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Sample records for metal salt solutions

  1. Cryochemical method for forming spherical metal oxide particles from metal salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Tinkle, M.C.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of preparing small metal oxide spheres cryochemically utilizing metal salts (e.g., nitrates) that cannot readily be dried and calcined without loss of sphericity of the particles. Such metal salts are cryochemically formed into small spheres, partially or completely converted to an insoluble salt, and dried and calcined. (Official Gazette)

  2. Metals removal from spent salts

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Peter C.; Von Holtz, Erica H.; Hipple, David L.; Summers, Leslie J.; Brummond, William A.; Adamson, Martyn G.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing metal contaminants from the spent salt of a molten salt oxidation (MSO) reactor is described. Spent salt is removed from the reactor and analyzed to determine the contaminants present and the carbonate concentration. The salt is dissolved in water, and one or more reagents may be added to precipitate the metal oxide and/or the metal as either metal oxide, metal hydroxide, or as a salt. The precipitated materials are filtered, dried and packaged for disposal as waste or can be immobilized as ceramic pellets. More than about 90% of the metals and mineral residues (ashes) present are removed by filtration. After filtration, salt solutions having a carbonate concentration >20% can be spray-dried and returned to the reactor for re-use. Salt solutions containing a carbonate concentration <20% require further clean-up using an ion exchange column, which yields salt solutions that contain less than 1.0 ppm of contaminants.

  3. Formation and stabilization of anionic metal complexes in concentrated aqueous quaternary ammonium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Aronson, F.L.; Hwang, L.L.Y.; Ronca, N.; Solomon, N.A.; Steigman, J.

    1985-02-04

    Anionic complexes of transition metals were stabilized in aqueous solutions containing high concentrations of various short-chain quaternary ammonium salts. Compounds with longer paraffin chains were effective in much less concentrated solution. Complex ions were detected spectrophotometrically. FeCl/sub 4//sup -/, which is usually formed in concentrated HCl, was the predominant Fe(III) complex in 30 m choline chloride containing only 0.12 M HCl. A yellow transitory Tc(VII) chloro-addition intermediate, formed in the reduction of TcO/sub 4//sup -/ by concentrated HCl, was stabilized when the solution also contained 25 m choline chloride. Its spectrum, as well as the isolation of an already known Tc(VII) bipyridyl complex, is reported. Concentrated organic electrolytes also stabilized Tc(V) oxide halides against disproportionation and Tc(IV) hexahalides against hydrolysis. Halochromates of Cr(VI) were formed and stabilized in dilute acid containing quaternary ammonium salts. Their UV spectra showed the well-resolved vibronic fine structure associated with the symmetric chromium-to-oxygen charge-transfer band. It is known that these progressions are resolved in aprotic solvents, but not in aqueous acidic solution alone, and that the loss of fine structure in aqueous media is due to hydrogen bonding. The stabilization of anionic metal complexes and the resolution of vibronic structure in halochromates are probably consequences of water-structure-enforced ion paring. The present work suggests that the water molecules in immediate contact with the complex anions are more strongly hydrogen bonded to each other than to the complex. 21 references, 4 figures.

  4. A novel method of non-violent dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, A. R.; Prasad, M. V. R.; Ponraju, D.; Krishnan, H.

    2004-10-01

    A new technique of non-violent and fast dissolution of sodium metal in a concentrated aqueous solution of Epsom salt (MgSO4.7H2O) at room temperature (RT) has been developed. The dissolution process is mildly exothermic but could be carried out even in a glass beaker in air under swift stirring condition. The reaction products consist of mixed salts of MgSO4 and Na2SO4 as well as Mg(OH)2 which are only mildly alkaline and hence are non-corrosive and non-hazardous unlike NaOH. A 50 mL solution having Epsom salt concentration of 2 M was found to give the optimal composition for disposal of 1 g of sodium. Supersaturated (>2.7 M), as well as dilute (<1.1 M) solutions, however, cause violent reactions and hence should be avoided. Repeated sodium dissolution in Epsom solution produced a solid waste of 4.7 g per g of sodium dissolved which is comparable with the waste (4 g) produced in 8 M NaOH solution. A 1.4 M Epsom solution sprayed with a high-pressure jet cleaner at RT in air easily removed the sodium blocked inside a metal pipe made of mild steel. The above jet also dissolved peacefully residual sodium collected on the metal tray after a sodium fire experiment. No sodium fire or explosion was observed during this campaign. The Epsom solution spray effectively neutralized the minor quantity of sodium aerosol produced during this campaign. This novel technique would hence be quite useful for draining sodium from fast breeder reactor components and bulk processing of sodium as well as for sodium fire fighting.

  5. An adiabatic linearized path integral approach for quantum time correlation functions: electronic transport in metal-molten salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Causo, Maria Serena; Ciccotti, Giovanni; Montemayor, Daniel; Bonella, Sara; Coker, David F

    2005-04-14

    We generalize the linearized path integral approach to evaluate quantum time correlation functions for systems best described by a set of nuclear and electronic degrees of freedom, restricting ourselves to the adiabatic approximation. If the operators in the correlation function are nondiagonal in the electronic states, then this adiabatic linearized path integral approximation for the thermal averaged quantum dynamics presents interesting and distinctive features, which we derive and explore in this paper. The capability of these approximations to accurately reproduce the behavior of physical systems is demonstrated by calculating the diffusion constant for an excess electron in a metal-molten salt solution.

  6. Electrophysical methods of separation of metal cations in the moving salts solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gofman, V. N.; Tuksov, I. V.; Timchenko, S. N.; Shamanin, I. V.; Poberezhnikov, A. D.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of experiments on the excitation of the phenomenon of selective drift of solvated ions under the influence of an external "asymmetric" electric field to the circulating solution of calcium chloride and magnesium salts in a polar liquid dielectric - water are shown. The purpose of the experiments was to determine the influence of the field frequency and amplitude of the field strength on the excitation phenomenon, and the study of the operating characteristics of the testing apparatus - a dividing cell. The dependences of the separation efficiency of solvated cations from the frequency of the external field and the excitation threshold of the phenomenon from the field strength in the separation cell are defined.

  7. Metal Oxide Solubility and Molten Salt Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-29

    METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT CORROSION.(U) MAR 82 K H STERN UNCLASSI E DL R L-4772NL EL .2. MICROCOPY RESOLUTION TEST CHART NATIONAL BURALU...METAL OXIDE SOLUBILITY AND MOLTEN SALT Interim report on a continuing CORROSION NRL problem. S. PERFORMING a4. REPORT NUMlER 7. AuTtwORr) S. CONTRACT OR...EQUILIBRIA AND OXIDE SOLUTION RELATIONS IN MOLTEN SALTS ............................................. 2 IV. METHODS FOR DETERMINING SOLUBILITIES

  8. Use of alkali metal salts to prepare high purity single-walled carbon nanotube solutions and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashour, Rakan F.

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) display interesting electronic and optical properties desired for many advanced thin film applications, such as transparent conductive electrodes or thin-film transistors. Large-scale production of SWCNTs generally results in polydispersed mixtures of nanotube structures. Since SWCNT electronic character (conducting or semiconducting nature) depends on the nanotube structure, application performance is being held back by this inability to discretely control SWCNT synthesis. Although a number of post-production techniques are able to separate SWCNTs based on electronic character, diameter, or chirality, most still suffer from the disadvantage of high costs of materials, equipment, or labor intensity to be relevant for large-scale production. On the other hand, chromatographic separation has emerged as a method that is compatible with large scale separation of metallic and semiconducting SWCNTs. In this work, SWCNTs, in an aqueous surfactant suspension of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), are separated by their electronic character using a gel chromatography process. Metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) are collected as initial fractions since they show minimum interaction with the gel medium, whereas, semiconducting SWCNTs (sc- SWCNTs) remain adsorbed to the gel. The process of sc-SWCNT retention in the gel is found to be driven by the packing density of SDS around the SWCNTs. Through a series of separation experiments, it is shown that sc-SWCNTs can be eluted from the gel simply by disturbing the configuration of the SDS/SWCNT micellar structure. This is achieved by either introducing a solution containing a co-surfactant, such as sodium cholate (SC), or solutions of alkali metal ionic salts. Analysis of SWCNT suspensions by optical absorption provides insights into the effect of changing the metal ion (M+ = Li+, Na+, and K+) in the eluting solution. Salts with smaller metal ions (e.g. Li+) require higher concentrations to achieve

  9. SEPARATION OF METAL SALTS BY ADSORPTION

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.

    1959-01-20

    It has been found that certain metal salts, particularly the halides of iron, cobalt, nickel, and the actinide metals, arc readily absorbed on aluminum oxide, while certain other salts, particularly rare earth metal halides, are not so absorbed. Use is made of this discovery to separate uranium from the rare earths. The metal salts are first dissolved in a molten mixture of alkali metal nitrates, e.g., the eutectic mixture of lithium nitrate and potassium nitrate, and then the molten salt solution is contacted with alumina, either by slurrying or by passing the salt solution through an absorption tower. The process is particularly valuable for the separation of actinides from lanthanum-group rare earths.

  10. Improving Loading Amount and Performance of Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells through Metal Salt Solutions Treatment on Photoanode.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenran; Du, Jun; Ren, Zhenwei; Peng, Wenxiang; Pan, Zhenxiao; Zhong, Xinhua

    2016-11-16

    Increasing QD loading amount on photoanode and suppressing charge recombination are prerequisite for high-efficiency quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs). Herein, a facile technique for enhancing the loading amount of QDs on photoanode and therefore improving the photovoltaic performance of the resultant cell devices is developed by pipetting metal salt aqueous solutions on TiO2 film electrode and then evaporating at elevated temperature. The effect of different metal salt solutions was investigated, and experimental results indicated that the isoelectric point (IEP) of metal ions influenced the loading amount of QDs and consequently the photovoltaic performance of the resultant cell devices. The influence of anions was also investigated, and the results indicated that anions of strong acid made no difference, while acetate anion hampered the performance of solar cells. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of oxyhydroxides, whose behavior was responsible for QD loading amount and thus solar cell performance. Suppressed charge recombination based on Mg(2+) treatment under optimal conditions was confirmed by impedance spectroscopy as well as transient photovoltage decay measurement. Combined with high-QD loading amount and retarded charge recombination, the champion cell based on Mg(2+) treatment exhibited an efficiency of 9.73% (Jsc = 27.28 mA/cm(2), Voc = 0.609 V, FF = 0.585) under AM 1.5 G full 1 sun irradiation. The obtained efficiency was one of the best performances for liquid-junction QDSCs, which exhibited a 10% improvement over the untreated cells with the highest efficiency of 8.85%.

  11. Study of quantitative interactions of potato and corn starch granules with ions in diluted solutions of heavy metal salts.

    PubMed

    Szymońska, Joanna; Molenda, Marcin; Wieczorek, Jerzy

    2015-12-10

    Interactions of potato and corn starch granules with ions in diluted solutions of silver, lead, copper or iron salts were investigated. It was shown experimentally that granules accumulated the cations in amounts depending on the granule structure and water content as well as a type of both metal and counter-ions present in solution. Potato starch retained almost three times more cations compared to corn starch what was proportional to the total phosphorous content in these starches. Quantity of milligrams of cations bound by 1g of starch was inversely correlated with the cation hydration. Ag(+), Pb(2+) and Cu(2+) were connected in stoichiometric amounts of moles to semicrystalline and amorphous parts of the granules. Fe(3+) ions were accumulated in higher than stoichiometric quantities mainly in granule amorphous regions. Metal ions penetrated into granules together with anions except nitrates which remained on surface of potato starch granules. Cations facilitated the starch thermal decomposition in accordance with values of their standard redox potentials. Nitrates supported this process only in the presence of base metal cations.

  12. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-10-14

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  13. Electrochromic Salts, Solutions, and Devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky, T. Mark

    2008-11-11

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  14. Electrochromic salts, solutions, and devices

    DOEpatents

    Burrell, Anthony K.; Warner, Benjamin P.; McClesky,7,064,212 T. Mark

    2006-06-20

    Electrochromic salts. Electrochromic salts of dicationic viologens such as methyl viologen and benzyl viologen associated with anions selected from bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide, and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide are produced by metathesis with the corresponding viologen dihalide. They are highly soluble in molten quarternary ammonium salts and together with a suitable reductant provide electrolyte solutions that are used in electrochromic windows.

  15. Salts of alkali metal anions and process of preparing same

    DOEpatents

    Dye, James L.; Ceraso, Joseph M.; Tehan, Frederick J.; Lok, Mei Tak

    1978-01-01

    Compounds of alkali metal anion salts of alkali metal cations in bicyclic polyoxadiamines are disclosed. The salts are prepared by contacting an excess of alkali metal with an alkali metal dissolving solution consisting of a bicyclic polyoxadiamine in a suitable solvent, and recovered by precipitation. The salts have a gold-color crystalline appearance and are stable in a vacuum at -10.degree. C. and below.

  16. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  17. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts.

    PubMed

    Zimnyakov, D A; Sevrugin, A V; Yuvchenko, S A; Fedorov, F S; Tretyachenko, E V; Vikulova, M A; Kovaleva, D S; Krugova, E Y; Gorokhovsky, A V

    2016-06-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka-Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5-1.5 eV and 1.6-3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction.

  18. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System.

    PubMed

    Lavrynenko, O M; Pavlenko, O Yu; Shchukin, Yu S

    2016-12-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  19. Characteristic of the Nanoparticles Formed on the Carbon Steel Surface Contacting with 3d-Metal Water Salt Solutions in the Open-Air System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrynenko, O. M.; Pavlenko, O. Yu; Shchukin, Yu S.

    2016-02-01

    The contact of a steel electrode with water dispersion medium in an open-air system leads to the development of various polymorphic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides on the steel surface. Whereas the usage of distilled water causes the obtaining of Fe(II)-Fe(III) layered double hydroxides (green rust) as a primary mineral phase, but in the presence of inorganic 3d-metal water salt solutions, mixed layered double hydroxides (LDHs) together with non-stoichiometric spinel ferrite nanoparticles are formed on the steel surface. Mixed LDHs keep stability against further oxidation and complicate the obtaining of spinel ferrite nanoparticles. Thermal treatment of mixed LDHs among other mineral phases formed via the rotation-corrosion dispergation process at certain temperatures permits to obtain homogenous nanoparticles of spinel ferrites as well as maghemite or hematite doped by 3d-metal cations.

  20. Metal salt catalysts for enhancing hydrogen spillover

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Wang, Yuhe

    2013-04-23

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a receptor, a hydrogen dissociating metal doped on the receptor, and a metal salt doped on the receptor. The hydrogen dissociating metal is configured to spill over hydrogen to the receptor, and the metal salt is configured to increase a rate of the spill over of the hydrogen to the receptor.

  1. Kinetic study of the α-tocopherol-regeneration reaction of ubiquinol-10 in methanol and acetonitrile solutions: notable effect of the alkali and alkaline earth metal salts on the reaction rates.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kazuo; Oi, Masanori; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi

    2012-03-01

    A kinetic study of regeneration reaction of α-tocopherol (α-TocH) by ubiquinol-10 has been performed in the presence of four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (LiClO(4), NaClO(4), NaI, and Mg(ClO(4))(2)) in methanol and acetonitrile solutions, using double-mixing stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The second-order rate constants (k(r)'s) for the reaction of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc•) radical with ubiquinol-10 increased and decreased notably with increasing concentrations of metal salts in methanol and acetonitrile, respectively. The k(r) values increased in the order of no metal salt < NaClO(4) ~ NaI < LiClO(4) < Mg(ClO(4))(2) at the same concentration of metal salts in methanol. On the other hand, in acetonitrile, the k(r) values decreased in the order of no metal salt > NaClO(4) ~ NaI > LiClO(4) > Mg(ClO(4))(2) at the same concentration of metal salts. The metal salts having a smaller ionic radius of cation and a larger charge of cation gave a larger k(r) value in methanol, and a smaller k(r) value in acetonitrile. The effect of anion was almost negligible in both the solvents. Notable effects of metal cations on the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-Toc• radical were observed in aprotic acetonitrile solution, suggesting complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations. On the other hand, effects of metal cations were negligible in protic methanol, suggesting that the complex formation between α-Toc• and metal cations is hindered by the hydrogen bond between α-Toc• and methanol molecules. The difference between the reaction mechanisms in methanol and acetonitrile solutions was discussed on the basis of the results obtained. High concentrations of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts coexist with α-TocH and ubiquinol-10 in plasma, blood, and many tissues, suggesting the contribution of the metal salts to the above regeneration reaction in biological systems.

  2. Data on energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles obtained by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of transition metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Zimnyakov, D.A.; Sevrugin, A.V.; Yuvchenko, S.A.; Fedorov, F.S.; Tretyachenko, E.V.; Vikulova, M.A.; Kovaleva, D.S.; Krugova, E.Y.; Gorokhovsky, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present the data on the energy-band-gap characteristics of composite nanoparticles produced by modification of the amorphous potassium polytitanate in aqueous solutions of different transition metal salts. Band gap characteristics are investigated using diffuse reflection spectra of the obtained powders. Calculated logarithmic derivative quantity of the Kubelka–Munk function reveals a presence of local maxima in the regions 0.5–1.5 eV and 1.6–3.0 eV which correspond to band gap values of the investigated materials. The values might be related to the constituents of the composite nanoparticles and intermediate products of their chemical interaction. PMID:27158654

  3. Notable effects of the metal salts on the formation and decay reactions of α-tocopheroxyl radical in acetonitrile solution. The complex formation between α-tocopheroxyl and metal cations.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Yutaro; Fujii, Miyabi; Matsuoka, Chihiro; Hashimoto, Haruka; Ouchi, Aya; Nagaoka, Shin-ichi; Mukai, Kazuo

    2011-08-18

    The measurement of the UV-vis absorption spectrum of α-tocopheroxyl (α-Toc(•)) radical was performed by reacting aroxyl (ArO(•)) radical with α-tocopherol (α-TocH) in acetonitrile solution including four kinds of alkali and alkaline earth metal salts (MX or MX(2)) (LiClO(4), LiI, NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2)), using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The maximum wavelength (λ(max)) of the absorption spectrum of the α-Toc(•) at 425.0 nm increased with increasing concentration of metal salts (0-0.500 M) in acetonitrile, and it approached constant values, suggesting an [α-Toc(•)-M(+) (or M(2+))] complex formation. The stability constants (K) were determined to be 9.2, 2.8, and 45 M(-1) for LiClO(4), NaClO(4), and Mg(ClO(4))(2), respectively. By reacting ArO(•) with α-TocH in acetonitrile, the absorption of ArO(•) disappeared rapidly, while that of α-Toc(•) appeared and then decreased gradually as a result of the bimolecular self-reaction of α-Toc(•) after passing through the maximum. The second-order rate constants (k(s)) obtained for the reaction of α-TocH with ArO(•) increased linearly with an increasing concentration of metal salts. The results indicate that the hydrogen transfer reaction of α-TocH proceeds via an electron transfer intermediate from α-TocH to ArO(•) radicals followed by proton transfer. Both the coordination of metal cations to the one-electron reduced anions of ArO(•) (ArO:(-)) and the coordination of counteranions to the one-electron oxidized cations of α-TocH (α-TocH(•)(+)) may stabilize the intermediate, resulting in the acceleration of electron transfer. A remarkable effect of metal salts on the rate of bimolecular self-reaction (2k(d)) of the α-Toc(•) radical was also observed. The rate constant (2k(d)) decreased rapidly with increasing concentrations of the metal salts. The 2k(d) value decreased at the same concentration of the metal salts in the following order: no metal salt > NaClO(4) > LiClO(4) > Mg

  4. Sol-gel processing with inorganic metal salt precursors

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng

    2004-10-19

    Methods for sol-gel processing that generally involve mixing together an inorganic metal salt, water, and a water miscible alcohol or other organic solvent, at room temperature with a macromolecular dispersant material, such as hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) added. The resulting homogenous solution is incubated at a desired temperature and time to result in a desired product. The methods enable production of high quality sols and gels at lower temperatures than standard methods. The methods enable production of nanosize sols from inorganic metal salts. The methods offer sol-gel processing from inorganic metal salts.

  5. SEPARATION OF INORGANIC SALTS FROM ORGANIC SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1958-06-24

    A process is described for recovering the nitrates of uranium and plutonium from solution in oxygen-containing organic solvents such as ketones or ethers. The solution of such salts dissolved in an oxygen-containing organic compound is contacted with an ion exchange resin whereby sorption of the entire salt on the resin takes place and then the salt-depleted liquid and the resin are separated from each other. The reaction seems to be based on an anion formation of the entire salt by complexing with the anion of the resin. Strong base or quaternary ammonium type resins can be used successfully in this process.

  6. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-02-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks.

  7. Coordination chemistry in fused-salt solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruen, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Spectrophotometric work on structural determinations with fused-salt solutions is reviewed. Constraints placed on the method, as well as interpretation of the spectra, are discussed with parallels drawn to aqueous spectrophotometric curves of the same materials.

  8. Metals in Metal Salts: A Copper Mirror Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pike, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    A simple lecture demonstration is described to show the latent presence of metal atoms in a metal salt. Copper(II) formate tetrahydrate is heated in a round-bottom flask forming a high-quality copper mirror.

  9. Metal speciation in salt marsh sediments: Influence of halophyte vegetation in salt marshes with different morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Raposo de Almeida, Pedro; Caçador, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes provide environmental conditions that are known to affect metal speciation in sediments. The elevational gradient along the marsh and consequent differential flooding are some of the major factors influencing halophytic species distribution and coverage due to their differential tolerance to salinity and submersion. Different species, in turn, also have distinct influences on the sediment's metal speciation, and its metal accumulation abilities. The present work aimed to evaluate how different halophyte species in two different salt marshes could influence metal partitioning in the sediment at root depth and how that could differ from bare sediments. Metal speciation in sediments around the roots (rhizosediments) of Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia fruticosa and Spartina maritima was determined by sequentially extracting operationally defined fractions with solutions of increasing strength and acidity. Rosário salt marsh generally showed higher concentrations of all metals in the rhizosediments. Metal partitioning was primarily related to the type of metal, with the elements' chemistry overriding the environment's influence on fractionation schemes. The most mobile elements were Cd and Zn, with greater availability being found in non-vegetated sediments. Immobilization in rhizosediments was predominantly influenced by the presence of Fe and Mn oxides, as well as organic complexes. In the more mature of both salt marshes, the differences between vegetated and non-vegetated sediments were more evident regarding S. fruticosa, while in the younger system all halophytes presented significantly different metal partitioning when compared to that of mudflats.

  10. CuInSe₂ thin-film solar cells with 7.72 % efficiency prepared via direct coating of a metal salts/alcohol-based precursor solution.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Sejin; Son, Tae Hwa; Cho, Ara; Gwak, Jihye; Yun, Jae Ho; Shin, Keeshik; Ahn, Seoung Kyu; Park, Sang Hyun; Yoon, Kyunghoon

    2012-09-01

    A simple direct solution coating process for forming CuInSe₂ (CIS) thin films was described, employing a low-cost and environmentally friendly precursor solution. The precursor solution was prepared by mixing metal acetates, ethanol, and ethanolamine. The facile formation of a precursor solution without the need to prefabricate nanoparticles enables a rapid and easy processing, and the high stability of the solution in air further ensures the precursor preparation and the film deposition in ambient conditions without a glove box. The thin film solar cell fabricated with the absorber film prepared by this route showed an initial conversion efficiency of as high as 7.72 %.

  11. Salting-in and salting-out of water-soluble polymers in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Rahmat; Jahani, Farahnaz

    2012-05-03

    To obtain further experimental evidence for the mechanisms of the salting effect produced by the addition of salting-out or sating-in inducing electrolytes to aqueous solutions of water-soluble polymers, systematic studies on the vapor-liquid equilibria and liquid-liquid equilibria of aqueous solutions of several polymers are performed in the presence of a large series of electrolytes. Polymers are polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME250), polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 2000 (PEGDME2000), and polypropylene glycol 400 (PPG400), and the investigated electrolytes are KCl, NH(4)Cl, MgCl(2), (CH(3))(4)NCl, NaCl, NaNO(3), Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit (tri-sodium citrate). Aqueous solutions of PPG400 form aqueous two-phase systems with all the investigated salts; however, other investigated polymers form aqueous two-phase systems only with Na(2)CO(3), Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)Cit. A relation was found between the salting-out or sating-in effects of electrolyte on the polymer aqueous solutions and the slopes of the constant water activity lines of ternary polymer-salt aqueous solutions, so that, in the case of the salting-out effect, the constant water activity lines had a concave slope, but in the case of the salting-in effects, the constant water activity lines had a convex slope. The effect of temperature, anion of electrolyte, cation of electrolyte, and type and molar mass of polymers were studied and the results interpreted in terms of the solute-water and solute-solute interactions. The salting-out effect results from the formation of ion (specially anion)-water hydration complexes, which, in turn, decreases hydration, and hence, the solubility of the polymer and the salting-in effect results from a direct binding of the cations to the ether oxygens of the polymers.

  12. Oscillations in a Linearly Stratified Salt Solution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heavers, Richard M.

    2007-01-01

    Our physics students like to watch a ball bouncing underwater. They do this by dropping a weighted plastic ball into a 1000-ml cylinder filled with a linearly stratified salt-water solution at room temperature. The ball oscillates and comes to rest at about mid-depth. Its motion is analogous to the damped vertical oscillations of a mass hanging…

  13. Chronopotentiometry of refractory metals, actinides and oxyanions in molten salts: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1992-01-01

    The applications of chronopotentiometry to the study of electrochemical behavior of three technologically important areas of refractory metals, actinides, and oxyanions in molten salts are critically reviewed. Chronopotentiometry is a very versatile diagnostic tool to understand the reaction mechanism of the electrode processes for the electrochemical reduction/oxidation of these electroactive species in molten salt solutions. Well adherent, compact, and uniformly thick coatings of refractory metals may be electrodeposited from their solutions in molten salts.

  14. Method for preparing salt solutions having desired properties

    DOEpatents

    Ally, Moonis R.; Braunstein, Jerry

    1994-01-01

    The specification discloses a method for preparing salt solutions which exhibit desired thermodynamic properties. The method enables prediction of the value of the thermodynamic properties for single and multiple salt solutions over a wide range of conditions from activity data and constants which are independent of concentration and temperature. A particular application of the invention is in the control of salt solutions in a process to provide a salt solution which exhibits the desired properties.

  15. Chlorate salts and solutions on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, Jennifer; Chevrier, Vincent F.; Berget, Deanna J.; Adams, Robert D.

    2012-04-01

    Chlorate (ClO3-) is an intermediate oxidation species between chloride (Cl-) and perchlorate (ClO4-), both of which were found at the landing site by the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL). The chlorate ion is almost as stable as perchlorate, and appears to be associated with perchlorate in most terrestrial reservoirs (e.g. Atacama and Antarctica). It is possible that chlorate contributed to the ion sensor response on the WCL, yet was masked by the strong perchlorate signal. However, very little is known about chlorate salts and their effect on the stability of water. We performed evaporation rate experiments in our Mars simulation chamber, which enabled us to determine the activity of water for various concentrations. From this we constructed solubility diagrams for NaClO3, KClO3, Mg(ClO3)2 and Ca(ClO3)2, and determined the Pitzer parameters for each salt. Chlorate salt eutectic temperatures range from 270 K (KClO3) to 204 K (Mg(ClO3)2). Modeling the addition of chlorate to the initial WCL solutions shows that it precipitates in concentrations comparable to other common salts, such as gypsum and epsomite, and implies that chlorates may play an important role in the wet chemistry on Mars.

  16. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  19. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. Link to an amendment published at 79 FR 34637, June... substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt (P-90-274), is subject to...

  1. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  5. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  6. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  9. 40 CFR 721.2093 - Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2093 Alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance... alkenyl carboxylate, metal salt (PMN P-99-0848) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10028 - Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disubstituted benzene metal salts... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10028 Disubstituted benzene metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as disubstituted benzene metal salts (PMNs P-01-901 and P-01-902) are subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.4660 - Alcohol, alkali metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcohol, alkali metal salt. 721.4660... Substances § 721.4660 Alcohol, alkali metal salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance generically identified as alcohol, alkali metal salt (PMN P-91-151)...

  12. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-01

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water.

  13. Hydration patterns and salting effects in sodium chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Mu, Yuguang

    2011-10-07

    The salting effects of 2M sodium chloride electrolyte are studied based on a series of model solutes with properties ranging from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. Generally, hydrophobic solutes will be salted out and hydrophilic solutes will be salted in by NaCl solution. The solvation free energy changes are highly correlated with Kirkwood-Buff integrals. The underlying mechanism resorts to the preferential binding of ions and water to solutes. Our results demonstrate that the salting effect not only depends on the salt's position in Hofmeister series, but also on the solutes' specifics. Taking the hydration free energies of solutes and ions as independent variables, a schematic diagram of salting effects is suggested. The resolved multifaceted salting effects rely on the sensitive balance of the tripartite interaction among solutes, ions, and water.

  14. Organic ionic salt draw solutions for osmotic membrane bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Katie S; Achilli, Andrea; Childress, Amy E

    2012-10-01

    This investigation evaluates the use of organic ionic salt solutions as draw solutions for specific use in osmotic membrane bioreactors. Also, this investigation presents a simple method for determining the diffusion coefficient of ionic salt solutions using only a characterized membrane. A selection of organic ionic draw solutions underwent a desktop screening process before being tested in the laboratory and evaluated for performance using specific salt flux (reverse salt flux per unit water flux), biodegradation potential, and replenishment cost. Two of the salts were found to have specific salt fluxes three to six times lower than two commonly used inorganic draw solutions, NaCl and MgCl(2). All of the salts tested have organic anions with the potential to degrade in the bioreactor as a carbon source and aid in nutrient removal. Results demonstrate the potential benefits of organic ionic salt draw solutions over currently implemented inorganics in osmotic membrane bioreactor systems.

  15. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  16. The Upside to Hg-DOM Associations for Water Quality: Removal of Hg from Solution Using Coagulaion with Metal-Based Salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henneberry, Y.; Kraus, T. E.; Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Horwath, W. R.

    2011-12-01

    This study assessed the potential use of metal-based coagulants to remove dissolved mercury (Hg) from natural waters and provides information regarding the importance of Hg associations with the dissolved organic matter (DOM) fraction and metal hydroxides. Previous research indicated coagulants were not effective at removing Hg from solution; however those studies used high concentrations of Hg, which did not reflect naturally occurring concentrations of Hg. Filtered water collected from an agricultural drain in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) was treated with three industrial-grade coagulants (ferric chloride, ferric sulfate, and polyaluminum chloride) to determine their efficacy in removing both inroganic (IHg) and methylmercury (MeHg) from the water column. The Delta suffers from elevated surface water Hg concentrations and as a result is listed as an imparied water body. Coagulants removed up to 85% of DOM from solution. In the absence of DOM, all three coagulants released IHg into solution, however in the presence of DOM the coagulants removed up to 97% of IHg and 80% of MeHg. Results suggest that the removal of Hg is mediated by DOM-coagulant interactions. There was a preferential association of IHg with the more aromatic, higher molecular weight fraction of DOM but no such relationship was found for MeHg. This study offers new fundamental insights regarding large-scale removal of Hg at environmentally relevant concentrations. Research using isotopically labeled Hg is providing insight into whether coagulation can remove recently added Hg (e.g. atmospheric deposition) from solution and whether once formed, the floc can remove additional Hg from the water column.

  17. Solubility of pllutonium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1993-02-26

    Plutonium solubility data from several studies have been evaluated. For each data set, a predictive model has been developed where appropriate. In addition, a statistical model and corresponding prediction intervals for plutonium solubility as a quadratic function of the hydroxide concentration have been developed. Because of the wide range of solution compositions, the solubility of plutonium can vary by as much as three orders of magnitude for any given hydroxide concentration and still remain within the prediction interval. Any nuclear safety assessments that depend on the maximum amount of plutonium dissolved in alkaline salt solutions should use concentrations at least as great as the upper prediction limits developed in this study. To increase the confidence in the prediction model, it is recommended that additional solubility tests be conducted at low hydroxide concentrations and with all of the other solution components involved. To validate the model for application to actual waste solutions, it is recommended that the plutonium solubilities in actual waste solutions be determined and compared to the values predicted by the quadratic model.

  18. Response of a salt marsh microbial community to metal contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Ana P.; Teixeira, Catarina; Reis, Izabela; Magalhães, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A.; Almeida, C. Marisa R.

    2013-09-01

    Salt marshes are important sinks for contaminants, namely metals that tend to accumulate around plant roots and could eventually be taken up in a process known as phytoremediation. On the other hand, microbial communities display important roles in the salt marsh ecosystems, such as recycling of nutrients and/or degradation of organic contaminants. Thus, plants can benefit from the microbial activity in the phytoremediation process. Nevertheless, above certain levels, metals are known to be toxic to microorganisms, fact that can eventually compromise their ecological functions. In this vein, the aim of present study was to investigate, in the laboratory, the effect of selected metals (Cd, Cu and Pb) on the microbial communities associated to the roots of two salt marsh plants. Sediments colonized by Juncus maritimus and Phragmites australis were collected in the River Lima estuary (NW Portugal), and spiked with each of the metals at three different Effects Range-Median (ERM) concentrations (1, 10×, 50×), being ERM the sediment quality guideline that indicates the concentration above which adverse biological effects may frequently occur. Spiked sediments were incubated with a nutritive saline solution, being left in the dark under constant agitation for 7 days. The results showed that, despite the initial sediments colonized by J. maritimus and P. australis displayed significant (p < 0.05) differences in terms of microbial community structure (evaluated by ARISA), they presented similar microbial abundances (estimated by DAPI). Also, in terms of microbial abundance, both sediments showed a similar response to metal addition, with a decrease in number of cells only observed for the higher addition of Cu. Nevertheless, both Cu and Pb, at intermediate metals levels promote a shift in the microbial community structure, with possibly effect on the ecological function of these microbial communities in salt marshes. These changes may affect plants phytoremediation

  19. Adaptive resolution simulation of salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevc, Staš; Junghans, Christoph; Kremer, Kurt; Praprotnik, Matej

    2013-10-01

    We present an adaptive resolution simulation of aqueous salt (NaCl) solutions at ambient conditions using the adaptive resolution scheme. Our multiscale approach concurrently couples the atomistic and coarse-grained models of the aqueous NaCl, where water molecules and ions change their resolution while moving from one resolution domain to the other. We employ standard extended simple point charge (SPC/E) and simple point charge (SPC) water models in combination with AMBER and GROMOS force fields for ion interactions in the atomistic domain. Electrostatics in our model are described by the generalized reaction field method. The effective interactions for water-water and water-ion interactions in the coarse-grained model are derived using structure-based coarse-graining approach while the Coulomb interactions between ions are appropriately screened. To ensure an even distribution of water molecules and ions across the simulation box we employ thermodynamic forces. We demonstrate that the equilibrium structural, e.g. radial distribution functions and density distributions of all the species, and dynamical properties are correctly reproduced by our adaptive resolution method. Our multiscale approach, which is general and can be used for any classical non-polarizable force-field and/or types of ions, will significantly speed up biomolecular simulation involving aqueous salt.

  20. Solute diffusion in liquid metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N.

    1973-01-01

    A gas model of diffusion in liquid metals is presented. In this model, ions of liquid metals are assumed to behave like the molecules in a dense gas. Diffusion coefficient of solute is discussed with reference to its mass, ionic size, and pair potential. The model is applied to the case of solute diffusion in liquid silver. An attempt was made to predict diffusion coefficients of solutes with reasonable accuracy.

  1. Metal salts of alkyl catechol dithiophosphoric acids and oil compositions containing the salts

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, E.S.; Liston, T.V.

    1988-03-08

    Metal salts of alkyl catechol esters of dithiophosphoric acid suitable as additives in oil compositions are disclosed in this patent. Oil compositions containing the salts of such esters show improved extreme pressure/anti-wear and anit-oxidant properties.

  2. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. III. Computational vibrational spectroscopy of HDO in aqueous salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Lim, Sohee; Chon, Bonghwan; Cho, Minhaeng; Kim, Heejae; Kim, Seongheun

    2015-05-28

    The vibrational frequency, frequency fluctuation dynamics, and transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode of HDO molecule in aqueous solutions are strongly dependent on its local electrostatic environment and hydrogen-bond network structure. Therefore, the time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy the O—D stretch mode has been particularly used to investigate specific ion effects on water structure. Despite prolonged efforts to understand the interplay of O—D vibrational dynamics with local water hydrogen-bond network and ion aggregate structures in high salt solutions, still there exists a gap between theory and experiment due to a lack of quantitative model for accurately describing O—D stretch frequency in high salt solutions. To fill this gap, we have performed numerical simulations of Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of the O—D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions and compared them with experimental results. Carrying out extensive quantum chemistry calculations on not only water clusters but also ion-water clusters, we first developed a distributed vibrational solvatochromic charge model for the O—D stretch mode in aqueous salt solutions. Furthermore, the non-Condon effect on the vibrational transition dipole moment of the O—D stretch mode was fully taken into consideration with the charge response kernel that is non-local polarizability density. From the fluctuating O—D stretch mode frequencies and transition dipole vectors obtained from the molecular dynamics simulations, the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO in salt solutions could be calculated. The polarization effect on the transition dipole vector of the O—D stretch mode is shown to be important and the asymmetric line shapes of the O—D stretch Raman scattering and IR absorption spectra of HDO especially in highly concentrated NaCl and KSCN solutions are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. We

  3. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  4. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  5. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  6. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  7. 40 CFR 721.640 - Amine substituted metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Amine substituted metal salts. 721.640... Substances § 721.640 Amine substituted metal salts. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substances identified generically as amine substituted metal...

  8. Cotton fabrics with UV blocking properties through metal salts deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emam, Hossam E.; Bechtold, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to sunlight is important for human health as this increases the resistance to diverse pathogens, but the higher doses cause skin problems and diseases. Hence, wearing of sunlight protective fabrics displays a good solution for people working in open atmosphere. The current study offered quite simple and technically feasible ways to prepare good UV protection fabrics based on cotton. Metal salts including Zn, Cu and Ti were immobilized into cotton and oxidized cotton fabrics by using pad-dry-cure technique. Metal contents on fabrics were determined by AAS; the highest metal content was recorded for Cu-fabric and it was 360.6 mmol/kg after treatment of oxidized cotton with 0.5 M of copper nitrate. Ti contents on fabrics were ranged between 168.0 and 200.8 mmol/kg and it showed the lowest release as only 38.1-46.4% leached out fabrics after five laundry washings. Metal containing deposits were specified by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. UV-transmission radiation over treated fabrics was measured and ultraviolet protection factor (UPF) was calculated. UPF was enhanced after treatment with Cu and Ti salts to be 11.6 and 14, respectively. After five washings, the amount of metal (Cu or Ti) retained indicates acceptable laundering durability.

  9. Alkali Metal/Salt Thermal-Energy-Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Wayne W.; Stearns, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed thermal-energy-storage system based on mixture of alkali metal and one of its halide salts; metal and salt form slurry of two immiscible melts. Use of slurry expected to prevent incrustations of solidified salts on heat-transfer surfaces that occur where salts alone used. Since incrustations impede heat transfer, system performance improved. In system, charging heat-exchanger surface immersed in lower liquid, rich in halide-salt, phase-charge material. Discharging heat exchanger surface immersed in upper liquid, rich in alkali metal.

  10. Imidazolium salt ion pairs in solution.

    PubMed

    Stassen, Hubert K; Ludwig, Ralf; Wulf, Alexander; Dupont, Jairton

    2015-06-01

    The formation, stabilisation and reactivity of contact ion pairs of non-protic imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) in solution are conceptualized in light of selected experimental evidence as well theoretical calculations reported mainly in the last ten years. Electric conductivity, NMR, ESI-MS and IR data as well as theoretical calculations support not only the formation of contact ion pairs in solution, but also the presence of larger ionic and neutral aggregates even when dissolved in solvents with relatively high dielectric constants, such as acetonitrile and DMSO. The presence of larger imidazolium supramolecular aggregates is favoured at higher salt concentrations in solvents of low dielectric constant for ILs that contain shorter N-alkyl side chains associated with anions of low coordination ability. The stability and reactivity of neutral contact species are also dependent on the nature of the anion, imidazolium substituents, and are more abundant in ILs containing strong coordinating anions, in particular those that can form charge transfer complexes with the imidazolium cation. Finally, some ILs display reactivities as contact ion pairs rather than solvent-separated ions.

  11. Composition and Method for Cleaning Salt Residues From Metal Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    CLEANING, *METALS), (*AIRCRAFT ENGINES, CLEANING), (*PATENTS, CLEANING), ETHYLENEDINITRILO TETRAACETATES, SALTS , HELICOPTER ENGINES...ETHYLENEDIAMINE, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POLYETHYLENE PLASTICS, PROPENES, SURFACE ACTIVE SUBSTANCES, ACETATES, CORROSION, NITRITES

  12. Dilute acid/metal salt hydrolysis of lignocellulosics

    DOEpatents

    Nguyen, Quang A.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2002-01-01

    A modified dilute acid method of hydrolyzing the cellulose and hemicellulose in lignocellulosic material under conditions to obtain higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable using dilute acid alone, comprising: impregnating a lignocellulosic feedstock with a mixture of an amount of aqueous solution of a dilute acid catalyst and a metal salt catalyst sufficient to provide higher overall fermentable sugar yields than is obtainable when hydrolyzing with dilute acid alone; loading the impregnated lignocellulosic feedstock into a reactor and heating for a sufficient period of time to hydrolyze substantially all of the hemicellulose and greater than 45% of the cellulose to water soluble sugars; and recovering the water soluble sugars.

  13. NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RELAXATION IN LIQUID METALS, ALLOYS, AND SALTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, *ALKALI METAL ALLOYS, *LIQUID METALS, * SALTS , NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE, RELAXATION TIME... SODIUM , GALLIUM, SODIUM ALLOYS, THALLIUM, THALLIUM COMPOUNDS, MELTING, NUCLEAR SPINS, QUANTUM THEORY, OPERATORS(MATHEMATICS), BIBLIOGRAPHIES, INTEGRAL EQUATIONS, TEST EQUIPMENT, MATHEMATICAL ANALYSIS.

  14. Solubility of plutonium and uranium in alkaline salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.; Fleischman, S.D.

    1993-02-12

    The solubility of plutonium and uranium in alkaline salt solutions, which will be processed in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process, was investigated to screen for significant factors and interactions among the factors comprising the salt solutions. The factors included in the study were hydroxide, nitrate, nitrite, aluminate, sulfate, carbonate, and temperature. Over the range of factor concentrations studied, the level of hydroxide in the solution is not sufficient alone to predict the resulting concentration of plutonium and uranium in the solution. Other constituents of the salt solution play an important role in determining the amount of plutonium and uranium in solution. Statistical models predicting the plutonium and uranium concentrations over the range of salt solutions investigated are provided.

  15. Pattern Formation in Drying Drops of Polyelectrolyte - Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Deniz; Belyi, Vladimir A.

    2005-03-01

    We use optical microscopy, AFM, and SEM to investigate salt patterns formed during evaporation of aqueous solutions of sodium poly(styrene sulfonate) and sodium chloride (NaPSS/NaCl). Observed patterns exhibit significantly larger variety than in the simple "drying coffee drop" experiments. We find that varying the concentration ratios of polyelectrolyte/salt solutions leads to formation of qualitatively different patterns, including radially grown salt deposits, concentric rings of salt and other structures. Our results indicate that these patterns are also sensitive to evaporation rate of the droplet. However molecular weight of the polymer appears to have little to no effect on the observed patterns.

  16. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4620 - Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. 721... Substances § 721.4620 Dialkylamino alkanoate metal salt. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as dialkylamino alkanoate...

  20. Apparatus and method for making metal chloride salt product

    DOEpatents

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt; Richmann, Michael K.

    2007-05-15

    A method of producing metal chlorides is disclosed in which chlorine gas is introduced into liquid Cd. CdCl.sub.2 salt is floating on the liquid Cd and as more liquid CdCl.sub.2 is formed it separates from the liquid Cd metal and dissolves in the salt. The salt with the CdCl.sub.2 dissolved therein contacts a metal which reacts with CdCl.sub.2 to form a metal chloride, forming a mixture of metal chloride and CdCl.sub.2. After separation of bulk Cd from the salt, by gravitational means, the metal chloride is obtained by distillation which removes CdCl.sub.2 and any Cd dissolved in the metal chloride.

  1. Salt-Finger Convection in a Stratified Fluid Layer Induced by Thermal and Solutal Capillary Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chuan F.; Chan, Cho Lik

    1996-01-01

    Salt-finger convection in a double-diffusive system is a motion driven by the release of gravitational potential due to different diffusion rates. Normally, when the gravitational field is reduced, salt-finger convection together with other convective motions driven by buoyancy forces will be rapidly suppressed. However, because the destabilizing effect of the concentration gradient is amplified by the Lewis number, with values varying from 10(exp 2) for aqueous salt solutions to 10 (exp 4) for liquid metals, salt-finger convection may be generated at much reduced gravity levels. In the microgravity environment, the surface tension gradient assumes a dominant role in causing fluid motion. In this paper, we report on some experimental results showing the generation of salt-finger convection due to capillary motio on the surface of a stratified fluid layer. A numerical simulation is presented to show the cause of salt-finger convection.

  2. [Structure and Activity of Fungal Lipases in Bile Salt Solutions].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L R; Bakirova, D R; Valiullina, Yu A; Idiyatullin, B Z; Faizullin, D A; Zueva, O S; Zuev, Yu F

    2016-01-01

    The changes in structure and catalytic properties of fungal lipases (Candida rugosa, Rhizomucor miehei, Mucor javanicus) were investigated in micellar solutions of bile salts that differ in hydrophilic-lypophilic balance and reaction medium properties. The methods of circular dichroism and tryptophan fluorescence were applied to estimate the changes in peptide structure within complexes with bile salt micelles. Bile salts do not exert a significant influence on the structure of the enzymes under study: in Rh. miehei and M. javanicus lipases the alpha helix content slightly decreased, the influence of bile salts on the C. rugosa structure was not revealed. Despite negligible structural modifications in the enzymes, in bile salt solutions a considerable change in their catalytic properties was observed: an abrupt decrease in catalytic effectiveness. Substrate-bile salts micelles complex formation was demonstrated by the NMR self-diffusion method. The model of a regulation of fungal lipase activity was proposed.

  3. Extraction of ethylene glycol from aqueous salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butyrskaya, E. V.; Belyakova, N. V.; Rozhkova, M. V.; Nechaeva, L. S.

    2012-11-01

    A method is proposed for extracting ethylene glycol from aqueous salt solutions by dialysis through ion-exchange membranes, based on the Donnan exclusion of the electrolyte. Dialysis is performed in the continuous and batch modes. It is found that the batch mode of dialysis is more effective for extracting ethylene glycol from its aqueous salt solutions. The effect of the ionic form of the membrane on ethylene glycol fluxes is explained through computer simulation.

  4. Spontaneous grafting of diazonium salts: chemical mechanism on metallic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mesnage, Alice; Lefèvre, Xavier; Jégou, Pascale; Deniau, Guy; Palacin, Serge

    2012-08-14

    The spontaneous reaction of diazonium salts on various substrates has been widely employed since it consists of a simple immersion of the substrate in the diazonium salt solution. As electrochemical processes involving the same diazonium salts, the spontaneous grafting is assumed to give covalently poly(phenylene)-like bonded films. Resistance to solvents and to ultrasonication is commonly accepted as indirect proof of the existence of a covalent bond. However, the most relevant attempts to demonstrate a metal-C interface bond have been obtained by an XPS investigation of spontaneously grafted films on copper. Similarly, our experiments give evidence of such a bond in spontaneously grafted films on nickel substrates in acetonitrile. In the case of gold substrates, the formation of a spontaneous film was unexpected but reported in the literature in parallel to our observations. Even if no interfacial bond was observed, formation of the films was explained by grafting of aryl cations or radicals on the surface arising from dediazoniation, the film growing later by azo coupling, radical addition, or cationic addition on the grafted phenyl layer. Nevertheless, none of these mechanisms fits our experimental results showing the presence of an Au-N bond. In this work, we present a fine spectroscopic analysis of the coatings obtained on gold and nickel substrates that allow us to propose a chemical structure of such films, in particular, their interface with the substrates. After testing the most probable mechanisms, we have concluded in favor of the involvement of two complementary mechanisms which are the direct reaction of diazonium salts with the gold surface that accounts for the observed Au-N interfacial bonds as well as the formation of aryl cations able to graft on the substrate through Au-C linkages.

  5. Methods for predicting properties and tailoring salt solutions for industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ally, Moonis R.

    1993-01-01

    An algorithm developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory accurately and quickly predicts thermodynamic properties of concentrated aqueous salt solutions. This algorithm is much simpler and much faster than other modeling schemes and is unique because it can predict solution behavior at very high concentrations and under varying conditions. Typical industrial applications of this algorithm would be in manufacture of inorganic chemicals by crystallization, thermal storage, refrigeration and cooling, extraction of metals, emissions controls, etc.

  6. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR CALCINING SALT SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Lawroski, S.; Jonke, A.A.; Taecker, R.G.

    1961-10-31

    A method is given for converting uranyl nitrate solution into solid UO/ sub 3/, The solution is sprayed horizontally into a fluidized bed of UO/sub 3/ particles at 310 to 350 deg C by a nozzle of the coaxial air jet type at about 26 psig, Under these conditions the desired conversion takes place, and caking in the bed is avoided.

  7. SWELLING OF ERYTHROCYTES IN SOLUTIONS OF AMMONIUM SALTS

    PubMed Central

    Schiödt, E.

    1933-01-01

    Two rather simple equations have been derived, which make it possible to express in a single number the result of a series of determinations of the volume of erythrocytes swelling in solutions of ammonium salts. In all experiments made with several combinations of different concentrations of permeating and non-permeating salts, the curves calculated from the equations have covered the points found by experiment. PMID:19872754

  8. Forces between hydrophobic solids in concentrated aqueous salt solution.

    PubMed

    Mastropietro, Dean J; Ducker, William A

    2012-03-09

    Much research has focused on the discovery and description of long-ranged forces between hydrophobic solids immersed in water. Here we show that the force between high contact-angle solids in concentrated salt solution (1 M KCl) agrees very well with van der Waals forces calculated from Lifshitz theory for separations greater than 5 nm. The hydrophobic solids are octadecyltrichlorosilane-coated glass, with an advancing contact angle of 108°. Thus, in 1 M salt solution, it is unnecessary to invoke the presence of a hydrophobic force at separations greater than 5 nm. Through measurement in salt solution, we avoid the necessity of accounting for large electrostatic forces that frequently occur in pure water and may obscure resolution of other forces.

  9. Infrared spectroscopy of aqueous ionic salt solutions at low concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Gessinger, Véronique; van Driessche, Caroline; Larouche, Pascal; Chapados, Camille

    2007-05-01

    The analysis by infrared spectroscopy of aqueous solutions of the binary inorganic salts NaI and NaCl and the ternary salts CaCl2 and BaCl2 at concentrations from 1000to2mM was carried out to complement a previous study done at higher concentrations on nine binary salts (alkali halides) and one ternary salt (MgCl2) [J.-J. Max and C. Chapados, J. Chem. Phys. 115, 2664 (2001)]. These salts are completely ionized in aqueous solutions, forming monoatomic species that do not absorb IR but that perturb the surrounding water, modifying its spectrum. The factor analysis of the spectra revealed that all these salt solutions were composed of two water types: pure water and salt solvated water. The authors obtained pure salt solvated water spectra for all the salts using an extrapolation technique. The water types obtained are constant for the binary and ternary salts down to 2mM. For the binary salts, we determine that 5.0 and 4.0 water molecules are solvated to the Na +-Cl- and Na+-I- ion pairs, respectively. These numbers are the same as that obtained at higher concentrations. For the new ternary salts, we find that 6.0 and 8.0 water molecules are solvated to Ca++-(Cl-)2 and Ba++-(Cl-)2 ion pairs, respectively. These numbers are higher than the four water molecules solvated to Mg++-(Cl-)2 ion pairs determined previously, but show a progression that follows their atomic numbers. These results constitute new experimental results on "simple" systems whose molecular organization is still a matter of debate. The IR method that probes the system at the molecular level is a method different than the macroscopic ones that give the activity coefficients. The IR gives direct observation at the molecular level of the strong ion-water interactions that are often neglected and its water structure not considered in macroscopic methods. The present results and their analysis together with those obtained by other methods will facilitate the determination of the organization of these

  10. Thermodynamics of extraction by solutions of amines and salts of substituted ammonium bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochkin, A. V.; Sergievskii, V. V.

