controlled by sample surface adsorption and co-precipitation, which are directly controlled by sample morphology.

  11. Phytoremediation: A novel strategy for the removal of toxic metals from the environment using plants

    SciTech Connect

    Salt, D.E.; Blaylock, M.; Kumar, N. P.B.A.

    1995-05-01

    Toxic metal pollution of waters and soils is a major environmental problem, and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solutions. The use of specially selected and engineered metal-accumulating plants for environmental clean-up is an emerging technology called phytoremediation. Three subsets of this technology are applicable to toxic metal remediation: (1) Phytoextraction: the use of metal-accumulating plants to remove toxic metals from soil; (2) Rhizofiltration: the use of plant roots to remove toxic metals from polluted waters; and (3) Phytostabilization: the use of plants to eliminate the bioavailability of toxic metals in soils. Biological mechanisms of toxic metal uptake, translocation and resistance as well as strategies for improving phytoremediation are also discussed. 83 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Super-Absorbent polymer gels for oil and grease removal from metal and non-metal surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research is to develop a new surface cleaning technology for removal of oil, grease and particulate matters from metal and non-metal surfaces. It is desired that the cleaner is in solid form and is VOC-exempt, HAP-free, non-toxic, non-corrosive, non-ozone depleting, recyclable...

  13. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  14. Heavy metal removal from multicomponent system by the cyanobacterium Nostoc muscorum: kinetics and interaction study.

    PubMed

    Roy, Arindam Sinha; Hazarika, Jayeeta; Manikandan, N Arul; Pakshirajan, Kannan; Syiem, Mayashree B

    2015-04-01

    In this study, Nostoc muscorum, a native cyanobacterial species isolated from a coal mining site, was employed to remove Cu(II), Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solution containing these metals in the mixture. In this multicomponent study, carried out as per the statistically valid Plackett-Burman design of experiments, the results revealed a maximum removal of both Pb(II) (96.3 %) and Cu(II) (96.42 %) followed by Cd(II) (80.04 %) and Zn(II) (71.3 %) at the end of the 60-h culture period. Further, the removal of these metals was attributed to both passive biosorption and accumulation by the actively growing N. muscorum biomass. Besides, the specific removal rate of these metals by N. muscorum was negatively correlated to its specific growth rate. For a better understanding of the effect of these metals on each other's removal by the cyanobacteria, the results were statistically analyzed in the form of analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Student's t test. ANOVA of the metal bioremoval revealed that the main (individual) effect due to the metals was highly significant (P value <0.05) on each other's removal. Student's t test results revealed that both Zn(II) and Pb(II) strongly inhibited both Cu(II) removal (P value <0.01) and Cd(II) removal (P value <0.02). All these results not only demonstrated a very good potential of the cyanobacteria in the bioremoval of these metals but also the effect of individual metals on each other's removal in the multicomponent system.

  15. Metal Ion Removal from Wastewaters by Sorption on Activated Carbon, Cement Kiln Dust, and Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Din, Hala M Gamal; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of activated carbon, cement kiln dust (CKD), and sawdust for the removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from aqueous solutions under mono-metal and competitive sorption systems and the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from different industrial wastewaters. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. The efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from industrial wastewaters was also investigated. Cement kiln dust expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by activated carbon and sawdust. Competition among the metals changed their distribution coefficient (Kd) with the sorbents. Sorption of Pb and Cu was higher than Cd and Zn. The average metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 74, 61, and 60% for Cd, Cu, and Zn, respectively, to nearly 100%. The efficiencies of CKD and activated carbon in removing metals were higher than sawdust, suggesting their potential as low-cost sorbents for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  16. Metal Ion Removal from Wastewaters by Sorption on Activated Carbon, Cement Kiln Dust, and Sawdust.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Sabry M; Eissa, Fawzy I; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Din, Hala M Gamal; Al Anany, Fathia S

    2015-06-01

    This study assessed the efficiency of activated carbon, cement kiln dust (CKD), and sawdust for the removal of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from aqueous solutions under mono-metal and competitive sorption systems and the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from different industrial wastewaters. Batch equilibrium experiments were conducted in a mono-metal and competitive sorption system. The efficiency of the sorbents in the removal of Cd, Cu, and Zn from industrial wastewaters was also investigated. Cement kiln dust expressed the highest affinity for the metals followed by activated carbon and sawdust. Competition among the metals changed their distribution coefficient (Kd) with the sorbents. Sorption of Pb and Cu was higher than Cd and Zn. The average metal removal from the wastewaters varied from 74, 61, and 60% for Cd, Cu, and Zn, respectively, to nearly 100%. The efficiencies of CKD and activated carbon in removing metals were higher than sawdust, suggesting their potential as low-cost sorbents for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters. PMID:26459819

  17. Removal and recovery of metal ions from process and waste streams using polymer filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvinen, G.D.; Smith, B.F.; Robison, T.W.; Kraus, K.M.; Thompson, J.A.

    1999-06-13

    Polymer Filtration (PF) is an innovative, selective metal removal technology. Chelating, water-soluble polymers are used to selectively bind the desired metal ions and ultrafiltration is used to concentrate the polymer-metal complex producing a permeate with low levels of the targeted metal ion. When applied to the treatment of industrial metal-bearing aqueous process streams, the permeate water can often be reused within the process and the metal ions reclaimed. This technology is applicable to many types of industrial aqueous streams with widely varying chemistries. Application of PF to aqueous streams from nuclear materials processing and electroplating operations will be described.

  18. REMOVAL OF CERTAIN FISSION PRODUCT METALS FROM LIQUID BISMUTH COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Dwyer, O.E.; Howe, H.E.; Avrutik, E.R.

    1959-11-24

    A method is described for purifying a solution of urarium in liquid bismuth containing at least one metal from the group consisting of selenium, tellurium, palladium, ruthenium, rhodium, niobium, and zirconium. The solution is contacted with zinc in an inert atmosphere to form a homogeneous melt, a solid zinc phase is formed, and the zinc phase containing the metal is separated from the melt.

  19. Novel Strategies for the Removal of Toxic Metals from Soils and Waters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roundhill, D. Max

    2004-01-01

    The elimination of poisonous metals possessing chemical or radioactive substances, from soils and waters, and chemistry's contribution towards efficacious and environmentally suitable removal methods are discussed. Various original tactics are studied and compared.

  20. Removing lead from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation: factorial design and removal mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingang; Gao, Yujie; Ding, Hui

    2013-10-01

    The lead removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation was optimized using experimental design, and a mathematical model was established to elucidate the removal mechanism. The variables studied in lead evaporation consisted of the chamber pressure, heating temperature, heating time, particle size and initial mass. The low-level chamber pressure was fixed at 0.1 Pa as the operation pressure. The application of two-level factorial design generated a first-order polynomial that agreed well with the data for evaporation efficiency of lead. The heating temperature and heating time exhibited significant effects on the efficiency, which was validated by means of the copper-lead mixture experiments. The optimized operating conditions within the region studied were the chamber pressure of 0.1 Pa, heating temperature of 1023 K and heating time of 120 min. After the conditions were employed to remove lead from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards, the efficiency was 99.97%. The mechanism of the effects was elucidated by mathematical modeling that deals with evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, and can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation.

  1. Evaluation of Moringa oleifera Seed Lectin as a Metal Remover in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Freitas, José H E S; de Santana, Keissy V; da Silva, Pollyanna M; de Moura, Maiara C; Coelho, Luana C B B; do Nascimento, Aline E; Paiva, Patrícia M G; Napoleao, Thiago H

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of Moringa oleifera seed lectin (WSMoL) as a metal remover in water and the effects of metals on its hemagglutinating and antibacterial activities were determined. Aqueous metal solutions were incubated with WSMoL for 8 h at 4°C and the concentrations of metals were determined using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Hemagglutination and antibacterial assays were conducted with WSMoL and lectin exposed or not to the metals. The removal efficiency of WSMoL was 49.00%, 53.21%, 71.45%, 55.42%, 69.88%, 62.14%, and 49.36% for Cd+2, Pb+2, Cu+2, Zn+2, Mg+2, Mn+2, and Al+3, respectively. WSMoL showed bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities against Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis. However, hemagglutinating and antibacterial activities were impaired after exposure to metals. In conclusion, WSMoL efficiently removed metals present in water but the interaction with metals impaired lectin carbohydrate-binding ability and antibacterial activity. This should be considered when properties of WSMoL other than metal removal are desired. PMID:27184499

  2. Method for removing silicide coatings in a medium of low-melting metals

    SciTech Connect

    Filipovskii, A.V.; Tarasenko, I.V.

    1994-11-01

    We propose a method for removing silicide coatings from the surfaces of workpieces made of refractory metals. The entire volume of the silicide layer is borated in a melt based on low-melting metals. The boride layer formed as a result is characterized by a large number of defects, low mechanical strength, and high etching susceptibility. Therefore, it can easily be removed by any existing method.

  3. Metal oxide regenerable carbon dioxide removal system for an advanced portable life support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nacheff, Maurena S.; Chang, Craig H.; Colombo, Gerald V.; Cusick, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a CO2 removal system for an astronaut portable life support system to meet the EVA requirements for the Space Station is discussed, focusing on the factors important in the selection of the metal oxide absorbent for CO2 removal. Results from laboratory tests on metal oxide absorbent materials are given, including characterization studies and dynamic CO2 uptake and regeneration measurements. The preliminary design of the breadboard system to perform both the absorption and regeneration functions is presented.

  4. Removal of chlorine gas by an amine functionalized metal-organic framework via electrophilic aromatic substitution.

    PubMed

    DeCoste, Jared B; Browe, Matthew A; Wagner, George W; Rossin, Joseph A; Peterson, Gregory W

    2015-08-11

    Here we report the removal of chlorine gas from air via a reaction with an amine functionalized metal-organic framework (MOF). It is found that UiO-66-NH2 has the ability to remove 1.24 g of Cl2 per g of MOF via an electrophilic aromatic substitution reaction producing HCl, which is subsequently neutralized by the MOF.

  5. Effects of activated carbon fibre-supported metal oxide characteristics on toluene removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen-Shu; Peng, Yu-Hui; Li, Wen-Kai

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the use of activated carbon fibres (ACFs) impregnated with metal oxides for the catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Thus, the effects of the ACF-supported metal oxides on toluene removal are determined in this study. Three catalysts, namely, Ce, Mn, and Cu, two pretreatment solutions NaOH and H2O2, and three reaction temperatures of 250 degrees C, 300 degrees C, and 350 degrees C, were employed to determine toluene removal. The composition and morphology of the catalysts were analysed using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), transmission electron microscope (TEM), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR), and thermo-gravimetric analyser (TGA) to study the effects of the catalyst's characteristics on toluene removal. The results demonstrated that the metal catalysts supported on the ACFs could significantly increase toluene removal. The Mn/ACFs and Cu/ACFs were observed to be most active in toluene removal at a reaction temperature of 250 degrees C with 10% oxygen content. Moreover, the data also indicated that toluene removal was slightly improved after pretreating the ACFs with NaOH and H2O2. The results suggested that surface-metal loading and the surface characteristics of the ACFs were the determinant parameters for toluene removal. Furthermore, the removal of toluene over Mn/ACFs-H202 decreased when the reaction temperature considered was > 300 degrees C.

  6. Enhanced removal of heavy metals in primary treatment using coagulation and flocculation.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pauline D; Girinathannair, Padmanabhan; Ohlinger, Kurt N; Ritchie, Stephen; Teuber, Leah; Kirby, Jason

    2008-05-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the removal efficiencies of chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc from raw wastewater by chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) and to attain a total suspended solids removal goal of 80%. Operating parameters and chemical doses were optimized by bench-scale tests. Locally obtained raw wastewater samples were spiked with heavy metal solutions to obtain representative concentrations of metals in wastewater. Jar tests were conducted to compare the metals removal efficiencies of the chemical treatment options using ferric chloride, alum, and anionic polymer. The results obtained were compared with those from other studies. It was concluded that CEPT using ferric chloride and anionic polymer is more effective than CEPT using alum for metals removal. The CEPT dosing of 40 mg/L ferric chloride and 0.5 mg/L polymer enhanced heavy metals removal efficiencies by over 200% for chromium, copper, zinc, and nickel and 475% for lead, compared with traditional primary treatment. Efficient metals capture during CEPT can result in increased allowable headworks loadings or lower metal levels in the outfall. PMID:18605386

  7. Removal and recovery of heavy metals from incinerator ash residues

    SciTech Connect

    Forrester, K.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper presents results of a novel and state-of-the-art patent-pending processes developed jointly by Forrester Environmental Services Inc. (FESI) and Brookhaven National Laboratories (BNL) for the extraction and recovery of lead (Pb), Cadmium (Cd), Copper (Cu), Zinc (Zn) and other heavy metals from heavy metal bearing wastes including but not limited to solid waste incinerator bottom ash, flyash and combined ash. The heavy metal extraction and recovery processes were found to be capable of high percentage of heavy metals extraction and recovery at a relatively low cost under bench scale and full-scale refuse incinerator facility conditions. This paper presents empirical data from bench scale studies only, as the full-scale data is currently under review. The ash product remaining after extraction passed all TCLP regulatory limits and retained only minimal Pb, Cd, Cu, and Zn content and other water insoluble heavy metal compounds. Results of heavy metals recovery and low cost from ongoing field applications of this technology are consistent with the bench scale data presented within this paper.

  8. Multivariate methods for evaluating the efficiency of electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from polluted harbour sediments.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Jensen, Pernille E; Lejon, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Chemometrics was used to develop a multivariate model based on 46 previously reported electrodialytic remediation experiments (EDR) of five different harbour sediments. The model predicted final concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn as a function of current density, remediation time, stirring rate, dry/wet sediment, cell set-up as well as sediment properties. Evaluation of the model showed that remediation time and current density had the highest comparative influence on the clean-up levels. Individual models for each heavy metal showed variance in the variable importance, indicating that the targeted heavy metals were bound to different sediment fractions. Based on the results, a PLS model was used to design five new EDR experiments of a sixth sediment to achieve specified clean-up levels of Cu and Pb. The removal efficiencies were up to 82% for Cu and 87% for Pb and the targeted clean-up levels were met in four out of five experiments. The clean-up levels were better than predicted by the model, which could hence be used for predicting an approximate remediation strategy; the modelling power will however improve with more data included.

  9. Multivariate methods for evaluating the efficiency of electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from polluted harbour sediments.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Kristine Bondo; Kirkelund, Gunvor M; Ottosen, Lisbeth M; Jensen, Pernille E; Lejon, Tore

    2015-01-01

    Chemometrics was used to develop a multivariate model based on 46 previously reported electrodialytic remediation experiments (EDR) of five different harbour sediments. The model predicted final concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn as a function of current density, remediation time, stirring rate, dry/wet sediment, cell set-up as well as sediment properties. Evaluation of the model showed that remediation time and current density had the highest comparative influence on the clean-up levels. Individual models for each heavy metal showed variance in the variable importance, indicating that the targeted heavy metals were bound to different sediment fractions. Based on the results, a PLS model was used to design five new EDR experiments of a sixth sediment to achieve specified clean-up levels of Cu and Pb. The removal efficiencies were up to 82% for Cu and 87% for Pb and the targeted clean-up levels were met in four out of five experiments. The clean-up levels were better than predicted by the model, which could hence be used for predicting an approximate remediation strategy; the modelling power will however improve with more data included. PMID:25464314

  10. Case studies for heavy metals removal using a granular, magnesium-based adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.D.; Witkowski, J.T.; Reyes, A.

    1994-12-31

    Environmental regulations have become increasingly severe regarding the types and amounts of pollutants that may be released into the environment. In particular, metal finishers are commonly restricted to the metal concentrations and pH of waste water that may be discharged into natural waterways, municipal sewers, etc. This paper details a granular Magnesium-based Adsorbent (FloMag{trademark} G) which has been used to remove various metals from surface finishing waste water streams. The metals treated in this study include copper, nickel, and zinc. Effluent concentrations of the treated metals are typically less than 0.5 mg/L. Three case studies are presented detailing the performance of FloMag{trademark} G as well as information about how FloMag{trademark} G removes metals from solution.

  11. A new method for the removal of toxic metal ions from acid-sensitive biomaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1997-06-01

    A new method (competitive adsorption method) for the removal of toxic heavy metals from acid-sensitive biomaterials was proposed and it was applied to the removal of cadmium from the midgut gland (MG) of scallop, Patinopecten yessoensis. Insolubilized humic acid, which has been developed in the laboratory, was used as a competitive adsorbent. A metal-complexation model was used to determine the adsorption characteristics of cadmium onto MG. Furthermore, the model was applied to the competitive adsorption system. The results showed that the competitive adsorption method enabled the simultaneous removal of toxic cadmium from both liquid and MG phase under mild acidic condition (pH 5).

  12. Method of removing bulk sodium from metallic surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Maffei, H.P.; Borisch, R.R.

    1975-11-11

    A process of removing sodium from an article, particularly one made of stainless steel, by treating it with a mixture of water vapor and a gas which is inert to sodium is described. By selecting combinations of temperature and water vapor-to-gas ratio, the reaction temperature is controlled to prevent damage to the articles.

  13. Removal characteristics of anionic metals by micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kitae; Kim, Bo-Kyong; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Yang, Ji-Won

    2003-05-30

    Surfactant-based separation of Fe(CN)(6)(3-) and CrO(4)(2-) using regenerated cellulose membrane was studied in order to assess the potential of micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration for the remediation of wastewater or groundwater polluted with ferriccyanide and chromate. In the ferriccyanide/octadecylamine acetate (ODA) and chromate/ODA systems, removal of ferriccyanide increased from 73 to 92% and to 98%, and that of chromate from 64 to 97% and to >99.9% as the molar ratio of ODA to ferriccyanide and to chromate increased from 1 to 2 and to 3, respectively. In the ferriccyanide/chromate/ODA system, while the removal of ferriccyanide increased from 62 to 72% and to 93%, the removal of chromate from 20 to 38% and to 68% as the molar ratio of ferriccyanide:chromate:ODA increased from 1:1:1 to 1:1:2 and to 1:1:4, respectively. With the molar ratio of 1:1:6, the removal was >99.9 and 98% for chromate and ferriccyanide, respectively. Ferriccyanide ions were more easily bound to ODA micelles because the binding power of ferriccyanide was greater than that of chromate.

  14. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  15. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R. , Pinole, CA ); Wilde, E.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- bioremoval'' -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

  16. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Benemann, J.R.; Wilde, E.W.

    1991-02-01

    Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- `` bioremoval`` -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R&D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.

  17. 42 CFR 493.575 - Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review. 493.575 Section 493.575 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  18. 42 CFR 493.575 - Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review. 493.575 Section 493.575 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  19. 42 CFR 493.575 - Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review. 493.575 Section 493.575 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  20. 42 CFR 493.575 - Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review. 493.575 Section 493.575 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  1. 42 CFR 493.575 - Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Removal of deeming authority or CLIA exemption and final determination review. 493.575 Section 493.575 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION...

  2. Final guidance on numeric removal action levels for contaminated drinking water sites. Directive

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this memorandum is to transmit the final OERR methodology and guidance on the calculation of numeric removal action levels (RALs), to assist Superfund personnel in deciding whether to provide alternate sources of drinking water to populations adversely affected by releases of hazardous substances into the environment.

  3. Removal of trace metals by Sorghum bicolor and Helianthus annuus in a site polluted by industrial wastes: a field experience.

    PubMed

    Marchiol, L; Fellet, G; Perosa, D; Zerbi, G

    2007-05-01

    Using the perspective of full scale application of phytoremediation techniques, research is focusing on the optimization of agronomic practices. Two annual high biomass yield crops, Sorghum bicolor and Helianthus annuus, were grown in a polymetallic soil. The experimental site, polluted by pyrite cinders, is located in an industrial site that has been listed in the clean-up national priority list since 2001. Specific aims of this work were to observe the concentration of metals in plants during the crop cycle and to establish the amount of metal removed by the crops. The field trial, arranged in a randomized block design, started in 2005. The concentrations of heavy metals in the soil were: As 309, Cd 4.29, Co 50.9, Cu 1527 and Zn 980mg kg(-1). The crops grown on the polluted soil received mineral fertilization (Fert) and organic amendment (Org), while plants in control soil (Ctrl) did not receive anything. The plots were watered during the crop cycle during two drought periods, using a sprinkler irrigation system. The phytoextraction potential of crops was estimated during the whole growth cycle and the plant biomass that was collected in each sampling date was ICP-analyzed. Plant-biomass growth curves were obtained. The concentrations of the metals in the shoots and in the total plant biomass were recorded. Finally, the metal removal was calculated for the harvestable parts of the crops. The amelioration of the nutritive status of the substrate that resulted, was highly effective for the biomass yield. However, fertilization and soil amendment did not heighten the concentration of metals in the harvestable tissue of the plants during the crop cycle. In some cases, organic matter appeared to bind the elements making them less available for the plants. The evaluation of the potential of phytoremediation of our plants compared to other crops in terms of metal removal was positive. Our results of metal removal are consistent with the results from other in situ

  4. Immobilization of Thiadiazole Derivatives on Magnetite Mesoporous Silica Shell Nanoparticles in Application to Heavy Metal Removal from Biological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emadi, Masoomeh; Shams, Esmaeil

    2010-12-01

    In this report magnetite was synthesized by a coprecipitation method, then coated with a layer of silica. Another layer of mesoporous silica was added by a sol-gel method, then 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-thiol (ATT) was immobilized onto the synthesized nanoparticles with a simple procedure. This was followed by a series of characterizations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR spectrum, elemental analysis and XRD. Heavy metal uptake of the modified nanoparticles was examined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. For further investigation we chose Cu2+ as the preferred heavy metal to evaluate the amount of adsorption, as well as the kinetics and mechanism of adsorption. Finally, the capacity of our nanoparticles for the heavy metal removal from blood was shown. We found that the kinetic rate of Cu2+ adsorption was 0.05 g/mg/min, and the best binding model was the Freundlich isotherm.

  5. Immobilization of Thiadiazole Derivatives on Magnetite Mesoporous Silica Shell Nanoparticles in Application to Heavy Metal Removal from Biological Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Emadi, Masoomeh; Shams, Esmaeil

    2010-12-02

    In this report magnetite was synthesized by a coprecipitation method, then coated with a layer of silica. Another layer of mesoporous silica was added by a sol-gel method, then 5-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole-thiol (ATT) was immobilized onto the synthesized nanoparticles with a simple procedure. This was followed by a series of characterizations, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR spectrum, elemental analysis and XRD. Heavy metal uptake of the modified nanoparticles was examined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. For further investigation we chose Cu{sup 2+} as the preferred heavy metal to evaluate the amount of adsorption, as well as the kinetics and mechanism of adsorption. Finally, the capacity of our nanoparticles for the heavy metal removal from blood was shown. We found that the kinetic rate of Cu{sup 2+} adsorption was 0.05 g/mg/min, and the best binding model was the Freundlich isotherm.

  6. Effective removal of heavy metal by biochar colloids under different pyrolysis temperatures.

    PubMed

    Qian, Linbo; Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Jingchun; Han, Lu; Gao, Weiguo; Liu, Rongqin; Chen, Mengfang

    2016-04-01

    Biochar colloids' association with heavy metal needs be studied to precisely evaluate the effectiveness of biochar as sorbents. The structure of biochar colloids and their roles in heavy metal removal were investigated by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction and batch adsorption experiments, respectively. Due to the numerous oxygen function groups and mineral matters contained in biochar colloids, the removal capacity of chromium (Cr) and cadmium (Cd) to biochar colloids was much greater than that of biochar residues. The highest adsorption capacities of Cr(III) and Cd(II) under initial pH 3.5 were obtained by RS400, which were mainly attributed to the presence of oxygen function groups and mineral matters simultaneously. The highest removal capacity of Cr(VI) was observed by RS300 due to the additional reduction by phenolic functional groups of RS300C. Therefore, the functions of biochar colloids for heavy metal removal should be considered.

  7. Heavy metal removal from MSS fly ash by thermal and chlorination treatments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyong; Chen, Jiacong; Huang, Limao

    2015-01-01

    The thermal behavior of heavy metals in the co-incineration of municipal solid waste-sludge incinerator fly ash (MSS fly ash) was studied using a laboratory-scale tube furnace. The results indicate that without the addition of chlorinating agents, temperature was an important parameter and had significantly influenced on heavy metal removal, whereas the residence time had a weak effect. Between 900 and 1000 °C for 60 to 300 min, heavy metals reacted with chloride-inherent in the fly ash, and approximately 80 to 89% of Pb, 48% to 56% of Cd, 27% to 36% of Zn and 6% to 24% of Cu were removed. After the adding chlorinating agents, the evaporation rate of the heavy metals improved dramatically, where the evaporation rates of Cu and Zn were larger than that of Pb and Cd. As the amount of added chlorinating agents increased, the removal rate of heavy metals increased. However, the effect of the type of chlorinating agent on the chlorination of heavy metals differed considerably, where NaCl had the weakest effect on the removal rate of Cu, Cd and Zn. In terms of resource recovery and decontamination, MgCl2 and CaCl2 are the best choices due to their efficient removal of Zn. PMID:26602592

  8. Heavy metal removal from MSS fly ash by thermal and chlorination treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingyong; Chen, Jiacong; Huang, Limao

    2015-11-01

    The thermal behavior of heavy metals in the co-incineration of municipal solid waste-sludge incinerator fly ash (MSS fly ash) was studied using a laboratory-scale tube furnace. The results indicate that without the addition of chlorinating agents, temperature was an important parameter and had significantly influenced on heavy metal removal, whereas the residence time had a weak effect. Between 900 and 1000 °C for 60 to 300 min, heavy metals reacted with chloride-inherent in the fly ash, and approximately 80 to 89% of Pb, 48% to 56% of Cd, 27% to 36% of Zn and 6% to 24% of Cu were removed. After the adding chlorinating agents, the evaporation rate of the heavy metals improved dramatically, where the evaporation rates of Cu and Zn were larger than that of Pb and Cd. As the amount of added chlorinating agents increased, the removal rate of heavy metals increased. However, the effect of the type of chlorinating agent on the chlorination of heavy metals differed considerably, where NaCl had the weakest effect on the removal rate of Cu, Cd and Zn. In terms of resource recovery and decontamination, MgCl2 and CaCl2 are the best choices due to their efficient removal of Zn.

  9. Heavy metal removal from MSS fly ash by thermal and chlorination treatments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyong; Chen, Jiacong; Huang, Limao

    2015-11-25

    The thermal behavior of heavy metals in the co-incineration of municipal solid waste-sludge incinerator fly ash (MSS fly ash) was studied using a laboratory-scale tube furnace. The results indicate that without the addition of chlorinating agents, temperature was an important parameter and had significantly influenced on heavy metal removal, whereas the residence time had a weak effect. Between 900 and 1000 °C for 60 to 300 min, heavy metals reacted with chloride-inherent in the fly ash, and approximately 80 to 89% of Pb, 48% to 56% of Cd, 27% to 36% of Zn and 6% to 24% of Cu were removed. After the adding chlorinating agents, the evaporation rate of the heavy metals improved dramatically, where the evaporation rates of Cu and Zn were larger than that of Pb and Cd. As the amount of added chlorinating agents increased, the removal rate of heavy metals increased. However, the effect of the type of chlorinating agent on the chlorination of heavy metals differed considerably, where NaCl had the weakest effect on the removal rate of Cu, Cd and Zn. In terms of resource recovery and decontamination, MgCl2 and CaCl2 are the best choices due to their efficient removal of Zn.

  10. Influence of intermittent wetting and drying conditions on heavy metal removal by stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Blecken, Godecke-Tobias; Zinger, Yaron; Deletić, Ana; Fletcher, Tim D; Viklander, Maria

    2009-10-01

    Biofiltration is a technology to treat urban stormwater runoff, which conveys pollutants, including heavy metals. However, the variability of metals removal performance in biofiltration systems is as yet unknown. A laboratory study has been conducted with vegetated biofilter mesocosms, partly fitted with a submerged zone at the bottom of the filter combined with a carbon source. The biofilters were dosed with stormwater according to three different dry/wet schemes, to investigate the effect of intermittent wetting and drying conditions on metal removal. Provided that the biofilters received regular stormwater input, metal removal exceeded 95%. The highest metal accumulation occurs in the top layer of the filter media. However, after antecedent drying before a storm event exceeding 3-4 weeks the filters performed significantly worse, although metal removal still remained relatively high. Introducing a submerged zone into the filter improved the performance significantly after extended dry periods. In particular, copper removal in filters equipped with a submerged zone was increased by around 12% (alpha=0.05) both during wet and dry periods and for lead the negative effect of drying could completely be eliminated, with consistently low outflow concentrations even after long drying periods.

  11. Immobilized materials for removal of toxic metal ions from surface/groundwaters and aqueous waste streams.

    PubMed

    Zawierucha, Iwona; Kozlowski, Cezary; Malina, Grzegorz

    2016-04-01

    Heavy metals from industrial processes are of special concern because they produce chronic poisoning in the aquatic environment. More strict environmental regulations on the discharge of toxic metals require the development of various technologies for their removal from polluted streams (i.e. industrial wastewater, mine waters, landfill leachate, and groundwater). The separation of toxic metal ions using immobilized materials (novel sorbents and membranes with doped ligands), due to their high selectivity and removal efficiency, increased stability, and low energy requirements, is promising for improving the environmental quality. This critical review is aimed at studying immobilized materials as potential remediation agents for the elimination of numerous toxic metal (e.g. Pb, Cd, Hg, and As) ions from polluted streams. This study covers the general characteristics of immobilized materials and separation processes, understanding of the metal ion removal mechanisms, a review of the application of immobilized materials for the removal of toxic metal ions, as well as the impacts of various parameters on the removal efficiency. In addition, emerging trends and opportunities in the field of remediation technologies using these materials are addressed.

  12. Heavy metal removal from MSS fly ash by thermal and chlorination treatments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingyong; Chen, Jiacong; Huang, Limao

    2015-01-01

    The thermal behavior of heavy metals in the co-incineration of municipal solid waste-sludge incinerator fly ash (MSS fly ash) was studied using a laboratory-scale tube furnace. The results indicate that without the addition of chlorinating agents, temperature was an important parameter and had significantly influenced on heavy metal removal, whereas the residence time had a weak effect. Between 900 and 1000 °C for 60 to 300 min, heavy metals reacted with chloride-inherent in the fly ash, and approximately 80 to 89% of Pb, 48% to 56% of Cd, 27% to 36% of Zn and 6% to 24% of Cu were removed. After the adding chlorinating agents, the evaporation rate of the heavy metals improved dramatically, where the evaporation rates of Cu and Zn were larger than that of Pb and Cd. As the amount of added chlorinating agents increased, the removal rate of heavy metals increased. However, the effect of the type of chlorinating agent on the chlorination of heavy metals differed considerably, where NaCl had the weakest effect on the removal rate of Cu, Cd and Zn. In terms of resource recovery and decontamination, MgCl2 and CaCl2 are the best choices due to their efficient removal of Zn. PMID:26602592

  13. Soil amendments for heavy metals removal from stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenouth, William R.; Gharabaghi, Bahram

    2015-10-01

    Concentrations of dissolved metals in stormwater runoff from urbanized watersheds are much higher than established guidelines for the protection of aquatic life. Five potential soil amendment materials derived from affordable, abundant sources have been tested as filter media using shaker tests and were found to remove dissolved metals in stormwater runoff. Blast furnace (BF) slag and basic oxygenated furnace (BOF) slag from a steel mill, a drinking water treatment residual (DWTR) from a surface water treatment plant, goethite-rich overburden (IRON) from a coal mine, and woodchips (WC) were tested. The IRON and BOF amendments were shown to remove 46-98% of dissolved metals (Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, Ni, Zn) in repacked soil columns. Freundlich adsorption isotherm constants for six metals across five materials were calculated. Breakthrough curves of dissolved metals and total metal accumulation within the filter media were measured in column tests using synthetic runoff. A reduction in system performance over time occurred due to progressive saturation of the treatment media. Despite this, the top 7 cm of each filter media removed up to 72% of the dissolved metals. A calibrated HYDRUS-1D model was used to simulate long-term metal accumulation in the filter media, and model results suggest that for these metals a BOF filter media thickness as low as 15 cm can be used to improve stormwater quality to meet standards for up to twenty years. The treatment media evaluated in this research can be used to improve urban stormwater runoff discharging to environmentally sensitive areas (ESAs).

  14. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange.

  15. Removal of textile dyes and metallic ions using polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups.

    PubMed

    Caldera Villalobos, M; Peláez Cid, A A; Herrera González, Ana M

    2016-07-15

    This work reports the removal of textile dyes and metallic ions by means of adsorption and coagulation-flocculation using two polyelectrolytes and two macroelectrolytes containing sulfonic acid groups. The adsorption of textile dyes was studied in aqueous solutions containing cationic dyes and in wastewater containing a vat dye. Also, removal of vat and naphthol dyes was studied using the process of coagulation-flocculation. The results show these materials possess elevated adsorption capacity, and they accomplished removal rates above 97% in aqueous solutions. The removal of the vat dye improved the quality of the wastewater notably, and an uncolored effluent was obtained at the end of the treatment. The treatment using adsorption decreased the values for coloration, conductivity, suspended solids, and pH. The removal of vat and naphthol dyes by means of coagulation-flocculation was studied as well, and removal rates of 90% were obtained. The polyelectrolytes and macroelectrolytes also proved effective in the adsorption of metallic ions in wastewater. The treatment using adsorption accomplished high removal rates of metallic ions, and it showed greater selectivity towards Cu(2+), Fe(3+) and Pb(2+). A decrease in the content of solids as well as the values for COD and conductivity was observed in the wastewater as well. The analyses of FT-IR indicated that cationic dyes and metallic ions were chemisorbed by means of ionic exchange. PMID:27082258

  16. REMOVAL OF HEAVY METALS BY BIOPOLYMERS. (R825549C018)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Using biopolymers to remove heavy metals from soil and water

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Frederick, R.M.

    1993-11-19

    Chemical remediation of soil may involve the use of harsh chemicals that generate waste streams, which may adversely affect the soil's integrity and ability to support vegetation. This article reviews the potential use of benign reagents, such as biopolymers, to extract heavy metals. The biopolymers discussed are chitin and chitosan, modified starch, cellulose, and polymer-containing algae. (Copyright (c) Remediation 1994.)

  18. Silver-modified clinoptilolite for the removal of Escherichia coli and heavy metals from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Akhigbe, Lulu; Ouki, Sabeha; Saroj, Devendra; Lim, Xiang Min

    2014-09-01

    This paper investigates the potential of using the silver antibacterial properties combined with the metal ion exchange characteristics of silver-modified clinoptilolite to produce a treatment system capable of removing both contaminants from aqueous streams. The results have shown that silver-modified clinoptilolite is capable of completely eliminating Escherichia coli after 30-min contact time demonstrating its effectiveness as a disinfectant. Systems containing both E. coli and metals exhibited 100 % E. coli reduction after 15-min contact time and maximum metal adsorption removal efficiencies of 97, 98, and 99 % for Pb(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+) respectively after 60 min; 0.182-0.266 mg/g of metal ions were adsorbed by the zeolites in the single- and mixed-metal-containing solutions. Nonmodified clinoptilolite showed no antibacterial properties. This study demonstrated that silver-modified clinoptilolite exhibited high disinfection and heavy metal removal efficiencies and consequently could provide an effective combined treatment system for the removal of E. coli and metals from contaminated water streams.

  19. Removal of metals in leachate from sewage sludge using electrochemical technology.

    PubMed

    Meunier, N; Drogui, P; Gourvenec, C; Mercier, G; Hausler, R; Blais, J F

    2004-02-01

    Heavy metals in acidic leachates from sewage sludge are usually removed by chemical precipitation, which often requires high concentration of chemicals and induces high metallic sludge production. Electrochemical technique has been explored as an alternative method in a laboratory pilot scale reactor for heavy metals (Cu and Zn) removal from sludge leachate. Three electrolytic cell arrangements using different electrodes materials were tested: mild steel or aluminium bipolar electrode (EC cell), Graphite/stainless steel monopolar electrodes (ER cell) and iron-monopolar electrodes (EC-ER cell). Results showed that the best performances of metal removal were obtained with EC and EC-ER cells using mild steel electrodes operated respectively at current intensities of 0.8 and 2.0 A through 30 and 60 min of treatment. The yields of Cu and Zn removal from leachate varied respectively from 92.4 to 98.9% and from 69.8 to 76.6%. The amounts of 55 and 44 kg tds(-1) of metallic sludge were respectively produced using EC and EC-ER cells. EC and EC-ER systems involved respectively a total cost of 21.2 and 13.1 CAN dollars per ton of dry sludge treated including only energy consumption and metallic sludge disposal. The treatment using EC-ER system was found to be effective and more economical than the traditional metal precipitation using either Ca(OH)2 and/or NaOH.

  20. Removing heavy metals from synthetic effluents using "kamikaze" Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia; Paraschivescu, Codruta; Matache, Mihaela; Avramescu, Sorin; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    One key step of the bioremediation processes designed to clean up heavy metal contaminated environments is growing resistant cells that accumulate the heavy metals to ensure better removal through a combination of biosorption and continuous metabolic uptake after physical adsorption. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can easily act as cation biosorbents, but isolation of mutants that are both hyperaccumulating and tolerant to heavy metals proved extremely difficult. Instead, mutants that are hypersensitive to heavy metals due to increased and continuous uptake from the environment were considered, aiming to use such mutants to reduce the heavy metal content of contaminated waters. In this study, the heavy metal hypersensitive yeast strain pmr1Delta was investigated for the ability to remove Mn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, or Cd2+ from synthetic effluents. Due to increased metal accumulation, the mutant strain was more efficient than the wild-type in removing Mn2+, Cu2+, or Co2+ from synthetic effluents containing 1-2 mM cations, with a selectivity and also in removing Mn2+ and Cd2+ from synthetic effluents containing 20-50 microM cations, with a selectivity Mn2+ > Cd2+. PMID:19795117

  1. Efficiency of SPIONs functionalized with polyethylene glycol bis(amine) for heavy metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanna, Yongyuth; Chindaduang, Anon; Tumcharern, Gamolwan; Phromyothin, Darinee; Porntheerapat, Supanit; Nukeaw, Jiti; Hofmann, Heirich; Pratontep, Sirapat

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid magnetic nanoparticles based on poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanopaticles (SPIONs) with selective surface modification has been developed for heavy metal removal by applying external magnetic fields. The nanoparticles were prepared by the emulsion polymerization technique in an aqueous suspension of SPIONs. The hydrolysis of carboxyl functional group was then applied for grafting polyethylene glycol bis(amine)(PEG-bis(amine)) onto the PMMA-coated SPIONs. The morphology, the chemical structure and the magnetic properties of the grafted nanoparticles were investigated. The efficiency of the hybrid nanoparticles for heavy metal removal were conducted on Pb(II), Hg(II), Cu(II) and Co(II) in aqueous solutions.The metal concentration in the solutions after separation by the hybrid nanoparticles was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES). The results show the heavy metal uptake ratios of 0.08, 0.04, 0.03, and 0.01 mM per gramme of the grafted SPIONs for Pb(II), Hg(II), Cu(II), and Co(II), respectively. A competitive removal of Cu(II), Pb(II), Co(II) and Hg(II) ions in mixed metal salt solutions has also been studied.The heavy metal removal efficiency of the hybrid nanoparitcles was found to depend on the cation radius, in accordance with capture of metal ions by the amine group.

  2. Layer modeling of zinc removal from metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yujie; Li, Xingang; Ding, Hui

    2015-08-01

    A layer model was established to elucidate the mechanism of zinc removal from the metallic mixture of waste printed circuit boards by vacuum distillation. The removal process was optimized by response surface methodology, and the optimum operating conditions were the chamber pressure of 0.1Pa, heating temperature of 923K, heating time of 60.0min, particle size of 70 mesh (0.212mm) and initial mass of 5.25g. Evaporation efficiency of zinc, the response variable, was 99.79%, which indicates that the zinc can be efficiently removed. Based on the experimental results, a mathematical model, which bears on layer structure, evaporation, mass transfer and condensation, interprets the mechanism of the variable effects. Especially, in order to reveal blocking effect on the zinc removal, the Blake-Kozeny-Burke-Plummer equation was introduced into the mass transfer process. The layer model can be applied to a wider range of metal removal by vacuum distillation.

  3. Removal of {sup 222}Rn daughters from metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Zuzel, G.; Wojcik, M.; Majorovits, B.; Lampert, M. O.; Wendling, P.

    2015-08-17

    Removal of the long-lived {sup 222}Rn daughters ({sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi and {sup 210}Po) from copper, stainless steel and germanium surfaces was investigated. As cleaning techniques etching and electro-polishing was applied to samples in a form of discs exposed earlier to a strong radon source. Reduction of the {sup 210}Pb activity was tested using a HPGe spectrometer, for {sup 210}Bi a beta spectrometer and for {sup 210}Po an alpha spectrometer was used. According to the conducted measurements electro-polishing was always more efficient compared to etching and in case of copper the activity reduction factors for {sup 210}Pb, {sup 210}Bi and {sup 210}Po were between 200 and 400. Etching does not remove {sup 210}Po from copper but works very efficiently from germanium. Results obtained for {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Bi for etched stainless steel were worse but still slightly better than those achieved for copper.

  4. Identification of Bacillus megaterium and Microbacterium liquefaciens genes involved in metal resistance and metal removal.

    PubMed

    Fierros-Romero, Grisel; Gómez-Ramírez, Marlenne; Arenas-Isaac, Ginesa E; Pless, Reynaldo C; Rojas-Avelizapa, Norma G

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus megaterium MNSH1-9K-1 and Microbacterium liquefaciens MNSH2-PHGII-2, 2 nickel- and vanadium-resistant bacteria from mine tailings located in Guanajuato, Mexico, are shown to have the ability to remove 33.1% and 17.8% of Ni, respectively, and 50.8% and 14.0% of V, respectively, from spent petrochemical catalysts containing 428 ± 30 mg·kg(-1) Ni and 2165 ± 77 mg·kg(-1) V. In these strains, several Ni resistance determinants were detected by conventional PCR. The nccA (nickel-cobalt-cadmium resistance) was found for the first time in B. megaterium. In M. liquefaciens, the above gene as well as the czcD gene (cobalt-zinc-cadmium resistance) and a high-affinity nickel transporter were detected for the first time. This study characterizes the resistance of M. liquefaciens and B. megaterium to Ni through the expression of genes conferring metal resistance.

  5. Removal of heavy metals from kaolin using an upward electrokinetic soil remedial (UESR) technology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yuan; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Kao, Jimmy C M; Stabnikova, Olena

    2006-08-25

    An upward electrokinetic soil remedial (UESR) technology was proposed to remove heavy metals from contaminated kaolin. Unlike conventional electrokinetic treatment that uses boreholes or trenches for horizontal migration of heavy metals, the UESR technology, applying vertical non-uniform electric fields, caused upward transportation of heavy metals to the top surface of the treated soil. The effects of current density, treatment duration, cell diameter, and different cathode chamber influent (distilled water or 0.01 M nitric acid) were studied. The removal efficiencies of heavy metals positively correlated to current density and treatment duration. Higher heavy metals removal efficiency was observed for the reactor cell with smaller diameter. A substantial amount of heavy metals was accumulated in the nearest to cathode 2 cm layer of kaolin when distilled water was continuously supplied to the cathode chamber. Heavy metals accumulated in this layer of kaolin can be easily excavated and disposed off. The main part of the removed heavy metals was dissolved in cathode chamber influent and moved away with cathode chamber effluent when 0.01 M nitric acid was used, instead of distilled water. Energy saving treatment by UESR technology with highest metal removal efficiencies was provided by two regimes: (1) by application of 0.01 M nitric acid as cathode chamber influent, cell diameter of 100 mm, duration of 18 days, and constant voltage of 3.5 V (19.7 k Wh/m(3) of kaolin) and (2) by application of 0.01 M nitric acid as cathode chamber influent, cell diameter of 100 cm, duration of 6 days, and constant current density of 0.191 mA/cm(2) (19.1 k Wh/m(3) of kaolin). PMID:16504386

  6. Understanding the factors influencing the removal of heavy metals in urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Maniquiz-Redillas, Marla C; Kim, Lee-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    In this research, an infiltration trench equipped with an extensive pretreatment and filter bed consisting of woodchip, sand and gravel was utilized as a low impact development technique to manage stormwater runoff from a highly impervious road with particular emphasis on heavy metal removal. Findings revealed that the major factors influencing the removal of heavy metals were the concentration of the particulate matters and heavy metals in runoff, runoff volume and flow rates. The reduction of heavy metals was enhanced by sedimentation of particulates through pretreatment. Fine particles (<2 mm) had the most significant amount of heavy metals, thus, enhanced adsorption and filtration using various filter media were important design considerations. Sediment was most highly attached on the surface area of woodchip than to other filter media like sand, gravel and geotextile. It is suggested that maintenance must be performed after the end of the winter season wherein high sediment rate was observed to maintain the efficiency of the treatment system.