    1989-09-01

    Extraction systems containing amines and their salts are widely used to concentrate and separate metals. From the theoretical viewpoint, these systems are among the most complex, because of the variety of intermolecular interactions in the organic phase. The explanation and quantitative description of the observed regularities of extraction became possible only as a result of progress in the study of the thermodynamics of binary and multicomponent solutions of salts of substituted ammonium bases in non-polar organic solvents, which make it possible to distinguish the contribution of each type of interaction to the non-ideal character of the solutions. All known "anomalous" features are due to the influence of the hydration of the salts of the substituted ammonium bases on their activity. The bibliography contains 113 references.

  11. Precursor Luminescence near the Collapse of Laser-Induced Bubbles in Alkali-Salt Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Han-Ching; Vo, Sonny; Williams, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    A precursor luminescence pulse consisting of atomic line emission is observed as much as 150 nanoseconds prior to the collapse point of laser-created bubbles in alkali-metal solutions. The timing of the emission from neutral Na, Li, and K atoms is strongly dependent on the salt concentration, which appears to result from resonant radiation trapping by the alkali atoms in the bubble. The alkali emission ends at the onset of the blackbody luminescence pulse at the bubble collapse point, and the duration of the blackbody pulse is found to be reduced by up to 30% as the alkali-salt concentration is increased. PMID:19519032

  12. [Determination of Chloride Salt Solution by NIR Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Chen, Jian-hong; Jiao, Ming-xing

    2015-07-01

    Determination of chloride salt solution by near infrared spectrum plays a very important role in Biomedicine. The near infrared spectrum analysis of Sodium chloride, potassium chloride, calcium chloride aqueous solution shows that the concentration change of chloride salt can affect hydrogen bond, resulting in the variation of near infrared spectrum of water. The temperature influence on NIR spectrum has been decreased by choosing reasonable wavelength range and the wavelength where the temperature effects are zero (isosbestic point). Chlorine salt prediction model was established based on partial least squares method and used for predicting the concentration of the chlorine ion. The impact on near infrared spectrum of the cation ionic radius, the number of ionic charge, the complex effect of ionic in water has also discussed in this article and the reason of every factor are analysed. Experimental results show that the temperature and concentration will affect the near-infrared spectrum of the solution, It is found that the effect of temperature plays the dominant role at low concentrations of chlorine salt; rather, the ionic dominates at high concentration. Chloride complexes are formed in aqueous solution, It has an effect on hydrogen bond of water combining with the cations in chlorine salt solution, Comparing different chloride solutions at the same concentration, the destruction effects of chloride complexes and catnions on the hydrogen bond of water increases in the sequences: CaCl2 >NaCl>KC. The modeling result shows that the determination coefficients (R2) = 99.97%, the root mean square error of cross validation (RM- SECV) = 4.51, and the residual prediction deviation (RPD) = 62.7, it meets the daily requirements of biochemical detection accuracy.

  13. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

  14. Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Hung-Sui; Geng, Lin; Skotheim, Terje A.

    1996-07-23

    The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate in Solution: Effects of Mono- and Divalent Salts

    PubMed Central

    Horkay, Ferenc; Basser, Peter J.; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate (CS) is a linear sulfated polysaccharide found in cartilage and other tissues in the body. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements are made on semi-dilute CS solutions to determine ion induced changes in the local order of the CS chains and in their dynamic properties. In salt-free CS solutions SANS detects the correlation peak due to local ordering between adjacent chains in which the characteristic interchain distance is d ≈ 57 Å. In both monovalent and divalent salts (NaCl and CaCl2) aligned linear regions are distinguishable corresponding to distance scales ranging from the length of the monomer unit (8 Å) to about 1000 Å. With increasing calcium ion concentration, the scattering intensity increases. Even in the presence of 200 mM CaCl2, however, neither phase separation nor cross-linking occurs. DLS in the CS solutions reveals two characteristic relaxation modes, the fast mode corresponding to the thermal concentration fluctuations. The collective diffusion coefficient D decreases with increasing calcium ion concentration and exhibits a power law function of the single variable c/J, where c is the CS concentration and J is the ionic strength of the salt in the solution. This result implies that the effect of the sodium and calcium ions on the dynamic properties of CS solutions is fully accounted for by the ionic strength. PMID:23814316

  16. Modification of FGD gypsum in hydrothermal mixed salt solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Qin; Wu, Zhong-Biao

    2006-01-01

    A novel utilization way of the sludge from wet calcium-based flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes has been developed in this paper. This study focused on the conversion of the FGD gypsum into alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate by a hydrothermal salt solution method at atmospheric pressure. Experimental study has been carried out in a batch reactor. Qualitative and quantitative analyses were made by DSC/TG thermal analysis, SEM, XRD, metalloscope and chemical analysis. The experimental results showed that the modification of FGD gypsum was controlled by the dissolution and recrystallization mechanisms. With the introduction of FGD gypsum the salt solution was supersaturated, then crystal nucleus of alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate were produced in the solution. With the submicroscopic structure of FGD gypsum crystal changed, the crystal nucleus grew up into alpha-hemihydrate calcium sulfate crystals. Thus, the modification of FGD gypsum was fulfilled.

  17. Castable cements to prevent corrosion of metals in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Vidal, J. C.; Morton, E.

    2016-08-01

    Castable cements on metals form a protective barrier that is able to prevent permeation of molten salts towards metallic surfaces. Silica-based castable cements are capable of protecting containment metallic alloys from the corrosive attack of molten chlorides at temperatures as high as 650 degrees C. Boron nitride (BN) blocking the pores in the cured cement prevents permeation of the molten chloride towards the metal surface. The cements tested are not chemically stable in molten carbonates, because the bonding components dissolved into molten carbonates salt. The corrosion rate is 7.72+/-0.32 mm/year for bare stainless steel 347 in molten eutectic NaCl - 65.58 wt% LiCl at 650 degrees C, which is the baseline used for determining how well the cement protects the metallic surfaces from corrosion. In particular the metal fully encapsulated with Aremco 645-N with pores filled with boron nitride immersed in molten eutectic NaCl - 65.58 wt% LiCl at 650 degrees C shows a corrosion rate of 9E-04 mm/year. The present study gives initial corrosion rates. Long-term tests are required to determine if Aremco 645-N with BN coating on metal has long term chemical stability for blocking salt permeation through coating pores.

  18. Catalyst Of A Metal Heteropoly Acid Salt That Is Insoluble In A Polar Solvent On A Non-Metallic Porous Support And Method Of Making

    DOEpatents

    Wang. Yong; Peden. Charles H. F.; Choi. Saemin

    2004-11-09

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  19. Catalyst of a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on a non-metallic porous support and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Peden, Charles H. F. [West Richland, WA; Choi, Saemin [Richland, WA

    2002-10-29

    The present invention includes a catalyst having (a) a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores; (b) a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent on the non-metallic support; wherein at least a portion of the metal heteropoly acid salt is dispersed within said plurality of pores. The present invention also includes a method of depositing a metal heteropoly acid salt that is insoluble in a polar solvent onto a non-metallic support having a plurality of pores. The method has the steps of: (a) obtaining a first solution containing a first precursor of a metal salt cation; (b) obtaining a second solution containing a second precursor of a heteropoly acid anion in a solvent having a limited dissolution potential for said first precursor; (c) impregnating the non-metallic support with the first precursor forming a first precursor deposit within the plurality of pores, forming a first precursor impregnated support; (d) heating said first precursor impregnated support forming a bonded first precursor impregnated support; (e) impregnating the second precursor that reacts with the precursor deposit and forms the metal heteropoly acid salt.

  20. Catalytic conversion of dihydroxyacetone to lactic acid using metal salts in water.

    PubMed

    Rasrendra, Carolus B; Fachri, Boy A; Makertihartha, I Gusti B N; Adisasmito, Sanggono; Heeres, Hero J

    2011-06-20

    We herein present a study on the application of homogeneous catalysts in the form of metal salts on the conversion of trioses, such as dihydroxyacetone (DHA), and glyceraldehyde (GLY) to lactic acid (LA) in water. A wide range of metal salts (26 in total) were examined. Al(III) salts were identified as the most promising and essentially quantitative LA yields (>90 mol%) were obtained at 140 °C and a reaction time of 90 min. A reaction pathway is proposed and a kinetic model using the power law approach was developed for the conversion of DHA to LA with pyruvaldehyde (PRV) as the intermediate. Good agreement between experimental data and the model was obtained. Model predictions, supported by experiments, indicate that a high yield of LA is favoured in dilute solutions of DHA (0.1 M) at elevated temperatures (180 °C) and reaction times less than 10 min.

  1. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  2. Molecular insights into shellac film coats from different aqueous shellac salt solutions and effect on disintegration of enteric-coated soft gelatin capsules.

    PubMed

    Al-Gousous, J; Penning, M; Langguth, P

    2015-04-30

    The purpose of this investigation was to study the effect of using different salts of shellac on the disintegration properties of shellac-based enteric coatings. In the last two decades, shellac has been increasingly used as an aqueous solution for enteric coating purposes, with the ammonium salt being the form typically used. Little investigation has been performed on using other salts, and therefore, this was the focus of our work. Enteric coatings, based on different shellac salts (ammonium, sodium, potassium and composite ammonium-sodium), were applied onto soft gelatin capsules. Disintegration testing of the coated soft gelatin capsules showed that alkali metal salts promote faster disintegration than ammonium salts. In order to determine the causes behind these differences, the solubility, thermal and spectroscopic properties of films cast from the different salts were investigated. The results show that films cast from ammonium-based salts of shellac are, unlike those cast from alkali metal-based salts, water-insoluble. Spectroscopic evidence suggests that this might be due to partial salt dissociation resulting in loss of ammonium as ammonia and reduced degree of shellac ionization during drying. In addition, oxidation of shellac aldehyde groups of the ammonium-based shellac salts could also play a role. And possible higher extent of shellac hydrolysis during the preparation of alkali metal salts might also be a factor. Therefore, the nature of the shellac salt used in the preparation of shellac-based aqueous coating solutions is a significant formulation factor affecting product performance.

  3. Precious-Metal Salt Coatings for Detecting Hydrazines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Louis A.; Greene, Benjamin

    2004-01-01

    Substrates coated with a precious-metal salt KAuCl4 have been found to be useful for detecting hydrazine vapors in air at and above a concentration of the order of 0.01 parts per million (ppm). Upon exposure to air containing a sufficient amount of hydrazine for a sufficient time, the coating material undergoes a visible change in color.

  4. PROCESS OF REMOVING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION WITH GROUP IVB METAL PHOSPHO-SILICATE COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1957-10-29

    A process for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions which contain the plutonium in minute concentrations is described. These values can be removed from an aqueous solution by taking an aqueous solution containing a salt of zirconium, titanium, hafnium or thorium, adding an aqueous solution of silicate and phosphoric acid anions to the metal salt solution, and separating, washing and drying the precipitate which forms when the two solutions are mixed. The aqueous plutonium containing solution is then acidified and passed over the above described precipi-tate causing the plutonium values to be adsorbed by the precipitate.

  5. Effects of metal salt mixtures on Daphnia magna reproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Biesinger, K.E.; Christensen, G.M.; Fiandt, J.T.

    1986-02-01

    Three binary metal experiments were conducted using a complete block design; testing the chlorides of Cd, Hg, and Zn individually and in combinations of Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg on Daphnia magna reproduction. These mixtures were tested at one-half, once, and twice the 16% reproductive impairment concentration previously determined for individual metals. The Cd-Hg, Cd-Zn, and Zn-Hg mixtures all showed significant reductions in reproduction at concentrations where the metal salts alone caused no significant effect.

  6. Scaling Equations for a Biopolymer in Salt Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissler, Erik; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Horkay, Ferenc

    2007-12-01

    The effect of the simultaneous presence of monovalent and divalent cations on the thermodynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions is an incompletely solved problem. In physiological conditions, combinations of these ions affect structure formation in biopolymer systems. Dynamic light scattering measurements of the collective diffusion coefficient D and the osmotic compressibility of semidilute hyaluronan solutions containing different ratios of sodium and calcium ions are compared with simple polyelectrolyte models. Scaling relationships are proposed in terms of polymer concentration and ionic strength J of the added salt. Differences in the effects of sodium and calcium ions are found to be expressed only through J.

  7. SODIUM ALUMINOSILICATE FOULING AND CLEANING OF DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION COALESCERS

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, M; Thomas Peters, T; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

    2008-10-28

    During initial non-radioactive operations at the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU), the pressure drop across the decontaminated salt solution coalescer reached {approx}10 psi while processing {approx}1250 gallons of salt solution, indicating possible fouling or plugging of the coalescer. An analysis of the feed solution and the 'plugged coalescer' concluded that the plugging was due to sodium aluminosilicate solids. MCU personnel requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate the formation of the sodium aluminosilicate solids (NAS) and the impact of the solids on the decontaminated salt solution coalescer. Researchers performed developmental testing of the cleaning protocols with a bench-scale coalescer container 1-inch long segments of a new coalescer element fouled using simulant solution. In addition, the authors obtained a 'plugged' Decontaminated Salt Solution coalescer from non-radioactive testing in the MCU and cleaned it according to the proposed cleaning procedure. Conclusions from this testing include the following: (1) Testing with the bench-scale coalescer showed an increase in pressure drop from solid particles, but the increase was not as large as observed at MCU. (2) Cleaning the bench-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (11 g of bayerite if all aluminum is present in that form or 23 g of sodium aluminosilicate if all silicon is present in that form). (3) Based on analysis of the cleaning solutions from bench-scale test, the 'dirt capacity' of a 40 inch coalescer for the NAS solids tested is calculated as 450-950 grams. (4) Cleaning the full-scale coalescer with nitric acid reduced the pressure drop and removed a large amount of solid particles (60 g of aluminum and 5 g of silicon). (5) Piping holdup in the full-scale coalescer system caused the pH to differ from the target value. Comparable hold-up in the facility could lead to less effective

  8. Separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions

    DOEpatents

    Almon, Amy C.

    1994-01-01

    A process and apparatus for quantitatively and selectively separating metal ions from mixtures thereof in aqueous solution. The apparatus includes, in combination, a horizontal electrochemical flow cell containing flow bulk electrolyte solution and an aqueous, metal ion-containing solution, the cell containing a metal mesh working electrode, a counter electrode positioned downstream from the working electrode, an independent variable power supply/potentiostat positioned outside of the flow cell and connected to the electrodes, and optionally a detector such as a chromatographic detector, positioned outside the flow cell. This apparatus and its operation has significant application where trace amounts of metal ions are to be separated.

  9. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-11-13

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat unit for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heayv metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  10. Removal of metal ions from aqueous solution

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1990-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  11. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  12. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  14. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  18. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  3. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  4. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  12. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  13. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids... substances identified generically as metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (PMNs P-89-576 and...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  15. 40 CFR 721.4663 - Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metal salts. 721.4663 Section 721.4663 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4663 Fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts. (a) Chemical... fluorinated carboxylic acid alkali metal salts (PMNs P-95-979/980/981) are subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  17. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  18. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  1. 40 CFR 721.5452 - Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alkali metal salt of halogenated... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5452 Alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (generic). (a... generically as alkali metal salt of halogenated organoborate (PMN P-00-0638) is subject to reporting...

  2. 40 CFR 721.4685 - Substituted purine metal salt (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted purine metal salt (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4685 Substituted purine metal salt (generic name). (a) Chemical... as a substituted purine metal salt (PMN P-95-175) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  3. 40 CFR 721.10097 - Disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., alkali metal salt (generic). 721.10097 Section 721.10097 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as disubstituted benzenesulfonic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10098 - Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... metal salt (generic). 721.10098 Section 721.10098 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10098 Disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt... identified generically as disubstituted benzoic acid, alkali metal salt (PMN P-03-643) is subject...

  5. Geotechnical factors and guidelines for storage of compressed air in solution-mined salt cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. D.; Doherty, T. J.; Thoms, R. L.

    1982-05-01

    The state of knowledge about utilization of solution mined salt cavities for CAES including laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, field characterization, solution mining experience, and operating parameters is outlined. Topics evaluated include: cavern geometry and size; long term creep and creep rupture of rock salt; effects of pressure and temperature loading rates; low frequency fatigue; progressive deterioration of salt fabric with possible air penetration; cavern monitoring methods; and salt properties at nonambient conditions. The only CAES operational facility in the world uses two solution mined salt cavern for air storage and is operating successfully. Stability critera for solution mined salt caverns.

  6. Precipitation of oppositely charged polyelectrolytes in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kudlay, Alexander; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We study phase separation in symmetric solutions of weakly charged flexible chains of opposite sign. Precipitation is caused by effective attractions due to charge fluctuations and by short-range attractions between monomers. The contribution from charge fluctuations is computed within the random phase approximation (RPA), which takes into account the connectivity of charges in the polyions. The impenetrability of the ions is accounted for by using a modified Coulomb potential in the RPA. In good solvent conditions the precipitate monotonically swells and eventually dissolves upon addition of salt. However, near the theta-solvent condition, but still in the good solvent, the precipitate can be stable at any salt concentration. Moreover, the density of the precipitate after initial decrease can increase with addition of salt. This effect is a result of redistribution of salt between the precipitate and the supernatant, which is due to an interplay of electrostatic and hardcore interactions. For not too weakly charged polyions the precipitate properties become strongly dependent on temperature even in good solvent conditions.

  7. Applications of molten salts in reactive metals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Averill, W.A.

    1993-12-31

    Pyrochemical processes using molten salts provide a unique opportunity for the extraction and refining of many reactive and valuable metals either directly from the beneficiated ore or from other process effluent that contain reactive metal compounds. This research program is aimed at developing a process for the production and recovery of reactive and valuable metals, such as zinc, tin, lead, bismuth and silver, in a hybrid reactor combining electrolytic production of the calcium reductant and in-situ utilization of this reductant for pyrochemical reduction of the metal compounds, such as halide or oxides. The process is equally suitable for producing other low melting metals, such as cadmium and antimony. The cell is typically operated below 1000C temperature. Attempts have been made to produce silver, lead, bismuth, tin and cerium by calciothermic reduction in a molten salt media. In a separate effort, calcium has been produced by an electrolytic dissociation of lime in a calcium chloride medium. The most important characteristic of the hybrid technology is its ability to produce metals under ``zero-waste`` conditions.

  8. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt

  9. Influence of metal salts on the photodegradation of imazapyr, an imidazolinone pesticide.

    PubMed

    Quivet, Etienne; Faure, René; Georges, Joseph; Paissé, Jean-Olivier; Lantéri, Pierre

    2006-05-01

    The behaviour of imazapyr (2-(4-isopropyl-4-methyl-5-oxo-2-imidazolin-2-yl)nicotinic acid), a broad spectrum herbicide of the imidazolinone family, has been studied under UV radiation in the presence of metal salts. Complexation interactions between imazapyr and metal ions decreased imazapyr photolysis. A chemometric study compared the photodegradation of imazapyr in aqueous solutions in the presence of Na+, Ca2+ or Cu2+ and their concomitant anionic species (Cl-, NO3-) at various pesticide/metal ion molar ratios. The study showed the major role of metal ions in the degradation of imazapyr and its main photoproducts. The molecules were strongly stabilised on complexation with metal ions, leading to an increase in persistence of the pesticide.

  10. Simulation of osmotic pressure in concentrated aqueous salt solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Roux, B.; Univ. of Chicago

    2010-01-01

    Accurate force fields are critical for meaningful simulation studies of highly concentrated electrolytes. The ion models that are widely used in biomolecular simulations do not necessarily reproduce the correct behavior at finite concentrations. In principle, the osmotic pressure is a key thermodynamic property that could be used to test and refine force field parameters for concentrated solutions. Here we describe a novel, simple, and practical method to compute the osmotic pressure directly from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of concentrated aqueous solutions by introducing an idealized semipermeable membrane. Simple models for Na+, K+, and Cl- are tested and calibrated to accurately reproduce the experimental osmotic pressure at high salt concentration, up to the solubility limit of 4-5 M. The methodology is general and can be extended to any type of solute as well as nonadditive polarizable force fields.

  11. Solvent effect induced solute damage in an organic inner salt.

    PubMed

    Shui, Min; Jin, Xiao; Li, Zhongguo; Yang, Junyi; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Xueru; Wang, Yuxiao; Yang, Kun; Wei, Tai-huei; Song, Yinglin

    2010-12-20

    Nonlinear absorption of a newly synthesized organic inner salt Ge-150 dissolved in four different solvents (DMF, DMSO, acetonitrile and acetone) is investigated by the Z-scan technique with both nanosecond and picosecond pulses. When pulse energy surpasses a threshold and pulse-to-pulse separation is shorter than a characteristic time, all the four solutions show absorption weakening induced by cross-pulse effects in the picosecond regime. However, only two of them (Ge-150 dissolved in DMF and DMSO) show this weakening in the nanosecond regime. By conducting a simple verification experiment, we verify this absorption weakening is induced by solute damage related to solvent effect rather than solute migration. A simple theoretical model is proposed to interpret the experimental phenomenon.

  12. Single crystals of metal solid solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. F.; Austin, A. E.; Richard, N.; Griesenauer, N. M.; Moak, D. P.; Mehrabian, M. R.; Gelles, S. H.

    1974-01-01

    The following definitions were sought in the research on single crystals of metal solid solutions: (1) the influence of convection and/or gravity present during crystallization on the substructure of a metal solid solution; (2) the influence of a magnetic field applied during crystallization on the substructure of a metal solid solution; and (3) requirements for a space flight experiment to verify the results. Growth conditions for the selected silver-zinc alloy system are described, along with pertinent technical and experimental details of the project.

  13. Molecular recognition properties of tartrates and metal-tartrates in solution and gas phase.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Aruna B; Schug, Kevin A

    2009-05-01

    Solution phase and gas phase chiral molecular recognition properties of tartrates (salts or esters of tartaric acid) and metal tartrates (binuclear tartrato(4-)-metal-bridged complexes) are reviewed in conjunction with their applications in enantiomeric separation science and their mass spectrometric chiral discrimination properties.

  14. Blending of Radioactive Salt Solutions in Million Gallon Tanks - 13002

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 - 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, 'One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory'. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks. (authors)

  15. Blending Of Radioactive Salt Solutions In Million Gallon Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Fowley, Mark D.; Poirier, Michael R.

    2012-12-10

    Research was completed at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to investigate processes related to the blending of radioactive, liquid waste, salt solutions in 4920 cubic meter, 25.9 meter diameter storage tanks. One process was the blending of large salt solution batches (up to 1135 ? 3028 cubic meters), using submerged centrifugal pumps. A second process was the disturbance of a settled layer of solids, or sludge, on the tank bottom. And a third investigated process was the settling rate of sludge solids if suspended into slurries by the blending pump. To investigate these processes, experiments, CFD models (computational fluid dynamics), and theory were applied. Experiments were performed using simulated, non-radioactive, salt solutions referred to as supernates, and a layer of settled solids referred to as sludge. Blending experiments were performed in a 2.44 meter diameter pilot scale tank, and flow rate measurements and settling tests were performed at both pilot scale and full scale. A summary of the research is presented here to demonstrate the adage that, ?One good experiment fixes a lot of good theory?. Experimental testing was required to benchmark CFD models, or the models would have been incorrectly used. In fact, CFD safety factors were established by this research to predict full-scale blending performance. CFD models were used to determine pump design requirements, predict blending times, and cut costs several million dollars by reducing the number of required blending pumps. This research contributed to DOE missions to permanently close the remaining 47 of 51 SRS waste storage tanks.

  16. Liquid chromatography coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry and post-column addition of metal salt solutions as a powerful tool for the metabolic profiling of Fusarium oxysporum.

    PubMed

    Cirigliano, Adriana M; Rodriguez, M Alejandra; Gagliano, M Laura; Bertinetti, Brenda V; Godeas, Alicia M; Cabrera, Gabriela M

    2016-03-25

    Fusarium oxysporum L11 is a non-pathogenic soil-borne fungal strain that yielded an extract that showed antifungal activity against phytopathogens. In this study, reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) coupled to different atmospheric pressure ionization sources-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (API-QTOF-MS) was applied for the comprehensive profiling of the metabolites from the extract. The employed sources were electrospray (ESI), atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). Post-column addition of metal solutions of Ca, Cu and Zn(II) was also tested using ESI. A total of 137 compounds were identified or tentatively identified by matching their accurate mass signals, suggested molecular formulae and MS/MS analysis with previously reported data. Some compounds were isolated and identified by NMR. The extract was rich in cyclic peptides like cyclosporins, diketopiperazines and sansalvamides, most of which were new, and are reported here for the first time. The use of post-column addition of metals resulted in a useful strategy for the discrimination of compound classes since specific adducts were observed for the different compound families. This technique also allowed the screening for compounds with metal binding properties. Thus, the applied methodology is a useful choice for the metabolic profiling of extracts and also for the selection of metabolites with potential biological activities related to interactions with metal ions.

  17. Many segments and few dollars: SALT solutions for ELTs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.; Meiring, Jacobus G.; Swiegers, Jian; Swart, Gerhard P.

    2004-07-01

    The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a little over 18 months away from completion (in early 2005). It is based on the innovative tilted-Arecibo optical analog, first pioneered by the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET). By the end of 2003, all major subsystems, including the verification instrument, will be in place and the commissioning of them begun. Tests of a 7-segment subset of the mirror array, including the Shack-Hartmann alignment instrument, the mirror actuators, capacitive edge sensors and active control system has recently started. The first engineering on-sky tests involving the complete light path, from object to detector, have begun. SALT's primary mirror consists of 91 identical segments mounted on a 9 point whiffle tree mount, using three actuators to control tip and tilt, and a foil-type capacitive edge sensor to detect mirror misalignment. These 480 relatively affordable sensors are permanently attached to the segment edges, and are capable of measuring all misalignment modes, including global radius of curvature. This sensing system, used together with a Shack-Hartman wavefront instrument at the center of curvature, controls the primary mirror array, and could be scaled to an array of the size envisaged for an ELT. SALT has developed some innovative designs improvement over the original HET concept. These include a more effective spherical aberration corrector (SAC), interferometric distance sensing and laser auto-collimation of the prime focus payload, the use of newly developed efficient and durable mirror coatings on the SAC optics, and the use of economical low expansion ceramics for the primary mirror segments. These innovative and cost effective solutions used on SALT have potential applications to ELT designs.

  18. Alkali Metal Suboxometalates-Structural Chemistry between Salts and Metals.

    PubMed

    Wörsching, Matthias; Hoch, Constantin

    2015-07-20

    The crystal structures of the new cesium-poor alkali metal suboxometalates Cs10MO5 (M = Al, Ga, Fe) show both metallic and ionic bonding following the formal description (Cs(+))10(MO4(5-))(O(2-))·3e(-). Comparable to the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4 (M = Al, Ga, In, Fe, Sc) with ionic subdivision (Cs(+))9(MO4(5-))·4e(-), they contain an oxometalate anion [M(III)O4](5-) embedded in a metallic matrix of cesium atoms. Columnlike building units form with prevalent ionic bonding inside and metallic bonding on the outer surface. In the cesium-rich suboxometalates Cs9MO4, additional cesium atoms with no contact to any anion are inserted between columns of the formal composition [Cs8MO4]. In the cesium-poor suboxometalates Cs10MO5, the same columns are extended by face-sharing [Cs6O] units, and no additional cesium atoms are present. The terms "cesium-rich" and "cesium-poor" here refer to the Cs:O ratio. The new suboxometalates Cs10MO5 crystallize in two modifications with new structure types. The orthorhombic modification adopts a structure with four formula units per unit cell in space group Pnnm with a = 11.158(3) Å, b = 23.693(15) Å, and c = 12.229(3) Å for Cs10AlO5. The monoclinic modification crystallizes with eight formula units per unit cell in space group C2/c with a = 21.195(3) Å, b = 12.480(1) Å, c = 24.120(4) Å, and β = 98.06(1)° for Cs10AlO5. Limits to phase formation are given by the restriction that the M atoms must be trivalent and by geometric size restrictions for the insertion of [Cs6O] blocks in Cs10MO5. All of the suboxometalate structures show similar structural details and form mixed crystal series with statistical occupation for the M elements following the patterns Cs9(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O4 and Cs10(M(1)xM(2)1-x)O5. The suboxometalates are a new example of ordered intergrowth of ionic and metallic structure elements, allowing for the combination of properties related to both ionic and metallic materials.

  19. Optical Sensor for Characterizing the Phase Transition in Salted Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Claverie, Rémy; Fontana, Marc D.; Duričković, Ivana; Bourson, Patrice; Marchetti, Mario; Chassot, Jean-Marie

    2010-01-01

    We propose a new optical sensor to characterize the solid-liquid phase transition in salted solutions. The probe mainly consists of a Raman spectrometer that extracts the vibrational properties from the light scattered by the salty medium. The spectrum of the O – H stretching band was shown to be strongly affected by the introduction of NaCl and the temperature change as well. A parameter SD defined as the ratio of the integrated intensities of two parts of this band allows to study the temperature and concentration dependences of the phase transition. Then, an easy and efficient signal processing and the exploitation of a modified Boltzmann equation give information on the phase transition. Validations were done on solutions with varying concentration of NaCl. PMID:22319327

  20. Methods of making metal oxide nanostructures and methods of controlling morphology of same

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Stanislaus S; Hongjun, Zhou

    2012-11-27

    The present invention includes a method of producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure. The method comprises providing a metal salt solution and providing a basic solution; placing a porous membrane between the metal salt solution and the basic solution, wherein metal cations of the metal salt solution and hydroxide ions of the basic solution react, thereby producing a crystalline metal oxide nanostructure.

  1. Surface Potential of DPPC Monolayers on Concentrated Aqueous Salt Solutions.

    PubMed

    Casper, Clayton B; Verreault, Dominique; Adams, Ellen M; Hua, Wei; Allen, Heather C

    2016-03-03

    The presence and exchange of electrical charges on the surfaces of marine aerosols influence their ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei and play a role in thundercloud electrification. Although interactions exist between surface-active inorganic ions and organic compounds, their role in surface charging of marine aerosols is not well understood. In this study, the surface potential of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) monolayers, a zwitterionic phospholipid found in the sea surface microlayer, is measured on concentrated (0.3-2.0 M) chloride salt solutions containing marine-relevant cations (Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+)) to model and elucidate the electrical properties of organic-covered marine aerosols. Monovalent cations show only a weak effect on the surface potential of DPPC monolayers in the condensed phase compared to water. In contrast, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) increase the surface potential, indicating different cation binding modes and affinities for the PC headgroup. Moreover, it is found that for divalent chloride salt solutions, the PC headgroup and interfacial water molecules make the largest dipolar contribution to the surface potential. This study shows that for equal charge concentrations, divalent cations impact surface potential of DPPC monolayers more strongly than monovalents likely through changes in the PC headgroup orientation induced by their complexation along with the lesser ordering of interfacial water molecules caused by phosphate group charge screening.

  2. Recyclables recovery of europium and yttrium metals and some salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    PubMed

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2008-01-01

    Europium and yttrium metals and some valuable salts were recovered from the powder coating the inner surface of the glass tubes of fluorescent lamps. The tubes were broken under 30% aqueous acetone to avoid emission of mercury vapor to the atmosphere, and the powder was collected by brushing. Metals available in the powder were pressure leached using sulfuric/nitric acid mixture. Sulphate salt of europium and yttrium so obtained was converted to thiocyanate. Trimethyl-benzylammonium chloride solvent was used to selectively extract Eu and Y from the thiocyanate solution. The metal loaded in the organic solvent was recovered by N-tributylphosphate in 1M nitric acid to produce nitrate salts of Eu and Y. Europium nitrate was separated from yttrium nitrate by dissolving in ethyl alcohol. The isolated powder contained 1.62% europium oxide, 1.65% yttrium oxide, 34.48% calcium sulphate, 61.52% Ca orthophosphate and 0.65% other impurity metals by weight. Autoclave digestion of the powder in the acid mixture for 4h at approximately 125 degrees C and 5 MPa dissolved 96.4% of the yttrium and 92.8% of the europium. Conversion of the sulphate to thiocyanate is favoured at low temperature. Extraction of Eu and Y from the thiocyanate solution attained its maximum at approximately 80 degrees C. N-tributylphosphate in 1N nitric acid at 125 degrees C achieved a stripping extent of 99%. Thermal reduction using hydrogen gas at 850 degrees C and 1575 degrees C produced europium and yttrium metals, respectively. A metal separation factor of 9.4 was achieved. Economic estimation revealed that the suggested method seemed feasible for industrial applications.

  3. Cloud-point temperatures for lysozyme in electrolyte solutions: effect of salt type, salt concentration and pH.

    PubMed

    Grigsby, J J; Blanch, H W; Prausnitz, J M

    2001-07-24

    Liquid-liquid phase-separation data were obtained for aqueous saline solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme at a fixed protein concentration (87 g/l). The cloud-point temperature (CPT) was measured as a function of salt type and salt concentration to 3 M, at pH 4.0 and 7.0. Salts used included those from mono and divalent cations and anions. For the monovalent cations studied, as salt concentration increases, the CPT increases. For divalent cations, as salt concentration rises, a maximum in the CPT is observed and attributed to ion binding to the protein surface and subsequent water structuring. Trends for sulfate salts were dramatically different from those for other salts because sulfate ion is strongly hydrated and excluded from the lysozyme surface. For anions at fixed salt concentration, the CPT decreases with rising anion kosmotropic character. Comparison of CPTs for pH 4.0 and 7.0 revealed two trends. At low ionic strength for a given salt, differences in CPT can be explained in terms of repulsive electrostatic interactions between protein molecules, while at higher ionic strength, differences can be attributed to hydration forces. A model is proposed for the correlation and prediction of the CPT as a function of salt type and salt concentration. NaCl was chosen as a reference salt, and CPT deviations from that of NaCl were attributed to hydration forces. The Random Phase Approximation, in conjunction with a square-well potential, was used to calculate the strength of protein-protein interactions as a function of solution conditions for all salts studied.

  4. Inhibition of hot salt corrosion by metallic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deadmore, D. L.; Lowell, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    The effectiveness of several potential fuel additives in reducing the effects of sodium sulfate-induced hot corrosion was evaluated in a cyclic Mach 0.3 burner rig. The potential inhibitors examined were salts of Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Zn, Mg, Ca, and Ba. The alloys tested were IN-100, U-700, IN-738, IN-792, Mar M-509, and 304 stainless steel. Each alloy was exposed for 100 cycles of 1 hour each at 900 C in combustion gases doped with the corrodant and inhibitor salts and the extent of attack was determined by measuring maximum metal thickness loss. The most effective and consistent inhibitor additive was Ba (NO3)2 which reduced the hot corrosion attack to nearly that of simple oxidation.

  5. Structures and stability of salt-bridge in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Sagarik, Kritsana; Chaiyapongs, Supaporn

    2005-09-01

    Structures and stability of salt-bridges in aqueous solutions were investigated using a complex formed from the guanidinium (Gdm+) and formate (FmO-) ions as a model system. The Test-particle model (T-model) potentials to describe the interactions in the Gdm+-H2O, FmO(-)-H2O and Gdm+-FmO- complexes were constructed, tested and applied in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the aqueous solutions at 298 K. The three-dimensional structures and energetic of the hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks of water in the first hydration shells of the Gdm+ and FmO- ions, as well as the Gdm+-FmO- complex, were visualized and analyzed using various probability distribution (PD) maps. The structures of the average potential energy landscapes at the H-bond networks were employed to characterize the stability and dynamic behavior of water molecules in the first hydration shells of the solutes. It was observed that water molecules in the first hydration shell of the close-contact Gdm+-FmO- complex form associated H-bond networks, which introduce a net stabilization effect to the ion-pair, whereas those in the interstitial H-bond network destabilize and break the solvent-separated Gdm+-FmO- complex. The present results showed that, in order to provide complete insights into the structures and stability of ion-pairs in aqueous solutions, explicit water molecules have to be included in the model calculations.

  6. Transgenerational adaptation to heavy metal salts in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rahavi, Mohammad Reza; Migicovsky, Zoë; Titov, Viktor; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to abiotic and biotic stress results in changes in plant physiology and triggers genomic instability. Recent reports suggest that the progeny of stressed plants also exhibit changes in genome stability, stress tolerance, and methylation. Here we analyzed whether exposure to Ni(2+), Cd(2+), and Cu(2+) salts leads to transgenerational changes in homologous recombination frequency and stress tolerance. We found that the immediate progeny of stressed plants exhibited an increased rate of recombination. However, when the progeny of stressed plants was propagated without stress, recombination reverted to normal levels. Exposure of plants to heavy metals for five consecutive generations (S1-S5) resulted in recombination frequency being maintained at a high level. Skipping stress following two to three generations of propagation with 50 mM Ni(2+) or Cd(2+) did not decrease the recombination frequency, suggesting plant acclimation to upregulated recombination. Analysis of the progeny of plants exposed to Cu(2+) and Ni(2+) indicated higher stress tolerance to the heavy metal parental plants were exposed to. Tolerance was higher in plants propagated with stress for three to five generations, which resulted in longer roots than plants propagated on heavy metals for only one to two generations. Tolerance was also more prominent upon exposure to a higher concentration of salts. The progeny of stressed plants were also more tolerant to NaCl and methyl methane sulfonate.

  7. Immunomodulatory effects of metal salts at sub-toxic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Steinborn, Carmen; Diegel, Christoph; Garcia-Käufer, Manuel; Gründemann, Carsten; Huber, Roman

    2016-10-07

    Because different metals are used in complementary medicine for the treatment of diseases related to a dysfunction of the immune system, this study aimed at determining the immunomodulatory potential of Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 , Cu(NO3 )2 , HgCl2 , AgNO3 , SnCl2 , AsCl3 and SbCl3 at sub-toxic concentrations and at assessing possible toxic side effects of low-concentrated metal preparations. The influence of the metal salts on primary human mononuclear cells was analyzed by measuring cell viability using the water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay, apoptosis and necrosis induction by annexin V/propidium iodide staining and proliferation by carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester staining and flow cytometry. Effects on T-cell activation were assessed with CD69 and CD25 expression using flow cytometry whereas CD83, CD86 and CD14 expression was measured to evaluate the influence on dendritic cell maturation. Alterations of interleukin-2 and interferon-γ secretion were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and genotoxic effects were analyzed using the comet assay. At sub-toxic concentrations retardation of T-cell proliferation was caused by Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 and Cu(NO3 )2 and inhibitory effects on interleukin-2 secretion were measured after incubation with Pb(NO3 )2 , AuCl3 , Cu(NO3 )2 , HgCl2 and AsCl3. Cu(NO3 )2 had immunosuppressive activity at dosages within the serum reference range for copper. All other metal salts showed effects at dosages above upper serum limits of normal. Therefore, only low-concentrated copper preparations are promising to have immunomodulatory potential. Toxic side effects of metal preparations used in complementary medicine are improbable because upper limits of metals set in the drinking water ordinance are either not exceeded or the duration of their application is limited. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. FUSED SALT METHOD FOR COATING URANIUM WITH A METAL

    DOEpatents

    Eubank, L.D.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for coating uranium with a less active metal such as Cr, Ni, or Cu comprising immersing the U in a substantially anhydrous molten solution of a halide of these less active metals in a ternary chloride composition which consists of selected percentages of KCl, NaCl and another chloride such as LiCl or CaCl/sub 2/.

  9. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  10. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  11. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  12. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  13. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  14. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  15. 40 CFR 721.2098 - Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2098 Aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as an aliphatic polycarboxylic acid metal salt (PMN P-01-7) is subject to reporting under...

  16. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10487 - Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10487 Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (PMNs P-04-599, P-04-600, P-04-605, and P-04-606)...

  18. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  19. 40 CFR 721.5985 - Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5985 Fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (generic). (a) Chemical... as a fatty alkyl phosphate, alkali metal salt (PMN P-99-0385) is subject to reporting under...

  20. 40 CFR 721.10487 - Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10487 Alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (generic). (a) Chemical... as alkylbenzenes sulfonic acids, metal salts (PMNs P-04-599, P-04-600, P-04-605, and P-04-606)...

  1. The use of molten salts as physical models for the study of solidification in metals and semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koziol, Jurek K.; Sadoway, Donald R.

    1987-01-01

    It is presently noted that molten salts possess attributes rendering them attractive as physical models of cast metals in solidification studies. Molten alkali halides have an approximately correct Prandtl number for this modeling of metallic melts, and are transparent to visible light. Attention is given to solidification in the LiCl-KCl system, in order to determine whether such phenomena as solute rejection can be observed and characterized through the application of laser schlieren imaging.

  2. Enhancing Skin Permeation of Biphenylacetic Acid (BPA) Using Salt Formation with Organic and Alkali Metal Bases

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Vijay; Naik, Prashant; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, a series of organic and alkali metal salts of biphenylacetic acid (BPA) have been prepared and evaluated in vitro for percutaneous drug delivery. The physicochemical properties of BPA salts were determined using solubility measurements, DSC, and IR. The DSC thermogram and FTIR spectra confirmed the salt formation with organic and alkali metal bases. Among the series, salts with organic amines (ethanolamine, diethanolamine, triethanolamine, and diethylamine) had lowered melting points while the alkali metal salt (sodium) had a higher melting point than BPA. The in vitro study showed that salt formation improves the physicochemical properties of BPA, leading to improved permeability through the skin. Amongst all the prepared salts, ethanolamine salt (1b) showed 7.2- and 5.4-fold higher skin permeation than the parent drug at pH 7.4 and 5.0, respectively, using rat skin. PMID:26839810

  3. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, Eddie C.

    1995-01-01

    An electrochemical method of separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500.degree. C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode.

  4. The effect of divalent salt in chondroitin sulfate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranghel, D.; Badita, C. R.; Radulescu, A.; Moldovan, L.; Craciunescu, O.; Balasoiu, M.

    2016-03-01

    Chondroitin-4 sulfate (CS4) is the main glycosaminoglycan extracted from bovine trachea. CS4 play an important role in osteoarthritis treatment, anticoagulant activity, reduces the degradation of cartilage matrix components, reduces necrosis and apoptosis of chondrocytes and reduces the activity of collagenase. Chondroitin sulfate is also responsible for proteoglycans degradation. Chondroitin sulfate can bind calcium ions with different affinities, depending on their sulfation position. The purpose of this study was to determine the structural properties and the influence of Ca2+ cations. We carried out measurements on CS4 solutions and mixtures of liquid CS4 with Ca2+ by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS). CS4 have a mass fractal behavior and the addition of a salt (CaCl2) in CS4 solutions generates the appearance of a correlation peak due to local ordering between adjacent chains with inter-chain distances between 483 Å and 233 Å for a calcium concentration of 0.01% w/w.

  5. Sodium chloride crystallization from drying drops of albumin-salt solutions with different albumin concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakhno, T. A.

    2015-11-01

    The salt nature of crystalline structures resulting from drying albumin-salt solutions with a low (<1 wt %) and high (7 and 9 wt %) concentration of albumin and a NaCl concentration kept at a physiological level (0.9 wt %) is experimentally substantiated. Such a conclusion is drawn from the dynamics of phase transitions, morphological studies, and differences between the physicochemical properties of albumin and salt. Obtained data give a deeper insight into the albumin and salt distributions in drying liquids.

  6. Geotechnical factors and guidelines for storage of compressed air in solution-mined salt cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Thoms, R.L.

    1982-05-01

    The state of knowledge about utilization of solution-mined salt cavities for CAES including laboratory experiments, numerical modeling, field characterization, solution mining experience, and operating parameters is outlined in this report. Topics evaluated in recent studies include: cavern geometry and size; long-term creep and creep rupture of rock salt; effects of pressure and temperature loading rates; low frequency fatigue; progressive deterioration of salt fabric with possible air penetration; cavern monitoring methods; and salt properties at nonambient conditions. Currently, the only CAES operational facility in the world is located at Huntorf, West Germany. This CAES facility uses two solution-mined salt caverns for air storage and has been operating successfully for more than 2 years. Stability criteria for solution-mined salt caverns from the Huntorf facility and recent field and laboratory studies are included in this report.

  7. Complex electronic waste treatment - An effective process to selectively recover copper with solutions containing different ammonium salts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z H I; Xiao, Y; Sietsma, J; Agterhuis, H; Yang, Y

    2016-11-01

    Recovery of valuable metals from electronic waste has been highlighted by the EU directives. The difficulties for recycling are induced by the high complexity of such waste. In this research, copper could be selectively recovered using an ammonia-based process, from industrially processed information and communication technology (ICT) waste with high complexity. A detailed understanding on the role of ammonium salt was focused during both stages of leaching copper into a solution and the subsequent step for copper recovery from the solution. By comparing the reactivity of the leaching solution with different ammonium salts, their physiochemical behaviour as well as the leaching efficiency could be identified. The copper recovery rate could reach 95% with ammonium carbonate as the leaching salt. In the stage of copper recovery from the solution, electrodeposition was introduced without an additional solvent extraction step and the electrochemical behaviour of the solution was figured out. With a careful control of the electrodeposition conditions, the current efficiency could be improved to be 80-90% depending on the ammonia salts and high purity copper (99.9wt.%). This research provides basis for improving the recyclability and efficiency of copper recovery from such electronic waste and the whole process design for copper recycling.

  8. Record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, R.J.; Thomson, J.

    1980-12-01

    The possibility that a useful, historical record of deposition might be found in a salt marsh is investigated by considering a record of the accumulation of sediment and trace metals in a Connecticut salt marsh. Evidence of salt-marsh deposition dominated by riverine runoff is presented.

  9. Molten Metal Treatment by Salt Fluxing with Low Environmental Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Yogeshwar Sahai

    2007-07-31

    Abstract: Chlorine gas is traditionally used for fluxing of aluminum melt for removal of alkali and alkaline earth elements. However this results in undesirable emissions of particulate matter and gases such as HCl and chlorine, which are often at unacceptable levels. Additionally, chlorine gas is highly toxic and its handling, storage, and use pose risks to employees and the local community. Holding of even minimal amounts of chlorine necessitates extensive training for all plant employees. Fugitive emissions from chlorine usage within the plant cause accelerated corrosion of plant equipment. The Secondary Aluminum Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) under the Clean Air Act, finalized in March 2000 has set very tough new limits on particulate matter (PM) and total hydrogen chloride emissions from aluminum melting and holding furnaces. These limits are 0.4 and 0.1 lbs per ton of aluminum for hydrogen chloride and particulate emissions, respectively. Assuming new technologies for meeting these limits can be found, additional requirements under the Clean Air Act (Prevention of Significant Deterioration and New Source Review) trigger Best Available Control Technology (BACT) for new sources with annual emissions (net emissions not expressed per ton of production) over specified amounts. BACT currently is lime coated bag-houses for control of particulate and HCl emissions. These controls are expensive, difficult to operate and maintain, and result in reduced American competitiveness in the global economy. Solid salt fluxing is emerging as a viable option for the replacement of chlorine gas fluxing, provided emissions can be consistently maintained below the required levels. This project was a cooperative effort between the Ohio State University and Alcoa to investigate and optimize the effects of solid chloride flux addition in molten metal for alkali impurity and non-metallic inclusion removal minimizing dust and toxic emissions and maximizing energy

  10. SEQUESTERING AGENTS FOR METAL IMMOBILIZATION APPLICATION TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF ACTIVE CAPS IN FRESH AND SALT WATER SEDIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Knox, A; Michael Paller, M

    2006-11-17

    This research evaluated the removal of inorganic contaminants by a variety of amendments and mixtures of amendments in fresh and salt water. A series of removal and retention batch experiments was conducted to identify the best treatment for metal removal. Metal removal by the amendments was evaluated by calculating the partition coefficient and percent removal. Retention of metals by the amendments was evaluated in retention (desorption) studies in which residue from the removal studies was extracted with 1 M MgCl{sub 2} solution. The results indicated that phosphate amendments, some organoclays (e.g., OCB-750), and the biopolymer, chitosan, are very effective in removal and retention of metals in both fresh and salt water. These amendments are being evaluated further as components in the development of active caps for sediment remediation.

  11. 40 CFR 721.4680 - Metal salts of complex inorganic oxyacids (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metal salts of complex inorganic... AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4680 Metal salts of complex inorganic...

  12. Alkali Metal Halide Salts as Interface Additives to Fabricate Hysteresis-Free Hybrid Perovskite-Based Photovoltaic Devices.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Moghe, Dhanashree; Hafezian, Soroush; Chen, Pei; Young, Margaret; Elinski, Mark; Martinu, Ludvik; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Lunt, Richard R

    2016-09-07

    A new method was developed for doping and fabricating hysteresis-free hybrid perovskite-based photovoltaic devices by using alkali metal halide salts as interface layer additives. Such salt layers introduced at the perovskite interface can provide excessive halide ions to fill vacancies formed during the deposition and annealing process. A range of solution-processed halide salts were investigated. The highest performance of methylammonium lead mixed-halide perovskite device was achieved with a NaI interlayer and showed a power conversion efficiency of 12.6% and a hysteresis of less than 2%. This represents a 90% improvement compared to control devices without this salt layer. Through depth-resolved mass spectrometry, optical modeling, and photoluminescence spectroscopy, this enhancement is attributed to the reduction of iodide vacancies, passivation of grain boundaries, and improved hole extraction. Our approach ultimately provides an alternative and facile route to high-performance and hysteresis-free perovskite solar cells.

  13. Salting-out effects in aqueous ionic liquid solutions: cloud-point temperature shifts.

    PubMed

    Trindade, Joana R; Visak, Zoran P; Blesic, Marijana; Marrucho, Isabel M; Coutinho, João A P; Lopes, José N Canongia; Rebelo, Luis P N

    2007-05-10

    The effects of the addition of three inorganic salts, namely, NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), and Na(3)PO(4), on the liquid-liquid (L-L) phase diagram of aqueous solutions containing the model ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF(4)], were investigated. All three inorganic salts trigger salting-out effects, leading to significant upward shifts of the L-L demixing temperatures of the systems. The magnitude of the shifts depends on both the water-structuring nature of the salt and its concentration; that is, the effects are correlated with the ionic strength of the solution and the Gibbs free energy of hydration of the inorganic salt. The pH effect and the occurrence of salt precipitation in concentrated solutions are also discussed.

  14. Partitioning of Alkali Metal Salts and Boric Acid from Aqueous Phase into the Polyamide Active Layers of Reverse Osmosis Membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingbo; Kingsbury, Ryan S; Perry, Lamar A; Coronell, Orlando

    2017-02-21

    The partition coefficient of solutes into the polyamide active layer of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes is one of the three membrane properties (together with solute diffusion coefficient and active layer thickness) that determine solute permeation. However, no well-established method exists to measure solute partition coefficients into polyamide active layers. Further, the few studies that measured partition coefficients for inorganic salts report values significantly higher than one (∼3-8), which is contrary to expectations from Donnan theory and the observed high rejection of salts. As such, we developed a benchtop method to determine solute partition coefficients into the polyamide active layers of RO membranes. The method uses a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) to measure the change in the mass of the active layer caused by the uptake of the partitioned solutes. The method was evaluated using several inorganic salts (alkali metal salts of chloride) and a weak acid of common concern in water desalination (boric acid). All partition coefficients were found to be lower than 1, in general agreement with expectations from Donnan theory. Results reported in this study advance the fundamental understanding of contaminant transport through RO membranes, and can be used in future studies to decouple the contributions of contaminant partitioning and diffusion to contaminant permeation.

  15. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticles from Fungi and Metal Salts: Scope and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-02-01

    Fungi secrete enzymes and proteins as reducing agents which can be used for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles from metal salts. Large-scale production of nanoparticles from diverse fungal strains has great potential since they can be grown even in vitro. In recent years, various approaches have been made to maximize the yield of nanoparticles of varying shape, size, and stability. They have been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/TEM, zeta potential measurements, UV-vis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this review, we focus on the biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles by fungi to explore the chemistry of their formation extracellularly and intracellularly. Emphasis has been given to the potential of metal nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent to inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi, and on other potential applications.

  16. Inhibition of Aminoglycoside Acetyltransferase Resistance Enzymes by Metal Salts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yijia; Green, Keith D.; Johnson, Brooke R.

    2015-01-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are clinically relevant antibiotics used to treat infections caused by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as Mycobacteria. As with all current antibacterial agents, resistance to AGs is an increasing problem. The most common mechanism of resistance to AGs is the presence of AG-modifying enzymes (AMEs) in bacterial cells, with AG acetyltransferases (AACs) being the most prevalent. Recently, it was discovered that Zn2+ metal ions displayed an inhibitory effect on the resistance enzyme AAC(6′)-Ib in Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli. In this study, we explore a wide array of metal salts (Mg2+, Cr3+, Cr6+, Mn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, and Au3+ with different counter ions) and their inhibitory effect on a large repertoire of AACs [AAC(2′)-Ic, AAC(3)-Ia, AAC(3)-Ib, AAC(3)-IV, AAC(6′)-Ib′, AAC(6′)-Ie, AAC(6′)-IId, and Eis]. In addition, we determine the MIC values for amikacin and tobramycin in combination with a zinc pyrithione complex in clinical isolates of various bacterial strains (two strains of A. baumannii, three of Enterobacter cloacae, and four of Klebsiella pneumoniae) and one representative of each species purchased from the American Type Culture Collection. PMID:25941215

  17. Metal intracellular partitioning as a detoxification mechanism for mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus) living in metal-polluted salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Goto, Daisuke; Wallace, William G

    2010-04-01

    Intracellular partitioning of trace metals is critical to metal detoxification in aquatic organisms. In the present study, we assessed metal (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) handling capacities of mummichogs (Fundulus heteroclitus) in metal-polluted salt marshes in New York, USA by examining metal intracellular partitioning. Despite the lack of differences in the whole body burdens, partitioning patterns of metals in intracellular components (heat-stable proteins, heat-denaturable proteins, organelles, and metal-rich granules) revealed clear differential metal handling capacities among the populations of mummichogs. In general, mummichogs living in metal-polluted sites stored a large amount of metals in detoxifying cellular components, particularly metal-rich granules (MRG). Moreover, only metals associated with MRG were consistently correlated with variations in the whole body burdens. These findings suggest that metal detoxification through intracellular partitioning, particularly the sequestration to MRG, may have important implications for metal tolerance of mummichogs living in chronically metal-polluted habitats.

  18. A Study of Novel Hexavalent Phosphazene Salts as Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mark L. Stone; Aaron D. Wilson; Mason K. Harrup; Frederick F. Stewart

    2013-03-01

    Two novel multi-valent salts based on phosphazene chemistry have been synthesized and characterized as forward osmosis (FO) draw solutes. Commercially obtained hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene was reacted with the sodium salt of 4-ethylhydroxybenzoate to yield hexa(4-ethylcarboxylatophenoxy)phosphazene. Hydrolysis, followed by and neutralization with NaOH or LiOH, of the resulting acidic moieties yielded water soluble sodium and lithium phosphazene salts, respectively. Degrees of dissociation were determined through osmometry over the range of 0.05-0.5 m, giving degrees of 3.08-4.95 per mole, suggesting a high osmotic potential. The Li salt was found to be more ionized in solution than the sodium salt, and this was reflected in FO experiments where the Li salt gave higher initial fluxes (~ 7 L/m2h) as compared to the sodium salt (~6 L/m2h) at identical 0.07 m draw solution concentrations at 30 °C. Longer term experiments revealed no detectable degradation of the salts; however some hydrolysis of the cellulose acetate membrane was observed, presumably due to the pH of the phosphazene salt draw solution (pH = ~8).

  19. Salt weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aly, Nevin; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Hamed, Ayman; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica

    2013-04-01

    weathering in Egyptian limestone after laboratory simulations with continuous flow of salt solutions at different temperatures Nevin Aly Mohamed (1), Miguel Gomez - Heras(2), Ayman Hamed Ahmed (1), and Monica Alvarez de Buergo(2). (1) Faculty of Pet. & Min. Engineering- Suez Canal University, Suez, Egypt, (2) Instituto de Geociencias (CSIC-UCM) Madrid. Spain. Limestone is one of the most frequent building stones in Egypt and is used since the time of ancient Egyptians and salt weathering is one of the main threats to its conservation. Most of the limestone used in historical monuments in Cairo is a biomicrite extracted from the Mid-Eocene Mokattam Group. During this work, cylindrical samples (2.4 cm diameter and approx. 4.8 cm length) were subjected, in a purpose-made simulation chamber, to simulated laboratory weathering tests with fixed salt concentration (10% weight NaCl solution), at different temperatures, which were kept constant throughout each test (10, 20, 30, 40 oC). During each test, salt solutions flowed continuously imbibing samples by capilarity. Humidity within the simulation chamber was reduced using silica gel to keep it low and constant to increase evaporation rate. Temperature, humidity inside the simulation chamber and samples weight were digitally monitored during each test. Results show the advantages of the proposed experimental methodology using a continuous flow of salt solutions and shed light on the effect of temperature on the dynamics of salt crystallization on and within samples. Research funded by mission sector of high education ministry, Egypt and Geomateriales S2009/MAT-1629.

  20. Photochemical aerobic detoxification of aqueous phenol and chlorophenol solutions promoted by iron salts and iron, vanadium, and copper oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Nizova, G.V.; Bochkova, M.M.; Kozlova, N.B.; Shul`pin, G.B.

    1995-09-10

    Phenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, and pentachlorophenol in air in the presence of soluble iron salts or insoluble V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CuO decompose in aqueous solution when irradiated by a luminescent lamp. The degree and the rate of decomposition are strongly influenced by the nature of the substrate and metal-containing promoter. As a result of decomposition, toxicity of solutions containing 2,4,5-trichlorophenol with respect to two types of living organisms - Protozoa (Tetrahymena pyriformis) and bacteria (Beneckea harveyi) - decreases significantly.

  1. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-01

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  2. Separation of metal ions in nitrate solution by ultrasonic atomization.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masanori; Ikeno, Masayuki; Fujii, Toshitaka

    2004-11-15

    In the ultrasonic atomization of metal nitrate solutions, the molar ratio of metal ions is changed between solution and mist. Small molar metal ions tend to be transferred to mist by ultrasonic wave acceleration, while large molar ions tend to remain in solution. As a result, metal ions can be separated by ultrasonic atomization. We show experimental data and propose a conceptual mechanism for the ultrasonic separation of metal ions.

  3. Testing of stripping columns for the removal of benzene from aqueous radioactive salt solution

    SciTech Connect

    Georgeton, G.K.; Taylor, G.A.; Gaughan, T.P.

    1995-06-27

    Radioactive high level wastes (HLW) generated from production of special nuclear materials at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are held in interim storage in 51 underground, million gallon tanks. Radioactive cesium ({sup 137}Cs) is segregated by evaporation of aqueous waste solution for interim storage in a salt matrix comprised of Na and K salts or in concentrated salt solution. The saltcake will be dissolved and {sup 137}Cs will be separated from the nonradioactive salts in solution in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) Process. The cesium will be combined with other radioactive species and glass formers to be melted and poured into stainless steel canisters in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The salt solution remaining after decontamination in the ITP process will be incorporated into grout for disposal at the site`s Saltstone facility. In the ITP facility, sodium tetraphenylborate (STPB) will be added to precipitate the cesium. Potassium in the waste solution also reacts with STPB and precipitates. Due to radiolytic and chemical degradation of the tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitate, benzene is generated. The benzene dissolves into the decontaminated salt solution (DSS) and into water (WW) used to {open_quotes}wash{close_quotes} the precipitate to lower the soluble salt content of the slurry. Safety and processing requirements for disposal of the DSS and for temporary storage of the WW dictate that the benzene concentration be reduced.

  4. Conformations of gelatin in trivalent chromium salt solutions: Viscosity and dynamic light scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Congde; Zhang, Jianlong; Kong, Aiqun

    2017-02-01

    An investigation of the influences of pH, salt type, and salt concentration on the conformations of gelatin molecules in trivalent chromium salt solutions was performed by viscosity and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. It was found that the viscosity behaviors as polyelectrolytes or polyampholytes depended on the charge distribution on the gelatin chains, which can be tuned by the value of pH of the gelatin solution. The intrinsic viscosity of gelatin in basic chromium sulfate aqueous solution at pH = 2.0 first decreased and then increased with increasing Cr(OH)SO4 concentration, while a monotonic decrease of the intrinsic viscosity of gelatin was observed in CrCl3 solution. However, the intrinsic viscosity of gelatin at pH = 5.0 was found to be increased first and then decreased with an increase in salt concentration in Cr(OH)SO4 solution, as well as in CrCl3 solution. We suggested that the observed viscosity behavior of gelatin in trivalent chromium salt solutions was attributed to the comprehensive effects of shielding, overcharging, and crosslinking (complexation) caused by the introduction of the different counterions. In addition, the average hydrodynamic radius ( R h ) of gelatin molecules in various salt solutions was determined by DLS. It was found that the change trend of R h with salt concentration was the same as the change of intrinsic viscosity. Based on the results of the viscosity and DLS, a possible mechanism for the conformational transition of gelatin chains with external conditions including pH, salt concentration, and salt type is proposed.

  5. Novel, electrolyte solutions comprising fully inorganic salts with high anodic stability for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, RE; Han, R; Hwang, J; Gmitter, AJ; Shterenberg, I; Yoo, HD; Pour, N; Aurbach, D

    2014-01-01

    Herein the first inorganic magnesium salt solution capable of highly reversible magnesium electrodeposition is presented. Synthesized by acid-base reaction of MgCl2 and Lewis acidic compounds such as AlCl3, this salt class demonstrates upwards of 99% Coulombic efficiency, deposition overpotential of <200 mV, and anodic stability of 3.1 V.

  6. The amplification of polymerized diaminobenzidine with physical developers: sensitizing effects of transition metal salts and sulphide.

    PubMed

    von Ruhland, C J; Jasani, B

    2010-05-01

    Amplification of metal-complexed polymerized diaminobenzidine by two light-insensitive physical developers was systematically examined in a dot blot model system following either polymerizing diaminobenzidine in the presence of transition metal salts or applying the metal salts post-diaminobenzidine polymerization. The effect of sodium sulphide treatment on subsequent amplification was also investigated. Those metal-diaminobenzidine complexes that facilitated the most powerful amplification were subsequently tested in an immunohistochemical setting. The most dramatic amplification of polymerized diaminobenzidine was observed following its post-polymerization treatment with salts of platinum alone, or gold or vanadium with subsequent sulphide treatment, and allowed previously invisible quantities of polymerized diaminobenzidine to be clearly seen. Three other transition metal salts also improved the amplification of polymerized diaminobenzidine but to a lesser degree, namely nickel alone, and silver or rhodium with subsequent sulphide treatment. Sensitivity was comparable with the colloidal gold-silver amplification system.

  7. Results for the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 Tank 50H Salt Solution Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    2016-01-11

    In this memorandum, the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sample of Tank 50H salt solution are presented in tabulated form. The Fourth Quarter CY15 Tank 50H samples were obtained on October 29, 2015 and received at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on October 30, 2015. The information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering for the transfer of aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Production Facility, where the waste will be treated and disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility. This memorandum compares results, where applicable, to Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits and targets. Data pertaining to the regulatory limits for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals will be documented at a later time per the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) for the Tank 50H saltstone task. The chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the characterization of the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sampling of Tank 50H were requested by SRR personnel and details of the testing are presented in the SRNL Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan.

  8. Adsorption of sulfur dioxide on natural clinoptilolite chemically modified with salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Emilia; Koumanova, Bogdana

    2009-08-15

    Various ion exchange forms of preliminary partly decationised zeolite (hydrogen forms) were obtained by indirect modification with metal salt solutions, as well as by direct treatment of natural clinoptilolite taken from Bulgarian deposits. Direct modification leads to a higher extent of samples enrichment with corresponding ion. Independently of the conditions, the alkaline and alkaline earth metal ions (especially sodium and calcium) were inserted at a greater extent, while the transitional metals-at a comparatively lower extent. The cationic forms of clinoptilolite were used for adsorption and desorption experiments. The breakthrough adsorption curves and the concentration curves at temperature-programmed desorption were obtained and compared. The breakthrough and saturation times, the adsorption capacity, the distribution coefficient, the adsorbed SO(2), the portions desorbed as SO(2) and SO(3), respectively, as well as the not desorbed portion of SO(2), were determined using these curves. It was established that a definite quantity of undesorbed SO(2) has remained in the zeolite forms modified with transitional metal cations. This statement was proved not only by the comparison between the adsorbed and desorbed quantities, but also by three-cycle adsorption-desorption experiments for the Cu(2+)-form. The results demonstrate a decrease in the capacity for each following cycle in an extent similar to the undesorbed SO(2) quantity. It was not observed a visible difference in the values of the distribution coefficients for adsorption on identical cation forms, directly or indirectly obtained. However, the breakthrough time of the samples obtained by ion exchange of the hydrogen form was longer in all cases. Definite quantities of desorbed SO(3) were registered for all forms, except for the natural clinoptilolite and the samples enriched with alkaline and alkaline earth metal cations.

  9. Location of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinscher, J.; Bernard, P.; Contrucci, I.; Mangeney, A.; Piguet, J. P.; Bigarre, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ground failures, caving processes and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities can produce significant socio-economic damages and represent a serious risk envisaged by the mine managements and municipalities. In order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms governing such a geohazard and to test the potential of geophysical methods to prevent them, the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity was monitored in the Lorraine basin in northeastern France. During the experiment, a huge microseismic data set (˜50 000 event files) was recorded by a local microseismic network. 80 per cent of the data comprised unusual swarming sequences with complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events which could not be processed through standard automatic detection and location routines. Here, we present two probabilistic methods which provide a powerful tool to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics of these swarming sequences in an automatic manner. Both methods take advantage of strong attenuation effects and significantly polarized P-wave energies at higher frequencies (>100 Hz). The first location approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates for different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain the hypocentre locations. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P-wave energies and the associated polarization angles which provide very valuable information on the hypocentre location. Both methods are applied to a microseismic data set recorded during an important step of the development of the cavity, that is, before its collapse. From our results, systematic spatio-temporal epicentre migration trends are observed in the order of seconds to minutes and several tens of meters which are partially associated with cyclic behaviours. In addition, from spatio-temporal distribution of epicentre clusters we observed similar epicentre migration in the order of hours and days. All together, we

  10. Numerical simulation of solute transport in southwestern Salt Lake Valley, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, P.M.

    1996-01-01

    Contaminated ground water characterized by high concentrations of dissolved solids and dissolved sulfate, and in areas, by low pH and elevated concentrations of metals, is present near public-supply wells in the southwestern Salt Lake Valley. To provide State officials and water users with information concerning the potential movement of contaminated ground water to points of withdrawal in the area, an analysis of solute transport using computer models was done by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water  Rights, and local municipalities and water users.A three-dimensional solute-transport model was developed and couples with an existing ground-water flow model of Salt Lake Valley to simulate the movement of dissolved sulfate in ground water in southwestern Salt Lake Valley. Development and calibration of the transport model focused mainly on sulfate movement down-gradient from the Bingham Creek Reservoirs and the South Jordan evaporation ponds east of the mouth of Bingham Canyon. Estimates of transport parameters were adjusted during a calibration simulation representing conditions during 1965-93. After calibration, the transport model was used to simulate future sulfate movement for 1994-2043.Because of uncertainty in estimated transport-parameter values, three projection transport simulations incorporating a range of probable parameter values were done to evaluate future sulfate movement and changes in sulfate concentrations at selected public-supply wells. These projection simulations produced a possible range of computed transport rates and patterns. In general, the projection simulations indicated movement of the sulfate plume east of the Bingham Creek reservoir toward public-supply wells northeast of the reservoirs and then eastward toward the Jordan River. Ground water with high concentrations of sulfate east of the South Jordan evaporation ponds is simulated as moving west to east under the

  11. Materials and methods for stabilizing nanoparticles in salt solutions

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, David Bruce; Zuckermann, Ronald; Buffleben, George M.

    2013-06-11

    Sequence-specific polymers are proving to be a powerful approach to assembly and manipulation of matter on the nanometer scale. Ligands that are peptoids, or sequence-specific N-functional glycine oligomers, allow precise and flexible control over the arrangement of binding groups, steric spacers, charge, and other functionality. We have synthesized short peptoids that can prevent the aggregation of gold nanoparticles in high-salt environments including divalent salt, and allow co-adsorption of a single DNA molecule. This degree of precision and versatility is likely to prove essential in bottom-up assembly of nanostructures and in biomedical applications of nanomaterials.

  12. Effect of Salt Concentration on the Structure of Poly(Vinyl Alcohol) Cryogels Obtained from Aqueous Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretinnikov, O. N.; Sushko, N. I.; Zagorskaya, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The degree of polymer crystallinity and water content on the surfaces and in the bulk of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) cryogels prepared from aqueous salt solutions were determined as functions of KCl concentration using FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. It was found that the degree of PVA crystallinity increased with increasing KCl concentration and was much greater in the cryogel bulk than on its surfaces. Addition of salt at a concentration of 1.3 M increased the degree of polymer crystallinity on the cryogel surfaces by 1.6-2.3 times whereas the crystallinity in the bulk increased by 3.3-4 times. The cryogel water contents on the surfaces and in the bulk were approximately equal and were practically independent of the salt concentration.

  13. IR spectroscopy of aqueous alkali halide solutions: Pure salt-solvated water spectra and hydration numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, Jean-Joseph; Chapados, Camille

    2001-08-01

    Extrapolation techniques were used to obtain pure salt-solvated water spectra from the attenuated total reflection infrared spectra (ATR-IR) of aqueous solutions of the nine alkali halide salts LiCl, NaCl, KCl, CsCl, NaBr, KBr, NaI, KI, and CsI and the alkaline-earth chloride salt MgCl2. These salts ionize completely in water. The ions by themselves do not absorb in the IR, but their interactions with water can be observed and analyzed. A pure salt-solvated water spectrum is easier to analyze than that of a combined solution of pure water and salt-solvated water. Although the salt-solvated water spectra examined have distinctive signatures, they can be classified in three categories: those similar to NaCl; those not similar to NaCl; and MgCl2, in a class by itself. Each of the pure salt-solvated water spectra differs from that of liquid water, though the number of bands is the same. From the Gaussian band fitting, we found that the positions of the bands were fairly constant, whereas their intensities differed. The salt hydration numbers were determined: for NaCl, KCl, NaBr, KBr, and CsI solutions it is 5; for KI and MgCL2 it is 4; for NaI it is 3.5; for CsCl it is 3; and for LiCl it is 2. From these results we found that each pair of ions (monoatomic ions) of the ten salt solutions studied are close bound and form a complex in a cluster organization with a fixed number of water molecules.

  14. Method of removal of heavy metal from molten salt in IFR fuel pyroprocessing

    DOEpatents

    Gay, E.C.

    1995-10-03

    An electrochemical method is described for separating heavy metal values from a radioactive molten salt including Li halide at temperatures of about 500 C. The method comprises positioning a solid Li--Cd alloy anode in the molten salt containing the heavy metal values, positioning a Cd-containing cathode or a solid cathode positioned above a catch crucible in the molten salt to recover the heavy metal values, establishing a voltage drop between the anode and the cathode to deposit material at the cathode to reduce the concentration of heavy metals in the salt, and controlling the deposition rate at the cathode by controlling the current between the anode and cathode. 3 figs.

  15. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, Chien M.; Smart, Neil G.; Lin, Yuehe

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  16. Extraction of metals and/or metalloids from acidic media using supercritical fluids and salts

    DOEpatents

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

    1998-06-23

    A method is described for extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a fluid solvent, particularly supercritical carbon dioxide, containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent comprises a trialkyl phosphate, a triaryl phosphate, a trialkylphosphine oxide, a triarylphosphine oxide, or mixtures thereof. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides from acidic solutions, and the process can be aided by the addition of nitrate salts. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

  17. Specific Ion Effects: Why the Properties of Lysozyme in Salt Solutions Follow a Hofmeister Series

    PubMed Central

    Boström, M.; Williams, D. R. M.; Ninham, B. W.

    2003-01-01

    Protein solubility in aqueous solutions depends in a complicated and not well understood way on pH, salt type, and salt concentration. Why for instance does the use of two different monovalent salts, potassium thiocyanate and potassium chloride, produce such different results? One important and previously neglected source of ion specificity is the ionic dispersion potential that acts between each ion and the protein. This attractive potential is found to be much stronger for SCN− than it is for Cl−. We present model calculations, performed within a modified ion-specific double-layer theory, that demonstrate the large effect of including these ionic dispersion potentials. The results are consistent with experiments performed on hen egg-white lysozymes and on neutral black lipid membranes. The calculated surface pH and net lysozyme charge depend strongly on the choice of anion. We demonstrate that the lysozyme net charge is larger, and the corresponding Debye length shorter, in a thiocyanate salt solution than in a chloride salt solution. Recent experiments have suggested that pKa values of histidines depend on salt concentration and on ionic species. We finally demonstrate that once ionic dispersion potentials are included in the theory these results can quantitatively be reinterpreted in terms of a highly specific surface pH (and a salt-independent pKa). PMID:12885620

  18. Trace metal concentrations in Spartina densiflora and associated soil from a Patagonian salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Bouza, Pablo J; Marinho, Carmen H; Gil, Mónica N

    2014-12-15

    The objectives of this study were to (i) assess in situ trace metal concentrations in soil and in Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh (Rawson, Chubut, Argentina) and (ii) investigate the relationship between trace metal concentrations in soils and in plants to improve our knowledge regarding the ability of S. densiflora to take up and accumulate trace metals from the soil within its native region. Our results indicate that the soil and S. densiflora exhibit low metal concentrations in the Rawson salt marsh. S. densiflora accumulates Zn in below- and above-ground plant structures and Cr in below-ground parts. These results suggest at the time of this study there is scarce human impact associated with metals in the Rawson salt marsh.

  19. Correlation of second virial coefficient with solubility for proteins in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chirag M; White, Edward T; Litster, James D

    2012-01-01

    In this work, osmotic second virial coefficients (B(22)) were determined and correlated with the measured solubilities for the proteins, α-amylase, ovalbumin, and lysozyme. The B(22) values and solubilities were determined in similar solution conditions using two salts, sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate in an acidic pH range. An overall decrease in the solubility of the proteins (salting out) was observed at high concentrations of ammonium sulfate and sodium chloride solutions. However, for α-amylase, salting-in behavior was also observed in low concentration sodium chloride solutions. In ammonium sulfate solutions, the B(22) are small and close to zero below 2.4 M. As the ammonium sulfate concentrations were further increased, B(22) values decreased for all systems studied. The effect of sodium chloride on B(22) varies with concentration, solution pH, and the type of protein studied. Theoretical models show a reasonable fit to the experimental derived data of B(22) and solubility. B(22) is also directly proportional to the logarithm of the solubility values for individual proteins in salt solutions, so the log-linear empirical models developed in this work can also be used to rapidly predict solubility and B(22) values for given protein-salt systems.

  20. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions: ion network versus ion cluster.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seongheun; Kim, Heejae; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-09-28

    The critical aggregation phenomena are ubiquitous in many self-assembling systems. Ions in high salt solutions could also spontaneously form larger ion aggregates, but their effects on hydrogen-bond structures in water have long been controversial. Here, carrying out molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of high salt solutions and comparing the MD simulation results with infrared absorption and pump-probe spectroscopy of O-D stretch mode of HDO in highly concentrated salt solutions and (13)C-NMR chemical shift of S(13)CN(-) in KSCN solutions, we find evidence on the onset of ion aggregate and large-scale ion-ion network formation that concomitantly breaks water hydrogen-bond structure in certain salt solutions. Despite that these experimental results cannot provide direct evidence on the three-dimensional morphological structures of ion aggregates, they serve as reference data for verifying MD simulation methods. The MD results suggest that disrupted water hydrogen-bond network is intricately intertwined with ion-ion network. This further shows morphological variation of ion aggregate structures from ion cluster to ion network in high salt solutions that are interrelated to the onset of macroscopic aggregate formation and the water hydrogen-bond structure making and breaking processes induced by Hofmeister ions.

  1. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, SeYeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-01-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo. PMID:26271456

  2. Sub-0.5 V Highly Stable Aqueous Salt Gated Metal Oxide Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sungjun; Lee, Seyeong; Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lee, Ilseop; Lee, Won-June; Kim, Sohee; Lee, Byung-Geun; Jang, Jae-Hyung; Yoon, Myung-Han

    2015-08-01

    Recently, growing interest in implantable bionics and biochemical sensors spurred the research for developing non-conventional electronics with excellent device characteristics at low operation voltages and prolonged device stability under physiological conditions. Herein, we report high-performance aqueous electrolyte-gated thin-film transistors using a sol-gel amorphous metal oxide semiconductor and aqueous electrolyte dielectrics based on small ionic salts. The proper selection of channel material (i.e., indium-gallium-zinc-oxide) and precautious passivation of non-channel areas enabled the development of simple but highly stable metal oxide transistors manifested by low operation voltages within 0.5 V, high transconductance of ~1.0 mS, large current on-off ratios over 107, and fast inverter responses up to several hundred hertz without device degradation even in physiologically-relevant ionic solutions. In conjunction with excellent transistor characteristics, investigation of the electrochemical nature of the metal oxide-electrolyte interface may contribute to the development of a viable bio-electronic platform directly interfacing with biological entities in vivo.

  3. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay liners permeated with inorganic salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Gonca; Yetimoglu, Temel; Arasan, Seracettin

    2008-10-01

    Due to their low permeability, geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) and compacted clay liners (CCLs) are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. The hydraulic conductivity of GCLs and CCLs is closely related to the chemistry of the permeant fluid. In this study, the effect on the hydraulic conductivity of clays of five different inorganic salt solutions as permeant fluid was experimentally investigated. For this purpose, NaCl, NH(4)Cl, KCl, CaCl(2), and FeCl( 3) inorganic salt solutions were used at concentrations of 0.01, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1 M. Laboratory hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on low plasticity (CL) and high plasticity (CH) compacted raw clays. The change in electrical conductivity and pH values of the clay samples with inorganic salt solutions were also determined. The experimental test results indicated that the effect of inorganic salt solutions on CL clay was different from that on CH clay. The hydraulic conductivity was found to increase for CH clay when the salt concentrations increased whereas when the salt concentrations were increased, the hydraulic conductivity decreased for the CL clay.

  4. Method for removing metals from a cleaning solution

    DOEpatents

    Deacon, Lewis E.

    2002-01-01

    A method for removing accumulated metals from a cleaning solution is provided. After removal of the metals, the cleaning solution can be discharged or recycled. The process manipulates the pH levels of the solution as a means of precipitating solids. Preferably a dual phase separation at two different pH levels is utilized.

  5. Brazing method produces solid-solution bond between refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Brazing two refractory metals by diffusion bonding minimizes distortion and avoids excessive grain growth in the metals. This method requires the selection of an interface metal that forms intermediate low-melting eutectics or solid solutions with the metals to be brazed.

  6. Length Scale Dependence of the Dynamic Properties of Hyaluronic Acid Solutions in the Presence of Salt

    SciTech Connect

    Horkay, Ferenc; Falus, Peter; Hecht, Anne-Marie; Geissler, Erik

    2010-12-07

    In solutions of the charged semirigid biopolymer hyaluronic acid in salt-free conditions, the diffusion coefficient D{sub NSE} measured at high transfer momentum q by neutron spin echo is more than an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by dynamic light scattering, D{sub DLS}. This behavior contrasts with neutral polymer solutions. With increasing salt content, D{sub DLS} approaches D{sub NSE}, which is independent of ionic strength. Contrary to theoretical expectation, the ion-polymer coupling, which dominates the low q dynamics of polyelectrolyte solutions, already breaks down at distance scales greater than the Debye-Hueckel length.

  7. Influence of adding salt on ultrasonic atomization in an ethanol-water solution.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Koumei; Takenaka, Norimichi; Nanzai, Ben; Okitsu, Kenji; Bandow, Hiroshi; Maeda, Yasuaki

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol was enriched by ultrasonic atomization. Enrichment ratios were increased by adding salt to the ethanol solution. Different enrichment ratios were observed for different types of salts in a range of low ethanol concentrations. The enrichment ratio was significantly improved by adding K(2)CO(3) or (NH(4))(2)SO(4). It is concluded that this is due to enhanced interfacial adsorption of the ethanol. Addition of Na(2)CO(3) to the ethanol solution also enhanced the interfacial adsorption of the ethanol, but the effect was relatively small. Addition of NaCl to the ethanol solution did not enhance the interfacial adsorption of the ethanol.

  8. Lanthanide salts solutions: representation of osmotic coefficients within the binding mean spherical approximation.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Alexandre; Moisy, Philippe; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Bernard, Olivier; Dufrêche, Jean-François; Turq, Pierre

    2005-03-24

    Osmotic coefficients of aqueous solutions of lanthanide salts are described using the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) model based on the Wertheim formalism for association. The lanthanide(III) cation and the co-ion are allowed to form a 1-1 ion pair. Hydration is taken into account by introducing concentration-dependent cation size and solution permittivity. An expression for the osmotic coefficient, derived within the BIMSA, is used to fit data for a wide variety of lanthanide pure salt aqueous solutions at 25 degrees C. A total of 38 lanthanide salts have been treated, including perchlorates, nitrates, and chlorides. For most solutions, good fits could be obtained up to high ionic strengths. The relevance of the fitted parameters has been discussed, and a comparison with literature values has been made (especially the association constants) when available.

  9. Fluid-loading solutions and plasma volume: Astro-ade and salt tablets with water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Seinmann, Laura; Young, Joan A.; Hoskin, Cherylynn N.; Barrows, Linda H.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid loading with salt and water is a countermeasure used after space flight to restore body fluids. However, gastrointestinal side effects have been frequently reported in persons taking similar quantities of salt and water in ground-based studies. The effectiveness of the Shuttle fluid-loading countermeasure (8 gms salt, 0.97 liters of water) was compared to Astro-ade (an isotonic electrolyte solution), to maintain plasma volume (PV) during 4.5 hrs of resting fluid restriction. Three groups of healthy men (n=6) were studied: a Control Group (no drinking), an Astro-ade Group, and a Salt Tablet Group. Changes in PV after drinking were calculated from hematocrit and hemoglobin values. Both the Salt Tablet and Astro-ade Groups maintained PV at 2-3 hours after ingestion compared to the Control Group, which had a 6 percent decline. Side effects (thirst, stomach cramping, and diarrhea) were noted in at least one subject in both the Astro-ade and Salt Tablet Groups. Nausea and vomiting were reported in one subject in the Salt Tablet Group. It was concluded that Astro-ade may be offered as an alternate fluid-loading countermeasure but further work is needed to develop a solution that is more palatable and has fewer side effects.

  10. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    DOEpatents

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ingersoll, David

    2000-01-01

    A method of preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A .beta.-metal .beta.-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  11. Method of producing solution-derived metal oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, T.J.; Ingersoll, D.

    2000-07-11

    A method is described for preparing metal oxide thin films by a solution method. A {beta}-metal {beta}-diketonate or carboxylate compound, where the metal is selected from groups 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12 of the Periodic Table, is solubilized in a strong Lewis base to form a homogeneous solution. This precursor solution forms within minutes and can be deposited on a substrate in a single layer or a multiple layers to form a metal oxide thin film. The substrate with the deposited thin film is heated to change the film from an amorphous phase to a ceramic metal oxide and cooled.

  12. [Solubilization of nitrobenzene in micellar solutions of Tween 80 and inorganic salts].

    PubMed

    Li, Sui; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Xu, Wei; Dai, Ning

    2008-04-01

    The solubilization of nitrobenzene by a nonionic surfactant Tween 80 was investigated at 10 degrees C. Experimental results indicated that the solubility of nitrobenzene in water was greatly enhanced by Tween 80 at surfactant concentration above CMC(critical micelle concentration) and a linear relationship was obtained between surfactant concentration and nitrobenzene concentration from the solubility curve. The molar solubilization ratio (MSR) value was 5.093 and IgKm was 3.499. The solubilization was attributed to the ethoxylation group in Tween 80 micellar. Effect of four inorganic salts such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl2 , MgCl2 on water solubilities of nitrobenzene in Tween 80 micellar solutions was also investigated by a matrix of batch experiments. Mix the Tween 80-inorganic salts at the total mass ratios of 2:1, 5:1 and 10:1. The results show that the inorganic salts at a high concentration( > or = 500 mg x L(-1)) can enhance the solubilization capacities of Tween 80 micellar solution and increase the value of MSR and IgKm . Because of the salting-out effect between the micellar of Tween 80 and inorganic salts, the volume of micelle turns bigger, which may provide larger solubility volume for nitrobenzene. The mixture of nonionic surfactant and inorganic salts can be used in subsurface remediation as a flushing solution.

  13. Influence of structure of the metal salts of phosphinates on the performance of the fire-retardant polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xueqing; Liu, Jiyan; Guo, Yuanhao; Cakmak, Miko

    2015-05-01

    Dialkylphosphinate salts (I) and amide-containing phosphinate salts(II) with varying metal cation and organic groups were used as flame retardants for epoxy resin(EP), poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) correspondingly. Their flame retardancy, mechanical properties, thermal stability, compatibility between phosphinate salts and polymer, and leaching of the salts from the polymer were investigated with respect to the structure of phosphinate salts.

  14. Geochemistry of metal-rich brines from central Mississippi Salt Dome basin, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kharaka, Y.K.; Maest, A.S.; Carothers, W.W.; Law, L.M.; Lamothe, P.J.; Fries, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    Oil-field brines are the most favored ore-forming solutions for the sediment-hosted Mississippi Valley-type ore deposits. Detailed inorganic and organic chemical and isotope analyses of water and gas samples from six oil fields in central Mississippi, one of the very few areas with high metal brines, were conducted to study the inorganic and organic complexes responsible for the high concentrations of these metals. The samples were obtained from production zones consisting of sandstone and limestone that range in depth from 1900 to 4000 m (70-120??C) and in age from Late Cretaceous to Late Jurassic. Results show that the waters are dominantly bittern brines related to the Louann Salt. The brines have extremely high salinities that range from 160,000 to 320,000 mg/l total dissolved solids and are NaCaCl-type waters with very high concentrations of Ca (up to 48,000 mg/l) and other alkaline-earth metals, but with low concentrations of aliphatic acid anions. The concentrations of metals in many water samples are very high, reaching values of 70 mg/l for Pb, 245 mg/l for Zn, 465 mg/l for Fe and 210 mg/l for Mn. The samples with high metal contents have extremely low concentrations (<0.02 mg/l) of H2S. Samples obtained from the Smackover Formation (limestone) have low metal contents that are more typical of oil-field waters, but have very high concentrations (up to 85 mg/l) of H2S. Computations with the geochemical code SOLMINEQ.87 give the following results: (1) both Pb and Zn are present predominantly as aqueous chloride complexes (mainly as PbCl42- and ZnCl42-, respectively); (2) the concentrations of metals complexed with short-chained aliphatic acid anions and reduced S species are minor; (3) organic acid anions are important in controlling the concentrations of metals because they affect the pH and buffer capacity of the waters at subsurface conditions; and (4) galena and sphalerite solubilities control the concentrations of Pb and Zn in these waters. ?? 1988.

  15. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt.

    PubMed

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-03-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM-INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM-PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM-PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM-INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N-H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM-PAM cocrystal, while ACM-CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid-carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM-INA, ACM-PAM and ACM-CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM-PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM-PPZ salt and ACM-nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM-PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine salt of acemetacin exhibits superior

  16. Acemetacin cocrystals and salts: structure solution from powder X-ray data and form selection of the piperazine salt

    PubMed Central

    Sanphui, Palash; Bolla, Geetha; Nangia, Ashwini; Chernyshev, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Acemetacin (ACM) is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), which causes reduced gastric damage compared with indomethacin. However, acemetacin has a tendency to form a less soluble hydrate in the aqueous medium. We noted difficulties in the preparation of cocrystals and salts of acemetacin by mechanochemical methods, because this drug tends to form a hydrate during any kind of solution-based processing. With the objective to discover a solid form of acemetacin that is stable in the aqueous medium, binary adducts were prepared by the melt method to avoid hydration. The coformers/salt formers reported are pyridine carboxamides [nicotinamide (NAM), isonicotinamide (INA), and picolinamide (PAM)], caprolactam (CPR), p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), and piperazine (PPZ). The structures of an ACM–INA cocrystal and a binary adduct ACM–PABA were solved using single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Other ACM cocrystals, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR, and the piperazine salt ACM–PPZ were solved from high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction data. The ACM–INA cocrystal is sustained by the acid⋯pyridine heterosynthon and N—H⋯O catemer hydrogen bonds involving the amide group. The acid⋯amide heterosynthon is present in the ACM–PAM cocrystal, while ACM–CPR contains carboxamide dimers of caprolactam along with acid–carbonyl (ACM) hydrogen bonds. The cocrystals ACM–INA, ACM–PAM and ACM–CPR are three-dimensional isostructural. The carboxyl⋯carboxyl synthon in ACM–PABA posed difficulty in assigning the position of the H atom, which may indicate proton disorder. In terms of stability, the salts were found to be relatively stable in pH 7 buffer medium over 24 h, but the cocrystals dissociated to give ACM hydrate during the same time period. The ACM–PPZ salt and ACM–nicotinamide cocrystal dissolve five times faster than the stable hydrate form, whereas the ACM–PABA adduct has 2.5 times faster dissolution rate. The pharmaceutically acceptable piperazine

  17. Influence of microwave power, metal oxides and metal salts on the pyrolysis of algae.

    PubMed

    Li, Longjun; Ma, Xiaoqian; Xu, Qing; Hu, Zhifeng

    2013-08-01

    The work was to investigate the influence of microwave power, metal oxides and metal salts onto the pyrolysis of algae (4.55 wt.% moisture). It was found that the heating rate and the final temperature would increase as enhancing the microwave power. When microwave power increased from 750 W to 2250 W, the yield of solid residue decreased by 22.05%, and gas yield increased 39.45%. After adding 5% (mass basis) CuO and MgO, the yield of solid residue and bio-oil appeared the greatest decreasing ranges of 14.35% and 11.04%, respectively. Electrical energy consumption increased by 1.44% and reduced by 40.76% after CuO and MgO was added, separately. When algae was mixed with 5% (mass basis) MgCl2, ZnCl2 and NaH2PO3, respectively, the yield of solid residue increased by 3.98%, 1.13% and 2.31%, and the bio-oil yield increased by 6.3%, 16.92% and 0.71%, respectively. The effect of microwave absorption was ZnCl2>NaH2PO3>MgCl2.

  18. Synthesis of noble metal/graphene nanocomposites without surfactants by one-step reduction of metal salt and graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jeong, Gyoung Hwa; Choi, Donghyeuk; Yoon, Sunyoung; Jeon, Heung Bae; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Sang-Wook

    2013-01-01

    We carried out hydrazine-free, surfactant-free synthesis of noble metal/graphene nanocomposites. The reduction of the noble metals and GO was carried out simultaneously in hot water using ascorbic acid as a reductant. In the noble metal/graphene nanocomposites of Pd, Pt, Au, and Ag nanoparticles, the GO and metal salts were reduced completely by this synthetic method. In addition, the Pd/graphene nanocomposites showed good catalytic activity in the Suzuki coupling reaction and could be reused many times without loss of catalytic activity.

  19. Issues affecting storage of compressed air in solution-mined salt cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Thoms, R.L.

    1982-04-01

    Geologic factors affecting salt deposit acceptability for CAES include diameter, depth, thickness, mineralogy, strength, faulting, seismic susceptibility, caprock quality and rate of dissolution by ground water. Assessment of a site involves analysis of existing information, seismic surveying, exploratory drilling, salt and caprock examination, geophysical logging, in situ stress measurement, and determination of hydrologic impact. Geologic exploration and solution mining at Huntorf, Federal Republic of Germany, are discussed. Cavern design parameters include octahedral shear strength, excess lateral stress, depth to cavern top, lateral salt thickness, vertical salt thickness, span, and height-to-diameter ratio. Noncompensated cavern operation involves cycling with respect to temperature, pressure, humidity and water. Cavern, borehole and surface monitoring methods are discussed.

  20. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. VI. Spectral graph analysis of chaotropic ion aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-11-01

    Carrying out molecular dynamics simulations and graph theoretical analyses of high salt solutions, and comparing numerically calculated vibrational spectroscopic properties of water with femtosecond IR pump-probe experimental data, we have recently found that ions in high salt solutions can form two morphologically different ion aggregate structures. In the cases of NaCl solutions, Na+ and Cl- tend to form compact cluster-like ion aggregate in high NaCl solutions. In contrast, K+ and SCN- form spatially extended network-like ion aggregates that also exhibit a percolating network behavior. Interestingly, a variety of graph theoretical properties of ion network in high KSCN solutions were found to be very similar to those of water H-bonding network. It was shown that spatially extended ion networks in high KSCN solutions are completely intertwined with water H-bonding networks, which might be the key to understand the high solubility of thiocyanate salts in water. Here, we further consider two salts that have been extensively studied experimentally by using femtosecond IR pump-probe technique, which are NaClO4 and NaBF4. Note that ClO4 - and BF4 - are well-known chaotropic ions that have been believed to behave as water structure breaker. To understand how such chaotropic ions affect water H-bonding structure, we carried out spectral graph analyses of molecular dynamics simulation data of these aqueous solutions. Graph spectra and degree distribution of ion aggregates formed in high NaBF4 and NaClO4 solutions show that these chaotropic anions also have a strong propensity to form ion networks. The fact that salts containing chaotropic ions like SCN-, BF4 - , and ClO4 - have very high solubility limits in water could then be related to our observation that these chaotropic anions with counter cations in high salt solutions are capable of forming intricate ion networks intertwined with water H-bonding networks. We anticipate that the present graph theoretical analysis

  1. [Biological activity of selenorganic compounds at heavy metal salts intoxication].

    PubMed

    Rusetskaya, N Y; Borodulin, V B

    2015-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of the antitoxic action of organoselenium compounds in heavy metal poisoning have been considered. Heavy metal toxicity associated with intensification of free radical oxidation, suppression of the antioxidant system, damage to macromolecules, mitochondria and the genetic material can cause apoptotic cell death or the development of carcinogenesis. Organic selenium compounds are effective antioxidants during heavy metal poisoning; they exhibit higher bioavailability in mammals than inorganic ones and they are able to activate antioxidant defense, bind heavy metal ions and reactive oxygen species formed during metal-induced oxidative stress. One of promising organoselenium compounds is diacetophenonyl selenide (DAPS-25), which is characterized by antioxidant and antitoxic activity, under conditions including heavy metal intoxication.

  2. Salting-out effect in aqueous NaCl solutions: trends with size and polarity of solute molecules.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Pfennigsdorff, Andrea; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2012-02-07

    Salting-out in aqueous NaCl solutions is relevant for the environmental behavior of organic contaminants. In this study, Setschenow (or salting-out) coefficients (K(s) [M(-1)]) for 43 diverse neutral compounds in NaCl solutions were measured using a shared headspace passive dosing method and a negligible depletion solid phase microextraction technique. The results were used to calibrate and evaluate estimation models for K(s). The molar volume of the solute correlated only moderately with K(s) (R(2) = 0.49, SD = 0.052). The polyparameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) model that uses five compound descriptors resulted in a more accurate fit to our data (R(2) = 0.83, SD = 0.031). The pp-LFER analysis revealed that Na(+) and Cl(-) in aqueous solutions increase the cavity formation energy cost and the polar interaction energies toward neutral organic solutes. Accordingly, the salting-out effect increases with the size and decreases with the polarity of the solute molecule. COSMO-RS, a quantum mechanics-based fully predictive model, generally overpredicted the experimental K(s), but the predicted values were moderately correlated with the experimental values (R(2) = 0.66, SD = 0.042). Literature data (n = 93) were predicted by the calibrated pp-LFER and COSMO-RS models with root mean squared errors of 0.047 and 0.050, respectively. This study offers prediction models to estimate K(s), allowing implementation of the salting-out effect in contaminant fate models, linkage of various partition coefficients (such as air-water, sediment-water, and extraction phase-water partition coefficients) measured for fresh water and seawater, and estimation of enhancement of extraction efficiency in analytical procedures.

  3. Changes in Proton Dynamics in Articular Cartilage Caused by Phosphate Salts and Fixation Solutions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shaokuan; Xia, Yang

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to study the effect of phosphate salts and fixation solutions on the proton dynamics in articular cartilage in vitro. Microscopic magnetic resonance imaging (μMRI) T(2) anisotropy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) double quantum-filtered (DQF) spectroscopy were used to study the full-thickness articular cartilage from several canine humeral heads. The in-plane pixel size across the depth of the cartilage tissue was 13 μm. The acid phosphate salt was an effective exchange catalyst for proton exchange in the cartilage with an organized structure of collagen fibrils, while the alkaline phosphate salt was not. For cartilage tissue containing less organized collagen fibrils, both acid and alkaline phosphate salts have no significant effect on the T(2) value at low concentration but decrease the T(2) value at high concentration. The solutions of NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), and D-PBS were found to have no significant effect on T(2) and DQF in cartilage. This study demonstrates the ability to modify the proton exchange in articular cartilage using the solutions of phosphate salts. The ability to modify the proton exchange in articular cartilage can be used to modulate the laminar appearance of articular cartilage in MRI.

  4. Reusable chelating resins concentrate metal ions from highly dilute solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, A. J.; Weetal, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Column chromatographic method uses new metal chelating resins for recovering heavy-metal ions from highly dilute solutions. The absorbed heavy-metal cations may be removed from the chelating resins by acid or base washes. The resins are reusable after the washes are completed.

  5. [Spermatogenic function under the influence of heavy metal salts and its correction by preparation Tivortin].

    PubMed

    Romaniuk, A M; Sauliak, S V; Moskalenko, R A; Moskalenko, Iu V

    2012-01-01

    Entrance of threshold concentrations of copper, zinc, iron, manganese, lead, chromium into the body of sexually mature male rats leads to secretory malfunction of the testicles, which manifests by a decrease of sperm concentration in the ejaculate, a decrease of percentage of motile gametes, an increase in the proportion of morphologically abnormal sperm forms. The evidence of disorders in spermatogram's parameters is directly depends on the duration of the influence of combination of heavy metal salts. The application of the drug Tivortin against intoxication of heavy metal salts decrease the adverse movement of quantitative and qualitative parameters of rat's spermatogramms, so far as Tivortin improves blood circulation, stimulates cell proliferation and cell differentiation, inhibits oxidative apoptosis. These explain beneficial effects of the drug on the growth and maturation of germ cells in case of the influence heavy metal salts combination on organ and the whole body.

  6. Characterization of Laboratory Prepared Concrete Pastes Exposed to High Alkaline and High Sodium Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C. A.

    2016-06-30

    The objective of this study was to identify potential chemical degradation mechanisms for the Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) concretes, which over the performance life of the structures may be exposed to highly alkaline sodium salt solutions containing sulfate, hydroxide, and other potentially corrosive chemicals in salt solution and saltstone flush water, drain water, leachate and / or pore solution. The samples analyzed in this study were cement pastes prepared in the SIMCO Technologies, Inc. concrete laboratory. They were based on the paste fractions of the concretes used to construct the Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs). SDU 1 and 4 concrete pastes were represented by the PV1 test specimens. The paste in the SDU 2, 3, 5, and 6 concrete was represented by the PV2 test specimens. SIMCO Technologies, Inc. selected the chemicals and proportions in the aggressive solutions to approximate proportions in the saltstone pore solution [2, 3, 5, and 6]. These test specimens were cured for 56 days in curing chamber before being immersed in aggressive solutions. After exposure, the samples were frozen to prevent additional chemical transport and reaction. Selected archived (retrieved from the freezer) samples were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for additional characterization using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Characterization results are summarized in this report. In addition, a correlation between the oxide composition of the pastes and their chemical durability in the alkaline salt solutions is provided.

  7. Effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kwong, Philip; Seidel, Scott; Gupta, Malancha

    2015-05-15

    In this work, the effect of transition metal salts on the initiated chemical vapor deposition of polymer thin films was studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The polymerizations of 4-vinyl pyridine and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate were studied using copper(II) chloride (CuCl{sub 2}) and iron(III) chloride (FeCl{sub 3}) as the transition metal salts. It was found that the surface coverages of both poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (P4VP) and poly(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl acrylate) were decreased on CuCl{sub 2}, while the surface coverage of only P4VP was decreased on FeCl{sub 3}. The decreased polymer surface coverage was found to be due to quenching of the propagating radicals by the salt, which led to a reduction of the oxidation state of the metal. The identification of this reaction mechanism allowed for tuning of the effectiveness of the salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage through the adjustment of processing parameters such as the filament temperature. Additionally, it was demonstrated that the ability of transition metal salts to decrease the polymer surface coverage could be extended to the fabrication of patterned cross-linked coatings, which is important for many practical applications such as sensors and microelectronics.

  8. A new class of draw solutions for minimizing reverse salt flux to improve forward osmosis desalination.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hau Thi; Nguyen, Nguyen Cong; Chen, Shiao-Shing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Li, Chi-Wang

    2015-12-15

    The applications of forward osmosis (FO) have been hindered because of the lack of an optimal draw solution. The reverse salt flux from the draw solution not only reduces the water flux but also increases the cost of draw solute replenishment. Therefore, in this study, Tergitol NP7 and NP9 with a long straight carbon chain and low critical micelle concentration (CMC) were coupled with highly charged ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) as an innovative draw solution to minimize reverse salt diffusion in FO for the first time. The results showed that the lowest reverse salt flux of 0.067 GMH was observed when 0.1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 was used as a draw solution and deionized water was used as a feed solution in FO mode (active layer facing with the feed solution). This is due to the hydrophobic interaction between the tails of NP7 and the FO membrane, thus creating layers on the membrane surface and constricting the FO membrane pores. Moreover, 1M EDTA-2Na coupled with 15mM NP7 is promising as an optimal draw solution for brackish water and sea water desalination. Average water fluxes of 7.68, 6.78, and 5.95 LMH were achieved when brackish water was used as a feed solution (5, 10, and 20g/L NaCl), and an average water flux of 3.81 LMH was achieved when sea water was used as a feed solution (35g/L NaCl). The diluted draw solution was recovered using a nanofiltration (NF-TS80) membrane with a high efficiency of 95% because of the high charge and large size of the draw solution.

  9. Effect of hygroscopicity of the metal salt on the formation and air stability of lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases in hydrated salt-surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cemal; Barım, Gözde; Dag, Ömer

    2014-11-01

    It is known that alkali, transition metal and lanthanide salts can form lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) mesophases with non-ionic surfactants (such as CiH2i+1(OCH2CH2)jOH, denoted as CiEj). Here we combine several salt systems and show that the percent deliquescence relative humidity (%DRH) value of a salt is the determining parameter in the formation and stability of the mesophases and that the other parameters are secondary and less significant. Accordingly, salts can be divided into 3 categories: Type I salts (such as LiCl, LiBr, LiI, LiNO3, LiClO4, CaCl2, Ca(NO3)2, MgCl2, and some transition metal nitrates) have low %DRH and form stable salt-surfactant LLC mesophases in the presence of a small amount of water, type II salts (such as some sodium and potassium salts) that are moderately hygroscopic form disordered stable mesophases, and type III salts that have high %DRH values, do not form stable LLC mesophases and leach out salt crystals. To illustrate this effect, a large group of salts from alkali and alkaline earth metals were investigated using XRD, POM, FTIR, and Raman techniques. Among the different salts investigated in this study, the LiX (where X is Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-), and ClO4(-)) and CaX2 (X is Cl(-), and NO3(-)) salts were more prone to establish LLC mesophases because of their lower %DRH values. The phase behavior with respect to concentration, stability, and thermal behavior of Li(I) systems were investigated further. It is seen that the phase transitions among different anions in the Li(I) systems follow the Hofmeister series.

  10. Electrochemical Recovery of Sodium Hydroxide from Alkaline Salt Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.T.; Edwards, T.B.