  7. Understanding the factors influencing the removal of heavy metals in urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Maniquiz-Redillas, Marla C; Kim, Lee-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    In this research, an infiltration trench equipped with an extensive pretreatment and filter bed consisting of woodchip, sand and gravel was utilized as a low impact development technique to manage stormwater runoff from a highly impervious road with particular emphasis on heavy metal removal. Findings revealed that the major factors influencing the removal of heavy metals were the concentration of the particulate matters and heavy metals in runoff, runoff volume and flow rates. The reduction of heavy metals was enhanced by sedimentation of particulates through pretreatment. Fine particles (<2 mm) had the most significant amount of heavy metals, thus, enhanced adsorption and filtration using various filter media were important design considerations. Sediment was most highly attached on the surface area of woodchip than to other filter media like sand, gravel and geotextile. It is suggested that maintenance must be performed after the end of the winter season wherein high sediment rate was observed to maintain the efficiency of the treatment system. PMID:27332837

  8. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.

    1996-04-02

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines. 13 figs.

  9. Method for removing metal vapor from gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, R. K.; Im, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    A process for cleaning an inert gas contaminated with a metallic vapor, such as cadmium, involves withdrawing gas containing the metallic contaminant from a gas atmosphere of high purity argon; passing the gas containing the metallic contaminant to a mass transfer unit having a plurality of hot gas channels separated by a plurality of coolant gas channels; cooling the contaminated gas as it flows upward through the mass transfer unit to cause contaminated gas vapor to condense on the gas channel walls; regenerating the gas channels of the mass transfer unit; and, returning the cleaned gas to the gas atmosphere of high purity argon. The condensing of the contaminant-containing vapor occurs while suppressing contaminant particulate formation, and is promoted by providing a sufficient amount of surface area in the mass transfer unit to cause the vapor to condense and relieve supersaturation buildup such that contaminant particulates are not formed. Condensation of the contaminant is prevented on supply and return lines in which the contaminant containing gas is withdrawn and returned from and to the electrorefiner and mass transfer unit by heating and insulating the supply and return lines.

  10. Application of lactic acid bacteria in removing heavy metals and aflatoxin B1 from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Elsanhoty, Rafaat M; Al-Turki, I A; Ramadan, Mohamed Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    In this study selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Lactobacillus plantrium and Streptococcus thermophiles) and probiotic bacteria (Bifidobacterium angulatum) were tested for their ability in removing heavy metals (HM) including cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and arsenic (As) as well as aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) from contaminated water. The biosorption parameters (pH, bacterial concentration, contact time and temperature) of removal using individual as well as mixed LAB and probiotic bacteria were studied. Removal of HM and AFB1 depended on the strain, wherein the process was strongly pH-dependent with high removal ability at a pH close to neutral. The increase in bacterial concentration enhanced the removal of Cd, Pb and As. Also, increasing of contact time and temperature increased the ability of LAB to remove HM. The effect of contact time on Cd removal was slightly different when freshly cultured cells were used. The removal of Cd, Pb and As decreased with the increase in the initial metal concentration. The most effective HM removers were Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium angulatum. The system was found to be adequate for concentrations of HM under investigation. At the end of the operation, the concentration of HM reached the level allowed by the World Health Organization regulations. PMID:27508367

  11. Anaerobic Biochemical Reactor (BCR) Treatment Of Mining-Influenced Water (MIW) - Investigation Of Metal Removal Efficiency and Ecotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    BCR have been successful at removing a high percentage of metals from MIW, while BCR effluent toxicity has not been examined previously in the field. This study examined 4 active pilot BCR systems for removal of metals and toxicity. Removal efficiency for Al, As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb...

  12. Influent concentrations and removal performances of metals through municipal wastewater treatment processes.

    PubMed

    Choubert, J M; Pomiès, M; Ruel, S Martin; Coquery, M

    2011-01-01

    This extensive study aimed at quantifying the concentrations and removal efficiency of 23 metals and metalloids in domestic wastewater passing through full-scale plants. Nine facilities were equipped with secondary biological treatment and three facilities were equipped with a tertiary treatment stage. The metals investigated were Li, B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Fe, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, TI, Pb and U. Particulate and dissolved metals were measured using 24 h composite samples at each treatment stage. In influents, total concentrations of Cd, Sb, Co, Se, U, Ag, V were below a few microg/L, whereas at the other extremity Zn, B, Fe, Ti, Al were in the range of 0.1 to > 1 mg/L. It was demonstrated that secondary treatment stage (activated sludge, biodisc and membrane bioreactor) were efficient to remove most metals (removal rate > 70%), with the exception of B, Li, Rb, Mo, Co, As, Sb and V due to their low adsorption capacities. With the tested tertiary stages (polishing pond, rapid chemical settler, ozonation), a removal efficiency was obtained for Ti, Cr, Cd, Cu, Zn, Sn, Pb, Fe, Ag and Al, whereas a little removal (< 30%) was obtained for other metals. PMID:21902037

  13. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    PubMed

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production. PMID:25315359

  14. Effects of different cleaning treatments on heavy metal removal of Panax notoginseng (Burk) F. H. Chen.

    PubMed

    Dahui, Liu; Na, Xu; Li, Wang; Xiuming, Cui; Lanping, Guo; Zhihui, Zhang; Jiajin, Wang; Ye, Yang

    2014-01-01

    The quality and safety of Panax notoginseng products has become a focus of concern in recent years. Contamination with heavy metals is one of the important factors as to P. notoginseng safety. Cleaning treatments can remove dust, soil, impurities or even heavy metals and pesticide residues on agricultural products. But effects of cleaning treatments on the heavy metal content of P. notoginseng roots have still not been studied. In order to elucidate this issue, the effects of five different cleaning treatments (CK, no treatment; T1, warm water (50°C) washing; T2, tap water (10°C) washing; T3, drying followed by polishing; and T4, drying followed by tap water (10°C) washing) on P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, As and Hg) contents were studied. The results showed that heavy metal (all five) content in the three parts all followed the order of hair root > rhizome > root tuber under the same treatment. Heavy metal removals were in the order of Hg > As > Pb > Cu > Cd. Removal efficiencies of the four treatments were in the order of T2 > T1 > T3 > T4. Treatments (T1-T4) could decrease the contents of heavy metal in P. notoginseng root significantly. Compared with the requirements of WM/T2-2004, P. notoginseng roots' heavy metal contents of Cu, Pb, As and Hg were safe under treatments T1 and T2. In conclusion, the cleaning process after production was necessary and could reduce the content of heavy metals significantly. Fresh P. notoginseng root washed with warm water (T2) was the most efficient treatment to remove heavy metal and should be applied in production.

  15. Filter materials for metal removal from mine drainage--a review.

    PubMed

    Westholm, Lena Johansson; Repo, Eveliina; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-01-01

    A large number of filter materials, organic and inorganic, for removal of heavy metals in mine drainage have been reviewed. Bark, chitin, chitosan, commercial ion exchangers, dairy manure compost, lignite, peat, rice husks, vegetal compost, and yeast are examples of organic materials, while bio-carbons, calcareous shale, dolomite, fly ash, limestone, olivine, steel slag materials and zeolites are examples of inorganic materials. The majority of these filter materials have been investigated in laboratory studies, based on various experimental set-ups (batch and/or column tests) and different conditions. A few materials, for instance steel slag materials, have also been subjects to field investigations under real-life conditions. The results from these investigations show that steel slag materials have the potential to remove heavy metals under different conditions. Ion exchange has been suggested as the major metal removal mechanisms not only for steel slag but also for lignite. Other suggested removal mechanisms have also been identified. Adsorption has been suggested important for activated carbon, precipitation for chitosan and sulphate reduction for olivine. General findings indicate that the results with regard to metal removal vary due to experimental set ups, composition of mine drainage and properties of filter materials and the discrepancies between studies renders normalisation of data difficult. However, the literature reveals that Fe, Zn, Pb, Hg and Al are removed to a large extent. Further investigations, especially under real-life conditions, are however necessary in order to find suitable filter materials for treatment of mine drainage. PMID:24781327

  16. Heavy metal removal by combining anaerobic upflow packed bed reactors with water hyacinth ponds.

    PubMed

    Sekomo, Christian Birame; Kagisha, Vedaste; Rousseau, Diederik; Lens, Piet

    2012-06-01

    The removal of four selected heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) has been assessed in an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor filled with porous volcanic rock as an adsorbent and an attachment surface for bacterial growth. Two different feeding regimes were applied using low (5 mg L(-1) of heavy metal each) and high (10 mg L(-1) of heavy metal each) strength wastewater. After a start-up and acclimatization period of 44 days, each regime was operated for a period of 10 days with a hydraulic retention time of one day. Good removal efficiencies of at least 86% were achieved for both the low and high strength wastewater. A subsequent water hyacinth pond with a hydraulic retention time of one day removed an additional 61% Cd, 59% Cu, 49% Pb and 42% Zn, showing its importance as a polishing step. The water hyacinth plant in the post-treatment step accumulated heavy metals mainly in the root system. Overall metal removal efficiencies at the outlet of the integrated system were 98% for Cd, 99% for Cu, 98% for Pb and 84% for Zn. Therefore, the integrated system can be used as an alternative treatment system for metal-polluted wastewater, especially in developing countries. PMID:22856321

  17. Heavy metal removal by combining anaerobic upflow packed bed reactors with water hyacinth ponds.

    PubMed

    Sekomo, Christian Birame; Kagisha, Vedaste; Rousseau, Diederik; Lens, Piet

    2012-06-01

    The removal of four selected heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) has been assessed in an upflow anaerobic packed bed reactor filled with porous volcanic rock as an adsorbent and an attachment surface for bacterial growth. Two different feeding regimes were applied using low (5 mg L(-1) of heavy metal each) and high (10 mg L(-1) of heavy metal each) strength wastewater. After a start-up and acclimatization period of 44 days, each regime was operated for a period of 10 days with a hydraulic retention time of one day. Good removal efficiencies of at least 86% were achieved for both the low and high strength wastewater. A subsequent water hyacinth pond with a hydraulic retention time of one day removed an additional 61% Cd, 59% Cu, 49% Pb and 42% Zn, showing its importance as a polishing step. The water hyacinth plant in the post-treatment step accumulated heavy metals mainly in the root system. Overall metal removal efficiencies at the outlet of the integrated system were 98% for Cd, 99% for Cu, 98% for Pb and 84% for Zn. Therefore, the integrated system can be used as an alternative treatment system for metal-polluted wastewater, especially in developing countries.

  18. Heavy metal removal by GLDA washing: Optimization, redistribution, recycling, and changes in soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiyin; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Zhong, Qinmei; Zhang, Chuer; Jia, Yongxia; Li, Ting; Deng, Ouping; Li, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Soil washing, an emerging method for treating soils contaminated by heavy metals, requires an evaluation of its efficiency in simultaneously removing different metals, the quality of the soil following remediation, and the reusability of the recycled washing agent. In this study, we employed N,N-bis (carboxymethyl)-l-glutamic acid (GLDA), a novel and readily biodegradable chelator to remove Cd, Pb, and Zn from polluted soils. We investigated the influence of washing conditions, including GLDA concentration, pH, and contact time on their removal efficiencies. The single factor experiments showed that Cd, Pb, and Zn removal efficiencies reached 70.62, 74.45, and 34.43% in mine soil at a GLDA concentration of 75mM, a pH of 4.0, and a contact time of 60min, and in polluted farmland soil, removal efficiencies were 69.12, 78.30, and 39.50%, respectively. We then employed response surface methodology to optimize the washing parameters. The optimization process showed that the removal efficiencies were 69.50, 88.09, and 40.45% in mine soil and 71.34, 81.02, and 50.95% in polluted farmland soil for Cd, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the overall highly effective removal of Cd and Pb was connected mainly to their highly effective removal from the water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fractions. GLDA-washing eliminated the same amount of metals as EDTA-washing, while simultaneously retaining most of the soil nutrients. Removal efficiencies of recycled GLDA were no >5% lower than those of the fresh GLDA. Therefore, GLDA could potentially be used for the rehabilitation of soil contaminated by heavy metals.

  19. Heavy metal removal by GLDA washing: Optimization, redistribution, recycling, and changes in soil fertility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guiyin; Zhang, Shirong; Xu, Xiaoxun; Zhong, Qinmei; Zhang, Chuer; Jia, Yongxia; Li, Ting; Deng, Ouping; Li, Yun

    2016-11-01

    Soil washing, an emerging method for treating soils contaminated by heavy metals, requires an evaluation of its efficiency in simultaneously removing different metals, the quality of the soil following remediation, and the reusability of the recycled washing agent. In this study, we employed N,N-bis (carboxymethyl)-l-glutamic acid (GLDA), a novel and readily biodegradable chelator to remove Cd, Pb, and Zn from polluted soils. We investigated the influence of washing conditions, including GLDA concentration, pH, and contact time on their removal efficiencies. The single factor experiments showed that Cd, Pb, and Zn removal efficiencies reached 70.62, 74.45, and 34.43% in mine soil at a GLDA concentration of 75mM, a pH of 4.0, and a contact time of 60min, and in polluted farmland soil, removal efficiencies were 69.12, 78.30, and 39.50%, respectively. We then employed response surface methodology to optimize the washing parameters. The optimization process showed that the removal efficiencies were 69.50, 88.09, and 40.45% in mine soil and 71.34, 81.02, and 50.95% in polluted farmland soil for Cd, Pb, and Zn, respectively. Moreover, the overall highly effective removal of Cd and Pb was connected mainly to their highly effective removal from the water-soluble, exchangeable, and carbonate fractions. GLDA-washing eliminated the same amount of metals as EDTA-washing, while simultaneously retaining most of the soil nutrients. Removal efficiencies of recycled GLDA were no >5% lower than those of the fresh GLDA. Therefore, GLDA could potentially be used for the rehabilitation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. PMID:27371771

  20. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management.

  1. Comparison of filter media materials for heavy metal removal from urban stormwater runoff using biofiltration systems.

    PubMed

    Lim, H S; Lim, W; Hu, J Y; Ziegler, A; Ong, S L

    2015-01-01

    The filter media in biofiltration systems play an important role in removing potentially harmful pollutants from urban stormwater runoff. This study compares the heavy metal removal potential (Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) of five materials (potting soil, compost, coconut coir, sludge and a commercial mix) using laboratory columns. Total/dissolved organic carbon (TOC/DOC) was also analysed because some of the test materials had high carbon content which affects heavy metal uptake/release. Potting soil and the commercial mix offered the best metal uptake when dosed with low (Cu: 44.78 μg/L, Zn: 436.4 μg/L, Cd, 1.82 μg/L, Pb: 51.32 μg/L) and high concentrations of heavy metals (Cu: 241 μg/L, Zn: 1127 μg/L, Cd: 4.57 μg/L, Pb: 90.25 μg/L). Compost and sludge also had high removal efficiencies (>90%). Heavy metal leaching from these materials was negligible. A one-month dry period between dosing experiments did not affect metal removal efficiencies. TOC concentrations from all materials increased after the dry period. Heavy metal removal was not affected by filter media depth (600 mm vs. 300 mm). Heavy metals tended to accumulate at the upper 5 cm of the filter media although potting soil showed bottom-enriched concentrations. We recommend using potting soil as the principal media mixed with compost or sludge since these materials perform well and are readily available. The use of renewable materials commonly found in Singapore supports a sustainable approach to urban water management. PMID:25261749

  2. Final report for the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the R&D activities within the U.S. Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) from March 2005 to June 2010. The purpose of the MHCoE has been to conduct highly collaborative and multi-disciplinary applied R&D to develop new reversible hydrogen storage materials that meet or exceed DOE 2010 and 2015 system goals for hydrogen storage materials. The MHCoE combines three broad areas: mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials), materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized) and system design and engineering (which allow these new materials to be realized as practical automotive hydrogen storage systems). This Final Report summarizes the organization and execution of the 5-year research program to develop practical hydrogen storage materials for light duty vehicles. Major results from the MHCoE are summarized, along with suggestions for future research areas.

  3. Magnetically controlled deposition of metals using gas plasma. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-02

    This is the first phase of a project that has the objective to develop a method of spraying materials on a substrate in a controlled manner to eliminate the waste and hazardous material generation inherent in present plating processes. The project is considering plasma spraying of metal on a substrate using magneto-hydrodynamics to control the plasma/metal stream. The process being developed is considering the use of commercially available plasma torches to generate the plasma/metal stream. The plasma stream is collimated, and directed using magnetic forces to the extent required for precise control of the deposition material. The project will be completed in phases. Phase one of the project, the subject of this grant, is the development of an analytical model that can be used to determine the feasibility of the process and to design a laboratory scale demonstration unit. The contracted time is complete, and the research is still continuing. This report provides the results obtained to date. As the model and calculations are completed those results will also be provided. This report contains the results of the computer code that have been completed to date. Results from a ASMEE Benchmark problem, flow over a backward step with heat transfer, Couette flow with magnetic forces, free jet flow are presented along with several other check calculations that are representative of the cases that were calculated in the course of the development process. The final cases that define a velocity field in the exit of a plasma spray torch with and without a magnetic field are in process. A separate program (SPRAY) has been developed that can track the plating material to the substrate and describe the distribution of the material on the substrate. When the jet calculations are complete SPRAY will be used to compare the distribution of material on the substrate with and without the effect of the magnetic focus.

  4. Removing Endotoxin from Metallic Biomaterials with Compressed Carbon Dioxide-Based Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Tarafa, Pedro J.; Williams, Eve; Panvelker, Samir; Zhang, Jian; Matthews, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial endotoxins have strong affinity for metallic biomaterials because of surface energy effects. Conventional depyrogenation methods may not eradicate endotoxins and may compromise biological properties and functionality of metallic instruments and implants. We evaluated the solubilization and removal of E. coli endotoxin from smooth and porous titanium (Ti) surfaces and stainless steel lumens using compressed CO2-based mixtures having water and/or surfactant Ls-54. The CO2/water/Ls-54 ternary mixture in the liquid CO2 region (25 °C and 27.6 MPa) with strong mixing removed endotoxin below detection levels. This suggests that the ternary mixture penetrates and dissolves endotoxins from all the tested substrates. The successful removal of endotoxins from metallic biomaterials with compressed CO2 is a promising cleaning technology for biomaterials and reusable medical devices. PMID:21499532

  5. Removal performance of heavy metals in MBR systems and their influence in water reuse.

    PubMed

    Arévalo, Juan; Ruiz, Luz Marina; Pérez, Jorge; Moreno, Begoña; Gómez, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    The removal performance of heavy metals by two experimental full-scale membrane bioreactors (microfiltration and ultrafiltration) and the influence of activated sludge total suspended solid (TSS) concentration were studied under real operational conditions. Influent and effluent Be, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Ba, Sn, Sb, Pb and U concentrations were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. An average contamination rate for most of the analysed heavy metals was observed in raw wastewater, resulting in effluents without limitation for reuse in agricultural destinations according to Spanish law. Removal efficiencies up to 80% were obtained regardless of whether microfiltration or ultrafiltration membranes were used, except for As, Mo and Sb. The removal yields of different heavy metals can be strengthened by increasing the activated sludge TSS concentration, mainly at concentrations above 10 g/L.

  6. Comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical precipitation for metals removal from acidic soil leachate.

    PubMed

    Meunier, Nathalie; Drogui, Patrick; Montané, Camille; Hausler, Robert; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical precipitation based on heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) removal from acidic soil leachate (ASL) at the laboratory pilot scale. Chemical precipitation was evaluated using either calcium hydroxide or sodium hydroxide, whereas electrocoagulation was evaluated via an electrolytic cell using mild steel electrodes. Chemical precipitation was as effective as electrocoagulation in removing metals from ASL having low contamination levels (30 mg Pbl(-1) and 18 mg Znl(-1)). For ASL enriched with different metals (each concentration of metals was initially adjusted to 100 mg l(-1)), the residual Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations at the end of the experiments were below the acceptable level recommended for discharge in sewage urban works (more than 99.8% of metal was removed) using either electrocoagulation or chemical precipitation. Cd was more effectively removed by electrochemical treatment, whereas Ni was easily removed by chemical treatment. The cost for energy, chemicals and disposal of metallic residue of electrocoagulation process ranged from USD 8.83 to 13.95 tds(-1), which was up to five times lower than that recorded using chemical precipitation. Highly effective electrocoagulation was observed as the ASL was specifically enriched with high concentration of Pb (250-2000 mg Pbl(-1)). More than 99.5% of Pb was removed regardless of the initial Pb concentration imposed in ASL and, in all cases, the residual Pb concentrations (0.0-1.44 mg l(-1)) were below the limiting value (2.0 mg l(-1)) for effluent discharge in sewage works.

  7. Microbial removal of toxic metals from a heavily polluted soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolova, Marina; Spasova, Irena; Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan

    2015-04-01

    Samples of a leached cinnamonic forest soil heavily polluted with uranium and some toxic heavy metals (mainly copper, zinc and cadmium) were subjected to cleaning by means of bioleaching with acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacteria. The treatment was carried out in a green house in which several plots containing 150 kg of soil each were constructed. The effect of some essential environmental factors such as pH, humidity, temperature and contents of nutrients on the cleaning process was studied. It was found that under optimal conditions the content of pollutants were decreased below the relevant permissible levels within a period of 170 days. The soil cleaned in this way was characterized by a much higher production of biomass of different plants (alfalfa, clover, red fescue, vetch) than the untreated polluted soil.

  8. WasteWater Treatment And Heavy Metals Removal In The A-01 Constructed Wetland 2003 Report

    SciTech Connect

    ANNA, KNOX

    2004-08-01

    The A-01 wetland treatment system (WTS) was designed to remove metals from the effluent at the A-01 NPDES outfall. The purpose of research conducted during 2003 was to evaluate (1) the ability of the A-01 wetland treatment system to remediate waste water, (2) retention of the removed contaminants in wetland sediment, and (3) the potential remobilization of these contaminants from the sediment into the water column. Surface water and sediment samples were collected and analyzed in this study.

  9. Removal Of Phenol From Wastewater By Using Low-Cost Catalyst From Metal Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbičková, Blanka; Soldán, Maroš; Belčík, Michal; Balog, Karol

    2014-12-01

    Utilization of AOPs (Advanced oxidation processes) as an emerging technology for removing of pollutants from wastewater is developed. In this paper, UV photodegradation was used for removing of phenol from wastewater. As a source of UV radiation medium pressure mercury lamp with output 400W was used. The influence of low-cost catalysts on this process was also monitored. Wastes from metal production, red mud and black nickel mud, were used as catalysts.

  10. Method for removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; Laidler, J.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report details the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) which involves electrorefining spent fuel in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI-U/PuCl{sub 3}) at 500{degree}C. The total heavy metal chloride concentration in the salt will be about 2 mol %. At some point, the concentrations of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products in the salt must be reduced to lower the amount of heat generated in the electrorefiner. The heavy metal concentration in the salt must be reduced before removing the fission products from the salt. The operation uses a lithium-cadmium alloy anode that is solid at 500{degree}C, a solid mandrel cathode with a ceramic catch crucible below to collect heavy metal that falls off it, and a liquid cadmium cathode. The design criteria that had to be met by this equipment included the following: (1) control of the reduction rate by lithium, (2) good separation between heavy metal and rare earths, and (3) the capability to collect heavy metal and rare earths over a wide range of salt compositions. In tests conducted in an engineering-scale electrorefiner (10 kg uranium per cathode), good separation was achieved while removing uranium and rare earths from the salt. Only 13% of the rare earths was removed, while 99.9% of the uranium in the salt was removed; subsequently, the rare earths were also reduced to low concentrations. The uranium concentration in the salt was reduced to 0.05 ppm after uranium and rare earths were transferred from the salt to a solid mandrel cathode with a catch crucible. Rare earth concentrations in the salt were reduced to less than 0.01 wt % in these operations. Similar tests are planned to remove plutonium from the salt in a laboratory-scale (100--300 g heavy metal) electrorefiner.

  11. Rhizofiltration - the use of plants to remove heavy metals from aqueous streams

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, I.; Dushenkov, V.; Kumar, P.B.A.N.; Motto, H.

    1995-12-31

    Heavy metal pollution of water is a major environmental problem facing the modern world. Rhizofiltration - the use of plant roots to remove heavy metals from water is an emerging environmental clean-up technology. Roots of many hydroponically grown terrestrial plants e.g. Indian mustard, sunflower (Hefianthus annuus L.) and various grasses effectively removed toxic metals such as CU{sup -2}, Cd{sup +2}Cr{sup +6}, Ni{sup +2}Pb{sup +2} and Zn{sup +2} from aqueous solutions. Roots of B. juncea concentrated these metals 131 to 563-fold (on a DW basis) above initial solution concentrations. Pb removal was based on tissue absorption and on root-mediated Pb precipitation in the form of insoluble inorganic compounds, mainly Pb phosphate. At high Pb concentrations precipitation played a progressively more important role in Pb removal than tissue absorption, which saturated at approximately 100 {mu}g Pb/g DW root. Dried roots were much less effective than live roots in accumulating Pb and in removing Pb from the solution.

  12. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions from wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Shi, W.

    1998-04-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for the removal of metal ions such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and chromium ions in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of four heavy metals are 29.3 mg/g (Cu{sup 2+}), 30.73 mg/g (Zn{sup 2+}), 42.18 mg/g (Cd{sup 2+}), and 25.07 mg/g (Cr{sup 3+}), respectively. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks affected the adsorption of metal ions; the finer size of particles showed better adsorption to the ions. Temperature also plays an interesting role in the adsorption of different metal ions. Copper, zinc, and cadmium exhibited lower adsorption on sunflower stalks at higher temperature, while chromium showed the opposite phenomenon. The adsorption rates of copper, cadmium, and chromium are quite rapid. Within 60 min of operation about 60--80% of these ions were removed from the solutions.

  13. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).

  14. Equilibrium analysis for heavy metal cation removal using cement kiln dust.

    PubMed

    El Zayat, Mohamed; Elagroudy, Sherien; El Haggar, Salah

    2014-01-01

    Ion exchange, reverse osmosis, and chemical precipitation have been investigated extensively for heavy metal uptake. However, they are deemed too expensive to meet stringent effluent characteristics. In this study, cement kiln dust (CKD) was examined for the removal of target heavy metals. Adsorption studies in completely mixed batch reactors were used to generate equilibrium pH adsorption edges. Studies showed the ability of CKD to remove the target heavy metals in a pH range below that of precipitation after an equilibrium reaction time of 24 h. A surface titration experiment indicated negative surface charge of the CKD at pH below 10, meaning that electrostatic attraction of the divalent metals can occur below the pH required for precipitation. However, surface complexation was also important due to the substantive metal removal. Accordingly, a surface complexation model approach that utilizes an electrostatic term in the double-layer description was used to estimate equilibrium constants for the protolysis interactions of the CKD surface as well as equilibria between background ions and the sorbent surface. It was concluded that the removal strength of adsorption is in the order: Pb > Cu > Cd. The experiments were also supported by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:25259489

  15. Magnetic sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) for dissolved metal ion removal.

    PubMed

    Su, Yiming; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Keller, Arturo A; Huang, Yuxiong; Dai, Chaomeng; Zhou, Xuefei; Zhang, Yalei

    2015-05-01

    Sulfide-modified nanoscale zerovalent iron (S-nZVI) is attracting a lot of attention due to its ease of production and high reactivity with organic pollutants. However, its structure is still poorly understood and its potential application in heavy metal remediation has not been explored. Herein, the structure of S-nZVI and its cadmium (Cd) removal performance under different aqueous conditions were carefully investigated. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis suggested that sulfur was incorporated into the zerovalent iron core. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with EDS analysis demonstrated that sulfur was also homogeneously distributed within the nanoparticles. When the concentration of Na2S2O4 was increased during synthesis, a flake-like structure (FeSx) increased significantly. S-nZVI had an optimal Cd removal capacity of 85 mg/g, which was >100% higher than for pristine nZVI. Even at pH 5, over 95% removal efficiency was observed, indicating sulfide compounds played a crucial role in metal ion removal and particle chemical stability. Oxygen impaired the structure of S-nZVI but enhanced Cd removal capacity to about 120 mg/g. Particle aging had no negative effect on removal capacity of S-nZVI, and Cd-containing mixtures remained stable in a two months experiment. S-nZVI can efficiently sequester dissolved metal ions from different contaminated water matrices. PMID:25706223

  16. Removal of heavy metals from wastewater with Bigadic (Tuerkiye) clinoptilolite

    SciTech Connect

    Kurama, Haldun; Kaya, Muammer

    1995-07-01

    In this study, Bigadic upper zone zeolitic tuff, which contains about 87% clinoptilolite was used as an ion exchanger for removal of Pb{sup ++}, Cu{sup ++}, Cd{sup ++} and Hg{sup ++}ions from wastewater. Bench scale experiments with two different glass columns, were carried out continuously under the closed/open circuit conditions. Before ion exchange tests, zeolite samples were treated with NaCl (6ml/min. and 42BV). The effects of particle size, bed volume, pH and flow rate on the ion exchange capacity were determined. Under the best operation conditions, the effect of initial influent solution concentration on ion exchange selectivity was tested. As a result, it was found that the Bigadic clinoptilolite had the following ion exchange capacities; Pb{sup ++}, 0.7540 meg/g; Cu{sup ++}, 0.6986 meg/g; Cd{sup ++}, 0.6580 meg/g; Hg{sup ++}, 0.5530 meg/g.

  17. Facilitation Drives the Positive Effects of Plant Richness on Trace Metal Removal in a Biodiversity Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiang; Ge, Yuan; Chen, Tong; Bai, Yi; Qian, Bao Ying; Zhang, Chong Bang

    2014-01-01

    Background Phytoextraction is an environmentally acceptable and inexpensive technique for mine tailing rehabilitation that uses metallophyte plants. These plants reduce the soil trace metal contents to environmentally acceptable levels by accumulating trace metals. Recently, whether more trace metals can be removed by species-rich communities of these plants received great attention, as species richness has been reported having positive effects on ecosystem functions. However, how the species richness affects trace metals removal of plant communities of mine tailing is rarely known. Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the effects of species richness on soil trace metal removal in both natural and experimental plant communities. The root lengths and stem heights of each plant species were measured in order to calculate the functional diversity indices. Our results showed that trace metal (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) concentrations in mine tailing soil declined as species richness increased in both the natural and experimental plant communities. Species richness, rather than functional diversity, positively affected the mineralomass of the experimental plant communities. The intensity of plant-plant facilitation increased with the species richness of experimental communities. Due to the incremental role of plant-plant facilitation, most of the species had higher biomasses, higher trace metal concentrations in their plant tissues and lower malondialdehyde concentrations in their leaves. Consequently, the positive effects of species richness on mineralomass were mostly attributable to facilitation among plants. Conclusions/Significance Our results provide clear evidence that, due to plant-plant facilitation, species richness positively affects the removal of trace metals from mine tailing soil through phytoextraction and provides further information on diversity conservation and environmental remediation in a mine tailing environment. PMID:24695538

  18. Removal of heavy metals from effluent. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the removal of lead, cadmium, mercury, and other heavy metals from waste waters. Precipitation, reverse osmosis, complexation, ultrafiltration, and adsorption are among the techniques described. The citations examine the efficiency, operational difficulties, cost effectiveness, and optimization of these methods. Prevention and remediation of metal pollution from electroplating, mining, smelting, and other industries are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Formation, Removal, and Reformation of Surface Coatings on Various Metal Oxide Surfaces Inspired by Mussel Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Kang, Taegon; Oh, Dongyeop X; Heo, Jinhwa; Lee, Han-Koo; Choy, Seunghwan; Hawker, Craig J; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-11-11

    Mussels survive by strongly attaching to a variety of different surfaces, primarily subsurface rocks composed of metal oxides, through the formation of coordinative interactions driven by protein-based catechol repeating units contained within their adhesive secretions. From a chemistry perspective, catechols are known to form strong and reversible complexes with metal ions or metal oxides, with the binding affinity being dependent on the nature of the metal ion. As a result, catechol binding with metal oxides is reversible and can be broken in the presence of a free metal ion with a higher stability constant. It is proposed to exploit this competitive exchange in the design of a new strategy for the formation, removal, and reformation of surface coatings and self-assembled monolayers (SAM) based on catechols as the adhesive unit. In this study, catechol-functionalized tri(ethylene oxide) (TEO) was synthesized as a removable and recoverable self-assembled monolayer (SAM) for use on oxides surfaces. Attachment and detachment of these catechol derivatives on a variety of surfaces was shown to be reversible and controllable by exploiting the high stability constant of catechol to soluble metal ions, such as Fe(III). This tunable assembly based on catechol binding to metal oxides represents a new concept for reformable coatings with applications in fields ranging from friction/wettability control to biomolecular sensing and antifouling.

  20. A combination of bioleaching and bioprecipitation for deep removal of contaminating metals from dredged sediment.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Zhang, Ruichang; Zhou, Lixiang; Li, Jie

    2011-08-15

    A linked microbial process comprising bioleaching with sulfate-oxidizing bacteria and bioprecipitation with sulfate-reducing bacteria operating sequentially was investigated to deeply remove contaminating metals from dredged sediment. The results showed that sediment bioleaching resulted in a sharp decrease in sediment pH from an initial pH ∼ 7.6 to pH ∼ 2.5 within 10-20 days, approximately 65% of the main heavy metals present (Zn+Cu+Cr) were solubilized, and most of the unsolubilized metals existed in residual form of sediment. The acidic leachate that resulted from sediment bioleaching was efficiently stripped of metal sulfates using a bioprecipitation reactor when challenged with influent as low as pH ∼ 3.7. More than 99% of Zn(2+), 99% of Cu(2+) and 90% of Cr(3+) were removed from the leachate, respectively, due to the formation of ZnS, Cu(2)S and CrOOH precipitates, as confirmed by SEM-EDS and XRD detection. It was also found that alkalization of bioleached sediment using Ca(OH)(2) excluded the risk of sediment re-acidification. The ability of the combined process developed in this study to deeply remove heavy metals in insoluble sulfides or hydroxides forms makes it particularly attractive for the treatment of different types of metal contaminants.

  1. Heavy metal ions affecting the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons by fungi with heavy-metal resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiao-Kui; Ling Wu, Ling; Fam, Hala

    2014-12-01

    The co-occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals (HMs) is very common in contaminated environments. It is of paramount importance and great challenge to exploit a bioremediation to remove PAHs in these environments with combined pollution. We approached this question by probing the influence of HMs coexisting with PAHs on the removal of PAHs by Acremonium sp. P0997 possessing metal resistance. A removal capability for naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, and fluoranthenepresentalone (98.6, 99.3, 89.9, 60.4, and 70 %, respectively) and in a mixture (96.9, 71.8, 67.0, 85.0, and 87.9 %, respectively) was achieved in mineral culture inoculated with Acremonium sp. P0997, and this strain also displayed high resistance to the individual HMs (Mn(2+), Fe(2+), Zn(2+), Cu(2+), Al(3+), and Pb(2+)). The removal of individual PAHs existing in a mixture was differently affected by the separately tested HMs. Cu(2+)enhanced the partition process of anthracene to dead or alive mycelia and the contribution of the biosorption by this strain but imposed a little negative influence on the contribution of biodegradation to the total removal of anthracene individually in a culture. However, Mn(2+) had an inhibitory effect on the partition process of anthracene to dead or alive mycelia and decreased the contributions of both biosorption and biodegradation to the total anthracene removal. This work showcased the value of fungi in bioremediation for the environments with combined pollution, and the findings have major implications for the bioremediation of organic pollutants in metal-organic mixed contaminated sites.

  2. Self-assembled monolayers on mosoporous supports (SAMMS) for RCRA metal removal

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiangdong; Liu, Jun; Fryxell, G.

    1997-10-01

    The Mixed Waste Focus Area has declared mercury removal and stabilization as the first and fourth priorities among 30 prioritized deficiencies. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal and mercury removal has also been identified as a high priority at DOE sites such as Albuquerque, Idaho Falls, Oak Ridge, Hanford, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River. Under this task, a proprietary new technology, Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports (SAMMS), for RCRA metal ion removal from aqueous wastewater and mercury removal from organic wastes such as vacuum pump oils is being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The six key features of the SAMMS technology are (1) large surface area (>900 m{sup 2}/g) of the mesoporous oxides (SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}) ensures high capacity for metal loading (more than 1 g Hg/g SAMMS); (2) molecular recognition of the interfacial functional groups ensures the high affinity and selectivity for heavy metals without interference from other abundant cations (such as calcium and iron) in wastewater; (3) suitability for removal of mercury from both aqueous wastes and organic wastes; (4) the Hg-laden SAMMS not only pass TCLP tests, but also have good long-term durability as a waste form because the covalent binding between mercury and SAMMS has good resistance to ion exchange, oxidation, and hydrolysis; (5) the uniform and small pore size (2 to 40 nm) of the mesoporous silica prevents bacteria (>2000 nm) from solubilizing the bound mercury; and (6) SAMMS can also be used for RCRA metal removal from gaseous mercury waste, sludge, sediment, and soil.

  3. [Three cases of removal of intrabronchial metal nails].

    PubMed

    Nohara, Jun; Lee, Synnum; Noguchi, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Yasuto; Kono, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuji

    2009-12-01

    We describe the successful extraction from an airway of foreign bodies metal nails in three cases. They were all carpenters, and often held nails between their lips. Case 1: a 72-year-old man had aspirated a nail three months earlier, but did not seek medical assistance at the time. A chest X-ray film and CT examination revealed a nail in the peripheral S7 region of the right lower lobe. The nail could not be extracted with forceps via bronchoscopy, so video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed. During surgery, the nail moved to the truncus intermedius, then it was extracted using bronchoscopy forceps. The extracted nail was rust-proof, and no rust was observed. Case 2 : a 76-year-old man visited our hospital with a history bloody sputum with a slightly dry cough for two months. A chest X-ray film showed a nail in the right hilum. Bronchoscopy revealed the nail covered with mucinous secretion in the right B7, and it was extracted by forceps. It was a rust-proof type nail, and no granulation tissue was observed in the bronchus. Case 3: a 74-year-old man visited our hospital because of dry cough for two months. A chest X-ray revealed a nail in the right hilus and bronchoscopy showed the nail was buried in reactive granulation tissue in the right middle lobe bronchus and could not be observed from the surface. Tranilast (n-[3,4-dimethoxycinnamoyl] anthranilic acid) at 300 mg/day and Methylprednisolone at 250 mg/day were prescribed for 4 days, followed by a reduction of the corticosteroid to 40 mg/day for 3 days. Seven days later, the granulation tissue and mucosal edema had diminished, and the nail was successfully extracted. The extracted nail was not rust-proof and had swollen with rust. These nails were found a few months after aspiration. The reason why these were not defected was possibly that the long and narrow shape did not obstruct the segmental bronchus and the symptoms can be less severe compared with other foreign bodies. The rust-proof nails were

  4. [Three cases of removal of intrabronchial metal nails].

    PubMed

    Nohara, Jun; Lee, Synnum; Noguchi, Tetsuo; Sakaguchi, Yasuto; Kono, Tomoya; Terada, Yasuji

    2009-12-01

    We describe the successful extraction from an airway of foreign bodies metal nails in three cases. They were all carpenters, and often held nails between their lips. Case 1: a 72-year-old man had aspirated a nail three months earlier, but did not seek medical assistance at the time. A chest X-ray film and CT examination revealed a nail in the peripheral S7 region of the right lower lobe. The nail could not be extracted with forceps via bronchoscopy, so video-assisted thoracic surgery was performed. During surgery, the nail moved to the truncus intermedius, then it was extracted using bronchoscopy forceps. The extracted nail was rust-proof, and no rust was observed. Case 2 : a 76-year-old man visited our hospital with a history bloody sputum with a slightly dry cough for two months. A chest X-ray film showed a nail in the right hilum. Bronchoscopy revealed the nail covered with mucinous secretion in the right B7, and it was extracted by forceps. It was a rust-proof type nail, and no granulation tissue was observed in the bronchus. Case 3: a 74-year-old man visited our hospital because of dry cough for two months. A chest X-ray revealed a nail in the right hilus and bronchoscopy showed the nail was buried in reactive granulation tissue in the right middle lobe bronchus and could not be observed from the surface. Tranilast (n-[3,4-dimethoxycinnamoyl] anthranilic acid) at 300 mg/day and Methylprednisolone at 250 mg/day were prescribed for 4 days, followed by a reduction of the corticosteroid to 40 mg/day for 3 days. Seven days later, the granulation tissue and mucosal edema had diminished, and the nail was successfully extracted. The extracted nail was not rust-proof and had swollen with rust. These nails were found a few months after aspiration. The reason why these were not defected was possibly that the long and narrow shape did not obstruct the segmental bronchus and the symptoms can be less severe compared with other foreign bodies. The rust-proof nails were

  5. Toxicity, accumulation, and removal of heavy metals by three aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Sorbo, S; Conte, B; Cobianchi, R Castaldo; Trinchella, F; Capasso, C; Carginale, V

    2012-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the uptake, tolerance, and transport of heavy metals by plants will be essential for the development of phytoremediation technologies. In the present paper, we investigated accumulation, tissue and intracellular localization, and toxic effects of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in three aquatic macrophytes (the angiosperms Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis, and the moss Leptodictyum riparium). We also tested and compared their capacity to absorb heavy metal from water under laboratory conditions. Our data showed that all the three species examined could be considered good bioaccumulators for the heavy metals tested. L. riparium was the most resistant species and the most effective in accumulating Cu, Zn, and Pb, whereas L. minor was the most effective in accumulating Cd. Cd was the most toxic metal, followed by Pb, Cu, and Zn. At the ultrastructural level, sublethal concentrations of the heavy metals tested caused induced cell plasmolysis and alterations of the chloroplast arrangement. Heavy metal removal experiments revealed that the three macrophytes showed excellent performance in removing the selected metals from the solutions in which they are maintained, thus suggesting that they could be considered good candidates for wastewaters remediation purpose.

  6. Toxicity, accumulation, and removal of heavy metals by three aquatic macrophytes.

    PubMed

    Basile, A; Sorbo, S; Conte, B; Cobianchi, R Castaldo; Trinchella, F; Capasso, C; Carginale, V

    2012-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the uptake, tolerance, and transport of heavy metals by plants will be essential for the development of phytoremediation technologies. In the present paper, we investigated accumulation, tissue and intracellular localization, and toxic effects of cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu) in three aquatic macrophytes (the angiosperms Lemna minor and Elodea canadensis, and the moss Leptodictyum riparium). We also tested and compared their capacity to absorb heavy metal from water under laboratory conditions. Our data showed that all the three species examined could be considered good bioaccumulators for the heavy metals tested. L. riparium was the most resistant species and the most effective in accumulating Cu, Zn, and Pb, whereas L. minor was the most effective in accumulating Cd. Cd was the most toxic metal, followed by Pb, Cu, and Zn. At the ultrastructural level, sublethal concentrations of the heavy metals tested caused induced cell plasmolysis and alterations of the chloroplast arrangement. Heavy metal removal experiments revealed that the three macrophytes showed excellent performance in removing the selected metals from the solutions in which they are maintained, thus suggesting that they could be considered good candidates for wastewaters remediation purpose. PMID:22567718

  7. Efficiency of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anil Kumar; Cameotra, Swaranjit Singh

    2013-10-01

    This study describes the potential application of lipopeptide biosurfactants in removal of petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals from the soil samples collected from industrial dumping site. High concentrations of heavy metals (like iron, lead, nickel, cadmium, copper, cobalt and zinc) and petroleum hydrocarbons were present in the contaminated soil samples. Lipopeptide biosurfactant, consisting of surfactin and fengycin was obtained from Bacillus subtilis A21. Soil washing with biosurfactant solution removed significant amount of petroleum hydrocarbon (64.5 %) and metals namely cadmium (44.2 %), cobalt (35.4 %), lead (40.3 %), nickel (32.2 %), copper (26.2 %) and zinc (32.07 %). Parameters like surfactant concentration, temperature, agitation condition and pH of the washing solution influenced the pollutant removing ability of biosurfactant mixture. Biosurfactant exhibited substantial hydrocarbon solubility above its critical micelle concentration. During washing, 50 % of biosurfactant was sorbed to the soil particles decreasing effective concentration during washing process. Biosurfactant washed soil exhibited 100 % mustard seed germination contradictory to water washed soil where no germination was observed. The results indicate that the soil washing with mixture of lipopeptide biosurfactants at concentrations above its critical micelle concentration can be an efficient and environment friendly approach for removing pollutants (petroleum hydrocarbon and heavy metals) from contaminated soil.

  8. Effects of impurities on the removal of heavy metals by natural limestones in aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Sdiri, Ali; Higashi, Teruo; Jamoussi, Fakher; Bouaziz, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Effects of impurities on the removal of heavy metals by natural limestones in aqueous solutions were studied by evaluating various factors including limestone concentration, pH, contact time and temperature. Solutions of Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II), prepared from chloride reagents at a concentration of 10 mg/L, were studied in a batch method. Four natural limestone samples, collected from the Campanian-Maastrichtian limestone beds in Tunisia, were used as adsorbents. Sorption experiments indicated that high removal efficiencies could be achieved. Limestone samples containing impurities, such as silica, iron/aluminum oxides and different kinds of clay minerals, demonstrated enhanced sorption capacity, nearing 100% removal in some cases. Kinetic experiments showed that the sorption of metal ions occurred rapidly at a low coverage stage, and that solutions were nearly at equilibrium after 60 min. Data trends generally fit pseudo-second order kinetic, and intra-particle diffusion, models. The following conditions were found to promote optimum, or near-optimum, sorption of heavy metals: 1) contact time of more than 60 min, 2) pH = 5, 3) >3 g/L limestone concentration and 4) T = 35 °C. The results of this study suggest that the limestones from northern Tunisia, that contain higher amounts of silica and iron/aluminum oxides, are promising adsorbents for the effective removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewaters. PMID:22054591

  9. Stabilized chitosan/Fe(0)-nanoparticle beads to remove heavy metals from polluted sediments.

    PubMed

    Liu, T; Sun, Y; Wang, Z L

    2016-01-01

    Sediment contamination by heavy metals has become a widespread problem that can affect the normal behaviors of rivers and lakes. After chitosan/Fe(0)-nanoparticles (CS-NZVI) beads were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde (GLA), their mechanical strength, stability and separation efficiency from the sediment were obviously improved. Moreover, the average aperture size of GLA-CS-NZVI beads was 20.6 μm and NZVI particles were nearly spherical in shape with a mean diameter of 40.2 nm. In addition, the pH showed an insignificant effect on the removal rates from the sediment. Due to the dissolution of metals species into aqueous solutions as an introduction of the salt, the removal rates of all heavy metals from the sediment were increased with an increase of the salinity. The competitive adsorption of heavy metals between the sediment particles and GLA-CS-NZVI beads became stronger as the sediment particles became smaller, leading to decreased removal rates. Therefore, the removal efficiency could be enhanced by optimizing experimental conditions and choosing appropriate materials for the target contaminants.

  10. Regenerable metallic oxide systems for removal of carbon dioxide: A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. G.; Heimlich, P. F.; Tepper, E. H.

    1972-01-01

    Design concepts for portable canisters for removal of carbon dioxide are described. One is screen pack configuration consisting of brazed rectangular canister with four metal oxide packs inserted. Other is radial flow canister with perforated central tube. Methods of production and operating principles are presented.

  11. Electrochemical Removal of Metal Cations from Wastewater Monitored by Differential Pulse Polarography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Delphine; Kuhn, Alexander; Sojic, Neso

    2004-01-01

    Electrodeposition eliminates wastewater pollutants such as electrochemically active metal cations, with different pulse polarography (DPP) scrutinizing the kinetics of the treatment process. These mechanisms produce qualitative and quantitative data about the removal process, while students appreciate the use of electrochemistry in resolving…

  12. Comparative performance evaluation of multi-metal resistant fungal strains for simultaneous removal of multiple hazardous metals.

    PubMed

    Dey, Priyadarshini; Gola, Deepak; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Kumar, Peeyush; Singh, Dileep Kumar; Patel, Neelam; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-11-15

    In the present study, five fungal strains viz., Aspergillus terreus AML02, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus 4099, Beauveria bassiana 4580, Aspergillus terreus PD-17, Aspergillus fumigatus PD-18, were screened for simultaneous multimetal removal. Highest metal tolerance index for each individual metal viz., Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (500mg/L) was recorded for A. fumigatus for the metals (Cd, 0.72; Cu, 0.72; Pb, 1.02; Zn, 0.94) followed by B. bassiana for the metals (Cd, 0.56; Cu, 0.14; Ni, 0.29; Zn, 0.85). Next, the strains were exposed to multiple metal mixture (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) of various concentrations (6, 12, 18, 30mg/L). Compared to other strains, B. bassiana and A. fumigatus had higher cube root growth (k) constants indicating their better adaptability to multi metal stress. After 72h, multimetal accumulation potential of B. bassiana (26.94±0.07mg/L) and A. fumigatus (27.59±0.09mg/L) were higher than the other strains at initial multimetal concentration of 30mg/L. However, considering the post treatment concentrations of individual metals in multimetal mixture (at all the tested concentrations), A. fumigatus demonstrated exceptional performance and could bring down the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn below the threshold level for irrigation prescribed by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).

  13. Comparative performance evaluation of multi-metal resistant fungal strains for simultaneous removal of multiple hazardous metals.

    PubMed

    Dey, Priyadarshini; Gola, Deepak; Mishra, Abhishek; Malik, Anushree; Kumar, Peeyush; Singh, Dileep Kumar; Patel, Neelam; von Bergen, Martin; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-11-15

    In the present study, five fungal strains viz., Aspergillus terreus AML02, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus 4099, Beauveria bassiana 4580, Aspergillus terreus PD-17, Aspergillus fumigatus PD-18, were screened for simultaneous multimetal removal. Highest metal tolerance index for each individual metal viz., Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn (500mg/L) was recorded for A. fumigatus for the metals (Cd, 0.72; Cu, 0.72; Pb, 1.02; Zn, 0.94) followed by B. bassiana for the metals (Cd, 0.56; Cu, 0.14; Ni, 0.29; Zn, 0.85). Next, the strains were exposed to multiple metal mixture (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) of various concentrations (6, 12, 18, 30mg/L). Compared to other strains, B. bassiana and A. fumigatus had higher cube root growth (k) constants indicating their better adaptability to multi metal stress. After 72h, multimetal accumulation potential of B. bassiana (26.94±0.07mg/L) and A. fumigatus (27.59±0.09mg/L) were higher than the other strains at initial multimetal concentration of 30mg/L. However, considering the post treatment concentrations of individual metals in multimetal mixture (at all the tested concentrations), A. fumigatus demonstrated exceptional performance and could bring down the concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn below the threshold level for irrigation prescribed by Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). PMID:27497228

  14. Heavy metal removal from acid mine drainage by calcined eggshell and microalgae hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Mok

    2015-09-01

    This study investigates the use of calcined eggshells and microalgae for the removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage (AMD) and the simultaneous enhancement of biomass productivity. The experiment was conducted over a period of 6 days in a hybrid system containing calcined eggshells and the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. The results show that the biomass productivity increased to ~8.04 times its initial concentration of 0.367 g/L as measured by an optical panel photobioreactor (OPPBR) and had a light transmittance of 95 % at a depth of 305 mm. On the other hand, the simultaneous percent removal of Fe, Cu, Zn, Mn, As, and Cd from the AMD effluent was found to be 99.47 to 100 %. These results indicate that the hybrid system with calcined eggshells and microalgae was highly effective for heavy metal removal in the AMD.

  15. The effect of heavy metals on nitrogen and oxygen demand removal in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Lim, P E; Tay, M G; Mak, K Y; Mohamed, N

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the respective effects of Zn, Pb and Cd as well as the combined effect of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu on the removal of nitrogen and oxygen demand in constructed wetlands. Four laboratory-scale gravel-filled subsurface-flow constructed wetland units planted with cattails (Typha latifolia) were operated outdoors and fed with primary-treated domestic wastewater at a constant flow rate of 25 ml/min. After 6 months, three of the wetland units were fed with the same type of wastewater spiked with Zn(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively, at 20, 5 and 1 mg/l for a further 9 months. The remaining unit was fed with the same type of wastewater spiked with a combination of Zn(II), Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) at concentrations of 10, 2.5, 0.5 and 5 mg/l, respectively, over the same period. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and ammoniacal nitrogen (AN) concentrations were monitored at the inlet, outlet and three additional locations along the length of the wetland units to assess the performance of the wetland units at various metal loadings. At the end of the study, all cattail plants were harvested for the determination of total Kjeldahl nitrogen and metal concentrations. The results showed that the COD removal efficiency was practically independent of increasing metal loading or a combination of metal loadings during the duration of the study. In contrast, the AN removal efficiency deteriorated progressively with increasing metal loading. The relative effect of the heavy metals was found to increase in the order: Znmetals was not observed. The metals seem to exhibit some inhibitory effect on nitrogen uptake by cattail plants as indicated by lower nitrogen uptake rates in comparison to rates recorded in wetland systems treating domestic wastewater only.

  16. SITE demonstration of the Dynaphore/Forager Sponge technology to remove dissolved metals from contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, C.R.; Vaccaro, G.

    1995-10-01

    A Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) demonstration was conducted of the Dynaphore/Forager Sponge technology during the week of April 3, 1994 at the N.L. Industries Superfund Site in Pedricktown, New Jersey. The Forager Sponge is an open-celled cellulose sponge incorporating an amine-containing chelating polymer that selectively absorbs dissolved heavy metals in both cationic and anionic states. This technology is a volume reduction technology in which heavy metal contaminants from an aqueous medium are concentrated into a smaller volume for facilitated disposal. The developer states that the technology can be used to remove heavy metals from a wide variety of aqueous media, such as groundwater, surface waters and process waters. The sponge matrix can be directly disposed, or regenerated with chemical solutions. For this demonstration the sponge was set up as a mobile pump-and-treat system which treated groundwater contaminated with heavy metals. The demonstration focused on the system`s ability to remove lead, cadmium, chromium and copper from the contaminated groundwater over a continuous 72-hour test. The removal of heavy metals proceeded in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of innocuous cations such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and aluminum.

  17. Removal of heavy metals by biosorption using freshwater alga Spirogyra hyalina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J I Nirmal; Oommen, Cini

    2012-01-01

    The use of biosorbents for heavy metal removal has revealed enormous potential of algae for biosorption. The dried biomass of Spirogyra hyalina was used as biosorbent for removal of cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), arsenic (As) and cobalt (Co) from aqueous solutions atdifferent initial concentrations of the heavy metals and contact time of the biomass. The results showed that highest amount of Cd, Hg and As was adsorbed when the initial heavy metal concentration was 40 mg l(-1) whereas Pb and Co exhibited greatest removal at 80 mg l(-1). The value of Freundlich model constant (1/n) for different metals ranged from 0.342 to 0.693 and the values of Langmuir separation factor values (R(L)) varied between 0.114 and 0.719 that indicated favorable biosorption by the biomass. The order of metal uptake for the dried biomass was found to be Hg>Pb>Cd>As>Co. The finding of the study revealed that dried biomass of S. hyalina has much potential as a biosorbent for the sorption of Cd, Hg, Pb, As and Co.

  18. The removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil by a combination of sulfidisation and flotation.

    PubMed

    Vanthuyne, Mathias; Maes, André

    2002-05-01

    The possibility of removing cadmium, copper, lead and zinc from Belgian loamy soil by a combination of sulfidisation pre-treatment and Denver flotation was investigated. The potentially available--sulfide convertible--metal content of the metal polluted soil was estimated by EDTA (0.1 M, pH 4.65) extraction and BCR sequential extraction. EDTA extraction is better at approximating the metal percentage that is expected to be convertible into a metal sulfide phase, in contrast to the sequential extraction procedure of 'Int. J. Environ. Anal. Chem. 51 (1993) pp. 135-151' in which transition metals present as iron oxide co-precipitates are dissolved by hydroxylammoniumchloride in the second extraction step. To compare the surface characteristics of metal sulfides formed by sulfidisation with those of crystalline metal sulfides, two types of synthetic sediments were prepared and extracted with 0.1 M EDTA (pH 4.65) in anoxic conditions. Separate metal sulfides or co-precipitates with iron sulfide were formed by sulfide conditioning. The Denver flotation of both types of synthetic sediments (kerosene as collector at high background electrolyte concentrations) resulted in similar concentrating factors for freshly formed metal sulfides as for fine-grained crystalline metal sulfides. The selective flotation of metal sulfides after sulfide conditioning of a polluted soil, using kerosene or potassium ethyl xanthate as collectors and MIBC as frother, was studied at high background electrolyte concentrations. The sulfidisations were made in ambient air and inside an anoxic glove box. The concentrating factors corrected by the potentially available metal percentage, determined by 0.1 M EDTA extraction, lie between 2 and 3. The selective flotation of these finely dispersed, amorphous, metal sulfides can possibly be improved by optimising the bubble-particle interaction. PMID:12083717

  19. Polymer functionalized nanocomposites for metals removal from water and wastewater: An overview.

    PubMed

    Lofrano, Giusy; Carotenuto, Maurizio; Libralato, Giovanni; Domingos, Rute F; Markus, Arjen; Dini, Luciana; Gautam, Ravindra Kumar; Baldantoni, Daniela; Rossi, Marco; Sharma, Sanjay K; Chattopadhyaya, Mahesh Chandra; Giugni, Maurizio; Meric, Sureyya

    2016-04-01

    Pollution by metal and metalloid ions is one of the most widespread environmental concerns. They are non-biodegradable, and, generally, present high water solubility facilitating their environmental mobilisation interacting with abiotic and biotic components such as adsorption onto natural colloids or even accumulation by living organisms, thus, threatening human health and ecosystems. Therefore, there is a high demand for effective removal treatments of heavy metals, making the application of adsorption materials such as polymer-functionalized nanocomposites (PFNCs), increasingly attractive. PFNCs retain the inherent remarkable surface properties of nanoparticles, while the polymeric support materials provide high stability and processability. These nanoparticle-matrix materials are of great interest for metals and metalloids removal thanks to the functional groups of the polymeric matrixes that provide specific bindings to target pollutants. This review discusses PFNCs synthesis, characterization and performance in adsorption processes as well as the potential environmental risks and perspectives. PMID:26827255

  20. Schedules of controlled substances: removal of naloxegol from control. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-23

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes naloxegol ((5[alpha],6[alpha])-17-allyl-6-((20-hydroxy-3,6,9,12,15,18-hexaoxaicos-1-yl)oxy)-4,5-epoxymorphinon-3,14-diol) and its salts from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). This scheduling action is pursuant to the CSA which requires that such actions be made on the record after opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, naloxegol was a schedule II controlled substance because it can be derived from opium alkaloids. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle naloxegol. PMID:25730920

  1. Final Report on NASA Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment, small parts and flight components result in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium (CrVI) from 52 to 5 micrograms per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in numerous pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Space Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient, and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation, and non destructive evaluation (NDE) is a relatively new application of the technology that has been proven to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The novel process eliminates VOCs and blast media and captures the removed coatings with an integrated vacuum system. This means that the only waste generated are the coatings that are removed, resulting in an overall cleaner process. The development of a

  2. A review on progress of heavy metal removal using adsorbents of microbial and plant origin.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalini; Agrawal, S B; Mondal, M K

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metals released into the water bodies and on land surfaces by industries are highly toxic and carcinogenic in nature. These heavy metals create serious threats to all the flora and fauna due to their bioaccumulatory and biomagnifying nature at various levels of food chain. Existing conventional technologies for heavy metal removal are witnessing a downfall due to high operational cost and generation of huge quantity of chemical sludge. Adsorption by various adsorbents appears to be a potential alternative of conventional technologies. Its low cost, high efficiency, and possibility of adsorbent regeneration for reuse and recovery of metal ions for various purposes have allured the scientists to work on this technique. The present review compiles the exhaustive information available on the utilization of bacteria, algae, fungi, endophytes, aquatic plants, and agrowastes as source of adsorbent in adsorption process for removal of heavy metals from aquatic medium. During the last few years, a lot of work has been conducted on development of adsorbents after modification with various chemical and physical techniques. Adsorption of heavy metal ions is a complex process affected by operating conditions. As evident from the literature, Langmuir and Freundlich are the most widely used isotherm models, while pseudo first and second order are popularly studied kinetic models. Further, more researches are required in continuous column system and its practical application in wastewater treatment. PMID:26315592

  3. A review on progress of heavy metal removal using adsorbents of microbial and plant origin.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shalini; Agrawal, S B; Mondal, M K

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metals released into the water bodies and on land surfaces by industries are highly toxic and carcinogenic in nature. These heavy metals create serious threats to all the flora and fauna due to their bioaccumulatory and biomagnifying nature at various levels of food chain. Existing conventional technologies for heavy metal removal are witnessing a downfall due to high operational cost and generation of huge quantity of chemical sludge. Adsorption by various adsorbents appears to be a potential alternative of conventional technologies. Its low cost, high efficiency, and possibility of adsorbent regeneration for reuse and recovery of metal ions for various purposes have allured the scientists to work on this technique. The present review compiles the exhaustive information available on the utilization of bacteria, algae, fungi, endophytes, aquatic plants, and agrowastes as source of adsorbent in adsorption process for removal of heavy metals from aquatic medium. During the last few years, a lot of work has been conducted on development of adsorbents after modification with various chemical and physical techniques. Adsorption of heavy metal ions is a complex process affected by operating conditions. As evident from the literature, Langmuir and Freundlich are the most widely used isotherm models, while pseudo first and second order are popularly studied kinetic models. Further, more researches are required in continuous column system and its practical application in wastewater treatment.

  4. Process for removing copper in a recoverable form from solid scrap metal

    DOEpatents

    Hartman, Alan D.; Oden, Laurance L.; White, Jack C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for removing copper in a recoverable form from a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix is disclosed. The process begins by placing a copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix into a reactor vessel. The atmosphere within the reactor vessel is purged with an inert gas or oxidizing while the reactor vessel is heated in the area of the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix to raise the temperature within the reactor vessel to a selected elevated temperature. Air is introduced into the reactor vessel and thereafter hydrogen chloride is introduced into the reactor vessel to obtain a desired air-hydrogen chloride mix. The air-hydrogen chloride mix is operable to form an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere which provides a protective oxide coating on the surface of the solid ferrous scrap metal in the mix and simultaneously oxidizes/chloridizes the copper in the mix to convert the copper to a copper monochloride gas for transport away from the solid ferrous scrap metal. After the copper is completely removed from the copper/solid ferrous scrap metal mix, the flows of air and hydrogen chloride are stopped and the copper monochloride gas is collected for conversion to a recoverable copper species.

  5. Recovery and removal of mercury from mixed wastes. Final report, September 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, W.F.; Weyand, T.E.; Koshinski, C.J.

    1995-06-01

    In recognition of the major environmental problem created by mercury contamination of wastes and soils at an estimated 200,000 sites along US natural gas and oil pipelines and at a number of government facilities, including Oak Ridge, Savannah River, Hanford, and Rocky Flats, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking an effective and economical process for removing mercury from various DOE waste streams in order to allow the base waste streams to be treated by means of conventional technologies. In response to the need for Unproved mercury decontamination technology, Mercury Recovery Services (MRS) has developed and commercialized a thermal treatment process for the recovery of mercury from contaminated soils and industrial wastes. The objectives of this program were to: demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the MRS process to successfully remove and recover mercury from low-level mixed waste containing mercury compounds (HgO, HgS, HgCl{sub 2}) and selected heavy metal compounds (PbO, CdO); determine optimum processing conditions required to consistently reduce the residual total mercury content to 1 mg/kg while rendering the treated product nontoxic as determined by TCLP methods; and provide an accurate estimate of the capital and operating costs for a commercial processing facility designed specifically to remove and recovery mercury from various waste streams of interest at DOE facilities. These objectives were achieved in a four-stage demonstration program described within with results.

  6. Small Community and Household Water Systems Research on Removal of Metals and Pesticides from Drinking Water Sources

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation entitled “Small Community and Household Water Systems Research on Removal of Metals and Pesticides from Drinking Water Sources” provides treatment alternatives for removal of metals and pesticides from surface and ground waters before human consumption. The pres...

  7. Preparation and characterisation of biodegradable pollen-chitosan microcapsules and its application in heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Sargın, İdris; Kaya, Murat; Arslan, Gulsin; Baran, Talat; Ceter, Talip

    2015-02-01

    Biosorbents have been widely used in heavy metal removal. New resources should be exploited to develop more efficient biosorbents. This study reports the preparation of three novel chitosan microcapsules from pollens of three common, wind-pollinated plants (Acer negundo, Cupressus sempervirens and Populus nigra). The microcapsules were characterized (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis) and used in removal of heavy metal ions: Cd(II), Cr(III), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Zn(II). Their sorption capacities were compared to those of cross-linked chitosan beads without pollen grains. C. sempervirens-chitosan microcapsules exhibited better performance (Cd(II): 65.98; Cu(II): 67.10 and Zn(II): 49.55 mg g(-1)) than the other microcapsules and the cross-linked beads. A. negundo-chitosan microcapsules were more efficient in Cr(III) (70.40 mg g(-1)) removal. P. nigra-chitosan microcapsules were found to be less efficient. Chitosan-pollen microcapsules (except P. nigra-chitosan microcapsules) can be used in heavy metal removal.

  8. Sewage sludge ash to phosphorus fertiliser: Variables influencing heavy metal removal during thermochemical treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Mattenberger, H.; Fraissler, G.; Brunner, T. Herk, P.; Hermann, L.

    2008-12-15

    The aim of this study was to improve the removal of heavy metals from sewage sludge ash by a thermochemical process. The resulting detoxified ash was intended for use as a raw material rich in phosphorus (P) for inorganic fertiliser production. The thermochemical treatment was performed in a rotary kiln where the evaporation of relevant heavy metals was enhanced by additives. The four variables investigated for process optimisation were treatment temperature, type of additive (KCl, MgCl{sub 2}) and its amount, as well as type of reactor (directly or indirectly heated rotary kiln). The removal rates of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and of Ca, P and Cl were investigated. The best overall removal efficiency for Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn could be found for the indirectly heated system. The type of additive was critical, since MgCl{sub 2} favours Zn- over Cu-removal, while KCl acts conversely. The use of MgCl{sub 2} caused less particle abrasion from the pellets in the kiln than KCl. In the case of the additive KCl, liquid KCl - temporarily formed in the pellets - acted as a barrier to heavy metal evaporation as long as treatment temperatures were not sufficiently high to enhance its reaction or evaporation.

  9. Heavy metals removal from contaminated sewage sludge by naturally fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes.

    PubMed

    Dacera, Dominica Del Mundo; Babel, Sandhya

    2007-01-01

    The large amount of unutilised pineapple wastes produced every year in tropical countries, particularly in Thailand, adds to the existing environmental pollution problems of the country. This study investigated the utilisation of pineapple wastes to treat another form of waste (sludge) from wastewater treatment facilities in Thailand. Laboratory scale studies were carried out to determine the potential of using naturally fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes as a source of citric acid in the extraction of Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. Results of the leaching study revealed its effectiveness in extracting Zn (at 92%) at pH 3.67 and a short leaching time of only 2 h, and Ni at almost 60% removal at the same leaching time. Chromium removal was also high at almost 75% at a longer leaching time of 11 days. Variation in metal removal efficiencies may also be attributed to the forms of metals in sludge, with metals predominantly in the exchangeable and oxidisable phases showing ease of leachability (such as Zn). Compared to citric acid, at pH approaching 4.0, naturally fermented raw liquid seemed to be more effective in the removal of Zn and Cu at the same leaching time of 2 h, and Cr at a longer leaching time of 11 days. The pineapple pulp, which is a by-product of the process, can still be used as animal feed because of its high protein content. PMID:17951878

  10. CHANGING THE LANDSCAPE--LOW-TECH SOLUTIONS TO THE PADUCAH SCRAP METAL REMOVAL PROJECT ARE PROVIDING SAFE, COST-EFFECTIVE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SCRAP YARDS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Dan; Eyman, Jeff

    2003-02-27

    Between 1974 and 1983, contaminated equipment was removed from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) process buildings as part of an enrichment process upgrade program. The upgrades consisted of the dismantlement, removal, and on-site storage of contaminated equipment, cell components, and scrap material (e.g., metal) from the cascade facilities. Scrap metal including other materials (e.g., drums, obsolete equipment) not related to this upgrade program have thus far accumulated in nine contiguous radiologically-contaminated and non-contaminated scrap yards covering 1.05E5 m2 (26 acres) located in the northwestern portion of the PGDP. This paper presents the sequencing of field operations and methods used to achieve the safe removal and disposition of over 47,000 tonnes (53,000 tons) of metal and miscellaneous items contained in these yards. The methods of accomplishment consist of mobilization, performing nuclear criticality safety evaluations, moving scrap metal to ground level, inspection and segregation, sampling and characterization, scrap metal sizing, packaging and disposal, and finally demobilization. Preventing the intermingling of characteristically hazardous and non-hazardous wastes promotes waste minimization, allowing for the metal and materials to be segregated into 13 separate waste streams. Low-tech solutions such as using heavy equipment to retrieve, size, and package scrap materials in conjunction with thorough planning that integrates safe work practices, commitment to teamwork, and incorporating lessons learned ensures that field operations will be conducted efficiently and safely.

  11. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-01-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed. PMID:26878770

  12. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil.

    PubMed

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-16

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  13. Chelating capture and magnetic removal of non-magnetic heavy metal substances from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liren; Song, Jiqing; Bai, Wenbo; Wang, Shengping; Zeng, Ming; Li, Xiaoming; Zhou, Yang; Li, Haifeng; Lu, Haiwei

    2016-02-01

    A soil remediation method based on magnetic beneficiation is reported. A new magnetic solid chelator powder, FS@IDA (core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles coated with iminodiacetic acid chelators), was used as a reactive magnetic carrier to selectively capture non-magnetic heavy metals in soil by chelation and removal by magnetic separation. FS@IDA was prepared via inorganic-organic and organic synthesis reactions that generated chelating groups on the surface of magnetic, multi-core, core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 (FS) nanoparticles. These reactions used a silane coupling agent and sodium chloroacetate. The results show that FS@IDA could chelate the heavy metal component of Cd, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni carbonates, lead sulfate and lead chloride in water-insoluble salt systems. The resulting FS@IDA-Cd and FS@IDA-Pb chelates could be magnetically separated, resulting in removal rates of approximately 84.9% and 72.2% for Cd and Pb, respectively. FS@IDA could not remove the residual heavy metals and those bound to organic matter in the soil. FS@IDA did not significantly alter the chemical composition of the soil, and it allowed for fast chelating capture, simple magnetic separation and facilitated heavy metal elution. FS@IDA could also be easily prepared and reprocessed.

  14. Removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using red loess as an adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shengtao; Zhao, Meiqing; Ma, Zichuan

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of heavy metals onto novel low-cost adsorbent, red loess, were investigated. Red loess was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectra. The results indicated that red loess mainly consisted of silicate, ferric and aluminum oxides. Solution pH, adsorbent dosage, initial metal concentration, contact time and temperature significantly influenced the efficiency of heavy metals removal. The adsorption reached equilibrium at 4 hr, and the experimental equilibrium data were fitted to Langmuir monolayer adsorption model. The adsorption of Cu(II) and Zn(II) onto red loess was endothermic, while the adsorption of Pb(II) was exothermic. The maximum adsorption capacities of red loess for Pb(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) were estimated to be 113.6, 34.2 and 17.5 mg/g, respectively at 25 degrees C and pH 6. The maximum removal efficiencies were 100% for Pb(II) at pH 7, 100% for Cu(II) at pH 8, and 80% for Zn(II) at pH 8. The used adsorbents were readily regenerated using dilute HCl solution, indicating that red loess has a high reusability. All the above results demonstrated that red loess could be used as a possible alternative low-cost adsorbent for the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution.

  15. Use of a glass residue in the removal of heavy metals from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Catalfamo, Paola; Primerano, Patrizia; Arrigo, Ileana; Corigliano, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    The extraction of silica from powdered glass cullet with an aqueous solution of sodium hydroxide has been proposed as an alternative to glass recycling aimed to the low temperature production of sodium silicates. The unextracted residue obtained after a counter current two-step extractive process at approximately 100 degrees C and room pressure is mainly made of calcium and sodium silicate and shows high porosity and a large surface area. We thought that it could be active as an agent for the removal of heavy metals from wastewater. In this paper the capacity of the unextracted residue of removing six metal ions (i.e., Cu2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Pb2+ e Cr3+) was studied in a stirred batch reactor. The data obtained demonstrate that the removal of metal ions from wastewater is achieved with high capacity in a short time and their concentration is lowered under the legal limits without any appreciable influence from changes of physical and chemical conditions. Sodium and calcium ions take the place of heavy metals in water while pH keeps almost neutral. The exchange mechanism was identified. PMID:16948437

  16. Water Treatment Residuals and Scrap Tire Rubber as Green Sorbents for Removal of Stormwater Metals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yang; Morris, Ciapha; Rakshit, Sudipta; Landa, Edward; Punamiya, Pravin; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2016-06-01

    Bench scale tests were performed to evaluate two recycled wastes, water treatment residuals (WTR) and scrap tire rubber (STR), for adsorption of selected metals from urban stormwater, and assess their release from used sorbents. Aluminum-WTR alone could rapidly and effectively remove Cu, Pb, and Zn, while STR alone continuously released Zn accompanied with Cu and Pb adsorption. Zn leaching from STR was significantly reduced in the presence of WTR. Very little metals released from used combined adsorbents in NaNO3 solution, and only part of them were extracted with EDTA (a strong chelating agent), suggesting that metal release is not a concern in a typical stormwater condition. A combination of WTR and STR is a new, effective method for mitigation of urban stormwater metals-WTR can inhibit the STR leaching, and STR improves the hydraulic permeability of WTR powders, a limiting factor for stormwater flow when WTR is used alone. PMID:27010486

  17. Polyurethane and alginate immobilized algal biomass for the removal of aqueous toxic metals

    SciTech Connect

    Fry, I.V.; Mehlhorn, R.J.

    1992-12-01

    We describe the development of immobilized, processed algal biomass for use as an adsorptive filter in the removal of toxic metals from waste water. To fabricate an adsorptive filter from precessed biomass several crucial criteria must be met, including: (1) high metal binding capacity, (2) long term stability (both mechanical and chemical), (3) selectivity for metals of concern (with regard to ionic competition), (4) acceptable flow capacity (to handle large volumes in short time frames), (5) stripping/regeneration (to recycle the adsorptive filter and concentrate the toxic metals to manageable volumes). This report documents experiments with processed algal biomass (Spirulina platensis and Spirulina maxima) immobilized in either alginate gel or preformed polyurethane foam. The adsorptive characteristics of these filters were assessed with regard to the criteria listed above.

  18. New heterocycle modified chitosan adsorbent for metal ions (II) removal from aqueous systems.

    PubMed

    Kandile, Nadia G; Mohamed, Hemat M; Mohamed, Mansoura I

    2015-01-01

    A new hydrogel based on a modified chitosan CS-B was synthesized and evaluated for its metal ion removal from aqueous systems. The CS-B hydrogel was prepared through modification of chitosan with 4-((1, 3-dioxoisoindolin-2-ylimino) methyl) benzaldehyde as a heterocyclic component. The new hydrogel was analyzed by diverse techniques such as FTIR, XRD, TGA, SEM, and swelling tests. The adsorption capacity of CS-B for metal ions Co(2+), Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) from aqueous systems at different pH values showed various levels of efficiency. The metal ion uptake data over a range of pH values for Co(2+) and Hg(2+) showed the highest adsorption capacity while Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+) showed moderate adsorption capacity. Selective metal ion efficiency was highest for Co(2+) and lowest for Hg(2+) in their binary mixture.

  19. Water Treatment Residuals and Scrap Tire Rubber as Green Sorbents for Removal of Stormwater Metals.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yang; Morris, Ciapha; Rakshit, Sudipta; Landa, Edward; Punamiya, Pravin; Sarkar, Dibyendu

    2016-06-01

    Bench scale tests were performed to evaluate two recycled wastes, water treatment residuals (WTR) and scrap tire rubber (STR), for adsorption of selected metals from urban stormwater, and assess their release from used sorbents. Aluminum-WTR alone could rapidly and effectively remove Cu, Pb, and Zn, while STR alone continuously released Zn accompanied with Cu and Pb adsorption. Zn leaching from STR was significantly reduced in the presence of WTR. Very little metals released from used combined adsorbents in NaNO3 solution, and only part of them were extracted with EDTA (a strong chelating agent), suggesting that metal release is not a concern in a typical stormwater condition. A combination of WTR and STR is a new, effective method for mitigation of urban stormwater metals-WTR can inhibit the STR leaching, and STR improves the hydraulic permeability of WTR powders, a limiting factor for stormwater flow when WTR is used alone.

  20. Municipal landfill leachate treatment for metal removal using water hyacinth in a floating aquatic system.

    PubMed

    El-Gendy, A S; Biswas, N; Bewtra, J K

    2006-09-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the ability of water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) to remove five heavy metals (cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, and lead) commonly found in leachate. All experiments were conducted in batch reactors in a greenhouse. It was found that living biomass of water hyacinth was a good accumulator for copper, chromium, and cadmium. The plants accumulated copper, chromium, and cadmium up to 0.96, 0.83, and 0.50%, respectively, of their dry root mass. However, lead and nickel were poorly accumulated in water hyacinth. Also, nonliving biomass of water hyacinth dry roots showed ability to accumulate all metals, except Cr(VI), which was added in anionic form. The highest total metal sorption by nonliving dry water hyacinth roots was found to take place at pH 6.4. The current research demonstrates the potential of using water hyacinth for the treatment of landfill leachate containing heavy metals. PMID:17120455

  1. Metal removal from oil sands tailings pond water by indigenous micro-alga.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Hamed; Ulrich, Ania C; Liu, Yang

    2012-09-01

    This paper reports the removal of ten target metals of environmental concern ((53)Cr, Mn, Co, (60)Ni, (65)Cu, (66)Zn, As, (88)Sr, (95)Mo, and Ba) from oil sands tailings pond water. The organism responsible for removal was found to be an indigenous green micro-alga identified as Parachlorella kessleri by sequencing of the 23S rRNA gene. P. kessleri grew in tailings pond water samples taken from two oil sands operators (Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Albian Sands Energy Inc.), and enriched with low (0.24 mM NO(3)(-) and 0.016 mM PO(4)(-3)) and high (1.98 mM NO(3)(-) and 0.20mM PO(4)(-3)) concentrations of nutrient supplements (the most realistic scenario). The removal of (60)Ni, (65)Cu, As, (88)Sr, (95)Mo, and Ba from Syncrude tailings pond water was significantly enhanced by high concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorus, whereas the high nutrient concentrations adversely affected the removal of Co, (60)Ni, As, (88)Sr, and Mo in samples of Albian tailings pond water. Based on ANOVA two-factor analysis, higher nutrient concentration does not always result in higher metal removal, and TPW source must also be considered.

  2. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction. Final technical report, September 1, 1988--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Eisch, J.J.

    1992-04-07

    The ultimate objective of this research has been to uncover novel reagents and experimental conditions for heteroatom removal and hydrogen transfer processes, which would be applicable to the liquefaction of coal under low-severity conditions. To this end, one phase of this research has investigated the cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds involving sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and halogen by subvalent transition-metal complexes. A second phase of the study has assessed the capability of the same transition-metal complexes or of organoaluminum Lewis acids to catalyze the cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds in aromatics and hence to promote hydrogen shuttling. Finally, a third phase of our work has uncovered a remarkable synergistic effect of combinations of transition metals with organoaluminum Lewis acids on hydrogen shuttling between aromatics and hydroaromatics. (VC)

  3. Voltage oxide removal for plating: A new method of electroplating oxide coated metals in situ

    SciTech Connect

    Gutfeld, R. J. von; West, A. C.

    2007-03-15

    A novel in situ method for electroplating oxide coated metals is described. Termed VORP, for voltage oxide removal for plating, the process utilizes a voltage pulse {approx}20-200 V, {approx}2 ms in duration, applied between working and counterelectrodes while both are immersed in a copper electrolyte. The pulse is almost immediately followed by galvanostatic plate-up. Adherent copper deposits up to {approx}4 {mu}m in height on stainless steel 316 coupons have been obtained. Temperature testing up to 260 deg. C in air does not affect the copper adhesion. A preliminary model for oxide removal is proposed utilizing concepts of dielectric breakdown.

  4. A Plutonium Finishing Plant Model for the Cercla Removal Action and Decommissioning Construction Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hopkins, A.

    2008-07-01

    The joint policy between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for decommissioning buildings at DOE facilities documents an agreement between the agencies to perform decommissioning activities including demolition under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The use of removal actions for decommissioning integrates EPA oversight authority, DOE lead agency responsibility, and state authority for decommissioning activities. Once removal actions have been performed under CERCLA, a construction completion report is required to document the completion of the required action. Additionally, a decommissioning report is required under DOE guidance. No direct guidance was found for documenting completion of decommissioning activities and preparing a final report that satisfies the CERCLA requirements and the DOE requirements for decommissioning. Additional guidance was needed for the documentation of construction completion under CERCLA for D and D projects undertaken under the joint policy that addresses the requirements of both agencies. A model for the construction completion report was developed to document construction completion for CERCLA D and D activities performed under the joint EPA/DOE policy at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The model documentation report developed at PFP integrates the DOE requirements for establishing decommissioning end-points, documenting end-point completion and preparing a final decommissioning report with the CERCLA requirements to document completion of the action identified in the Action Memorandum (AM). The model includes the required information on health and safety, data management, cost and schedule and end-points completion. (authors)

  5. Final Report on Portable Laser Coating Removal Systems Field Demonstrations and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothgeb, Matthew J.; McLaughlin, Russell L.

    2008-01-01

    Processes currently used throughout the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to remove corrosion and coatings from structures, ground service equipment and small components results in waste streams consisting of toxic chemicals, spent media blast materials, and waste water. When chemicals are used in these processes they are typically high in volatile organic compounds (VOC) and are considered hazardous air pollutants (HAP). When blast media is used, the volume of hazardous waste generated is increased significantly. Many of the coatings historically used within NASA contain toxic metals such as hexavalent chromium, and lead. These materials are highly regulated and restrictions on worker exposure continue to increase. Most recently the EPA reduced the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for hexavalent chromium. The new standard lowers OSHA's PEL for hexavalent chromium from 52 to 5 micrograms of Cr(V1) per cubic meter of air as an 8-hour time-weighted average. Hexavalent chromium is found in the pretreatment and primer coatings used within the Shuttle Program. In response to the need to continue to protect assets within the agency and the growing concern over these new regulations, NASA is researching different ways to continue the required maintenance of both facility and flight equipment in a safe, efficient and environmentally preferable manner. The use of laser energy to remove prepare surfaces for a variety of processes, such as corrosion and coating removal, weld preparation and non destructive evaluation is a relatively new technology that has shown itself to be environmentally preferable and in many cases less labor intensive than currently used removal methods. The development of a Portable Laser Coating Removal System (PLCRS) started as the goal of a Joint Group on Pollution Prevention (JG-PP) project, led by the Air Force, where several types of lasers in several configurations were thoroughly evaluated. Following this project, NASA decided

  6. Selective removals of heavy metals (Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+)) from wastewater by gelation with alginate for effective metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Lu, Xingwen; Li, Xiao-yan

    2016-05-01

    A novel method that uses the aqueous sodium alginate solution for direct gelation with metal ions is developed for effective removal and recovery of heavy metals from industrial wastewater. The experimental study was conducted on Pb(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) as the model heavy metals. The results show that gels can be formed rapidly between the metals and alginate in less than 10 min and the gelation rates fit well with the pseudo second-order kinetic model. The optimum dosing ratio of alginate to the metal ions was found to be between 2:1 and 3:1 for removing Pb(2+) and around 4:1 for removing Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) from wastewater, and the metal removal efficiency by gelation increased as the solution pH increased. Alginate exhibited a higher gelation affinity toward Pb(2+) than Cu(2+) and Cd(2+), which allowed a selective removal of Pb(2+) from the wastewater in the presence of Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) ions. Chemical analysis of the gels suggests that the gelation mainly occurred between the metal ions and the -COO(-) and -OH groups on alginate. By simple calcination of the metal-laden gels at 700 °C for 1 h, the heavy metals can be well recovered as valuable resources. The metals obtained after the thermal treatment are in the form of PbO, CuO, and CdO nanopowders with crystal sizes of around 150, 50, and 100 nm, respectively.

  7. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shohreh; Kamika, Ilunga; Tekere, Memory

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l) concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours), while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l), is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater.

  8. Removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution by zeolite synthesized from fly ash.

    PubMed

    He, Kuang; Chen, Yuancai; Tang, Zhenghua; Hu, Yongyou

    2016-02-01

    Zeolite was synthesized from coal fly ash by a fusion method and was used for the removal of heavy metal ions (Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Ni(2+), and Mn(2+)) in aqueous solutions. Batch method was employed to study the influential parameters such as adsorbent dosage, pH, and coexisting cations. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics studies were carried out in single-heavy and multiheavy metal systems, respectively. The Langmuir isotherm model fitted to the equilibrium data better than the Freundlich model did, and the kinetics of the adsorption were well described by the pseudo-second-order model, except for Cd(2+) and Ni(2+) ions which were fitted for the pseudo-first-order model in the multiheavy metal system. The maximum adsorption capacity and the distribution coefficients exhibited the same sequence for Pb(2+) > Cu(2+) > Cd(2+) > Ni(2+) > Mn(2+) in both single- and multiheavy metal systems. In the end, the adsorption capacity of zeolite was tested using industrial wastewaters and the results demonstrated that zeolite could be used as an alternative adsorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from industrial wastewater.

  9. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Shohreh; Kamika, Ilunga; Tekere, Memory

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l) concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours), while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l), is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater. PMID:27186636

  10. Evaluation of Heavy Metal Removal from Wastewater in a Modified Packed Bed Biofilm Reactor

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Shohreh; Kamika, Ilunga; Tekere, Memory

    2016-01-01

    For the effective application of a modified packed bed biofilm reactor (PBBR) in wastewater industrial practice, it is essential to distinguish the tolerance of the system for heavy metals removal. The industrial contamination of wastewater from various sources (e.g. Zn, Cu, Cd and Ni) was studied to assess the impacts on a PBBR. This biological system was examined by evaluating the tolerance of different strengths of composite heavy metals at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2 hours. The heavy metal content of the wastewater outlet stream was then compared to the source material. Different biomass concentrations in the reactor were assessed. The results show that the system can efficiently treat 20 (mg/l) concentrations of combined heavy metals at an optimum HRT condition (2 hours), while above this strength there should be a substantially negative impact on treatment efficiency. Average organic reduction, in terms of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the system, is reduced above the tolerance limits for heavy metals as mentioned above. The PBBR biological system, in the presence of high surface area carrier media and a high microbial population to the tune of 10 000 (mg/l), is capable of removing the industrial contamination in wastewater. PMID:27186636

  11. Hydrogen sulfide removal from coal gas by the metal-ferrite sorbents made from the heavy metal wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ting Ke; Chang, Han Ching; Chu, Hsin; Chen, Hung Ta

    2008-12-30

    The metal-ferrite (chromium-ferrite and zinc-ferrite) sorbents made from the heavy metal wastewater sludge have been developed for the hydrogen sulfide removal from coal gas. The high temperature absorption of hydrogen sulfide from coal gas with the metal-ferrite sorbent in a fixed bed reactor was conducted in this study. The metal-ferrite powders were the products of the ferrite process for the heavy metal wastewater treatment. The porosity analysis results show that the number of micropores of the sorbents after sulfidation and regeneration process decreases and the average pore size increases due to the acute endothermic and exothermic reactions during the sulfidation-regeneration process. The FeS, ZnS, and MnS peaks are observed on the sulfided sorbents, and the chromium extraction of the CFR6 can fulfill the emission standard of Taiwan EPA. The suitable sulfidation temperature range for chromium-ferrite sorbent is at 500-600 degrees C. In addition, effects of various concentrations of H2 and CO were also conducted in the present work at different temperatures. By increasing the H2 concentration, the sulfur sorption capacity of the sorbent decreases and an adverse result is observed in the case of increasing CO concentration. This can be explained via water-shift reaction.

  12. Applications of peat-based sorbents for removal of metals from water

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, A.D.; Stack, E.M.; Eltayeb, S.; Durig, J.B

    1995-12-31

    The results reported in this paper are derived from one part of an ongoing investigation of peat sorption properties, in particular, the capacities of acid-treated peats to adsorb chromium, nickel, zinc, copper, and cadmium from water. Acid treatment was done to remove as much previously adsorbed metal as possible before testing. Four peat types were selected for study, two highly decomposed types (a woody, Taxodium-dominated peat from the Okefenokee Swamp of Georgia and a sedge-dominated, charcoal-rich peat from the Tamiami Trail region of Florida) and two less decomposed ones (a Sphagnum moss-dominated peat from Maine and a Nymphaea-dominated peat from the Okefenokee Swamp of Georgia). Single metal and mixed metal solutions were tested in slurry experiments with each peat type. Solutions were analyzed using a Perkin-Elmer model 305B Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. In single metal tests, chromium and copper tended to be adsorbed to a greater extent than the other metals. Three of the peats were found to be capable of adsorbine more copper ions than zince ions, while a fourth type adsorbed approximately the same amounts of each. Degree of decomposition of the peats tended to affect sorption properties for certain metals. The results of batch studies revealed that chromium was always preferentially adsorbed regardless of the peat type tested. The results of these studies further confirm that remediation of metal-contaminated waters using peats will require selection of specific peats to match the contaminants.