    1996-10-01

    A statistically designed set of tests determined the effects of current density, temperature, and the concentrations of nitrate/nitrite, hydroxide and aluminate on the recovery of sodium as sodium hydroxide (caustic) from solutions simulating those produced from the Savannah River Site (SRS) In-Tank Precipitation process. These tests included low nitrate and nitrite concentrations which would be produced by electrolytic nitrate/nitrite destruction. The tests used a two compartment electrochemical cell with a Nafion Type 324 ion-exchange membrane. Caustic was successfully recovered from the waste solutions. Evaluation of the testing results indicated that the transport of sodium across the membrane was not significantly affected by any of the varied parameters. The observed variance in the sodium flux is attributed to experimental errors and variations in the performance characteristics of individual pieces of the organic-based Nafion membrane.Additional testing is recommended to determine the maximum current density, to evaluate the chemical durability of the organic membrane as a function of current density and to compare the durability and performance characteristics of the organic-based Nafion membrane with that of other commercially available organic membranes and the inorganic class of membranes under development by Ceramatec and PNNL.

  11. Raman studies of solutions of single-wall carbon nanotube salts.

    PubMed

    Anglaret, E; Dragin, F; Pénicaud, A; Martel, R

    2006-03-09

    Polyelectrolyte solutions of Na-doped single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) salts are studied by Raman spectroscopy. Their Raman signature is first compared to undoped SWNT suspensions and dry alkali-doped SWNT powders, and the results indicate that the nanotube solutions consist of heavily doped (charged) SWNT. Raman signature of doping is then used to monitor in situ the oxidation reaction of the nanotube salt solutions upon exposure to air and to an acceptor molecule (benzoquinone). The results indicate a direct charge-transfer reaction from the acceptor molecule to the SWNT, leading to their gradual charge neutralization and eventual precipitation in solution. The results are consistent with a simple redox titration process occurring at the thermodynamical equilibrium.

  12. Cross-sectional study of platinum salts sensitization among precious metals refinery workers.

    PubMed

    Baker, D B; Gann, P H; Brooks, S M; Gallagher, J; Bernstein, I L

    1990-01-01

    A cross-sectional medical evaluation was conducted to determine respiratory and dermatological effects of platinum salts sensitization among workers in a secondary refinery of precious metals. Fifteen of 107 current employees and eight (28%) of 29 former employees, who had been terminated from employment on average for 5 years because of respiratory symptoms, had positive skin reactivity to platinum salts. Platinum salts skin reactivity was significantly associated with average air concentrations of platinum salts in employees' present work area. Workers with positive platinum salts skin tests had significantly higher prevalences of reported rhinitis, asthma, and dermatitis than negative skin test workers. They also had increased bronchial response to cold air challenge and elevated levels of total serum IgE. Platinum salts sensitization was not associated with atopic tendency as measured by sensitivity to common aeroallergens, but was strongly associated with cigarette smoking status. The findings indicate that cigarette smoking may be a risk factor for the development of platinum salts allergy. The persistence of platinum salts sensitization and high prevalence of adverse health outcomes among former workers demonstrate the importance of regular medical monitoring so that sensitized workers can be removed from exposure before they develop long-term health problems.

  13. Oxygen isotope activities and concentrations in aqueous salt solutions at elevated temperatures: Consequences for isotope geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, A.H.

    1974-01-01

    Studies of the effect of dissolved salts on the oxygen isotope activity ratio of water have been extended to 275??C. Dehydrated salts were added to water of known isotope composition and the solutions were equilibrated with CO2 which was sampled for analysis. For comparison similar studies were made using pure water. Results on water nearly coincide with earlier calculations. Salt effects diminish with increasing temperature only for solutions of MgCl2 and LiCl. Other salt solutions show complex behavior due to the temperature-dependent formation of ion pairs of changing character. Equilibrium fractionations (103 ln ??) between 1 molal solutions and pure water at 25, 100, and 275??C are: NaCl 0.0, -1.5, +1.0; KCl 0.0, -1.0, +2.0; LiCl -1.0, -0.6, -0.5; CaCl2 -0.4, -1.8, +0.8; MgCl2 -1.1, -0.7, -0.3; MgSO4 -1.1, +0.1, -; NaF (0.8 m) 0.0, -1.5, -0.3; and NH4Cl (0.55 m) 0.0, -1.2, -1.3. These effects are significant in the isotope study of hot saline fluids responsible for ore deposition and of fluids found in certain geothermal systems. Minor modification of published isotope geothermometers may be required. ?? 1974.

  14. Mechanism of Pitting Corrosion Prevention by Nitrite in Carbon Steel Exposed to Dilute Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.E.

    2002-05-02

    The overall goal of this project was to develop a detailed understanding of the role of nitrite in preventing the breakdown of protective oxide on steel and on the onset of pitting, by considering the interactions of the oxidation and reduction reactions that may occur in alkaline salt solutions.

  15. Cocoa shells for heavy metal removal from acidic solutions.

    PubMed

    Meunier, N; Laroulandie, J; Blais, J F; Tyagi, R D

    2003-12-01

    The development of economic and efficient processes for the removal of heavy metals present in acidic effluents from industrial sources or decontamination technologies has become a priority. The purpose of this work was to study the efficiency with which cocoa shells remove heavy metals from acidic solutions (pH 2) and to investigate how the composition of these solutions influences heavy metal uptake efficiency. Adsorption tests were conducted in agitated flasks with single-metal solutions (0.25 mM Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn), multi-metal solution (comprised of 0.25 mM of each of the cations above) and an effluent obtained from chemical leaching of metal-contaminated soil, in the presence of different cocoa shell concentrations (5-40 g/l). Results from the single-metal solution assays indicated that the fixation capacity of heavy metals by cocoa shells followed a specific order: Pb>Cr>Cd=Cu=Fe>Zn=Co>Mn=Ni=Al. Cocoa shells are particularly efficient in the removal of lead from very acidic solutions (q(max)=6.2 mg Pb/g, pH(i)=2.0 and T=22 degrees C). The presence of other metals and cations in solution did not seem to affect the recovery of lead. It was also observed that the maximum metal uptake was reached in less than 2 h. This research has also demonstrated that the removal of metals caused a decline in solution proton concentration (pH increase) and release of calcium, magnesium, potassium and sodium from the cocoa shells.

  16. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained.

  17. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -} ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  18. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The solvation structures of Na^+, K^+, and Cl^- ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na^+, K^+, and Cl^-, respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  19. Hydration structure of salt solutions from ab initio molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Bankura, Arindam; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L

    2013-01-07

    The solvation structures of Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-) ions in aqueous solution have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) based Car-Parrinello (CP) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. CPMD trajectories were collected for systems containing three NaCl or KCl ion pairs solvated by 122 water molecules using three different but commonly employed density functionals (BLYP, HCTH, and PBE) with electron correlation treated at the level of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The effect of including dispersion forces was analyzed through the use of an empirical correction to the DFT-GGA scheme. Special attention was paid to the hydration characteristics, especially the structural properties of the first solvation shell of the ions, which was investigated through ion-water radial distribution functions, coordination numbers, and angular distribution functions. There are significant differences between the present results obtained from CPMD simulations and those provided by classical MD based on either the CHARMM force field or a polarizable model. Overall, the computed structural properties are in fair agreement with the available experimental results. In particular, the observed coordination numbers 5.0-5.5, 6.0-6.4, and 6.0-6.5 for Na(+), K(+), and Cl(-), respectively, are consistent with X-ray and neutron scattering studies but differ somewhat from some of the many other recent computational studies of these important systems. Possible reasons for the differences are discussed.

  20. An Evaluation of Metal Salts of 3-Nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO) as Potential Primary Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    heavy metal salts; silver, lead, mercuric, barium, cadmium, strontium, cupric, nickel and stannous.Normal salts were prepared in all cases, and acid salts for sodium, potassium lead and mercuric. The ammonium salt was shown to be identical to that reported previously. Response to mechanical and thermal stimuli is typical of sensitive secondary explosives. It is concluded that these materials do not have any potential for use as primary (initiating) explosives. Keywords: Fillers, Warheads, Fuzes ordnance, Boosters explosives,

  1. Salt-water-freshwater transient upconing - An implicit boundary-element solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemblowski, M.

    1985-01-01

    The boundary-element method is used to solve the set of partial differential equations describing the flow of salt water and fresh water separated by a sharp interface in the vertical plane. In order to improve the accuracy and stability of the numerical solution, a new implicit scheme was developed for calculating the motion of the interface. The performance of this scheme was tested by means of numerical simulation. The numerical results are compared to experimental results for a salt-water upconing under a drain problem. ?? 1985.

  2. Effect of perfusion of bile salts solutions into the oesophagus of hiatal hernia patients and controls.

    PubMed Central

    Bachir, G S; Collis, J L

    1976-01-01

    Tests of the response to perfusion of the oesophagus were made in 54 patients divided into three groups. Group I consisted of patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia, group II hiatal hernia patients with peptic stricture, and group III normal individuals. Each individual oesophagus was perfused at a rate of 45-65 drops per minute over 25 minutes with six solutions: normal saline, N/10 HCl, taurine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, taurine conjugates of bile salts in N/10 HCl, glycine conjugates of bile salts in normal saline, and taurine and glycine conjugates in a ratio of 1 to 2 in normal saline. It was found that acidified taurine solutions were more irritating than acid alone. With a 2mM/l solution of taurine in acid, symptoms are produced even in controls. With a 1 mM/l solution of the same conjugates, the majority of normal people feel slight heartburn or nothing, and therefore perfusion into the oesophagus of such a solution could be used as a test for oesophagitis. PMID:941112

  3. Fourteen-year survival of Pseudomonas cepacia in a salts solution preserved with benzalkonium chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Geftic, S G; Heymann, H; Adair, F W

    1979-01-01

    A strain of Pseudomonas cepacia that survived for 14 years (1963 to 1977) as a contaminant in an inorganic salt solution which contained commercial 0.05% benzalkonium chloride (CBC) as an antimicrobial preservative, was compared to a recent clinical isolate of P. cepacia. Ammonium acetate was present in the concentrated stock CBC solution, and served as a carbon and nitrogen source for growth when carried over into the salts solution with the CBC. The isolate's resistance to pure benzalkonium chloride was increased step-wise to a concentration of 16%. Plate counts showed 4 x 10(3) colony-forming units per ml in the salts solution. Comparison of growth rates, mouse virulence, antibiotics resistance spectra, and substrate requirements disclosed no differences between the contaminant and a recently isolated clinical strain of P. cepacia. The results indicate that it is critical that pharmaceutical solutions containing benzalkonium chloride as an antimicrobial preservative be formulated without extraneous carbon and nitrogen sources or be preserved with additional antimicrobial agents. PMID:453827

  4. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite with a solution-based approach to immobilize a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. The reactants used were the salt solution, NaAlO2, and either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4. Additionally, seven different glass sintering aids (at loadings of 5 mass%) were evaluated as sintering aids for consolidating the as-made powders using a cold-press-and-sinter technique. This process of using alkoxide additives for the Group IV component can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at near-room temperature as compared to a method where colloidal silica was used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during heat treatments.

  5. Release of Metals by the Leaves of the Salt Marsh Grasses Spartina alterniflora and Phragmites australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, D. J.; Weis, J. S.; Weis, P.

    2000-08-01

    The perennial grass Spartina alterniflora, common to salt marshes of eastern North America, is known to accumulate metals from marsh sediment and release them into the environment. One pathway by which Spartina alterniflora releases metals is through the excretion of metal-containing salts produced by leaf salt glands. We examined the differential release of metals by Spartina alterniflora and the invasive perennial grass Phragmites australis in an urban marsh ecosystem. Leaching rates were measured by cleaning residues off leaf surfaces under field and controlled laboratory conditions. Leaf residues and leaf tissue were analysed for copper, chromium, lead and zinc by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Spartina alterniflora was found to release significantly more metal through leaf tissue than Phragmites australis, under both field and laboratory situations. Spartina alterniflora was also found to accumulate significantly more chromium and lead in leaves than Phragmites australis. Therefore, Spartina alterniflora can release larger quantities of metals into the marsh environment than Phragmites australis, through both excretion and leaf deposition.

  6. Assessment of a 42 metal salts chemical library in mouse embryonic stem cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The developmental effects of xenobiotics on differentiation can be profiled using mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). The adherent cell differentiation and cytotoxicity (ACDC) technique was used to evaluate a library of 42 metal and metaloid salts. Jl mESCs were allowed to prolif...

  7. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  8. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  9. Adsorption of N-alkylpyridinium chlorides from water and salt solutions on cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, N.A.; Yaroshenko, N.A.; Kondratova, T.B.

    1988-09-01

    A study has been made of the adsorption of three homologues in the N-alkylpyridinium chloride series from water and salt solutions, over a wide range of concentrations, on cellulose acetate ultrafiltration membranes, Grades UAM-500 and UAM-150. When adsorption takes place from true solutions, the membrane surface is hydrophobized. In the region of micellar solutions, nonassociated molecules and micelles are adsorbed in the mesopores and supermicropores, forming a mosaic adsorption layer. The thickness of the modifying layer depends on the length of the hydrophobic radical and on the composition of the system.

  10. Metal oxide chemistry in solution: the early transition metal polyoxoanions.

    PubMed

    Day, V W; Klemperer, W G

    1985-05-03

    Many of the early transition elements form large polynuclear metal-oxygen anions containing up to 200 atoms or more. Although these polyoxoanions have been investigated for more than a century, detailed studies of structure and reactivity were not possible until the development of modern x-ray crystallographic and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic techniques. Systematic studies of small polyoxoanions in inert, aprotic solvents have clarified many of the principles governing their structure and reactivity, and also have made possible the preparation of entirely new types of covalent derivatives such as CH(2)Mo(4)O(15)H(3-), C(5)H(5)TiMo(5)O(18)(3-), and (OC)(3)Mn(Nb(2)W(4)O(19))(3-). Since most early transition metal polyoxoanions have structures based on close-packed oxygen arrays containing interstitial metal centers, their chemistry offers a rare opportunity to study chemical transformations in detail on well-defined metal oxide surfaces.

  11. Results For The Third Quarter Calendar Year 2016 Tank 50H Salt Solution Sample

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, C.

    2016-10-13

    In this memorandum, the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the Third Quarter Calendar Year 2016 (CY16) sample of Tank 50H salt solution are presented in tabulated form. The Third Quarter CY16 Tank 50H samples (a 200 mL sample obtained 6” below the surface (HTF-5-16-63) and a 1 L sample obtained 66” from the tank bottom (HTF-50-16-64)) were obtained on July 14, 2016 and received at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on the same day. Prior to obtaining the samples from Tank 50H, a single pump was run at least 4.4 hours, and the samples were pulled immediately after pump shut down. The information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering for the transfer of aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Saltstone Production Facility, where the waste will be treated and disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility. This memorandum compares results, where applicable, to Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits and targets. Data pertaining to the regulatory limits for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals will be documented at a later time per the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) for the Tank 50H saltstone task. The chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the characterization of the Third Quarter CY16 sampling of Tank 50H were requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) personnel and details of the testing are presented in the SRNL TTQAP.

  12. Nonmonotonic variation with salt concentration of the second virial coefficient in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Allahyarov, E; Löwen, H; Hansen, J P; Louis, A A

    2003-05-01

    The osmotic virial coefficient B2 of globular protein solutions is calculated as a function of added salt concentration at fixed pH by computer simulations of the "primitive model." The salt and counterions as well as a discrete charge pattern on the protein surface are explicitly incorporated. For parameters roughly corresponding to lysozyme, we find that B2 first decreases with added salt concentration up to a threshold concentration, then increases to a maximum, and then decreases again upon further raising the ionic strength. Our studies demonstrate that the existence of a discrete charge pattern on the protein surface profoundly influences the effective interactions and that linear and nonlinear Poisson Boltzmann theories fail for large ionic strength. The observed nonmonotonicity of B2 is compared with experiments. Implications for protein crystallization are discussed.

  13. Transparent Metal-Salt-Filled Polymeric Radiation Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David; Lennhoff, John; Harris, George

    2003-01-01

    "COR-RA" (colorless atomic oxygen resistant -- radiation shield) is the name of a transparent polymeric material filled with x-ray-absorbing salts of lead, bismuth, cesium, and thorium. COR-RA is suitable for use in shielding personnel against bremsstrahlung radiation from electron-beam welding and industrial and medical x-ray equipment. In comparison with lead-foil and leaded-glass shields that give equivalent protection against x-rays (see table), COR-RA shields are mechanically more durable. COR-RA absorbs not only x-rays but also neutrons and rays without adverse effects on optical or mechanical performance. The formulation of COR-RA with the most favorable mechanical-durability and optical properties contains 22 weight percent of bismuth to absorb x-rays, plus 45 atomic percent hydrogen for shielding against neutrons.

  14. Effects of ion exchange on stream solute fluxes in a basin receiving highway deicing salts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shanley, J.B.

    1994-01-01

    At Fever Brook, a 1260-ha forested basin in central Massachusetts, highway deicing salt application increased the solute flux in streamflow by 120% above background flux (equivalent basis) during a 2-yr period. Attempts to isolate the nonsalt component of stream solute fluxes have commonly subtracted salt contributions based on the net Cl flux (Cl output in streamflow minus Cl input in precipitation). In these studies, any net Na flux in excess of the amount needed to balance the net Cl flux has been attributed to weathering. At Fever Brook, however, the net output of Na was less than the net output of Cl, suggesting a loss of Na within the basin. The Na sink was inferred to be cation exchange of Na for Ca and Mg in the soil. A method was developed to quantify the exchange based on a Na budget, which included an independent estimate of the Na flux from weathering. The amount of exchange was apportioned to Ca and Mg based on their relative concentrations in the stream. The background fluxes of Ca and Mg (i.e., those that would occur in the absence of deicing salts) were calculated by subtracting the amounts from ion exchange plus the much smaller direct contributions in deicing salts from the observed fluxes. Ion exchange and direct salt contributions increased the net output fluxes of Ca and Mg, each by 44% above background. In basins that receive deicing salts, failure to account for cation exchange thus may result in an underestimate of the flux of Na from weathering and overestimates of the fluxes of Ca and Mg from weathering.

  15. Plutonium and americium separation from salts

    DOEpatents

    Hagan, Paul G.; Miner, Frend J.

    1976-01-01

    Salts or materials containing plutonium and americium are dissolved in hydrochloric acid, heated, and contacted with an alkali metal carbonate solution to precipitate plutonium and americium carbonates which are thereafter readily separable from the solution.

  16. Molecular thermodynamics for swelling of a mesoscopic ionomer gel in 1 : 1 salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Victorov, A; Radke, C; Prausnitz, J

    2006-01-14

    For a microphase-separated diblock copolymer ionic gel swollen in salt solution, a molecular-thermodynamic model is based on the self-consistent field theory in the limit of strongly segregated copolymer subchains. The geometry of microdomains is described using the Milner generic wedge construction neglecting the packing frustration. A geometry-dependent generalized analytical solution for the linearized Poisson-Boltzmann equation is obtained. This generalized solution not only reduces to those known previously for planar, cylindrical and spherical geometries, but is also applicable to saddle-like structures. Thermodynamic functions are expressed analytically for gels of lamellar, bicontinuous, cylindrical and spherical morphologies. Molecules are characterized by chain composition, length, rigidity, degree of ionization, and by effective polymer-polymer and polymer-solvent interaction parameters. The model predicts equilibrium solvent uptakes and the equilibrium microdomain spacing for gels swollen in salt solutions. Results are given for details of the gel structure: distribution of mobile ions and polymer segments, and the electric potential across microdomains. Apart from effects obtained by coupling the classical Flory-Rehner theory with Donnan equilibria, viz. increased swelling with polyelectrolyte charge and shrinking of gel upon addition of salt, the model predicts the effects of microphase morphology on swelling.

  17. Preparation and use of crystalline bis-monoorganic phosphonate and phosphate salts of tetravalent metals

    DOEpatents

    Maya, L.

    1980-06-26

    A method of preparing and using the crystalline organic derivatives of the tetravalent metal phosphates and phosphonates provides for the contacting of an aqueous solution of a metal nitrate, with a solution of an organophosphorus acid for a period of time at room temperature that is sufficient for the formation of a metal phosphate product, and thereafter recovering said product. According to the invention, the product of the disclosed process is used in effecting analytical separations, such as ion exchange and chromatography.

  18. Solution synthesis of mixed-metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and spray deposition of precursor films

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Douglas L.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.

    2000-01-01

    A colloidal suspension comprising metal chalcogenide nanoparticles and a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is made by reacting a metal salt with a chalcogenide salt in an organic solvent to precipitate a metal chalcogenide, recovering the metal chalcogenide, and admixing the metal chalcogenide with a volatile capping agent. The colloidal suspension is spray deposited onto a substrate to produce a semiconductor precursor film which is substantially free of impurities.

  19. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Paul A.; Stines, William B.

    1983-10-11

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300.degree. to 800.degree. C. is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  20. Method for improved decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    DOEpatents

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1981-01-21

    A method for co-conversion of aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates is described, wherein thermal decomposition within a temperature range of about 300 to 800/sup 0/C is carried out in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal.

  1. Electromarking solution

    DOEpatents

    Bullock, Jonathan S.; Harper, William L.; Peck, Charles G.

    1976-06-22

    This invention is directed to an aqueous halogen-free electromarking solution which possesses the capacity for marking a broad spectrum of metals and alloys selected from different classes. The aqueous solution comprises basically the nitrate salt of an amphoteric metal, a chelating agent, and a corrosion-inhibiting agent.

  2. Characterization of Swollen States of Polyelectrolyte Brushes in Salt Solution by Neutron Reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Mitamura, Koji; Terada, Masami; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Takahara, Atsushi

    2011-01-01

    Cationic and zwitterionic polyelectrolyte brushes on quartz substrate were synthesized by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)-ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (MTAC) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The effects of ionic strength on brush structure are investigated by neutron reflectivity (NR) in NaCl deuterium oxide (D2O) solutions. We observed that poly(MTAC) chains were drastically shrunk at concentrations above 0.1 M NaCl/D2O, which may be the change in charge-screening effect against ions on poly(MTAC). On the other hand, effect of salt concentration on a swollen state of poly(MPC) brush was negligible, even at the high concentration (5.0 M) close to saturation. The behaviour of poly(MPC) in salt aqueous solution is completely different from that of poly(MTAC), which may arise from the unique interaction properties, neutral nature, and hydrated water structure of phosphorylcholine units.

  3. Characterization of swollen structure of high-density polyelectrolyte brushes in salt solution by neutron reflectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Terayama, Yuki; Hino, Masahiro; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takahara, Atsushi

    2009-08-01

    Zwitterionic and cationic polyelectrolyte brushes on quartz substrate were prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyltrimethylammonium chloride (METAC), respectively. The effects of ionic strength on brush structure and surface properties of densely grafted polyelectrolyte brushes were analysed by neutron reflectivity (NR) measurements. NR at poly(METAC)/D2O and poly(MPC)/D2O interface revealed that the grafted polymer chains were fairly extended from the substrate surface, while the thickness reduction of poly(METAC) brush was observed in 5.6 M NaCl/D2O solution due to the screening of the repulsive interaction between polycations by hydrated salt ions. Interestingly, no structural change was observed in poly(MPC) brush even in a salt solution probably due to the unique interaction properties of phosphorylcholine units.

  4. Prediction of subsidence resulting from creep closure of solutioned-mined caverns in salt domes

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of subsidence rates over a range of areal configurations of solution-mined caverns in salt domes is possible, based on some fifty years of history in solution mining. Several approaches contribute to predictions: site-specific observations obtained from subsidence monitoring; numerical modeling, now becoming more practicable and credible; salt-creep data from testing; and rule-of-thumb methods, based on experience. All of these approaches contribute to understanding subsidence but none are totally reliable alone. The example of subsidence occurring at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites demonstrates several principles of cavern creep closure, the main cause of the subsidence, and shows that reliable projections of future subsidence are possible. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Condensation of semiflexible polyelectrolytes in mixed solutions of mono- and multivalent salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plunk, Amelia A.; Luijten, Erik

    2013-03-01

    The salt-dependent condensation of highly charged polyelectrolytes in aqueous solution is a topic of great biological and industrial importance that has been widely studied over the past decades. It is well established that interaction with multivalent counterions leads to the formation of bundle-like aggregates for rigid polyelectrolytes and to collapsed structures or disordered aggregates for flexible polyelectrolytes. Here, we investigate the behavior of semiflexible chain molecules, where the electrostatically induced aggregation is impeded by the intrinsic bending stiffness of the polymer. Moreover, we study the competition between monovalent and multivalent counterions in mixed solutions and establish the threshold salt concentration required for condensation. Our findings are relevant for a range of biomedical problems, including the fabrication of nanoparticles for gene delivery and the packaging of DNA by histones. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  6. Solution-derived sodalite made with Si- and Ge-ethoxide precursors for immobilizing electrorefiner salt

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Lepry, William C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

    2016-01-01

    Chlorosodalite has the general form of Na8(AlSiO4)6Cl2 and this paper describes experiments conducted to synthesize sodalite to immobilize a mixed chloride salt using solution-based techniques. Sodalites were made using different Group IV contributions from either Si(OC2H5)4 or Ge(OC2H5)4, NaAlO2, and a simulated spent electrorefiner salt solution containing a mixture of alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide chlorides. Additionally, 6 glass binders at low loadings of 5 mass% were evaluated as sintering aids for the consolidation process. The approach of using the organic Group IV additives can be used to produce large quantities of sodalite at room temperature and shows promise over a method where colloidal silica is used as the silica source. However, the small particle sizes inhibited densification during pressure-less sintering.

  7. Effect of salt solutions applied during wheat conditioning on lipase activity and lipid stability of whole wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Doblado-Maldonado, Andrés F; Arndt, Elizabeth A; Rose, Devin J

    2013-09-01

    Lipolytic activity in whole wheat flour (WWF) is largely responsible for the loss in baking quality during storage. Metal ions affect the activity of seed lipases; however, no previous studies have applied this information to WWF in a way that reduces lipase activity, is practical for commercial manufacture, and uses common food ingredients. NaCl, KCl, Ca-propionate, or FeNa-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeNa-EDTA) were applied to hard red winter (HRW) and hard white spring (HWS) wheats during conditioning as aqueous solutions at concentrations that would be acceptable in baked goods. Salts affected lipase activity to different degrees depending on the type of wheat used. Inhibition was greater in HRW compared with HWS WWF, probably due to higher lipase activity in HRW wheat. In HRW WWF, 1% NaCl (flour weight) reduced hydrolytic and oxidative rancidity and resulted in higher loaf volume and lower firmness than untreated WWF after 24 weeks of storage.

  8. Molten fluoride salts incorporation into pristine and ion-modified carbon allotropes and metallic foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vacík, J.; Hnatowicz, V.; Ĉervená, J.; Mach, R.; Peka, I.

    1999-01-01

    Incorporation of molten fluoride salts into different carbon allotropes (glassy carbon, pyrolytic graphite etc.) and metallic foils (Ni, Ti, etc.), pristine and ion- treated substances, has been studied using non-destructive, depth sensitive nuclear analytical methods—Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and Rutherford Backscattering (RBS). Strong interaction between the molten LiF and LiF+KF+NaF salts and the tested materials was found. The results are of great interest for accelerator driven transmutation technology (ADTT) which is a promising way towards effective liquidation of nuclear wastes.

  9. Investigation of the salting out of methane from aqueous electrolyte solutions using computer simulations.

    PubMed

    Docherty, H; Galindo, A; Sanz, E; Vega, C

    2007-08-02

    We calculate the excess chemical potential of methane in aqueous electrolyte solutions of NaCl using Monte Carlo computer simulations. In a recent work [Docherty et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 125, 074510], we presented a new potential model for methane in water which is capable of describing accurately the excess chemical potential of methane in pure water over a range of temperatures, a quantity that can be related to the solubility and which is commonly used to study the hydrophobic effect. Here, we use the same potential model for the water-methane interactions and investigate the effect of added salt on the chemical potential of methane in the solution. The methane molecules are modeled as single Lennard-Jones (LJ) interaction sites, and the water molecules are modeled with the TIP4P/2005 model. A correcting factor of chi = 1.07 for the energetic Berthelot (geometric) combining rule of the methane-water interaction is also used, which mimics the polarization of methane in water. We consider NaCl as the salt and treat the ions with the Smith and Dang model (i.e., as charged LJ interaction sites). Ion-water, ion-ion, and ion-methane interactions are treated using Lorentz-Berthelot combining rules. In addition, the Coulombic potential is used to model charge-charge interactions which are calculated using the Ewald sum. We have carried out isobaric-isothermal (NpT) simulations to determine the equilibrium densities of the solutions. The simulation data is in excellent agreement with experimental densities of aqueous NaCl solutions of different concentration. Hydration numbers are also obtained and found to be in agreement with reported data. Canonical (NVT) simulations at the averaged densities are then performed using the Widom test-particle insertion method to obtain the excess chemical potential of methane in the saline solutions. An increase in the chemical potential of methane, corresponding to a salting out effect, is observed when salt is added to the solution

  10. Inefficacy of osmotic backwash induced by sodium chloride salt solution in controlling SWRO membrane fouling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooque, A. Mohammed; Al-Jeshi, Subhi; Saeed, Mohamed O.; Alreweli, Ali

    2014-12-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of osmotic backwash induced by high salt (NaCl) concentration solution on feed side of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) membranes, online and offline, in controlling membrane fouling and therefore minimizing/eliminating the need for chemical cleaning. SWRO membranes were deliberately fouled by feeding seawater from an open intake located on the Arabian Gulf Coast without dosing chemicals. The fouled membranes were subjected to offline cleaning with the salt solution of up to 25 % concentration. Despite the partial removal of foulants from the membrane surface, SWRO membrane performance could not be restored, indicating the ineffectiveness of osmotic backwash in aiding offline salt cleaning. Similarly, online osmotic backwash was found to be not only ineffective in removing foulants from membrane surfaces but actually increased the fouling rate, as indicated by faster fouling rates compared to other cases. Although the driving force required for the osmotic backwash existed, the generated back flow proved to be insufficient to detach foulants from membrane surfaces. During the study period, the average SWRO membrane flux was maintained between 19 and 23 LMH, whereas the average generated back flow flux by high salt concentration solution was only 11 LMH, which was not adequate to remove foulants from membrane surfaces. Moreover, it seems that the membrane configuration as well as inherent microstructure of SWRO membrane places certain constraints on the osmotic backwash process and renders osmotic backwash ineffective in tackling SWRO membrane fouling. Hence, chemical cleaning is essential to restore SWRO membrane performance whenever fouling occurs, and the use of highly concentrated salt solution does not have any significant benefit. Membrane autopsy revealed only an insignificant accumulation of biofouling layer despite the absence of disinfection. However, it was shown that culturable biofilm bacteria species

  11. Silica precipitation in acidic solutions: mechanism, pH effect, and salt effect.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Elizabeth A; Wongthahan, Pattanapong; Raha, Sasanka; Fogler, H Scott

    2010-07-06

    This study is the first to show that silica precipitation under very acidic conditions ([HCl] = 2-8 M) proceeds through two distinct steps. First, the monomeric form of silica is quickly depleted from solution as it polymerizes to form primary particles approximately 5 nm in diameter. Second, the primary particles formed then flocculate. A modified Smoluchowski equation that incorporates a geometric population balance accurately describes the exponential growth of silica flocs. Variation of the HCl concentration between 2 and 8 M further showed that polymerization to form primary particles and subsequent particle flocculation become exponentially faster with increasing acid concentration. The effect of salt was also studied by adding 1 M chloride salts to the solutions; it was found that salts accelerated both particle formation and growth rates in the order: AlCl(3) > CaCl(2) > MgCl(2) > NaCl > CsCl > no salt. It was also found that ionic strength, over cation identity, determines silica polymerization and particle flocculation rates. This research reveals that precipitation of silica products from acid dissolution of minerals can be studied apart from the mineral dissolution process. Thus, silica product precipitation from mineral acidization follows a two-step process--formation of 5 nm primary particles followed by particle flocculation--which becomes exponentially faster with increasing HCl concentration and with salts accelerating the process in the above order. This result has implications for any study of acid dissolution of aluminosilicate or silicate material. In particular, the findings are applicable to the process of acidizing oil-containing rock formations, a common practice of the petroleum industry where silica dissolution products encounter a low-pH, salty environment within the oil well.

  12. Spectrophotometric investigation of reaction of uranyl salts with neutral organophosphorus compounds in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Takshin, V.V.; Khokhlova, N.L.

    1985-07-01

    The authors study the reaction of uranyl salts with neutral organophosphorous compounds in aqueous solutions of mineral acids. They show that compounds of the R /SUB n/ P(O)-(OR) /SUB 3-n/ type (n = 0, 1, 2, 3; R = CH/sub 3/, C/sub 2/H/sub 5/) do not form complexes with UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/. In perchlorate solutions U/sub 2//sup 2 +/ forms complex with ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ N)/sub 3/ PO. The equilibrium constant of this reaction is 6.4 + or - 0.6 mole/sup -1/. liter at 298 degrees K.

  13. Ice crystallization in ultrafine water-salt aerosols: nucleation, ice-solution equilibrium, and internal structure.

    PubMed

    Hudait, Arpa; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-06-04

    Atmospheric aerosols have a strong influence on Earth's climate. Elucidating the physical state and internal structure of atmospheric aqueous aerosols is essential to predict their gas and water uptake, and the locus and rate of atmospherically important heterogeneous reactions. Ultrafine aerosols with sizes between 3 and 15 nm have been detected in large numbers in the troposphere and tropopause. Nanoscopic aerosols arising from bubble bursting of natural and artificial seawater have been identified in laboratory and field experiments. The internal structure and phase state of these aerosols, however, cannot yet be determined in experiments. Here we use molecular simulations to investigate the phase behavior and internal structure of liquid, vitrified, and crystallized water-salt ultrafine aerosols with radii from 2.5 to 9.5 nm and with up to 10% moles of ions. We find that both ice crystallization and vitrification of the nanodroplets lead to demixing of pure water from the solutions. Vitrification of aqueous nanodroplets yields nanodomains of pure low-density amorphous ice in coexistence with vitrified solute rich aqueous glass. The melting temperature of ice in the aerosols decreases monotonically with an increase of solute fraction and decrease of radius. The simulations reveal that nucleation of ice occurs homogeneously at the subsurface of the water-salt nanoparticles. Subsequent ice growth yields phase-segregated, internally mixed, aerosols with two phases in equilibrium: a concentrated water-salt amorphous mixture and a spherical cap-like ice nanophase. The surface of the crystallized aerosols is heterogeneous, with ice and solution exposed to the vapor. Free energy calculations indicate that as the concentration of salt in the particles, the advance of the crystallization, or the size of the particles increase, the stability of the spherical cap structure increases with respect to the alternative structure in which a core of ice is fully surrounded by

  14. An empirical correlation between the enthalpy of solution of aqueous salts and their ability to form hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pandelov, S.; Werhahn, Jasper C.; Pilles, Bert M.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Iglev, H.

    2010-09-30

    The ability of aqueous salt solutions to form hydrates by cooling them at ambient pressure is probed by infrared (IR) spectroscopy by examining the structure of the spectra in the hydrogen-bonding region (3,000 - 3,800 cm-1). A collection of 75 organic and inorganic salts in saturated solutions are examined. We have found a correlation between the enthalpy of solution of the salt and its ability to form a hydrate, namely that the salt’s enthalpy of solution is lower than the standard enthalpy of fusion of ice (6 kJ/mol). This observation can serve as an empirical rule that determines whether a salt will form a hydrate upon cooling from its aqueous solution.

  15. Aqueous Biphasic Systems Based on Salting-Out Polyethylene Glycol or Ionic Solutions: Strategies for Actinide or Fission Product Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Robin D.; Gutowski, Keith E.; Griffin, Scott T.; Holbrey, John D.

    2004-03-29

    Aqueous biphasic systems can be formed by salting-out (with kosmotropic, waterstructuring salts) water soluble polymers (e.g., polyethylene glycol) or aqueous solutions of a wide range of hydrophilic ionic liquids based on imidazolium, pyridinium, phosphonium and ammonium cations. The use of these novel liquid/liquid biphases for separation of actinides or other fission products associated with nuclear wastes (e.g., pertechnetate salts) has been demonstrated and will be described in this presentation.

  16. Hexahalorhenate(iv) salts of metal oxazolidine nitroxides.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anders H; Geoghegan, Blaise L; Nichol, Gary S; Lupton, David W; Murray, Keith S; Martínez-Lillo, José; Gass, Ian A; Brechin, Euan K

    2017-04-04

    Eight coordination compounds of formulae [Fe(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Cl6] (1a), [Fe(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Br6] (1b), [Co(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Cl6]·CH3CN (2a), [Co(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Br6] (2b), [Ni(II)(L˙)(CH3CN)3][Re(IV)Cl6]·CH3CN (3a), [Ni(II)(L˙)(CH3CN)3][Re(IV)Br6]·3CH3CN (3b), [Cu(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Cl6] (4a) and [Cu(II)(L˙)2][Re(IV)Br6] (4b), where L˙ is the aminoxyl radical chelating ligand, 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-di(2-pyridyl)oxazolidine-N-oxide, have been synthesised. Structural and magnetic studies reveal metal-radical intramolecular antiferromagnetic interactions in the [M(II)(L˙)2](2+) cations in the iron, cobalt and copper based compounds (1a, 1b, 2a, 2b, 4a and 4b) with the central metal ion low-spin in the case of iron (1a and 1b) and a gradual, cobalt based, spin-crossover transition present in 2a and 2b. The nickel based compounds, 3a and 3b, were analysed in the dried form (3a(dried) and 3b(dried)) and directly in acetonitrile (3a(solvated) and 3b(solvated)). Microanalysis and IR spectroscopy on 3a(dried) and 3b(dried) suggest that the dried samples are best formulated as [Ni(II)(L˙)(H2O)3][Re(IV)X6], where X = Cl (3a(dried)) and Br (3b(dried)). All forms of 3a and 3b exhibit cationic metal-radical ferromagnetic interactions resulting in S = 3/2 ground states. In addition, 3a(dried) exhibits spin-canting behaviour with an ordering temperature of 2.7 K, an open hysteresis loop with a coercive field Hc = 580 Oe, and a remanent magnetisation Mr = 0.21μB, resulting in a canting angle of ∼1.8°. In contrast, 3b(dried) shows no spin-canting behaviour; a maximum in χMvs. T at T = 3 K suggesting long-range antiferromagnetic ordering. 3a(solvated) and 3b(solvated) show no indication of long-range magnetic ordering, unlike 4a and 4b where anomalies are evident in the low-temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements.

  17. Nanoporous thin films from nanophase-separated hybrids of block copolymer/metal salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sageshima, Yoshio; Noro, Atsushi; Matsushita, Yushu

    2013-03-01

    Block copolymers self-assemble into periodic nanostructures, i.e. nanophase-separated structures, which can be scaffolds for nano-applications such as nanoporous membranes, nanolithographic masks, photonic crystals, etc. In this study, we report facile preparation to achieve nanoporous thin films from nanophase-separated hybrids comprising polystyrene- b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-P4VP, Mn = 54k, PDI =1.13, fs = 0.61) and water-soluble iron(III) chloride (FeCl3) , where FeCl3 are incorporated into a P4VP phase via metal-to-ligand coordination. To obtain a nanoporous film, firstly a hybrid thin film was prepared by microtoming. Then, the film was immersed into water to remove metal salts, this simple procedure can produce nanoporous thin film. Morphological observations were conducted by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ordered cylindrical nanopores were observed in the thin film of the water-immersed hybrid, which originally presents cylindrical nanodomains. The nanoporous film was modified by loading another metal salt, samarium(III) nitrate, into nanopores via coordination between the metal salt and P4VP tethered to the pore walls. The structure of the sample after modification was evaluated by TEM and an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  18. Rheological properties and thickening mechanism of aqueous diutan gum solution: Effects of temperature and salts.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Gong, Houjian; Dong, Mingzhe; Li, Yajun

    2015-11-05

    Rheological properties of a new microbial polysaccharide, diutan gum in aqueous solution have been systematically investigated. It is found that molecular aggregates of diutan gum can be formed at a very low concentration (0.12 g/L), and the mechanism of thickening by diutan gum is proposed. The viscosity retention rate of diutan gum changes little when increasing the temperature from 298 K to 348 K or in a high salinity solution (55.5 g L(-1)). Gel structure can be formed in the diutan gum solution, owing to the finding that the dynamic modulus has an exponential relationship with the concentration. The gel properties of diutan gum are not sensitive to temperature, and are virtually independent of cationic environment (Na(+) and Ca(2+)). The temperature/salt tolerance of the diutan gum solution is mainly attributed to its perfect double helix molecular conformation, the location of the side chains of its molecules, and its water retention capacity.

  19. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, V.A.; von Winbush, S.

    1987-05-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500/degree/C, electrolysis at a voltage not more negative that about /minus/1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  20. Molten salt extraction process for the recovery of valued transition metals from land-based and deep-sea minerals

    DOEpatents

    Maroni, Victor A.; von Winbush, Samuel

    1988-01-01

    A process for extracting transition metals and particularly cobalt and manganese together with iron, copper and nickel from low grade ores (including ocean-floor nodules) by converting the metal oxides or other compositions to chlorides in a molten salt, and subsequently using a combination of selective distillation at temperatures below about 500.degree. C., electrolysis at a voltage not more negative than about -1.5 volt versus Ag/AgCl, and precipitation to separate the desired manganese and cobalt salts from other metals and provide cobalt and manganese in metallic forms or compositions from which these metals may be more easily recovered.

  1. Adding salt to a surfactant solution: Linear rheological response of the resulting morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudino, Danila; Pasquino, Rossana Grizzuti, Nino

    2015-11-15

    The micellar system composed of Cetylpyridinium Chloride-Sodium Salicylate (CPyCl-NaSal) in brine aqueous solutions has been studied by systematically changing the salt concentration, in order to investigate the rheology of the arising morphologies. In particular, the zero-shear viscosity and the linear viscoelastic response have been measured as a function of the NaSal concentration (with [CPyCl] = 100 mM). The Newtonian viscosity shows a nonmonotonic dependence upon concentration, passing through a maximum at NaSal/CPyCl ≈ 0.6, and eventually dropping at higher salt concentrations. The progressive addition of salt determines first a transition from a Newtonian to a purely Maxwell-like behavior as the length of the micelles significantly increases. Beyond the peak viscosity, the viscoelastic data show two distinct features. On the one hand, the main relaxation time of the system strongly decreases, while the plateau modulus remains essentially constant. Calculations based on the rheological data show that, as the binding salt concentration increases, there is a decrease in micelles breaking rate and a decrease in their average length. On the other hand, in the same concentration region, a low-frequency elastic plateau is measured. Such a plateau is considered as the signature of a tenuous, but persistent branched network, whose existence is confirmed by cryo-transmission electron microscopy images.

  2. DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL USING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS CONTAINING POTASSIUM FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rudisill, T.; Crowder, M.; Bronikowski, M.

    2007-10-15

    The deinventory and deactivation of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) FB-Line facility required the disposition of approximately 2000 items from the facility's vaults. Plutonium (Pu) scraps and residues which do not meet criteria for conversion to a mixed oxide fuel will be dissolved and the solution stored for subsequent disposition. Some of the items scheduled for dissolution are composite materials containing Pu and tantalum (Ta) metals. The preferred approach for handling this material is to dissolve the Pu metal, rinse the Ta metal with water to remove residual acid, and burn the Ta metal. The use of a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) was initially recommended for the dissolution of approximately 500 g of Pu metal. However, prior to the use of the flowsheet in the SRS facility, a new processing plan was proposed in which the feed to the dissolver could contain up to 1250 g of Pu metal. To evaluate the use of a larger batch size and subsequent issues associated with the precipitation of plutonium-containing solids from the dissolving solution, scaled experiments were performed using Pu metal and samples of the composite material. In the initial experiment, incomplete dissolution of a Pu metal sample demonstrated that a 1250 g batch size was not feasible in the HB-Line dissolver. Approximately 45% of the Pu was solubilized in 4 h. The remaining Pu metal was converted to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Based on this work, the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal using a 4-6 h cycle time was recommended for the HB-Line facility. Three dissolution experiments were subsequently performed using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material to demonstrate conditions which reduced the risk of precipitating a double fluoride salt containing Pu and K from the dissolving solution. In these experiments, the KF concentration was reduced from 0.2 M to either 0.15 or 0.175 M. With the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} and a reduction in the KF

  3. Analytical Results from Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) Samples HTF-16-6 and HTF-16-40

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.

    2016-09-23

    Two samples from the Salt Solution Feed Tank (SSFT) were analyzed by SRNL, HTF-16-6 and HTF-16-40. Multiple analyses of these samples indicate a general composition almost identical to that of the Salt Batch 8-B feed and the Tank 21H sample results.

  4. Effects of Salts and Metal Oxides on Electrochemical and Optical Properties of Streptococcus mutans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Nagame, Seigo; Kambara, Masaki; Yoshino, Katsumi

    1994-10-01

    The effects of calcium salts and metal oxide powders on electrochemical, optical and biological properties of Streptococcus mutans have been studied as a novel method to determine the strain. Electrochemical signals of Streptococcus mutans show remarkable decrease in the presence of saturated calcium salts such as CaHPO4, Ca3(PO4)2, and Ca5(PO4)3OH depending on the strains of Streptococcus mutans: Ingbritt, NCTC-10449, or GS-5. The number of viable cells also decreases upon addition of these powders. The effects of metal oxides such as ZnO and BaTiO3 on the electrochemical characteristics and photoluminescence of Streptococcus mutans have also been studied.

  5. [Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Konotop, Ie O; Kovalenko, M S; Ulynets', V Z; Meleshko, A O; Batsmanova, L M; Taran, N Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles (Ag, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn) has been investigated using a standard Allium cepa (L.) test system. Toxicity of experimental solutions at the organism level was evaluated in terms of biomass growth of onion roots, and cytotoxicity was estimated by the mitotic index of root meristem cells. The colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Allium cepa (L.) roots due to their ability to penetrate into cells and interact with their components, and thus to inhibit mitosis. According to our results cytotoxicity of test solutions decreases in the following order: Cu > or = Zn > Ag > or = Fe. Solution of Mn-containing nanoparticles revealed physiological activity according to root growth reaction.

  6. Molecular Thermodynamics for Swelling of a Mesoscopic Ionomer Gelin 1:1 Salt Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Victorov, Alexey; Radke, Clayton; Prausnitz,John

    2005-06-15

    For a microphase-separated diblock copolymer ionic gel swollen in salt solution, a molecular-thermodynamic model is based on the self-consistent field theory in the limit of strongly segregated copolymer subchains. The geometry of microdomains is described using the Milner generic wedge construction neglecting the packing frustration. Thermodynamic functions are expressed analytically for gels of lamellar, bicontinuous, cylindrical and spherical morphologies. Molecules are characterized by chain composition, length, rigidity, degree of ionization, and by effective polymer-polymer and polymer-solvent interaction parameters. The model predicts equilibrium solvent uptakes and the equilibrium microdomain spacing for gels swollen in salt solutions. Results are given for details of the gel structure: distribution of mobile ions and polymer segments, and the electric potential across microdomains. Apart from effects obtained by coupling classical Flory-Rehner theory with Donnan equilibria, viz., increased swelling with polyelectrolyte charge and shrinking of gel upon addition of salt, the model predicts the effects of microphase morphology on swelling.

  7. Viscosity-Reducing Bulky-Salt Excipients Prevent Gelation of Protein, but Not Carbohydrate, Solutions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Awanish; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2017-01-23

    The problem of gelation of concentrated protein solutions, which poses challenges for both downstream protein processing and liquid formulations of pharmaceutical proteins, is addressed herein by employing previously discovered viscosity-lowering bulky salts. Procainamide-HCl and the salt of camphor-10-sulfonic acid with L-arginine (CSA-Arg) greatly retard gelation upon heating and subsequent cooling of the model proteins gelatin and casein in water: Whereas in the absence of additives the proteins form aqueous gels within several hours at room temperature, procainamide-HCl for both proteins and also CSA-Arg for casein prevent gel formation for months under the same conditions. The inhibition of gelation by CSA-Arg stems exclusively from the CSA moiety: CSA-Na was as effective as CSA-Arg, while Arg-HCl was marginally or not effective. The tested bulky salts did not inhibit (and indeed accelerated) temperature-induced gel formation in aqueous solutions of all examined carbohydrates-starch, agarose, alginate, gellan gum, and carrageenan.

  8. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  9. Molecular dynamics study of salt–solution interface: Solubility and surface charge of salt in water

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kazuya; Liang, Yunfeng E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Matsuoka, Toshifumi E-mail: matsuoka@earth.kumst.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sakka, Tetsuo

    2014-04-14

    The NaCl salt–solution interface often serves as an example of an uncharged surface. However, recent laser-Doppler electrophoresis has shown some evidence that the NaCl crystal is positively charged in its saturated solution. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we have investigated the NaCl salt–solution interface system, and calculated the solubility of the salt using the direct method and free energy calculations, which are kinetic and thermodynamic approaches, respectively. The direct method calculation uses a salt–solution combined system. When the system is equilibrated, the concentration in the solution area is the solubility. In the free energy calculation, we separately calculate the chemical potential of NaCl in two systems, the solid and the solution, using thermodynamic integration with MD simulations. When the chemical potential of NaCl in the solution phase is equal to the chemical potential of the solid phase, the concentration of the solution system is the solubility. The advantage of using two different methods is that the computational methods can be mutually verified. We found that a relatively good estimate of the solubility of the system can be obtained through comparison of the two methods. Furthermore, we found using microsecond time-scale MD simulations that the positively charged NaCl surface was induced by a combination of a sodium-rich surface and the orientation of the interfacial water molecules.

  10. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Skornik, W.A.; Brain, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (/sup 198/Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC/sub 50/) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m/sup 3/), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m/sup 3/), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m/sup 3/), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m/sup 3/ cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m/sup 3/ ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC/sub 50/ values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  11. Relative toxicity of inhaled metal sulfate salts for pulmonary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Skornik, W A; Brain, J D

    1983-08-01

    The effects of metal sulfate aerosols on respiratory defense mechanisms in hamsters were studied. Pulmonary macrophage phagocytic rates were measured by determining the in vivo uptake of radioactive colloidal gold (198Au) 1, 24, or 48 h after a single 4-h exposure. The concentrations of sulfate aerosols causing a 50% inhibition in pulmonary macrophage endocytosis (EC50) were determined. When hamsters were exposed for 4 h to cupric sulfate (greater than or equal to 4.8 mg/m3), zinc sulfate (greater than or equal to 3.1 mg/m3), ferric sulfate (greater than or equal to 7.8 mg/m3), or zinc ammonium sulfate (greater than or equal to 10.0 mg/m3), macrophage endocytosis was significantly reduced 1 h after exposure compared with that in unexposed control animals. Although the response was variable, 24 h after exposures to the higher sulfate concentrations the percent of gold ingested by pulmonary macrophages remained depressed. By 48 h, the rate of macrophage endocytosis in hamsters had returned to normal control values except in hamsters exposed to 4.8 mg/m3 cupric sulfate or 9.8 mg/m3 ferric sulfate. These hamsters showed significant increases in phagocytosis. The EC50 values in milligrams of sulfate per cubic meter for cupric sulfate, zinc sulfate, ferric sulfate, and zinc ammonium sulfate were 2.7, 4.5, 7.5, and 17.9, respectively. These results are negatively correlated with the ranking of sulfates using the criteria of relative irritant potency, as measured by increases in pulmonary flow resistance. Thus, rankings of related chemical structures are not absolute. Their relative toxicities vary depending on the end point selected.

  12. A new procedure to measure effective molecular diffusion coefficients of salts solutions in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado, J. M. P. Q.

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this work is to present a mathematical and experimental formulation of a new simple procedure for the measurement of effective molecular diffusion coefficients of a salt solution in a water-saturated building material. This innovate experimental procedure and mathematical formulation is presented in detail and experimental values of "effective" molecular diffusion coefficient of sodium chloride in a concrete sample ( w/ c = 0.45), at five different temperatures (between 10 and 30 °C) and four different initial NaCl concentrations (between 0.1 and 0.5 M), are reported. The experimental results obtained are in good agreement with the theoretical and experimental values of molecular diffusion coefficient presented in literature. An empirical correlation is presented for the prediction of "effective" molecular diffusion coefficient over the entire range of temperatures and initial salt concentrations studied.

  13. Phase behavior of concentrated hydroxypropyl methylcellulose solution in the presence of mono and divalent salt.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Nalinda; Rakesh, Leela; Zhao, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Thermo reversible sol-gel transitions of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) are critical for many pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food applications. This study examined the effects of salt (NaCl and CaCl₂) on the viscoelastic properties of concentrated low molecular weight HPMC solutions and found that the gelation temperature decreased linearly as a function of salt concentrations, independent of valency of cations and the mole concentration of anions. Thermal analysis showed that the depression of melting temperature can be fitted for both NaCl and CaCl₂ as a function of the total number of ions by a single linear curve, which was consistent with the melting point depression of pure water by NaCl and CaCl₂, but with a higher linear slope.

  14. The microscopic and ultramicroscopic changes in the skeletal muscles, caused by heavy metal salts

    PubMed Central

    Tymoshenko, Alexey; Tkach, Gennadii; Sikora, Vitalii; Bumeister, Valentina; Shpetnyi, Ihor; Lyndin, Mykola; Maksymova, Olena; Maslenko, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The article is devoted to study the structural changes in the skeletal muscles caused by heavy metal salts. Materials and methods The study was conducted on 72 mature male rats. The experimental groups were given to drink water with combinations of heavy metal salts for one, two and three months. This type of water is typical for the water basins in the northern districts of the Sumy region. The study of morphological changes in the striated muscles was concluded using light and scanning electron microscopy. Results The data analysis revealed that a prolonged duration of negative factor could intensify sclerotic and edematous processes. The structure of muscle fibers was destroyed, nuclei were deformed and placed irregularly, and many petechial hemorrhages occurred. Besides, cross-striation was irregular, I and A bands were deformed and destroyed, H band was hardly visualized. The inner mitochondrial membrane and cristae become deformed. The symplastic nuclei were placed irregularly within sarcoplasm. Besides, they were swollen. Against swollen and enlarged symplastic nuclei, pyknotic nuclei were also found. The structures of sarcoplasmic reticulum were mainly dilated with deformed and ruptured areas. Conclusion Our study approves that high concentrations of heavy metal salts have a destructive influence on the skeletal striated muscles. PMID:28386464

  15. Acute tellurium toxicity from ingestion of metal-oxidizing solutions.

    PubMed

    Yarema, Mark C; Curry, Steven C

    2005-08-01

    Tellurium is an element used in the vulcanization of rubber and in metal-oxidizing solutions to blacken or tarnish metals. Descriptions of human toxicity from tellurium ingestion are rare. We report the clinical course of 2 children who ingested metal-oxidizing solutions containing substantial concentrations of tellurium. Clinical features included vomiting, black discoloration of the oral mucosa, and a garlic odor to the breath. One patient developed corrosive injury to the esophagus secondary to the high concentration of hydrochloric acid in the solution. Both patients recovered without serious sequelae, which is typical of tellurium toxicity. An awareness of situations in which children may be exposed to tellurium and its clinical presentation may assist clinicians in the diagnosis of this rare poisoning.

  16. Ionic conductivity of dual-phase polymer electrolytes comprised of NBR/SBR latex films swollen with lithium salt solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Morihiko; Ichino, Toshihiro; Rutt, J.S.; Nishi, Shiro . NTT Interdisciplinary Research Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    Dual-phase polymer electrolytes (DPE) with high ionic conductivity and good mechanical strength were prepared by swelling poly(acrylonitrile-co-butadiene) rubber (NBR) and poly(styrene-co-butadiene) rubber (SBR) mixed latex films with lithium salt solutions (e.g., 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-butyrolactone). The latex films retain particle morphology in the solid state. The NBR phase (formed from fused NBR latex particles) is polar and is impregnated selectively with polar lithium salt solutions, yielding ion-conductive channels, whereas the SBR phase (formed from fused SBR latex particles) is nonpolar and is not impregnated, providing a mechanically supportive matrix. The ionic conductivity of the DPE increased dramatically with increasing content of lithium salt solution, and higher amounts of solution were imbibed with increasing content of NBR relative to SBR. Several factors which affect the ionic conductivity of this system were examined, and the highest ionic conductivity (>10[sup [minus]3] S/cm) was obtained when either an NBR/SBR 70/30 (w/w) or a 50/50 (w/w) latex film was saturated with 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL solution or 1M LiClO[sub 4]/[gamma]-BL/DME solution. Ion-conductive behavior changed critically with increasing lithium salt solution uptake. At low levels of lithium salt solution uptake, evidence suggested that ionic conductivity of the absorbed lithium salt solution was strongly influenced by the presence of the NBR in the ion-conductive channel, but at higher levels, the effects of the NBR were reduced and free'' lithium salt solution was present.

  17. Photochromism of a spiropyran and a diarylethene in bile salt aggregates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Santos, Cerize S; Miller, Allyson C; Pace, Tamara C S; Morimitsu, Kentaro; Bohne, Cornelia

    2014-09-30

    Bile salt aggregates incorporate aqueous-insoluble photochromic compounds. The photochromism of a spiropyran (1, 1',3',3'-trimethyl-6-nitrospiro[2H-1]-benzopyran-2,2'-indoline) and a diarylethene derivative (2, 1,2-bis(2,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-3-thienyl)-3,3,4,4,5,5-hexafluoro-1-cyclopentene) was quantified in different bile salt aggregates. These aggregates act as efficient hosts to solubilize aqueous insoluble photochromic compounds where either both isomers are nonpolar, for example, 2, or compounds where one isomer is hydrophobic and the other is more polar, for example, 1. Methodology was developed to determine molar absorptivity coefficients for solutions containing both isomers and to determine the photoconversion quantum yields under continuous irradiation. The methods were validated by determining parameters in homogeneous solution, which were the same as previously reported. In the case of the colored isomer of 1, the molar extinction coefficient in ethanol at 537 nm ((3.68 ± 0.03) × 10(4) cm(-1) M(-1)) was determined with higher precision. The quantum yields for the photoconversion between the isomers of 2 were shown to be the same in cyclohexane and in the aggregates of sodium cholate (NaCh), deoxycholate (NaDC), and taurocholate (NaTC), showing that bile salt aggregates are not sufficiently rigid to affect the equilibrium between the two possible conformers of the colorless form. In contrast, for 1 the quantum yields for the conversion from the colorless to the colored isomer were higher in bile salts than in ethanol, and the quantum yield was highest in the more hydrophobic aggregates of NaDC, followed by NaCh and then NaTC. The structure of the bile salt had no effect on the quantum yield for the conversion of the colored to the colorless isomer of 1, but these values were higher than in ethanol. For all three bile salts, the absorption maximum for the colored form of 1 suggested that this isomer was located in an environment that is more polar than

  18. Solution processed metal oxide thin film hole transport layers for high performance organic solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Steirer, K. Xerxes; Berry, Joseph J.; Chesin, Jordan P.; Lloyd, Matthew T.; Widjonarko, Nicodemus Edwin; Miedaner, Alexander; Curtis, Calvin J.; Ginley, David S.; Olson, Dana C.

    2017-01-10

    A method for the application of solution processed metal oxide hole transport layers in organic photovoltaic devices and related organic electronics devices is disclosed. The metal oxide may be derived from a metal-organic precursor enabling solution processing of an amorphous, p-type metal oxide. An organic photovoltaic device having solution processed, metal oxide, thin-film hole transport layer.

  19. RESULTS OF ANALYSES OF MACROBATCH 3 DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION (DSS) COALESCER AND PRE-FILTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fondeur, F.; Fink, S.

    2012-06-13

    SRNL analyzed the pre-filter and Decontamination Salt Solution (DSS) coalescer from MCU by several analytical methods. The results of these analyses indicate that overall there is light to moderate solids fouling of both the coalescer and pre-filter elements. The majority of the solids contain aluminum, sodium, silicon, and titanium, in oxide and/or hydroxide forms that we have noted before. The titanium is presumably precipitated from leached, dissolved monosodium titanate (MST) or fines from MST at ARP, and the quantity we find is significantly greater than in the past. A parallel report discusses potential causes for the increased leaching rate of MST, showing that increases in free hydroxide concentration of the feed solutions and of chemical cleaning solutions lead to faster leaching of titanium.

  20. Faraday Discussion 160 Introductory Lecture: Interpreting and Predicting Hofmeister Salt Ion and Solute Effects on Biopolymer and Model Processes Using the Solute Partitioning Model

    PubMed Central

    Record, M. Thomas; Guinn, Emily; Pegram, Laurel; Capp, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how Hofmeister salt ions and other solutes interact with proteins, nucleic acids, other biopolymers and water and thereby affect protein and nucleic acid processes as well as model processes (e.g solubility of model compounds) in aqueous solution is a longstanding goal of biophysical research. Empirical Hofmeister salt and solute “m-values” (derivatives of the observed standard free energy change for a model or biopolymer process with respect to solute or salt concentration m3) are equal to differences in chemical potential derivatives: m-value = Δ(dμ2/dm3) = Δμ23 which quantify the preferential interactions of the solute or salt with the surface of the biopolymer or model system (component 2) exposed or buried in the process. Using the SPM, we dissect μ23 values for interactions of a solute or Hofmeister salt with a set of model compounds displaying the key functional groups of biopolymers to obtain interaction potentials (called α-values) that quantify the interaction of the solute or salt per unit area of each functional group or type of surface. Interpreted using the SPM, these α-values provide quantitative information about both the hydration of functional groups and the competitive interaction of water and the solute or salt with functional groups. The analysis corroborates and quantifies previous proposals that the Hofmeister anion and cation series for biopolymer processes are determined by ion-specific, mostly unfavorable interactions with hydrocarbon surfaces; the balance between these unfavorable nonpolar interactions and often-favorable interactions of ions with polar functional groups determine the series null points. The placement of urea and glycine betaine (GB) at opposite ends of the corresponding series of nonelectrolytes results from the favorable interactions of urea, and unfavorable interactions of GB, with many (but not all) biopolymer functional groups. Interaction potentials and local-bulk partition coefficients

  1. Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

    2012-04-01

    This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was

  2. Solution synthesis of metal oxides for electrochemical energy storage applications.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xinhui; Zhang, Yongqi; Chao, Dongliang; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yijun; Li, Lu; Ge, Xiang; Bacho, Ignacio Mínguez; Tu, Jiangping; Fan, Hong Jin

    2014-05-21

    This article provides an overview of solution-based methods for the controllable synthesis of metal oxides and their applications for electrochemical energy storage. Typical solution synthesis strategies are summarized and the detailed chemical reactions are elaborated for several common nanostructured transition metal oxides and their composites. The merits and demerits of these synthesis methods and some important considerations are discussed in association with their electrochemical performance. We also propose the basic guideline for designing advanced nanostructure electrode materials, and the future research trend in the development of high power and energy density electrochemical energy storage devices.

  3. Metal ion removal from aqueous solution using physic seed hull.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Masita; Maitra, Saikat; Ahmad, Naveed; Bustam, Azmi; Sen, T K; Dutta, Binay K

    2010-07-15

    The potential of physic seed hull (PSH), Jantropha curcas L. as an adsorbent for the removal of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) metal ions from aqueous solution has been investigated. It has been found that the amount of adsorption for both Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) increased with the increase in initial metal ions concentration, contact time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and the solution pH (in acidic range), but decreased with the increase in the particle size of the adsorbent. The adsorption process for both metal ions on PSH consists of three stages-a rapid initial adsorption followed by a period of slower uptake of metal ions and virtually no uptake at the final stage. The kinetics of metal ions adsorption on PSH followed a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted in the three adsorption isotherms-Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms. The data best fit in the Langmuir isotherm indication monolayer chemisorption of the metal ions. The adsorption capacity of PSH for both Zn(2+) and Cd(2+) was found to be comparable with other available adsorbents. About 36-47% of the adsorbed metal could be leached out of the loaded PSH using 0.1M HCl as the eluting medium.

  4. Aggregate transitions in aqueous solutions of sodium dodecylsulfate with a "gemini-type" organic salt.

    PubMed

    Yu, Defeng; Tian, Maozhang; Fan, Yaxun; Ji, Gang; Wang, Yilin

    2012-06-07

    Effects of a "gemini-type" organic salt 1,2-bis(2-benzylammoniumethoxy) ethane dichloride (BEO) on the aggregation behavior of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) have been investigated by turbidity, surface tension, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, dynamic light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and differential scanning microcalorimetry. The aggregation behavior of the SDS/BEO mixed aqueous solution shows strong concentration and ratio dependence. For the SDS/BEO solution with a molar ratio of 5:1, large loose irregular aggregates, vesicles, and long thread-like micelles are formed in succession with the increase of the total SDS and BEO concentration. Because BEO has two positive charges, the SDS/BEO solution may consist of the (SDS)(2)-BEO gemini-type complex, the SDS-BEO complex and extra SDS. The aggregation ability and surface activity of the SDS/BEO mixture exhibit the characteristics of gemini-type surfactants. Along with the results of DSC and (1)H NMR, the (SDS)(2)-BEO gemini-type structure is confirmed to exist in the system. This work provides an approach to construct the surfactant systems with the characteristics of gemini surfactants through intermolecular interaction between a two-charged organic salt and oppositely charged single-chain surfactants.

  5. Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic study of cesium adsorption onto nanocrystalline mordenite from high-salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun-Young; Park, Minsung; Kim, Jimin; Oh, Maengkyo; Lee, Eil-Hee; Kim, Kwang-Wook; Chung, Dong-Yong; Moon, Jei-Kwon

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics of cesium adsorption by nanocrystalline mordenite were investigated under cesium contamination with high-salt solution, simulating the case of an operation and decommissioning of nuclear facilities or an accident during the processes. The adsorption rate constants were determined using a pseudo second-order kinetic model. The kinetic results strongly demonstrated that the cesium adsorption rate of nano mordenite is extremely fast, even in a high-salt solution, and much faster than that of micro mordenite. In the equilibrium study, the Langmuir isotherm model fit the cesium adsorption data of nano mordenite better than the Freundlich model, which suggests that cesium adsorption onto nano mordenite is a monolayer homogeneous adsorption process. The obtained thermodynamic parameters indicated that the adsorption involved a very stable chemical reaction. In particular, the combination of rapid particle dispersion and rapid cesium adsorption of the nano mordenite in the solution resulted in a rapid and effective process for cesium removal without stirring, which may offer great advantages for low energy consumption and simple operation.

  6. Do salt and low temperature impair metal treatment in stormwater bioretention cells with or without a submerged zone?

    PubMed

    Søberg, Laila C; Viklander, Maria; Blecken, Godecke-Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Although seasonal temperature changes and (road) salt in winter and/or coastal stormwater runoff might interfere with the metal treatment performance of stormwater bioretention cells, no previous study has evaluated the effect of these factors and their interactions under controlled conditions. In this 18week long study 24 well established pilot-scale bioretention columns were employed to evaluate the individual and combined effect(s) of low/high temperature, salt and presence of a submerged zone with an embedded carbon source on metal removal using a three factor, two-level full factorial experimental design. In most instances, the three factors significantly influenced the metal outflow concentrations and thus the treatment performance; the effect of temperature depended on the metal in question, salt had an overall negative effect and the submerged zone with carbon source had an overall positive effect. Despite these statistically significant effects, the discharge water quality was generally markedly improved. However, leaching of dissolved Cu and Pb did occur, mainly from bioretention cells dosed with salt-containing stormwater. The highest concentrations of metals were captured in the top layer of the filter material and were not significantly affected by the three factors studied. Overall, the results confirmed that bioretention provides a functioning stormwater treatment option in areas experiencing winter conditions (road salt, low temperatures) or coastal regions (salt-laden stormwater). However, validation of these results in the field is recommended, especially focusing on dissolved metal removal, which may be critically affected under certain conditions.

  7. Electrically conducting poly(para-phenylene sulfide) prepared by doping with nitrosyl salts from solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubner, Michael; Cukor, Peter; Jopson, Harriet; Deits, Walter

    1982-03-01

    Para(polyphenylene sulfide) may be doped spontaneously and rapidly with nitrosyl salts (NOPF6, NOSbF6) from solution to yield an electrically conducting material (10-1ohm-1cm-1). The level of conductivity is primarily dependent on the extent of dopant incorporation, which in turn is determined by the polymer’s crystallinity; the more amorphous the polymer, the more dopant it takes up and the more conductive it becomes. The incorporation of dopants produces irreversible chemical changes in the polymer resulting in the deterioration of its mechanical properties.

  8. Metals recovering from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) using molten salts.

    PubMed

    Flandinet, L; Tedjar, F; Ghetta, V; Fouletier, J

    2012-04-30

    Recycling of waste electrical and electronic equipments (WEEE) has been taken into consideration in the literature due to the large quantity of concerned wastes and their hazardous contents. The situation is so critical that EU published European Directives imposing collection and recycling with a minimum of material recovery [1]. Moreover, WEEEs contain precious metals, making the recycling of these wastes economically interesting, but also some critical metals and their recycling leads to resource conservation. This paper reports on a new approach for recycling waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). Molten salts and specifically molten KOH-NaOH eutectic is used to dissolve glasses, oxides and to destruct plastics present in wastes without oxidizing the most valuable metals. This method is efficient for recovering a copper-rich metallic fraction, which is, moreover, cleared of plastics and glasses. In addition, analyses of gaseous emission show that this method is environmentally friendly since most of the process gases, such as carbon monoxide and dioxide and halogens, are trapped in the highly basic molten salt. In other respects, under operation without oxygen, a large quantity of hydrogen is produced and might be used as fuel gas or as synthesis gas, leading to a favourable energy balance for this new process.

  9. Modeling of dielectric properties of aqueous salt solutions with an equation of state.

    PubMed

    Maribo-Mogensen, Bjørn; Kontogeorgis, Georgios M; Thomsen, Kaj

    2013-09-12

    The static permittivity is the most important physical property for thermodynamic models that account for the electrostatic interactions between ions. The measured static permittivity in mixtures containing electrolytes is reduced due to kinetic depolarization and reorientation of the dipoles in the electrical field surrounding ions. Kinetic depolarization may explain 25-75% of the observed decrease in the permittivity of solutions containing salts, but since this is a dynamic property, this effect should not be included in the thermodynamic modeling of electrolytes. Kinetic depolarization has, however, been ignored in relation to thermodynamic modeling, and authors have either neglected the effect of salts on permittivity or used empirical correlations fitted to the measured static permittivity, leading to an overestimation of the reduction in the thermodynamic static permittivity. We present a new methodology for obtaining the static permittivity over wide ranges of temperatures, pressures, and compositions for use within an equation of state for mixed solvents containing salts. The static permittivity is calculated from a new extension of the framework developed by Onsager, Kirkwood, and Fröhlich to associating mixtures. Wertheim's association model as formulated in the statistical associating fluid theory is used to account for hydrogen-bonding molecules and ion-solvent association. Finally, we compare the Debye-Hückel Helmholtz energy obtained using an empirical model with the new physical model and show that the empirical models may introduce unphysical behavior in the equation of state.

  10. Super-absorbency and phase transition of gels in physiological salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Qing; Tanaka, Toyoichi; Shibayama, Mitsuhiro

    1992-11-01

    IONIC gels with the ability to absorb many times their dry weight of water have found widespread use as absorbents in medical, chemical and agricultural applications1. The dramatic swelling power of these super-absorbent gels results from both the electrostatic repulsion between the charges on the polymer chains, and the osmotic pressure of the counter-ions2. In salt solutions such as saline, urine or blood, however, excess Na+ and Cl- ions screen the polymer charges and eliminate the osmotic imbalance, effectively changing the properties of the material to that of a non-ionic gel3: this greatly diminishes the swelling power, and hence the utility of these materials under physiological conditions. Here we report the development of a system combining a non-ionic gel with ionized surfactants, which shows super-absorbent behaviour even in the presence of salt. In water, the hydrophobic gel facilitates the formation of spherical surfactant micelles, which mimic the charged sites of an ionic gel. As the salt concentration is increased, the micelles become rod-like, maintaining the electrostatic repulsion along the polymer chains and thereby preserving the swelling power of the gel.

  11. A new strategy to stabilize oxytocin in aqueous solutions: I. The effects of divalent metal ions and citrate buffer.

    PubMed

    Avanti, Christina; Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Setyaningsih, Dewi; Hawe, Andrea; Jiskoot, Wim; Visser, Jan; Kedrov, Alexej; Driessen, Arnold J M; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

    2011-06-01

    In the current study, the effect of metal ions in combination with buffers (citrate, acetate, pH 4.5) on the stability of aqueous solutions of oxytocin was investigated. Both monovalent metal ions (Na(+) and K(+)) and divalent metal ions (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)) were tested all as chloride salts. The effect of combinations of buffers and metal ions on the stability of aqueous oxytocin solutions was determined by RP-HPLC and HP-SEC after 4 weeks of storage at either 4°C or 55°C. Addition of sodium or potassium ions to acetate- or citrate-buffered solutions did not increase stability, nor did the addition of divalent metal ions to acetate buffer. However, the stability of aqueous oxytocin in aqueous formulations was improved in the presence of 5 and 10 mM citrate buffer in combination with at least 2 mM CaCl(2), MgCl(2), or ZnCl(2) and depended on the divalent metal ion concentration. Isothermal titration calorimetric measurements were predictive for the stabilization effects observed during the stability study. Formulations in citrate buffer that had an improved stability displayed a strong interaction between oxytocin and Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Zn(2+), while formulations in acetate buffer did not. In conclusion, our study shows that divalent metal ions in combination with citrate buffer strongly improved the stability of oxytocin in aqueous solutions.

  12. Organic conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokhorova, T. G.; Yagubskii, E. B.

    2017-02-01

    The results of studies of a family of conductors and superconductors based on bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene radical cation salts with paramagnetic and diamagnetic supramolecular tris(oxalato)metallate anions are collated and analyzed. Methods for the preparation of these salts and various types of packing of conducting layers within the salt structures are considered. The transport properties of crystals of the salts of this family and the effect of guest solvent molecules on these properties are discussed. The contribution of scientists from the Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, RAS, to the research into organic conductors and superconductors is noted. The bibliography includes 70 references.

  13. Structural studies of ammonia and metallic lithium-ammonia solutions.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen; Wasse, Jonathan C; Skipper, Neal T; Hayama, Shusaku; Bowron, Daniel T; Soper, Alan K

    2003-03-05

    The technique of hydrogen/deuterium isotopic substitution has been used to extract detailed information concerning the solvent structure in pure ammonia and metallic lithium-ammonia solutions. In pure ammonia we find evidence for approximately 2.0 hydrogen bonds around each central nitrogen atom, with an average N-H distance of 2.4 A. On addition of alkali metal, we observe directly significant disruption of this hydrogen bonding. At 8 mol % metal there remains only around 0.7 hydrogen bond per nitrogen atom. This value decreases to 0.0 for the saturated solution of 21 mol % metal, as all ammonia molecules have then become incorporated into the tetrahedral first solvation spheres of the lithium cations. In conjunction with a classical three-dimensional computer modeling technique, we are now able to identify a well-defined second cationic solvation shell. In this secondary shell the nitrogen atoms tend to reside above the faces and edges of the primary tetrahedral shell. Furthermore, the computer-generated models reveal that on addition of alkali metal the solvent molecules form voids of approximate radius 2.5-3.0 A. Our data therefore provide new insight into the structure of the polaronic cavities and tunnels, which have been theoretically predicted for lithium-ammonia solutions.

  14. KNH2-KH: a metal amide-hydride solid solution.

    PubMed

    Santoru, Antonio; Pistidda, Claudio; Sørby, Magnus H; Chierotti, Michele R; Garroni, Sebastiano; Pinatel, Eugenio; Karimi, Fahim; Cao, Hujun; Bergemann, Nils; Le, Thi T; Puszkiel, Julián; Gobetto, Roberto; Baricco, Marcello; Hauback, Bjørn C; Klassen, Thomas; Dornheim, Martin

    2016-09-27

    We report for the first time the formation of a metal amide-hydride solid solution. The dissolution of KH into KNH2 leads to an anionic substitution, which decreases the interaction among NH2(-) ions. The rotational properties of the high temperature polymorphs of KNH2 are thereby retained down to room temperature.

  15. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    DOE PAGES

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; ...

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions andmore » conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.« less

  16. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    SciTech Connect

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  17. Method for removing metal ions from solution with titanate sorbents

    DOEpatents

    Lundquist, Susan H.; White, Lloyd R.

    1999-01-01

    A method for removing metal ions from solution comprises the steps of providing titanate particles by spray-drying a solution or slurry comprising sorbent titanates having a particle size up to 20 micrometers, optionally in the presence of polymer free of cellulose functionality as binder, said sorbent being active towards heavy metals from Periodic Table (CAS version) Groups IA, IIA, IB, IIB, IIIB, and VIII, to provide monodisperse, substantially spherical particles in a yield of at least 70 percent of theoretical yield and having a particle size distribution in the range of 1 to 500 micrometers. The particles can be used free flowing in columns or beds, or entrapped in a nonwoven, fibrous web or matrix or a cast porous membrane, to selectively remove metal ions from aqueous or organic liquid.

  18. Combined influence of ectoine and salt: spectroscopic and numerical evidence for compensating effects on aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Marc Benjamin; Uhlig, Frank; Solomun, Tihomir; Smiatek, Jens; Sturm, Heinz

    2016-10-19

    Ectoine is an important osmolyte, which allows microorganisms to survive in extreme environmental salinity. The hygroscopic effects of ectoine in pure water can be explained by a strong water binding behavior whereas a study on the effects of ectoine in salty solution is yet missing. We provide Raman spectroscopic evidence that the influence of ectoine and NaCl are opposing and completely independent of each other. The effect can be explained by the formation of strongly hydrogen-bonded water molecules around ectoine which compensate the influence of the salt on the water dynamics. The mechanism is corroborated by first principles calculations and broadens our understanding of zwitterionic osmolytes in aqueous solution. Our findings allow us to provide a possible explanation for the relatively high osmolyte concentrations in halotolerant bacteria.

  19. Evaluation of poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) as a draw solute for forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Gwak, Gimun; Jung, Bokyung; Han, Sungsoo; Hong, Seungkwan

    2015-09-01

    Poly (aspartic acid sodium salt) (PAspNa) was evaluated for its potential as a novel draw solute in forward osmosis (FO). The inherent advantages of PAspNa, such as good water solubility, high osmotic pressure, and nontoxicity, were first examined through a series of physicochemical analyses and atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations. Then, lab-scale FO tests were performed to evaluate its suitability in practical processes. Compared to other conventional inorganic solutes, PAspNa showed comparable water flux but significantly lower reverse solute flux, demonstrating its suitability as a draw solute. Moreover, fouling experiments using synthetic wastewater as a feed solution demonstrated that PAspNa reversely flowed to the feed side reduced inorganic scaling on the membrane active layer. The recyclability of PAspNa was studied using both nanofiltration (NF) and membrane distillation (MD) processes, and the results exhibited its ease of recovery. This research reported the feasibility and applicability of FO-NF or FO-MD processes using PAspNa for wastewater reclamation and brackish water desalination.

  20. [Study on the spectra of NTO and its rubidium salt in aqueous solution].

    PubMed

    Xia, Shu-Ping; Hu, Man-Cheng; Gao, Shi-Yang; Jiang, Yu-Cheng

    2005-05-01

    In this paper, the Raman and difference FTIR spectra of NTO crystal, NTO solutions at different pH and saturated aqueous solution of Rb(NTO) x H2O have been studied. The determined structure of crystal suggests that the metal ion with oxygen and nitrogen atoms of [chemical structure see text] C-N, [chemical structure see text] C-NO2, [chemical structure see text] C=O and H2O formed bonds. The highest characterization peaks of Raman and FTIR spectra show that [chemical structure see text] C-NO2, [chemical structure see text] C=O and [chemical structure see text] C-N of NTO- formed week coordination bonds. The vibration spectra of saturation solution basically accord with those of the crystal. The bonds of saturation solution of the coordination compound have not changed. Therefore, the different vibration spectra of the saturation water solution of Rb (NTO) x H2O can be explicated by the formation of the bonds in crystal. The coordination compound formation mechanism of metal ion with NTO in alkali aqueous solution is discussed.

  1. Composite Properties of Polyimide Resins Made From "Salt-Like" Solution Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cano, Roberto J.; Weiser, Erik S.; SaintClair, Terry L.; Echigo, Yoshiaki; Kaneshiro, Hisayasu

    1997-01-01

    Recent work in high temperature materials at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC (trademark)) have led to the development of new polyimide resin systems with very attractive properties. The majority of the work done with these resin systems has concentrated on determining engineering mechanical properties of composites prepared from a poly(amide acid) precursor. Three NASA Langley-developed polyimide matrix resins, LaRC (trademark) -IA, LaRC (trademark) -IAX, and LaRC (trademark) -8515, were produced via a salt-like process developed by Unitika Ltd. The 'salt-like' solutions (sixty-five percent solids in NMP) were prepregged onto Hexcel IM7 carbon fiber using the NASA LaRC Multipurpose Tape Machine. Process parameters were determined and composite panels fabricated. Mechanical properties are presented for these three intermediate modulus carbon fiber/polyimide matrix composites and compared to existing data on the same polyimide resin systems and IM7 carbon fiber manufactured via poly(amide acid) solutions (thirty-five percent solids in NMP). This work studies the effects of varying the synthetic route on the processing and mechanical properties of polyimide composites.

  2. Changes in mechanical properties and morphology of elastomer coatings after immersion in salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terán Arce, Fernando; Avci, Recep; Beech, Iwona; Cooksey, Keith; Wigglesworth-Cooksey, Barbara

    2004-03-01

    RTV11 (^TM GE Silicones) and Intersleek (^TM International Paints) are two elastomers of considerable significance to the navy and maritime industry for their application as fouling release coatings. Both materials are composed of polymeric matrices with embedded filler particles, which provide increased strength and durability to the elastomer. Using Atomic force microscopy (AFM), surface and bulk analysis techniques, we have found surface regions with microelastic properties, which correlate with the locations of filler particles inside the coatings. These particles are able to undergo elastic displacements of hundreds of nm inside the polymeric matrix during compression by the AFM tip. While elastic properties of Intersleek remain largely unchanged after immersion in salt solutions, roughening, embrittlement and stiffening occurs in RTV11 coatings depending on the amount of curing agent and humidity used during preparation and curing, respectively. Interestingly, such transformations are absent after immersion in pure water. In particle free regions, elastic moduli of RTV11 take values of 2 - 3 MPa before immersion in salt solutions. After immersion, those values increase 5 - 10 times.

  3. METAL PHTHALOCYANINES

    DOEpatents

    Frigerio, N.A.

    1962-03-27

    A process is given for preparing heavy metal phthalocyanines, sulfonated or not. The process comprises mixing an inorganic metal salt with dimethyl formamide or methyl sulfoxide; separating the metal complex formed from the solution; mixing the complex with an equimolar amount of sodium, potassium, lithium, magnesium, or beryllium sulfonated or unsulfonated phthalocyanine whereby heavy-metal phthalocyanine crystals are formed; and separating the crystals from the solution. Uranyl, thorium, lead, hafnium, and lanthanide rare earth phthalocyanines can be produced by the process. (AEC)

  4. The Equilibrium Between Titanium Ions and Titanium Metal in NaCl-KCl Equimolar Molten Salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiuyu; Song, Jianxun; Hu, Guojing; Zhu, Xiaobo; Hou, Jungang; Jiao, Shuqiang; Zhu, Hongmin

    2013-08-01

    The equilibrium between metallic titanium and titanium ions, 3Ti2+ ⇌ 2Ti3+ + Ti, in NaCl-KCl equimolar molten salt was reevaluated. At a fixed temperature and an initial concentration of titanium chloride, the equilibrium was achieved by adding an excess amount of sponge titanium in assistant with bubbling of argon into the molten salt. The significance of this work is that the accurate concentrations of titanium ions have been obtained based on a reliable approach for taking samples. Furthermore, the equilibrium constant {{K}}_{{C}} = (x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 3 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )3 /(x_{{{{Ti}}^{{ 2 { + }}} }}^{{eql}} )2 was calculated through the best-fitting method under the consideration of the TiOCl dissolution. Indeed, the final results have disclosed that the stable value of KC could be achieved based on all modifications.

  5. Ionic association in poly(propylene oxide) complexed with divalent metal trifluoromethanesulfonate salts

    SciTech Connect

    Frech, R.; Huang, W.

    1993-12-31

    The ionic species present in 3000 MW {alpha},{omega}-hydroxy poly(propylene oxide), PPO, complexed with divalent metal trifluoromethanesulfonate, CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}-, {open_quotes}triflate{close_quotes} salts have been studied using infrared and Raman vibrational spectroscopy. The cations considered in this work include magnesium, calcium, zinc, cadmium and lead. The formation of ionic species was studied as a function of salt concentration in complexes with ether oxygenation ratios of 80:1, 40:1, 20:1 and 10:1. The temperature dependence of ionic association was measured in the 20:1 complexes from room temperature to 125{degrees}C. Ionic association was examined by observing bands in the symmetric SO{sub 3} stretching region and the doubly degenerate asymmetric SO{sub 3} stretching mode.

  6. Actinides recovery from molten salt/liquid metal system by electrochemical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iizuka, Masatoshi; Koyama, Tadafumi; Kondo, Naruhito; Fujita, Reiko; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1997-08-01

    Electrochemical methods were examined for the recovery of actinides from the electrorefiner which is used in pyrometallurgical reprocessing of spent metal fuel for fast reactors. Uranium was successfully collected at the solid steel cathode from both liquid cadmium and molten salt solvents. In electrotransport from liquid cadmium, the behavior of uranium and rare earths was as expected by a computer simulation code based on the diffusion layer model at the interface between the electrolyte and the electrodes. In electroreduction from the molten salt electrolyte, a considerable amount of uranium was reduced at the CdLi anode by direct chemical reduction with lithium, especially at a lower anodic current density. The decrease in collection efficiency of uranium due to the direct chemical reduction would be avoided by maintaining the anode potential higher than the deposition potential of uranium.

  7. Metal ion sensing solution containing double crossover DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byeongho; Dugasani, Sreekantha R.; Cho, Youngho; Oh, Juyeong; Kim, Chulki; Seo, Min Ah; Lee, Taikjin; Jhon, Young Miin; Woo, Deok Ha; Lee, Seok; Jun, Seong Chan; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Jae Hun

    2015-07-01

    The current study describes metal ion sensing with double crossover DNAs (DX1 and DX2), artificially designed as a platform of doping. The sample for sensing is prepared by a facile annealing method to grow the DXs lattice on a silicon/silicon oxide. Adding and incubating metal ion solution with the sensor substrate into the micro-tube lead the optical property change. Photoluminescence (PL) is employed for detecting the concentration of metal ion in the specimen. We investigated PL emission for sensor application with the divalent copper. In the range from 400 to 650 nm, the PL features of samples provide significantly different peak positions with excitation and emission detection. Metal ions contribute to modify the optical characteristics of DX with structural and functional change, which results from the intercalation of them into hydrogen bonding positioned at the center of double helix. The PL intensity is decreased gradually after doping copper ion in the DX tile on the substrate.

  8. Tidal salt marsh sediment in California, USA. Part 2: occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Min; Green, Peter G; Higashi, Richard M; Young, Thomas M

    2006-09-01

    Surface sediment samples (0-5 cm) from 5 tidal salt marshes along the coast in California, USA were analyzed to investigate the occurrence and anthropogenic input of trace metals. Among study areas, Stege Marsh located in the central San Francisco Bay was the most contaminated marsh. Concentrations of metals in Stege Marsh sediments were higher than San Francisco Bay ambient levels. Zinc (55.3-744 microg g(-1)) was the most abundant trace metal and was followed by lead (26.6-273 microg g(-1)). Aluminum normalized enrichment factors revealed that lead was the most anthropogenically impacted metal in all marshes. Enrichment factors of lead in Stege Marsh ranged from 8 to 49 (median=16). Sediments from reference marshes also had high enrichment factors (2-8) for lead, indicating that lead contamination is ubiquitous, possibly due to continuous input from atmospherically transported lead that was previously used as a gasoline additive. Copper, silver, and zinc in Stege Marsh were also enriched by anthropogenic input. Though nickel concentrations in Stege Marsh and reference marshes exceeded sediment quality guidelines, enrichment factors indicated nickel from anthropogenic input was negligible. Presence of nickel-rich source rock such as serpentinite in the San Francisco Bay watershed can explain high levels of nickel in this area. Coefficients of variation were significantly different between anthropogenically impacted and non-impacted metals and might be used as a less conservative indicator for anthropogenic input of metals when enrichment factors are not available.

  9. Synthesis, structures, and properties of crystalline salts with radical anions of metal-containing and metal-free phthalocyanines.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Kuzmin, Alexey V; Faraonov, Maxim A; Ishikawa, Manabu; Khasanov, Salavat S; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2015-01-12

    Radical anion salts of metal-containing and metal-free phthalocyanines [MPc(3-)](·-), where M = Cu(II), Ni(II), H2, Sn(II), Pb(II), Ti(IV)O, and V(IV)O (1-10) with tetraalkylammonium cations have been obtained as single crystals by phthalocyanine reduction with sodium fluorenone ketyl. Their formation is accompanied by the Pc ligand reduction and affects the molecular structure of metal phthalocyanine radical anions as well as their optical and magnetic properties. Radical anions are characterized by the alternation of short and long C-Nimine bonds in the Pc ligand owing to the disruption of its aromaticity. Salts 1-10 show new bands at 833-1041 nm in the NIR range, whereas the Q- and Soret bands are blue-shifted by 0.13-0.25 eV (38-92 nm) and 0.04-0.07 eV (4-13 nm), respectively. Radical anions with Ni(II), Sn(II), Pb(II), and Ti(IV)O have S = 1/2 spin state, whereas [Cu(II)Pc(3-)](·-) and [V(IV)OPc(3-)](·-) containing paramagnetic Cu(II) and V(IV)O have two S = 1/2 spins per radical anion. Central metal atoms strongly affect EPR spectra of phthalocyanine radical anions. Instead of narrow EPR signals characteristic of metal-free phthalocyanine radical anions [H2Pc(3-)](·-) (linewidth of 0.08-0.24 mT), broad EPR signals are manifested (linewidth of 2-70 mT) with g-factors and linewidths that are strongly temperature-dependent. Salt 11 containing the [Na(I)Pc(2-)](-) anions as well as previously studied [Fe(I)Pc(2-)](-) and [Co(I)Pc(2-)](-) anions that are formed without reduction of the Pc ligand do not show changes in molecular structure or optical and magnetic properties characteristic of [MPc(3-)](·-) in 1-10.

  10. Determining the Enthalpy of Vaporization of Salt Solutions Using the Cooling Effect of a Bubble Column Evaporator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Chao; Pashley, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The enthalpy of vaporization (?H[subscript vap]) of salt solutions is not easily measured, as a certain quantity of pure water has to be evaporated from a solution, at constant composition, and at a fixed temperature and pressure; then the corresponding heat input has to be measured. However, a simple bubble column evaporator (BCE) was used as a…

  11. Osmotic second virial cross-coefficient measurements for binary combination of lysozyme, ovalbumin, and α-amylase in salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Chirag M; White, Edward T; Litster, James D

    2013-01-01

    Interactions measurement is a valuable tool to predict equilibrium phase separation of a desired protein in the presence of unwanted macromolecules. In this study, cross-interactions were measured as the osmotic second virial cross-coefficients (B23 ) for the three binary protein systems involving lysozyme, ovalbumin, and α-amylase in salt solutions (sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate). They were correlated with solubility for the binary protein mixtures. The cross-interaction behavior at different salt concentrations was interpreted by either electrostatic or hydrophobic interaction forces. At low salt concentrations, the protein surface charge dominates cross-interaction behavior as a function of pH. With added ovalbumin, the lysozyme solubility decreased linearly at low salt concentration in sodium chloride and increased at high salt concentration in ammonium sulfate. The B23 value was found to be proportional to the slope of the lysozyme solubility against ovalbumin concentration and the correlation was explained by preferential interaction theory.

  12. Allergenicity and cross-reactivity of naphthenic acid and its metallic salts in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Tetsuo; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Noda, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    The allergenicity and the cross-reactivity of naphthenic acid (NA) and its metallic salts were evaluated in experimental animals. In the guinea pig maximization test, sensitizing skin reactions were observed with cobalt naphthenate (CoN), zinc naphthenate (ZnN) and NA, but not with copper naphthenate, with CoN being the most potent sensitizer. Animals sensitized with 1 naphthenic compound cross-reacted to the other 3 as well. Furthermore, animals in the CoN-sensitized group reacted to the relevant metallic salt cobalt chloride (CoCl2). A dose-response study using the CoN-sensitized group showed that the concentration of CoCl2 required to elicit a skin reaction of similar extent in comparison with CoN was more than 10 times higher, when skin-reaction scores were compared on the basis of cobalt content. In the local lymph node assay, significant increases in stimulation index values without skin irritation were observed with CoN and ZnN, where the former was more potent than the latter. Although CoN is a reported skin sensitizer, this study showed that skin allergenicity of naphthenic compounds is not restricted solely to CoN. In addition, the results suggest the main antigenic determinant of naphthenic compounds to be the structure of NA, even though metal moieties modulate their allergenicity.

  13. System and process for production of magnesium metal and magnesium hydride from magnesium-containing salts and brines

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Peter B.; Nune, Satish K.; Motkuri, Radha K.; Glezakou, Vassiliki-Alexandra; Koech, Phillip K.; Adint, Tyler T.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Liu, Jian

    2016-11-22

    A system and process are disclosed for production of consolidated magnesium metal products and alloys with selected densities from magnesium-containing salts and feedstocks. The system and process employ a dialkyl magnesium compound that decomposes to produce the Mg metal product. Energy requirements and production costs are lower than for conventional processing.

  14. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  15. Measuring and modeling the salting-out effect in ammonium sulfate solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Lei, Ying Duan; Endo, Satoshi; Wania, Frank

    2014-11-18

    The presence of inorganic salts significantly influences the partitioning behavior of organic compounds between environmentally relevant aqueous phases, such as seawater or aqueous aerosol, and other, nonaqueous phases (gas phase, organic phase, etc.). In this study, salting-out coefficients (or Setschenow constants) (KS [M(-1)]) for 38 diverse neutral compounds in ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) solutions were measured using a shared headspace passive dosing method and a negligible depletion solid phase microextraction technique. The measured KS were all positive, varied from 0.216 to 0.729, and had standard errors in the range of 0.006-0.060. Compared to KS for sodium chloride (NaCl) in the literature, KS values for (NH4)2SO4 are always higher for the same compound, suggesting a higher salting-out effect of (NH4)2SO4. A polyparameter linear free energy relationship (pp-LFER) for predicting KS in (NH4)2SO4 solutions was generated using the experimental data for calibration. pp-LFER predicted KS agreed well with measured KS reported in the literature. KS for (NH4)2SO4 was also predicted using the quantum-chemical COSMOtherm software and the thermodynamic model AIOMFAC. While COSMOtherm generally overpredicted the experimental KS, predicted and experimental values were correlated. Therefore, a fitting factor needs to be applied when using the current version of COSMOtherm to predict KS. AIOMFAC tends to underpredict the measured KS((NH4)2SO4) but always overpredicts KS(NaCl). The prediction error is generally larger for KS(NaCl) than for KS((NH4)2SO4). AIOMFAC also predicted a dependence of KS on the salt concentrations, which is not observed in the experimental data. In order to demonstrate that the models developed and calibrated in this study can be applied to estimate Setschenow coefficients for atmospherically relevant compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation based on chemical structure alone, we predicted and compared KS for selected

  16. Effect of Protein-Lipid-Salt Interactions on Sodium Availability in the Mouth and Consequent Perception of Saltiness: In Solutions.

    PubMed

    Yucel, Umut; Peterson, Devin G

    2015-09-02

    The influence of protein-sodium interactions on the availability of sodium in the aqueous phase of liquid samples and consequently on the perception of saltiness was investigated. The aqueous effluents of casein and casein emulsion-salt solutions were monitored for sodium availability from a tongue column system. In the aqueous protein-salt solutions, increasing the protein/salt ratio from 1:1 to 5:1 or 10:1 significantly decreased the initial salt concentration in the effluent and resulted in a higher salt concentration in the effluent over time. Sensory analysis was in agreement. Samples with increased protein were rated as having significantly lower initial saltiness and a higher salty aftertaste. However, when casein was formulated as an emulsion, the initial release of sodium in the effluent was enhanced (compared to nonemulsified protein). Increasing the emulsion interfacial area (more hydrophilic segments of the protein were structured into the aqueous phase) resulted in a higher salt concentration in the aqueous phase and greater perceived saltiness intensity. In summary, protein interactions, specifically ionic, were reported as food interactions that influence salt perception and provide a basis to develop higher flavor quality low-sodium food products.

  17. Heavy metal contents of refined and unrefined table salts from Turkey, Egypt and Greece.

    PubMed

    Soylak, Mustafa; Peker, Dondu Serpil Kacar; Turkoglu, Orhan

    2008-08-01

    Trace metal contents of 28 of refined and unrefined table salt samples from Turkey, Egypt and Greece have been determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation by dysprosium(III) hydroxide. Copper, nickel, cobalt, manganese, lead and cadmium levels were found in the range of 0.17-0.47, 0.16-1.57, 0.22-0.48, 0.26-4.68, 0.50-1.64 and 0.14-0.30 microg g(-1), respectively. The results found in the presented work were compared with literature values.

  18. Electromyogram as a measure of heavy metal toxicity in fresh water and salt water mussels

    SciTech Connect

    Kidder, G.W. III |; McCoy, A.A. |

    1996-02-01

    The response of bivalves to heavy metals and other toxins has usually been determined by observing valve position. Since mussels close their valves to avoid noxious stimuli, experimental delivery of chemicals ins uncertain. To obtain constant results plastic spacers can be employed to hold the valves apart. This obviates valve position as an index of response and some other method is required. Electromyography of intact mussels is one such index, giving a simple, effective, and quantitative measurement of activity. Experiments are reported in this article on the effects of added mercury on salt water and fresh water species.

  19. Highly Efficient Transition Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changlong; Ciganda, Roberto; Salmon, Lionel; Gregurec, Danijela; Irigoyen, Joseba; Moya, Sergio; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2016-02-24

    A ligand design is proposed for transition metal nanoparticle (TMNP) catalysts in aqueous solution. Thus, a tris(triazolyl)-polyethylene glycol (tris-trz-PEG) amphiphilic ligand, 2, is used for the synthesis of very small TMNPs with Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Pd, Ag, Pt, and Au. These TMNP-2 catalysts were evaluated and compared for the model 4-nitrophenol reduction, and proved to be extremely efficient. High catalytic efficiencies involving the use of only a few ppm metal of PdNPs, RuNPs, and CuNPs were also exemplified in Suzuki-Miyaura, transfer hydrogenation, and click reactions, respectively.

  20. Application of the hybrid complexation-ultrafiltration process for metal ion removal from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jianxian; Ye, Hongqi; Hu, Zhongyu

    2009-01-30

    Complexation-ultrafiltration process was investigated for mercury and cadmium removal from aqueous solutions by using poly(acrylic acid) sodium salt (PAASS) as a complexing agent. The kinetics of complexation reactions of PAASS with the metal ions were studied under a large excess PAASS and pH 5.5. It takes 25 and 50 min for mercury and cadmium to get the complexation equilibrium, respectively, and the reaction kinetics can be described by a pseudo-first-order equation. Effects of various operating parameters such as loading ratios, pH values, etc. on metal rejection coefficients (R) were investigated. In the process of concentration, membrane fluxes decline slowly and R values are about 1. The concentrated retentates were used further for the decomplexation. The decomplexation ratio of mercury-PAASS complex is about 30%, whereas that of cadmium-PAASS complex reaches 93.5%. After the decomplexation, diafiltration experiments were carried out at pH 2.5. Cadmium can be diafiltrated satisfactorily from the retentate, but for mercury it is the contrary. Selective separation of the both metal ions was studied from a binary solution at pH 5. When mercury, cadmium and PAASS concentrations are 30, 30 and 40 mg L(-1), respectively, mercury is retained by ultrafiltration while almost all cadmium passes through the membrane.

  1. Water Uptake by Mars Salt Analogs: An Investigation of Stable Aqueous Solutions Using Raman Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuding, Danielle L.

    Liquid water processes that may occur on the surface and near-subsurface of Mars have important implications for the present-day water cycle, habitability, and planetary protection policies. The presence of salts on Mars plays a role in surface-atmosphere interactions as salts enhance the soil's ability to retain water. This thesis explores the phase transitions of water upon interaction with Mars relevant salt analogs. Water uptake and loss properties of a single and complex Mars analog are examined using a Raman microscope equipped with an environmental cell. The effect of the hygroscopic salts on bacterial spores was evaluated with a focus on potential terrestrial contamination on outbound spacecraft and its influence on planetary protection concerns. Calcium perchlorate (Ca(ClO4)2) is a highly deliquescent salt that may exist on the surface of present-day Mars. Here, we quantify the deliquescent relative humidity (DRH) and efflorescent relative humidity (ERH) of Ca(ClO4)2 as a function of temperature (223 K to 273 K) to elucidate its behavior on the surface of Mars. Mars relevant temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions were simulated and deliquescence (solid to aqueous) and efflorescence (aqueous to solid) phase transitions of Ca(ClO4)2 were characterized. Experimental DRH values were compared to a thermodynamic model for three hydration states of Ca(ClO 4)2. Calcium perchlorate was found to supersaturate, with lower ERH values than DRH values. Additionally, we conducted a 17-hour experiment to simulate a subsurface relative humidity and temperature diurnal cycle. This demonstrated that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions can persist without efflorescing for the majority of a martian sol, up to 17 hours under Mars temperature heating rates and RH conditions. Applying these experimental results to martian surface and subsurface heat and mass transfer models, we find that aqueous Ca(ClO4)2 solutions could persist for most of the martian sol under present

  2. Hydrology of the Bonneville Salt Flats, northwestern Utah, and simulation of ground-water flow and solute transport in the shallow-brine aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, James L.; Kipp, Kenneth L.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes the hydrologic system of the Bonneville Salt Flats with emphasis on the mechanisms of solute transport. Variable-density, three-dimensional computer simulations of the near-surface part of the ground-water system were done to quantify both the transport of salt dissolved in subsurface brine that leaves the salt-crust area and the salt dissolved and precipitated on the land surface. The study was designed to define the hydrology of the brine ground-water system and the natural and anthropogenic processes causing salt loss, and where feasible, to quantify these processes. Specific areas of study include the transport of salt in solution by ground-water flow and the transport of salt in solution by wind-driven ponds and the subsequent salt precipitation on the surface of the playa upon evaporation or seepage into the subsurface. In addition, hydraulic and chemical changes in the hydrologic system since previous studies were documented.

  3. Concentrated dual-salt electrolytes for improving the cycling stability of lithium metal anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pin, Liu; Qiang, Ma; Zheng, Fang; Jie, Ma; Yong-Sheng, Hu; Zhi-Bin, Zhou; Hong, Li; Xue-Jie, Huang; Li-Quan, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Lithium (Li) metal is an ideal anode material for rechargeable Li batteries, due to its high theoretical specific capacity (3860 mAh/g), low density (0.534 g/cm3), and low negative electrochemical potential (-3.040 V vs. standard hydrogen electrode). In this work, the concentrated electrolytes with dual salts, composed of Li[N(SO2F)2] (LiFSI) and Li[N(SO2CF3)2] (LiTFSI) were studied. In this dual-salt system, the capacity retention can even be maintained at 95.7% after 100 cycles in Li|LiFePO4 cells. A Li|Li cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 600 h, and a Li|Cu cell can be cycled at 0.5 mA/cm2 for more than 200 cycles with a high average Coulombi efficiency of 99%. These results show that the concentrated dual-salt electrolytes exhibit superior electrochemical performance and would be a promising candidate for application in rechargeable Li batteries. Project supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51222210, 51472268, 51421002, and 11234013) and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA09010300).