  13. Estuaries as filters: the role of tidal marshes in trace metal removal.

    PubMed

    Teuchies, Johannes; Vandenbruwaene, Wouter; Carpentier, Roos; Bervoets, Lieven; Temmerman, Stijn; Wang, Chen; Maris, Tom; Cox, Tom J S; Van Braeckel, Alexander; Meire, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Flux calculations demonstrate that many estuaries are natural filters for trace metals. Yet, the underlying processes are poorly investigated. In the present study, it was hypothesized that intertidal marshes contribute significantly to the contaminant filter function of estuaries. Trace metal concentrations and sediment characteristics were measured along a transect from the subtidal, over an intertidal flat and marsh to a restored marsh with controlled reduced tide. Metal concentrations in the intertidal and restored marsh were found to be a factor two to five higher than values in the subtidal and intertidal flat sediments. High metal concentrations and high accretion rates indicate a high metal accumulation capacity of the intertidal marshes. Overbank sedimentation in the tidal marshes of the entire estuary was calculated to remove 25% to 50% of the riverine metal influx, even though marshes comprise less than 8% of the total surface of the estuary. In addition, the large-scale implementation of planned tidal marsh restoration projects was estimated to almost double the trace metal storage capacity of the present natural tidal marshes in the estuary.

  14. Removal and recovery of radionuclides and toxic metals from wastes, soils and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.J.

    1993-07-01

    A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the removal of metals and radionuclides from contaminated materials, soils, and waste sites (Figure 1). In this process, citric acid, a naturally occurring organic complexing agent, is used to extract metals such as Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, and radionuclides Co, Sr, Th, and U from solid wastes by formation of water soluble, metal-citrate complexes. Citric acid forms different types of complexes with the transition metals and actinides, and may involve formation of a bidentate, tridentate, binuclear, or polynuclear complex species. The extract containing radionuclide/metal complex is then subjected to microbiological degradation followed by photochemical degradation under aerobic conditions. Several metal citrate complexes are biodegraded and the metals are recovered in a concentrated form with the bacterial biomass. Uranium forms binuclear complex with citric acid and is not biodegraded. The supernatant containing uranium citrate complex is separated and upon exposure to light, undergoes rapid degradation resulting in the formation of an insoluble, stable polymeric form of uranium. Uranium is recovered as a precipitate (uranium trioxide) in a concentrated form for recycling or for appropriate disposal. This treatment process, unlike others which use caustic reagents, does not create additional hazardous wastes for disposal and causes little damage to soil which can then be returned to normal use.

  15. Effect of final irrigating solution on smear layer removal and penetrability of the root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Amarnath; Ahmaduddin; Bolla, Nagesh; Raj, Sarath; Mandava, Pragna; Nayak, Shruti

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of final rinsing solution on smear layer removal through penetrability of the root canal sealer. Materials and Methods: Each of the 30 teeth selected was decoronated and the root length standardized at 16 mm measured from the apex of the tooth to the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). A size 10-k file was used and working length was determined by subtracting 1mm from the measured length so that the length of the sample was 15mm. A combination of step back and crown down technique was done and apical portion was prepared till H-file no. 30. 3% NaOCl was used during cleaning and shaping of the canals. Finally the teeth were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. Group-I was irrigated with 17% EDTA, Group-II with TUBLICID plus, and Group-III with Biopure MTAD®. ISO 30 size gutta-percha points were selected as master cones. The Acroseal sealer was mixed with approximated concentration 0.1% fluorescent rhodamine B isothiocyanate dye. Obturation was done and after 48 hours, the roots were sectioned and subjected to confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Comparisons among the three groups were done by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Newman-Keuls multiple post-hoc procedures. The two-way ANOVA showed statistically highly significant results. The maximum depth of sealer penetration was observed in Group II followed by Group III and Group I. Conclusion: The use of -Tubulicid plus as a final irrigant provided better smear layer removal than Biopure a mixture of doxicycline, citric acid and a detergent (Tween 80) (MTAD®) and 17% EDTA. PMID:24554859

  16. Performance of a 'Transitioned' Infiltration Basin Part 1: TSS, Metals, and Chloride Removals.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Poornima; Davis, Allen P

    2015-09-01

    The water quality performance of a 'failed' stormwater infiltration basin that has 'transitioned' to a wetpond/wetland has been evaluated over a three-year period. Total suspended solids, heavy metals, and chloride in highway runoff and discharge from the transitioned basin were measured during 38 storm events. The transitioned basin provided significant reductions in TSS Event Mean Concentrations (EMCs) and mass in the runoff. Reductions in metal EMCs generally occurred. Chloride followed a seasonal cycle of high loading and mass export during colder periods, and gradual reductions in both EMCs and mass during other periods. The cumulative mass reductions were 89% TSS, 73% copper, 63% lead, 55% zinc, and 45% chloride for the study period. Combined with the dry-weather water quality in the transitioned basin, the mechanisms of pollutant removal were identified as volume reduction, sedimentation, adsorption, and dilution. The presence of wetpond/wetland features, including hydrophytic vegetatioņ enhanced the pollutant removal processes. PMID:26182408

  17. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals by magnetic nanoadsorbent: an equilibrium and thermodynamic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirsath, D. S.; Shirivastava, V. S.

    2015-11-01

    An efficient and new magnetic nanoadsorbent photocatalyst was fabricated by co-precipitation technique. This research focuses on understanding metal removal process and developing a cost-effective technology for treatment of heavy metal-contaminated industrial wastewater. In this investigation, magnetic nanoadsorbent has been employed for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions by a batch adsorption technique. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted very well to Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. The thermodynamics of Zn(II) ions adsorption onto the magnetic nanoadsorbents indicated that the adsorption was spontaneous, endothermic and physical in nature. Surface morphology of magnetic nanoadsorbent by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and elemental analysis by EDX technique. The structural and photocatalytic properties of magnetic nanoadsorbent were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR techniques. Also, the magnetic properties of synthesized magnetic nanoadsorbent were determined by vibrating spinning magnetometer (VSM).

  18. Tailored zeolites for the removal of metal oxyanions: overcoming intrinsic limitations of zeolites.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Hugo; Quintelas, Cristina

    2014-06-15

    This review aims to present a global view of the efforts conducted to convert zeolites into efficient supports for the removal of heavy metal oxyanions. Despite lacking affinity for these species, due to inherent charge repulsion between zeolite framework and anionic species, zeolites have still received considerable attention from the scientific community, since their versatility allowed tailoring them to answer specific requirements. Different processes for the removal and recovery of toxic metals based on zeolites have been presented. These processes resort to modification of the zeolite surface to allow direct adsorption of oxyanions, or by combination with reducing agents for oxyanions that allow ion-exchange with the converted species by the zeolite itself. In order to testify zeolite versatility, as well as covering the wide array of physicochemical constraints that oxyanions offer, chromium and arsenic oxyanions were selected as model compounds for a review of treatment/remediation strategies, based on zeolite modification.

  19. Removal of heavy metals from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles.

    PubMed

    Elektorowicz, M; Muslat, Z

    2008-04-01

    Development of a new simple and economic method for heavy-metal removal from oil sludge using ion exchange textiles was the main objective of this research. Three experimental stages were developed for this purpose using the bottom tank oil sludge from the Shell Canada refinery in Montreal, Canada. The first stage consisted of the direct application of ion exchange to oil sludge. The second stage included the pretreatment of oil sludge with organic solvents prior to the application of ion exchange process. The third stage included the pretreatment of oil sludge with an aqueous solution in order to extract heavy metals to the aqueous phase and then apply ion exchange textiles to the aqueous phase. Best results were obtained when acetone was used as an organic solvent leading to a total removal of vanadium while cadmium, zinc, nickel, iron, copper by 99%; 96%; 94%; 92% and 89%, respectively. PMID:18619144

  20. A Potential Waste to be Selected as Media for Metal and Nutrient Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayadi, N.; Othman, N.; Hamdan, R.

    2016-07-01

    This study describes the potential of application of cassava peel, banana peel, coconut shell, and coconut coir to be selected as metal removal while limestone and steel slag for nutrient removal. The media were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy-Energy Dispersive X-Ray (FESEM-EDX), and X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD). The results of XRF analysis medias show the present of calcium oxide, CaO which confirm the high efficiency in adsorbing metal ions and nutrient which is in agreement with the result of XRD. The characteristics of medias by FTIR analysis also confirmed the involvement of alcohol, carboxylic, alkanes, amines and ethers which play important role to reduce ions while FESEM-EDX indicates the porous structures of study medias. The characterization analysis highlight that cassava peel and steel slag were selected as a potential media in this study.

  1. Functional metal sulfides and selenides for the removal of hazardous dyes from Water.

    PubMed

    Shamraiz, Umair; Hussain, Raja Azadar; Badshah, Amin; Raza, Bareera; Saba, Sonia

    2016-06-01

    Water contamination by organic dyes, is among the most alarming threats to healthy green environment. Complete removal of organic dyes is necessary to make water healthy for drinking, cooking, and for other useful aspects. Recently use of nanotechnology for removing organic dyes, became fruitful because of high surface to volume ratio and adsorption properties. Among these materials, metal chalcogenides emerge as new class of active materials for water purification. In this review article, we gathered information related to sulfide and selenide based nanomaterials which include metal sulfides and selenides, their binary composites, and use of different capping agents and dopants for enhancing photocatalysis. We have discussed in detail, about adsorption power of different dyes, relative percentage degradation, reaction time and concentration.

  2. Removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater by chemically modified plant wastes as adsorbents: a review.

    PubMed

    Wan Ngah, W S; Hanafiah, M A K M

    2008-07-01

    The application of low-cost adsorbents obtained from plant wastes as a replacement for costly conventional methods of removing heavy metal ions from wastewater has been reviewed. It is well known that cellulosic waste materials can be obtained and employed as cheap adsorbents and their performance to remove heavy metal ions can be affected upon chemical treatment. In general, chemically modified plant wastes exhibit higher adsorption capacities than unmodified forms. Numerous chemicals have been used for modifications which include mineral and organic acids, bases, oxidizing agent, organic compounds, etc. In this review, an extensive list of plant wastes as adsorbents including rice husks, spent grain, sawdust, sugarcane bagasse, fruit wastes, weeds and others has been compiled. Some of the treated adsorbents show good adsorption capacities for Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni.

  3. The use of nutshell carbons in drinking water filters for removal of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Ahmedna, Mohamed; Marshall, Wayne E; Husseiny, Abdo A; Rao, Ramu M; Goktepe, Ipek

    2004-02-01

    Filtration of drinking water by point-of-use (POU) or point-of-entry (POE) systems is becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Drinking water is filtered to remove both organic and inorganic contaminants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of granular activated carbon from nutshells (almond, English walnut, pecan) in a POU water filtration system to determine its effectiveness in removing select, potentially toxic metal ions, namely, copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+) or zinc (Zn2+) found in drinking water. The nutshell-based carbon system was designated "Envirofilter" and was compared to four commercial POU systems with brand names of BRITA, Omni Filter, PUR and Teledyne Water Pik. Eight prototype "Envirofilters", consisting of individual or binary mixtures of carbons made from acid-activated almond or pecan shells and steam-activated pecan or walnut shells were constructed and evaluated for adsorption of the three metal ions. The results indicated that a binary mixture of carbons from acid-activated almond and either steam-activated pecan or walnut shells were the most effective in removing these metals from drinking water of all the POU systems evaluated. Binary mixtures of acid-activated almond shell-based carbon with either steam-activated pecan shell- or walnut shell-based carbon removed nearly 100% of lead ion, 90-95% of copper ion and 80-90% of zinc ion. Overall the performance data on the "Envirofilters" suggest that these prototypes require less carbon than commercial filters to achieve the same metal adsorption efficiency and may also be a less expensive product.

  4. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, Robert L.; Navratil, James D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

  5. The use of nutshell carbons in drinking water filters for removal of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Ahmedna, Mohamed; Marshall, Wayne E; Husseiny, Abdo A; Rao, Ramu M; Goktepe, Ipek

    2004-02-01

    Filtration of drinking water by point-of-use (POU) or point-of-entry (POE) systems is becoming increasingly popular in the United States. Drinking water is filtered to remove both organic and inorganic contaminants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of granular activated carbon from nutshells (almond, English walnut, pecan) in a POU water filtration system to determine its effectiveness in removing select, potentially toxic metal ions, namely, copper (Cu2+), lead (Pb2+) or zinc (Zn2+) found in drinking water. The nutshell-based carbon system was designated "Envirofilter" and was compared to four commercial POU systems with brand names of BRITA, Omni Filter, PUR and Teledyne Water Pik. Eight prototype "Envirofilters", consisting of individual or binary mixtures of carbons made from acid-activated almond or pecan shells and steam-activated pecan or walnut shells were constructed and evaluated for adsorption of the three metal ions. The results indicated that a binary mixture of carbons from acid-activated almond and either steam-activated pecan or walnut shells were the most effective in removing these metals from drinking water of all the POU systems evaluated. Binary mixtures of acid-activated almond shell-based carbon with either steam-activated pecan shell- or walnut shell-based carbon removed nearly 100% of lead ion, 90-95% of copper ion and 80-90% of zinc ion. Overall the performance data on the "Envirofilters" suggest that these prototypes require less carbon than commercial filters to achieve the same metal adsorption efficiency and may also be a less expensive product. PMID:14769427

  6. Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin

    DOEpatents

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1997-01-21

    Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

  7. Investigation of Media Effects on Removal of Heavy Metals in Bioretention Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülbaz, Sezar; Melek Kazezyilmaz-Alhan, Cevza; Copty, Nadim K.

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals are the most toxic elements at high concentrations, although some of them such as Cu and Zn are essential to plants, humans, and animals within a limited value. However, some heavy metals, such as Pb, have adverse effects even at low concentrations. Therefore, it is known that the toxic metals such as Zn, Cu and Pb in storm water runoff are serious threat for aquatic organisms. It is very important to control and reduce heavy metal concentration in urban storm water runoff. There are several methods to remove the aforementioned toxic metals such as electrolyte extraction, chemical precipitation, ion-exchange, reverse osmosis, membrane filtration, adsorption, cementation, and electrochemical treatment technologies. However, these methods are highly expensive and hard to implement for treatment of big volumes of water such as storm water. For this purpose, Low Impact Development (LID) Best Management Practices (BMPs) have become popular to collect, infiltrate, and treat toxic metals in storm water runoff in recent years. LID-BMP is a land planning method which is used to manage storm water runoff and improve water quality by reducing contaminant in storm water runoff. Bioretention is an example of LID-BMP application of which usage has recently been started in storm water treatment. Researchers have been investigating the advantages of bioretention systems and this study contributes to these research efforts by seeking for the media effects of bioretention on heavy metal removal. For this purpose, batch sorption experiments were performed to determine the distribution coefficients and retardation factor of copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) for bioretention media such as mulch, turf, local or vegetative soil, sand and gravel. Furthermore, sorption reaction kinetics of Cu, Pb and Zn are tested in order to assess the sorption equilibrium time of these metals for 5 bioretention media. The results of sorption test show that turf has higher sorption

  8. A preliminary study for removal of heavy metals from acidic synthetic wastewater by using pressmud-rice husk mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Ee, C. J.; Baharudin, N. S.

    2016-06-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effect of combining pressmud and rice husk in the removal efficiencies of heavy metals in acidic synthetic wastewater. The ratios of pressmud to rice husk were varied at different percentages of weight ratio (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% 80% and 100%) and removal of heavy metals concentrations was observed. The result showed that the removal efficiency was increased with the addition of pressmud by up to almost 100%. Pressmud alone was able to remove 95% to 100% of heavy metals while rice husk alone managed to remove only 10% to 20% of heavy metals. The study also demonstrated that pressmud behaved as a natural acid neutralizer. Hence, the initial pH of the synthetically prepared acidic wastewater which was below 2 also was increased to pH ranging from 6 to 8.

  9. Simultaneous removal of PAHs and metal contaminants from water using magnetic nanoparticle adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuxiong; Fulton, Aaron N; Keller, Arturo A

    2016-11-15

    Many industrial wastewaters are contaminated with both heavy metal ions and organic compounds, posing a major threat to public health and the environment. In this study, magnetic nanoparticle adsorbents, namely Mag-PCMA-T, which contain a maghemite core and a silica mesoporous layer that permanently confines surfactant micelles within the mesopores, were synthesized to achieve simultaneous removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (1mg/L) and metal contaminants (1mg/L). The individual removal efficiency of Cd(2+) and acenaphthene using Mag-PCMA-T was evaluated under a range of initial ion concentrations and adsorbent dosages, as well as the competitive adsorption with Cd(2+) and acenaphthene simultaneously present. The isotherms and kinetics of Cd(2+) and acenaphthene sorption onto Mag-PCMA-T were determined. Mag-PCMA-T removed >85% of the acenaphthene in <30min, with relatively high sorption capacity (up to 1060mg/kg). Mag-PCMA-T also exhibited high sorption capacity for Cd(2+) (up to 2250mg/kg). The simultaneous sorption performance was stable across a wide pH range (4-9) as well as in the presence of competitive metal ions (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) or natural organic matters. The Mag-PCMA-T can be regenerated and reused, providing a sustainable, fast, convenient, and efficient approach for water treatment. PMID:27450251

  10. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading. PMID:24736500

  11. Increasing Mechanical Strength of Gelatin Hydrogels by Divalent Metal Ion Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C.; Zhao, Feng

    2014-04-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca2+ and Fe2+ play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading.

  12. Increasing mechanical strength of gelatin hydrogels by divalent metal ion removal.

    PubMed

    Xing, Qi; Yates, Keegan; Vogt, Caleb; Qian, Zichen; Frost, Megan C; Zhao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    The usage of gelatin hydrogel is limited due to its instability and poor mechanical properties, especially under physiological conditions. Divalent metal ions present in gelatin such as Ca(2+) and Fe(2+) play important roles in the gelatin molecule interactions. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of divalent ion removal on the stability and mechanical properties of gelatin gels with and without chemical crosslinking. The gelatin solution was purified by Chelex resin to replace divalent metal ions with sodium ions. The gel was then chemically crosslinked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). Results showed that the removal of divalent metal ions significantly impacted the formation of the gelatin network. The purified gelatin hydrogels had less interactions between gelatin molecules and form larger-pore network which enabled EDC to penetrate and crosslink the gel more efficiently. The crosslinked purified gels showed small swelling ratio, higher crosslinking density and dramatically increased storage and loss moduli. The removal of divalent ions is a simple yet effective method that can significantly improve the stability and strength of gelatin hydrogels. The in vitro cell culture demonstrated that the purified gelatin maintained its ability to support cell attachment and spreading. PMID:24736500

  13. Copper removal using a heavy-metal resistant microbial consortium in a fixed-bed reactor.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Isis E Mejias; Machado-Santelli, Glaucia; Sakata, Solange Kazumi; Ferreira Filho, Sidney Seckler; Rodrigues, Debora Frigi

    2014-10-01

    A heavy-metal resistant bacterial consortium was obtained from a contaminated river in São Paulo, Brazil and utilized for the design of a fixed-bed column for the removal of copper. Prior to the design of the fixed-bed bioreactor, the copper removal capacity by the live consortium and the effects of copper in the consortium biofilm formation were investigated. The Langmuir model indicated that the sorption capacity of the consortium for copper was 450.0 mg/g dry cells. The biosorption of copper into the microbial biomass was attributed to carboxyl and hydroxyl groups present in the microbial biomass. The effect of copper in planktonic cells to form biofilm under copper rich conditions was investigated with confocal microscopy. The results revealed that biofilm formed after 72 h exposure to copper presented a reduced thickness by 57% when compared to the control; however 84% of the total cells were still alive. The fixed-bed bioreactor was set up by growing the consortium biofilm on granular activated carbon (GAC) and analyzed for copper removal. The biofilm-GAC (BGAC) column retained 45% of the copper mass present in the influent, as opposed to 17% in the control column that contained GAC only. These findings suggest that native microbial communities in sites contaminated with heavy metals can be immobilized in fixed-bed bioreactors and used to treat metal contaminated water. PMID:24952346

  14. Removal of Heavy Metals from Solid Wastes Leachates Coagulation-Flocculation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Z.; Zazouli, M. A.

    The main objectives of present research were to determine heavy metals (Ni, Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) and COD concentration in raw leachate in Esfahan (Iran) composting plant and to examine the application of coagulation-flocculation process for the treatment of raw leachates. Jar-test experiments were employed in order to determine the optimum conditions (effective dosage and optimum pH) for the removal of COD and heavy metals. Alum (aluminum sulphate) and Ferric chloride were tested as conventional coagulants. Ten times had taken sampling from leachates as standard methods in the composting plant prior to composting process. The results showed that Leachate pH was 4.3-5.9 and the average was 4.98±0.62. The concentration of Leachate pollutants were more than effluent standard limits (Environment protection Agency). And also the results indicated, Cd and Zn with concentration 0.46±0.41 and 5.81±3.69 mg L-1, had minimum and maximum levels, respectively. The results of coagulation and flocculation tests showed that in optimum conditions, the removal efficiency of heavy metals and COD by using alum were 77-91 and 21%, respectively. While removal of heavy metals and COD by ferric chloride were 68-85.5% and 28%, respectively. Also the residues of heavy metals after treatment get to under of standard limits of Iran EPA. The results have indicated optimum pH of two coagulants for leachate treatment was 6.5 and 10 and also effective coagulant dosages were 1400 and 1000 mg L-1 for alum and ferric chloride, respectively. In view of economical, ferric chloride is cost benefit. The physico-chemical process may be used as a useful pretreatment step, especially for fresh leachates.

  15. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency. PMID:27565780

  16. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency.

  17. A novel route for the removal of bodily heavy metal lead (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Weirong; Zhang, Penghua; Xu, Hui; Chang, Shengli; He, Yongju; Wang, Fei; Liang, Gaowei

    2015-09-01

    The lead ion concentration in bile is considerably higher than in blood, and bile is released into the alimentary tract. Thiol-modified SBA-15 administered orally can combine with lead ions in the alimentary tract. In this paper, the in vitro lead absorption of bile was investigated. This thiol-modified SBA-15 material was used in pharmacodynamics studies on rabbits. The result that the lead content in faeces was notably higher indicates that thiol-modified SBA-15 can efficiently remove lead. The mechanism could include the following: thiol-modified SBA-15 material cuts off the heavy metal lead recirculation in the process of bile enterohepatic circulation by chelating the lead in the alimentary tract, causing a certain proportion of lead to be removed by the thiol mesoporous material, and the lead is subsequently egested out of the body in faeces. The results indicate that this material might be a potential non-injection material for the removal bodily heavy metal lead in the alimentary tract. This material may also be a useful means of lead removal, especially for non-acute sub-poisoning symptoms.

  18. Effects of humic substances on the heavy metal removal and the phytotoxicity of pesticide

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.E.; Shin, Y.K.; Rhee, H.I.; Kim, J.J.

    1995-12-31

    Efficiency of humic (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) on the removal of Cu or Pb from aqueous solution and phytotoxicity of Paraquat were assessed using the principle of contaminant-ligand complexation. Increasing HA concentrations enhanced the efficiency of Cu or Pb removal, up to a critical ligand concentration capable of forming a maximum HA-metal complex. Removal efficiency ranged from 70 to 95% for Pb, but only 13 to 65% for Cu. HA of 100mg was estimated to complex with 7.5 mg of Cu and 34.1 mg of Pb. Fulvic acid removed nearly 100% of Pb, but only 13 to 29% of Cu. The reactions followed the first- or multiple first-order kinetics depending on the concentrations of metal and ligand, pH and temperature. Paraquat alone exerted a high degree of phytotoxicity at low concentration to the hydroponically grown rye (Secale cereale L.), but the presence of HA or FA decreased the Paraquat toxicity up to 40% and enhanced the yield and growth of rye up to 20% indicating that humic substances reduced the bioavailability of paraquat to rye due to the complexation.

  19. A novel route for the removal of bodily heavy metal lead (II).

    PubMed

    Huang, Weirong; Zhang, Penghua; Xu, Hui; Chang, Shengli; He, Yongju; Wang, Fei; Liang, Gaowei

    2015-09-25

    The lead ion concentration in bile is considerably higher than in blood, and bile is released into the alimentary tract. Thiol-modified SBA-15 administered orally can combine with lead ions in the alimentary tract. In this paper, the in vitro lead absorption of bile was investigated. This thiol-modified SBA-15 material was used in pharmacodynamics studies on rabbits. The result that the lead content in faeces was notably higher indicates that thiol-modified SBA-15 can efficiently remove lead. The mechanism could include the following: thiol-modified SBA-15 material cuts off the heavy metal lead recirculation in the process of bile enterohepatic circulation by chelating the lead in the alimentary tract, causing a certain proportion of lead to be removed by the thiol mesoporous material, and the lead is subsequently egested out of the body in faeces. The results indicate that this material might be a potential non-injection material for the removal bodily heavy metal lead in the alimentary tract. This material may also be a useful means of lead removal, especially for non-acute sub-poisoning symptoms. PMID:26317506

  20. Spontaneous electrochemical processing in conventional organic solutions for iron ion removal and metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jinghua

    2002-01-01

    In one part of this research, spontaneous electrochemical redox reactions in conventional organic solutions commonly used in solvent extraction were demonstrated. In these reactions, the more noble metal is reduced while the less noble metal dissolves simultaneously. This technique was successfully applied in metal recovery or impurity separation in laboratory tests using synthetic and commercially produced solutions. The second use of the process was in depositing metal seed layers on metallized wafers for use in chip manufacture. The patented process in the first application, called galvanic stripping, has been demonstrated on batch and continuous levels to separate iron from a sulfate medium using DEHPA. The use of zinc and steel scrap as reductants was evaluated. The reductant was found to be one of the most important components in the galvanic stripping process. The effects of other processing variables such as solution chemistry, reductant surface area, ferric ion concentration in the organic phase, agitation, and aqueous pH on iron recovery and efficiency were also evaluated. An experimental design with statistical analysis was utilized to optimize overall iron removal and process efficiency. The continuous test allowed the cycling of the organic and strip aqueous solutions and produced a concentrated iron sulfate strip solution containing ferrous ions in the range of 90 to 130 g/L. Based on the galvanic stripping principle a novel metal deposition technique was successfully applied for depositing seed layers on TiSiN and other metal films on Si wafers for subsequent electroless copper deposition as well as the deposition of gold onto a sputtered copper film. XPS measurements confirmed that the deposited particles or films were a pure metallic metal phase. The effects of various factors including the organic bath composition, reaction time, temperature and agitation on the deposit surface morphologies and the distribution of nuclei were investigated.

  1. Efficiency of Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia for heavy metal removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Menka; Tripathi, B D

    2015-02-01

    A cost-effective and promising technology has been demonstrated for the removal of copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) from urban sewage mixed with industrial effluents within 14 days. With the help of P. australis and T. latifolia grown alone and in combination batch experiments were designed to assess the removal of heavy metals from the wastewater collected from 5 sampling stations. The results revealed that P. australis performed better than T. latifolia for Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn removal, while mixing of the plant species further enhanced the removal of Cu to 78.0±1.2%, Cd to 60.0±1.2%, Cr to 68.1±0.4%, Ni to 73.8±0.6%, Fe to 80.1±0.3%, Pb to 61.0±1.2% and Zn to 61.0±1.2% for wastewater samples from Raj Ghat. Negative correlation coefficients of Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn concentrations in wastewater with the retention time revealed that there was an increase in the heavy metal removal rate with retention time. P. australis showed higher accumulative capacities for Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni and Fe than T. latifolia. P. australis and T. latifolia grown in combination can be used for the removal of Cu, Cd, Cr, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn from the urban sewage mixed with industrial effluents within 14 days.

  2. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  3. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    PubMed

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  4. Heavy metals removal from aqueous environments by electrocoagulation process- a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Mohammadi, Leili; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals pollution has become a more serious environmental problem in the last several decades as a result releasing toxic materials into the environment. Various techniques such as physical, chemical, biological, advanced oxidation and electrochemical processes were used for the treatment of domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents. The commonly used conventional biological treatments processes are not only time consuming but also need large operational area. Accordingly, it seems that these methods are not cost-effective for effluent containing toxic elements. Advanced oxidation techniques result in high treatment cost and are generally used to obtain high purity grade water. The chemical coagulation technique is slow and generates large amount of sludge. Electrocoagulation is an electrochemical technique with many applications. This process has recently attracted attention as a potential technique for treating industrial wastewater due to its versatility and environmental compatibility. This process has been applied for the treatment of many kinds of wastewater such as landfill leachate, restaurant, carwash, slaughterhouse, textile, laundry, tannery, petroleum refinery wastewater and for removal of bacteria, arsenic, fluoride, pesticides and heavy metals from aqueous environments. The objective of the present manuscript is to review the potential of electrocoagulation process for the treatment of domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents, especially removal of heavy metals from aqueous environments. About 100 published studies (1977-2016) are reviewed in this paper. It is evident from the literature survey articles that electrocoagulation are the most frequently studied for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater. PMID:26512324

  5. The removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution using natural Jordanian zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taamneh, Yazan; Sharadqah, Suhail

    2016-02-01

    In this article, the adsorption process of cadmium and copper using natural Jordanian (NJ) zeolite as adsorbent has been experimentally estimated. The samples of NJ zeolite were obtained from Al Mafraq discrete, north east of Jordan. The influence of the bulk concentration (C o), contact time (t) and different adsorbent masses (m) of NJ zeolite on the removal of heavy metal were evaluated. These variables had a considerable function in promoting the sorption process of heavy metal using the NJ zeolite. The initial concentration of heavy metals in the stock solution was extended between 80 and 600 mg/L. The batch adsorption method was employed to investigate the adsorption process. The experimental data were correlated using Freundlich and Langmuir empirical formula. The ability of NJ zeolite to eliminate cadmium and copper was estimated according to Langmuir isotherm empirical formula and found 25.9 and 14.3 mg/g for cadmium and copper, respectively. The kinetics of adsorption of cadmium and copper have been analyzed and correlated by first-order and second-order reaction model. It was noticed that adsorption of cadmium and copper was better correlated with pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The results presented that NJ zeolite is practical adsorbent for removing cadmium and copper ion metal.

  6. Heavy metals removal from aqueous environments by electrocoagulation process- a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Mohammadi, Leili; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Heavy metals pollution has become a more serious environmental problem in the last several decades as a result releasing toxic materials into the environment. Various techniques such as physical, chemical, biological, advanced oxidation and electrochemical processes were used for the treatment of domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents. The commonly used conventional biological treatments processes are not only time consuming but also need large operational area. Accordingly, it seems that these methods are not cost-effective for effluent containing toxic elements. Advanced oxidation techniques result in high treatment cost and are generally used to obtain high purity grade water. The chemical coagulation technique is slow and generates large amount of sludge. Electrocoagulation is an electrochemical technique with many applications. This process has recently attracted attention as a potential technique for treating industrial wastewater due to its versatility and environmental compatibility. This process has been applied for the treatment of many kinds of wastewater such as landfill leachate, restaurant, carwash, slaughterhouse, textile, laundry, tannery, petroleum refinery wastewater and for removal of bacteria, arsenic, fluoride, pesticides and heavy metals from aqueous environments. The objective of the present manuscript is to review the potential of electrocoagulation process for the treatment of domestic, industrial and agricultural effluents, especially removal of heavy metals from aqueous environments. About 100 published studies (1977-2016) are reviewed in this paper. It is evident from the literature survey articles that electrocoagulation are the most frequently studied for the treatment of heavy metal wastewater.

  7. Nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling for certain area removal of metal coating on plastics surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kai; Jia, Zhenyuan; Ma, Jianwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Ling

    2014-12-01

    Metal coating with functional pattern on engineering plastics surface plays an important role in industry applications; it can be obtained by adding or removing certain area of metal coating on engineering plastics surface. However, the manufacturing requirements are improved continuously and the plastic substrate presents three-dimensional (3D) structure-many of these parts cannot be fabricated by conventional processing methods, and a new manufacturing method is urgently needed. As the laser-processing technology has many advantages like high machining accuracy and constraints free substrate structure, the machining of the parts is studied through removing certain area of metal coating based on the nanosecond multi-pulse laser milling. To improve the edge quality of the functional pattern, generation mechanism and corresponding avoidance strategy of the processing defects are studied. Additionally, a prediction model for the laser ablation depth is proposed, which can effectively avoid the existence of residual metal coating and reduces the damage of substrate. With the optimal machining parameters, an equiangular spiral pattern on copper-clad polyimide (CCPI) is machined based on the laser milling at last. The experimental results indicate that the edge of the pattern is smooth and consistent, the substrate is flat and without damage. The achievements in this study could be applied in industrial production.

  8. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  9. Metal artifact removal (MAR) analysis for the security inspections using the X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Hyo Sung; Woo, Tae Ho; Park, Chul Kyu

    2016-10-01

    Using the metal artifact property, it is analyzed for the X-ray computed tomography (CT) in the aspect of the security on the examined places like airport and surveillance areas. Since the importance of terror prevention strategy has been increased, the security application of X-ray CT has the significant remark. One shot X-ray image has the limitation to find out the exact shape to property in the closed box, which could be solved by the CT scanning without the tearing off the box in this work. Cleaner images can be obtained by the advanced technology if the CT scanning is utilized in the security purposes on the secured areas. A metal sample is treated by the metal artifact removal (MAR) method for the enhanced image. The mimicked explosive is experimented for the imaging processing application where the cleaner one is obtained. The procedure is explained and the further study is discussed.

  10. Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turhanen, Petri A.; Vepsäläinen, Jouko J.; Peräniemi, Sirpa

    2015-03-01

    A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step.

  11. Removal of heavy metal ions from oil shale beneficiation process water by ferrite process

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, R.K.; Zhang, L.; Lamont, W.E.; Schultz, C.W. . Mineral Resources Inst.)

    1991-01-01

    The ferrite process is an established technique for removing heavy metals from waste water. Because the process water resulting from oil shale beneficiation falls into the category of industrial waste water, it is anticipated that this process may turn out to be a potential viable treatment for oil shale beneficiation process water containing many heave metal ions. The process is chemoremedial because not only effluent water comply with quality standards, but harmful heavy metals are converted into a valuable, chemically stable by-product known as ferrite. These spinel ferrites have magnetic properties, and therefore can be use in applications such as magnetic marker, ferrofluid, microwave absorbing and scavenging material. Experimental results from this process are presented along with results of treatment technique such as sulfide precipitation.

  12. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al2O3 via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jianlong; Zhao, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-15

    Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO4 or NiMoO4) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90°C, 0.1wt% SDS, 2.0wt% NaOH and 10ml/gL/S ratio for 4h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO4 is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts.

  13. Oil removal of spent hydrotreating catalyst CoMo/Al2O3 via a facile method with enhanced metal recovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; Li, Zhen; Wang, Jianlong; Zhao, Zhongwei; Xu, Zhenghe

    2016-11-15

    Deoiling process is a key issue for recovering metal values from spent hydrotreating catalysts. The oils can be removed with organic solvents, but the industrialized application of this method is greatly hampered by the high cost and complex processes. Despite the roasting method is simple and low-cost, it generates hardest-to-recycle impurities (CoMoO4 or NiMoO4) and enormous toxic gases. In this study, a novel and facile approach to remove oils from the spent hydrotreating catalysts is developed. Firstly, surface properties of spent catalysts are characterized to reveal the possibility of oil removal. And then, oils are removed with water solution under the conditions of 90°C, 0.1wt% SDS, 2.0wt% NaOH and 10ml/gL/S ratio for 4h. Finally, thermal treatment and leaching tests are carried out to further explore the advantages of oil removal. The results show that no hardest-to-recycle impurity CoMoO4 is found in XPS spectra of thermally treated samples after deoiling and molybdenum is leached completely with sodium carbonate solution. It means that the proposed deoiling method can not only remove oils simply and without enormous harmful gases generating, but also avoid the generation of detrimental impurity and promote recycling of valuable metals from spent hydrotreating catalysts. PMID:27484947

  14. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, November 1995--May 1997. Addendum 1: Task 2 topical report -- Pollutant removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) uses two Condensing Heat Exchangers (CHXs{reg_sign}) in series to recover waste heat from the flue gas and remove a variety of pollutants from the flue gas. The Teflon{reg_sign}-covered internals of the condensing heat exchanger permit heat recovery at temperatures below the acid dew-point of the flue gas. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions in a pilot Integrated Flue Gas Treatment System rated at 1.2 MW{sub t} (4 million Btu/hr) using a wide range of coals. The coals tested included a high-sulfur coal, a medium-sulfur coal and a low-sulfur coal. The flue gas pollutants investigated included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was also investigated. Soda ash, lime and magnesium-lime scrubbing reagents were investigated. The test results show that the IFGT system can remove greater than 95% removal of acid gases with a liquid-to-gas ratio less than 1.34 l/m{sup 3} (10 gal/1,000 ft{sup 3}), and that lime reagents show promise as a substitute for soda ash. Particulate and ammonia gas removal was also very high. Ionic mercury removal averaged 80%, while elemental mercury removal was very low. Trace metals were found to be concentrated in the fine particulate with removal efficiencies in the range of 50% to 80%. The data measured in this task provides the basis for predictions of the performance of an IFGT system for both utility and industrial applications.

  15. Removal of metals from aqueous solution and sea water by functionalized graphite nanoplatelets based electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Ramaprabhu, S

    2011-01-15

    In the present wok, we have demonstrated the simultaneous removal of sodium and arsenic (pentavalent and trivalent) from aqueous solution using functionalized graphite nanoplatelets (f-GNP) based electrodes. In addition, these electrodes based water filter was used for multiple metals removal from sea water. Graphite nanoplatelets (GNP) were prepared by acid intercalation and thermal exfoliation. Functionalization of GNP was done by further acid treatment. Material was characterized by different characterization techniques. Performance of supercapacitor based water filter was analyzed for the removal of high concentration of arsenic (trivalent and pentavalent) and sodium as well as for desalination of sea water, using cyclic voltametry (CV) and inductive coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) techniques. Adsorption isotherms and kinetic characteristics were studied for the simultaneous removal of sodium and arsenic (both trivalent and pentavalent). Maximum adsorption capacities of 27, 29 and 32 mg/g for arsenate, arsenite and sodium were achieved in addition to good removal efficiency for sodium, magnesium, calcium and potassium from sea water.

  16. SO2 surface chemistry on metal substrates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.M.; Sloan, D.; White, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    The surface chemistry, induced by thermal and non-thermal methods, of SO2 on metal substrates is reviewed. The substrate temperature during dosing is important; regardless of metal, adsorption is dissociative at 300 K and molecular at 100 K. On Ni, Pd, and Pt, molecular adsorption occurs through the S and one O atom, and the molecular plane is perpendicular to the surface. However, on Ag and Cu, adsorption occurs only through the S with the molecular plane perpendicular to the surface. The differences can be attributed to the structure of the metal`s molecular orbitals and their interactions with the SO2 orbitals. Upon heating, SO2 dissociates on all transition metal surfaces with the exception of Ag, Au, and Cu, where only molecular desorption occurs. On Pt, Fe, and Pd, additional reactions are observed between SO2 and its dissociation products. The nonthermal reactions induced by photons and electrons for monolayer coverages of SO2 on Ag (111) are dominated by molecular desorption. Desorption cross sections for 313 nm photons and 50 eV electrons were 2.8 x 10(exp {minus}20) sq cm and approx. 1 x 10(exp {minus}16) sq cm, respectively. Nonthermal excitation mechanisms and quenching processes as well as interesting characteristics of SO2 under irradiation are also reviewed.

  17. Toxicity and removal of heavy metals (cadmium, copper, and zinc) by Lemna gibba.

    PubMed

    Megateli, Smain; Semsari, Saida; Couderchet, Michel

    2009-09-01

    Effects of cadmium, copper, and zinc on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba were determined under controlled conditions; in parallel their removal from the growth medium was followed. The results showed that the three heavy metals affected growth, a physiological stress index defined as the ratio of Chlorophyll to phaeophytin (D665/D665a), and the contents of proline. After 4 days, 10(-3)-10(-1)mg/L Cd inhibited growth by 25-100%, reduced D665/D665a by 35-89%, and increased proline content by 44-567%. Under the same conditions, 10(-4)-10(-1) microg/L Cu inhibited growth by 36-75%, reduced D665/D665a by 19-81%, and increased proline content by 67-288%. Comparable concentrations of Zn had little effect. However, higher concentrations (4, 30, and 50mg/L) inhibited growth by 50-79%. Also, 0.1 and 30 mg/L induced a small reduction of D665/D665a (-3.8% and -22%) and an increase in proline contents (+144% and +177%). When it was observed, proline accumulation was always transient and the maximum was reached after 4 days. Monitoring metal concentration in the medium showed that L. gibba was able to remove metals from the medium. Zn and Cu removal was biphasic, it was rapid during the first 2 days (> 60% reduction) and slow (10-20%) during the following 8 days. For Cd, removal was linear and depended on the initial concentration. It reached approximately 90% after 6 or 8 days for initial concentrations of 10(-1) and 10(-3)mg/L, respectively. PMID:19505721

  18. Assessing the utility of mixed organic materials for removal of metals in mine drainage impacted waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, H.; Neculita, C.; Lee, G.; Jeong, J.; Cho, D.; Chang, S.

    2010-12-01

    The use of natural organic materials in bioreactors is one of the most sustainable technologies for treatment of metals in mine-impacted waters. Several natural organic substrates including mushroom compost, cow manure, sawdust, wood chips, and cut rice straw were characterized and used in combination for treating mine drainage with acidic (pH 3) and moderate pH (pH 6). Bench-scale batch experiments were performed for 35-day period to evaluate the performance of organic substrates in removing dissolved metals. Overall results indicated that mixtures of different substrates showed satisfactory performances in removing metals (Al > Fe > Mn) (up to 100%), generating alkalinity, and reducing sulfate at both pH conditions. The mixture of sawdust and cow manure was found as the most effective whereas the mixture containing 40% cut rice straw gave limited efficiency, suggesting organic carbon released from this substrate is not readily available for biodegradation under anaerobic conditions. The mushroom compost based bioreactors released significant amount of sulfate, which may raise a concern upon the start-up of field-scale bioreactors. Collectively, the substrate mixtures had comparable performances to the mushroom compost, the most commonly used material in field bioreactors, in terms of metal removal, pH neutralization, and sulfate reduction, except for the reactors containing rice straw. Especially, the mixture of sawdust and cow manure was the most efficient substrate for treatment of mine-impacted waters. The correlation between the extent of sulfate reduction and dissolved organic carbon/SO42- ratio was weak and this indicates the type of DOC plays more important role in sulfate reduction than the absolute concentration and that the ratio is not sensitive enough to properly describe the relative effectiveness of substrate mixtures.

  19. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the

  20. Comprehensive review on phytotechnology: Heavy metals removal by diverse aquatic plants species from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Shahabaldin; Taib, Shazwin Mat; Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Kamyab, Hesam

    2016-11-15

    Environmental pollution specifically water pollution is alarming both in the developed and developing countries. Heavy metal contamination of water resources is a critical issue which adversely affects humans, plants and animals. Phytoremediation is a cost-effective remediation technology which able to treat heavy metal polluted sites. This environmental friendly method has been successfully implemented in constructed wetland (CWs) which is able to restore the aquatic biosystem naturally. Nowadays, many aquatic plant species are being investigated to determine their potential and effectiveness for phytoremediation application, especially high growth rate plants i.e. macrophytes. Based on the findings, phytofiltration (rhizofiltration) is the sole method which defined as heavy metals removal from water by aquatic plants. Due to specific morphology and higher growth rate, free-floating plants were more efficient to uptake heavy metals in comparison with submerged and emergent plants. In this review, the potential of wide range of aquatic plant species with main focus on four well known species (hyper-accumulators): Pistia stratiotes, Eicchornia spp., Lemna spp. and Salvinia spp. was investigated. Moreover, we discussed about the history, methods and future prospects in phytoremediation of heavy metals by aquatic plants comprehensively.