  4. Lysozyme-lysozyme and lysozyme-salt interactions in the aqueous saline solution: a new square-well potential.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bong Ho; Bae, Young Chan

    2003-01-01

    We investigate lysozyme-lysozyme and lysozyme-salt interactions in electrolyte solutions using a molecular-thermodynamic model. An equation of state based on the statistical mechanical perturbation theory is applied to describe the interactions. The perturbation term includes a new square-well potential of mean force, which implies the information about the lysozyme surface and salt type. The attractive energy of the potential of mean force is correlated with experimental cloud-point temperatures of lysozyme in various solution conditions. The same attractive energy is used to predict osmotic pressure of a given system with no additional parameters. The new potential shows a satisfactory improvement in understanding the interactions between lysozymes in aqueous salt solutions.

  5. Hydrogen generation in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a heat-regenerated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m(3) H(2)/m(3)·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H(2)/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes.

  6. Artificial sweeteners and salts producing a metallic taste sensation activate TRPV1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Riera, Céline E; Vogel, Horst; Simon, Sidney A; le Coutre, Johannes

    2007-08-01

    Throughout the world many people use artificial sweeteners (AS) for the purpose of reducing caloric intake. The most prominently used of these molecules include saccharin, aspartame (Nutrasweet), acesulfame-K, and cyclamate. Despite the caloric advantage they provide, one key concern in their use is their aversive aftertaste that has been characterized on a sensory level as bitter and/or metallic. Recently, it has been shown that the activation of particular T2R bitter taste receptors is partially involved with the bitter aftertaste sensation of saccharin and acesulfame-K. To more fully understand the biology behind these phenomena we have addressed the question of whether AS could stimulate transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors, as these receptors are activated by a large range of structurally different chemicals. Moreover, TRPV1 receptors and/or their variants are found in taste receptor cells and in nerve terminals throughout the oral cavity. Hence, TRPV1 activation could be involved in the AS aftertaste or even contribute to the poorly understood metallic taste sensation. Using Ca(2+) imaging on TRPV1 receptors heterologously expressed in the human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells and on dissociated primary sensory neurons, we find that in both systems, AS activate TRPV1 receptors, and, moreover, they sensitize these channels to acid and heat. We also found that TRPV1 receptors are activated by CuSO(4), ZnSO(4), and FeSO(4), three salts known to produce a metallic taste sensation. In summary, our results identify a novel group of compounds that activate TRPV1 and, consequently, provide a molecular mechanism that may account for off tastes of sweeteners and metallic tasting salts.

  7. Kinetics of metal exchange in Cd(II) octa(4-bromophenyl)porphyrinate with d-metal salts in organic solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvezdina, S. V.; Chizhova, N. V.; Mamardashvili, N. Zh.

    2017-03-01

    The reaction of metal exchange between Cd(II) octa(4-bromophenyl)porphyrinate with CuCl2 and ZnCl2 in DMFA and DMSO is studied by means of spectrophotometry. The kinetic parameters of the metal exchange reaction are calculated, a stoichiometric reaction mechanism is proposed. The effect the natures of the solvent, salt solvate, and the chemical modification of tetrapyrrole macrocycle have on the kinetic parameters of the metal exchange reaction are revealed.

  8. The Analysis of Metal Finishing Solutions by Ion Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    traditional chemical methods now in use. This report describes procedures for the analysis of solutions for chromium plating, acid finishing, metal...samples and standards must have similar acid -base characteristics. These methods are an improvement to standard methods now in practice and have been...CITED ............................... 195 iv LIST OF TABLES Page Table 1. Ionization Constants of Acids (12) . 29 Table 2. Common Anion Eluents

  9. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1995-11-28

    Electrolyte salts are disclosed for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts. 2 figs.

  10. Electrolyte salts for power sources

    DOEpatents

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Ingersoll, David

    1995-01-01

    Electrolyte salts for power sources comprising salts of phenyl polysulfonic acids and phenyl polyphosphonic acids. The preferred salts are alkali and alkaline earth metal salts, most preferably lithium salts.

  11. Effect of laser irradiation of nanoparticles in aqueous uranium salt solutions on nuclide activity

    SciTech Connect

    Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2011-07-31

    This paper presents an experimental study of the effect of laser irradiation of aqueous uranyl chloride solutions containing gold nanoparticles on the activity of the uranium series radionuclides {sup 234}Th, {sup 234m}Pa, and {sup 235}U. The solutions were exposed to femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser pulses and to the second or third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser (150-ps pulses) at a peak intensity in the medium of {approx}10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2}. The activities of the radionuclides in the irradiated solutions were shown to differ markedly from their equilibrium values. The sign of the deviation depends on the laser wavelength. The measured activity deviations can be interpreted as evidence that laser exposure of nanoparticles accelerates the alpha and beta decays of the radionuclides. The observed effects are accounted for in terms of a mechanism that involves resonant enhancement of optical waves by metallic nanoparticles. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  12. Synthesis, Solution, and Structural Characterization of Tetrahydrofuranyl-2,2-Bisphosphonic Acid Disodium Salt

    PubMed Central

    Maltezou, Elena; Stylianou, Marios; Roy, Sudeshna; Drouza, Chryssoula; Keramidas, Anastasios D.

    2010-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are biologically relevant therapeutics for bone disorders and cancer. Reaction of γ-chlorobutyric acid, phosphorus acid, and phosphorus trichloride without the use of solvent gave the tetrahydrofuranyl-2,2-bisphosphonate sodium salt (Na2H2L). The Na2H2L was isolated, characterized in solution by 1H, 13C, and 31P NMR spectroscopy and in solid state by single X-Ray crystallography. The crystal structure showed that the Na2H2L forms in the crystal infinite two-dimensional sheets stacked one parallel to the other. A comparison of the chelating properties of H2L2− with similar hydroxyl bisphosphonate ligands shows that the strength of the Na–O(furanyl/hydroxyl) bond is directly related to the total charge of the ligand anion. PMID:20467558

  13. Sensing temperature via downshifting emissions of lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts. A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dramićanin, Miroslav D.

    2016-12-01

    Temperature is important because it has an effect on even the tiniest elements of daily life and is involved in a broad spectrum of human activities. That is why it is the most commonly measured physical quantity. Traditional temperature measurements encounter difficulties when used in some emerging technologies and environments, such as nanotechnology and biomedicine. The problem may be alleviated using optical techniques, one of which is luminescence thermometry. This paper reviews the state of luminescence thermometry and presents different temperature read-out schemes with an emphasis on those utilizing the downshifting emission of lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts. The read-out schemes for temperature include those based on measurements of spectral characteristics of luminescence (band positions and shapes, emission intensity and ratio of emission intensities), and those based on measurements of the temporal behavior of luminescence (lifetimes and rise times). This review (with 140 references) gives the basics of the fundamental principles and theory that underlie the methods presented, and describes the methodology for the estimation of their performance. The major part of the text is devoted to those lanthanide-doped metal oxides and salts that are used as temperature probes, and to the comparison of their performance and characteristics.

  14. Scalable salt-templated synthesis of two-dimensional transition metal oxides

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xu; Song, Huaibing; Lin, Shizhe; Zhou, Ying; Zhan, Xiaojun; Hu, Zhimi; Zhang, Qi; Sun, Jiyu; Yang, Bo; Li, Tianqi; Jiao, Liying; Zhou, Jun; Tang, Jiang; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional atomic crystals, such as two-dimensional oxides, have attracted much attention in energy storage because nearly all of the atoms can be exposed to the electrolyte and involved in redox reactions. However, current strategies are largely limited to intrinsically layered compounds. Here we report a general strategy that uses the surfaces of water-soluble salt crystals as growth templates and is applicable to not only layered compounds but also various transition metal oxides, such as hexagonal-MoO3, MoO2, MnO and hexagonal-WO3. The planar growth is hypothesized to occur via a match between the crystal lattices of the salt and the growing oxide. Restacked two-dimensional hexagonal-MoO3 exhibits high pseudocapacitive performances (for example, 300 F cm−3 in an Al2(SO4)3 electrolyte). The synthesis of various two-dimensional transition metal oxides and the demonstration of high capacitance are expected to enable fundamental studies of dimensionality effects on their properties and facilitate their use in energy storage and other applications. PMID:27103200

  15. Microwave irradiation affects ion pairing in aqueous solutions of alkali halide salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohorič, Tomaž; Bren, Urban

    2017-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics simulations with separate thermostats for translational and rotational degrees of freedom, we investigate the effects of water's rotational motion on the ion pairing of ionic solutes in aqueous solutions. The situation with rotational temperature higher than the translational one, Trot>Ttrs , is mimicking the non-equilibrium effects of microwaves on model solutions of alkali halide salts. The simulations reveal that an increase in the rotational temperature at constant translational temperature exerts significant changes in the structure of the solution. The latter are reflected in increased pairing of the oppositely charged ions, which can be explained by the weaker ability of rotationally excited water to screen and separate the opposite charges. It seems that Collins' law of matching water affinities retains its validity also in the non-equilibrium situation where the rotational temperature exceeds the translational one. On the other hand, the equilibrium effect (i.e., an increase in the solution's overall temperature T ≡Trot = Ttrs) favors the formation of small-small (NaCl), while it has a little effect on large-large (CsI) ion pairs. This is in accordance with water becoming less polar solvent upon a temperature increase. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of excited translational motion of water (and ions) on the ion pairing by increasing the translational temperature, while keeping the rotational one unchanged (i.e., Ttrs>Trot ). Interestingly, in certain cases the faster translational motion causes an increase in correlations. The temperature variations in the like-ion association constants, Kas++ and Kas-, are also examined. Here the situation is more complex but, in most cases, a decrease in the ion pairing is observed.

  16. Towards organic zeolites and inclusion catalysts: heptazine imide salts can exchange metal cations in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Antonietti, Markus; Savateev, Aleksandr; Pronkin, Sergey; Willinger, Marc; Dontsova, Dariya

    2017-02-15

    Highly crystalline potassium (heptazine imides) were prepared by the thermal condensation of substituted 1,2,4-triazoles in eutectic salt melts. These semiconducting salts are already known to be highly active photocatalysts, e.g. for the visible light driven generation of hydrogen from water. Herein, we show that within the solid state structure, potassium ions can be exchanged to other metal ions while the crystal habitus is essentially preserved.

  17. Alkali metal salts of rutin - Synthesis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-VIS), antioxidant and antimicrobial studies.

    PubMed

    Samsonowicz, M; Kamińska, I; Kalinowska, M; Lewandowski, W

    2015-12-05

    In this work several metal salts of rutin with lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium were synthesized. Their molecular structures were discussed on the basis of spectroscopic (FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-VIS) studies. Optimized geometrical structure of rutin was calculated by B3LYP/6-311++G(∗∗) method and sodium salt of rutin were calculated by B3LYP/LanL2DZ method. Metal chelation change the biological properties of ligand therefore the antioxidant (FRAP and DPPH) and antimicrobial activities (toward Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecium, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) of alkali metal salts were evaluated and compared with the biological properties of rutin.

  18. Excellent dynamic stability under saturated salt solution for aqueous quantum dots capped by multi-branched ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jingkun; Xu, Shuhong; Lv, Changgui; Wang, Chunlei; Cui, Yiping

    2016-09-01

    Preparing quantum dots (QDs) with strong stability against salts is extremely important in some environments with ultrahigh salts concentration, such as the oil exploitation, wastewater treatment and biological markers. In this paper, we reported a simple new method to prepared highly stable QDs by using multi-branched ligands. Our results suggested that multi-branched ligands-capped QDs have extremely good dynamic stability even in salt-saturated solution. Unlike to traditional dynamic stability theory, which considers the electrostatic repulsion of QDs dominant QD stability, the current work found a new determined factor: the steric hindrance of ligand structure. The high steric hindrance effect of multi-branched ligands can maintain the single dispersity of QDs even at extremely low electrostatic repulsion. As a result, QDs with ultrahigh stability against salts can be realized.

  19. Release of gaseous bromine from the photolysis of nitrate and hydrogen peroxide in simulated sea-salt solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Ingrid J.; Anastasio, Cort

    We have carried out a series of laboratory experiments to investigate the oxidation of bromide (Br -) by hydroxyl radical ( rad OH) in solutions used to mimic sea-salt particles. Aqueous halide solutions with nitrate or hydrogen peroxide (HOOH) as a photochemical source of rad OH were illuminated with 313 nm light and the resulting gaseous bromine (Br*(g)) was collected. While illumination of these solutions nearly always formed gaseous bromine (predominantly Br 2 based on modeling results), there was no evidence for the release of gaseous chlorine. The rate of Br*(g) release increased (up to a plateau value) with increasing concentrations of bromide and was enhanced at lower pH values for both nitrate and HOOH solutions. Increased ionic strength in nitrate solutions inhibited Br*(g) release and the extent of inhibition was dependent upon the salt used. In HOOH solutions, however, no ionic strength effects were observed and the presence of Cl - strongly enhanced Br*(g) release. Overall, for conditions typical of aged, deliquesced, sea-salt particles, the efficiencies of gaseous bromine release, expressed as mole of Br*(g) released per mole of rad OH photochemically formed, were typically 20-30%. Using these reaction efficiencies, we calculated the Br 2(g) release rate from aged, ambient sea-salt particles due to rad OH oxidation to be approximately 0.07 pptv h -1 with the main contributions from nitrate photolysis and partitioning of gas-phase rad OH into the particle. While our solution conditions are simplified compared to ambient particles, this estimated rate of Br 2 release is high enough to suggest that rad OH-mediated reactions in sea-salt particles could be a significant source of reactive bromine to the marine boundary layer.

  20. [The induction and the prevention of Vi antigen of S.typhi loss by three metalic ions of salts].

    PubMed

    Zhang, J X; Cao, J; Tu, J

    1997-04-01

    Three metalic salts Ferrous, Mgnesium and Calcium were used to induce and to prevent Vi antigen of S. typhi loss. All of the 96 Vi-II phage typing standard strains belonged to V type (a recovery rate of 100%). Out of 1320 local strains, 1292 were type V (a recovery rate of 97.7%) and 28 remained type W with a Vi loss rate of 2.1%. The results showed that induction and prevention of Vi antigen of S. typhi loss by the three metalic salts was higher than that of other reports which showed a loss rate of 5% Vi antigen of S. typhi.

  1. Aqueous biphasic systems for metal separations : a microcalorimetric analysis of polymer/salt interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiko, D. J.; Hatton, T. A.; Zaslavsky, B.

    1999-05-03

    Certain radionuclide ions (e.g., TcO{sub 4}{sup 16}) exhibit unusually strong Affinities toward the polymer-rich phase in aqueous biphase systems generated by combinations of salt solutions with polymers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(propylene glycol) (PPG). Thus, aqueous polymer phases could potentially be used to selectively extract these ions during pretreatment of radioactive tank wastes at Hanford. To help develop a fundamental understanding of the interactions between various ions and polymers in aqueous solution, interaction enthalpies between sodium perrhenate and a random copolymer of PEG and PPG (UCON-50) were measured by microcalorimetric titration. An entropy compensation effect was observed in this system in which changes in enthalpic interactions were balanced by entropy changes such that the interaction free energy remained constant and approximately equal to zero.

  2. Comparison of the effect of hormones on the hormone synthesis of Tetrahymena in medium or salt solution.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva

    2010-11-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis was maintained in TYM (tryptone-yeast medium) as well as in Losina salt solution. One hour treatment of 10⁻¹⁵ M histamine, serotonin or insulin was given before the histamine, serotonin, triiodothyronine and adrenocorticotropin contents of the cells were measured by flow cytometry after immunocytochemical staining. Maintenance in salt solution increased the hormone level in the cells, and use of the treatment hormone treatments further increased the endogenous hormone content relative to that in medium. The cells in salt mimic better the natural conditions, which means that the effects of hormones under more natural conditions are expressed to a greater extent than the exogenously given hormones in TYM typically used under laboratory conditions. Intercellular hormonal communication between the cells of a Tetrahymena population might assist in the survival of the individual cells.

  3. Surface-induced liquid-gas transition in salt-free solutions of model charged colloids.

    PubMed

    Budkov, Yu A; Frolov, A I; Kiselev, M G; Brilliantov, N V

    2013-11-21

    We report a novel phenomenon of a surface-induced phase transition in salt-free solutions of charged colloids. We develop a theory of this effect and confirm it by Molecular Dynamics simulations. To describe the colloidal solution we apply a primitive model of electrolyte with a strong asymmetry of charge and size of the constituent particles - macroions and counterions. To quantify interactions of the colloidal particles with the neutral substrate we use a short-range potential which models dispersion van der Waals forces. These forces cause the attraction of colloids to the surface. We show that for high temperatures and weak attraction, only gradual increase of the macroion concentration in the near-surface layer is observed with increase of interaction strength. If however temperature drops below some threshold value, a new dense (liquid) phase is formed in the near-surface layer. It can be interpreted as a surface-induced first-order phase transition with a critical point. Using an appropriately adopted Maxwell construction, we find the binodal. Interestingly, the observed near-surface phase transition can occur at the absence of the bulk phase transition and may be seemingly classified as prewetting transition. The reported effect could be important for various technological applications where formation of colloidal particle layers with the desired properties is needed.

  4. Dilute solution properties of Prunus armeniaca gum exudates: Influence of temperature, salt, and sugar.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Morteza; Mohebbi, Mohebbat; Koocheki, Arash; Hesarinejad, Mohammad Ali

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the current paper was to investigate the effect of different temperatures, salts and sugars on dilute solution properties of Prunus armeniaca gum exudates (PAGE) as a starting point to evaluate the potential utilization of this novel source of hydrocolloids in food and pharmaceutical systems. Berry number and the slope of master curve indicated that PAGE samples in all evaluated conditions were in dilute domain without coil overlapping and entanglement. Furthermore, the slope power law model also demonstrated that the molecular conformation of PAGE in all tested temperatures was close to rode-like. On the other hand, PAGE samples had random coil conformation in the presence of sugars and ions studied. Activation energy and chain flexibility of PAGE were found to be 0.83×10(7) (J/kg) and 997.3, respectively. This result revealed that temperature has a slight effect on intrinsic viscosity of PAGE solution, implying this gum can be introduced as a promising ingredient in food formulation that need to high stability against temperature. The data obtained in the present study and results thereof can be useful when considering the effect of additives generally used in food products and/or processing parameters like temperature in food systems.

  5. Adaptive resolution simulation of an atomistic DNA molecule in MARTINI salt solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavadlav, J.; Podgornik, R.; Melo, M. N.; Marrink, S. J.; Praprotnik, M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a dual-resolution model of a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule in a bathing solution, where we concurrently couple atomistic bundled water and ions with the coarse-grained MARTINI model of the solvent. We use our fine-grained salt solution model as a solvent in the inner shell surrounding the DNA molecule, whereas the solvent in the outer shell is modeled by the coarse-grained model. The solvent entities can exchange between the two domains and adapt their resolution accordingly. We critically asses the performance of our multiscale model in adaptive resolution simulations of an infinitely long DNA molecule, focusing on the structural characteristics of the solvent around DNA. Our analysis shows that the adaptive resolution scheme does not produce any noticeable artifacts in comparison to a reference system simulated in full detail. The effect of using a bundled-SPC model, required for multiscaling, compared to the standard free SPC model is also evaluated. Our multiscale approach opens the way for large scale applications of DNA and other biomolecules which require a large solvent reservoir to avoid boundary effects.

  6. Thermodynamic instability in supersaturated lysozyme solutions: Effect of salt and role of concentration fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manno, Mauro; Xiao, Caide; Bulone, Donatella; Martorana, Vincenzo; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2003-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical work has suggested that protein crystal nucleation can be affected by the separation of two metastable liquid phases with different local concentrations, or more specifically by critical density fluctuations. We measure the amplitude and correlation length of local concentration fluctuations by light scattering for supersaturated solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme (at pH 4.5 and at different NaCl concentrations, up to 7% w/v). By extrapolating the critical divergent behavior of concentration fluctuation amplitude versus temperature, we determine the spinodal line, that is the limit of stability. Cloud-point measurements are used to determine liquid-liquid coexistence, consistent with previous work. In the present work, which is an extensive study of off-critical fluctuations in supersaturated protein solution, we observe a nonclassical scaling divergent behavior of the correlation length of concentration fluctuations, thus suggesting that off-critical fluctuations may have a role in crystallization kinetics. To appropriately fit the spinodal data, an entropic term must be added to the van der Waals or to the adhesive hard-sphere model. We interpret this contribution as due to the salt-induced modulation of protein hydration.

  7. Thermodynamic instability in supersaturated lysozyme solutions: effect of salt and role of concentration fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Manno, Mauro; Xiao, Caide; Bulone, Donatella; Martorana, Vincenzo; San Biagio, Pier Luigi

    2003-07-01

    Experimental and theoretical work has suggested that protein crystal nucleation can be affected by the separation of two metastable liquid phases with different local concentrations, or more specifically by critical density fluctuations. We measure the amplitude and correlation length of local concentration fluctuations by light scattering for supersaturated solutions of hen egg-white lysozyme (at pH 4.5 and at different NaCl concentrations, up to 7% w/v). By extrapolating the critical divergent behavior of concentration fluctuation amplitude versus temperature, we determine the spinodal line, that is the limit of stability. Cloud-point measurements are used to determine liquid-liquid coexistence, consistent with previous work. In the present work, which is an extensive study of off-critical fluctuations in supersaturated protein solution, we observe a nonclassical scaling divergent behavior of the correlation length of concentration fluctuations, thus suggesting that off-critical fluctuations may have a role in crystallization kinetics. To appropriately fit the spinodal data, an entropic term must be added to the van der Waals or to the adhesive hard-sphere model. We interpret this contribution as due to the salt-induced modulation of protein hydration.

  8. ION EXCHANGE IN FUSED SALTS. II. THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALKALI METAL AND ALKALINE EARTH IONS BETWEEN CHABAZITE AND FUSED LINO3, NANO3, AND KNO3,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    ION EXCHANGE, SALTS ), (*ALKALI METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*ALKALINE EARTH METALS, ION EXCHANGE), (*NITRATES, ION EXCHANGE), SODIUM , CALCIUM, POTASSIUM...BARIUM, RUBIDIUM, CESIUM, LITHIUM COMPOUNDS, SODIUM COMPOUNDS, POTASSIUM COMPOUNDS, DISTRIBUTION, MINERALS, IONS

  9. High-temperature corrosion of metals in the salt and metallic melts containing rare earths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, V. V.; Abramov, A. V.; Zhilyakov, A. Yu.; Belikov, S. V.; Volkovich, V. A.; Polovov, I. B.; Rebrin, O. I.

    2016-09-01

    A complex of independent methods was employed to study the corrosion resistance of molybdenum, zirconium, tantalum and tungsten in chloride, chloride-fluoride and fluoride-oxide melts based on LiCl, CaCl2, NaCl- KCl, LiF, and containing rare earths. Tests were conducted for 30 h at 750-1050 °C. The metals showed excellent corrosion resistance in fused chlorides (the corrosion rates were below 0.0005 g/(m2 h). Despite the presence of chemically active fluoride ions in the chloride-fluoride melts, the metals studied also showed very low corrosion rates, except molybdenum, for which the rate of corrosion was 0,8 g/(m2 h). The corrosion resistance of tantalum was considerably reduced in the fluoride-oxide melts; the corrosion rate was over 1 g/(m2 h) corresponding to the 8-th grade of stability and placing tantalum to the group of "low stability" materials.

  10. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of two heavy metal salts in a fish cell line (RF).

    PubMed

    Goswami, Mukunda; Yadav, Kamalendra; Dubey, Akhilesh; Sharma, Bhagwati S; Konwar, Rituraj; Kumar, Ravindra; Nagpure, Naresh S; Lakra, Wazir S

    2014-01-01

    Labeo rohita (rohu) is one of most important of Indian major carps, which is highly ranked among the important freshwater aquaculture species in the world. Heavy metals are major risk factors for aquatic health, which are biomagnified through the food chain. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of different divalent salts of two heavy metals, such as zinc (ZnCl(2), ZnSO(4) and ZnNO(3)) and cadmium (CdCl(2) and CdSO(4)), in an established fish cell line, RF developed from fin tissue of L. rohita. The RF cell line was used for assessment of heavy metal cytotoxicity through various endpoint assays, including maximum tolerated dose (MTD) determination, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, neutral red (NR) uptake assay, and Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) assay. Results revealed that these heavy metal salts were cytotoxic to the RF cell line at varied concentrations. MTD values were found to be 1.563, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/L for CdCl(2), CdSO(4), ZnCl(2), Zn(NO(3))(2) and ZnSO(4), respectively. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values calculated by MTT, NR and CB assay were 53.83 ± 7.02, 58.03 ± 9.12 and 79.20 ± 15.27 for ZnSO(4), 26.44 ± 7.01, 36.60 ± 7.82 and 155.6 ± 14.75 for Zn(NO(3))(2), 20.26 ± 17.95, 16.94 ± 7.05 and 87.54 ± 7.58 for ZnCl(2), 5.166 ± 0.57, 15 ± 1 and 41.80 ± 8.38 for CdSO(4) and 4.966 ± 0.56, 9.56 ± 1.73 and 20.93 ± 4.47 for CdCl(2). This study establishes the RF cell line as an in vitro tool for assessment and monitoring of heavy metal concentration in the aquatic environment.

  11. Behaviour of kaolinite intercalation compounds with selected ammonium salts in aqueous chromate and arsenate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matusik, Jakub; Matykowska, Lucyna

    2014-08-01

    The removal of aqueous Cr(VI) and As(V) oxyanions from waters by different materials with sorption properties is of environmental importance. In this study, a methoxy-kaolinite derivative was intercalated with benzyltrimethylammonium (B1), tetramethylammonium (TMA), and benzyldimethylhexadecylammonium (B5) chlorides and the interaction of the obtained materials with oxyanions was examined. The PXRD (powder X-ray diffraction) and IR (Infrared spectroscopy) analyses indicated a monolayer arrangement of the B1 and TMA molecules in the interlayer space of the mineral, while a tilted arrangement was noticed in the case of B5. A complete or partial deintercalation of introduced molecules was observed in the reactions with aqueous solutions of Cr(VI) and As(V). In all studied systems a significant improvement of the oxyanions removal was observed as compared to the pure kaolinite. The highest uptake of oxyanions was noticed in the reaction with B5-intercalated material. This was due to precipitation of organic alkyl salts. The formation of alkylchromate was confirmed using FTIR spectroscopy. The lower uptake of oxyanions by the B1- and TMA-intercalated materials was due to lack of new solid precipitation and resulted from the ion-exchange of chlorides initially compensating the ammonia nitrogen charge. The experimental sorption isotherms for all the reactions were best represented by Langmuir equation. A gradual, two-step removal process of Cr(VI) and As(V) by B1- and TMA-intercalated materials was observed. In turn, the precipitation of alkyl salts in reaction with B5-intercalated material resulted in a rapid immobilization of the oxyanions. The kinetic data modelled using pseudo-second order equation showed very good agreement with experimental results.

  12. Diversity of endophytic Pseudomonas in Halimione portulacoides from metal(loid)-polluted salt marshes.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Jaqueline; Tacão, Marta; Fidalgo, Cátia; Alves, Artur; Henriques, Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Phytoremediation assisted by bacteria is seen as a promising alternative to reduce metal contamination in the environment. The main goal of this study was to characterize endophytic Pseudomonas isolated from Halimione portulacoides, a metal-accumulator plant, in salt marshes contaminated with metal(loid)s. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA and gyrB genes showed that isolates affiliated with P. sabulinigri (n = 16), P. koreensis (n = 10), P. simiae (n = 5), P. seleniipraecipitans (n = 2), P. guineae (n = 2), P. migulae (n = 1), P. fragi (n = 1), P. xanthomarina (n = 1), and Pseudomonas sp. (n = 1). Most of these species have never been described as endophytic. The majority of the isolates were resistant to three or more metal(loid)s. Antibiotic resistance was frequent among the isolates but most likely related to species-intrinsic features. Common acquired antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were not detected. Plasmids were detected in 43.6 % of the isolates. Isolates that affiliated with different species shared the same plasmid profile but attempts to transfer metal resistance to receptor strains were not successful. Phosphate solubilization and IAA production were the most prevalent plant growth promoting traits, and 20 % of the isolates showed activity against phytopathogenic bacteria. Most isolates produced four or more extracellular enzymes. Preliminary results showed that two selected isolates promote Arabidopsis thaliana root elongation. Results highlight the diversity of endophytic Pseudomonas in H. portulacoides from contaminated sites and their potential to assist phytoremediation by acting as plant growth promoters and as environmental detoxifiers.

  13. Synthesis and Application of Organic Phosphonate Salts as Draw Solutes in Forward Osmosis for Oil-Water Separation.

    PubMed

    Long, Qingwu; Shen, Liang; Chen, Rongbiao; Huang, Jiaqi; Xiong, Shu; Wang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The development of suitable draw solution in forward osmosis (FO) process has attracted the growing attention for water treatment purpose. In this study, a series of organic phosphonate salts (OPSs) are synthesized by one-step Mannich-like reaction, confirmed by FTIR and NMR characterizations, and applied as novel draw solutes in FO applications. Their solution properties including osmotic pressures and viscosities, as well as their FO performance as a function of the solution concentration are investigated systematically. In FO process, a higher water flux of 47-54 LMH and a negligible reverse solute flux can be achieved in the PRO (AL-DS) mode (active layer faces the draw solution) using a homemade thin-film composite membrane (PSF-TFC) and deionized water as the feed solution. Among all OPS draw solutes, the tetraethylenepentamine heptakis(methylphosphonic) sodium salt (TPHMP-Na) exhibits the best FO flux at 0.5 mol/kg concentration, which is further applied for the separation of emulsified oil-water mixture. The recovery of diluted OPS solutions is carried out via a nanofiltration (NF) system with a rejection above 92%. The aforementioned features show the great potential of OPS compounds as a novel class of draw solutes for FO applications.

  14. On the feasibility of near infrared spectroscopy to detect contaminants in water using single salt solutions as model systems.

    PubMed

    Gowen, A A; Marini, F; Tsuchisaka, Y; De Luca, S; Bevilacqua, M; O'Donnell, C; Downey, G; Tsenkova, R

    2015-01-01

    This research work evaluates the feasibility of NIRS to detect contaminants in water using single salt solutions as model systems. Previous research has indicated the potential of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detecting solutes in water; however, a comprehensive investigation of the limit of detection of this technique has not been carried out. Near infrared transmittance spectra of aqueous salt solutions in the concentration range 0.002-0.1 mol L(-1) (equivalent to 117-13,334 ppm or 0.0001-0.01% mass/mass) were investigated. The first overtone region of the near infrared spectrum (1300-1600 nm) was found to be the most effective wavelength range for prediction of salt concentration in aqueous solutions. Calibration models built using this wavelength range and employing the extended multiplicative scatter spectral pre-treatment resulted in root mean squared error of prediction values ranging from 0.004 to 0.01 mol L(-1). The limit of detection (LOD) was estimated to be of the order of 0.1% (mass/mass) or 1000 ppm. Within the framework of Aquaphotomics, it was possible to examine the effect of different salts on the NIR spectra of water in the first overtone range. Our results were confirmed through test experiments at various geographical locations employing dispersive and Fourier transform type NIRS instruments.

  15. Estimation of salt water upconing using a steady-state solution for partial completion of a pumped well.

    PubMed

    Garabedian, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    A new steady-state analytical solution to the two-dimensional radial-flow equation was developed for drawdown (head) conditions in an aquifer with constant transmissivity, no-flow conditions at the top and bottom, constant head conditions at a known radial distance, and a partially completed pumping well. The solution was evaluated for accuracy by comparison to numerical simulations using MODFLOW. The solution was then used to estimate the rise of the salt water-fresh water interface (upconing) that occurs under a pumping well, and to calculate the critical pumping rate at which the interface becomes unstable, allowing salt water to enter the pumping well. The analysis of salt water-fresh water interface rise assumed no significant effect on upconing by recharge; this assumption was tested and supported using results from a new steady-state analytical solution developed for recharge under two-dimensional radial-flow conditions. The upconing analysis results were evaluated for accuracy by comparison to those from numerical simulations using SEAWAT for salt water-fresh water interface positions under mild pumping conditions. The results from the equation were also compared with those of a published numerical sharp-interface model applied to a case on Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This comparison indicates that estimating the interface rise and maximum allowable pumping rate using the analytical method will likely be less conservative than the maximum allowable pumping rate and maximum stable interface rise from a numerical sharp-interface model.

  16. Saturated Salt Solution Method: A Useful Cadaver Embalming for Surgical Skills Training

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST. PMID:25501070

  17. Saturated salt solution method: a useful cadaver embalming for surgical skills training.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Homma, Hiroshi; Naito, Munekazu; Oda, Jun; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Kawamoto, Atsuo; Kawata, Shinichi; Sato, Norio; Fukuhara, Tomomi; Taguchi, Hirokazu; Mashiko, Kazuki; Azuhata, Takeo; Ito, Masayuki; Kawai, Kentaro; Suzuki, Tomoya; Nishizawa, Yuji; Araki, Jun; Matsuno, Naoto; Shirai, Takayuki; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Fukui, Hidekimi; Ohseto, Kiyoshige; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Itoh, Masahiro

    2014-12-01

    This article evaluates the suitability of cadavers embalmed by the saturated salt solution (SSS) method for surgical skills training (SST). SST courses using cadavers have been performed to advance a surgeon's techniques without any risk to patients. One important factor for improving SST is the suitability of specimens, which depends on the embalming method. In addition, the infectious risk and cost involved in using cadavers are problems that need to be solved. Six cadavers were embalmed by 3 methods: formalin solution, Thiel solution (TS), and SSS methods. Bacterial and fungal culture tests and measurement of ranges of motion were conducted for each cadaver. Fourteen surgeons evaluated the 3 embalming methods and 9 SST instructors (7 trauma surgeons and 2 orthopedists) operated the cadavers by 21 procedures. In addition, ultrasonography, central venous catheterization, and incision with cauterization followed by autosuture stapling were performed in some cadavers. The SSS method had a sufficient antibiotic effect and produced cadavers with flexible joints and a high tissue quality suitable for SST. The surgeons evaluated the cadavers embalmed by the SSS method to be highly equal to those embalmed by the TS method. Ultrasound images were clear in the cadavers embalmed by both the methods. Central venous catheterization could be performed in a cadaver embalmed by the SSS method and then be affirmed by x-ray. Lungs and intestines could be incised with cauterization and autosuture stapling in the cadavers embalmed by TS and SSS methods. Cadavers embalmed by the SSS method are sufficiently useful for SST. This method is simple, carries a low infectious risk, and is relatively of low cost, enabling a wider use of cadavers for SST.

  18. Localized corrosion of high performance metal alloys in an acid/salt environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, L. G.; Ontiveros, C.

    1991-01-01

    Various vacuum jacketed cryogenic supply lines at the Space Shuttle launch site at Kennedy Space Center use convoluted flexible expansion joints. The atmosphere at the launch site has a very high salt content, and during a launch, fuel combustion products include hydrochloric acid. This extremely corrosive environment has caused pitting corrosion failure in the thin walled 304L stainless steel flex hoses. A search was done to find a more corrosion resistant replacement material. The study focussed on 19 metal alloys. Tests which were performed include electrochemical corrosion testing, accelerated corrosion testing in a salt fog chamber, and long term exposure at a beach corrosion testing site. Based on the results of these tests, several nickel based alloys were found to have very high resistance to this corrosive environment. Also, there was excellent agreement between the electrochemical tests and the actual beach exposure tests. This suggests that electrochemical testing may be useful for narrowing the field of potential candidate alloys before subjecting samples to long term beach exposure.

  19. Biogeochemical and hydrological controls on fate and distribution of trace metals in oiled Gulf salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keevan, J.; Natter, M.; Lee, M.; Keimowitz, A.; Okeke, B.; Savrda, C.; Saunders, J.

    2011-12-01

    carbon source for stimulating sulfate-reducing bacteria. The high sulfur levels, coupled with the low levels of iron, indicate that iron-reducing bacteria are outcompeted by sulfate reducers in oiled salt marshes. Moreover, pore-water pH values show a general increasing trend (ranging from 6.6 to 8.0) with depth, possibly reflecting the combined effects of bacterial sulfate reduction and saltwater intrusion at depth. Despite high levels of trace metals in bulk sediments, concentrations of trace metals dissolved in pore-waters are generally low. It is very likely that high organic matter content and bacterially-mediated sulfate reduction promote metal retention through the formation of sulfide solids. Framboidal pyrites, as well as other sulfides, have been identified, and are currently undergoing XRD, SEM, and EDAX analyses. Continued research is needed to monitor possible re-mobilization of trace metals in changing redox and biogeochemical conditions.

  20. Salt-enhanced removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions by adsorption on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Bao, Zongbi; Zhang, Zhiguo; Xing, Huabin; Su, Baogen; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2013-12-15

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol has extensive industrial applications in solvent extraction, however, in view of its potential pollution to environment, the removal and recovery of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol is considered an essential step toward its sustainable use in the future. In this work, we report the removal of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol from aqueous solutions containing salts in high concentrations by adsorption on a coal-based activated carbon. Adsorption thermodynamics showed that the experimental isotherms were conformed well to the Langmuir equation. Also it was found that inorganic salts, i.e. MgCl2 and CaCl2 in high concentration significantly enhanced the adsorption capacity from 223 mg/g in the deionized water to 277 mg/g in a saline water. This phenomenon of adsorption enhancement could be ascribed to the salt-out effect. Kinetic analysis indicated that adsorption kinetics follows the pseudo-second-order equation and the adsorption rate constants increase with the salt concentration. The dynamic breakthrough volume and adsorbed amount of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol were significantly elevated when the salt is present in the water. The dynamic saturated adsorption amount increased from 218.3mg/g in the deionized water to 309.5mg/g in a salt lake brine. The Tomas model was well applied to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the characteristics parameters of the adsorption column.

  1. The on-line removal of non-regenerable salts from amine solutions using the UCARSEP{reg_sign} Process

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.; Gregory, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    Amine unit contamination with non-regenerable salts, whether as a result of acid or inorganic salt incursion, or solvent degradation, is a common industry problem. In MEA systems this is usually addressed by the use of a reclaimer but this is not a practical solution for DEA, MDEA or formulated solvents. Similarly, the old approach of purging solvent is no longer economically or environmentally justifiable. Neutralization of amine salts with a strong base can significantly prolong the useful life of the amine solution but eventually some of the salt may have to be removed, especially if mechanical losses are low. Electrodialysis (ED) has recently been applied to this problem and has been found to overcome many of the disadvantages of vacuum distillation and ion exchange technologies, both of which have been used in recent years for solvent clean-up. Union Carbide adapted ED technology to the unique conditions encountered in an amine system and developed the UCARSEP{reg_sign} Process. A mobile UCARSEP{reg_sign} unit has been built to achieve on-line salt removal rates of 40 lbmol/day (about 3,300 lb/day). This has been successfully used to clean up UCARSOL{reg_sign} solvents as well as DEA. Case studies are presented and the relative merits of this and other clean-up options are discussed.

  2. [Physical and chemical evaluation during refrigeration storage of salted catfish (Pseudoplatystoma sp.) in brine solution, and packed under vacuum].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Diana; Barrero, Marinela; Kodaira, Makie

    2009-06-01

    Salting fish in the south Venezuelan towns are still the main method of preserving fish including cutt, and salting fish process, storage and commercialization. As the result, salted-dried fish is particularly susceptible to spoilage by a number of factors, including lipid oxidation, browning meat. Packing salted fish product is an alternative increasing storage life time reducing lost of quality and enhancing the storage time. The present study evaluated the physic, chemist, and sensory quality of fish fillet from cat fish (Pseudoplatystoma sp.) from Apure state, Venezuela. Fillet fish were placed in brine solution at 36% of sodium chloride 1:2 fillet: brine solution; after, they were packed under followed conditions: vacuum, vacuum and storage under refrigeration condition, and room temperature. The results showed significant differences (p < 0.01) for moisture, salt content, and Aw. The fillets packed at vacuum and storage at 4 degrees C were significant different from the resting treatments; not significant differences were presented at room and refrigeration temperature after three moths. The best conditions treatment was vacuum packing and refrigeration at 4 degrees C.

  3. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

    2011-01-12

    This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be

  4. The solution behavior of poly(vinylpyrrolidone): its clouding in salt solution, solvation by water and isopropanol, and interaction with sodium dodecyl sulfate.

    PubMed

    Dan, Abhijit; Ghosh, Soumen; Moulik, Satya P

    2008-03-27

    This article deals with the solution properties of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) in salt and surfactant environment. The cloud point (CP) of PVP has been found to be induced by the salts NaCl, KCl, KBr, Na2SO4, MgSO4, and Na3PO4. On the basis of CP values for a salt at different [PVP], the energetics of the clouding process have been estimated. The effect of the surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), on the salt-induced CP has also been studied, and reduction in CP at low [SDS] and increase in CP at high [SDS] have been observed. The water vapor adsorption of PVP has been determined by isopiestic method. The results display a BET Type III isotherm whose analysis has helped to obtain the monolayer capacity of PVP and formation of multilayer on it. The solvation of PVP in a solution of water and a water-isopropanol mixture has been determined by conductometry from which contribution of the individual components were estimated. The interaction of PVP with SDS in solution led to formation of a complex entity, which has been studied also by conductometry adopting a binding-equilibrium scheme. SDS has been found to undergo two types of binding as monomers in the pre- critical aggregation concentration (CAC) range and as small clusters in the post CAC region. The stoichiometries of binding and binding constant were evaluated.

  5. Diclofenac Salts, VIII. Effect of the Counterions on the Permeation through Porcine Membrane from Aqueous Saturated Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Fini, Adamo; Bassini, Glenda; Monastero, Annamaria; Cavallari, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    The following bases: monoethylamine (EtA), diethylamine (DEtA), triethylamine (TEtA), monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), triethanolamine (TEA), pyrrolidine (Py), piperidine (Pp), morpholine (M), piperazine (Pz) and their N-2-hydroxyethyl (HE) analogs were employed to prepare 14 diclofenac salts. The salts were re-crystallized from water in order to obtain forms that are stable in the presence of water. Vertical Franz-type cells with a diffusional surface area of 9.62 cm2 were used to study the permeation of these diclofenac salts from their saturated solutions through an internal pig ear membrane. The receptor compartments of the cells contained 100 mL of phosphate buffer (pH 7.4); a saturated solution (5 mL) of each salt was placed in the donor compartment, thermostated at 37 °C. Aliquots were withdrawn at predetermined time intervals over 8 h and then immediately analyzed by HPLC. Fluxes were determined by plotting the permeated amount, normalized for the membrane surface area versus time. Permeation coefficients were obtained dividing the flux values J by the concentration of the releasing phase—that is, water solubility of each salt. Experimental results show that fluxes could be measured when diclofenac salts with aliphatic amines are released from a saturated aqueous solution. Different chemical species (acid, anion, ion pairs) contribute to permeation of the anti-inflammatory agent even though ion-pairs could be hypothesized to operate to a greater extent. Permeation coefficients were found higher when the counterion contains a ring; while hydroxy groups alone do not appear to play an important role, the ring could sustain permeation, disrupting the organized domains of the membrane. PMID:24300300

  6. Opto-electrochemical spectroscopy of metals in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.

    2016-03-01

    In the present investigation, holographic interferometry was utilized for the first time to determine the rate change of the electrical resistance of aluminium samples during the initial stage of anodisation processes in aqueous solution. In fact, because the resistance values in this investigation were obtained by holographic interferometry, electromagnetic method rather than electronic method, the abrupt rate change of the resistance was called electrical resistance-emission spectroscopy. The anodisation process of the aluminium samples was carried out by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) in different sulphuric acid concentrations (1.0%-2.5% H2SO4) at room temperature. In the meantime, the real time holographic interferometry was used to determine the difference between the electrical resistance of two subsequent values, dR, as a function of the elapsed time of the EIS experiment for the aluminium samples in 1.0%, 1.5%, 2.0%, and 2.5% H2SO4 solutions. The electrical resistance-emission spectra of the present investigation represent a detailed picture of not only the rate change of the electrical resistance throughout the anodisation processes but also the spectra represent the rate change of the growth of the oxide films on the aluminium samples in different solutions. As a result, a new spectrometer was developed based on the combination of the holographic interferometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy for studying in situ the electrochemical behavior of metals in aqueous solutions.

  7. The history of metals pollution in Narragansett Bay as recorded by salt-marsh sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, S.B.

    1990-01-01

    Sediment cores from 5 salt marshes from the head to the mouth of Narragansett Bay and an additional core from a lagoon on Block Island Sound were analyzed for [sup 210]Pb and for Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn, Ag, and Ni in order to examine the long-term variation of metal inputs to Narragansett Bay. The [sup 210]Pb results were used to determine accretion rates for each core. Distributions of Fe and Mn were used as indicators of chemical conditions of sediment cores and Cu, Pb, Cr, Zn, Ag, and Ni distributions with time were compared with known or estimated source inputs to examine the long-term variation of pollutant metal inputs to Narragansett Bay. At one location, duplicate cores were sampled to look at variability within a marsh. At another location, a high marsh, receiving predominantly atmospheric inputs and a low marsh, receiving waterborne and atmospheric inputs, were sampled so that atmospheric and tidal contributions could be determined. A comparison was made of the distributions of metals in bay cores and in the lagoon core. All the Rhode Island marshes accrete at rates equal to or greater than the local rise in sea level. Based on the [sup 210]Pb chronologies, pollutant metals began to increase in the mid to late 1800s, corresponding to coal burning emissions to the atmosphere. Steeper increases in the 1900s reflect industrial and sewage discharges. Maximum concentrations were reached in the 1950s and have declined almost continuously since then. Observed reductions were attributable to implementation of and improvements to sewage treatment, and controls on atmospheric emissions.

  8. New sol-gel synthetic route to transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels using inorganic salt precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Gash, A E; Tillotson, T M; Satcher Jr, J H; Hrubesh, L W; Simpson, R L

    2000-09-12

    We have developed a new sol-gel route to synthesize several transition and main-group metal oxide aerogels. The approach is straightforward, inexpensive, versatile, and it produces monolithic microporous materials with high surface areas. Specifically, we report the use of epoxides as gelation agents for the sol-gel synthesis of chromia aerogels and xerogels from simple Cr(III) inorganic salts. The dependence of both gel formation and its rate was studied by varying the solvent used, the Cr(III) precursor salt, the epoxide/Cr(III) ratio, as well as the type of epoxide employed. All of these variables were shown to affect the rate of gel formation and provide a convenient control of this parameter. Dried chromia aerogels were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analyses, results of which will be presented. Our studies have shown that rigid monolithic gels can be prepared from many different metal ions salts, provided the formal oxidation state of the metal ion is greater than or equal to +3. Conversely, when di-valent transition metal salts are used precipitated solids are the products.

  9. Anomalous ion effects on rupture and lifetime of aqueous foam films from monovalent salt solutions up to saturation concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakashev, S. I.; Nguyen, P. T.; Tsekov, R.; Hampton, M. A.; Nguyen, A. V.

    2008-09-01

    We report the effects of ions on rupture and lifetime of aqueous foam films formed from sodium chloride (NaCl), lithium chloride (LiCl), sodium acetate (NaAc), and sodium chlorate (NaClO 3) using microinterferometry. In the case of NaCl and LiCl, the foam films prepared from the salt solutions below 0.1 M were unstable they thinned until rupturing. The film lifetime measured from the first interferogram (appearing at a film thickness on the order of 500 nm) until the film rupture was only a second or so. However, relatively long lasting and nondraining films prepared from salt solutions above 0.1 M were observed. The film lifetime was significantly longer by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude, i.e., from 10 to 100 s. Importantly, both the film lifetime and the (average) thickness of the nondraining films increased with increasing salt concentration. This effect has not been observed with foam films stabilized by surfactants. The film lifetime and thickness also increased with increasing film radius. The films exhibited significant surface corrugations. The films with large radii often contained standing dimples. There was a critical film radius below which the films thinned until rupturing. In the cases of NaAc and NaClO 3, the films were unstable at all radii and salt concentrations they thinned until rupturing, ruling out the effect of solution viscosity on stabilizing the films.

  10. Survival of Bifidobacterium longum immobilized in calcium alginate beads in simulated gastric juices and bile salt solution.

    PubMed

    Lee, K Y; Heo, T R

    2000-02-01

    Bifidobacterium longum KCTC 3128 and HLC 3742 were independently immobilized (entrapped) in calcium alginate beads containing 2, 3, and 4% sodium alginate. When the bifidobacteria entrapped in calcium alginate beads were exposed to simulated gastric juices and a bile salt solution, the death rate of the cells in the beads decreased proportionally with an increase in both the alginate gel concentration and bead size. The initial cell numbers in the beads affected the numbers of survivors after exposure to these solutions; however, the death rates of the viable cells were not affected. Accordingly, a mathematical model was formulated which expressed the influences of several parameters (gel concentration, bead size, and initial cell numbers) on the survival of entrapped bifidobacteria after sequential exposure to simulated gastric juices followed by a bile salt solution. The model proposed in this paper may be useful for estimating the survival of bifidobacteria in beads and establishing optimal entrapment conditions.

  11. Salt Solutions in Carbon Nanotubes: The Role of Cation- π Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Mortuza, Golam; Wood, Brandon; Lau, Edmond; Ogitsu, Tadashi; Buchsbaum, Steven; Siwy, Zuzanna; Fornasiero, Francesco; Schwegler, Eric

    Understanding the structure of aqueous electrolytes at interfaces is essential for predicting and optimizing device performances for a wide variety of emerging energy and environmental technologies. In this work, we investigate the structure of two common salt solutions, NaCl and KCl, at a hydrophobic interface within narrow carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Using a combination of first-principles and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we find that the solvation structure of the cations in the CNTs can deviate substantially from the conventional weakly interacting hydrophobic picture. Instead, interactions between solvated ions and the π-orbitals of the CNTs are found to play a critically important role, with the ion solvation structure ultimately determined by a subtle interplay between cation- π interactions and the intrinsic flexibility of the solvation shell. In the case of K+, these effects result in an unusually strong propensity to partially desolvate and reside closer to the carbon wall than either Na+ and Cl-, in sharp contrast to the known ion ordering at the water-vapor interface. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Influence and hydrolysis kinetics in titanyl sulfate solution from the sodium hydroxide molten salt method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weijing; Chen, Desheng; Chu, Jinglong; Li, Jie; Xue, Tianyan; Wang, Lina; Wang, Dong; Qi, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Hydrated titanium dioxide (HTD) was precipitated by thermal hydrolysis in purified titanyl sulfate solution (TSS) obtained through the sodium hydroxide molten salt clean method. Various factors including the stirring speed and initial concentrations of TiOSO4, sulfuric acid, and sodium ion were studied. The main influence factors in the hydrolysis process were the initial concentrations of TiOSO4 and sulfuric acid. Contrary to the ferrous ion, the sodium ion improved the ionic activity of Ti4+, but did not decrease the crystal size. The Boltzman growth model (x=A2+(A1-A2)/{1+exp[(t-t0)/dt)]}, which focuses on two main parameters (CTiOSO4 and CH2SO4), fits the hydrolysis process well with R2>0.97. An increase in sulfuric acid concentration negatively affected the hydrolysis rates and the value of A2, while t0 increased. An increase in titanyl sulfate concentration directly reduced the hydrolysis rates and particle size of HTD, contrary to the trend for the value of t0. A simulation software called 1stopt was used to observe the relationship between Z (A1, A2, t0, dt) and a, b (CTiO2 and CH2SO4).

  13. Salting-Out of Methane in the Aqueous Solutions of Urea and Glycine-Betaine.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Mayank Kumar; Siddique, Asrar A; Tembe, B L

    2015-08-27

    We have studied the hydrophobic association and solvation of methane molecules in aqueous solutions of urea and glycine betaine (GB). We have calculated the potentials of mean force (PMFs) between methane molecules in water, aqueous GB, aqueous urea and aqueous urea-GB mixtures. The PMFs and equilibrium constants indicate that both urea and GB increase the hydrophobic association of methane. Calculation of thermodynamic parameters shows that the association of methane is stabilized by entropy whereas solvation is favored by enthalpy. In the case of the water-urea-GB mixture, both hydrophobic association and solvation are stabilized by entropy. From the investigation of radial distribution functions, running coordination numbers and excess coordination numbers, we infer that both urea and GB are preferentially excluded from methane surface in the mixtures of osmolytes and methane is preferentially solvated by water molecules in all the mixtures. The favorable exclusion of both urea and GB from the methane surface suggests that both urea and GB increase the interaction between methane molecules, i.e., salting-out of methane. We observe that addition of both urea and GB to water enhances local water structure. The calculated values of diffusion constants of water also suggest enhanced water-water interactions in the presence of urea and GB. The calculated free energies of methane in these mixtures show that methane is less soluble in the mixtures of urea and GB than in water. The data on solvation free energies support the observations obtained from the PMFs of methane molecules.