  1. Electrodialytic treatment for metal removal from sewage sludge ash from fluidized bed combustion.

    PubMed

    Pazos, M; Kirkelund, G M; Ottosen, L M

    2010-04-15

    Sewage sludge contains several potentially hazardous compounds such as heavy metals, PCBs, PAHs, etc. However, elements with high agricultural value (P, K or Ca) are also present. During the last years, the fluidized bed sludge combustor (FBSC) is considered an effective and novel alternative to treat sewage sludge. By its use, the high amount of sludge is reduced to a small quantity of ash and thermal destruction of toxic organic constituents is obtained. Conversely, heavy metals are retained in the ash. In this work the possibility for electrodialytic metal removal for sewage sludge ash from FBSC was studied. A detailed characterization of the sewage sludge ash was done initially, determining that, with the exception of Cd, the other heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Zn) were under the limiting levels of Danish legislation for the use of sewage sludge as fertilizer. After 14 days of electrodialytic treatment, the Cd concentration was reduced to values below the limiting concentration. In all experiments the concentrations of other metals were under limiting values of the Danish legislation. It can be concluded that the electrodialytic treatment is an adequate alternative to reduce the Cd concentration in FBSC ash prior to use as fertilizer. PMID:20034740

  2. Comprehensive review on phytotechnology: Heavy metals removal by diverse aquatic plants species from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Shahabaldin; Taib, Shazwin Mat; Md Din, Mohd Fadhil; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Kamyab, Hesam

    2016-11-15

    Environmental pollution specifically water pollution is alarming both in the developed and developing countries. Heavy metal contamination of water resources is a critical issue which adversely affects humans, plants and animals. Phytoremediation is a cost-effective remediation technology which able to treat heavy metal polluted sites. This environmental friendly method has been successfully implemented in constructed wetland (CWs) which is able to restore the aquatic biosystem naturally. Nowadays, many aquatic plant species are being investigated to determine their potential and effectiveness for phytoremediation application, especially high growth rate plants i.e. macrophytes. Based on the findings, phytofiltration (rhizofiltration) is the sole method which defined as heavy metals removal from water by aquatic plants. Due to specific morphology and higher growth rate, free-floating plants were more efficient to uptake heavy metals in comparison with submerged and emergent plants. In this review, the potential of wide range of aquatic plant species with main focus on four well known species (hyper-accumulators): Pistia stratiotes, Eicchornia spp., Lemna spp. and Salvinia spp. was investigated. Moreover, we discussed about the history, methods and future prospects in phytoremediation of heavy metals by aquatic plants comprehensively. PMID:27474848

  3. Synthesis and implementation of nano-chitosan and its acetophenone derivative for enhanced removal of metals.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Mohamed E; Abou Kana, Maram T H; Hendy, Ahmed A

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, nano-chitosan (Nano-Ch) was synthesized by ionic gelation of chitosan/tripolyphosphate system and successfully modified with acetophenone via Schiff's base condensation to produce nano-chitosan-modified-actophenone (Nano-Ch-Ac). The produced nano-materials were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, HR-TEM and TGA techniques. The average particle sizes were found in the range of 5.20-14.54nm based on the HR-TEM analysis. The metal interaction properties of Nano-Ch and Nano-Ch-Ac with Cu(II), Cd(II), Hg(II) and Pb(II) were compared in presence of various experimental parameters. Nano-Ch-Ac sorbent was found more superior in the extraction processes of all examined metal ions under the evaluated experimental parameters. This trend was confirmed from the highest determined metal sorption capacity values of metal ions as 1298-1608 and 810-1236μmolg(-1) in pH 7.0 by Nano-Ch-Ac and Nano-Ch sorbents, respectively. The adsorption equilibrium was established at 30.0min of contact time by the two nano-chitosan sorbents. The superiority of Nano-Ch-Ac was also confirmed from the dynamic applications of this nano-sorbent for removal of divalent metal ions from tap water, sea water and industrial wastewater (91.3-100.0±1.0-3.0).

  4. Removal of heavy metals from toxic wastes using composite polypyrrole films

    SciTech Connect

    Hepel, M.; Stephenson, R.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, we will present a new method of removal of heavy metals such as Pb{sup 2+}, Ni{sup +2}, Ca{sup +2}, Cd{sup +2} from contaminated waters or toxic wastes by using conductive polymer films. Procedures used in the preparation of composite polypyrrole films will be discussed. These films, when electrodeposited on the electrode, are capable of fast and efficient incorporation of any heavy metals which exist in aqueous solution in the form of cations by applying suitable potential step. To track the incorporation or release of heavy metals from the film, the Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance (EQCM) has been used. The EQCM technique, as a sensitive piezoelectric sensor offers a direct and {open_quotes}in-situ{close_quotes} measurement of ion selectivity and ion dynamics in these conductive polymer films. The selectivity coefficients for a variety of heavy metals versus Na{sup +} were evaluated. An electrochemical post-treatment step restores the incorporation capacity of the composite polymer for heavy metals to its initial state.

  5. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance. PMID:24901625

  6. Growth and heavy metal removal by Klebsiella aerogenes at different pH and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shahwani, M.F.; Jazrawi, S.F.; Al-Rawi, E.H.; Ayar, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    A strain of Klebsiella aerogenes isolated from Rustamiyah Station for treatment of wastewater was examined for its ability to grow in a media supplemented with maximum tolerance concentrations of Pb/sup + +/, Zn/sup + +/, Ni/sup + +/, and Cd/sup + +/, separately, at different temperatures and initial pH. The results indicated that at 28/sup 0/C during the first 24 hr, Pb/sup + +/ and Ni/sup + +/ had no effect on the growth of the bacteria, while the presence of Zn/sup + +/ and Cd/sup + +/ decreased the cell count. The growth reached a maximum level after the second day and started to decrease gradually. The bacterial count at 37/sup 0/C was less than that at 28/sup 0/C. No bacterial multiplication occurred at 44/sup 0/C. There was little difference between heavy metal removal at 28 and 37/sup 0/C. At 44/sup 0/C, little removal took place. In general, slightly acidic or neutral medium was better for both bacterial growth and metal removal.

  7. FULL-SCALE TREATMENT WETLANDS FOR METAL REMOVAL FROM INDUSTRIAL WASTEWATER

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E; John Gladden, J

    2007-03-22

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater discharges and stormwater runoff from the Savannah River National Laboratory. Routine monitoring indicated that copper concentrations were regularly higher than discharge permit limit, and water routinely failed toxicity tests. These conditions necessitated treatment of nearly one million gallons of water per day plus storm runoff. Washington Savannah River Company personnel explored options to bring process and runoff waters into compliance with the permit conditions, including source reduction, engineering solutions, and biological solutions. A conceptual design for a constructed wetland treatment system (WTS) was developed and the full-scale system was constructed and began operation in 2000. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland with a hydraulic retention time of approximately 48 hours. Copper, mercury, and lead removal efficiencies are very high, all in excess of 80% removal from water passing through the wetland system. Zinc removal is 60%, and nickel is generally unaffected. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Concentrations of metals in the A-01 WTS sediments generally decrease with depth and along the flow path through the wetland. Sequential extraction results indicate that most metals are tightly bound to wetland sediments.

  8. Penile Incarceration with Encircling Metallic Objects: A Study of Successful Removal

    PubMed Central

    Lal, Shyam; Shrivastava, G.P.; Singh, Lal Mani

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article aimed to study the various treatment options according to the grading scale for penile incarceration. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review, of all the case files of patients presented with penile incarceration with encircling metallic object was performed. The patients were analyzed for age, marital status, motive, object used, who applied it, trauma grade, duration of incarceration, removal technique, removal time, anesthesia used and recovery time. Result: A total of seven patients were identified. The average age was 46.71 years. Self-sexual gratification was the most common motive (five patients). Six patients presented within 24 hours. Grade II of injury was commonest type of injury seen in five patients.The technique of removal chosen was according to grade of penile injury, duration of incarceration and type of object used. Spinal anesthesia was used in most of the cases (five patients). Conclusion: Penile incarceration with encircling metallic objects is a rare presentation and requires urgent intervention according to trauma grade to prevent complications. PMID:25121021

  9. The influence of temperature and salt on metal and sediment removal in stormwater biofilters.

    PubMed

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Stormwater biofilters are used to treat stormwater runoff. In countries with cold winter climates, biofilters are subject to low temperatures which, in some cases, are combined with potentially high salt concentrations from road de-icing, potentially affecting the biofilter's performance. Since stormwater biofilters have been developed without consideration of their critical winter use, a laboratory study was carried out to evaluate the performance of stormwater biofilters subjected to low and high temperatures, with and without salt. Both factors and their interaction had a significant effect on outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Salt had a negative impact on outflow concentrations, causing lower removal percentages for (especially dissolved) metals, this impact being most pronounced for Cu and Pb. The unrealistic combination of salt with high temperature seemed to further amplify the negative impacts of salt despite the fact that temperature alone did not cause significant differences in outflow concentrations and removal percentages. Still, biofilters showed the ability to treat stormwater efficiently under the simulated winter conditions; outflow concentrations for total metals as a minimum met the class 4 threshold value defined in the Swedish freshwater quality guidelines, while inflow concentrations clearly exceeded the threshold value for class 5. The relatively coarse filter material (which is recommended to facilitate infiltration during winter) did not seem to exacerbate biofilter performance.

  10. Removal of PCR Error Products and Unincorporated Primers by Metal-Chelate Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Kanakaraj, Indhu; Jewell, David L.; Murphy, Jason C.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography (IMAC) has been used for decades to purify proteins on the basis of amino acid content, especially surface-exposed histidines and “histidine tags” genetically added to recombinant proteins. We and others have extended the use of IMAC to purification of nucleic acids via interactions with the nucleotide bases, especially purines, of single-stranded RNA and DNA. We also have demonstrated the purification of plasmid DNA from contaminating genomic DNA by IMAC capture of selectively-denatured genomic DNA. Here we describe an efficient method of purifying PCR products by specifically removing error products, excess primers, and unincorporated dNTPs from PCR product mixtures using flow-through metal-chelate affinity adsorption. By flowing a PCR product mixture through a Cu2+-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) agarose spin column, 94–99% of the dNTPs and nearly all the primers can be removed. Many of the error products commonly formed by Taq polymerase also are removed. Sequencing of the IMAC-processed PCR product gave base-calling accuracy comparable to that obtained with a commercial PCR product purification method. The results show that IMAC matrices (specifically Cu2+-IDA agarose) can be used for the purification of PCR products. Due to the generality of the base-specific mechanism of adsorption, IMAC matrices may also be used in the purification of oligonucleotides, cDNA, mRNA and micro RNAs. PMID:21264292

  11. Clogging influence on metals migration and removal in sub-surface flow constructed wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranieri, Ezio; Young, Thomas M.

    2012-03-01

    Chromium (Cr) and Nickel (Ni) removal from secondary effluent has been evaluated in a four year research program to determine the effectiveness of Sub-Surface Flow (SSF) Constructed Wetlands (cws). Tests were performed in small scale (10 l/h) and full scale (150 m3/d) SSF cws. Metals removal was also assessed as a function of increased clogging that occurred in the cws over the course of the study. Cr and Ni content were evaluated in sediments at various locations along the flow path and in plant tissues by sampling Phragmites australis roots, stems and leaves. Clogging was evaluated by measuring hydraulic conductivity at the same sampling locations at the beginning and at the end of the experiment. Residence Time Distribution (RTD) curves were also assessed at the beginning and after 48 months; the skewness of the RTDs increased over this period. Proportionality between increasing clogging and sediment accumulation of metals was observed, especially for Ni. Adsorption to the original matrix and the accumulated sediment is a removal mechanism consistent with available data.

  12. Removal and biodegradation of naphthenic acids by biochar and attached environmental biofilms in the presence of co-contaminating metals.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Mathew L; Bhuiyan, Tazul I; Veksha, Andrei; Demeter, Marc A; Layzell, David B; Helleur, Robert J; Hill, Josephine M; Turner, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of using a combined biofilm-biochar approach to remove organic (naphthenic acids (NAs)) and inorganic (metals) contaminants from process water (OSPW) generated by Canada's oil sands mining operations. A microbial community sourced from an OSPW sample was cultured as biofilms on several carbonaceous materials. Two biochar samples, from softwood bark (SB) and Aspen wood (N3), facilitated the most microbial growth (measured by protein assays) and were used for NA removal studies performed with and without biofilms, and in the presence and absence of contaminating metals. Similar NA removal was seen in 6-day sterile N3 and SB assays (>30%), while biodegradation by SB-associated biofilms increased NA removal to 87% in the presence of metals. Metal sorption was also observed, with up to four times more immobilization of Fe, Al, and As on biofilm-associated biochar. These results suggest this combined approach may be a promising treatment for OSPW. PMID:27259191

  13. Heavy metal removal from synthetic wastewaters in an anaerobic bioreactor using stillage from ethanol distilleries as a carbon source.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, M M M; da Costa, A C A; Leite, S G F; Sant'Anna, G L

    2007-11-01

    This work was conducted to investigate the possibility of using stillage from ethanol distilleries as substrate for sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) growth and to evaluate the removal efficiency of heavy metals present in wastewaters containing sulfates. The experiments were carried out in a continuous bench-scale Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor (13 l) operated with a hydraulic retention time of 18 h. The bioreactor was inoculated with 7 l of anaerobic sludge. Afterwards, an enrichment procedure to increase SRB numbers was started. After this, cadmium and zinc were added to the synthetic wastewater, and their removal as metal sulfide was evaluated. The synthetic wastewater used represented the drainage from a dam of a metallurgical industry to which a carbon source (stillage) was added. The results showed that high percentages of removal (>99%) of Cd and Zn were attained in the bioreactor, and that the removal as sulfide precipitates was not the only form of metal removal occurring in the bioreactor environment.

  14. Simultaneous heavy metals removal and municipal sewage sludge dewaterability improvement in bioleaching processes by various inoculums.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chaohong; Zhu, Nengwu; Shang, Ru; Kang, Naixin; Wu, Pingxiao

    2015-11-01

    The heavy metals content and dewaterability of municipal sewage sludge (MSS) are important parameters affecting its subsequent disposal and land application. Six kinds of inoculums were prepared to examine the characteristics of heavy metals removal and MSS dewaterability improvement in bioleaching processes. The results showed that Cu, Zn and Cd bioleaching efficiencies (12 days) were 81-91, 87-93 and 81-89%, respectively, which were significantly higher than those of Fe-S control (P < 0.05) and blank control (P < 0.01). The bioleaching boosted by the prepared inoculums could also significantly enhance MSS dewaterability (P < 0.01). The centrifugal dehydration efficiency of MSS rose from 73.00 to 90.00% at day 12. Microscopic observations and energy dispersive spectrum analysis demonstrated that the dewaterability improvement might be attributed to the changes of sludge structure from flocculent to obvious granular and the formation of secondary minerals mainly consisting of iron, oxygen and sulfur elements. The results above demonstrated that bacterial consortium enriched from acid mine drainage (AMD) was suitable to boost sludge bioleaching for heavy metals removal and dewaterability improvement. It also suggested that the synergy of sulfur/ferrous-oxidizing bacteria (SFOB) enriched from AMD and the cooperation of exogenous and indigenous SFOB significantly promoted bioleaching efficiencies.

  15. Pectin-rich fruit wastes as biosorbents for heavy metal removal: equilibrium and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Schiewer, Silke; Patil, Santosh B

    2008-04-01

    Biosorption can be used as a cost effective and efficient technique for the removal of toxic heavy metals from wastewater. Waste materials from industries such as food processing and agriculture may act as biosorbents. This study investigates the removal of cadmium by fruit wastes (derived from several citrus fruits, apples and grapes). Citrus peels were identified as the most promising biosorbent due to high metal uptake in conjunction with physical stability. Uptake was rapid with equilibrium reached after 30-80 min depending on the particle size (0.18-0.9 mm). Sorption kinetics followed a second-order model. Sorption equilibrium isotherms could be described by the Langmuir model in some cases, whereas in others an S-shaped isotherm was observed, that did not follow the Langmuir isotherm model. The metal uptake increased with pH, with uptake capacities ranging between 0.5 and 0.9 meq/g of dry peel. Due to their low cost, good uptake capacity, and rapid kinetics, citrus peels are a promising biosorbent material warranting further study. PMID:17540559

  16. Removal of Machine Oil from Metal Surface by Mesoplasma Jet under Open Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Haruki; Shiki, Hajime; Tsujii, Kenichi; Oke, Shinichiro; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Okawa, Takashi; Yamanaka, Shigenobu

    2009-08-01

    An attempt was made to employ the plasma-energized jet (PEN-jet) generated by pulsed arc discharge, one of the atmospheric-pressure mesoplasmas, for removal of machine oil from the surface of electrically-grounded aluminum (Al) alloy substrate under open atmosphere. Three types of nozzle configurations were examined; a metal nozzle, ceramic nozzle, and electrically-floated metal nozzle. Electric input power to the pulsed arc plasma discharge was 700 W constant. First, free-burning of the PEN-jet was observed as a function of air gas flow. When the PEN-jets were irradiated to the clean substrate, the PEN-jet with the metal nozzle caused substrate damage by the arc spot due to transferring arc discharge. Then the PEN-jet with the ceramic nozzle was irradiated to the oily substrate. The adhesion strength of sealant and water contact angle of the treated surface were then measured. As a result, these values of the oily substrate treated by the PEN-jet were almost the same as those of clean substrate. The treated surface was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and reflectance spectroscopy. Their spectral profiles clearly indicated oil removal from the surface by PEN-jet.

  17. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for the Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems: Adsorption and Application

    PubMed Central

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R. Shane

    2012-01-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials’ biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  18. Continuous metal removal from solution and industrial effluents using Spirogyra biomass-packed column reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Kumar, Dhananjay; Gaur, J P

    2012-03-01

    The granules of Spirogyra neglecta biomass, diameter 0.2-0.5mm, were successfully prepared by boiling it in urea-formaldehyde mixture. Metal sorption performance of the column packed with Spirogyra granules was assessed under variable operating conditions, such as, different influent metal concentrations, bed heights and flow rates. These conditions greatly influenced the breakthrough time and volume, saturation time and volume, and the ability of the column to attain saturation after reaching the breakthrough. The experimental breakthrough curves obtained under varying experimental conditions were modeled using Bohart-Adams, Wolborska, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson and modified dose-response models. The first two models were valid only in representing the initial part of the breakthrough curves; however, the other three models were good in representing the entire breakthrough curve. The granule-packed column could be successfully used up to 6 and 9 cycles of sorption and desorption for the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II), respectively. The column could efficiently remove different metals from real industrial effluents, and hence the test biomass (Spirogyra granules) is a good candidate for commercial application.

  19. Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber for the removal of dye and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Agarwal, Shilpi; Singh, Prerna; Pathania, Deepak

    2013-10-15

    Acrylic acid grafted cellulosic Luffa cylindrical fiber was utilized for the removal of methylene blue and metal ions from the water system using batch process. The grafted sample used was found to demonstrate a maximum grafting efficiency of 90.8% under concentrations of 0.432×10(-3) mol/L, temperature of 35 °C, time of 60 min and pH of 7.0 respectively. The remarkable improvement in thermal properties of the grafted sample was observed. The formation of new bands in FTIR spectra of grafted sample confirmed the grafting of acrylic acid onto the cellulosic fiber. The maximum adsorption capacity of dye onto adsorbent was observed to be 62.15 mg g(-1) at 175 min. A maximum removal of 45.8% was observed for Mg(2+) as compared to other metal ions. High values of correlation coefficient for methylene blue (0.995) and metal ions such as Mg(2+) (0.996), Ni(2+) (0.995), Zn(2+) (0.996) confirmed the applicability of Langmuir isotherm that assumed a monolayer coverage and uniform activity distribution on the adsorbent surface.

  20. Functionalized nanoporous silica for the removal of heavy metals from biological systems: adsorption and application.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L; Warner, Marvin G; Fryxell, Glen E; Wiacek, Robert J; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, R Shane

    2010-10-01

    Surface-functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS), has previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems, suggesting that they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials' biocompatibility, and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e., blood, urine, etc.) Consequentially, thiol-functionalized SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material's performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e., variable pH and ionic strength) to gauge any potentially negative effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or the removal of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus nontoxic. The results show that organic ligand functionalized nanoporous silica could be a valuable material for a range of detoxification therapies and potentially other biomedical applications. PMID:20939537

  1. Continuous metal removal from solution and industrial effluents using Spirogyra biomass-packed column reactor.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alpana; Kumar, Dhananjay; Gaur, J P

    2012-03-01

    The granules of Spirogyra neglecta biomass, diameter 0.2-0.5mm, were successfully prepared by boiling it in urea-formaldehyde mixture. Metal sorption performance of the column packed with Spirogyra granules was assessed under variable operating conditions, such as, different influent metal concentrations, bed heights and flow rates. These conditions greatly influenced the breakthrough time and volume, saturation time and volume, and the ability of the column to attain saturation after reaching the breakthrough. The experimental breakthrough curves obtained under varying experimental conditions were modeled using Bohart-Adams, Wolborska, Thomas, Yoon-Nelson and modified dose-response models. The first two models were valid only in representing the initial part of the breakthrough curves; however, the other three models were good in representing the entire breakthrough curve. The granule-packed column could be successfully used up to 6 and 9 cycles of sorption and desorption for the removal of Cu(II) and Pb(II), respectively. The column could efficiently remove different metals from real industrial effluents, and hence the test biomass (Spirogyra granules) is a good candidate for commercial application. PMID:22169159

  2. Enhancing the removal of arsenic, boron and heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetlands using different supporting media.

    PubMed

    Allende, K Lizama; Fletcher, T D; Sun, G

    2011-01-01

    The presence of arsenic and heavy metals in drinking water sources poses a serious health risk due to chronic toxicological effects. Constructed wetlands have the potential to remove arsenic and heavy metals, but little is known about pollutant removal efficiency and reliability of wetlands for this task. This lab-scale study investigated the use of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands for removing arsenic, boron, copper, zinc, iron and manganese from synthetic wastewater. Gravel, limestone, zeolite and cocopeat were employed as wetland media. Conventional gravel media only showed limited capability in removing arsenic, iron, copper and zinc; and it showed virtually no capability in removing manganese and boron. In contrast, alternative wetland media: cocopeat, zeolite and limestone, demonstrated significant efficiencies--in terms of percentage removal and mass rate per m3 of wetland volume--for removing arsenic, iron, manganese, copper and zinc; their ability to remove boron, in terms of mass removal rate, was also higher than that of the gravel media. The overall results demonstrated the potential of using vertical flow wetlands to remove arsenic and metals from contaminated water, having cocopeat, zeolite or limestone as supporting media.

  3. Enhancing the removal of arsenic, boron and heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetlands using different supporting media.

    PubMed

    Allende, K Lizama; Fletcher, T D; Sun, G

    2011-01-01

    The presence of arsenic and heavy metals in drinking water sources poses a serious health risk due to chronic toxicological effects. Constructed wetlands have the potential to remove arsenic and heavy metals, but little is known about pollutant removal efficiency and reliability of wetlands for this task. This lab-scale study investigated the use of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands for removing arsenic, boron, copper, zinc, iron and manganese from synthetic wastewater. Gravel, limestone, zeolite and cocopeat were employed as wetland media. Conventional gravel media only showed limited capability in removing arsenic, iron, copper and zinc; and it showed virtually no capability in removing manganese and boron. In contrast, alternative wetland media: cocopeat, zeolite and limestone, demonstrated significant efficiencies--in terms of percentage removal and mass rate per m3 of wetland volume--for removing arsenic, iron, manganese, copper and zinc; their ability to remove boron, in terms of mass removal rate, was also higher than that of the gravel media. The overall results demonstrated the potential of using vertical flow wetlands to remove arsenic and metals from contaminated water, having cocopeat, zeolite or limestone as supporting media. PMID:22049756

  4. Impact of humic/fulvic acid on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using nanomaterials: a review.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wang-Wang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gong, Ji-Lai; Liang, Jie; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Nowadays nanomaterials have been widely used to remove heavy metals from water/wastewater due to their large surface area and high reactivity. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) exist ubiquitously in aquatic environments and have a variety of functional groups which allow them to complex with metal ions and interact with nanomaterials. These interactions can not only alter the environmental behavior of nanomaterials, but also influence the removal and transportation of heavy metals by nanomaterials. Thus, the interactions and the underlying mechanisms involved warrant specific investigations. This review outlined the effects of HA/FA on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by various nanomaterials, mainly including carbon-based nanomaterials, iron-based nanomaterials and photocatalytic nanomaterials. Moreover, mechanisms involved in the interactions were discussed and potential environmental implications of HA/FA to nanomaterials and heavy metals were evaluated.

  5. Removal and recovery of metals and other materials by supported liquid membranes with strip dispersion.

    PubMed

    Ho, W S Winston

    2003-03-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in supported liquid membranes (SLMs) with strip dispersion for removal and recovery of metals including chromium, copper, zinc, and strontium; it also discusses potential applications of SLMs for removal and recovery of other materials, including cobalt and penicillin G. The technology for chromium that we developed, not only removes the Cr(VI) from about 100-1,000 ppm to less than 0.05 ppm in the treated effluent allowable for discharge or recycle, but also recovers the chromium product at a high concentration of about 20% Cr(VI) (62.3% Na(2)CrO(4)) suitable for resale or reuse. In other words, we have achieved the goals of zero discharge and no sludge. The stability of the SLM is ensured by a modified SLM with strip dispersion, where the aqueous strip solution is dispersed in the organic membrane solution in a mixer. The strip dispersion formed is circulated from the mixer to the membrane module to provide a constant supply of the organic solution to the membrane pores. The copper SLM system that we have identified, not only removed the copper from 150 ppm in the inlet feed to less than 0.15 ppm in the treated feed, but also recovered the copper at a high concentration of greater than 10,000 ppm in the strip solution. For the zinc SLM system identified, zinc at an inlet feed concentration of 550 ppm was removed to less than 0.3 ppm in the treated feed, whereas a high zinc concentration of more than 17,000 ppm was recovered in the strip solution. For strontium removal, we synthesized a family of new extractants, alkyl phenylphosphonic acids. The SLM removed radioactive (90)Sr to the target of 8 pCi/L or lower from feed solutions of 300-1,000 pCi/L. The SLM removed cobalt from about 525 ppm to 0.7 ppm in the treated feed solution, concentrating it to at least 30,000 ppm in the aqueous strip solution. Concerning penicillin G recovery, the SLM removed penicillin G from a feed of 8,840 ppm and concentrated it to a high concentration

  6. Changes in worldwide demand for metals (final). Open File report

    SciTech Connect

    Faucett, J.G.; Chmelynski, H.J.

    1986-08-01

    Worldwide demand for metals was analyzed to identify the important factors that explain differences in the level of demand among world countries. The per capita demand for steel, aluminum, copper, and total nonferrous metals was investigated for 40 to 50 countries over a 22-year period. These countries have been further grouped into four world regions for purposes of making generalizations about the importance of these factors for countries in different stages of development and with dissimilar levels of per capita gross domestic product (GDP). Intercountry and intertemporal differences are explained largely by differences in per capita GDP and changes over time in per capita GDP, oil real prices, and to a lesser extent, metal real prices. The trend in world consumption is dramatically different in the last decade than the previous one. In 1962-73, per capita consumption increased in all areas and consumption intensity (consumption divided by (GDP) increased in most areas). In 1973-84, per capita consumption fell in most areas and intensity fell dramatically, except in developing nations.

  7. Removing heavy metals in water: the interaction of cactus mucilage and arsenate (As (V)).

    PubMed

    Fox, Dawn I; Pichler, Thomas; Yeh, Daniel H; Alcantar, Norma A

    2012-04-17

    High concentrations of arsenic in groundwater continue to present health threats to millions of consumers worldwide. Particularly, affected communities in the developing world need accessible technologies for arsenic removal from drinking water. We explore the application of cactus mucilage, pectic polysaccharide extracts from Opuntia ficus-indica for arsenic removal. Synthetic arsenate (As (V)) solutions were treated with two extracts, a gelling extract (GE) and a nongelling extract (NE) in batch trials. The arsenic concentration at the air-water interface was measured after equilibration. The GE and NE treated solutions showed on average 14% and 9% increases in arsenic concentration at the air-water interface respectively indicating that the mucilage bonded and transported the arsenic to the air-water interface. FTIR studies showed that the -CO groups (carboxyl and carbonyl groups) and -OH (hydroxyl) functional groups of the mucilage were involved in the interaction with the arsenate. Mucilage activity was greater in weakly basic (pH 9) and weakly acidic (pH 5.5) pH. This interaction can be optimized and harnessed for the removal of arsenic from drinking water. This work breaks the ground for the application of natural pectic materials to the removal of anionic metallic species from water. PMID:22401577

  8. Removal and bioaccumulation of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Shamshad, Isha; Khan, Sardar; Waqas, Muhammad; Ahmad, Nadeem; Khushnood-Ur-Rehman; Khan, Kifayatullah

    2015-01-01

    Four freshwater algae, including Cladophora glomerata, Oedogonium westii, Vaucheria debaryana and Zygnema insigne, were tested for their bioaccumulation capacity for cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a controlled environment with an average temperature of 18 °C, and light/dark duration of 12:12 h. Experiments were performed in aqueous solutions containing selected heavy metals (HM) (ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mg L(-1)) with 0.5 g of living algae at 18 °C and pH 6.8. The results indicated that C. glomerata was observed to be the most competent species for the removal of Cr, Cd and Pb from aqueous solutions. HM removal trends were in the order of Cd>Cr>Pb while the removal efficiency of selected algae species was in the order of C. glomerata, O. westii, V. debaryana and Z. insigne. The bioaccumulation capacity of C. glomerata, V. debaryana and Z. insigne was observed for different HM. Removal of HM was higher with low levels of HM in aqueous solutions. The results indicated that C. glomerata, O. westii, V. debaryana and Z. insigne had significant (P≤0.01) diverse bioaccumulation capacity for Cr, Cd and Pb. PMID:25607667

  9. Removal and bioaccumulation of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Shamshad, Isha; Khan, Sardar; Waqas, Muhammad; Ahmad, Nadeem; Khushnood-Ur-Rehman; Khan, Kifayatullah

    2015-01-01

    Four freshwater algae, including Cladophora glomerata, Oedogonium westii, Vaucheria debaryana and Zygnema insigne, were tested for their bioaccumulation capacity for cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr) and lead (Pb) in a controlled environment with an average temperature of 18 °C, and light/dark duration of 12:12 h. Experiments were performed in aqueous solutions containing selected heavy metals (HM) (ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mg L(-1)) with 0.5 g of living algae at 18 °C and pH 6.8. The results indicated that C. glomerata was observed to be the most competent species for the removal of Cr, Cd and Pb from aqueous solutions. HM removal trends were in the order of Cd>Cr>Pb while the removal efficiency of selected algae species was in the order of C. glomerata, O. westii, V. debaryana and Z. insigne. The bioaccumulation capacity of C. glomerata, V. debaryana and Z. insigne was observed for different HM. Removal of HM was higher with low levels of HM in aqueous solutions. The results indicated that C. glomerata, O. westii, V. debaryana and Z. insigne had significant (P≤0.01) diverse bioaccumulation capacity for Cr, Cd and Pb.

  10. Evaluation of the capability of low-impact development practices for the removal of heavy metal from urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Maniquiz-Redillas, Marla C; Kim, Lee-Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Low-impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) have recently become well-known methods to capture, collect, retain, and remove pollutants in stormwater runoff. The research was conducted to assess the efficiency of LID/GI systems applied in removing the particulate and dissolved heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cr, Cd, and Fe) from urban stormwater runoff. A total of 82 storm events were monitored over a four-year period (2010-2014) on six LID/GI systems including infiltration trenches, tree box filter, rain garden, and hybrid constructed wetlands employed for the management of road, parking lot, and roof runoff. It was observed that the heavy metal concentration increased proportionally with the total suspended solids concentration. Among the heavy metal constituents, Fe appeared to be highly particulate-bound and was the easiest to remove followed by Zn and Pb; while metals such as Cr, Ni, Cu, and Cd were mostly dissolved and more difficult to remove. The mass fraction ratios of metal constituents at the effluent were increased relative to the influent. All the systems performed well in the removal of particulate-bound metals and were more efficient for larger storms greater than 15 mm wherein more particulate-bound metals were generated compared to smaller storms less than 5 mm that produced more dissolved metals. The efficiency of the systems in removing the particulate-bound metals was restricted during high average/peak flows; that is, high-intensity storms events and when heavy metals have low concentration levels.

  11. Evaluation of the capability of low-impact development practices for the removal of heavy metal from urban stormwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Maniquiz-Redillas, Marla C; Kim, Lee-Hyung

    2016-09-01

    Low-impact development (LID) and green infrastructure (GI) have recently become well-known methods to capture, collect, retain, and remove pollutants in stormwater runoff. The research was conducted to assess the efficiency of LID/GI systems applied in removing the particulate and dissolved heavy metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Ni, Cr, Cd, and Fe) from urban stormwater runoff. A total of 82 storm events were monitored over a four-year period (2010-2014) on six LID/GI systems including infiltration trenches, tree box filter, rain garden, and hybrid constructed wetlands employed for the management of road, parking lot, and roof runoff. It was observed that the heavy metal concentration increased proportionally with the total suspended solids concentration. Among the heavy metal constituents, Fe appeared to be highly particulate-bound and was the easiest to remove followed by Zn and Pb; while metals such as Cr, Ni, Cu, and Cd were mostly dissolved and more difficult to remove. The mass fraction ratios of metal constituents at the effluent were increased relative to the influent. All the systems performed well in the removal of particulate-bound metals and were more efficient for larger storms greater than 15 mm wherein more particulate-bound metals were generated compared to smaller storms less than 5 mm that produced more dissolved metals. The efficiency of the systems in removing the particulate-bound metals was restricted during high average/peak flows; that is, high-intensity storms events and when heavy metals have low concentration levels. PMID:26862669

  12. Thermodynamics Study of Removal of Heavy Metal by TiN-Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdavian, Leila

    2015-12-01

    The ability of TiN-nanotube to remove lead (Pb(II)) and arsenic (As(III)) ions from aqueous solutions is investigated. The thermodynamics properties of Pb(II) and As(III) ions passing through TiN-nanotubes (TiN-NTs) is calculated in basis set (B3LYP/6-31G**) DFT-IR method by Gaussian program package. The results showed, Pb(II) and As(III) passing through had low potential in middle nanotubes, and are trapped in this place. The thermodynamic properties showed; the passing through are spontaneous and favorable because ΔGele (MJ/mol) is negative for them. The goal of this study is the detection of surface species of TiN-NTs for metal ions removal by using computer calculations. The structural and thermodynamic properties studied ions absorption on TiN-NTs at room temperature.

  13. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, David O.; Alexeff, Igor; Sikka, Vinod K.

    1988-01-01

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to "float" in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields.

  14. Ingested metal in whooping cranes: an endoscopic technique for removal and implications for the release program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Olsen, G.H.; Wise, M.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1993 when the whooping crane (Grus americana) release program in Florida started, 21 whooping cranes at the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (Patuxent) have been diagnosed with gastrointestinal foreign bodies (primarily metal objects). A technique for safely removing these objects has been developed. The technique uses a flexible gastric endoscope to enter the proventriculus or ventriculus, and a snare or forceps passed down a channel of the endoscope to retrieve the foreign bodies. The technique is very successful with the whooping crane usually back to its pen the next day. The long-term survival of the whooping cranes from which gastrointestinal foreign bodies were removed was comparable to the survival of whooping cranes released with no history of gastrointestinal foreign bodies.

  15. Removal of Endobronchially Placed Vascular Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Using Flexible Bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kremens, Karol

    2016-04-01

    Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are commonly placed in malignant airway obstruction and sometimes in benign obstruction. Complications from SEMS placement are common, especially after 30 days from deployment. SEMS removal can be complicated and often involves significant resources. We report a case of a 78-year-old man with small cell carcinoma who underwent placement of a Luminexx endovascular stent in his right main stem bronchus, complicated by stent migration after initiation of chemotherapy. Stent removal was performed by flexible bronchoscopy, utilizing forceps inserted via a working channel, as well as a goose neck snare operated parallel to the bronchoscope. The patient was discharged the same day with no complications. PMID:27197344

  16. Method and apparatus for removal of gaseous, liquid and particulate contaminants from molten metals

    DOEpatents

    Hobson, D.O.; Alexeff, I.; Sikka, V.K.

    1987-08-10

    Method and apparatus for removal of nonelectrically-conducting gaseous, liquid, and particulate contaminants from molten metal compositions by applying a force thereto. The force (commonly referred to as the Lorentz Force) exerted by simultaneous application of an electric field and a magnetic field on a molten conductor causes an increase, in the same direction as the force, in the apparent specific gravity thereof, but does not affect the nonconducting materials. This difference in apparent densities cause the nonconducting materials to ''float'' in the opposite direction from the Lorentz Force at a rapid rate. Means are further provided for removal of the contaminants and prevention of stirring due to rotational forces generated by the applied fields. 6 figs.

  17. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were ‑5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  18. Investigation of metal contamination induced by a through silicon via reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Naoya; Aoyagi, Masahiro; Katagawa, Daisuke; Bandoh, Tsubasa; Mitsui, Takahiko; Yamamoto, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated metal contamination induced by a through silicon via (TSV) reveal process using direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. A complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) wafer including TSVs was bonded to a glass support substrate, and a TSV reveal process was performed by direct Si/Cu grinding and residual metal removal. Then, metal contamination near the SiO2/Si interface on the front side of the wafer was investigated by using a pulsed-MOS capacitor technique and measuring the effective generation lifetime and effective surface generation velocity before and after this TSV reveal process. The results of Zerbst analysis showed that the changes in average effective generation lifetime and average effective surface generation velocity were -5.4 and +4.2%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the effect of metal contamination induced by our TSV reveal process on circuit components is small.

  19. Evaluation of single and multilayered reactive zones for heavy metals removal from stormwater.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, Katarzyna; Fronczyk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the ability of granular activated carbon (GAC), silica spongolite (SS) and zeolite (Z) to remove heavy metals from aqueous solutions has been investigated through column tests. The breakthrough times for a mobile tracer that does not sorb to the material for SS, GAC and layered SS, Z and GAC were as follows: 2.54×10(4) s, 2.38×10(4) s and 3.02×10(4) s. The breakthrough time (tbR) for Ni was in the range from tbR=1.70×10(6) s for SS, through tbR=3.98×10(5) s for the layered bed, to tbR=8.75×10(5) s for GAC. The breakthrough time for Cd was in the range from tbR=1.83×10(5) s for GAC to tbR=1.30×10(6) s for SS, Z, GAC. During the experiment, the concentration of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in the solution from a column filled with construction aggregate and the concentration of Pb, and Cu in a filtrate from the column filled with several materials was close to zero. The reduction in metal ions removal was due to high pH values of the solution (above 8.00). In addition, during the testing period, an increase in Cd and Zn concentrations in the filtrate from the column filled with the layered bed was observed, but at the end of the experiment the concentrations did not reach the maximum values. The test results suggest that the multilayered permeable reactive barrier is the most effective technology for long time effective removal of heavy metals.

  20. Carbon Dioxide Removal from Flue Gas Using Microporous Metal Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Lesch, David A

    2010-06-30

    UOP LLC, a Honeywell Company, in collaboration with Professor Douglas LeVan at Vanderbilt University (VU), Professor Adam Matzger at the University of Michigan (UM), Professor Randall Snurr at Northwestern University (NU), and Professor Stefano Brandani at the University of Edinburgh (UE), supported by Honeywell's Specialty Materials business unit and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), have completed a three-year project to develop novel microporous metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and an associated vacuum-pressure swing adsorption (vPSA) process for the removal of CO{sub 2} from coal-fired power plant flue gas. The project leveraged the team's complementary capabilities: UOP's experience in materials development and manufacturing, adsorption process design and process commercialization; LeVan and Brandani's expertise in high-quality adsorption measurements; Matzger's experience in syntheis of MOFs and the organic components associated with MOFs; Snurr's expertise in molecular and other modeling; Honeywell's expertise in the manufacture of organic chemicals; and, EPRI's knowledge of power-generation technology and markets. The project was successful in that a selective CO{sub 2} adsorbent with good thermal stability and reasonable contaminant tolerance was discovered, and a low cost process for flue gas CO{sub 2} capture process ready to be evaluated further at the pilot scale was proposed. The team made significant progress toward the current DOE post-combustion research targets, as defined in a recent FOA issued by NETL: 90% CO{sub 2} removal with no more than a 35% increase in COE. The team discovered that favorable CO{sub 2} adsorption at more realistic flue gas conditions is dominated by one particular MOF structure type, M/DOBDC, where M designates Zn, Co, Ni, or Mg and DOBDC refers to the form of the organic linker in the resultant MOF structure, dioxybenzenedicarboxylate. The structure of the M/DOBDC MOFs consists of infinite-rod secondary

  1. Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

  2. Separation of heavy metals: Removal from industrial wastewaters and contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.

    1993-03-01

    This paper reviews the applicable separation technologies relating to removal of heavy metals from solution and from soils in order to present the state-of-the-art in the field. Each technology is briefly described and typical operating conditions and technology performance are presented. Technologies described include chemical precipitation (including hydroxide, carbonate, or sulfide reagents), coagulation/flocculation, ion exchange, solvent extraction, extraction with chelating agents, complexation, electrochemical operation, cementation, membrane operations, evaporation, adsorption, solidification/stabilization, and vitrification. Several case histories are described, with a focus on waste reduction techniques and remediation of lead-contaminated soils. The paper concludes with a short discussion of important research needs in the field.

  3. PROCESS OF REMOVING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION WITH GROUP IVB METAL PHOSPHO-SILICATE COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1957-10-29

    A process for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions which contain the plutonium in minute concentrations is described. These values can be removed from an aqueous solution by taking an aqueous solution containing a salt of zirconium, titanium, hafnium or thorium, adding an aqueous solution of silicate and phosphoric acid anions to the metal salt solution, and separating, washing and drying the precipitate which forms when the two solutions are mixed. The aqueous plutonium containing solution is then acidified and passed over the above described precipi-tate causing the plutonium values to be adsorbed by the precipitate.

  4. Metal-Organic Frameworks for Removal of Xe and Kr from Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Strachan, Denis M.

    2012-08-07

    Removal of Xenon (Xe) and Krypton (Kr) from in parts per million (ppm) levels were demonstrated for the first time using two well known metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and Ni/DOBDC. Results of an activated carbon were also included for comparison. Ni/DOBDC has higher Xe/Kr selectivities than those of the activated carbon. Moreover, results show that the Ni/DOBDC and HKUST-1 can selectively adsorb Xe and Kr from air even at 1000 ppm concentration. This shows a promising future for MOFs in a radioactive nuclides separation from spent fuel.

  5. Influence of vegetation on the removal of heavy metals and nutrients in a constructed wetland.

    PubMed

    Maine, M A; Suñe, N; Hadad, H; Sánchez, G; Bonetto, C

    2009-01-01

    A free water surface wetland was built to treat wastewater containing metals (Cr, Ni, Zn) and nutrients from a tool factory in Argentina. Water, sediment and macrophytes were sampled in the inlet and outlet area of the constructed wetland during three years. Three successive phases of vegetation dominance were developed and three different patterns of contaminant retention were observed. During the Eichhornia crassipes dominance, contaminants were retained in the macrophyte biomass; during the E. crassipes+Typha domingensis stage, contaminants were retained in the sediment and in the T. domingensis dominance stage, contaminants were retained in sediment and in the macrophyte biomass. Removal efficiency was not significantly different among the three vegetation stages, except for NH(4)(+) and i-P(diss). Because of its highest tolerance, T. domingensis is the best choice to treat wastewater of high pH and conductivity with heavy metals, a common result from many industrial processes.

  6. Removal of NOx or its conversion into harmless gases by charcoals and composites of metal oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Shigehisa; Furutsuka, Takeshi

    1996-12-31

    In recent years, much attention has been devoted to environmental problems such as acid rain, photochemical smog and water pollution. In particular, NOx emissions from factories, auto mobiles, etc. in urban areas have become worse. To solve these problems on environmental pollution on a global scale, the use of activated charcoal to reduce air pollutants is increasing. However, the capability of wood-based charcoal materials is not yet fully known. The removal of NOx or its conversion into harmless gases such as N{sub 2} should be described. In this study, the adsorption of NO over wood charcoal or metal oxide-dispersed wood charcoal was investigated. In particular, carbonized wood powder of Sugi (Cryptomeria japonica D. Don) was used to study the effectivity of using these materials in adsorbing NOx. Since wood charcoal is chemically stable, metal oxide with the ability of photocatalysis was dispersed into wood charcoal to improve its adsorption and capability to use the light energy effectively.