  14. In vitro corrosion of ZEK100 plates in Hank's Balanced Salt Solution

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years magnesium alloys have been intensively investigated as potential resorbable materials with appropriate mechanical and corrosion properties. Particularly in orthopedic research magnesium is interesting because of its mechanical properties close to those of natural bone, the prevention of both stress shielding and removal of the implant after surgery. Methods ZEK100 plates were examined in this in vitro study with Hank's Balanced Salt Solution under physiological conditions with a constant laminar flow rate. After 14, 28 and 42 days of immersion the ZEK100 plates were mechanically tested via four point bending test. The surfaces of the immersed specimens were characterized by SEM, EDX and XRD. Results The four point bending test displayed an increased bending strength after 6 weeks immersion compared to the 2 week group and 4 week group. The characterization of the surface revealed the presence of high amounts of O, P and Ca on the surface and small Mg content. This indicates the precipitation of calcium phosphates with low solubility on the surface of the ZEK100 plates. Conclusions The results of the present in vitro study indicate that ZEK100 is a potential candidate for degradable orthopedic implants. Further investigations are needed to examine the degradation behavior. PMID:22413949

  15. Modulation of Elasticity and Interactions in Charged Lipid Multibilayers: Monovalent Salt Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the electrostatic screening effect of NaCl solutions on the interactions between anionic lipid bilayers in the fluid lamellar phase using a Poisson–Boltzmann-based mean-field approach with constant charge and constant potential limiting charge regulation boundary conditions. The full DLVO potential, including the electrostatic, hydration and van der Waals interactions, was coupled to thermal bending fluctuations of the membranes via a variational Gaussian Ansatz. This allowed us to analyze the coupling between the osmotic pressure and the fluctuation amplitudes and compare them both simultaneously with their measured dependence on the bilayer separation, determined by the small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. High-structural resolution analysis of the scattering data revealed no significant changes of membrane structure as a function of salt concentration. Parsimonious description of our results is consistent with the constant charge limit of the general charge regulation phenomenology, with fully dissociated lipid charge groups, together with a 6-fold reduction of the membranes’ bending rigidity upon increasing NaCl concentration. PMID:27993014

  16. Protein-salt binding data from potentiometric titrations of lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl

    SciTech Connect

    Engmann, J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M. |

    1997-03-01

    An existing method for potentiometric titrations of proteins was improved, tested and applied to titrations of the enzyme hen-egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solutions containing KCl at ionic strengths from 0.1 M to 2.0 M at 25 C. Information about the protein`s net charge dependence on pH and ionic strength were obtained and salt binding numbers for the system were calculated using a linkage concept. For the pH range 2.5--11.5, the net charge slightly but distinctly increases with increasing ionic strength between 0.1 M and 2.0 M. The differences are most distinct in the pH region below 5. Above pH 11.35, the net charge decreases with increasing ionic strength. Preliminary calculation of binding numbers from titration curves at 0.1 M and 1.0 M showed selective association of chloride anions and expulsion of potassium ions at low pH. Ion-binding numbers from this work will be used to evaluate thermodynamic properties and to correlate crystallization or precipitation phase-equilibrium data in terms of a model based on the integral-equation theory of fluids which is currently under development.

  17. Factors affecting storage of compressed air in solution mined salt cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Doherty, T.J.; Thoms, R.L.

    1982-08-01

    Geologic factors affecting a salt deposit's acceptability for compressed air energy storage include diameter, depth, thickness, mineralogy, strength, presence of gas, faulting, seismic susceptibility, caprock quality, and rate of dissolution by ground water. Assessment of a potential site involves analyzing existing information, seismic surveying, exploratory drilling, examining salt and caprock, geophysical logging, measuring in situ stress, and determining hydrologic impact. Geologic exploration at Huntorf, Federal Republic of Germany, is discussed. Criteria are presented for cavern design parameters, which include octahedral shear strength, excess lateral stress, depth to cavern top, lateral salt thickness, vertical salt thickness, span, and height-todiameter ratio. Cavern, borehole and surface monitoring methods are discussed.

  18. Self-assembly of micelles in organic solutions of lecithin and bile salt: Mesoscale computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, A.; Ivanov, V.; Komarov, P.; Khokhlov, A.; Tung, S.-H.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a coarse-grained model for studying the effects of adding bile salt to lecithin organosols by means of computer simulation. This model allows us to reveal the mechanisms of experimentally observed increasing of viscosity upon increasing the bile salt concentration. We show that increasing the bile salt to lecithin molar ratio induces the growth of elongated micelles of ellipsoidal and cylindrical shape due to incorporation of disklike bile salt molecules. These wormlike micelles can entangle into transient network displaying perceptible viscoelastic properties.

  19. Method and device for electroextraction of heavy metals from technological solutions and wastewater

    DOEpatents

    Khalemsky, Aron Mikhailov; Payusov, Sergei Abramovic; Kelner, Leonid; Jo, Jae

    2005-05-03

    The basic principles of the method for heavy metals electroextraction from technological solutions and wastewater includes pretreating to remove Chromium-6 and high concentrations of heavy metals and periodically treating in a six-electrode bipolar cylindrical electroreactor made of non-conducting material to achieve lower accepted levels of impurities. Six cylindrical steel electrodes form two triode stacks and are fed with three-phase alternating current of commercial frequency (50-60 Hz), which can be pulsed. Each phase of the three-phase current is connected to three electrodes of one triode stack or in parallel to two triode stacks. The parallel connection of three-phase current to two triode stacks is performed so that the same phase of the three phase current is connected in parallel with each two opposite electrodes of six electrodes located along the periphery, or with two adjacent electrodes. A bipolar stationary aluminum electrode is situated in the inter-electrode space. In one of the embodiments, the bipolar electrode is made of a perforated heat-resistant plastic container filled with secondary aluminum and duralumin scrap. In another embodiment, the bipolar electrode of aluminum or duralumin scrap may be made without a perforated container and is placed in the inter-electrode space as a bulk scrap. In this case, to prevent shorts, each of six steel electrodes is placed in isolated perforated plastic shell with holes of 5 mm in diameter. Non-ferrous metals are extracted in a form of ferrite-chromites, and aluminates as well as hydroxyl salts deposited in the inter-electrode space without electrolysis deposits on electrodes. Deposits are separated from solution by known methods of filtration.

  20. Method and system for producing lower alcohols. [Heteropolyatomic lead salt coated with alkali metal formate

    DOEpatents

    Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.; Heiberger, J.J.

    1983-09-26

    It is an object of the present invention to provide an improved catalyst for the reaction of carbon monoxide with water to produce methanol and other lower alcohols. It is a further object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and water in which a relatively inexpensive catalyst permits the reaction at low pressures. It is also an object to provide a process for the production of methanol in which ethanol is also directly produced. It is another object to provide a process for the production of mixtures of methanol with ethanol and propanol from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. It is likewise an object to provide a system for the catalytic production of lower alcohols from the reaction of carbon monoxide and water at moderate pressure with inexpensive catalysts. In accordance with the present invention, a catalyst is provided for the reaction of carbon monoxide and water to produce lower alcohols. The catalyst includes a lead heteropolyatomic salt in mixture with a metal formate or a precursor to a metal formate.

  1. Metal-Ligand Interactions and Salt Bridges as Sacrificial Bonds in Mussel Byssus-Derived Materials.

    PubMed

    Byette, Frédéric; Laventure, Audrey; Marcotte, Isabelle; Pellerin, Christian

    2016-10-10

    The byssus that anchors mussels to solid surfaces is a protein-based material combining strength and toughness as well as a self-healing ability. These exceptional mechanical properties are explained in part by the presence of metal ions forming sacrificial bonds with amino acids. In this study, we show that the properties of hydrogel films prepared from a byssus protein hydrolyzate (BPH) can also be improved following the biomimetic formation of sacrificial bonds. Strengthening and toughening of the materials are both observed when treating films with multivalent ions (Ca(2+) or Fe(3+)) or at the BPH isoelectric point (pI) as a result of the formation of metal-ligand bonds and salt bridges, respectively. These treatments also provide a self-healing behavior to the films during recovery time following a deformation. While pI and Ca(2+) treatments have a similar but limited pH-dependent effect, the modulus, strength, and toughness of the films increase largely with Fe(3+) concentration and reach much higher values. The affinity of Fe(3+) with multiple amino acid ligands, as shown by vibrational spectroscopy, and the more covalent nature of this interaction can explain these observations. Thus, a judicious choice of treatments on polyampholyte protein-based materials enables control of their mechanical performance and self-healing behavior through the strategic exploitation of reversible sacrificial bonds.

  2. Metal cladding envelope problems, retrofit solutions, and quality control investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colantonio, Antonio

    1992-04-01

    This paper deals with a case study of a building envelope retrofit of an insulated sheet steel and corrugated metal clad building. The building in discussion is a satellite testing facility which requires specific clean room conditions with controlled interior temperature (22 degree(s)C +/- 1 degree(s)C) and high relative humidity conditions (45% +/- 3%) to facilitate satellite testing programs. Preliminary mechanical system inspections indicated substantial increase in air intake to make up for air leakage losses. An infrared inspection along with an approximate air leakage test of the building envelope was requested by the client to determine the magnitude of the building envelope problem. This investigation concluded that significant air leakage was present throughout the building envelope and that existing mechanical systems did not have sufficient capacity to pressurize the building and negate wind and stack effect. Exfiltration particularly through openings on the top sections of the building were causing interior moisture to saturate wall insulation and render it ineffective. Concern for rusting of metal components was indicated. The subsequent envelope analysis discovered a number of typical metal building details that led to poor air tightness and wall insulation ineffectiveness. These were correlated to infrared investigation data. The retrofit solutions produced for this building not only apply to this building but to other similar building types. Further investigations indicated that air leakage and mechanical system performance were significant problems with buildings using metal cladding systems comparable to this building. Quality control before, during and after construction was identified as an important function of the architectural commissioning of the retrofit work and infrared investigations were used to verify locations of air leakage and insulation effectiveness.

  3. Metal Nanoparticles Preparation In Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Harry W. Rollins

    2004-04-01

    The novel optical, electronic, and/or magnetic properties of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles have resulted in extensive research on new methods for their preparation. An ideal preparation method would allow the particle size, size distribution, crystallinity, and particle shape to be easily controlled, and would be applicable to a wide variety of material systems. Numerous preparation methods have been reported, each with its inherent advantages and disadvantages; however, an ideal method has yet to emerge. The most widely applied methods for nanoparticle preparation include the sonochemical reduction of organometallic reagents,(1&2) the solvothermal method of Alivisatos,(3) reactions in microemulsions,(4-6) the polyol method (reduction by alcohols),(7-9) and the use of polymer and solgel materials as hosts.(10-13) In addition to these methods, there are a variety of methods that take advantage of the unique properties of a supercritical fluid.(14&15) Through simple variations of temperature and pressure, the properties of a supercritical fluid can be continuously tuned from gas-like to liquid-like without undergoing a phase change. Nanoparticle preparation methods that utilize supercritical fluids are briefly reviewed below using the following categories: Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions (RESS), Reactive Supercritical Fluid Processing, and Supercritical Fluid Microemulsions. Because of its easily accessible critical temperature and pressure and environmentally benign nature, carbon dioxide is the most widely used supercritical solvent. Supercritical CO2 is unfortunately a poor solvent for many polar or ionic species, which has impeded its use in the preparation of metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. We have developed a reactive supercritical fluid processing method using supercritical carbon dioxide for the preparation of metal and metal sulfide particles and used it to prepare narrowly distributed nanoparticles of silver (Ag) and silver sulfide

  4. How can we take advantage of halophyte properties to cope with heavy metal toxicity in salt-affected areas?

    PubMed Central

    Lutts, Stanley; Lefèvre, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Background Many areas throughout the world are simultaneously contaminated by high concentrations of soluble salts and by high concentrations of heavy metals that constitute a serious threat to human health. The use of plants to extract or stabilize pollutants is an interesting alternative to classical expensive decontamination procedures. However, suitable plant species still need to be identified for reclamation of substrates presenting a high electrical conductivity. Scope Halophytic plant species are able to cope with several abiotic constraints occurring simultaneously in their natural environment. This review considers their putative interest for remediation of polluted soil in relation to their ability to sequester absorbed toxic ions in trichomes or vacuoles, to perform efficient osmotic adjustment and to limit the deleterious impact of oxidative stress. These physiological adaptations are considered in relation to the impact of salt on heavy metal bioavailabilty in two types of ecosystem: (1) salt marshes and mangroves, and (2) mine tailings in semi-arid areas. Conclusions Numerous halophytes exhibit a high level of heavy metal accumulation and external NaCl may directly influence heavy metal speciation and absorption rate. Maintenance of biomass production and plant water status makes some halophytes promising candidates for further management of heavy-metal-polluted areas in both saline and non-saline environments. PMID:25672360

  5. Reoxidation of uranium metal immersed in a Li2O-LiCl molten salt after electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eun-Young; Jeon, Min Ku; Lee, Jeong; Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Sang Kwon; Lee, Sung-Jai; Heo, Dong Hyun; Kang, Hyun Woo; Jeon, Sang-Chae; Hur, Jin-Mok

    2017-03-01

    We present our findings that uranium (U) metal prepared by using the electrolytic reduction process for U oxide (UO2) in a Li2O-LiCl salt can be reoxidized into UO2 through the reaction between the U metal and Li2O in LiCl. Two salt types were used for immersion of the U metal: one was the salt used for electrolytic reduction, and the other was applied to the unused LiCl salts with various concentrations of Li2O and Li metal. Our results revealed that the degree of reoxidation increases with the increasing Li2O concentration in LiCl and that the presence of the Li metal in LiCl suppresses the reoxidation of the U metal.

  6. A mechanistic analysis of the increase in the thermal stability of proteins in aqueous carboxylic acid salt solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, J. K.; Bhat, R.

    1999-01-01

    The stability of proteins is known to be affected significantly in the presence of high concentration of salts and is highly pH dependent. Extensive studies have been carried out on the stability of proteins in the presence of simple electrolytes and evaluated in terms of preferential interactions and increase in the surface tension of the medium. We have carried out an in-depth study of the effects of a series of carboxylic acid salts: ethylene diamine tetra acetate, butane tetra carboxylate, propane tricarballylate, citrate, succinate, tartarate, malonate, and gluconate on the thermal stability of five different proteins that vary in their physico-chemical properties: RNase A, cytochrome c, trypsin inhibitor, myoglobin, and lysozyme. Surface tension measurements of aqueous solutions of the salts indicate an increase in the surface tension of the medium that is very strongly correlated with the increase in the thermal stability of proteins. There is also a linear correlation of the increase in thermal stability with the number of carboxylic groups in the salt. Thermal stability has been found to increase by as much as 22 C at 1 M concentration of salt. Such a high thermal stability at identical concentrations has not been reported before. The differences in the heat capacities of denaturation, deltaCp for RNase A, deduced from the transition curves obtained in the presence of varying concentrations of GdmCl and that of carboxylic acid salts as a function of pH, indicate that the nature of the solvent medium and its interactions with the two end states of the protein control the thermodynamics of protein denaturation. Among the physico-chemical properties of proteins, there seems to be an interplay of the hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that lead to an overall stabilizing effect. Increase in surface free energy of the solvent medium upon addition of the carboxylic acid salts appears to be the dominant factor in governing the thermal stability of proteins

  7. Coordination effect-regulated CO2 capture with an alkali metal onium salts/crown ether system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen; Jiang, Deen; Zhu, Xiang; Tian, Chengcheng; Brown, Suree; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; He, Liang-Nian; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A coordination effect was employed to realize equimolar CO2 absorption, adopting easily synthesized amino group containing absorbents (alkali metal onium salts). The essence of our strategy was to increase the steric hindrance of cations so as to enhance a carbamic acid pathway for CO2 capture. Our easily synthesized alkali metal amino acid salts or phenolates were coordinated with crown ethers, in which highly sterically hindered cations were obtained through a strong coordination effect of crown ethers with alkali metal cations. For example, a CO2 capacity of 0.99 was attained by potassium prolinate/18-crown-6, being characterized by NMR, FT-IR, and quantum chemistry calculations to go through a carbamic acid formation pathway. The captured CO2 can be stripped under very mild conditions (50 degrees C, N-2). Thus, this protocol offers an alternative for the development of technological innovation towards efficient and low energy processes for carbon capture and sequestration.

  8. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. V. Graph entropy analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved ions in water tend to form polydisperse ion aggregates such as ion pairs, relatively compact ion clusters, and even spatially extended ion networks with increasing salt concentration. Combining molecular dynamics simulation and graph theoretical analysis methods, we recently studied morphological structures of ion aggregates with distinctively different characteristics. They can be distinguished from each other by calculating various spectral graph theoretical properties such as eigenvalues and eigenvectors of adjacency matrices of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks, minimum path lengths, clustering coefficients, and degree distributions. Here, we focus on percolation and graph entropic properties of ion aggregates and water hydrogen-bonding networks in high salt solutions. Ion network-forming K+ and SCN- ions at high concentrations show a percolating behavior in their aqueous solutions, but ion cluster-forming ions in NaCl solutions do not show such a transition from isolated ion aggregates to percolating ion-water mixture morphology. Despite that the ion aggregate structures are strikingly different for either cluster- or network-forming ions in high salt solutions, it is interesting that the water structures remain insensitive to the electrostatic properties, such as charge densities and polydentate properties, of dissolved ions, and morphological structures of water H-bonding networks appear to be highly robust regardless of the nature and concentration of salt. We anticipate that the present graph entropy analysis results would be of use in understanding a variety of anomalous behaviors of interfacial water around biomolecules as well as electric conductivities of high electrolyte solutions.

  9. Growth of single crystals of organic salts with large second-order optical nonlinearities by solution processes for devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, Thomas M.

    1995-01-01

    Data obtained from the electric field induced second harmonic generation (EFISH) and Kurtz Powder Methods will be provided to MSFC for further refinement of their method. A theoretical model for predicting the second-order nonlinearities of organic salts is being worked on. Another task is the synthesis of a number of salts with various counterions. Several salts with promising SHG activities and new salts will be tested for the presence of two crystalline forms. The materials will be recrystallized from dry and wet solvents and compared for SHG efficiency. Salts that have a high SHG efficiency and no tendency to form hydrates will be documented. The synthesis of these materials are included in this report. A third task involves method to aid in the growth of large, high quality single crystals by solution processes. These crystals will be characterized for their applicability in the fabrication of devices that will be incorporated into optical computers in future programs. Single crystals of optimum quality may be obtained by crystal growth in low-gravity. The final task is the design of a temperature lowering single crystal growth apparatus for ground based work. At least one prototype will be built.

  10. Development of tropine-salt aqueous two-phase systems and removal of hydrophilic ionic liquids from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haoran; Yao, Shun; Qian, Guofei; Song, Hang

    2016-08-26

    A novel aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) composed of a small molecule organic compound tropine and an organic or inorganic salt aqueous solution has been developed for the first time. The phase behavior of tropine-salt ATPS was systemically investigated and the phase equilibrium data were measured in different temperatures and concentrations and correlated by the Merchuk equation with satisfactory results. The detection of the conductivity and particle size proved the formation of micelle in the process of forming tropine-salt ATPS. The separation application of the ATPS was assessed with the removal of hydrophilic benzothiazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) from aqueous solution. The result showed that ILs were effectively extracted into the top tropine-rich phase. Finally, ILs in the top tropine-rich phase were further separated by the means of adsorption-desorption with DM301 macroporous resin and ethanol. The method of novel tropine-salt ATPS combined with adsorption-desorption is demonstrated a promising alternative thought and approach for the removal or recovery of hydrophilic compounds from aqueous media and also could provide a potential application for bio-separation.

  11. Model of the biotic cycle "plants germs - microorganisms" by affect heavy metal salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisman, Tamara

    The growth of wheat germ roots exposed to heavy metal salts (ZnSO4) was studied experimentally and theoretically. During the experiment the plant seeds were preliminarily treated with an experimental microbial association. As a result, data were obtained about the decrease of the inhibiting effect of zinc on the growth of wheat germ roots where the seeds had been treated with the microbial association. To understand such effect, calculations were made to reveal the specific growth rate of a germ root depending on the inhibitor concentration with and without microorganism association treatment. It was shown that in case with the wheat germ roots the seeds of which had been treated with the microorganisms the inhibition constant (kI = 45 MPC (Maximum Permissible Concentration) was higher than in the case with the roots growing out of the seeds that hadn't been treated with the microorganisms (kI = 32 MPC). One of possible reasons for the decrease of growth inhibition of wheat germ roots by zinc salt is the protective function of microorganism's treatment of the seeds. To verify and confirm the experimental results, a mathematical model was created imitating the interaction between wheat germ roots and microbial association exposed to an inhibitor. Investigation of the model proved that the microbial association has a positive effect on the growth of wheat germ roots exposed to an inhibitor. The experimental and theoretical results agreed quantitatively. It was found out that the increase of the inhibitor concentration led to the effect of maximum relief of zinc inhibiting impact. The work is supported by grants Yenissei 07-04-96806.

  12. 1H NMR spectroscopic analysis detects metabolic disturbances in rat urine on acute exposure to heavy metal tungsten alloy based metals salt.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ritu; Rana, Poonam; Gupta, Mamta; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Srivastava, Shatakshi; Roy, Raja; Khushu, Subash

    2014-03-25

    Heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) have been found to be safer alternatives for making military munitions. Recently, some studies demonstrating the toxic potential of HMTAs have raised concern over the safety issues, and further propose that HMTAs exposure may lead to physiological disturbances as well. To look for the systemic effect of acute toxicity of HMTA based metals salt, (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) spectroscopic profiling of rat urine was carried out. Male Sprague Dawley rats were administered (intraperitoneal) low and high dose of mixture of HMTA based metals salt and NMR spectroscopy was carried out in urine samples collected at 8, 24, 72 and 120 h post dosing (p.d.). Serum biochemical parameters and liver histopathology were also conducted. The (1)H NMR spectra were analysed using multivariate analysis techniques to show the time- and dose-dependent biochemical variations in post HMTA based metals salt exposure. Urine metabolomic analysis showed changes associated with energy metabolism, amino acids, N-methyl nicotinamide, membrane and gut flora metabolites. Multivariate analysis showed maximum variation with best classification of control and treated groups at 24h p.d. At the end of the study, for the low dose group most of the changes at metabolite level reverted to control except for the energy metabolites; whereas, in the high dose group some of the changes still persisted. The observations were well correlated with histopathological and serum biochemical parameters. Further, metabolic pathway analysis clarified that amongst all the metabolic pathways analysed, tricarboxylic acid cycle was most affected at all the time points indicating a switchover in energy metabolism from aerobic to anaerobic. These results suggest that exposure of rats to acute doses of HMTA based metals salt disrupts physiological metabolism with moderate injury to the liver, which might indirectly result from heavy metals induced oxidative stress.

  13. Hydrate-based heavy metal separation from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongchen; Dong, Hongsheng; Yang, Lei; Yang, Mingjun; Li, Yanghui; Ling, Zheng; Zhao, Jiafei

    2016-01-01

    A novel hydrate-based method is proposed for separating heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. We report the first batch of experiments and removal characteristics in this paper, the effectiveness and feasibility of which are verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis and cross-experiment. 88.01–90.82% of removal efficiencies for Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ were obtained. Further study showed that higher R141b–effluent volume ratio contributed to higher enrichment factor and yield of dissociated water, while lower R141b–effluent volume ratio resulted in higher removal efficiency. This study provides insights into low-energy, intensive treatment of wastewater. PMID:26887357

  14. OSMOTIC COEFFICIENTS, SOLUBILITIES, AND DELIQUESCENCE RELATIONS IN MIXED AQUEOUS SALT SOLUTIONS AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    M.S. Gruszkiewicz; D.A. Palmer

    2006-02-22

    While thermodynamic properties of pure aqueous electrolytes are relatively well known at ambient temperature, there are far fewer data for binary systems extending to elevated temperatures and high concentrations. There is no general theoretically sound basis for prediction of the temperature dependence of ionic activities, and consequently temperature extrapolations based on ambient temperature data and empirical equations are uncertain and require empirical verification. Thermodynamic properties of mixed brines in a wide range of concentrations would enhance the understanding and precise modeling of the effects of deliquescence of initially dry solids in humid air in geological environments and in modeling the composition of waters during heating, cooling, evaporation or condensation processes. These conditions are of interest in the analysis of waters on metal surfaces at the proposed radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The results obtained in this project will be useful for modeling the long-term evolution of the chemical environment, and this in turn is useful for the analysis of the corrosion of waste packages. In particular, there are few reliable experimental data available on the relationship between relative humidity and composition that reveals the eutonic points of the mixtures and the mixture deliquescence RH. The deliquescence RH for multicomponent mixtures is lower than that of pure component or binary solutions, but is not easy to predict quantitatively since the solutions are highly nonideal. In this work we used the ORNL low-temperature and high-temperature isopiestic facilities, capable of precise measurements of vapor pressure between ambient temperature and 250 C for determination of not only osmotic coefficients, but also solubilities and deliquescence points of aqueous mixed solutions in a range of temperatures. In addition to standard solutions of CaCl{sub 2}, LiCl, and NaCl used as references, precise direct

  15. Geobacter sp. SD-1 with enhanced electrochemical activity in high-salt concentration solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan; Call, Douglas; Wang, Aijie; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-12-01

    An isolate, designated strain SD-1, was obtained from a biofilm dominated by Geobacter sulfurreducens in a microbial fuel cell. The electrochemical activity of strain SD-1 was compared with type strains, G. sulfurreducens PCA and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, and a mixed culture in microbial electrolysis cells. SD-1 produced a maximum current density of 290 ± 29 A m−3 in a high-concentration phosphate buffer solution (PBS-H, 200 mM). This current density was significantly higher than that produced by the mixed culture (189 ± 44 A m−3) or the type strains (< 70 A m−3). In a highly saline water (SW; 50 mM PBS and 650 mM NaCl), current by SD-1 (158 ± 4 A m−3) was reduced by 28% compared with 50 mM PBS (220 ± 4 A m−3), but it was still higher than that of the mixed culture (147 ± 19 A m−3), and strains PCA and GS-15 did not produce any current. Electrochemical tests showed that the improved performance of SD-1 was due to its lower charge transfer resistance and more negative potentials produced at higher current densities. These results show that the electrochemical activity of SD-1 was significantly different than other Geobacter strains and mixed cultures in terms of its salt tolerance.

  16. Effects of solution mining of salt on wetland hydrology as inferred from tree rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yanosky, T.M.; Kappel, W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Radial growth and concentrations of selected elements within rings were studied in white pine (Pinus strobus) trees from a wetland in central New York approximately 5 km north of a salt-solution mining field that operated from 1889 to 1988. Trees seemingly document three sequential episodes of mine-induced alterations of groundwater discharge irrigating the wetland during the 100-year period. The radial growth of trees established before the onset of mining declined abruptly in the early 1890s and remained suppressed until about 1960, as did growth of numerous other trees that became established after the onset of mining. Suppressed pre-1960 radial growth coincided with the interval that surface water was injected into the saltbeds, suggesting that losses of injected water to the bedrock and/or unconsolidated deposits increased groundwater flow into the wetland. An abrupt and sustained enhancement of radial growth beginning about 1960 indicates that the wetland became drier, and thus more conducive to tree growth, when injection practices were discontinued in the late 1950s despite the continued pumping of brine. Following the cessation of mining in the late 1980s, head pressures again increased in the upper valley, driving chloride-enriched flow northward along regional bedding-plane fractures and into the wetland. Large concentrations of chloride were detected within the most recently formed rings of some trees. As the result of chloride-enriched irrigation, the radial growth of some trees declined, and some trees died. Thus trees have preserved evidence of a century of hydrologic alterations, unobtainable by other means, where the effects of brine mining have not been documented previously.

  17. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. II. Spectral graph analysis of water hydrogen-bonding network and ion aggregate structures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2014-10-21

    Graph theory in mathematics and computer science is the study of graphs that are structures with pairwise connections between any objects. Here, the spectral graph theory and molecular dynamics simulation method are used to describe both morphological variation of ion aggregates in high salt solutions and ion effects on water hydrogen-bonding network structure. From the characteristic value analysis of the adjacency matrices that are graph theoretical representations of ion clusters, ion networks, and water H-bond structures, we obtained the ensemble average eigenvalue spectra revealing intricate connectivity and topology of ion aggregate structure that can be classified as either ion cluster or ion network. We further show that there is an isospectral relationship between the eigenvalue spectra of ion networks in high KSCN solutions and those of water H-bonding networks. This reveals the isomorphic relationship between water H-bond structure and ion-ion network structure in KSCN solution. On the other hand, the ion clusters formed in high NaCl solutions are shown to be graph-theoretically and morphologically different from the ion network structures in KSCN solutions. These observations support the bifurcation hypothesis on large ion aggregate growth mechanism via either ion cluster or ion network formation. We thus anticipate that the present spectral graph analyses of ion aggregate structures and their effects on water H-bonding network structures in high salt solutions can provide important information on the specific ion effects on water structures and possibly protein stability resulting from protein-water interactions.

  18. [Concentrations and distribution characteristics of PCDD/Fs in spent etching solution and its copper salt recycling products].

    PubMed

    Qing, Xian; Han, Jing-Lei; Wen, Yan-Shen

    2013-02-01

    Concentrations of 17 PCDD/Fs congeners in spent etching solution and its copper salt recycling products were determined by the high resolution gas chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC-HRMS). The PCDD/F concentrations and corresponding WHO-TEQ (toxic equivalent quantity) values were in the range of 0-3 460 pg.L (mean= 616 pg.L-1) and 0-246 pg.L-1 (mean = 42.9 pg.L-1) , respectively, in the spent etching solution, and 1.08-24.6 ng.kg-1 (mean = 8.83 ng.kg-1) and 0.112-0.715 ng.kg-1 (mean = 0.338 ng.kg-1), respectively, in the copper salt products. The established purification treatment technique could remove most of the PCDD/Fs in the etching solution. Of the copper products, higher PCDD/F concentrations were detected in industrial products than in feed grade and plating grade products. Similar distribution characteristics were found for PCDD/ Fs in all copper salt products as the followings: 1. PCDFs were more abundant than PCDDs, 2. high chlorinated congeners were more abundant than low chlorinated congeners, except for 2,3,7,8-TCDF in the copper sulfate products.

  19. Formation of globules and aggregates of DNA chains in DNA/polyethylene glycol/monovalent salt aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Kawakita, H; Uneyama, T; Kojima, M; Morishima, K; Masubuchi, Y; Watanabe, H

    2009-09-07

    It has been known that giant DNA shows structural transitions in aqueous solutions under the existence of counterions and other polymers. However, the mechanism of these transitions has not been fully understood. In this study, we directly observed structures of probed (dye-labeled), dilute DNA chains in unprobed DNA/polyethylene glycol (PEG)/monovalent salt (NaCl) aqueous solutions with fluorescent microscopy to examine this mechanism. Specifically, we varied the PEG molecular weight and salt concentration to investigate the effect of competition between the depletion and electrostatic interactions on the coil-globule transition and the aggregate formation. It was found that the globules coexist with the aggregates when the unprobed DNA chains have a concentration higher than their overlap concentration. We discuss the stability of the observed structures on the basis of a free energy model incorporating the attractive depletion energy, the repulsive electrostatic energy, and the chain bending energy. This model suggested that both of the globules and aggregates are more stable than the random coil at high salt concentrations/under existence of PEG and the transition occurs when the depletion interaction overwhelms the electrostatic interaction. However, the coexistence of the globule and aggregate was not deduced from the thermodynamic model, suggesting a nonequilibrium aspect of the DNA solution and metastabilities of these structures. Thus, the population ratio of globules and aggregates was also analyzed on the basis of a kinetic model. The analysis suggested that the depletion interaction dominates this ratio, rationalizing the coexistence of globules and aggregates.

  20. Absorption of 308-nm excimer laser radiation by balanced salt solution, sodium hyaluronate, and human cadaver eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Keates, R.H.; Bloom, R.T.; Schneider, R.T.; Ren, Q.; Sohl, J.; Viscardi, J.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Absorption of the excimer laser radiations of 193-nm argon fluorine and 308-nm xenon chloride in balanced salt solution, sodium hyaluronate, and human cadaver eyes was measured. The absorption of these materials as considerably different for the two wavelengths; we found that 308-nm light experienced much less absorption than the 193-nm light. The extinction coefficient (k) for 308 nm was k = 0.19/cm for balanced salt solution and k = 0.22/cm for sodium hyaluronate. In contrast to this, the extinction coefficient for 193 nm was k = 140/cm for balanced salt solution and k = 540/cm for sodium hyaluronate. Two 1-day-old human phakic cadaver eyes showed complete absorption with both wavelengths. Using aphakic eyes, incomplete absorption was noted at the posterior pole with 308 nm and complete absorption was noted with 193 nm. The extinction in the anterior part of aphakic eyes (the first 6 mm) was 4.2/cm for 308 nm, meaning that the intensity of the light is reduced by a factor of 10 after traveling the first 5.5 mm. However, we observed that the material in the eye fluoresces, meaning the 308 nm is transformed into other (longer) wavelengths that travel through the total eye with minimal absorption. Conclusions drawn from this experiment are that the use of the 308-nm wavelength may have undesirable side effects, while the use of the 193-nm wavelength should be consistent with ophthalmic use on both the cornea and the lens.

  1. Modeling of Flow, Transport and Controlled Sedimentation Phenomena during Mixing of Salt Solutions in Complex Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skouras, Eugene D.; Jaho, Sofia; Pavlakou, Efstathia I.; Sygouni, Varvara; Petsi, Anastasia; Paraskeva, Christakis A.

    2015-04-01

    The deposition of salts in porous media is a major engineering phenomenon encountered in a plethora of industrial and environmental applications where in some cases is desirable and in other not (oil production, geothermal systems, soil stabilization etc). Systematic approach of these problems requires knowledge of the key mechanisms of precipitating salts within the porous structures, in order to develop new methods to control the process. In this work, the development and the solution of spatiotemporally variable mass balances during salt solution mixing along specific pores were performed. Both analytical models and finite differences CFD models were applied for the study of flow and transport with simultaneous homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation (by crystal growth on the surface of the pores) in simple geometries, while unstructured finite elements and meshless methods were developed and implemented for spatial discretization, reconstruction, and solution of transport equations and homogeneous / heterogeneous reactions in more complex geometries. At initial stages of this work, critical problem parameters were identified, such as the characteristics of the porosity, the number of dissolved components, etc. The parameters were then used for solving problems which correspond to available experimental data. For each combination of ions and materials, specific data and process characteristics were included: (a) crystal kinetics (nucleation, growth rates or reaction surface rates of crystals, critical suspension concentrations), (b) physico-chemical properties (bulk density, dimensions of generated crystals, ion diffusion coefficients in the solution), (c) operating parameters (macroscopic velocity, flow, or pressure gradient of the solution, ion concentration) (d) microfluidic data (geometry, flow area), (e) porosity data in Darcy description (initial porosity, specific surface area, tortuosity). During the modeling of flow and transport in three

  2. Electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions at metal electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Augustynski, J.; Jermann, B.; Kedzierzawski, P.

    1996-12-31

    The quantities of carbon stored in the form of atmospheric carbon dioxide, CO{sub 2} in the hydrosphere and carbonates in the terrestrial environment substantially exceed those of fossil fuels. In spite of this the industrial use of carbon dioxide as a source of chemical carbon is presently limited to preparation of urea and certain carboxylic acids as well as organic carbonates and polycarbonates. However, the situation is expected to change in the future, if effective catalytic systems allowing to activate carbon dioxide will become available. In this connection, the electrochemical reduction of CO{sub 2}, requiring only an additional input of water and electrical energy, appears as an attractive possibility. For more than 100 years formic acid and formates of alkali metals were considered as the only significant products of the electroreduction of carbon dioxide in aqueous solutions. The highest current efficiencies, exceeding 90 %, were obtained either with mercury or with amalgam electrodes. The only comprehensive study regarding kinetics of CO{sub 2} reduction in aqueous solution has been performed by Eyring et al. using a mercury cathode. This paper describes electrolysis studies.

  3. Remote laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for the detection and removal of salt on metal and polymeric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, M; Grönlund, R; Lundqvist, M; Larsson, A; Kröll, S; Svanberg, S

    2006-10-01

    The detection of contamination such as salt in outdoor high-voltage insulator systems and its subsequent removal are vital for a reliable transmission of electric power. Remote detection of salt on a copper metal surface was carried out by using a mobile laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) Lidar system with a laser wavelength of 355 nm. Detection of salt on a polymeric high-voltage insulator was obtained when an additional lens was inserted into the beam path, and the number of photons that was detected could be calculated by using a calibrated white light source. Ablative cleaning could readily be carried out with LIBS and was verified by observing the disappearance of the sodium D-line emission.

  4. Glyoxal and Methylglyoxal Setschenow Salting Constants in Sulfate, Nitrate, and Chloride Solutions: Measurements and Gibbs Energies.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Eleanor M; Elm, Jonas; Kurtén, Theo; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Ziemann, Paul J; Volkamer, Rainer

    2015-10-06

    Knowledge about Setschenow salting constants, KS, the exponential dependence of Henry's Law coefficients on salt concentration, is of particular importance to predict secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from soluble species in atmospheric waters with high salt concentrations, such as aerosols. We have measured KS of glyoxal and methylglyoxal for the atmospherically relevant salts (NH4)2SO4, NH4NO3, NaNO3, and NaCl and find that glyoxal consistently "salts-in" (KS of -0.16, -0.06, -0.065, -0.1 molality(-1), respectively) while methylglyoxal "salts-out" (KS of +0.16, +0.075, +0.02, +0.06 molality(-1)). We show that KS values for different salts are additive and present an equation for use in atmospheric models. Additionally, we have performed a series of quantum chemical calculations to determine the interactions between glyoxal/methylglyoxal monohydrate with Cl(-), NO3(-), SO4(2-), Na(+), and NH4(+) and find Gibbs free energies of water displacement of -10.9, -22.0, -22.9, 2.09, and 1.2 kJ/mol for glyoxal monohydrate and -3.1, -10.3, -7.91, 6.11, and 1.6 kJ/mol for methylglyoxal monohydrate with uncertainties of 8 kJ/mol. The quantum chemical calculations support that SO4(2-), NO3(-), and Cl(-) modify partitioning, while cations do not. Other factors such as ion charge or partitioning volume effects likely need to be considered to fully explain salting effects.

  5. Rheological and kinetic study of the ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum in aqueous saline and salt-free solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruoshi; Feke, Donald L

    2015-11-01

    The ultrasonic degradation of locust bean gum (LBG) in aqueous solutions has been studied at 25°C for ultrasonication times up to 120 min. Although LBG is not a polyelectrolyte, the degradation extent and kinetics were found to be somewhat sensitive to the ionic conditions in solution, and this is attributed to changes in molecular conformation that can occur in different salt environments. Ultrasonic degradation was tracked by rheological measurements that lead to the determination of intrinsic viscosity for the LBG molecules. A kinetic model was also developed and successfully applied to characterize and predict the degradation results.

  6. Soft X-ray absorption spectra of aqueous salt solutions with highly charged cations in liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Craig P.; Uejio, Janel S.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Smith, Jared D.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2010-03-11

    X-ray absorption spectra of 1M aqueous solutions of indium (III) chloride, yttrium (III) bromide, lanthanum (III) chloride, tin (IV) chloride and chromium (III) chloride have been measured at the oxygen K-edge. Relatively minor changes are observed in the spectra compared to that of pure water. SnCl{sub 4} and CrCl{sub 3} exhibit a new onset feature which is attributed to formation of hydroxide or other complex molecules in the solution. At higher energy, only relatively minor, but salt-specific changes in the spectra occur. The small magnitude of the observed spectral changes is ascribed to offsetting perturbations by the cations and anions.

  7. Speciation of phytate ion in aqueous solution. Alkali metal complex formation in different ionic media.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Concetta; Milea, Demetrio; Pettignano, Alberto; Sammartano, Silvio

    2003-08-01

    The acid-base properties of phytic acid [ myo-inositol 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakis(dihydrogen phosphate)] (H(12)Phy; Phy(12-)=phytate anion) were studied in aqueous solution by potentiometric measurements ([H+]-glass electrode) in lithium and potassium chloride aqueous media at different ionic strengths (0< I mol L(-1)< or =3) and at t=25 degrees C. The protonation of phytate proved strongly dependent on both ionic medium and ionic strength. The protonation constants obtained in alkali metal chlorides are considerably lower than the corresponding ones obtained in a previous paper in tetraethylammonium iodide (Et(4)NI; e.g., at I=0.5 mol L(-1), log K(3)(H)=11.7, 8.0, 9.1, and 9.1 in Et(4)NI, LiCl, NaCl and KCl, respectively; the protonation constants in Et(4)NI and NaCl were already reported), owing to the strong interactions occurring between the phytate and alkaline cations present in the background salt. We explained this in terms of complex formation between phytate and alkali metal ions. Experimental evidence allows us to consider the formation of 13 mixed proton-metal-ligand complexes, M(j)H(i)Phy((12-i-j)-), (M+ =Li+, Na+, K+), with j< or =7 and i< or =6, in the range 2.5< or =pH< or =10 (some measurements, at low ionic strength, were extended to pH=11). In particular, all the species formed are negatively charged: i+j-12=-5, -6. Very high formation percentages of M+-phytate species are observed in all the pH ranges investigated. The stability of alkali metal complexes follows the trend Li+ > or =Na+K+. Some measurements were also performed at constant ionic strength (I=0.5 mol L(-1)), using different mixtures of Et(4)NI and alkali metal chlorides, in order to confirm the formation of hypothesized and calculated metal-proton-ligand complex species and to obtain conditional protonation constants in these multi-component ionic media.

  8. Evaluation and elimination of inhibitory effects of salts and heavy metal ions on biodegradation of Congo red by Pseudomonas sp. mutant.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Kannappan Panchamoorthy; Kathiravan, Mathur Natarajan; Srinivasan, Raman; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian

    2011-02-01

    In this study, it was attempted to evaluate the influences and also recommended some elimination methods for inhibitory effects offered by salts and heavy metal ions. Congo red dye solution treated with mutant Pseudomonas sp. was taken as a model system for study. The salts used in this study are NaCl, CaCl(2) and MgSO(4)· 7H(2)O. Though the growth was inhibited at concentrations above 4 g/l, toleration was achieved by acclimatization process. In case of heavy metal ions, Cr (VI) showed low inhibition up to 500 mg/l of concentration, compared to Zn (II) and Cu (II). It was due to the presence of chromium reductase enzyme which was confirmed by SDS-PAGE. Zn (II) and Cu (II) ion inhibitions were eliminated by chelation with EDTA. The critical ion concentrations obtained as per Han-Levenspiel model for Cr (VI), Zn (II) and Cu (II) were 0.8958, 0.3028 and 0.204 g/l respectively.

  9. Electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometric study of salt cluster ions: part 2--salts of polyatomic acid groups and of multivalent metals.

    PubMed

    Hao, C; March, R E

    2001-05-01

    Salt cluster ions formed from 0.05 M solutions of CaCl(2), CuCl(2) and Na(A)B (where A = 1 or 2 and B = CO(3)(2-), HCO(3)(-), H(2)PO(4)(-) and HPO(4)(2-)) were studied by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The effects on salt cluster ions of droplet pH and of redox reactions induced by electrospray provide information on the electrospray process. CaCl(2) solution yielded salt cluster ions of the form (CaCl(2))(n)(CaCl)(x)(x+) and (CaCl(2))(n)(Cl)(y)(y-), where x, y = 1-3, in positive- and negative-ion modes, respectively. Upon collision induced dissociation (CID), singly charged CaCl(2) cluster ions fragmented, doubly charged cluster ions generated either singly or both singly and doubly charged fragment ions, depending on the cluster mass, and triply charged clusters fragmented predominantly by the loss of charged species. CuCl(2) solution yielded nine series of cluster ions of the form (CuCl(2))(n)(CuCl)(m) plus Cu(+), CuCl(+), or Cl(-). CuCl, the reductive product of CuCl(2), was observed as a neutral component of positively and negatively charged cluster ions. Free electrons were formed in a visible discharge that bridged the gap between the electrospray capillary and the sampling cone brought about the reduction of Cu(2+) to Cu(+). Upon CID, these cluster ions fragmented to lose CuCl(2), CuCl, Cl, and Cl(2). Na(2)CO(3) and NaHCO(3) solutions yielded cluster ions of the form (Na(2)CO(3))(n) plus Na(+) or NaCO(3)(-). Small numbers of NaHCO(3) molecules were found in some cluster ions obtained with the NaHCO(3) solution. For both Na(2)HPO(4) and NaH(2)PO(4) solutions, ions of the form (Na(2)HPO(4))(h), (NaH(2)PO(4))(i), (Na(3)PO(4))(j), (NaPO(3))(k) plus Na(+), PO(3)(-) or H(2)PO(4)(-) were observed. In addition, ions having one or two phosphoric acid (H(3)PO(4)) molecules were observed from the NaH(2)PO(4) solution while ions containing one sodium hydroxide (NaOH) molecule were observed from the Na(2)HPO(4) solution. The cluster ions observed from

  10. Heavy metal displacement in salt-water-irrigated soil during phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Wahla, Intkhab Hazoor; Kirkham, M B

    2008-09-01

    In regions where phytoremediation is carried out, brackish water must often be used. However, no information exists concerning the consequences of saline-water irrigation on the mobility of heavy metals in sludge applied to soil during phytoremediation. The purpose of this experiment was to determine the effect of NaCl irrigation on displacement of seven heavy metals in sludge (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) applied to the surface of soil columns containing barley plants. Half the columns received NaCl irrigation (10,000 mg L(-1)) and half the columns received tap-water irrigation. Half the columns were treated with the chelating agent EDTA. With no EDTA, irrigation with the NaCl solution increased the concentrations of Cd, Fe, Mn, and Pb in the drainage water above drinking-water standards. Irrigation of sludge farms with brackish water is not recommended, because saline water increased the mobility of the heavy metals and they polluted the drainage water.

  11. A new class of Solvent-in-Salt electrolyte for high-energy rechargeable metallic lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Suo, Liumin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Li, Hong; Armand, Michel; Chen, Liquan

    2013-01-01

    Liquid electrolyte plays a key role in commercial lithium-ion batteries to allow conduction of lithium-ion between cathode and anode. Traditionally, taking into account the ionic conductivity, viscosity and dissolubility of lithium salt, the salt concentration in liquid electrolytes is typically less than 1.2 mol l(-1). Here we show a new class of 'Solvent-in-Salt' electrolyte with ultrahigh salt concentration and high lithium-ion transference number (0.73), in which salt holds a dominant position in the lithium-ion transport system. It remarkably enhances cyclic and safety performance of next-generation high-energy rechargeable lithium batteries via an effective suppression of lithium dendrite growth and shape change in the metallic lithium anode. Moreover, when used in lithium-sulphur battery, the advantage of this electrolyte is further demonstrated that lithium polysulphide dissolution is inhibited, thus overcoming one of today's most challenging technological hurdles, the 'polysulphide shuttle phenomenon'. Consequently, a coulombic efficiency nearing 100% and long cycling stability are achieved.

  12. Uptake and distribution of N, P and heavy metals in three dominant salt marsh macrophytes from Yangtze River estuary, China.

    PubMed

    Quan, W M; Han, J D; Shen, A L; Ping, X Y; Qian, P L; Li, C J; Shi, L Y; Chen, Y Q

    2007-07-01

    We examined the variation in aboveground biomass accumulation and tissue concentrations of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn) and lead (Pb) in Phragmites australis (common reed), Spartina alterniflora (salt cordgrass), and Scirpus mariqueter throughout the growing season (April-October 2005), in order to determine the differences in net element accumulation and distribution between the three salt marsh macrophytes in the Yangtze River estuary, China. The aboveground biomass was significantly greater in the plots of S. alterniflora than in the plots of P. australis and S. mariqueter throughout the growing season (P<0.05). In August, the peak aboveground biomass was 1246+/-89 gDW/m(2), 2759+/-250 gDW/m(2) and 548+/-54 gDW/m(2) for P. australis, S. alterniflora and S. mariqueter, respectively. The concentrations of nutrients and heavy metals in plant tissues showed similar seasonal patterns. There was a steady decline in element concentrations of the aboveground tissues from April to October. Relative element concentrations in aboveground tissues were at a peak during the spring sampling intervals with minimum levels during the fall. But the concentrations of total nitrogen and total phosphorus in the belowground tissues were relatively constant throughout growing season. Generally, trace metal concentrations in the aboveground tissues of S. mariqueter was the highest throughout the growing season, and the metal concentrations of S. alterniflora tissues (aboveground and belowground) were greater than those of P. australis. Furthermore, the aboveground pools of nutrients and metals were consistently greater for S. alterniflora than for P. australis and S. mariqueter, which suggested that the rapid replacement of native P. australis and S. mariqueter with invasive S. alterniflora would significantly improve the magnitude of nutrient cycling and bioavailability of trace metals in the salt marsh and maybe transport more toxic metals into the water column

  13. Thermoresponsive Poly(Ionic Liquid)s in Aqueous Salt Solutions: Salting-Out Effect on Their Phase Behavior and Water Absorption/Desorption Properties.

    PubMed

    Okafuji, Akiyoshi; Kohno, Yuki; Ohno, Hiroyuki

    2016-07-01

    Here, a thermoresponsive phase behavior of polymerized ionic liquids (PILs) composed of poly([tri-n-alkyl(vinylbenzyl)phosphonium]chloride) (poly([Pnnn VB ]Cl) is reported, where n (the number of carbon atoms of an alkyl chain) = 4, 5, or 6 after mixing with aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Both monomeric [P555VB ]Cl and the resulting poly([P555VB ]Cl) linear homopolymer show a lower critical solution temperature (LCST)-type phase behavior in aq. NaCl solutions. The phase transition temperature of the PIL shifts to lower value by increasing concentration of NaCl. Also the swelling degree of cross-linked poly([P555VB ]Cl) gel decreases by increasing NaCl concentration, clearly suggesting the "salting-out" effect of NaCl results in a significant dehydration of the poly([P555VB ]Cl) gel. The absorbed water in the PIL gel is desorbed by moderate heating via the LCST behavior, and the absolute absorption/desorption amount is improved by copolymerization of [P555VB ]Cl with more hydrophilic [P444VB ]Cl monomer.

  14. Characterization of PVA doped with different metallic salts as conductor polymer and as holographic film sensitized with ammonium dichromate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Garay, M. P.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.; Baltasar-Arroyo, R.; Ruiz-Limón, B.; Ponce-Lee, L.

    2007-02-01

    Multitudes of materials were and are investigated for holographic recording. materials and processes are advantageous because its has high exposure sensitivity, high diffraction efficiency, stability, etc. We report a photosensitive emulsion its electro-optical and chemical properties by mixing PVA with metallic salts and ammonium dichromate. We describe a hypothesis with respect to some mechanisms of photo and thermo sensitivity to different characteristics in emulsions.

  15. Heat Transfer from Optically Excited Gold Nanostructures into Water, Sugar, and Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew J.