  7. Characterization and use of Moringa oleifera seeds as biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Cleide S T; Alves, Vanessa N; Rezende, Hélen C; Almeida, Ione L S; de Assunção, Rosana M N; Tarley, César R T; Segatelli, Mariana G; Coelho, Nivia M Melo

    2010-01-01

    Moringa oleifera seeds were investigated as a biosorbent for removing metal ions from aqueous effluents. The morphological characteristics as well as the chemical composition of M. oleifera seeds were evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Spectroscopy, Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The FT-IR spectra showed the presence of lipids and protein components. Scanning electron micrographs showed that Moringa seeds have an adequate morphological profile for the retention of metal ions. The results suggest that M. oleifera seeds have potential application in Cd(II), Pb(II), Co(II), Cu(II) and Ag(I) decontamination from aqueous effluents. PMID:21045350

  8. 76 FR 61342 - Magnesium Metal from the Russian Federation: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 56396 (September 13, 2011) (Final Results). We... Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003... International Trade Administration Magnesium Metal from the Russian Federation: Amended Final Results...

  9. Mathematically modeling the removal of heavy metals from a wastewater using immobilized biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo, E.M. ); Jeffers, T.H.; Ferguson, C.; Stevenson, H.Q. )

    1991-09-01

    A technique developed by the US Bureau of Mines using biomass, sphagnum peat moss, immobilized in porous polysulfone beads selectively removed Zn, Cd, and other metals from a zinc mining wastewater to concentrations well below the National Drinking Water Standards. The objective of this paper was to obtain experimental data on the biosorption of several heavy metals onto the beads containing sphagnum peat moss and to develop the appropriate mathematical models that might be used to describe the multicomponent phenomena. Nonequilibrium multicomponent mathematical models were developed and experimental data obtained for the simultaneous, competitive adsorption of six metal ions from an actual wastewater for both batch kinetic and semicontinuous packed-bed experiments. Experimental results indicated a selectivity order of Al > Cd > Zn > Ca > Mn > Mg and that metal ion breakthroughs were quite sensitive to ionic concentrations and adsorptive capacity. In addition, it was observed that, for the packed-bed experiments, the adsorptive capacity of the beads appeared to increase after the first few cycles. Mathematical models provided effective multicomponent equilibrium constants, adsorptive capacities, and reduced overall mass-transfer coefficients. The constants obtained from the packed-bed model were in reasonable agreement with those obtained from the batch kinetic model.

  10. [Prosthetic rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients: fixed - removable - combined? Metal - ceramics - all - ceramics? Implants? Anything goes! Part 1: two example cases of a combined fixed-removable restoration].

    PubMed

    Schnabl, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    After a careful diagnosis, treatment planning and pretreatment, two partially edentulous patients were restored partly by onlays, crowns and bridges, partly by removable prostheses. According to esthetic and functional demands all- and/or metal-ceramic restorations were used as well as cast frame prostheses with clasps or extracoronal attachments. PMID:25735004

  11. Final Report: Sintered CZTS Nanoparticle Solar Cells on Metal Foil; July 26, 2011 - July 25, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Leidholm, C.; Hotz, C.; Breeze, A.; Sunderland, C.; Ki, W.; Zehnder, D.

    2012-09-01

    This is the final report covering 12 months of this subcontract for research on high-efficiency copper zinc tin sulfide (CZTS)-based thin-film solar cells on flexible metal foil. Each of the first three quarters of the subcontract has been detailed in quarterly reports. In this final report highlights of the first three quarters will be provided and details will be given of the final quarter of the subcontract.

  12. The Initial-Final Mass Relation and its Dependence with Metallicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, A. D.; Campos, F.; Kepler, S. O.

    2015-06-01

    We present a study of the low end of the initial-final mass relation and its dependence on metallicity. We computed a grid of full evolutionary models, from the Main Sequence, trough the Asymptotic Giant Branch phase, to low luminosity stages on the white dwarf cooling curve. We consider metallicity values from Z=0.0001 to Z=0.04 with initial masses between 0.8 and 3M⊙. We found that the spreading in the observations can be explained by means of different metallicities of the environment. We also found a strong dependence of the pre-white dwarf age with metallicity.

  13. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Barekatain, Behnaz; Naseri, Roohollah; Zarezadeh, Hossein; Askari, Navid; Nasiri, Saman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove a cemented post from a root canal requiring endodontic retreatment. Various results have been reported from the studies that evaluated the effect of ultrasonic instruments in removing the posts cemented with resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic energy on the retention of prefabricated metal post cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty eight extracted single root premolars were decoronated with a diamond disc leaving a 13 mm long root and endodontically treated. The root canals were obturated by gutta-percha up to 5 mm with vertical condensation method and the 8 mm post-space was prepared to receive a no. 2 long Dentorama post. The roots were placed in an incubator for 48 h in 37°C and 100% humidity. After mounting the teeth in acrylic blocks, posts were cemented in the root canals using Panavia F2.0 in 24 specimens and Maxcem Elite in 24 others. For half of the specimens in each subgroup, an ultrasonic device was applied for 4 min. Universal testing machine was used to measure the force needed to remove the posts with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the post came out of the canal. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results: The removal force was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia) and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite) resin cements. PMID:24379864

  14. METAL REMOVAL FROM PROCESS AND STORMWATER DISCHARGES BY CONSTRUCTED TREATMENT WETLANDS

    SciTech Connect

    NELSON, ERIC

    2004-11-02

    The A-01 NPDES outfall at the Savannah River Site receives process wastewater and stormwater which passes through a wetland treatment system (WTS) prior to discharge. The overall objective of our research is to better understand the mechanisms of operation of the A-01 WTS in order to provide better input to the design of future systems. The system is a vegetated surface flow wetland and has a retention time of approximately 48 hours. Sampling conducted during the fourth year of operation validated continued wetland performance, and assessed the fate of a larger suite of metals present in the water. Copper and mercury removal efficiencies were still very high, both in excess of 80 per cent removal from the water after passage through the wetland system. Lead removal from the water by the system was 83 per cent, zinc removal was 60 per cent, and nickel was generally unaffected. Nitrates entering into the wetland cells are almost immediately removed from the water column and generally no nitrates are discharged from the A cells. The wetland cells are very anaerobic and the sediments have negative redox potentials. As a result, manganese and iron mineral phases in the sediments have been reduced to soluble forms and increase in the water during passage through the wetland system. Dissolved organic carbon in the water column is also increased by the system and reduces toxicity of the effluent. Operation and maintenance of the system is minimal, and consists of checking for growth of the vegetation and free flow of the water through the system.

  15. Removal of heavy metal species from industrial sludge with the aid of biodegradable iminodisuccinic acid as the chelating ligand.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Duan, Gaoqi; Cui, Yanrui; Sun, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    High level of heavy metals in industrial sludge was the obstacle of sludge disposal and resource recycling. In this study, iminodisuccinic acid (IDS), a biodegradable chelating ligand, was used to remove heavy metals from industrial sludge generated from battery industry. The extraction of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc from battery sludge with aqueous solution of IDS was studied under various conditions. It was found that removal efficiency greatly depends on pH, chelating agent's concentration, as well as species distribution of metals. The results showed that mildly acidic and neutral systems were not beneficial to remove cadmium. About 68 % of cadmium in the sample was extracted at the molar ratio of IDS to heavy metals 7:1 without pH adjustment (pH 11.5). Copper of 91.3 % and nickel of 90.7 % could be removed by IDS (molar ratio, IDS: metals = 1:1) with 1.2 % phosphoric acid effectively. Removal efficiency of zinc was very low throughout the experiment. Based on the experimental results, IDS could be a potentially useful chelant for heavy metal removal from battery industry sludge.

  16. Removal of heavy metal species from industrial sludge with the aid of biodegradable iminodisuccinic acid as the chelating ligand.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qing; Duan, Gaoqi; Cui, Yanrui; Sun, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    High level of heavy metals in industrial sludge was the obstacle of sludge disposal and resource recycling. In this study, iminodisuccinic acid (IDS), a biodegradable chelating ligand, was used to remove heavy metals from industrial sludge generated from battery industry. The extraction of cadmium, copper, nickel, and zinc from battery sludge with aqueous solution of IDS was studied under various conditions. It was found that removal efficiency greatly depends on pH, chelating agent's concentration, as well as species distribution of metals. The results showed that mildly acidic and neutral systems were not beneficial to remove cadmium. About 68 % of cadmium in the sample was extracted at the molar ratio of IDS to heavy metals 7:1 without pH adjustment (pH 11.5). Copper of 91.3 % and nickel of 90.7 % could be removed by IDS (molar ratio, IDS: metals = 1:1) with 1.2 % phosphoric acid effectively. Removal efficiency of zinc was very low throughout the experiment. Based on the experimental results, IDS could be a potentially useful chelant for heavy metal removal from battery industry sludge. PMID:25115899

  17. Simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using an upward electrokinetic soil remediation process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing-Yuan; Huang, Xiang-Jun; Kao, Jimmy C M; Stabnikova, Olena

    2007-06-01

    Kaolins contaminated with heavy metals, Cu and Pb, and organic compounds, p-xylene and phenanthrene, were treated with an upward electrokinetic soil remediation (UESR) process. The effects of current density, cathode chamber flushing fluid, treatment duration, reactor size, and the type of contaminants under the vertical non-uniform electric field of UESR on the simultaneous removal of the heavy metals and organic contaminants were studied. The removal efficiencies of p-xylene and phenanthrene were higher in the experiments with cells of smaller diameter or larger height, and with distilled water flow in the cathode chamber. The removal efficiency of Cu and Pb were higher in the experiments with smaller diameter or shorter height cells and 0.01M HNO(3) solution as cathode chamber flow. In spite of different conditions for removal of heavy metals and organics, it is possible to use the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process for their simultaneous removal. Thus, in the experiments with duration of 6 days removal efficiencies of phenanthrene, p-xylene, Cu and Pb were 67%, 93%, 62% and 35%, respectively. The experiment demonstrated the feasibility of simultaneous removal of organic contaminants and heavy metals from kaolin using the upward electrokinetic soil remediation process. PMID:17110023

  18. Thermal analysis for laser selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Jizhou; Li, Yuhang; Du, Frank; Xie, Xu; Rogers, John A.; Huang, Yonggang

    2015-04-28

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been envisioned as one of the best candidates for future semiconductors due to their excellent electrical properties and ample applications. However, SWNTs grow as mixture of both metallic and semiconducting tubes and this heterogeneity hampers their practical applications. Laser radiation shows promises to remove metallic SWNTs (m-SWNTs) in air under an appropriate condition. We established a scaling law, validated by finite element simulations, for the temperature rise of m-SWNTs under a pulsed laser with a Gaussian spot. It is shown that the maximum normalized m-SWNT temperature rise only depends on two non-dimensional parameters: the normalized pulse duration time and the normalized interfacial thermal resistance. In addition, the maximum temperature rise is inversely proportional to the square of spot size and proportional to the incident laser power. These results are very helpful to understand the underlying physics associated with the removal process and provides easily interpretable guidelines for further optimizations.

  19. Removal of heavy metal ions from water by using calcined phosphate as a new adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Aklil, A; Mouflih, M; Sebti, S

    2004-08-30

    Calcined phosphate (CP) has been employed in our laboratories as a heterogeneous catalyst in a variety of reactions. In this study, CP was evaluated as a new product for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution. Removal of Pb2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ on the CP was investigated in batch experiments. The kinetic of lead on CP adsorption efficiency and adsorption process were evaluated and analysed using the theories of Langmuir and Freundlich. The influence of pH was studied. The adsorption capacity obtained at pH 5 were 85.6, 29.8, and 20.6 mg g(-1) for Pb2+, Cu2+ and Zn2+, respectively. We hypothesize at pH 2 and 3, the dissolution of CP and precipitation of a fluoropyromorphite for lead and the formation of solid-solution type fluorapatite for copper. The results obtained show that CP is a good adsorbent for these toxic heavy metals. The abundance of natural phosphate, its low price and non-aggressive nature towards the environment are advantage for its utilisation in point of view of wastewater and wastes clean up.

  20. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity. PMID:26396007

  1. Biostimulation of metal-resistant microbial consortium to remove zinc from contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Mejias Carpio, Isis E; Franco, Diego Castillo; Zanoli Sato, Maria Inês; Sakata, Solange; Pellizari, Vivian H; Seckler Ferreira Filho, Sidney; Frigi Rodrigues, Debora

    2016-04-15

    Understanding the diversity and metal removal ability of microorganisms associated to contaminated aquatic environments is essential to develop metal remediation technologies in engineered environments. This study investigates through 16S rRNA deep sequencing the composition of a biostimulated microbial consortium obtained from the polluted Tietê River in São Paulo, Brazil. The bacterial diversity of the biostimulated consortium obtained from the contaminated water and sediment was compared to the original sample. The results of the comparative sequencing analyses showed that the biostimulated consortium and the natural environment had γ-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and uncultured bacteria as the major classes of microorganisms. The consortium optimum zinc removal capacity, evaluated in batch experiments, was achieved at pH=5 with equilibrium contact time of 120min, and a higher Zn-biomass affinity (KF=1.81) than most pure cultures previously investigated. Analysis of the functional groups found in the consortium demonstrated that amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and phosphate groups present in the consortium cells were responsible for zinc uptake.

  2. Biostimulation of metal-resistant microbial consortium to remove zinc from contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Mejias Carpio, Isis E; Franco, Diego Castillo; Zanoli Sato, Maria Inês; Sakata, Solange; Pellizari, Vivian H; Seckler Ferreira Filho, Sidney; Frigi Rodrigues, Debora

    2016-04-15

    Understanding the diversity and metal removal ability of microorganisms associated to contaminated aquatic environments is essential to develop metal remediation technologies in engineered environments. This study investigates through 16S rRNA deep sequencing the composition of a biostimulated microbial consortium obtained from the polluted Tietê River in São Paulo, Brazil. The bacterial diversity of the biostimulated consortium obtained from the contaminated water and sediment was compared to the original sample. The results of the comparative sequencing analyses showed that the biostimulated consortium and the natural environment had γ-Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and uncultured bacteria as the major classes of microorganisms. The consortium optimum zinc removal capacity, evaluated in batch experiments, was achieved at pH=5 with equilibrium contact time of 120min, and a higher Zn-biomass affinity (KF=1.81) than most pure cultures previously investigated. Analysis of the functional groups found in the consortium demonstrated that amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and phosphate groups present in the consortium cells were responsible for zinc uptake. PMID:26849331

  3. Removal of bisphenol A and some heavy metal ions by polydivinylbenzene magnetic latex particles.

    PubMed

    Marzougui, Zied; Chaabouni, Amel; Elleuch, Boubaker; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-08-01

    In this study, magnetic polydivinylbenzene latex particles MPDVB with a core-shell structure were tested for the removal of bisphenol A (BPA), copper Cu(II), lead Pb(II), and zinc Zn(II) from aqueous solutions by a batch-adsorption technique. The effect of different parameters, such as initial concentration of pollutant, contact time, adsorbent dose, and initial pH solution on the adsorption of the different adsorbates considered was investigated. The adsorption of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) was found to be fast, and the equilibrium was achieved within 30 min. The pH 5-5.5 was found to be the most suitable pH for metal removal. The presence of electrolytes and their increasing concentration reduced the metal adsorption capacity of the adsorbent. Whereas, the optimal pH for BPA adsorption was found 7, both hydrogen bonds and π-π interaction were thought responsible for the adsorption of BPA on MPDVB. The adsorption kinetics of BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) were found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Equilibrium data for BPA, Cu(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) adsorption were fitted well by the Langmuir isotherm model. Furthermore, the desorption and regeneration studies have proven that MPDVB can be employed repeatedly without impacting its adsorption capacity.

  4. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, G.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC{sub 0.88} in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V{sub 8}C{sub 7} superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  5. Oxidative removal of implanted photoresists and barrier metals in semiconductor processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindarajan, Rajkumar

    Chemical systems containing oxidants are widely used at various stages in semiconductor processing, particularly for wet cleaning and polishing applications. This dissertation presents a series of studies related to oxidative removal of materials in the Front-End-Of-Line (FEOL) and Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) processes during IC fabrication. In the first part of this study, stripping of photoresists exposed to high dose of ions (1E16 As/cm2) was investigated in activated hydrogen peroxide systems. Stripping of photoresists (PR) exposed to high dose (>1E15/cm2) ion beams is one of the most challenging steps in FEOL processing. This is due to unreactive crust layer that forms on the resist surface during ion implantation. The use of hydrogen peroxide systems activated by metal ion or UV light, for disrupting crust formed on deep UV resist to enable complete removal of crust as well as underlying photoresist was investigated. A systematic evaluation of variables such as hydrogen peroxide and metal ion concentration, UV intensity, temperature and time was conducted and an optimal formulation capable of attacking the crust was developed. A two step process involving pretreatment with activated hydrogen peroxide solution, followed by treatment with sulfuric acid-hydrogen peroxide mixture (SPM) was developed for complete removal of crusted resist films. In the second part of this study, electrochemically enhanced abrasive removal of Ta/TaN films was investigated in solutions containing 2,5 dihydroxy benzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) and potassium iodate (KIO3). This method known as Electrically-assisted Chemical Mechanical Planarization (ECMP) is generating a lot of interest in IC manufacturing. Ta/TaN films were abraded at low pressures (<0.5 psi) on a polyurethane pad under galvanostatic conditions. The effect of variables including pH, KIO3 concentration, and current density has been explored. In the optimized formulation, tantalum and tantalum nitride removal

  6. Synthesis of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) for efficient removal of organic dyes from water.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuangliu; Tang, Zhi; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Yaqi; Meng, Wei; Wu, Fengchang; Giesy, John P

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple and efficient strategy for fabricating a magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) as sorbent to remove organic compounds from simulated water samples is presented and tested for removal of methylene blue (MB) as an example. The novel adsorbents combine advantages of MOFs and magnetic nanoparticles and possess large capacity, low cost, rapid removal and easy separation of the solid phase, which makes it an excellent sorbent for treatment of wastewaters. The resulting magnetic MOFs composites (also known as MFCs) have large surface areas (79.52 m(2) g(-1)), excellent magnetic response (14.89 emu g(-1)), and large mesopore volume (0.09 cm(3) g(-1)), as well as good chemical inertness and mechanical stability. Adsorption was not drastically affected by pH, suggesting π-π stacking interaction and/or hydrophobic interactions between MB and MFCs. Kinetic parameters followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and adsorption was described by the Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption capacity was 84 mg MB g(-1) at an initial MB concentration of 30 mg L(-1), which increased to 245 mg g(-1) when the initial MB concentration was 300 mg L(-1). This capacity was much greater than most other adsorbents reported in the literature. In addition, MFC adsorbents possess excellent reusability, being effective after at least five consecutive cycles. PMID:26149818

  7. Synthesis of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) for efficient removal of organic dyes from water

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuangliu; Tang, Zhi; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Yaqi; Meng, Wei; Wu, Fengchang; Giesy, John P.

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple and efficient strategy for fabricating a magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) as sorbent to remove organic compounds from simulated water samples is presented and tested for removal of methylene blue (MB) as an example. The novel adsorbents combine advantages of MOFs and magnetic nanoparticles and possess large capacity, low cost, rapid removal and easy separation of the solid phase, which makes it an excellent sorbent for treatment of wastewaters. The resulting magnetic MOFs composites (also known as MFCs) have large surface areas (79.52 m2 g−1), excellent magnetic response (14.89 emu g−1), and large mesopore volume (0.09 cm3 g−1), as well as good chemical inertness and mechanical stability. Adsorption was not drastically affected by pH, suggesting π–π stacking interaction and/or hydrophobic interactions between MB and MFCs. Kinetic parameters followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and adsorption was described by the Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption capacity was 84 mg MB g−1 at an initial MB concentration of 30 mg L−1, which increased to 245 mg g−1 when the initial MB concentration was 300 mg L−1. This capacity was much greater than most other adsorbents reported in the literature. In addition, MFC adsorbents possess excellent reusability, being effective after at least five consecutive cycles. PMID:26149818

  8. Synthesis of magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) for efficient removal of organic dyes from water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Shuangliu; Tang, Zhi; Niu, Hongyun; Cai, Yaqi; Meng, Wei; Wu, Fengchang; Giesy, John P.

    2015-07-01

    A novel, simple and efficient strategy for fabricating a magnetic metal-organic framework (MOF) as sorbent to remove organic compounds from simulated water samples is presented and tested for removal of methylene blue (MB) as an example. The novel adsorbents combine advantages of MOFs and magnetic nanoparticles and possess large capacity, low cost, rapid removal and easy separation of the solid phase, which makes it an excellent sorbent for treatment of wastewaters. The resulting magnetic MOFs composites (also known as MFCs) have large surface areas (79.52 m2 g-1), excellent magnetic response (14.89 emu g-1), and large mesopore volume (0.09 cm3 g-1), as well as good chemical inertness and mechanical stability. Adsorption was not drastically affected by pH, suggesting π-π stacking interaction and/or hydrophobic interactions between MB and MFCs. Kinetic parameters followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and adsorption was described by the Freundlich isotherm. Adsorption capacity was 84 mg MB g-1 at an initial MB concentration of 30 mg L-1, which increased to 245 mg g-1 when the initial MB concentration was 300 mg L-1. This capacity was much greater than most other adsorbents reported in the literature. In addition, MFC adsorbents possess excellent reusability, being effective after at least five consecutive cycles.

  9. Characteristics of arsenate removal from water by metal-organic frameworks (MOFs).

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Wu, Yi-nan; Li, Zehua; Zhu, Miao; Li, Fengting

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of arsenic in groundwater and surface water occurs frequently across the globe, requiring an effective purification technology. Among the common technologies, the adsorption method is widely used for the merits of low cost and easy operation. Nevertheless, the development of efficient adsorbents remains one of the central challenges in this field. In this article, one kind of typical porous metal-organic framework material (MIL-53(Al)) was explored for the removal of arsenate from water. MIL-53(Al) has a maximum removal capacity of 105.6 mg/g and a conditional capacity of 15.4 mg/g at a low equilibrium concentration (10 μg/L). The optimum initial pH value is 8.0. Except for PO4(3-), other coexisting anions do not show a notable influence on the adsorption capacity of MIL-53(Al). In general, MIL-53(Al) is a promising new material for arsenate removal from water. Investigation of the effects of electrical charges, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra revealed that electrostatic attraction and hydrogen bond might be involved in the adsorption process of arsenate onto MIL-53(Al).

  10. Selective removal/recovery of RCRA metals from waste and process solutions using polymer filtration{trademark} technology

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.F.

    1997-10-01

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals are found in a number of process and waste streams at many DOE, U.S. Department of Defense, and industrial facilities. RCRA metals consist principally of chromium, mercury, cadmium, lead, and silver. Arsenic and selenium, which form oxyanions, are also considered RCRA elements. Discharge limits for each of these metals are based on toxicity and dictated by state and federal regulations (e.g., drinking water, RCRA, etc.). RCRA metals are used in many current operations, are generated in decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations, and are also present in old process wastes that require treatment and stabilization. These metals can exist in solutions, as part of sludges, or as contaminants on soils or solid surfaces, as individual metals or as mixtures with other metals, mixtures with radioactive metals such as actinides (defined as mixed waste), or as mixtures with a variety of inert metals such as calcium and sodium. The authors have successfully completed a preliminary proof-of-principle evaluation of Polymer Filtration{trademark} (PF) technology for the dissolution of metallic mercury and have also shown that they can remove and concentrate RCRA metals from dilute solutions for a variety of aqueous solution types using PF technology. Another application successfully demonstrated is the dilute metal removal of americium and plutonium from process streams. This application was used to remove the total alpha contamination to below 30 pCi/L for the wastewater treatment plant at TA-50 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and from nitric acid distillate in the acid recovery process at TA-55, the Plutonium Facility at LANL (ESP-CP TTP AL16C322). This project will develop and optimize the PF technology for specific DOE process streams containing RCRA metals and coordinate it with the needs of the commercial sector to ensure that technology transfer occurs.

  11. Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

    2003-06-01

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  12. Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Removal of Heavy Metals from Biological Systems; Adsorption and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Rutledge, Ryan D.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Sukwarotwat, Vichaya; Orr, Galya; Warner, Cynthia L.; Warner, Marvin G.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Timchalk, Charles; Addleman, Raymond S.

    2010-10-01

    Functionalized nanoporous silica, often referred to as self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports (SAMMS) have previously demonstrated the ability to serve as very effective heavy metal sorbents in a range of aquatic and environmental systems suggesting they may be advantageously utilized for biomedical applications such as chelation therapy. Herein we evaluate surface chemistries for heavy metal capture from biological fluids, various facets of the materials biocompatibility and the suitability of these materials as potential therapeutics. Of the materials tested, thiol-functionalized SAMMS proved most capable of removing selected heavy metals from biological solutions (i.e. blood, urine, etc.) As a result, thiol SAMMS was further analyzed to assess the material’s performance under a number of different biologically relevant conditions (i.e. variable pH and ionic strength) as well to gauge any potentially negative cellular effects resulting from interaction with the sorbent, such as cellular toxicity or possible chelation of essential minerals. Additionally, cellular uptake studies demonstrated no cell membrane permeation by the silica-based materials generally highlighting their ability to remain cellularly inert and thus non-toxic. As a result, it has been determined that organic ligand-functionalized nanoporous silica materials could be a valuable material for detoxification therapeutics and potentially other biomedical applications as needed.

  13. Lignocellulosic Wheat Straw-Derived Ion-Exchange Adsorbent for Heavy Metals Removal.

    PubMed

    Krishnani, K K

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this work is to develop partially delignified Ca(2+)-and-Mg(2+)-ion-exchanged product from lignocellulosic wheat straw for the removal of eight different heavy metals Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Hg(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) and for detoxification of Cr(VI). Maximum fixation capacity, pH, and initial metal concentration dependence were determined to confirm strong affinity of Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), and Hg(2+) ions onto the product, whereas Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Mn(2+) were the least fixed. Morphology of the product characterized by scanning electron microscope showed its physical integrity. Different experimental approaches were applied to determine the role of cations such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Na(+) and several functional groups present in the product in an ion exchange for the fixation of metal ions. Potentiometric titration and Scatchard and Dahlquist interpretation were employed for determination of binding site heterogeneity. Results showed strong and weak binding sites in the product. This product has advantages over other conventional processes by virtue of abundance, easy operational process, and cost reduction in waste disposal of its raw material.

  14. Biological removal of heavy metals by sulfate reduction using a submerged packed tower

    SciTech Connect

    Neserke, G.; Figueroa, L.; Cook, N.

    1994-12-31

    The Coors Brewing Co. owns and operates two wastewater treatment plants which handle the combined waste of the City of Golden and the Brewery. The discharge permit for Coors contains very strict limits for metals. Silver and mercury are prohibited from discharge at all and copper and zinc are both at low limits. The copper and zinc limits cannot be achieved with the present plant configuration and several programs are underway to reduce the source concentrations to meet the respective limits. Most of the programs are either very expensive or unlikely to produce the needed results soon enough. One possible treatment alternative that has been described in literature is sulfate reduction leading to the generation of hydrogen sulfide. The hydrogen sulfide in turn can precipitate most divalent metals that are available, though there are limits on the precipitation process. The purpose of this research has been to investigate the use of sulfate reduction to remove metals from the effluent of the Coors` Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP).

  15. Removing heavy metals from wastewaters with use of shales accompanying the coal beds.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska, Beata; Siedlecka, Ewa

    2015-05-15

    A possibility of using clay waste rocks (shales) from coal mines in the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters is considered in this paper. Raw and calcined (600 °C) shales accompanying the coal beds in two Polish coal mines were examined with respect to their adsorptive capabilities for Pb, Ni and Cu ions. The mineralogical composition of the shales was determined and the TG/DTG analysis was carried out. The granulometric compositions of raw and calcined shales were compared. Tests of adsorption for various Pb(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) concentrations were conducted and the pH before and after adsorption was analyzed. The results indicate that the shales from both coal mines differ in adsorptive capabilities for particular metal ions. The calcination improved the adsorptive capabilities for lead, but worsened them for nickel. The examined shales have good adsorptive capabilities, and could be used as inexpensive adsorbents of heavy metal ions, especially in the regions where resources of shale are easy accessible in the form of spoil tips. PMID:25770963

  16. Removal of heavy metals and lanthanides from industrial phosphoric acid process liquors

    SciTech Connect

    Koopman, C.; Witkamp, G.J.; Van Rosmalen, G.M.

    1999-11-01

    To diminish the discharge of heavy metals and lanthanides by the phosphoric acid industry, these impurities have to be removed from the mother liquor before their incorporation in the gypsum crystals. This can best be achieved by means of solvent extraction or ion exchange during the recrystallization of hemihydrate to dihydrate gypsum. Various commercial carriers and two ion-exchange resins were screened for their efficiency and selectivity. Light and heavy lanthanide ions are extracted from the recrystallization acid by didodecylnaphthalenesulfonic acid (Nacure 1052) and di(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), and the heavy-metal ions by bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)dithiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 301) and by bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)monothiophosphinic acid (Cyanex 302). Mercury is also extracted by the anion carriers tri(C{sub 8}-C{sub 10})amine (Alamine 336) and tri(C{sub 8}-C{sub 10}) monomethyl ammonium chloride (Aliquat 336). Both Dowex C-500 and Amberlite IR-120 extract lanthanide and heavy-metal ions. Unfortunately, D2EHPA, Nacure 1052, and the two ion-exchange resins also show affinity for ions present in much higher concentrations, like calcium or iron ions.

  17. Contemplating the feasibility of vermiculate blended chitosan for heavy metal removal from simulated industrial wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, N.; Soundarrajan, M.; Arungalai Vendan, S.; Sudha, P. N.; Renganathan, N. G.

    2015-12-01

    Wastewater contaminated by heavy metals pose great challenges as they are non biodegradable, toxic and carcinogenic to the soil and aquifers. Vermiculite blended with chitosan have been used to remove Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from the industrial wastewater. The results indicate that the vermiculite blended with chitosan adsorb Cr(VI) and Cd(II) from industrial waste water. Batch adsorption experiments were performed as a function of pH 5.0 and 5.5 respectively for chromium and cadmium. The adsorption rate was observed to be 72 and 71 % of chromium and cadmium respectively. The initial optimum contact time for Cr(VI) was 300 min with 59.2 % adsorption and 300 min for Cd(II) with 71.5 % adsorption. Whereas, at 4-6 there is saturation, increasing the solid to liquid ratio for chitosan biopolymers increases the number of active sites available for adsorption. The optimum pH required for maximum adsorption was found to be 5.0 and 5.5 for chromium and cadmium respectively. The experimental equilibrium adsorption data were fitted using Langmuir and Freundlich equations. It was observed that adsorption kinetics of both the metal ions on vermiculite blended chitosan is well be analyzed with pseudo-second-order model. The negative free energy change of adsorption indicates that the process was spontaneous and vermiculite blended chitosan was a favourable adsorbent for both the metals.

  18. Removing heavy metals from wastewaters with use of shales accompanying the coal beds.

    PubMed

    Jabłońska, Beata; Siedlecka, Ewa

    2015-05-15

    A possibility of using clay waste rocks (shales) from coal mines in the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastewaters is considered in this paper. Raw and calcined (600 °C) shales accompanying the coal beds in two Polish coal mines were examined with respect to their adsorptive capabilities for Pb, Ni and Cu ions. The mineralogical composition of the shales was determined and the TG/DTG analysis was carried out. The granulometric compositions of raw and calcined shales were compared. Tests of adsorption for various Pb(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) concentrations were conducted and the pH before and after adsorption was analyzed. The results indicate that the shales from both coal mines differ in adsorptive capabilities for particular metal ions. The calcination improved the adsorptive capabilities for lead, but worsened them for nickel. The examined shales have good adsorptive capabilities, and could be used as inexpensive adsorbents of heavy metal ions, especially in the regions where resources of shale are easy accessible in the form of spoil tips.

  19. Advanced material and approach for metal ions removal from aqueous solutions

    PubMed Central

    Turhanen, Petri A.; Vepsäläinen, Jouko J.; Peräniemi, Sirpa

    2015-01-01

    A Novel approach to remove metals from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method is based on a resin free, solid, non-toxic, microcrystalline bisphosphonate material, which has very low solubility in water (59 mg/l to ion free Milli-Q water and 13 mg/l to 3.5% NaCl solution). The material has been produced almost quantitatively on a 1 kg scale (it has been prepared also on a pilot scale, ca. 7 kg) and tested successfully for its ability to collect metal cations from different sources, such as ground water and mining process waters. Not only was this material highly efficient at collecting several metal ions out of solution it also proved to be regenerable and reusable over a number of adsorption/desorption, which is crucial for environmental friendliness. This material has several advantages compared to the currently used approaches, such as no need for any precipitation step. PMID:25758924

  20. Aquatic and terrestrial plant species with potential to remove heavy metals from storm-water.

    PubMed

    Fritioff, Asa; Greger, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Remediation of storm-water polluted with heavy metals should be possible in percolation systems, ponds, or wetlands. The aim of this work was to find plant species for such systems that are efficient in the uptake of Zn, Cu, Cd, and Pb. Plants were collected from percolation and wetland areas and analyzed for heavy metal concentrations. Results showed that submersed and free-floating plants had the capacity to take up high levels of Cu, Zn, and Pb into their shoots. With roots having a concentration factor above 1, the terrestrial plants show efficient stabilization of Cd and Zn and emergent plants show corresponding stabilisation of Zn. In addition, Potamogeton natans, Alisma plantago-aquatica, and Filipendula ulmaria were used in a controlled experiment. The shoots of P. natans and the roots of A. plantago-aquatica were found to accumulate even higher concentrations of Zn, Cu, and Pb than found in the field-harvested plants. Similar results were found for Cd in shoots and Pb in roots of F. ulmaria. Our conclusion is that submersed plant species seem to be the most efficient for removal of heavy metals from storm-water. PMID:14750429

  1. Hybrid flotation--membrane filtration process for the removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Blöcher, C; Dorda, J; Mavrov, V; Chmiel, H; Lazaridis, N K; Matis, K A

    2003-09-01

    A promising process for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions involves bonding the metals firstly to a special bonding agent and then separating the loaded bonding agents from the wastewater stream by separation processes. For the separation stage, a new hybrid process of flotation and membrane separation has been developed in this work by integrating specially designed submerged microfiltration modules directly into a flotation reactor. This made it possible to combine the advantages of both flotation and membrane separation while overcoming the limitations. The feasibility of this hybrid process was proven using powdered synthetic zeolites as bonding agents. Stable fluxes of up to 80l m(-2)h(-1) were achieved with the ceramic flat-sheet multi-channel membranes applied at low transmembrane pressure (<100 mbar). The process was applied in lab-scale to treat wastewater from the electronics industry. All toxic metals in question, namely copper, nickel and zinc, were reduced from initial concentrations of 474, 3.3 and 167mg x l(-1), respectively, to below 0.05 mg x l(-1), consistently meeting the discharge limits.

  2. 75 FR 20812 - Silicon Metal from Brazil: Amended Final Results of Administrative Review Pursuant to Court Decision

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Metal from Brazil for the period of review beginning July 1, 1996, through June 30, 1997. See Silicon Metal from Brazil: Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 64 FR 6305... International Trade Administration Silicon Metal from Brazil: Amended Final Results of Administrative...

  3. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis.

    PubMed

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems. PMID:26848015

  4. The influence of the structure of the metal load removal from liquid steel in electric arc furnaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pǎcurar, Cristina; Hepuť, Teodor; Crisan, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    One of the main technical and economic indicators in the steel industry and steel respectively the development it is the removal of liquid steel. This indicator depends on several factors, namely technology: the structure and the quality metal load, the degree of preparedness of it, and the content of non-metallic material accompanying the unit of drawing up, the technology for the elaboration, etc. research has been taken into account in drawing up steel electric arc furnace type spring EBT (Electric Bottom taping), seeking to load and removing components of liquid steel. Metal load has been composed of eight metal grades, in some cases with great differences in terms of quality. Data obtained were processed in the EXCEL spreadsheet programs and MATLAB, the results obtained being presented both graphically and analytically. On the basis of the results obtained may opt for a load optimal structure metal.

  5. Removal of the metal ions from aqueous solutions by nanoscaled low molecular pectin isolated from seagrass Phyllospadix iwatensis.

    PubMed

    Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Podkorytova, Elena; Khotimchenko, Maksim

    2016-09-15

    Pectins from sea grasses are considered as promising substances with pronounced metal-binding activity. Due to the high molecular weight and heterogeneous structure, the use of pectins for removal of metal ions is difficult. Technology of directed pectin degradation was developed and homogenous degraded nanoscaled pectin polymers were synthesized. Experimental samples of degraded pectin isolated from Phyllospadix iwatensis were tested for their metal binding activity in comparison with native pectin from this seagrass and commercial citrus pectin. The metal uptake of all pectin compounds was highest within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were applied to describe the isotherms and constants. Results showed that depolymerized pectin exerts highest lead and cadmium binding activity with pronounced affinity. All pectin compounds were suggested to be favorable sorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that degraded pectin is a prospective material for creation of metal-removing water treatment systems.

  6. Adsorptive removal of heavy metals from water using sodium titanate nanofibres loaded onto GAC in fixed-bed columns.

    PubMed

    Sounthararajah, D P; Loganathan, P; Kandasamy, J; Vigneswaran, S

    2015-04-28

    Heavy metals are serious pollutants in aquatic environments. A study was undertaken to remove Cu, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn individually (single metal system) and together (mixed metals system) from water by adsorption onto a sodium titanate nanofibrous material. Langmuir adsorption capacities (mg/g) at 10(-3)M NaNO3 ionic strength in the single metal system were 60, 83, 115 and 149 for Ni, Zn, Cu, and Cd, respectively, at pH 6.5 and 250 for Pb at pH 4.0. In the mixed metals system they decreased at high metals concentrations. In column experiments with 4% titanate material and 96% granular activated carbon (w/w) mixture at pH 5.0, the metals breakthrough times and adsorption capacities (for both single and mixed metals systems) decreased in the order Pb>Cd, Cu>Zn>Ni within 266 bed volumes. The amounts adsorbed were up to 82 times higher depending on the metal in the granular activated carbon+titanate column than in the granular activated carbon column. The study showed that the titanate material has high potential for removing heavy metals from polluted water when used with granular activated carbon at a very low proportion in fixed-bed columns.

  7. Cast Metals Coalition Technology Transfer and Program Management Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn, Mike

    2009-03-31

    The Cast Metals Coalition (CMC) partnership program was funded to ensure that the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) metalcasting research and development (R&D) projects are successfully deployed into industry. Specifically, the CMC program coordinated the transfer and deployment of energy saving technologies and process improvements developed under separately funded DOE programs and projects into industry. The transition of these technologies and process improvements is a critical step in the path to realizing actual energy savings. At full deployment, DOE funded metalcasting R&D results are projected to save 55% of the energy used by the industry in 1998. This closely aligns with DOE's current goal of driving a 25% reduction in industrial energy intensity by 2017. In addition to benefiting DOE, these energy savings provide metalcasters with a significant economic advantage. Deployment of already completed R&D project results and those still underway is estimated to return over 500% of the original DOE and industry investment. Energy savings estimates through December 2008 from the Energy-Saving Melting and Revert Reduction Technology (E-SMARRT) portfolio of projects alone are 12 x 1012 BTUs, with a projection of over 50 x 1012 BTUs ten years after program completion. These energy savings and process improvements have been made possible through the unique collaborative structure of the CMC partnership. The CMC team consists of DOE's Office of Industrial Technology, the three leading metalcasting technical societies in the U.S: the American Foundry Society; the North American Die Casting Association; and the Steel Founders Society of America; and the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), a recognized leader in distributed technology management. CMC provides collaborative leadership to a complex industry composed of approximately 2,100 companies, 80% of which employ less than 100 people, and only 4% of which employ more than 250 people. Without collaboration

  8. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  9. Effects of sorption, sulphate reduction, and Phragmites australis on the removal of heavy metals in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms.

    PubMed

    Lesage, E; Rousseau, D P L; Van de Moortel, A; Tack, F M G; De Pauw, N; Verloo, M G

    2007-01-01

    The removal of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn from synthetic industrial wastewater was studied in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms filled with gravel or a gravel/straw mixture. Half of the microcosms were planted with Phragmites australis and half were left unplanted. All microcosms received low-strength wastewater (1 mg L(-1) of Co, Ni, and Zn, 0.5 mg L(-1) Cu, 2,000mg L(-1) SO4) during seven 14-day incubation batches. The pore water was regularly monitored at two depths for heavy metals, sulphate, organic carbon and redox potential. Sorption properties of gravel and straw were assessed in a separate experiment. A second series of seven incubation batches with high-strength wastewater (10 mg L(-1) of each metal, 2,000 mg L(-1) SO4) was then applied to saturate the substrate. Glucose was added to the gravel microcosms together with the high-strength wastewater. Sorption processes were responsible for metal removal during start-up, with the highest removal efficiencies in the gravel microcosms. The lower initial efficiencies in the gravel/straw microcosms were presumably caused by the decomposition of straw. However, after establishment of anaerobic conditions (Eh approximately -200 mV), precipitation as metal sulphides provided an additional removal pathway in the gravel/straw microcosms. The addition of glucose to gravel microcosms enhanced sulphate reduction and metal removal, although Phragmites australis negatively affected these processes in the top-layer of all microcosms.

  10. Evaluation of {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} as a VOC removal catalyst: Comparison with a noble metal catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Lahousse, C.; Bernier, A.; Grange, P.; Delmon, B.; Papaefthimiou, P.; Ioannides, T.; Verykios, X.

    1998-08-15

    The performances of two very active catalysts for VOC removal (one metal oxide and one noble metal catalyst, namely {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} and Pt/TiO{sub 2}) are compared. The comparison takes into account not only the activity but also the sensitivity to competition effects between compounds, the influence of water vapor and the stability. The metal oxide catalyst proves to be more active than the supported noble metal one. Moreover, its performance is less affected by interferences between VOC`s than those of the noble metal catalyst. Conversely, the activity of the noble metal appears slightly more stable. Both are affected by water vapor which slightly decreases their efficiency. On the metal oxide catalyst, water shortens the time needed to get a stable catalytic activity.

  11. Zero-Valent Metallic Treatment System and Its Application for Removal and Remediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (Pcbs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Brooks, Kathleen B. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    PCBs are removed from contaminated media using a treatment system including zero-valent metal particles and an organic hydrogen donating solvent. The treatment system may include a weak acid in order to eliminate the need for a coating of catalytic noble metal on the zero-valent metal particles. If catalyzed zero-valent metal particles are used, the treatment system may include an organic hydrogen donating solvent that is a non-water solvent. The treatment system may be provided as a "paste-like" system that is preferably applied to natural media and ex-situ structures to eliminate PCBs.

  12. The czc operon of Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34: from resistance mechanism to the removal of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Diels, L; Dong, Q; van der Lelie, D; Baeyens, W; Mergeay, M

    1995-02-01

    The plasmid-borne czc operon ensures for resistance to Cd2+, Zn2+ and Co2+ ions through a tricomponent export pathway and is associated to various conjugative plasmids of A. eutrophus strains isolated from metal-contaminated industrial areas. The czc region of pMOL30 was reassessed especially for the segments located upstream and downstream the structural genes czc CBA. In cultures grown with high concentrations of heavy metals, czc-mediated efflux of cations is followed by a process of metal bioprecipitation. These observations led to the development of bioreactors designed for the removal of heavy metals from polluted effluents.

  13. Development of new sorbents to remove mercury and selenium from flue gas. Final report, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Shiao, S.Y.

    1995-02-01

    Mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) are two of the volatile trace metals in coal, which are often not captured by conventional gas clean up devices of coal-fired boilers. An alternative is to use sorbents to capture the volatile components of trace metals after coal combustion. In this project sorbent screening tests were performed in which ten sorbents were selected to remove metallic mercury in N{sub 2}. These sorbents included activated carbon, char prepared from Ohio No. 5 coal, molecular sieves, silica gel, aluminum oxide, hydrated lime, Wyoming bentonite, kaolin, and Amberite IR-120 (an ion-exchanger). The sorbents were selected based on published information and B&W`s experience on mercury removal. The promising sorbent was then selected and modified for detailed studies of removal of mercury and selenium compounds. The sorbents were tested in a bench-scale adsorption facility. A known amount of each sorbent was loaded in the column as a packed bed. A carrier gas was bubbled through the mercury and selenium compounds. The vaporized species were carried by the gas and went through the sorbent beds. The amount of mercury and selenium compounds captured by the sorbents was determined by atomic absorption. Results are discussed.

  14. Influence of thermal debinding on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys for metal injection molding (MIM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Páez-Pavón, A.; Jiménez-Morales, A.; Santos, T. G.; Quintino, L.; Torralba, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Metal injection molding (MIM) may be used to produce soft magnetic materials with optimal mechanical and magnetic properties. Unlike other techniques, MIM enables the production of complex and small Fe-Si alloy parts with silicon contents greater than 3% by weight. In MIM process development, it is critical to design a proper debinding cycle not only to ensure complete removal of the binder system but also to obtain improved properties in the final part. This work is a preliminary study on the production of Fe-3.8Si soft magnetic parts by MIM using pre-alloyed powders and a non-industrialized binder. Two different heating rates during thermal debinding were used to study their effect on the final properties of the part. The final properties of the sintered parts are related to thermal debinding. It has been demonstrated that the heating rate during thermal debinding has a strong influence on the final properties of Fe-Si soft magnetic alloys.

  15. Effective removal of field-emitting sites from metallic surfaces by dry ice cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Dangwal, Arti; Mueller, Guenter; Reschke, Detlef; Floettmann, Klaus; Singer, Xenia

    2007-08-15

    Systematic results of the field emission properties of polycrystalline copper and niobium and single-crystal Nb are reported. Dry ice cleaning (DIC) is found to suppress enhanced field emission from metallic surfaces. The cleaning effect on the emitting sites was investigated by means of field emission scanning microscopy up to fields of 250 MV/m and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray analysis. The number density of emitters at given fields was drastically reduced by dry ice cleaning. Current-voltage measurements and derived Fowler-Nordheim parameters are partially discussed with respect to the morphology and impurity content of localized emitters. No emission from grain boundaries on large-grain Nb samples was observed. The microscopy results prove the effective removal of field-emitting particulates down to 400 nm as well as the partial smoothing of surface protrusions by DIC.

  16. Impression Procedures for Metal Frame Removable Partial Dentures as Applied by General Dental Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Fokkinga, Wietske A; van Uchelen, Judith; Witter, Dick J; Mulder, Jan; Creugers, Nico H J

    2016-01-01

    This pilot study analyzed impression procedures for conventional metal frame removable partial dentures (RPDs). Heads of RPD departments of three dental laboratories were asked to record features of all incoming impressions for RPDs during a 2-month period. Records included: (1) impression procedure, tray type (stock/custom), impression material (elastomer/alginate), use of border-molding material (yes/no); and (2) RPD type requested (distal-extension/tooth-bounded/combination). Of the 132 total RPD impressions, 111 (84%) involved custom trays, of which 73 (55%) were combined with an elastomer. Impression border-molding material was used in 4% of the cases. Associations between impression procedure and RPD type or dentists' year/university of graduation were not found.

  17. Removal of metals and water-insoluble materials from desalter emulsions

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, S.K.; Mosby, J.F.; Treadman, J.E. II.

    1993-06-15

    A process for removing metals and insoluble materials from crude oil is described comprising the steps of: blending crude oil with water and desalting chemicals; charging the oil blend to a desalting chamber and passing it through an electrical field whereby agglomeration of suspended insoluble materials occurs and layers of clean oil, brine and oil-brine interface emulsion are formed; withdrawing the oil and brine; measuring the volume of the emulsion layer; withdrawing a portion of the emulsion layer; blending the withdrawn emulsion with up to 2 volumes of aromatic-rich hydrocarbon containing at least 20% aromatics by volume; maintaining the blend at a temperature of 100 to 300 F and a positive pressure; and subjecting the blend to a force of at least about 500 g, whereby oil free of at least 90% of suspended particulates and water results.

  18. An analysis of manganese as an indicator for heavy metal removal in passive treatment using laboratory spent mushroom compost columns

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, B.A.; Unz, R.F.; Dempsey, B.A.

    1999-07-01

    The National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) dictates removal of manganese in mine drainage to less than 4 mg/1 daily or less than 2 mg/1 on a monthly average. Owing to its high solubility at low and circumneutral pH, removal of manganese is often the most difficult of the NPDES discharge standards. This has lead to the use of Mn(II) as a surrogate for metal removal. However, recent studies concluded that zinc or nickel may be more appropriate indicators for removal of other metals. Previous field studies showed zinc removal to be highly correlated to the removal of copper, cobalt, and nickel in a sulfate reducing subsurface loaded wetland, whereas manganese removal was poorly correlated. The objective of this study was to evaluate zinc and manganese retention under sulfate reducing conditions in bench scale columns containing fresh spent mushroom compost. Column effluent data were analyzed using an EPA geochemical computer model (MINTEQ) over the pH range of 6.0 to 6.8. Under these conditions, zinc and manganese displayed distinctly reactivities. Zn(II) was supersaturated with respect to ZnS{sub s} and the Zn(HS){sub 2}{degree} and Zn(HS){sub 3}{sup minus} complexes dominated solubility. Soluble zinc concentrations were inversely correlated to sulfide. Mn(II) remained as soluble Mn{sup +2}. During early column operation at pH > 7, MnCO{sup 3(s)} was supersaturated. Manganese concentrations did not correlate with pH or sulfide. Given these fundamental differences in removal mechanisms between Zn and Mn under sulfate reducing conditions, the use of manganese removal as a surrogate for heavy metal removal in passive treatment of mine drainage seems unjustified.

  19. Removal of heavy metals from a metaliferous water solution by Typha latifolia plants and sewage sludge compost.

    PubMed

    Manios, T; Stentiford, E I; Millner, P

    2003-11-01

    Typha latifolia plants, commonly known as cattails, were grown in a mixture of mature sewage sludge compost, commercial compost and perlite (2:1:1 by volume). Four Groups (A, B, C and D) were irrigated (once every two weeks) with a solution containing different concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Zn, where in the fifth (group M) tap water was used. At the end of the 10 weeks experimental period substrate and plants were dried, weighed and analysed for heavy metals. The amounts of all three metals removed from the irrigation solution, were substantial. In the roots and leaves/stems of T. latifolia the mean concentration of Zn reached values of 391.7 and 60.8 mg/kg of dry weight (d.w.), respectively. In the substrate of Group D all three metals recorded their highest mean concentrations of 1156.7 mg/kg d.w. for Cu, 296.7 mg/kg d.w. for Ni and 1231.7 mg/kg d.w. for Zn. Linear correlation analyses suggested that there was a linear relationship between the concentration of metals in the solutions and the concentration of metals in the substrates at the end of the experiment. The percentage removal of the metals in the substrate was large, reaching 100% for Cu and Zn in some groups and almost 96% for Ni in group D. The total amount of metals removed by the plants was considerably smaller than that of the substrate, due mainly to the small biomass development. A single factor ANOVA test (5% level) indicated that the build up in the concentration of metals in the roots and the leaves/stems was due to the use of metaliferous water solution and not from the metals pre-existing in the substrate. The contribution of the plants (both roots and leaves/stems) in the removing ability of the system was less than 1%.

  20. A multi-level bioreactor to remove organic matter and metals, together with its associated bacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yonghong; Hu, Zhengyi; Kerr, Philip G; Yang, Linzhang

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to treat complex wastewater consisting of domestic wastewater, tobacco processing and building materials washings. The proposed multi-level bioreactor consists of a biopond-biofilter, anoxic/aerobic (A/O) fluidized beds and a photoautotrophic system. The results show that when the hydraulic load of the bioreactor was 200 m3/d, it successfully and simultaneously removed the organic matter and metals. When the bioreactor was in a relatively steady-state condition, the overall average organic matter and metals removal efficiencies are as follows, COD (89%), UV245 nm-matter (91%), Cu (78%), Zn (79%) and Fe (84%). The growth conditions of the native bacterial habitat were improved, which resulted from the increase of the in bacterial diversity under the rejuvenated conditions induced by the bioreactor. The results demonstrate that the multi-level bioreactor, without a sludge treatment system, can remove heterogeneous organic matter and metals from wastewater.

  1. Decontamination of aquatic vegetable leaves by removing trace toxic metals during pickling process with acetic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbiao; Yang, Yixing

    2011-01-01

    The heavy-metal content of aquatic plants is mainly dependent upon their ecological system. This study indicated that although the toxic heavy-metal contents could be above the recommended maximum levels depending upon their concentrations in growing water, they can be decontaminated by pickling with 5% acetic acid solution. Almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.5% Pb, 96.7% Ag, or 97.1% Al were removed from Water Spinach leaves by soaking in acetic acid solution. For Water-Shield leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Pb, Ba, or Sb and 95.0% Ag or 96.1% Al were removed. For Watercress leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Pb or 99.7% Ag were removed. For Water Hyacinth leaves, almost all Cd, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Hg, 98.5% Pb, 95.0% Ag, or 98.7% Al were removed.

  2. Decontamination of aquatic vegetable leaves by removing trace toxic metals during pickling process with acetic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wenbiao; Yang, Yixing

    2011-01-01

    The heavy-metal content of aquatic plants is mainly dependent upon their ecological system. This study indicated that although the toxic heavy-metal contents could be above the recommended maximum levels depending upon their concentrations in growing water, they can be decontaminated by pickling with 5% acetic acid solution. Almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.5% Pb, 96.7% Ag, or 97.1% Al were removed from Water Spinach leaves by soaking in acetic acid solution. For Water-Shield leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Pb, Ba, or Sb and 95.0% Ag or 96.1% Al were removed. For Watercress leaves, almost all Cd, Hg, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Pb or 99.7% Ag were removed. For Water Hyacinth leaves, almost all Cd, Ba, or Sb and 99.0% Hg, 98.5% Pb, 95.0% Ag, or 98.7% Al were removed. PMID:21888602

  3. Removal of dust particles from metal-mirror surfaces by excimer-laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, Klaus R.; Wolff-Rottke, B.; Mueller, F.

    1995-07-01

    The effect of particle desorption from Al mirror surfaces by the influence of pulsed UV laser radiation has been studied. The investigations are closely related to the demands of astronomers, who are looking for a more effective way of cleaning the Al coatings of future very large telescope mirrors. A systematic parameter study has been performed in order to determine the irradiation conditions which yield the highest dust removal efficiency (i.e. reflectivity increase) on contaminated samples, taking particularly into account laser-induced damage and degradation effects of coating and substrate. The particle removal rate increases with increasing laser fluence, being limited however by the damage threshold of the coating. Therefore, parameters influencing the damage threshold of metal coatings like wavelength, pulse width, and number of pulses have been studied in detail. Data indicate that on Al coated BK7 and Zerodur samples KrF laser radiation yields the optimum result, with cleaning efficiencies comparable to polymer film stripping. The initial reflectivity of the clean coating can nearly be reinstalled, in particular when an additional solvent film on the sample surface is applied. Hence, laser desorption seems to be a viable method of cleaning large Al mirrors for telescopes.

  4. Heavy metals removal from electroplating wastewater by aminopropyl-Si MCM-41.

    PubMed

    Algarra, Manuel; Jiménez, M Victoria; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique; Jiménez-López, Antonio; Jiménez-Jiménez, José

    2005-05-01

    The potential of removing nickel and copper from industrial electroplating wastewaters by using mesoporous materials with MCM-41 type structure functionalised with different ratios of aminopropyl groups, namely Na50, Na25 and Na5, were evaluated. The synthesised solids sorbents obtained were characterised by X-ray diffraction, elemental chemical analysis and IR spectroscopy. In preliminary experiments, studies were carried out to determine the optimal experimental conditions for the retention of heavy ions. Effects of concentration, optimal pH, interference with humic substances and other metals were studied for Na5, which showed the best capacity of absorption determined by the corresponding isotherm. This material has a greater selectivity against sodium, indicating that ionic strength does not affect the extraction. Results of an application of this material to remove nickel and copper in synthetic and real industrial wastewater samples from an electrochemical industry area are shown with successful results. The lowest level of nickel and copper were observed when Na5 was used. This observation suggests that reactive aminopropyl-Si MCM-41 and similar materials may be a promising and provide for alternative environmental technologies in the future.

  5. Removal of heavy metals from aqueous systems with thiol functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Cynthia L; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Addleman, R Shane; Carter, Timothy G; Wiacek, Robert J; Fryxell, Glen E; Timchalk, Charles; Warner, Marvin G

    2007-07-15

    We have shown that superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a surface functionalization of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) are an effective sorbent material for toxic soft metals such as Hg, Ag, Pb, Cd, and Tl, which effectively bind to the DMSA ligands and for As, which binds to the iron oxide lattices. The nanoparticles are highly dispersible and stable in solutions, have a large surface area (114 m2/g), and have a high functional group content (1.8 mmol thiols/g). They are attracted to a magnetic field and can be separated from solution within a minute with a 1.2 T magnet. The chemical affinity, capacity, kinetics, and stability of the magnetic nanoparticles were compared to those of conventional resin based sorbents (GT-73), activated carbon, and nanoporous silica (SAMMS) of similar surface chemistries in river water, groundwater, seawater, and human blood and plasma. DMSA-Fe3O4 had a capacity of 227 mg of Hg/g, a 30-fold larger value than GT-73. The nanoparticles removed 99 wt% of 1 mg/L Pb within a minute, while it took over 10 and 120 min for Chelex-100 and GT-73 to remove 96% of Pb. PMID:17711232

  6. Enhanced chitosan beads-supported Fe(0)-nanoparticles for removal of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater in permeable reactive barriers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingyi; Yang, Xi; Wang, Zhong-Liang; Yan, Xiaoxing

    2013-11-01

    The removal of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater is a matter of paramount importance due to their high toxicity causing major environmental pollution problems. Nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) became more effective to remove heavy metals from electroplating wastewater when enhanced chitosan (CS) beads were introduced as a support material in permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). The removal rate of Cr (VI) decreased with an increase of pH and initial Cr (VI) concentration. However, the removal rates of Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) increased with an increase of pH while decreased with an increase of their initial concentrations. The initial concentrations of heavy metals showed an effect on their removal sequence. Scanning electron microscope images showed that CS-NZVI beads enhanced by ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether (EGDE) had a loose and porous surface with a nucleus-shell structure. The pore size of the nucleus ranged from 19.2 to 138.6 μm with an average aperture size of around 58.6 μm. The shell showed a tube structure and electroplating wastewaters may reach NZVI through these tubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscope (XPS) demonstrated that the reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) was complete in less than 2 h. Cu (II) and Pb (II) were removed via predominant reduction and auxiliary adsorption. However, main adsorption and auxiliary reduction worked for the removal of Cd (II). The removal rate of total Cr, Cu (II), Cd (II) and Pb (II) from actual electroplating wastewater was 89.4%, 98.9%, 94.9% and 99.4%, respectively. The findings revealed that EGDE-CS-NZVI-beads PRBs had the capacity to remediate actual electroplating wastewater and may become an effective and promising technology for in situ remediation of heavy metals.

  7. Adsorptive removal of fluoride from aqueous solution using orange waste loaded with multi-valent metal ions.

    PubMed

    Paudyal, Hari; Pangeni, Bimala; Inoue, Katsutoshi; Kawakita, Hidetaka; Ohto, Keisuke; Harada, Hiroyuki; Alam, Shafiq

    2011-08-30

    Adsorption gels for fluoride ion were prepared from orange waste by saponification followed by metal loading. The pectin compounds contained in orange waste creates ligand exchange sites once it is loaded with multi-valent metal ions such as Al(3+), La(3+), Ce(3+), Ti(4+), Sn(4+), and V(4+) to be used for fluoride removal from aqueous solution. The optimum pH for fluoride removal depends on the type of loaded metal ions. The isotherm experiments showed the Langmuir type monolayer adsorption. Among all kinds of metal loaded gels tested, Al loaded gel appeared to exhibit the most favorable adsorption behavior. The adsorption kinetics of fluoride on loaded gel demonstrated fast adsorption process. The presence of NO(3)(-), Cl(-) and Na(+) ions has negligible effect on fluoride removal whereas SO(4)(2-) and HCO(3)(-) retarded the fluoride removal capacity in some extent. Fluoride removal at different adsorbent doses showed that fluoride concentration can be successfully lowered down to the acceptable level of environmental standard. The fluoride adsorption mechanism was interpreted in terms of ligand exchange mechanism. The complete elution of adsorbed fluoride from the gel was successfully achieved using NaOH solution.

  8. Evaluation of removal efficiency of heavy metals by low-cost activated carbon prepared from African palm fruit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulrazak, Sani; Hussaini, K.; Sani, H. M.

    2016-09-01

    This study details the removal of heavy metals; Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead from wastewater effluent using an activated carbon produced from African palm fruit. The effluent was obtained from Old Panteka market; a metal scrap Market located in Kaduna State, Nigeria, which has several components that constitute high level of pollution in the environment. The effect of temperature and contact time on the removal of these heavy metals using the activated carbon produced was investigated. The activated carbon showed a significant ability in removing heavy metals; Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead from the wastewater. Higher percentage removal was observed at a temperature of 80 °C (93.23 ± 0.035, 96.71 ± 0.097, 92.01 ± 0.018, and 95.42 ± 0.067 % for Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead, respectively) and at an optimum contact time of 60 min (99.235 ± 0.148, 96.711 ± 0.083, 95.34 ± 0.015, and 97.750 ± 0.166 % for Cadmium, Copper, Nickel, and Lead, respectively) after which the percentage removal decreases. This work, therefore, suggests that African palm fruit can be successfully applied to solve this environmental pollution.

  9. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture

    PubMed Central

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 44 square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials. PMID:24964404

  10. Fe3O4/cyclodextrin polymer nanocomposites for selective heavy metals removal from industrial wastewater.

    PubMed

    Badruddoza, Abu Zayed M; Shawon, Zayed Bin Zakir; Tay, Wei Jin Daniel; Hidajat, Kus; Uddin, Mohammad Shahab

    2013-01-01

    In this work, carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) polymer modified Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles (CDpoly-MNPs) was synthesized for selective removal of Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Ni(2+) ions from water. This magnetic adsorbent was characterized by TEM, FTIR, XPS and VSM. The adsorption of all studied metal ions onto CDpoly-MNPs was found to be dependent on pH, ionic strength, and temperature. Batch adsorption equilibrium was reached in 45 min and maximum uptakes for Pb(2+), Cd(2+) and Ni(2+) in non-competitive adsorption mode were 64.5, 27.7 and 13.2 mg g(-1), respectively at 25 °C. Adsorption data were fitted well to Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order models for kinetic study. The polymer grafted on MNPs enhanced the adsorption capacity because of the complexing abilities of the multiple hydroxyl and carboxyl groups in polymer backbone with metal ions. In competitive adsorption experiments, CDpoly-MNPs could preferentially adsorb Pb(2+) ions with an affinity order of Pb(2+)>Cd(2+)>Ni(2+) which can be explained by hard and soft acids and bases (HASB) theory. Furthermore, we explored the recyclability of CDpoly-MNPs.

  11. Metal-organic frameworks for removal of Xe and Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K; Strachan, Denis

    2012-08-01

    Removal of xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) from process off-gases containing 400 ppm Xe, 40 ppm Kr, 78% N(2), 21% O(2), 0.9% Ar, 0.03% CO(2), and so forth using adsorption was demonstrated for the first time. Two well-known metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), HKUST-1 and Ni/DOBDC, which both have unsaturated metal centers but different pore morphologies, were selected as novel adsorbents. Results of an activated carbon were also included for comparison. The Ni/DOBDC has higher Xe/Kr selectivities than those of the activated carbon and the HKUST-1. In addition, results show that the Ni/DOBDC and HKUST-1 can adsorb substantial amounts of Xe and Kr even when they are mixed in air. Moreover, the Ni/DOBDC can successfully separate 400 ppm Xe from 40 ppm Kr and air containing O(2), N(2), and CO(2) with a Xe/Ke selectivity of 7.3 as indicated by our breakthrough results. This shows a promising future for MOFs in radioactive nuclide separations from spent fuels.

  12. Made-to-order metal-organic frameworks for trace carbon dioxide removal and air capture.

    PubMed

    Shekhah, Osama; Belmabkhout, Youssef; Chen, Zhijie; Guillerm, Vincent; Cairns, Amy; Adil, Karim; Eddaoudi, Mohamed

    2014-06-25

    Direct air capture is regarded as a plausible alternate approach that, if economically practical, can mitigate the increasing carbon dioxide emissions associated with two of the main carbon polluting sources, namely stationary power plants and transportation. Here we show that metal-organic framework crystal chemistry permits the construction of an isostructural metal-organic framework (SIFSIX-3-Cu) based on pyrazine/copper(II) two-dimensional periodic 4(4) square grids pillared by silicon hexafluoride anions and thus allows further contraction of the pore system to 3.5 versus 3.84 Å for the parent zinc(II) derivative. This enhances the adsorption energetics and subsequently displays carbon dioxide uptake and selectivity at very low partial pressures relevant to air capture and trace carbon dioxide removal. The resultant SIFSIX-3-Cu exhibits uniformly distributed adsorption energetics and offers enhanced carbon dioxide physical adsorption properties, uptake and selectivity in highly diluted gas streams, a performance, to the best of our knowledge, unachievable with other classes of porous materials.

  13. Space Shuttle reaction control system thruster metal nitrate removal and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, R. L.; Mccartney, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle hypergolic primary reaction control system (PRCS) thrusters continue to fail-leak or fail-off at a rate of approximately 1.5 per flight, attributed primarily to metal nitrate formation in the nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) pilot operated valves (POV's). The failures have continued despite ground support equipment (GSE) and subsystem operational improvements. As a result, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed a study to characterize the contamination in the N204 valves. This study prompted the development and implementation of a highly successful flushing technique using deionized (DI) water and gaseous nitrogen (GN2) to remove the contamination while minimizing Teflon seat damage. Following flushing a comprehensive acceptance test is performed before the thruster is deemed recovered. Between the time WSTF was certified to process flight thrusters (March 1992) and September 1993, a 68 percent thruster recovery rate was achieved. The contamination flushed from these thrusters was analyzed and has provided insight into the corrosion process, which is reported in this publication. Additionally, the long-term performance of 24 flushed thrusters installed in the WSTF Fleet Leader Shuttle reaction control subsystem (RCS) test articles is being assessed. WSTF continues to flush flight and test article thrusters and compile data to investigate metal nitrate formation characteristics in leaking and nonleaking valves.

  14. Use of MgO doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation for removing arsenic from water

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C; Holt-Larese, Kathleen C; Bontchev, Ranko

    2013-08-13

    Systems and methods for use of magnesium hydroxide, either directly or through one or more precursors, doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, for removing arsenic from drinking water, including water distribution systems. In one embodiment, magnesium hydroxide, Mg(OH).sub.2 (a strong adsorbent for arsenic) doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is used to adsorb arsenic. The complex consisting of arsenic adsorbed on Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation is subsequently removed from the water by conventional means, including filtration, settling, skimming, vortexing, centrifugation, magnetic separation, or other well-known separation systems. In another embodiment, magnesium oxide, MgO, is employed, which reacts with water to form Mg(OH).sub.2. The resulting Mg(OH).sub.2 doped with a divalent or trivalent metal cation, then adsorbs arsenic, as set forth above. The method can also be used to treat human or animal poisoning with arsenic.

  15. Studies on sorption, desorption, regeneration and reuse of sugar-beet pectin gels for heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Mata, Y N; Blázquez, M L; Ballester, A; González, F; Muñoz, J A

    2010-06-15

    This work reports the effectiveness of sugar-beet pectin xerogels for the removal of heavy metals (cadmium, lead and copper) after multiple batch sorption-desorption cycles, with and without a gels regeneration step. Metals were recovered from xerogel beads without destroying their sorption capability and the beads were successfully reused (nine cycles) without significant loss in both biosorption capacity and biosorbent mass. Metals uptake levelled off or increased after using a 1M CaCl(2) regeneration step after each desorption. Calcium, as a regenerating agent, increased the stability and reusability of the gels repairing the damage caused by the acid and removing the excess protons after each elution providing new binding sites. Because of their excellent reusability, pectin xerogels are suitable for metal remediation technologies.

  16. Adsorption compared with sulfide precipitation as metal removal processes from acid mine drainage in a constructed wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machemer, Steven D.; Wildeman, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Metal removal processes from acid mine drainage were studied in an experimental constructed wetland in the Idaho Springs-Central City mining district of Colorado. The wetland was designed to passively remove heavy metals from the mine drainage flowing from the Big Five Tunnel. Concurrent studies were performed in the field on the waters flowing from the wetland and in the laboratory on the wetland substrate. Both studies suggest that there is competition for organic adsorption sites among Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn. Iron and Cu appear to be more strongly adsorbed than Zn and Mn. The adsorption of metals varies with the fluctuation of pH in the outflow water. Also indicated by field and laboratory studies is the microbial reduction of sulfate with a corresponding increase in the sulfide concentration of the water. As sulfide is generated. Cu and Zn are completely removed. The field results suggest that upon start up of a constructed wetland, the adsorption of dissolved metals onto organic sites in the substrate material will be an important process. Over time, sulfide precipitation becomes the dominant process for metal removal from acid mine drainage.

  17. Heavy metal removal and speciation transformation through the calcination treatment of phosphorus-enriched sewage sludge ash.

    PubMed

    Li, Rundong; Zhao, Weiwei; Li, Yanlong; Wang, Weiyun; Zhu, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of the heavy metal (Cd, As, Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, and Ni) control problem during the thermochemical recovery of phosphorus (P) from sewage sludge (SS), P-enriched sewage sludge ash (PSSA) was calcined at 1100°C. The effect of organic chlorinating agent (PVC) and inorganic chlorinating agent (MgCl2) on the fixed rate of P removal and the speciation transformation of heavy metal was studied. The removal of heavy metals Cd, Pb, As, Zn, and Cr exhibited an increasing tendency with the addition of chlorinating agent (PVC). However, an obvious peak under 100gCl/kg of PSSA appeared for Cu, owing to the presence of carbon and hydrogen in PVC. MgCl2 was found to be more effective than PVC in the removal of most heavy metals, such that up to 98.9% of Cu and 97.3% of Zn was effectively removed. Analyses of heavy metal forms showed that Pb and Zn occurred in the residue fraction after calcination. Meanwhile, the residue fraction of Cr, Ni, Cd, and Cu exhibited a decreasing tendency with the increase in the added chlorinating agent (MgCl2). Losses of P from PSSA were around 16.6% without the addition of chlorinating agent, which were greatly reduced to around 7.7% (PVC) and to only 1.7% (MgCl2).

  18. Uptake and removal of toxic metal ions from solution by inactivated cells of Larrea tridentata (creosote bush)

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Hernandez, A.; Tiemann, K.J.; Bibb, J.; Rodriguez, O.

    1997-12-31

    Larrea tridentata (creosote bush) is a plant that grows in the desert environment abundantly. This desert plant has been found naturally growing in heavy-metal contaminated soils. Previous experiments showed that the inactivated biomass of creosote bush was able to adsorb Cu(II) ions from aqueous solutions. The copper binding capacity of the creosote biomass that grows in heavy-metal uncontaminated soils was higher than the biomass that grows in heavy-metal contaminated soils. Experiments were performed to determine the ability of creosote biomass (grown in heavy metal uncontaminated soils) to adsorb Pb(II), Cd(II), Zn(II), Cr(III), Cr(VI), and Ni(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Batch pH profile experiments for the indicated metal ions showed that the metal ion binding was different for every metal tested but increased as the pH was raised as high as 6.0. The metal ion uptake by the creosote`s roots, stems, and leaves was quite fast. Binding capacity experiments showed a more significant binding capacity for lead(II) and chromium(III) ions and in general, the leaves bound more metal ions than the stems and roots. A great portion of the adsorbed metal ions by the creosote`s roots, stems, and leaves was desorbed by treatment with 0.1 M HCl (up to 99% in some cases). Biomass of creosote bush may prove to be useful to remove and recover metal ions from contaminated waters.

  19. Heavy metal removal in groundwater originating from acid mine drainage using dead Bacillus drentensis sp. immobilized in polysulfone polymer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Insu; Lee, Minhee; Wang, Sookyun

    2014-12-15

    Batch, column, and pilot scale feasibility experiments for a bio-sorption process using a bio-carrier (beads) with dead Bacillus drentensis sp. in polysulfone polymer were performed to remove heavy metals in groundwater originating from an acid mine drainage (AMD). For batch experiments, various amounts of bio-carrier each containing a different amount of dead biomass were added in artificial solution, of which the initial heavy metal concentration and pH were about 10 mg/L and 3, respectively. The heavy metal removal efficiencies of the bio-carrier under various conditions were calculated and more than 92% of initial Pb and Cu were found to have been removed from the solution when using 2 g of bio-carriers containing 5% biomass. For a continuous experiment with a column packed with bio-carriers (1 m in length and 0.02 m in diameter), more than 98% of Pb removal efficiency was maintained for 36 pore volumes and 1.553 g of Pb per g of bio-carrier was removed. For the pilot scale feasibility test, a total of 80 tons of groundwater (lower than pH of 4) were successfully treated for 40 working days and the removal efficiencies of Cu, Cd, Zn, and Fe were maintained above 93%, demonstrating that one kg of bio-carrier can clean up at least 1098 L of groundwater in the field.

  20. Use of precalciners to remove alkali from raw materials in the cement industry. Final report, July 1978-July 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Gartner, E.M.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of this work was to develop an efficient means of removing alkali metal compounds (alkalies) from high-alkali aluminosilicate raw materials of the type commonly used as part of cement raw mixes in order to increase the energy efficiency of cement manufacture. The intention of this project was to determine whether the high-alkali raw materials could be pyroprocessed separately to remove the alkalies before they entered the rotary kiln, where they would be mixed with the other raw feed components. If this could be achieved, considerable savings could be made in the energy required to remove alkalies, compared to conventional methods in which the cement raw mix must be treated as a whole. Two different methods of alkali removal were examined, namely, vaporization of alkalies at relatively low temperatures; and alkali-rich melt separation at relativey high temperatures. The results showed that the removal of alkalies by pyroprocessing of high-alkali raw feed components separate from the other cement raw mix components is not likely to be a practical alternative to the best available conventional precalciner technology. (LCL)

  1. Toxic metals in Venics lagoon sediments: Model, observation, an possible removal

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, A.; Molinaroli, E.

    1994-11-01

    We have modeled the distribution of nine toxic metals in the surface sediments from 163 stations in the Venice lagoon using published data. Three entrances from the Adriatic Sea control the circulation in the lagoon and divide it into three basins. We assume, for purposes of modeling, that Porto Marghera at the head of the Industrial Zone area is the single source of toxic metals in the Venice lagoon. In a standing body of lagoon water, concentration of pollutants at distance x from the source (C{sub 0}) may be given by C=C{sub 0}e{sup -kx} where k is the rate constant of dispersal. We calculated k empirically using concentrations at the source, and those farthest from it, that is the end points of the lagoon. Average k values (ppm/km) in the lagoon are: Zn 0.165, Cd 0.116, Hg 0.110, Cu 0.105, Co 0.072, Pb 0.058, Ni 0.008, Cr (0.011) and Fe (0.018 percent/km), and they have complex distributions. Given the k values, concentration at source (C{sub 0}), and the distance x of any point in the lagoon from the source, we have calculated the model concentrations of the nine metals at each sampling station. Tides, currents, floor morphology, additional sources, and continued dumping perturb model distributions causing anomalies (observed minus model concentrations). Positive anomalies are found near the source, where continued dumping perturbs initial boundary conditions, and in areas of sluggish circulation. Negative anomalies are found in areas with strong currents that may flush sediments out of the lagoon. We have thus identified areas in the lagoon where higher rate of sediment removal and exchange may lesson pollution. 41 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Use of Office of Research and Development's bioremediation expertise in Superfund removal program. Directive (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-12

    The directive establishes a formal mechanism for accessing and using the Office of Research and Development's (ORD) capabilities in the area of bioremediation of oil spills, hazardous substance spills, and Superfund removal actions.

  3. Thermal spray removal of lead-based paint from the viaduct bridge at Rock Island Arsenal, IL. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Weber, R.A.; Kumar, A.

    1998-06-01

    This report documents a field demonstration at the Rock Island Arsenal, IL, that validated the thermal spray vitrification (TSV) process as a safe and effective technique for removing lead-based paint from a steel bridge. Specially formulated glass was applied in a molten state to painted steel using a conventional thermal spray application system. The molten glass reacts with the paint, and encapsulates the lead. The cooled glass readily cracks and falls off, removing the paint. After onsite remelting of the glass waste to complete the encapsulation process, the final waste product is chemically inert and may be disposed of in a regular landfill. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency, Division of Air Pollution Control determined that the glass remelt process could be considered a paint-removal operation for which no air quality permit was required.

  4. Fabrication of a metal-ceramic crown to fit an existing partial removable dental prosthesis using ceramic pressed to metal technique: a clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Jae-Min

    2014-01-01

    Fabricating a crown to retrofit an existing abutment tooth for a partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) is one of the most time-consuming and labor-intensive clinical procedures. In particular, when the patient is concerned with esthetic aspects of restoration, the task of fabricating becomes more daunting. Many techniques for the fabrication of all-metallic or metal-ceramic crowns have been discussed in the literature. This article was aimed to describe a simple fabrication method in which a retrofitting crown was fabricated for a precise fit using a ceramic-pressed-to-metal system. PMID:25006389

  5. Removal of heavy metals and arsenic from a co-contaminated soil by sieving combined with washing process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Li, You; Yan, Xiulan

    2016-03-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with a heavy metals and arsenic co-contaminated soil from an abandoned mine to evaluate the feasibility of a remediation technology that combines sieving with soil washing. Leaching of the arsenic and heavy metals from the different particle size fractions was found to decrease in the order: <0.1, 2-0.1, and >2mm. With increased contact time, the concentration of heavy metals in the leachate was significantly decreased for small particles, probably because of adsorption by the clay soil component. For the different particle sizes, the removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were 75%-87%, and 61%-77% for Zn and Cu, although the extent of removal was decreased for As and Cr at <45%. The highest efficiency by washing for Pb, Cd, Zn, and As was from the soil particles >2mm, although good metal removal efficiencies were also achieved in the small particle size fractions. Through SEM-EDS observations and correlation analysis, the leaching regularity of the heavy metals and arsenic was found to be closely related to Fe, Mn, and Ca contents of the soil fractions. The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil by sieving combined with soil washing was proven to be efficient, and practical remediation parameters were also recommended.

  6. Removal of heavy metals and arsenic from a co-contaminated soil by sieving combined with washing process.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xiaoyong; Li, You; Yan, Xiulan

    2016-03-01

    Batch experiments were conducted with a heavy metals and arsenic co-contaminated soil from an abandoned mine to evaluate the feasibility of a remediation technology that combines sieving with soil washing. Leaching of the arsenic and heavy metals from the different particle size fractions was found to decrease in the order: <0.1, 2-0.1, and >2mm. With increased contact time, the concentration of heavy metals in the leachate was significantly decreased for small particles, probably because of adsorption by the clay soil component. For the different particle sizes, the removal efficiencies for Pb and Cd were 75%-87%, and 61%-77% for Zn and Cu, although the extent of removal was decreased for As and Cr at <45%. The highest efficiency by washing for Pb, Cd, Zn, and As was from the soil particles >2mm, although good metal removal efficiencies were also achieved in the small particle size fractions. Through SEM-EDS observations and correlation analysis, the leaching regularity of the heavy metals and arsenic was found to be closely related to Fe, Mn, and Ca contents of the soil fractions. The remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil by sieving combined with soil washing was proven to be efficient, and practical remediation parameters were also recommended. PMID:26969066

  7. Treatment of tunnel wash waters--experiments with organic sorbent materials. Part II: Removal of toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Paruch, Adam M; Roseth, Roger

    2008-01-01

    In the first part of the article, the column and the bag experiments concerning removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nonpolar oil (NPO) from tunnel wash waters using organic sorbent materials have been described. This part presents the results of removal of toxic metals. The metals of concern (Al, As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Mo, Ni, and Zn) were selected based on the priority toxicant pollutants defined in surface water quality criteria. Concentrations of these metals in the collected effluents varied more than the concentrations of PAHs and NPO, and thus only metal contents were considered for statistical analyses. These analyses determined significant differences (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.001) between the mean metal concentrations in the column effluents and those in applied wash water of road tunnel. The results obtained during both experiments revealed that the organic sorbents, and in particular their combination, removed toxic metals more effectively from wash water of road tunnel than from wash water of tunnel electrostatic filters. Among the investigated toxicants, Al and Fe showed the highest levels of reduction in the column experiment, 99.7% and 99.6%, respectively. The lowest reduction levels of 66.0% and 76.2% were found for Pb and Mo, respectively. The results of the bag experiment showed that even one day treatment of wash waters from tunnel electrostatic filters could reduce concentration of some toxicants by more than 70% (Al and Fe) and 80% (Cu).

  8. Development of HUMASORB{trademark}, a lignite derived humic acid for removal of metals and organic contaminants from groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Sanjay, H.G.; Srivastave, K.C.; Walia, D.S.

    1995-10-01

    Heavy metal and organic contamination of surface and groundwater systems is a major environmental concern. The contamination is primarily due to improperly disposed industrial wastes. The presence of toxic heavy metal ions, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides in water is of great concern and could affect the safety of drinking water. Decontamination of surface and groundwater can be achieved using a broad spectrum of treatment options such as precipitation, ion-exchange, microbial digestion, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, etc. The state of the art technologies for treatment of contaminated water however, can in one pass remediate only one class of contaminants, i.e., either VOCs (activated carbon) or heavy metals (ion exchange). This would require the use of at a minimum, two different stepwise processes to remediate a site. The groundwater contamination at different Department of Energy (DOE) sites (e.g., Hanford) is due to the presence of both VOCs and heavy metals. The two-step approach increases the cost of remediation. To overcome the sequential treatment of contaminated streams to remove both organics and metals, a novel material having properties to remove both classes of contaminants in one step is being developed as part of this project.The objective of this project is to develop a lignite-derived adsorbent, Humasorb{sup TM} to remove heavy metals and organics from ground water and surface water streams.

  9. Feasibility/treatability studies for removal of heavy metals from training range soils at the Grafenwoehr Training Area, Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.

    1995-05-01

    A feasibility/treatability study was performed to investigate the leaching potential of heavy metals (particularly lead) from soils at the Grafenw6hr Training Area (GTA) in Germany. The study included an evaluation of the effectiveness of chelant extraction to remediate the heavy-metal-contarninated soils. Batch shaker tests indicated that ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) (0.01M) was more effective than citric acid (0.01M) at removing cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc. EDTA and citric acid were equally effective in mobilizing chromium and barium from the soil. The batch shaker technique with chelant extraction offers promise as a remediation technique for heavy-metal-contaninated soil at the GTA. Columnar flooding tests conducted as part of the study revealed that deionized water was the least effective leaching solution for mobilization of the heavy metals; the maximum solubilization obtained was 3.72% for cadmium. EDTA (0.05M) achieved the greatest removal of lead (average removal of 17.6%). The difficulty of extraction using deionized water indicates that all of the heavy metals are very tightly bound to the soil; therefore, they are very stable in the GTA soils and do not pose a serious threat to the groundwater system. Columnar flooding probably does not represent a viable remediation technique for in-situ cleanup of heavy-metal-contaminated soils at the GTA.

  10. Demonstration [sic] of a System for Removing Malachite Green : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Marking, Leif L.

    1989-04-01

    Activated carbon has been used effectively to remove tastes, odors, and contaminants from public water supplies. The adsorption efficiency is influenced by the size of carbon granules, flow rate, column depth, and retention time. A study was designed to (1) determine the type of filter and kind of carbon that was most efficient and (2) demonstrate that carbon filters can be used to remove malachite green from water used for egg incubation or to hold adult salmon before spawning. Minicolumn simulation studies showed that 8 /times/ 30 mesh granular carbon manufactured from bituminous coal was effective for continuously removing malachite green from water for 230 days at a flow rate of 500 gpm and for 62 days at a flow rate of 1000 gpm. The removal capacity at the slower flow rate was 69 mg of malachite green per gram of carbon. A filter system that contained 20,000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in adult salmon holding ponds at flows of 500 gpm and greater. The removal efficiency was 99.8% after 105 hours of operation, and the adsorption capacity of the system was projected to be 20 or more years of routine hatchery operation. A filter system that contained 2000 pounds of activated carbon in each of two chambers was effective for removal of malachite green from treated water in salmon egg incubation units at the designated flow rate of 50 gpm and also at faster flow rates. 14 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Upstream H/sub 2/S removal from geothermal steam. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to evaluate a new heat exchanger process as a method for removing hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) gas from geothermal steam upstream of a power plant turbine. The process utilizes a heat exchanger to condense geothermal steam so that noncondensable gases (including H/sub 2/S) can be removed in the form of a concentrated vent stream. Ultimate disposal of the removed H/sub 2/S gas may then be accomplished by use of other processes such as the commercially available Stretford process. The clean condensate is reevaporated on the other side of the heat exchanger using the heat removed from the condensing geothermal steam. The necessary heat transfer is induced by maintaining a slight pressure difference, and consequently a slight temperature difference, between the two sides of the heat exchanger. Evaluation of this condensing and reboiling process was performed primarily through the testing of a small-scale 14 m/sup 2/ (150 ft/sup 2/) vertical tube evaporator heat exchanger at The Geysers Power Plant in northern California. The field test results demonstrated H/sub 2/S removal rates consistently better than 90 percent, with an average removal rate of 94 percent. In addition, the removal rate for all noncondensable gases is about 98 percent. Heat transfer rates were high enough to indicate acceptable economics for application of the process on a commercial scale. The report also includes an evaluation of the cost and performance of various configurations of the system, and presents design and cost estimates for a 2.5 MWe and a 55 MWe unit.

  12. A new morphological approach for removing acid dye from leather waste water: preparation and characterization of metal-chelated spherical particulated membranes (SPMs).

    PubMed

    Şenay, Raziye Hilal; Gökalp, Safiye Meriç; Türker, Evren; Feyzioğlu, Esra; Aslan, Ahmet; Akgöl, Sinan

    2015-03-15

    In this study, p(HEMA-GMA) poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) spherical particulated membranes (SPMs) were produced by UV-photopolymerization and the synthesized SPMs were coupled with iminodiacetic acid (IDA). Finally the novel SPMs were chelated with Cr(III) ions as ligand and used for removing acid black 210 dye. Characterizations of the metal-chelated SPMs were made by SEM, FTIR and swelling test. The water absorption capacities and acid dye adsorption properties of the SPMs were investigated and the results were 245.0, 50.0, 55.0 and 51.9% for p(HEMA), p(HEMA-GMA), p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA and p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs respectively. Adsorption properties of the p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs were investigated under different conditions such as different initial dye concentrations and pH. The optimum pH was observed at 4.3 and the maximum adsorption capacity was determined as 885.14 mg/g at about 8000 ppm initial dye concentration. The concentrations of the dyes were determined using a UV/Vis Spectrophotometer at a wavelength of 435 nm. Reusability of p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA-Cr(III) SPMs was also shown for five adsorption-desorption cycles without considerable decrease in its adsorption capacity. Finally, the results showed that the metal-chelated p(HEMA-GMA)-IDA SPMs were effective sorbent systems removing acid dye from leather waste water.

  13. Heavy metal removal and recovery using microorganisms. Volume 1, State-of-the-art and potential applications at the SRS

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, E.W.; Benemann, J.R.

    1991-02-01

    Microorganisms -- bacteria, fungi, and microalgae -- can accumulate relatively large amounts of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from the environment. These organisms often exhibit specificity for particular metals. The metal content of microbial biomass can be a substantial fraction of total dry weight with concentration factors (metal in dry biomass to metal in solution) exceeding one million in some cases. Both living and inert (dead) microbial biomass can be used to reduce heavy metal concentrations in contaminated waters to very low levels -- parts per billion and even lower. In many respects (e.g. specificity, residual metal concentrations, accumulation factors, and economics) microbial bioremoval processes can be superior to conventional processes, such as ion exchange and caustic (lime or hydroxide) precipitation for heavy metals removal from waste and contaminated waters. Thus, bioremoval could be developed to contribute to the clean-up of wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other DOE facilities. However, the potential advantages of bioremoval processes must still be developed into practical operating systems. A detailed review of the literature suggests that appropriate bioremoval processes could be developed for the SRS. There is great variability from one biomass source to another in bioremoval capabilities. Bioremoval is affected by pH, other ions, temperature, and many other factors. The biological (living vs. dead) and physical (immobilized vs. dispersed) characteristics of the biomass also greatly affect metal binding. Even subtle differences in the microbial biomass, such as the conditions under which it was cultivated, can have major effects on heavy metal binding.

  14. Economic evaluation of air stripping to remove volatile organic compounds from water. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaghloul, H.H.; Ball, R.O.; Maloney, S.W.

    1987-12-01

    This report documents the results of a study conducted to provide a basis for estimating the costs of installing and using air stripping to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from water. The air-stripping technology was found to be a very economical and efficient method for contaminant removal. The technology is simple, relatively inexpensive to install, and has low labor and maintenance requirements. VOC removal rates range from 90 to 99.99%. Estimated costs, in terms of percentage of total production costs, were found to be 40% for capital costs, 50% for operational costs, and 10% for maintenance costs, according to literature sources. Results of a survey conducted during this study generally agree with these percentages, except that maintenance costs reported on the survey were lower due to the highly automated nature of new installations.

  15. High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal Sorbents for Removal of Contaminants from Natural Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Shane; Cinson, Anthony D.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-06-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle based heavy metal sorbents with various surface chemistries that demonstrate an excellent affinity for the separation of heavy metals in contaminated water systems (i.e. spiked Columbia river water). The magnetic nanoparticle sorbents are prepared from an easy to synthesize iron oxide precursor, followed by a simple, one-step ligand exchange technique to introduce the organic surface functionality of interest chosen to target either specific or broader classes of heavy metals. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles are excellent sorbent materials for the extraction of heavy metal contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. These engineered magnetic nanoparticle sorbents have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g), allowing for increased binding capacity. To demonstrate the potential sorbent performance of each of the surface modified magnetic nanoparticles, river water was spiked with Hg, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cu, and Tl and exposed to low concentrations of the functionalized nanoparticles. The samples were analyzed to determine the metal content before and after exposure to the magnetic nanoparticle sorbents. In almost all cases reported here the nanoparticles were found to be superior to commercially available sorbents binding a wide range of different heavy metals with extremely high affinity. Detailed characterization of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticle sorbents including FT-IR, BET surface analysis, TGA, XPS and VSM as well as the heavy metal removal experiments are presented.

  16. [Through the canal metal crochet embedding operation to remove the stylomastoid foramen for facial paralysis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Sun, Feng; Lv, Feng

    2015-09-01

    One case with metal crochet through external auditory meatus embedded stylomastoid foramen, preoperative found no paralysis, underwent temporal bone CT examination to assess the illness after emergency surgery to remove the foreign body, postoperative patients of peripheral facial paralysis, explore and summarize the clinical experience.

  17. Removal of heavy metals from contaminated sewage sludge using Aspergillus niger fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes.

    PubMed

    Del Mundo Dacera, Dominica; Babel, Sandhya

    2008-04-01

    The environmental benefits derived from using citric acid in the removal of heavy metals from contaminated sewage sludge have made it promising as an extracting agent in the chemical extraction process. At present, citric acid is produced commercially by fermentation of sucrose using mutant strains of Aspergillus niger (A. niger), and chemical synthesis. In recent years, various carbohydrates and wastes (such as pineapple wastes) have been considered experimentally, to produce citric acid by A. niger. This study investigated the potential of using A. niger fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes as a source of citric acid, in extracting chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. Results of the study revealed that metal removal efficiencies varied with pH, forms of metals in sludge and contact time. At pH approaching 4, and contact time of 11 days, A. niger fermented liquid seemed to remove all Cr and Zn while removing 94% of Ni. Moreover, chemical speciation studies revealed that metals which are predominantly in the exchangeable and oxidizable phases seemed to exhibit ease of leachability (e.g., Zn). The by-products of the process such as pineapple pulp and mycelium which are rich in protein, can still be used as animal feed. It can be said therefore that this novel process provides a sustainable way of managing contaminated sewage sludge.

  18. Removal of heavy metals from contaminated sewage sludge using Aspergillus niger fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes.

    PubMed

    Del Mundo Dacera, Dominica; Babel, Sandhya

    2008-04-01

    The environmental benefits derived from using citric acid in the removal of heavy metals from contaminated sewage sludge have made it promising as an extracting agent in the chemical extraction process. At present, citric acid is produced commercially by fermentation of sucrose using mutant strains of Aspergillus niger (A. niger), and chemical synthesis. In recent years, various carbohydrates and wastes (such as pineapple wastes) have been considered experimentally, to produce citric acid by A. niger. This study investigated the potential of using A. niger fermented raw liquid from pineapple wastes as a source of citric acid, in extracting chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) from anaerobically digested sewage sludge. Results of the study revealed that metal removal efficiencies varied with pH, forms of metals in sludge and contact time. At pH approaching 4, and contact time of 11 days, A. niger fermented liquid seemed to remove all Cr and Zn while removing 94% of Ni. Moreover, chemical speciation studies revealed that metals which are predominantly in the exchangeable and oxidizable phases seemed to exhibit ease of leachability (e.g., Zn). The by-products of the process such as pineapple pulp and mycelium which are rich in protein, can still be used as animal feed. It can be said therefore that this novel process provides a sustainable way of managing contaminated sewage sludge. PMID:17512728

  19. Method for gas bubble and void control and removal from metals

    DOEpatents

    Van Siclen, Clinton D.; Wright, Richard N.

    1996-01-01

    A method for enhancing the diffusion of gas bubbles or voids attached to impurity precipitates, and biasing their direction of migration out of the host metal (or metal alloy) by applying a temperature gradient across the host metal (or metal alloy). In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the impurity metal is insoluble in the host metal and has a melting point lower than the melting point of the host material. Also, preferably the impurity metal is lead or indium and the host metal is aluminum or a metal alloy.

  20. Method for gas bubble and void control and removal from metals

    DOEpatents

    Siclen, C.D. Van; Wright, R.N.

    1996-02-06

    A method is described for enhancing the diffusion of gas bubbles or voids attached to impurity precipitates, and biasing their direction of migration out of the host metal (or metal alloy) by applying a temperature gradient across the host metal (or metal alloy). In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the impurity metal is insoluble in the host metal and has a melting point lower than the melting point of the host material. Also, preferably the impurity metal is lead or indium and the host metal is aluminum or a metal alloy. 2 figs.

  1. A Scanning electron microscopic evaluation of intracanal smear layer removal by two different final irrigation activation systems

    PubMed Central

    Dua, Deepti; Dua, Ankur; Uppin, Veerendra M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compare smear layer removal at apical 1 mm level after final irrigation activation with an EndoVac system and Max-I probe. Materials and Methods: Fifty freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were randomly divided into two groups after completing cleaning and shaping with ProTaper rotary files. In one group, final irrigation was performed with an EndoVac system while in the other group final irrigation was performed with a 30 gauge Max-I probe. 3% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediaminetetracetic acid were used as final irrigants in all teeth. After instrumentation and irrigation, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally into buccal and palatal halves and viewed under a scanning electron microscope for evaluation of the smear layer. Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The EndoVac group showed significantly better smear layer removal compared with the Max-I probe at the apical 1 mm level. Conclusion: An apical negative pressure system (EndoVac) results in better debridement at apical 1 mm when compared with side-vented closed ended needle irrigation (Max-I probe). PMID:24808693

  2. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  3. Removal of a hazardous heavy metal from aqueous solution using functionalized graphene and boron nitride nanosheets: Insights from simulations.

    PubMed

    Azamat, Jafar; Sattary, Batoul Shirforush; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-09-01

    A computer simulation was performed to investigate the removal of Zn(2+) as a heavy metal from aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS). The simulated systems were comprised of a graphene nanosheet or BNNS with a functionalized pore containing an aqueous ionic solution of zinc chloride. In order to remove heavy metal from an aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and BNNS, an external voltage was applied along the z-axis of the simulated box. For the selective removal of zinc ions, the pores of graphene and BNNS were functionalized by passivating each atom at the pore edge with appropriate atoms. For complete analysis systems, we calculated the potential of the mean force of ions, the radial distribution function of ion-water, the residence time of ions, the hydrogen bond, and the autocorrelation function of the hydrogen bond. PMID:26186492

  4. Removal of a hazardous heavy metal from aqueous solution using functionalized graphene and boron nitride nanosheets: Insights from simulations.

    PubMed

    Azamat, Jafar; Sattary, Batoul Shirforush; Khataee, Alireza; Joo, Sang Woo

    2015-09-01

    A computer simulation was performed to investigate the removal of Zn(2+) as a heavy metal from aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and boron nitride nanosheet (BNNS). The simulated systems were comprised of a graphene nanosheet or BNNS with a functionalized pore containing an aqueous ionic solution of zinc chloride. In order to remove heavy metal from an aqueous solution using the functionalized pore of a graphene nanosheet and BNNS, an external voltage was applied along the z-axis of the simulated box. For the selective removal of zinc ions, the pores of graphene and BNNS were functionalized by passivating each atom at the pore edge with appropriate atoms. For complete analysis systems, we calculated the potential of the mean force of ions, the radial distribution function of ion-water, the residence time of ions, the hydrogen bond, and the autocorrelation function of the hydrogen bond.

  5. Evaluation of a low-cost adsorbent for removal of toxic metal ions from wastewater of an electroplating factory.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Francisco W; Sousa, Marcelo James; Oliveira, Isadora R N; Oliveira, André G; Cavalcante, Rivelino M; Fechine, Pierre B A; Neto, Vicente O S; de Keukeleire, Denis; Nascimento, Ronaldo F

    2009-08-01

    In this study, sugar cane residue or bagasse was used for removal of toxic metal ions from wastewater of an electroplating factory located in northeast Brazil. Prior acid treatment increased the adsorption efficacies in batch wise experiments. The microstructure of the material before and after the treatment was investigated by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Column operations showed that removals of Cu(2+), Ni(2+) and Zn(2+) from wastewater (in the absence of cyanide) were 95.5%, 96.3.0%, and 97.1%, respectively. Regeneration of the adsorbent obtained in acid indicated that the efficiencies decreased only after the fourth cycle of re-use. Acid-treated sugar cane bagasse can be considered a viable alternative to common methods to remove toxic metal ions from aqueous effluents of electroplating industries.

  6. Optical nanosphere sensor based on shell-by-shell fabrication for removal of toxic metals from human blood.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, S A; Abdellatef, S; Ismael, M; Shahat, A

    2013-06-01

    Because toxic heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate, they represent a substantial human health hazard. Various methods are used to identify and quantify toxic metals in biological tissues and environment fluids, but a simple, rapid, and inexpensive system has yet to be developed. To reduce the necessity for instrument-dependent analysis, we developed a single, pH-dependent, nanosphere (NS) sensor for naked-eye detection and removal of toxic metal ions from drinking water and physiological systems (i.e., blood). The design platform for the optical NS sensor is composed of double mesoporous core-shell silica NSs fabricated by one-pot, template-guided synthesis with anionic surfactant. The dense shell-by-shell NS construction generated a unique hierarchical NS sensor with a hollow cage interior to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, longevity, selectivity, and signal stability. Here, we examined the application of the NS sensor for the removal of toxic metals (e.g., lead ions from a physiological system, such as human blood). The findings show that this sensor design has potential for the rapid screening of blood lead levels so that the effects of lead toxicity can be avoided.

  7. Optical nanosphere sensor based on shell-by-shell fabrication for removal of toxic metals from human blood.

    PubMed

    El-Safty, S A; Abdellatef, S; Ismael, M; Shahat, A

    2013-06-01

    Because toxic heavy metals tend to bioaccumulate, they represent a substantial human health hazard. Various methods are used to identify and quantify toxic metals in biological tissues and environment fluids, but a simple, rapid, and inexpensive system has yet to be developed. To reduce the necessity for instrument-dependent analysis, we developed a single, pH-dependent, nanosphere (NS) sensor for naked-eye detection and removal of toxic metal ions from drinking water and physiological systems (i.e., blood). The design platform for the optical NS sensor is composed of double mesoporous core-shell silica NSs fabricated by one-pot, template-guided synthesis with anionic surfactant. The dense shell-by-shell NS construction generated a unique hierarchical NS sensor with a hollow cage interior to enable accessibility for continuous monitoring of several different toxic metal ions and efficient multi-ion sensing and removal capabilities with respect to reversibility, longevity, selectivity, and signal stability. Here, we examined the application of the NS sensor for the removal of toxic metals (e.g., lead ions from a physiological system, such as human blood). The findings show that this sensor design has potential for the rapid screening of blood lead levels so that the effects of lead toxicity can be avoided. PMID:23307510

  8. Removal of eutrophication factors and heavy metal from a closed cultivation system using the macroalgae, Gracilaria sp. (Rhodophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Kyoung Ho; Sui, Zhenghong

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the ability of macroalgae Gracilaria sp. of removing eutrophication factors and toxic heavy metals Al, Cr, and Zn in a closed cultivation system is reported. The results show that the concentration of the three heavy metals decreased significantly during the experimental period in an algal biomass dependent manner. The biofiltration capacity of the alga for Al, Cr, and Zn is 10.1%-72.6%, 52.5%-83.4% and 36.5%-91.7%, respectively. Using more materials resulted in stronger heavy metal removal. Additionally, the concentration of chl- a, TN, TP and DIN of water samples from aquariums involving large, medium, and small algal biomass cultivation increased first and then decreased during the experiment. COD value of all three groups decreased with time and displayed algal biomass dependency: more algae resulting in a greater COD value than those of less biomass. Furthermore, changes in COD reflect an obvious organic particles deprivation process of algae. This is the first report on heavy metal removal effect by Gracilaria species. The results suggest that macroalgae can be used as a biofilter for the treatment of nutrient-enriched or heavy-metal polluted water, to which an appropriate time range should be carefully determined.

  9. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-12-31

    It is the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Under the reaction conditions employed, the behavior of other trace elements of concern will also be evaluated. The recovery of the chlorine removed from the coal as a marketable byproduct, calcium chloride suitable for use as a road deicer, is also being investigated using a novel absorption/crystallization device. This report presents chlorine removal and energy balances obtained on a series of runs performed at 385{degrees}C, and information on the purity of calcium chloride produced by neutralization of the hydrogen chloride trapped in the absorber. The importance of subjecting the coal to a preheating period before exposure for a few minutes at higher temperature has been verified. Chlorine removal of approximately 84% with about 90% energy recovery in the treated coal has been attained. Calcium chloride of nearly 50% purity has been produced from the absorber solution of the tube furnace. When the bench scale dechlorination unit is complete, the larger quantities of by-product calcium chloride produced should permit upgrading the product by recrystallization.

  10. Cesium removal demonstration utilizing crystalline silicotitanate sorbent for processing Melton Valley Storage Tank supernate: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.F. Jr.; Taylor, P.A.; Cummins, R.L.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides details of the Cesium Removal Demonstration (CsRD), which was conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on radioactive waste from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks. The CsRD was the first large-scale use of state-of-the-art sorbents being developed by private industry for the selective removal of cesium and other radionuclides from liquid wastes stored across the DOE complex. The crystalline silicotitanate sorbent used in the demonstration was chosen because of its effectiveness in laboratory tests using bench-scale columns. The demonstration showed that the cesium could be removed from the supernate and concentrated on a small-volume, solid waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Nevada Test Site. During this project, the CsRD system processed > 115,000 L (30,000 gal) of radioactive supernate with minimal operational problems. Sluicing, drying, and remote transportation of the sorbent, which could not be done on a bench scale, were successfully demonstrated. The system was then decontaminated to the extent that it could be contact maintained with the use of localized shielding only. By utilizing a modular, transportable design and placement within existing facilities, the system can be transferred to different sites for reuse. The initial unit has now been removed from the process building and is presently being reinstalled for use in baseline operations at ORNL.

  11. Evaluation of asbestos levels in two schools before and after asbestos removal. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karaffa, M.A.; Chesson, J.; Russell, J.

    1989-03-01

    This report presents a statistical evaluation of airborne asbestos data collected at two schools before and after removal of asbestos-containing material (ACM). Although the monitoring data are not totally consistent with new Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) requirements and recent EPA guidelines, the study evaluates these historical data by standard statistical methods to determine if abated work areas meet proposed clearance criteria. The objectives of this statistical analysis were to compare (1) airborne asbestos levels indoors after removal with levels outdoors, (2) airborne asbestos levels before and after removal of asbestos, and (3) static sampling and aggressive sampling of airborne asbestos. The results of this evaluation indicated the following: the effect of asbestos removal on indoor air quality is unpredictable; the variability in fiber concentrations among different sampling sites within the same building indicates the need to treat different sites as separate areas for the purpose of clearance; and aggressive sampling is appropriate for clearance testing because it captures more entrainable asbestos structures. Aggressive sampling lowers the chance of declaring a worksite clean when entrainable asbestos is still present.

  12. Ferrate(VI)-prompted removal of metals in aqueous media: mechanistic delineation of enhanced efficiency via metal entrenchment in magnetic oxides.

    PubMed

    Prucek, Robert; Tuček, Jiří; Kolařík, Jan; Hušková, Ivana; Filip, Jan; Varma, Rajender S; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-02-17

    The removal efficiency of heavy metal ions (cadmium(II), Cd(II); cobalt(II), Co(II); nickel(II), Ni(II); copper(II), Cu(II)) by potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4, Fe(VI)) was studied as a function of added amount of Fe(VI) (or Fe) and varying pH. At pH = 6.6, the effective removal of Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from water was observed at a low Fe-to-heavy metal ion ratio (Fe/M(II) = 2:1) while a removal efficiency of 70% was seen for Cd(II) ions at a high Fe/Cd(II) weight ratio of 15:1. The role of ionic radius and metal valence state was explored by conducting similar removal experiments using Al(III) ions. The unique combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements enabled the delineation of several distinct mechanisms for the Fe(VI)-prompted removal of metal ions. Under a Fe/M weight ratio of 5:1, Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) were removed by the formation of MFe2O4 spinel phase and partially through their structural incorporation into octahedral positions of γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) nanoparticles. In comparison, smaller sized Al(III) ions got incorporated easily into the tetrahedral positions of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. In contrast, Cd(II) ions either did not form the spinel ferrite structure or were not incorporated into the lattic of iron(III) oxide phase due to the distinct electronic structure and ionic radius. Environmentally friendly removal of heavy metal ions at a much smaller dosage of Fe than those of commonly applied iron-containing coagulants and the formation of ferrimagnetic species preventing metal ions leaching back into the environment and allowing their magnetic separation are highlighted.

  13. Ferrate(VI)-prompted removal of metals in aqueous media: mechanistic delineation of enhanced efficiency via metal entrenchment in magnetic oxides.

    PubMed

    Prucek, Robert; Tuček, Jiří; Kolařík, Jan; Hušková, Ivana; Filip, Jan; Varma, Rajender S; Sharma, Virender K; Zbořil, Radek

    2015-02-17

    The removal efficiency of heavy metal ions (cadmium(II), Cd(II); cobalt(II), Co(II); nickel(II), Ni(II); copper(II), Cu(II)) by potassium ferrate(VI) (K2FeO4, Fe(VI)) was studied as a function of added amount of Fe(VI) (or Fe) and varying pH. At pH = 6.6, the effective removal of Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) from water was observed at a low Fe-to-heavy metal ion ratio (Fe/M(II) = 2:1) while a removal efficiency of 70% was seen for Cd(II) ions at a high Fe/Cd(II) weight ratio of 15:1. The role of ionic radius and metal valence state was explored by conducting similar removal experiments using Al(III) ions. The unique combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), in-field Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetization measurements enabled the delineation of several distinct mechanisms for the Fe(VI)-prompted removal of metal ions. Under a Fe/M weight ratio of 5:1, Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) were removed by the formation of MFe2O4 spinel phase and partially through their structural incorporation into octahedral positions of γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) nanoparticles. In comparison, smaller sized Al(III) ions got incorporated easily into the tetrahedral positions of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. In contrast, Cd(II) ions either did not form the spinel ferrite structure or were not incorporated into the lattic of iron(III) oxide phase due to the distinct electronic structure and ionic radius. Environmentally friendly removal of heavy metal ions at a much smaller dosage of Fe than those of commonly applied iron-containing coagulants and the formation of ferrimagnetic species preventing metal ions leaching back into the environment and allowing their magnetic separation are highlighted. PMID:25607569

  14. Removal of inorganic mercury and methylmercury from surface waters following coagulation of dissolved organic matter with metal-based salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henneberry, Y.K.; Kraus, T.E.C.; Fleck, J.A.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Bachand, P.M.; Horwath, W.R.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of inorganic mercury (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in surface waters is a health concern worldwide. This study assessed the removal potential use of metal-based coagulants as a means to remove both dissolved IHg and MeHg from natural waters and provides information regarding the importance of Hg associations with the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction and metal hydroxides. Previous research indicated coagulants were not effective at removing Hg from solution; however these studies used high concentrations of Hg and did not reflect naturally occurring concentrations of Hg. In this study, water collected from an agricultural drain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta was filtered to isolate the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction. The DOM was then treated with a range of coagulant doses to determine the efficacy of removing all forms of Hg from solution. Three industrial-grade coagulants were tested: ferric chloride, ferric sulfate, and polyaluminum chloride. Coagulation removed up to 85% of DOM from solution. In the absence of DOM, all three coagulants released IHg into solution, however in the presence of DOM the coagulants removed up to 97% of IHg and 80% of MeHg. Results suggest that the removal of Hg is mediated by DOM-coagulant interactions. There was a preferential association of IHg with the more aromatic, higher molecular weight fraction of DOM but no such relationship was found for MeHg. This study offers new fundamental insights regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  15. 76 FR 7811 - Silicon Metal From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-11

    ... Partial Rescission of the 2008-2009 Administrative Review of the Antidumping Duty Order, 76 FR 3084... International Trade Administration Silicon Metal From the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results of... the final results of the antidumping duty administrative review of silicon metal from the...

  16. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992; Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, R.L.; Lazarov, L.K.; Prudich, M.E.; Lange, C.A.; Kumar, N.

    1994-03-10

    The initial technical goal in the project was to develop a chemical method for the cost effective removal of both inorganic and organic sulfur from Ohio coals. Verifying and using a process of reacting ethanol vapors with coal under conditions disclosed in U.S. Patent 4,888,029, the immediate technical objectives were to convert a small scale laborative batch process to a larger scale continuous process which can serve as the basis for commercial development of the technology. This involved getting as much information as possible from small scale batch autoclave or fluid bed laboratory reactors for use in pilot plant studies. The laboratory data included material balances on the coal and sulfur, temperature and pressure ranges for the reaction, minimum reaction times at different conditions, the effectiveness of different activators such as oxygen and nitric oxide, the amount and nature of by-products such as sulfur dioxide, hydrogen sulfide and acetaldehyde, the effect of coal particle size on the speed and completeness of the reaction, and the effectiveness of the reaction on different Ohio coals. Because the laboratory experiments using the method disclosed in U.S. 4,888,029 were not successful, the objective for the project was changed to develop a new laboratory process to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Using copper as a catalyst and as an H{sub 2}S scavenger, a new laboratory procedure to use ethanol to remove sulfur from coal has been developed at Ohio University and a patent application covering this process was filed in March, 1993. The process is based on the use of copper as a catalyst for the dehydrogenation of ethanol to produce nascent hydrogen to remove sulfur from the coal and the use of copper as a scavenger to capture the hydrogen sulfide formed from the sulfur removed from coal.

  17. Removal of uranium and other metals from wastewaters using calcium alginate and bacteria immobilized in calcium alginate

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, K.R.; Montgomery, J.R.; Adams, D.J.

    1995-12-31

    Calcium alginate beads, containing immobilized bacteria, removed turanium and other metals from mine wastewaters. Batch tests using 2% calcium alginate beads with and without immobilized bacteria showed both were effective at removing uranium. Beads containing live and dead cells removed essentially the same amount of uranium and removed significantly more uranium than beads without bacteria. The bacteria-alginate system was used to treat waters containing 24.5 mg/L uranium and produced effluents containing 1.0 mg/L uranium in 1 hr and <0.1 mg/L uranium in 24 hr. Calcium alginate beads, with and without immobilized bacteria, also removed arsenic, selenium, and other metals from wastewaters. Bacteria investigated for immobilization in the alginate beads include Bacillus and Pseudomonas sp. A spray technique using an air nozzle has been tested to disperse the alginate into mine wastewater eliminating the bead-making process. Ninety-nine percent of the uranium was removed in less than 15 min contact.

  18. Zirconium-Based Metal-Organic Framework for Removal of Perrhenate from Water.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Debasis; Xu, Wenqian; Nie, Zimin; Johnson, Lewis E V; Coghlan, Campbell; Sushko, Maria L; Kim, Dongsang; Schweiger, Michael J; Kruger, Albert A; Doonan, Christian J; Thallapally, Praveen K

    2016-09-01

    The efficient removal of pertechnetate (TcO4(-)) anions from liquid waste or melter off-gas solution for an alternative treatment is one of the promising options to manage (99)Tc in legacy nuclear waste. Safe immobilization of (99)Tc is of major importance because of its long half-life (t1/2 = 2.13 × 10(5) yrs) and environmental mobility. Different types of inorganic and solid-state ion-exchange materials have been shown to absorb TcO4(-) anions from water. However, both high capacity and selectivity have yet to be achieved in a single material. Herein, we show that a protonated version of an ultrastable zirconium-based metal-organic framework can adsorb perrhenate (ReO4(-)) anions, a nonradioactive surrogate for TcO4(-), from water even in the presence of other common anions. Synchrotron-based powder X-ray diffraction and molecular simulations were used to identify the position of the adsorbed ReO4(-) (surrogate for TcO4(-)) molecule within the framework. PMID:27494264

  19. Superior removal of arsenic from water with zirconium metal-organic framework UiO-66

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenghong; Liu, Xinlei; Chen, J. Paul; Li, Kang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, water stable zirconium metal-organic framework (UiO-66) has been synthesized and for the first time applied as an adsorbent to remove aquatic arsenic contamination. The as-synthesized UiO-66 adsorbent functions excellently across a broad pH range of 1 to 10, and achieves a remarkable arsenate uptake capacity of 303 mg/g at the optimal pH, i.e., pH = 2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest arsenate As(V) adsorption capacity ever reported, much higher than that of currently available adsorbents (5–280 mg/g, generally less than 100 mg/g). The superior arsenic uptake performance of UiO-66 adsorbent could be attributed to the highly porous crystalline structure containing zirconium oxide clusters, which provides a large contact area and plenty of active sites in unit space. Two binding sites within the adsorbent framework are proposed for arsenic species, i.e., hydroxyl group and benzenedicarboxylate ligand. At equilibrium, seven equivalent arsenic species can be captured by one Zr6 cluster through the formation of Zr-O-As coordination bonds. PMID:26559001

  20. Nanometric Graphene Oxide Framework Membranes with Enhanced Heavy Metal Removal via Nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Sui; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2015-08-18

    A novel dual-modification strategy, including (1) the cross-linking and construction of a GO framework by ethylenediamine (EDA) and (2) the amine-enrichment modification by hyperbranched polyethylenimine (HPEI), has been proposed to design stable and highly charged GO framework membranes with the GO selective layer thickness of 70 nm for effective heave metal removal via nanofiltration (NF). Results from sonication experiments and positron annihilation spectroscopy confirmed that EDA cross-linking not only enhanced structural stability but also enlarged the nanochannels among the laminated GO nanosheets for higher water permeability. HPEI 60K was found to be the most effective post-treatment agent that resulted in GO framework membranes with a higher surface charge and lower transport resistance. The newly developed membrane exhibited a high pure water permeability of 5.01 L m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) and comparably high rejections toward Mg(2+), Pb(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Zn(2+). These results have demonstrated the great potential of GO framework materials in wastewater treatment and may provide insights for the design and fabrication of the next generation two-dimensional (2D)-based NF membranes. PMID:26197200

  1. Magnetic adsorbents for actinide and heavy metal removal from waste water

    SciTech Connect

    Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    Magnetic adsorbents can be applied to the treatment of waste water in various physical forms. For example, barium ferrite (BaO{center_dot}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been used successfully as powder, granules or pellets. Iron ferrite, or magnetite, a naturally occurring ore, can also be used in much the same manner. However, natural magnetic needs activation to have the same capacity as freshly prepared ferrite. Furthermore, ferrites have been used solely in a batch mode because of their finely divided nature. To permit utilization of activated magnetite in a column mode with good water flow-through properties, magnetic resins were prepared. In this work, the authors discovered a synergistic effect in using the magnetic resin in a column mode in conjunction with an external magnetic field for concentration of plutonium and americium from waste water. Thus ferrities in a column made surrounded by a magnetic field greatly surpasses the metal removal capacity of ferrite used in a batch mode.

  2. Removal of heavy metals in wastewater by using zeolite nano-particles impregnated polysulfone membranes.

    PubMed

    Yurekli, Yilmaz

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the adsorption and the filtration processes were coupled by a zeolite nanoparticle impregnated polysulfone (PSf) membrane which was used to remove the lead and the nickel cations from synthetically prepared solutions. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis indicated that the synthesized zeolite nanoparticles, using conventional hydrothermal method, produced a pure NaX with ultrafine and uniform particles. The performance of the hybrid membrane was determined under dynamic conditions. The results also revealed that the sorption capacity as well as the water hydraulic permeability of the membranes could both be improved by simply tuning the membrane fabricating conditions such as evaporation period of the casting film and NaX loading. The maximum sorption capacity of the hybrid membrane for the lead and nickel ions was measured as 682 and 122 mg/g respectively at the end of 60 min of filtration, under 1 bar of transmembrane pressure. The coupling process suggested that the membrane architecture could be efficiently used for treating metal solutions with low concentrations and transmembrane pressures. PMID:26874311

  3. Superior removal of arsenic from water with zirconium metal-organic framework UiO-66

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenghong; Liu, Xinlei; Chen, J. Paul; Li, Kang

    2015-11-01

    In this study, water stable zirconium metal-organic framework (UiO-66) has been synthesized and for the first time applied as an adsorbent to remove aquatic arsenic contamination. The as-synthesized UiO-66 adsorbent functions excellently across a broad pH range of 1 to 10, and achieves a remarkable arsenate uptake capacity of 303 mg/g at the optimal pH, i.e., pH = 2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest arsenate As(V) adsorption capacity ever reported, much higher than that of currently available adsorbents (5-280 mg/g, generally less than 100 mg/g). The superior arsenic uptake performance of UiO-66 adsorbent could be attributed to the highly porous crystalline structure containing zirconium oxide clusters, which provides a large contact area and plenty of active sites in unit space. Two binding sites within the adsorbent framework are proposed for arsenic species, i.e., hydroxyl group and benzenedicarboxylate ligand. At equilibrium, seven equivalent arsenic species can be captured by one Zr6 cluster through the formation of Zr-O-As coordination bonds.

  4. Process for removing and detoxifying cadmium from scrap metal including mixed waste

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-07-01

    Cadmium-bearing scrap from nuclear applications, such as neutron shielding and reactor control and safety rods, must usually be handled as mixed waste since it is radioactive and the cadmium in it is both leachable and highly toxic. Removing the cadmium from this scrap, and converting it to a nonleachable and minimally radioactive form, would greatly simplify disposal or recycling. A process now under development will do this by shredding the scrap; leaching it with reagents which selectively dissolve out the cadmium; reprecipitating the cadmium as its highly insoluble sulfide; then fusing the sulfide into a glassy matrix to bring its leachability below EPA limits before disposal. Alternatively, the cadmium may be recovered for reuse. A particular advantage of the process is that all reagents (except the glass frit) can easily be recovered and reused in a nearly closed cycle, minimizing the risk of radioactive release. The process does not harm common metals such as aluminum, iron and stainless steel, and is also applicable to non-nuclear cadmium-bearing scrap such as nickel-cadmium batteries.

  5. Superior removal of arsenic from water with zirconium metal-organic framework UiO-66.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenghong; Liu, Xinlei; Chen, J Paul; Li, Kang

    2015-11-12

    In this study, water stable zirconium metal-organic framework (UiO-66) has been synthesized and for the first time applied as an adsorbent to remove aquatic arsenic contamination. The as-synthesized UiO-66 adsorbent functions excellently across a broad pH range of 1 to 10, and achieves a remarkable arsenate uptake capacity of 303 mg/g at the optimal pH, i.e., pH = 2. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest arsenate As(V) adsorption capacity ever reported, much higher than that of currently available adsorbents (5-280 mg/g, generally less than 100 mg/g). The superior arsenic uptake performance of UiO-66 adsorbent could be attributed to the highly porous crystalline structure containing zirconium oxide clusters, which provides a large contact area and plenty of active sites in unit space. Two binding sites within the adsorbent framework are proposed for arsenic species, i.e., hydroxyl group and benzenedicarboxylate ligand. At equilibrium, seven equivalent arsenic species can be captured by one Zr6 cluster through the formation of Zr-O-As coordination bonds.

  6. Removal of volatile organics from humidified air streams by absorption. Final report, July 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Coutant, R.W.; Zwick, T.; Kim, B.C.

    1987-12-01

    The Air Force frequently relies on air-stripping technologies to remove organic chemicals from ground waters contaminated from fuel and solvent spills. Although air stripping is extremely efficient at removing contaminants from the groundwater, these contaminants are only transferred into the air and in several states, air pollution controls are also required. Activated-carbon beds are one potential emissions control under study. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of contaminant concentration, humidity, and chemical competition on the sorption performance of activated carbons. Based on laboratory results, a preliminary cost comparison was made for heated and unheated carbon beds. Volatile organics of interest included benzene, ethyl benzene, toluene, xylenes. trichloroethylene, and 1,1-dichloroethylene.

  7. Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger: Phase 1 final report, October 1995--July 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, R.T.; Jankura, B.J.; Kudlac, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The Integrated Flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) system is a new concept whereby a Teflon{reg_sign} covered condensing heat exchanger is adapted to remove certain flue gas constitutents, both particulate and gaseous, while recovering low level heat. Phase 1 includes two experimental tasks. One task dealt principally with the pollutant removal capabilities of the IFGT at a scale of about 1.2MW{sub t}. The other task studied the durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covering to withstand the rigors of abrasive wear by fly ash emitted as a result of coal combustion. The pollutant removal characteristics of the IFGT system were measured over a wide range of operating conditions. The coals tested included high, medium and low-sulfur coals. The flue gas pollutants studied included ammonia, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen fluoride, particulate, sulfur dioxide, gas phase and particle phase mercury and gas phase and particle phase trace elements. The particulate removal efficiency and size distribution was investigated. These test results demonstrated that the IFGT system is an effective device for both acid gas absorption and fine particulate collection. The durability of the Teflon{reg_sign} covered heat exchanger tubes was studied on a pilot-scale single-stage condensing heat exchanger (CHX{reg_sign}). Data from the test indicate that virtually no decrease in Teflon{reg_sign} thickness was observed for the coating on the first two rows of heat exchanger tubes, even at high inlet particulate loadings. Evidence of wear was present only at the microscopic level, and even then was very minor in severity.

  8. The effects of magnetic field on the removal of organic compounds and metals by coagulation and flocculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duangduen, C.; Nathaporn, A.; Kitiphatmontree, M.

    2006-09-01

    The effects of magnetic field (MF) were studied using surface water from the Pra Ram IX reservoir. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal was improved by exposure of untreated water to MF for up to 5 hours duration. MF was found to alter the physico-chemical properties of some involved substances. Optimum DOC removal (15-20%) was observed after 30-40 minutes of exposure. Flocculation was also improved in the presence of MF. The removal of DOC, iron, heavy metals (As, Zn) was the best with an optimum ferric chloride dosage of 50 mg/L and exposure to 0.35Tesla magnetic field for 30 min. However, Ca removal was not affected by this treatment.

  9. Soil treatment to remove uranium and related mixed radioactive contaminants. Final report September 1992--October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    A research and development project to remove uranium and related radioactive contaminants from soil by an ultrasonically-aided chemical leaching process began in 1993. The project objective was to develop and design, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale experimental studies, a cost-effective soil decontamination process to produce a treated soil containing less than 35 pCi/g. The project, to cover a period of about thirty months, was designed to include bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to remove primarily uranium from the Incinerator Area soil, at Fernald, Ohio, as well as strontium-90, cobalt-60 and cesium-137 from a Chalk River soil, at the Chalk River Laboratories, Ontario. The project goal was to develop, design and cost estimate, on the basis of bench-scale and pilot-scale ex-situ soil treatment studies, a process to remove radionuclides form the soils to a residual level of 35 pCi/g of soil or less, and to provide a dischargeable water effluent as a result of soil leaching and a concentrate that can be recovered for reuse or solidified as a waste for disposal. In addition, a supplementary goal was to test the effectiveness of in-situ soil treatment through a field study using the Chalk River soil.

  10. Efficacy of different final irrigant activation protocols on smear layer removal by EDTA and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Daniel R; Santos, Zarina T; Tay, Lidia Y; Silva, Emmanuel J; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different activation protocols for chelating agents used after chemo-mechanical preparation (CMP), for smear layer (SL) removal. Forty-five single-rooted human premolars with straight canals and fully formed apex were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups depending on the chelating agent used for smear layer removal: distilled water (DW, control group); 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA); and 10% citric acid (CA). Each group was further divided into three subgroups according to the activation protocol used: no-activation (NA), manual dynamic activation (MDA), or sonic activation (SA). After CMP, all specimens were sectioned and processed for observation of the apical thirds by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Two calibrated evaluators attributed scores to each specimen. The differences between activation protocols were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Friedman and Wilcoxon signed rank tests were used for comparison between each root canal third. When chelating agents were activated, either by MDA or SA, it was obtained the best cleaning results with no significant difference between EDTA and CA (P > 0.05). Sonic activation showed the best results when root canal thirds were analyzed, in comparison to MDA and NA groups (P < 0.05). The activation of chelating agents, independent of the protocol used, benefits smear layer removal from root canals.

  11. Thermal treatment for chlorine removal from coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1991--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Muchmore, C.B.; Hesketh, H.E.; Chen, Han Lin

    1992-12-31

    It was the goal of this research to provide the technical basis for development of a process to remove chlorine from coal prior to combustion, based on a thermal treatment process. Reaction rate constants and activation energy have been determined, and energy and mass balances performed. Substitution of a synthetic flue gas (7% 0{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 81% N{sub 2}) for nitrogen in the tube furnace resulted in at least equivalent chlorine removal (85.5%) compared to nitrogen. The fluidized bed dechlorination system modifications have resulted in a steady increase in performance, the most recent run providing 64% reduction in chlorine concentration. Addition of supplemental heat to the column should permit attainment of the slightly higher temperatures required to attain over 80% removal of the chlorine. Calcium chloride by-product of 67% purity has been produced. A bench scale catenary grid concentrator with supplemental heating coils and limited insulation is capable of concentrating CaCl{sub 2} solution up to essentially 40%, with no sign of scale or plugging. Further development of the process should include a thorough evaluation of the use of combustion gases to serve as the fluidizing medium and to provide the energy for the thermal dechlorination process.

  12. Effect of central metal ions of analogous metal-organic frameworks on the adsorptive removal of benzothiophene from a model fuel.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-09-15

    Liquid phase adsorption of benzothiophene (BT) has been studied over CuCl₂-loaded analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal-benzenedicarboxylates (Me-BDCs, Me: Al, Cr and V), to understand the effect of central metal ions on the adsorptive removal of BT from a model fuel. Among the central metal ions (Al(3+), Cr(3+) and V(3+)) of the Me-BDCs only V(3+) was oxidized by the loaded CuCl₂ (or Cu(2+)) at ambient condition resulting in V(4+) and Cu(+) species. Different from the CuCl₂-loaded Al- and Cr-BDCs, the CuCl₂/V-BDC adsorbed BT remarkably well compared to the virgin V-BDCs which suggests a specific favorable interaction (π-complexation) between the obtained Cu(+) in the CuCl₂/V-BDC and BT. PMID:23892314

  13. Effect of central metal ions of analogous metal-organic frameworks on the adsorptive removal of benzothiophene from a model fuel.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2013-09-15

    Liquid phase adsorption of benzothiophene (BT) has been studied over CuCl₂-loaded analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), metal-benzenedicarboxylates (Me-BDCs, Me: Al, Cr and V), to understand the effect of central metal ions on the adsorptive removal of BT from a model fuel. Among the central metal ions (Al(3+), Cr(3+) and V(3+)) of the Me-BDCs only V(3+) was oxidized by the loaded CuCl₂ (or Cu(2+)) at ambient condition resulting in V(4+) and Cu(+) species. Different from the CuCl₂-loaded Al- and Cr-BDCs, the CuCl₂/V-BDC adsorbed BT remarkably well compared to the virgin V-BDCs which suggests a specific favorable interaction (π-complexation) between the obtained Cu(+) in the CuCl₂/V-BDC and BT.

  14. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane. PMID:26364325

  15. Schedules of Controlled Substances: Removal of [123I]Ioflupane From Schedule II of the Controlled Substances Act. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-09-11

    With the issuance of this final rule, the Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration removes [123I]ioflupane from the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act. This action is pursuant to the Controlled Substances Act which requires that such actions be made on the record after an opportunity for a hearing through formal rulemaking. Prior to the effective date of this rule, [123I]ioflupane was, by definition, a schedule II controlled substance because it is derived from cocaine via ecgonine, both of which are schedule II controlled substances. This action removes the regulatory controls and administrative, civil, and criminal sanctions applicable to controlled substances, including those specific to schedule II controlled substances, on persons who handle (manufacture, distribute, reverse distribute, dispense, conduct research, import, export, or conduct chemical analysis) or propose to handle [123I]ioflupane.

  16. Sewage sludge ash to phosphate fertilizer by chlorination and thermal treatment: residence time requirements for heavy metal removal.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Benedikt; Wegerer, Harald; Aschenbrenner, Philipp; Rechberger, Helmut; Winter, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash can be performed by mixing the ash with environmentally compatible chlorides (e.g. CaCl2 or MgCl2) and water, pelletizing the mixture and treating the pellets in a rotary reactor at about 1000 degrees C. Thermogravimetry-mass spectroscopy, muffle oven tests (500-1150 degrees C) and investigations in a laboratory-scale rotary reactor (950-1050 degrees C, residence time 1-25 min) were carried out. In the rotary reactor, up to 97% of Cu, 95% Pb and 95% Zn can be removed at 1050 degrees C. As Cl release starts from 400 degrees C (obtained from thermogravimetry-mass spectrometry experiments), heavy metals are already removed partially within the heating period. This heavy metal removal can be described as being similar to a first-order rate law. To meet the limit values specified in the Austrian and German fertilizer ordinances, residence times of the order of minutes are sufficient at 950 degrees C. PMID:23393980

  17. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal. PMID:25839833

  18. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal.

  19. The use of ethanol to remove sulfur from coal. Final report, September 1991--December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-15

    In developing the new Ohio University procedure the thermodynamic limitations of the reactions for removal of both pyritic and organic sulfur from coal at 400--600{degrees}C were studied using copper as a very strong H{sub 2}S-acceptor. Copper serves as a catalyst for ethanol dehydrogenation to form nascent hydrogen. Copper also serves as a scavenger to form copper sulfide from the hydrogen sulfide evolved during the reaction. Copper sulfide in turn serves as a catalyst for organic sulfur hydrodesulfurization reactions. If the coal to be desulfurized contains pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) or FeS, the copper scavenger effect reduces any back reaction of hydrogen sulfide with the iron and increases the removal of sulfur from the carbonaceous material. The desired effect of using copper can be achieved by using copper or copper containing alloys as materials of construction or as liners for a regenerable reactor. During the time period that Ohio Coal Development Office supported this work, small scale (560 grams) laboratory experiments with coals containing about 3.5% sulfur have achieved up to 90% desulfurization at temperatures of 500{degrees}C when using a copper reactor. Results from the autoclave experiments have identified the nature of the chemical reactions taking place. Because the process removes both pyritic and organic sulfur in coal, the successful scale up of the process would have important economic significance to the coal industry. Even though this and other chemical processes may be relatively expensive and far from being commercial, the reason for further development is that this process may hold the promise of achieving much greater sulfur reduction and of producing a cleaner coal than other methods. This would be especially important for small or older power plants and industrial boilers.

  20. Biodesulfurization techniques: Application of selected microorganisms for organic sulfur removal from coals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elmore, B.B.

    1993-08-01

    As an alternative to post-combustion desulfurization of coal and pre-combustion desulfurization using physicochemical techniques, the microbial desulfurization of coal may be accomplished through the use of microbial cultures that, in an application of various microbial species, may remove both the pyritic and organic fractions of sulfur found in coal. Organisms have been isolated that readily depyritize coal but often at prohibitively low rates of desulfurization. Microbes have also been isolated that may potentially remove the organic-sulfur fraction present in coal (showing promise when acting on organic sulfur model compounds such as dibenzothiophene). The isolation and study of microorganisms demonstrating a potential for removing organic sulfur from coal has been undertaken in this project. Additionally, the organisms and mechanisms by which coal is microbially depyritized has been investigated. Three cultures were isolated that grew on dibenzothiophene (DBT), a model organic-sulfur compound, as the sole sulfur source. These cultures (UMX3, UMX9, and IGTS8) also grew on coal samples as the sole sulfur source. Numerous techniques for pretreating and ``cotreating`` coal for depyritization were also evaluated for the ability to improve the rate or extent of microbial depyritization. These include prewashing the coal with various solvents and adding surfactants to the culture broth. Using a bituminous coal containing 0.61% (w/w) pyrite washed with organic solvents at low slurry concentrations (2% w/v), the extent of depyritization was increased approximately 25% in two weeks as compared to controls. At slurry concentrations of 20% w/v, a tetrachloroethylene treatment of the coal followed by depyritization with Thiobacillus ferrooxidans increased both the rate and extent of depyritization by approximately 10%.