    Nanotechnology has introduced a wide variety of new behaviors to study and understand. Metal nanostructures are of particular interest due to their ability to generate large amounts of heat when irradiated at the plasmon resonance. Furthermore, heat dissipation at the nanoscale becomes exceedingly more complicated with respect to bulk behavior. What are the credentials for a heat carrier to move across an interface? Is it important for both materials to have similar vibrational density of states? What changes if one material is a liquid? All of these questions have open ended answers, each of which hold potential for new technologies to be exploited once understood. This dissertation will discuss topics exploring the transfer of heat from an optically excited gold nanoparticle into a surrounding liquid. Gold nanostructures are created using conventional electron beam lithography with lift-off. The nanostructures are deposited onto a thin film thermal sensor composed of AlGaN:Er3+. Erbium(III) has two thermally coupled excited states that can be excited with a 532nm laser. The relative photoluminescence from these excited states are related by a Boltzmann factor and are thusly temperature dependent. A scanning optical microscope collects an image of Er3+ photoluminescence while simultaneously exciting the gold nanostructure. The nanostructure temperature is imaged which is directly related to the surrounding's heat dissipation properties. The first of two topics discuss the heat dissipation and phase change properties of water. A gold nanostructure is submersed under water and subsequently heated with a 532 nm laser. The water immediately surrounding the nanodot is can be superheated beyond the boiling point up to the spinodal decomposition temperature at 594 +/- 17 K. The spinodal decomposition has been confirmed with the observation of critical opalescence. We characterize the laser scattering that occurs in unison with spinodal decomposition due to an increased

  16. Effects of solution temperature on solution-processed high-performance metal oxide thin-film transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keun Ho; Park, Jee Ho; Yoo, Young Bum; Jang, Woo Soon; Oh, Jin Young; Chae, Soo Sang; Moon, Kyeong Ju; Myoung, Jae Min; Baik, Hong Koo

    2013-04-10

    Herein, we report a novel and easy strategy for fabricating solution-processed metal oxide thin-film transistors by controlling the dielectric constant of H2O through manipulation of the metal precursor solution temperature. As a result, indium zinc oxide (IZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) fabricated from IZO solution at 4 °C can be operated after annealing at low temperatures (∼250 °C). In contrast, IZO TFTs fabricated from IZO solutions at 25 and 60 °C must be annealed at 275 and 300 °C, respectively. We also found that IZO TFTs fabricated from the IZO precursor solution at 4 °C had the highest mobility of 12.65 cm2/(V s), whereas the IZO TFTs fabricated from IZO precursor solutions at 25 and 60 °C had field-effect mobility of 5.39 and 4.51 cm2/(V s), respectively, after annealing at 350 °C. When the IZO precursor solution is at 4 °C, metal cations such as indium (In3+) and zinc ions (Zn2+) can be fully surrounded by H2O molecules, because of the higher dielectric constant of H2O at lower temperatures. These chemical complexes in the IZO precursor solution at 4 °C are advantageous for thermal hydrolysis and condensation reactions yielding a metal oxide lattice, because of their high potential energies. The IZO TFTs fabricated from the IZO precursor solution at 4 °C had the highest mobility because of the formation of many metal-oxygen-metal (M-O-M) bonds under these conditions. In these bonds, the ns-orbitals of the metal cations overlap each other and form electron conduction pathways. Thus, the formation of a high proportion of M-O-M bonds in the IZO thin films is advantageous for electron conduction, because oxide lattices allow electrons to travel easily through the IZO.

  17. Insights to caving processes from localization of microseismic swarms induced by salt solution mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennart Kinscher, Jannes; Bernard, Pascal; Contrucci, Isabelle; Mangeney, Anne; Piguet, Jack Pierre; Bigarre, Pascal

    2014-05-01

    In order to improve our understanding of hazardous ground failures, caving processes, and collapses of large natural or man-made underground cavities, we studied microseismicity induced by the development and collapse of a salt solution mining cavity with a diameter of ~ 200 m at Cerville-Buissoncourt in Lorraine, France. Microseismicity was recorded as part of a large geophysical, multi-parameter monitoring research project (GISOS) by a local, high resolution, triggered 40 Hz geophone monitoring system consisting of five one-component and four three-component borehole stations located around and in the center of the cavity. The recorded microseismic events are very numerous (~ 50.000 recorded event files) where the major portion (~ 80 %) appear in unusual swarming sequences constituted by complex clusters of superimposed microseismic events. Body wave phase based routine tools for microseismic event detection and localization face strong limitations in the treatment of these signals. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed two probabilistic methods being able to assess the spatio-temporal characteristics in a semi-automatic manner. The first localization approach uses simple signal amplitude estimates on different frequency bands, and an attenuation model to constrain hypocenter source location. The second approach was designed to identify significantly polarized P wave energies and the associated polarization angles. Both approaches and its probabilistic conjunction were applied to the data of a two months lasting microseismic crisis occurring one year before the final collapse that was related to caving processes leading to a maximal growth of ~ 50 m of the cavity roof. The obtained epicenter locations show systematic spatio-temporal migration trends observed for different time scales. During three phases of major swarming activity, epicenter migration trends appear in the order of several seconds to minutes, are spatially constrained, and show partially a

  18. Real-time monitoring of a salt solution mining cavern: view from microseismic and levelling monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contrucci, Isabelle; Cao, Ngoc-Tuyen; Klein, Emmanuelle; Daupley, Xavier; Bigarre, Pascal

    2010-05-01

    In 2004, in order to better understand processes involved in large-scale mine collapse, an instrumentation was settled in the surrounding of a salt cavern located at a depth of 180 m in NE France. The cavern was mined by solution mining until the large-scale ground failure occurred. A high resolution multi-parameter monitoring system was deployed in the framework of the GISOS (Scientific Interest Group on the Impact and Safety of Underground Structures formed by INERIS, BRGM, INPL and ENSG). Instrumentation, installed by INERIS, consisted of a microseismic network, coupled to automatic-measurement system for levelling (Tacheometer and RTK GPS). Quasi real time transmission of the data to INERIS, at Nancy, enabled rock mass activity of the site to be monitored on a few hours basis. Also, the various recorded observations, in the beginning of spring 2008, led the operator to cause the collapse in February 2009. This was done by intensive extraction of the brine contained in the cavern, which was considered to be at limit equilibrium. On the second day of pumping sudden increase in microseismic activity indicated the start of collapse, followed by manifestation of a surface crater about 35 hours later. All the data and information collected during this experiment are now being processed and back-analysed aimed at ensuring high quality of interpretation. In particular, the space-time distribution of the failures and the evolution of the waveforms enlighten the changing conditions in the geological overburden. When correlated with the measurements of the movement and the known geology, the microseismic data enable a precise description of the failure mechanism(s), and especially of the complex and major role of the overlying bedrock. Similarly, feedback from this experience should lead to practical recommendations concerning collapse phenomena monitoring in such a mining context. While the preliminary results already indicate the exceptional quality of this data set

  19. The role of the binding salt sodium salicylate in semidilute ionic cetylpyridinium chloride micellar solutions: a rheological and scattering study.

    PubMed

    Gaudino, D; Pasquino, R; Stellbrink, J; Szekely, N; Krutyeva, M; Radulescu, A; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W; Grizzuti, N

    2016-12-21

    The micellar system based on cetylpyridinium chloride (CPyCl) and sodium salicylate (NaSal) in brine solution is investigated on both macro- and micro-length scales through rheology and scattering measurements. The linear viscoelasticity of the system and its structural parameters are explored by systematically changing the amount of NaSal over an extremely wide range of concentrations, thus producing salt-to-surfactant molar ratios from zero to about 8.5. As a result, the well-known non-monotonic behaviour of the zero-shear rate viscosity as a function of salinity can be connected to micellar morphological changes, whose driving force is represented by the simultaneous binding and screening actions of NaSal. The viscosity behaviour can be seen as a direct consequence of consecutive lengthening/shortening of the contour length, where the micelles attempt to minimize the electrostatic charge density on their surface. Along similar lines, the scattering measurements of the semidilute solutions show that the local stiffness of the micellar chain changes with increasing salt content influencing the elasticity of the resulting network. Within this general view, the branching of the micelles can be seen as a side effect attributable to the main character of the play, namely, the binding salt NaSal, whereas the overall dynamics of the system is driven by the considerable changes in the entanglement density of the micellar network.

  20. Induction by inorganic metal salts of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in human and Syrian hamster cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Larramendy, M.L.; Popescu, N.C.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosome aberration induction were determined for several inorganic metal salts. Arsenic, nickel, and beryllium salts at concentrations effective in causing transformation of Syrian hamster cells (HEC) induced SCE and chromosome aberrations of HEC and human lymphocytes, whereas sodium tungstate, a non-transforming chemical, neither induced SCE nor chromosome aberrations. Normal human and hamster cells exhibited equal sensitivity to SCE induction; nontoxic concentrations of sodium arsenite, beryllium sulfate, and nickel sulfate caused an increase of 8-10 SCE/cell over control values. Sodium arsenite, a trivalent arsenic, and sodium arsenate, a pentavalent arsenic, produced increases in SCE but the former was effective at lower concentrations. Both arsenic salts were less efficient in inducing SCE in human whole blood than in purified lymphocyte cultures. Sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate, nickel sulfate, and beryllium sulfate also caused damage consisting primarily of chromatid type of aberrations. In HEC, with doses most effective in SCE induction , all four metals produced aberrations in 16-21% of cells. In human lymphocytes, 34 and 30% of the cells had chromosome damage after sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate, respectively, whereas beryllium sulfate or nickel sulfate caused damage in about 10% of the cells. The induction of SCE and chromosomal aberrations by metals reemphasizes the sensitivity of cytological assays and their importance for detecting genetic damage caused by carcinogens.

  1. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-14

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  2. Ion aggregation in high salt solutions. IV. Graph-theoretical analyses of ion aggregate structure and water hydrogen bonding network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2015-09-01

    Ions in high salt solutions form a variety of ion aggregates, from ion pairs to clusters and networks. Their influences on water hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) network structures have long been of great interest. Recently, we have shown that the morphological structures of ion aggregates can be analyzed by using a spectral graph analysis theory, where each ion cluster or ion network is represented by a properly defined graph with edges and vertices. Here, to further examine the network properties of ion aggregates and water H-bonding networks in high salt solutions, we consider a few representative graph-theoretical descriptors: clustering coefficient, minimum path length, global efficiency, and degree distribution of ion aggregates. From the molecular dynamics trajectories, these graph theoretical properties of ion aggregates and water structures in NaCl and kosmotropic solutions are calculated and shown to be strongly dependent on the two types of ion aggregate structures, i.e., ion cluster and ion network. Ion clusters in high NaCl solutions exhibit typical behaviors of scale free network. The corresponding graph theoretical properties of ion networks in high KSCN solutions are notably different from those of NaCl ion clusters and furthermore they are very similar to those of water hydrogen-bonding network. The present graph-theoretical analysis results indicate that the high solubility limits of KSCN and other ion-network-forming salts might originate from their ability to form a large scale morphological network that can be intertwined with co-existing water H-bonding network. Furthermore, it is shown that the graph-theoretical properties of water H-bonding network structures do not strongly depend on the nature of dissolved ions nor on the morphological structures of ion aggregates, indicating that water's H-bonding interaction and network-forming capability are highly robust. We anticipate that the present graph-theoretical analysis results of high salt

  3. Observation of vapor pressure enhancement of rare-earth metal-halide salts in the temperature range relevant to metal-halide lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Curry, J. J.; Henins, A.; Hardis, J. E.; Estupinan, E. G.; Lapatovich, W. P.; Shastri, S. D.

    2012-02-20

    Total vapor-phase densities of Dy in equilibrium with a DyI{sub 3}/InI condensate and Tm in equilibrium with a TmI{sub 3}/TlI condensate have been measured for temperatures between 900 K and 1400 K. The measurements show strong enhancements in rare-earth vapor densities compared to vapors in equilibrium with the pure rare-earth metal-halides. The measurements were made with x-ray induced fluorescence on the sector 1-ID beam line at the Advanced Photon Source. The temperature range and salt mixtures are relevant to the operation of metal-halide high-intensity discharge lamps.

  4. On the appearance of vorticity and gradient shear bands in wormlike micellar solutions of different CPCl/salt systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mütze, Annekathrin Heunemann, Peggy; Fischer, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Wormlike micellar salt/surfactant solutions (X-salicylate, cetylpyridinium chloride) are studied with respect to the applied shear stress, concentration, temperature, and composition of the counterions (X = lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium) of the salicylate salt solute to determine vorticity and gradient shear bands. A combination of rheological measurements, laser technique, video analysis, and rheo-small-angle neutron scattering allow for a detailed exploration of number and types of shear bands. Typical flow curves of the solutions show Newtonian, shear-thinning, and shear-thickening flow behavior. In the shear-thickening regime, the solutions show vorticity and gradient shear bands simultaneously, in which vorticity shear bands dominate the visual effect, while gradient shear bands always coexist and predominate the rheological response. It is shown that gradient shear bands change their phases (turbid, clear) with the same frequency as the shear rate oscillates, whereas vorticity shear bands change their phases with half the frequency of the shear rate. Furthermore, we show that with increasing molecular mass of the counterions the number of gradient shear bands increases, while the number of vorticity shear bands remains constant. The variation of temperature, shear stress, concentration, and counterions results in a predictable change in the rheological behavior and therefore allows adjustment of the number of vorticity shear bands in the shear band regime.

  5. Metal-free arylation of ethyl acetoacetate with hypervalent diaryliodonium salts: an immediate access to diverse 3-aryl-4(1H)-quinolones.

    PubMed

    Monastyrskyi, Andrii; Namelikonda, Niranjan K; Manetsch, Roman

    2015-03-06

    A clean arylation protocol of ethyl acetoacetate was developed using hypervalent diaryliodonium salts under mild and metal-free conditions. The scope of the reaction, using symmetric and unsymmetric iodonium salts with varying sterics and electronics, was examined. Further, this method has been applied for the synthesis of antimalarial compound ELQ-300, which is currently in preclinical development.

  6. Bathing in a magnesium-rich Dead Sea salt solution improves skin barrier function, enhances skin hydration, and reduces inflammation in atopic dry skin.

    PubMed

    Proksch, Ehrhardt; Nissen, Hans-Peter; Bremgartner, Markus; Urquhart, Colin

    2005-02-01

    Magnesium salts, the prevalent minerals in Dead Sea water, are known to exhibit favorable effects in inflammatory diseases. We examined the efficacy of bathing atopic subjects in a salt rich in magnesium chloride from deep layers of the Dead Sea (Mavena(R) Dermaline Mg(46) Dead Sea salt, Mavena AG, Belp, Switzerland). Volunteers with atopic dry skin submerged one forearm for 15 min in a bath solution containing 5% Dead Sea salt. The second arm was submerged in tap water as control. Before the study and at weeks 1-6, transepidermal water loss (TEWL), skin hydration, skin roughness, and skin redness were determined. We found one subgroup with a normal and one subgroup with an elevated TEWL before the study. Bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution significantly improved skin barrier function compared with the tap water-treated control forearm in the subgroup with elevated basal TEWL. Skin hydration was enhanced on the forearm treated with the Dead Sea salt in each group, which means the treatment moisturized the skin. Skin roughness and redness of the skin as a marker for inflammation were significantly reduced after bathing in the salt solution. This demonstrates that bathing in the salt solution was well tolerated, improved skin barrier function, enhanced stratum corneum hydration, and reduced skin roughness and inflammation. We suggest that the favorable effects of bathing in the Dead Sea salt solution are most likely related to the high magnesium content. Magnesium salts are known to bind water, influence epidermal proliferation and differentiation, and enhance permeability barrier repair.

  7. Potential of Spartina maritima in restored salt marshes for phytoremediation of metals in a highly polluted estuary.

    PubMed

    Curado, G; Rubio-Casal, A E; Figueroa, E; Castillo, J M

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentary abiotic environment, and concentration and stock of nine metals were analyzed in vegetation and sediments to evaluate the phytoremediation capacity of restored Spartina maritima prairies in the highly polluted Odiel Marshes (SW Iberian Peninsula). Samples were collected in two 10 -m long rows parallel to the tidal line at two sediments depths (0-2 cm and 2-20 cm). Metal concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Iron, aluminum, copper, and zinc were the most concentrated metals. Every metal, except nickel, showed higher concentration in the root zone than at the sediment surface, with values as high as ca. 70 g Fe kg(-1). The highest metal concentrations in S. maritima tissues were recorded in its roots (maximum for iron in Spartina roots: 4160.2 +/- 945.3 mg kg(-1)). Concentrations of aluminum and iron in leaves and roots were higher than in superficial sediments. Rhizosediments showed higher concentrations of every metal than plant tissues, except for nickel. Sediment metal stock in the first 20 cm deep was ca. 170.89 t ha(-1). Restored S. maritima prairies, with relative cover of 62 +/- 6%, accumulated ca. 22 kg metals ha(-1). Our results show S. maritima to be an useful biotool for phytoremediation projects in European salt marshes.

  8. Formation of Gaseous Bromine From the Photolysis of Nitrate and Hydrogen Peroxide in Sea-Salt Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, I.; Anastasio, C.

    2003-12-01

    The formation of reactive halogen gases in sea-salt particles can play a significant role in chemistry within the marine boundary layer (MBL). While there have been several proposed mechanisms for the formation of reactive halogens in sea-salt particles, we were interested in whether hydroxyl radical (ṡOH) generated within the particles themselves could lead to release of gaseous reactive bromine species (Br*(g)). To examine this question, we illuminated (313 nm) solutions of chloride and bromide that contained either nitrate or hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of ṡOH. Experiments were performed either in concentrated seawater or in laboratory solutions with halide concentrations that in most experiments were typical for deliquesced, aged sea-salt particles (e.g., 3.5 M Cl-, 5.0 mM Br-, 100 mM NO3-, and pH 4). During illumination we bubbled air through the solutions and collected the released gaseous reactive bromine in downstream bubblers or denuders. We found that gaseous bromide was nearly always released during the illumination of solutions containing either nitrate (100 mM) or hydrogen peroxide (1.0 mM). In order to gain insight into the mechanisms for these reactions, we studied the effects of several factors on the rate of release of gaseous bromine. For example, the release of Br*(g) was enhanced in solutions at lower pH, and this pH-dependent trend was similar in both the nitrate and hydrogen peroxide systems. In solutions containing bromide and nitrate at a fixed ionic strength, the addition of chloride showed little effect on the Br*(g) release, while increasing ionic strength significantly slowed down its release. In hydrogen peroxide solutions, however, the presence of chloride strongly enhanced Br*(g) release, while the ionic strength of the solution was shown to have no effect on the reaction. Furthermore, the Br*(g) formation rate increased rapidly with bromide concentration in nitrate solutions containing 0 - 2 mM Br-, but was

  9. Heavy metal contamination in compost. A possible solution.

    PubMed

    Zennaro, Mariachiara; Cristofori, Fabrizio; Formigoni, Daniele; Frignani, Franco; Pavoni, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    With the objective of improving qualitative characteristics of compost, an analytical survey was carried out in a composting plant in Lombardy (Italy) in all process of production, with particular reference to heavy metals (HM) Zn and Pb. The investigation was principally aimed to study the contents and the accumulation of HM during composting process and to identify a technological solution for reducing HM content in the final product. A merceological analysis of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) input to the composting plant, a chemical analysis of the organic fraction of MSW after mechanical separation, and a comparison with values reported by some authors, showed that Zn and Pb are significant contaminants, even though concentrations have recently decreased in comparison to previous years. On the basis of Zn and Pb content in raw material input to the plant, an estimate of the theoretical value of Zn and Pb in produced compost was made. The comparison of theoretical values with the real ones, experimentally determined, confirmed that at the end of composting process the concentration is 2.6 times the initial value for Zn and 1.6 times the initial value for Pb, as suggested by some authors. Finally, the analytical investigation of Zn and Pb contents in the compost refining line, carried out by means of sieving tests, showed that by eliminating a fraction of compost < 1 mm, both Zn and Pb, which is the more critical one, can be largely removed, without a substantial yield loss (only 10% of the final product is eliminated).

  10. Solution-based deposition of ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Glenn

    Solution chemical methods were used to deposit ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces. Platinum-molybdenum oxide films were deposited by spontaneous adsorption and electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate, PtMO6O248-. Spectroscopic characterization by 17O and 195Pt NMR showed that the PtMo6O248- anion is stable in aqueous solution below pH 4. The interaction of this solution stable anion with Au and Ag was characterized by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The anion was partially reduced upon adsorption on Ag, but spontaneously adsorbed on Au to form an amorphous surface phase. The electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate on Au electrodes resulted in an electrode surface that was different from the spontaneously adsorbed species, in terms of composition, voltammetry, and reactivity. Cyclic voltammetry was also used to compare the reactivity of these materials for the electrooxidation of methanol. Ultrathin zirconia films were deposited on YBa2Cu3O 7-delta by alternating exposures to tetra n-propyl zirconate, Zr4(OPrn)16, and H2O in n-propanol. Physical and chemical characterization of these films was done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The zirconia films were determined to be ultrathin (<10 nm) and highly conformal to the surface of YBa2Cu3O7-delta. Metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions fabricated in this fashion were characterized by current-voltage and conductivity-voltage measurements. Solution deposition from Zr4(OPrn) 16 was also used to deposit ultrathin zirconia films on gold, silver, and aluminum surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the physical properties of these films. Electrical measurements showed that zirconia films on Ag and Au are not insulating, but aluminum-zirconia-aluminum capacitors fabricated by this method

  11. Metal and acidity fluxes controlled by precipitation/dissolution cycles of sulfate salts in an anthropogenic mine aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cánovas, C. R.; Macías, F.; Pérez-López, R.

    2016-05-01

    Underground mine drainages are extremely difficult to study due to the lack of information about the flow path and source proximity in relation to the outflow adit. Geochemical processes controlling metals and acidity fluxes in a complex anthropogenic mine aquifer in SW Spain during the dry and rainy season were investigated by geochemical and statistical tools. High concentrations of acidity, sulfate, metals and metalloids (e.g. Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Ni, Co) were observed due to intense sulfide oxidation processes. The high residence time inside the anthropogenic aquifer, around 40 days, caused the release of significant quantities of metals linked to host rocks (e.g. Al, Ca, Ge, Li, Mg, REE). The most outstanding characteristic of the acid mine drainage (AMD) outflows is the existence of higher Fe/SO4 molar ratios than those theoretical of pyrite (0.50) during most of the monitored period, due to a fire which occurred in 1949 and remained active for decades. Permanent and temporal retention mechanisms of acidity and metals were observed in the galleries. Once released from sulfide oxidation, Pb and As are sorbed on Fe oxyhydroxysulfate or precipitated as low solubility minerals (i.e. anglesite) inside the galleries. The precipitation of evaporitic sulfate salts during the dry season and the subsequent re-dissolution after rainfall control the fluxes of acidity and main metals (i.e. Fe, Mg, Al) from this anthropogenic aquifer. Some elements, such as Cd, Cu, Ni, REE and Zn, are retained in highly soluble sulfate salts while other elements, such as Ge, Pb and Sc, have a lower response to washout processes due to its incorporation in less soluble sulfate salts. In this way, metal concentration during the washout processes would be controlled by the proportion and solubility of each type of evaporitic sulfate salt stored during the dry season. The recovery of metals of economic interest contained in the AMD could help to self-finance the remediation of these waters in

  12. Radiochemical synthesis of pure anhydrous metal halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Method uses radiation chemistry as practical tool for inorganic preparations and in particular deposition of metals by irradiation of their aqueous metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. Higher valence metal halide is dissolved in organic liquid and exposed to high energy electrons. This causes metal halide to be reduced to a lower valence metal halide.

  13. Heavy metal removal mechanisms of sorptive filter materials for road runoff treatment and remobilization under de-icing salt applications.

    PubMed

    Huber, Maximilian; Hilbig, Harald; Badenberg, Sophia C; Fassnacht, Julius; Drewes, Jörg E; Helmreich, Brigitte

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research study was to elucidate the removal and remobilization behaviors of five heavy metals (i.e., Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) that had been fixed onto sorptive filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems receiving traffic area runoff. Six filter materials (i.e., granular activated carbon, a mixture of granular activated alumina and porous concrete, granular activated lignite, half-burnt dolomite, and two granular ferric hydroxides) were evaluated in column experiments. First, a simultaneous preloading with the heavy metals was performed for each filter material. Subsequently, the remobilization effect was tested by three de-icing salt experiments in duplicate using pure NaCl, a mixture of NaCl and CaCl2, and a mixture of NaCl and MgCl2. Three layers of each column were separated to specify the attenuation of heavy metals as a function of depth. Cu and Pb were retained best by most of the selected filter materials, and Cu was often released the least of all metals by the three de-icing salts. The mixture of NaCl and CaCl2 resulted in a stronger effect upon remobilization than the other two de-icing salts. For the material with the highest retention, the effect of the preloading level upon remobilization was measured. The removal mechanisms of all filter materials were determined by advanced laboratory methods. For example, the different intrusions of heavy metals into the particles were determined. Findings of this study can result in improved filter materials used in decentralized stormwater treatment systems.

  14. Comparison of soymilk, powdered milk, Hank's balanced salt solution and tap water on periodontal ligament cell survival.

    PubMed

    Moazami, Fariborz; Mirhadi, Hosein; Geramizadeh, Bita; Sahebi, Safoura

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of soymilk, powdered milk, and Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) to maintain human periodontal ligament (PDL) cell viability in vitro. PDL cells were obtained from extracted healthy third molars and cultured in Dulbecco's modified Eagles medium (DMEM). The cultures were exposed for 1, 2, 4, and 8 h to experimental solutions (tap water served as negative control and DMEM as positive control) at 37°C. The viable cells were then counted using the trypan blue exclusion technique. Data were analyzed by using one-way anova, post hoc Scheffe and two-way anova test. Statistical analysis showed that HBSS, powdered baby formula, and soymilk maintain cell viability equally well in different periods of times. Tap water cannot keep cells viable as well as other solutions. Soymilk and powdered baby formula can be recommended as suitable storage media for avulsed teeth for up to 8 h.

  15. Molecular-scale Hydrophilicity Induced by Solute: Molecular-thick Charged Pancakes of Aqueous Salt Solution on Hydrophobic Carbon-based Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guosheng; Shen, Yue; Liu, Jian; Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Ying; Song, Bo; Hu, Jun; Fang, Haiping

    2014-01-01

    We directly observed molecular-thick aqueous salt-solution pancakes on a hydrophobic graphite surface under ambient conditions employing atomic force microscopy. This observation indicates the unexpected molecular-scale hydrophilicity of the salt solution on graphite surfaces, which is different from the macroscopic wetting property of a droplet standing on the graphite surface. Interestingly, the pancakes spontaneously displayed strong positively charged behavior. Theoretical studies showed that the formation of such positively charged pancakes is attributed to cation–π interactions between Na+ ions in the aqueous solution and aromatic rings on the graphite surface, promoting the adsorption of water molecules together with cations onto the graphite surface; i.e., Na+ ions as a medium adsorbed to the graphite surface through cation–π interactions on one side while at the same time bonding to water molecules through hydration interaction on the other side at a molecular scale. These findings suggest that actual interactions regarding carbon-based graphitic surfaces including those of graphene, carbon nanotubes, and biochar may be significantly different from existing theory and they provide new insight into the control of surface wettability, interactions and related physical, chemical and biological processes. PMID:25348642

  16. Modeling of Copper(II), Cadmium(II), and Lead(II) Adsorption on Red Mud from Metal-EDTA Mixture Solutions.

    PubMed

    Güçlü; Apak

    2000-08-15

    The adsorption of toxic heavy metal cations, i.e., Cu(II), Cd(II), and Pb(II), from metal-EDTA mixture solutions on a composite adsorbent having a heterogeneous surface, i.e., bauxite waste red mud, has been investigated and modeled with the aid of a modified surface complexation approach in respect to pH and complexant dependency of heavy metal adsorption. EDTA was selected as the modeling ligand in view of its wide usage as an anthropogenic chelating agent and abundance in natural waters. The adsorption experiments were conducted for metal salts (nitrates), metal-EDTA complexes alone, or in mixtures containing (metal+metal-EDTA). The adsorption equilibrium constants for the metal ions and metal-EDTA complexes were calculated. For all studied cases, the solid adsorbent phase concentrations of the adsorbed metal and metal-EDTA complexes were found by using the derived model equations with excellent compatibility of experimental and theoretically generated adsorption isotherms. The model was useful for metal and metal-EDTA mixture solutions either at their natural pH of equilibration with the sorbent, or after pH elevation with NaOH titration up to a certain pH. Thus adsorption of every single species (M(2+) or MY(2-)) or of possible mixtures (M(2+)+MY(2-)) at natural pH or after NaOH titration could be calculated by the use of simple quadratic model equations, once the initial concentrations of the corresponding species, i.e., [M(2+)](0) or [MY(2-)](0), were known. The compatibility of theoretical and experimental data pairs of adsorbed species concentrations was verified by means of nonlinear regression analysis. The findings of this study can be further developed so as to serve environmental risk assessment concerning the expansion of a heavy metal contaminant plume with groundwater move ment in soil consisting of hydrated-oxide type minerals. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. RESULTS OF ROUTINE STRIP EFFLUENT HOLD TANK AND DECONTAMINATED SALT SOLUTION HOLD TANK SAMPLES FROM MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT DURING MACROBATCH 3 OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-10

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the 'microbatches' of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch ('Macrobatch') 3 have been analyzed for {sup 238}Pu, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and by Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES). The results indicate good decontamination performance within process design expectations. While the data set is sparse, the results of this set and the previous set of results for Macrobatch 3 samples indicate consistent operations. However, the Decontamination Factors for plutonium and strontium removal have declined in Macrobatch 3, compared to Macrobatch 2. This may be due to the differences in the Pu concentration or the bulk chemical concentrations in the feed material. SRNL is considering the possible reasons for this decline. The DSSHT samples show continued presence of titanium, likely from leaching of the monosodium titanate in ARP. During operation of the ISDP, quantities of salt waste are processed through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and MCU in batches of {approx}3800 gallons. Monosodium titanate (MST) is used in ARP to adsorb actinides and strontium from the salt waste and the waste slurry is then filtered prior to sending the clarified salt solution to MCU. The MCU uses solvent extraction technology to extract cesium from salt waste and concentrate cesium in an acidic aqueous stream (Strip Effluent - SE), leaving a decontaminated caustic salt aqueous stream (Decontaminated Salt Solution - DSS). Sampling occurs in the Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) and Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) in the MCU process. The MCU sample plan requires that batches be sampled and analyzed for plutonium and strontium content by Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to determine MST effectiveness. The cesium measurement is used to monitor cesium removal effectiveness and the inductively coupled plasma emission spectroscopy (ICPES) is

  18. A scaled-ionic-charge simulation model that reproduces enhanced and suppressed water diffusion in aqueous salt solutions.

    PubMed

    Kann, Z R; Skinner, J L

    2014-09-14

    Non-polarizable models for ions and water quantitatively and qualitatively misrepresent the salt concentration dependence of water diffusion in electrolyte solutions. In particular, experiment shows that the water diffusion coefficient increases in the presence of salts of low charge density (e.g., CsI), whereas the results of simulations with non-polarizable models show a decrease of the water diffusion coefficient in all alkali halide solutions. We present a simple charge-scaling method based on the ratio of the solvent dielectric constants from simulation and experiment. Using an ion model that was developed independently of a solvent, i.e., in the crystalline solid, this method improves the water diffusion trends across a range of water models. When used with a good-quality water model, e.g., TIP4P/2005 or E3B, this method recovers the qualitative behaviour of the water diffusion trends. The model and method used were also shown to give good results for other structural and dynamic properties including solution density, radial distribution functions, and ion diffusion coefficients.

  19. History and future of human cadaver preservation for surgical training: from formalin to saturated salt solution method.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Shogo; Naito, Munekazu; Kawata, Shinichi; Qu, Ning; Hatayama, Naoyuki; Hirai, Shuichi; Itoh, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, surgical training meant on-the-job training with live patients in an operating room. However, due to advancing surgical techniques, such as minimally invasive surgery, and increasing safety demands during procedures, human cadavers have been used for surgical training. When considering the use of human cadavers for surgical training, one of the most important factors is their preservation. In this review, we summarize four preservation methods: fresh-frozen cadaver, formalin, Thiel's, and saturated salt solution methods. Fresh-frozen cadaver is currently the model that is closest to reality, but it also presents myriad problems, including the requirement of freezers for storage, limited work time because of rapid putrefaction, and risk of infection. Formalin is still used ubiquitously due to its low cost and wide availability, but it is not ideal because formaldehyde has an adverse health effect and formalin-embalmed cadavers do not exhibit many of the qualities of living organs. Thiel's method results in soft and flexible cadavers with almost natural colors, and Thiel-embalmed cadavers have been appraised widely in various medical disciplines. However, Thiel's method is relatively expensive and technically complicated. In addition, Thiel-embalmed cadavers have a limited dissection time. The saturated salt solution method is simple, carries a low risk of infection, and is relatively low cost. Although more research is needed, this method seems to be sufficiently useful for surgical training and has noteworthy features that expand the capability of clinical training. The saturated salt solution method will contribute to a wider use of cadavers for surgical training.

  20. Energy efficiency of iron–boron–silicon metallic glasses in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.; Jiang, W.; Rahman, B. M. A.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2017-03-01

    A criterion of the energy efficiency of iron–boron–silicon metallic glasses in sulfuric acid solutions is proposed for the first time. The criterion has been derived based on calculating the limit of the ratio value of the conductivity of a metallic glass in aqueous solution to the conductivity of the metallic glass in air. In other words, the conductivity ratio of a metallic glass in aqueous solution to the conductivity of the metallic glass in air  = 1, was applied to determine the energy efficiency of the metallic glass in the aqueous solution when the conductivity of a metallic glass in air became equal (decreased) to the steady conductivity of the metallic glass in aqueous solution as a function of time of the exposure of the metallic glass to the aqueous solution. This criterion was not only used to determine the energy efficiency of different metallic glasses, but also, the criterion was used to determine the energy efficiency of metallic glasses exposed to a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations. These conductivity values were determined by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In addition, the criterion can be applied under diverse test conditions with a predetermined period of the operational life of the metallic glasses as functional materials. Furthermore, variations of the energy efficiency of the metallic glasses as a function of the acid concentration and time were produced by fitting the experimental data to a numerical model using a nonlinear regression method. The profiles of the metallic glasses exhibit a less conservative behavior of the energy efficiency than the proposed analytical criterion.

  1. Application of Sargassum biomass to remove heavy metal ions from synthetic multi-metal solutions and urban storm water runoff.

    PubMed

    Vijayaraghavan, K; Teo, Ting Ting; Balasubramanian, R; Joshi, Umid Man

    2009-05-30

    The ability of Sargassum sp. to biosorb four metal ions, namely lead, copper, zinc, and manganese from a synthetic multi-solute system and real storm water runoff has been investigated for the first time. Experiments on synthetic multi-solute systems revealed that Sargassum performed well in the biosorption of all four metal ions, with preference towards Pb, followed by Cu, Zn, and Mn. The solution pH strongly affected the metal biosorption, with pH 6 being identified as the optimal condition for achieving maximum biosorption. Experiments at different biosorbent dosages revealed that good biosorption capacity as well as high metal removal efficiency was observed at 3g/L. The biosorption kinetics was found to be fast with equilibrium being attained within 50 min. According to the Langmuir isotherm model, Sargassum exhibited maximum uptakes of 214, 67.5, 24.2 and 20.2mg/g for lead, copper, zinc, and manganese, respectively in single-solute systems. In multi-metal systems, strong competition between four metal ions in terms of occupancy binding sites was observed, and Sargassum showed preference in the order of Pb>Cu>Zn>Mn. The application of Sargassum to remove four heavy metal ions in real storm water runoff revealed that the biomass was capable of removing the heavy metal ions. However, the biosorption performance was slightly lower compared to that of synthetic metal solutions. Several factors were responsible for this difference, and the most important factor is the presence of other contaminants such as anions, organics, and other trace metals in the runoff.

  2. Metallic sulfide deposits in Winnefield salt dome, Louisiana: evidence for episodic introduction of metalliferous brines during cap rock formation

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, M.R.

    1984-09-01

    Winnfield dome is a shallow piercement salt structure that penetrates Late Jurassic through early Tertiary siliciclastic and carbonate strata of the North Louisiana basin. Quarrying operations in the calcite and anhydrite portions of the cap rock have exposed zones of metallic sulfides and barite. A roughly laminated massive sulfide lens is exposed at the calcite to anhydrite transition zone. These sulfide concentrations are believed to have originated from the interaction of metalliferous basinal brines with reduced sulfur trapped within the cap rock. Textural relationships and variations in chemical compositions between the sulfide layers in the anhydrite portion of the cap rock suggest that distinct pulses of metalliferous brines were responsible for the sulfide concentrations. Anhydrite grains outside the mineralized areas are deformed and tightly intergrown. These textures suggest that mineralizing fluids were introduced episodically along the salt and anhydrite interface at the zone of salt dissolution before that portion of the anhydrite zone was compressed and accreted to overlying anhydrite cap rock. Therefore, the earliest formed sulfides originating by this mechanism occur at the top of the anhydrite cap rock zone, whereas the last sulfides to form are found at the base. Extensive sulfide concentrations along the anhydrite-calcite contact suggest that this contact also acted as a permeable zone allowing metalliferous brines into the cap rock. Textural and compositional relationships suggest that sulfides that formed along the anhydrite-calcite contact are locally superimposed on sulfides that formed at the salt-anhydrite contact.

  3. H{sub 2}S-removal and sulfur-recovery processes using metal salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Cairns, E.J.

    1992-11-01

    Scrubbing a sour gas stream with a solution of copper sulfate allows the clean-up temperature to be increased from ambient to the adiabatic saturation temperature of the gas. The copper ion in solution reacts with the H{sub 2}S to produce insoluble CuS. The choice of copper sulfate was set by the very low solubility of CuS and the very rapid kinetics of the Cus formation. Since the copper sulfate solutions used are acidic, CO{sub 2} will not be co-absorbed. In a subsequent step the solid CuS is oxidized by a solution of ferric sulfate. The copper sulfate is regenerated, and elemental sulfur is formed together with ferrous sulfate. The ferrous sulfate is reoxidized to ferric sulfate using air. Since the copper sulfate and ferric solutions are regenerated, the overall reaction in this process is the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen to form sulfur. The use of copper sulfate has the further advantage that the presence of sulfuric acid, even as concentrated as 1 molar, does not inhibit the sorption of H{sub 2}S. Furthermore, the absorption reaction remains quite favorable thermodynamically over the temperature range of interest. Because the reaction goes to completion, only a single theoretical stage is required for complete H{sub 2}S removal and cocurrent gas/liquid contacting may be employed. The formation of solids precludes the use of a packed column for the contacting device. However, a venturi scrubber would be expected to perform satisfactorily. The kinetics of the oxidation of metal sulfides, in particular zinc and copper sulfide, is reported in the literature to be slow at near-ambient temperatures. The proposed process conditions for the oxidation step are different from those reported in the literature, most notably the higher temperature. The kinetics of the reaction must be studied at high temperatures and corresponding pressures. An important goal is to obtain sulfur of high purity, which is a salable product.

  4. H[sub 2]S-removal and sulfur-recovery processes using metal salts

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Cairns, E.J.

    1992-01-01

    Scrubbing a sour gas stream with a solution of copper sulfate allows the clean-up temperature to be increased from ambient to the adiabatic saturation temperature of the gas. The copper ion in solution reacts with the H[sub 2]S to produce insoluble CuS. The choice of copper sulfate was set by the very low solubility of CuS and the very rapid kinetics of the Cus formation. Since the copper sulfate solutions used are acidic, CO[sub 2] will not be co-absorbed. In a subsequent step the solid CuS is oxidized by a solution of ferric sulfate. The copper sulfate is regenerated, and elemental sulfur is formed together with ferrous sulfate. The ferrous sulfate is reoxidized to ferric sulfate using air. Since the copper sulfate and ferric solutions are regenerated, the overall reaction in this process is the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen to form sulfur. The use of copper sulfate has the further advantage that the presence of sulfuric acid, even as concentrated as 1 molar, does not inhibit the sorption of H[sub 2]S. Furthermore, the absorption reaction remains quite favorable thermodynamically over the temperature range of interest. Because the reaction goes to completion, only a single theoretical stage is required for complete H[sub 2]S removal and cocurrent gas/liquid contacting may be employed. The formation of solids precludes the use of a packed column for the contacting device. However, a venturi scrubber would be expected to perform satisfactorily. The kinetics of the oxidation of metal sulfides, in particular zinc and copper sulfide, is reported in the literature to be slow at near-ambient temperatures. The proposed process conditions for the oxidation step are different from those reported in the literature, most notably the higher temperature. The kinetics of the reaction must be studied at high temperatures and corresponding pressures. An important goal is to obtain sulfur of high purity, which is a salable product.

  5. Polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD): a full-solution strategy for flexible, stretchable, compressible, and wearable metal conductors.

    PubMed

    Yu, You; Yan, Casey; Zheng, Zijian

    2014-08-20

    Metal interconnects, contacts, and electrodes are indispensable elements for most applications of flexible, stretchable, and wearable electronics. Current fabrication methods for these metal conductors are mainly based on conventional microfabrication procedures that have been migrated from Si semiconductor industries, which face significant challenges for organic-based compliant substrates. This Research News highlights a recently developed full-solution processing strategy, polymer-assisted metal deposition (PAMD), which is particularly suitable for the roll-to-roll, low-cost fabrication of high-performance compliant metal conductors (Cu, Ni, Ag, and Au) on a wide variety of organic substrates including plastics, elastomers, papers, and textiles. This paper presents i) the principles of PAMD, and how to use it for making ii) flexible, stretchable, and wearable conductive metal electrodes, iii) patterned metal interconnects, and d) 3D stretchable and compressible metal sponges. A critical perspective on this emerging strategy is also provided.

  6. Salting effects on protein components in aqueous NaCl and urea solutions: toward understanding of urea-induced protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-02-02

    The mechanism of urea-induced protein denaturation is explored through studying the salting effect of urea on 14 amino acid side chain analogues, and N-methylacetamide (NMA) which mimics the protein backbone. The solvation free energies of the 15 molecules were calculated in pure water, aqueous urea, and NaCl solutions. Our results show that NaCl displays strong capability to salt out all 15 molecules, while urea facilitates the solvation (salting-in) of all the 15 molecules on the other hand. The salting effect is found to be largely enthalpy-driven for both NaCl and urea. Our observations can explain the higher stability of protein's secondary and tertiary structures in typical salt solutions than that in pure water. Meanwhile, urea's capability to better solvate protein backbone and side-chain components can be extrapolated to explain protein's denaturation in aqueous urea solution. Urea salts in molecules through direct binding to solute surface, and the strength is linearly dependent on the number of heavy atoms of solute molecules. The van der Waals interactions are found to be the dominant force, which challenges a hydrogen-bonding-driven mechanism proposed previously.

  7. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies of Aluminosilicate Gels Prepared in High-Alkaline and Salt-Concentrated Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Li Q.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Parker, Kent E.; Hobbs, David T.; McCready, David E.

    2005-11-01

    Solid-state 29Si, 27Al, and 23Na MAS (magic angle spinning) NMR techniques in combination with x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) are used to characterize aluminosilicate gels as a function of composition, pH, and reaction times. These gels were prepared at 80 C using initial solutions with low Si/Al ratios, high alkaline and salt concentrations that are characteristic of nuclear tank wastes. XRD data show that cancrinite and sodalite are the main crystalline phases in the aluminosilicate gels produced. It is found that the pH and the salt content have significant effects on the nature of the aluminosilicate gels. Higher pH appears to increase the rate of crystallization, the degree of overall crystallinity and the percentage of cancrinite phases in aluminosilicate gels, whereas the high salt concentration promotes the formation of cancrinite and sodalite and prohibits the formation of other zeolites. Complementary to XRD, NMR is extremely useful for providing the information on the structure of amorphous intermediate gels with no long-range order.

  8. Application of extraction chromatography to the separation of thorium and uranium dissolved in a solution of high salt concentration.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Asako; Kameo, Yutaka; Hoshi, Akiko; Haraga, Tomoko; Nakashima, Mikio

    2007-01-26

    Extraction chromatography with commercially available UTEVA resin (for uranium and tetravalent actinide) was applied for the separation of Th and U from control solutions prepared from a multi-element control solution and from sample solutions of solidified simulated waste. Thorium and U in control solutions with 1-5mol/dm(3) HNO(3) were extracted with UTEVA resin and recovered with a solution containing 0.1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) and 0.05mol/dm(3) oxalic acid to be separated from the other metallic elements. Extraction behavior of U in the sample solutions was similar to that in the control solutions, but extraction of Th was dependent on the concentration of HNO(3). Thorium was extracted from 5mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solutions but not from 1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solutions. We conjecture that thorium fluoride formation interferes with extraction of Th. Addition of Al(NO(3))(3) and Fe(NO(3))(3), which have higher stability constant with fluoride ion than Th, does improve extractability of Th from 1mol/dm(3) HNO(3) sample solution.

  9. Spiropyran salts and their neutral precursors: synthesis, crystal structure, photochromic transformations in solutions and solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurieva, E. A.; Aldoshin, S. M.

    2015-06-01

    This review covers investigations of spiropyran iodides with N-substituted indoline fragment, and with the pyran cycle being annelated to N-methylated pyridine ring. The schemes of synthesis of iodides and their neutral precursors, as well as results of X-ray analysis and photochemical study of the crystals of the obtained compounds are presented. Based on our and literature data, the relationship between the structure and photochromic properties has been discussed for a series of salts and neutral pyridospiropyrans.

  10. Microbially Mediated Plant Salt Tolerance and Microbiome-based Solutions for Saline Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yuan; Druzhinina, Irina S; Pan, Xueyu; Yuan, Zhilin

    2016-11-15

    Soil salinization adversely affects plant growth and has become one of the major limiting factors for crop productivity worldwide. The conventional approach, breeding salt-tolerant plant cultivars, has often failed to efficiently alleviate the situation. In contrast, the use of a diverse array of microorganisms harbored by plants has attracted increasing attention because of the remarkable beneficial effects of microorganisms on plants. Multiple advanced '-omics' technologies have enabled us to gain insights into the structure and function of plant-associated microbes. In this review, we first focus on microbe-mediated plant salt tolerance, in particular on the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying root-microbe symbiosis. Unfortunately, when introducing such microbes as single strains to soils, they are often ineffective in improving plant growth and stress tolerance, largely due to competition with native soil microbial communities and limited colonization efficiency. Rapid progress in rhizosphere microbiome research has revived the belief that plants may benefit more from association with interacting, diverse microbial communities (microbiome) than from individual members in a community. Understanding how a microbiome assembles in the continuous compartments (endosphere, rhizoplane, and rhizosphere) will assist in predicting a subset of core or minimal microbiome and thus facilitate synthetic re-construction of microbial communities and their functional complementarity and synergistic effects. These developments will open a new avenue for capitalizing on the cultivable microbiome to strengthen plant salt tolerance and thus to refine agricultural practices and production under saline conditions.

  11. Solution-based metal enhanced fluorescence with gold and gold/silver core-shell nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zebin; Li, Xiaoyi; Guo, Jingxia; Wang, Ruibo; Wu, Yanni; Zhang, Mingdi; Li, Caixia; Han, Qingyan; Dong, Jun; Zheng, Hairong

    2015-12-01

    Metal enhanced fluorescence of Oxazine720 fluorophore with gold and gold/silver core-shell nanorods is investigated experimentally in aqueous solution system. Metallic nanorods are synthesized for providing proper localized surface plasmon resonance and necessary enhancement to the fluorophore molecule. The experimental observation shows that the fluorescence enhancement increases firstly and then decreases when the concentration of metallic nanorods increases, which is resulted by the competition between enhanced emission and inner-filtering effect. Further investigation with different amounts of metallic nanorods shows that the relationship between metal enhanced fluorescence and spectral correlation strongly depends on the concentration of metallic nanorods.

  12. Bupivacaine salts of diflunisal and other aromatic hydroxycarboxylic acids: aqueous solubility and release characteristics from solutions and suspensions using a rotating dialysis cell model.

    PubMed

    Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Susan W; Parshad, Henrik; Larsen, Claus

    2005-11-01

    In the search for poorly soluble bupivacaine salts potentially enabling prolonged postoperative pain relief after local joint administration in the form of suspensions the solubility of bupivacaine salts of diflunisal and other aromatic hydroxycarboxylic acids were investigated together with the release characteristics of selected 1:1 salts from solutions and suspensions using a rotating dialysis cell model. The poorest soluble bupivacaine salts were obtained from the aromatic ortho-hydroxycarboxylic acids diflunisal, 5-iodosalicylic acid, and salicylic acid (aqueous solubilities: 0.6-1.9 mM at 37 degrees C). Diffusant appearance rates in the acceptor phase upon instillation of solutions of various salts in the donor cell applied to first-order kinetics. Calculated permeability coefficients for bupivacaine and the counterions diflunisal, 5-iodosalicylic acid, and mandelic acid were found to be correlated with the molecular size of the diffusants. Release experiments at physiological pH involving suspensions of the bupivacaine-diflunisal salt revealed that at each sampling point the diflunisal concentration exceeded that of bupivacaine in the acceptor phase. However, after an initial lag period, a steady state situation was attained resulting in equal and constant fluxes of the two diffusants controlled by the permeability coefficients in combination with the solubility product of the salt. Due to the fact that the saturation solubility of the bupivacaine-salicylic acid salt in water exceeded that of bupivacaine at pH 7.4, suspensions of the latter salt were unable to provide simultaneous release of the cationic and anionic species at pH 7.4. The release profiles were characterised by a rapid release of salicylate accompanied by a much slower appearance of bupivacaine in the acceptor phase caused by precipitation of bupivacaine base from the solution upon dissolution of the salt in the donor cell.

  13. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  14. Cesium Platinide Hydride 4Cs2 Pt⋅CsH: An Intermetallic Double Salt Featuring Metal Anions.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2016-11-14

    With Cs9 Pt4 H a new representative of ionic compounds featuring metal anions can be added to this rare-membered family. Cs9 Pt4 H exhibits a complex crystal structure containing Cs(+) cations, Pt(2-) and H(-) anions. Being a red, transparent compound its band gap is in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum and the ionic type of bonding is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. This cesium platinide hydride can formally be considered as a double salt of the "alloy" cesium-platinum, or better cesium platinide, Cs2 Pt, and the salt cesium hydride CsH according to Cs9 Pt4 H≡4 Cs2 Pt⋅CsH.

  15. Cesium Platinide Hydride 4Cs 2 Pt-CsH: An Intermetallic Double Salt Featuring Metal Anions

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2016-10-24

    With Cs9Pt4H a new representative of ionic compounds featuring metal anions can be added to this rare-membered family. Cs9Pt4H exhibits a complex crystal structure containing Cs+ cations, Pt2- and H- anions. Being a red, transparent compound its band gap is in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum and the ionic type of bonding is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. This cesium platinide hydride can formally be considered as a double salt of the “alloy” cesium–platinum, or better cesium platinide, Cs2Pt, and the salt cesium hydride CsH according to Cs9Pt4H≡4 Cs2Pt∙CsH.

  16. Metal-free Synthesis of Ynones from Acyl Chlorides and Potassium Alkynyltrifluoroborate Salts

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Cassandra L.; Bolshan, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Ynones are a valuable functional group and building block in organic synthesis. Ynones serve as a precursor to many important organic functional groups and scaffolds. Traditional methods for the preparation of ynones are associated with drawbacks including harsh conditions, multiple purification steps, and the presence of unwanted byproducts. An alternative method for the straightforward preparation of ynones from acyl chlorides and potassium alkynyltrifluoroborate salts is described herein. The adoption of organotrifluoroborate salts as an alternative to organometallic reagents for the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds has a number of advantages. Potassium organotrifluoroborate salts are shelf stable, have good functional group tolerance, low toxicity, and a wide variety are straightforward to prepare. The title reaction proceeds rapidly at ambient temperature in the presence of a Lewis acid without the exclusion of air and moisture. Fair to excellent yields may be obtained via reaction of various aryl and alkyl acid chlorides with alkynyltrifluoroborate salts in the presence of boron trichloride. PMID:25742169

  17. Reinecke's Salt Revisited. An Undergraduate Project Involving an Unknown Metal Complex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Graeme H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes 10 experiments for characterizing the chromium complex Reinecke's Salt. The properties of the complex, experimental procedures, and a discussion are provided. Analyses are presented for chromium, total ammonia, thiocyanate, ammonium ion, and hydrate water. Measurement methods are described. (YP)

  18. Enhanced cycling performance of a Li metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide-based electrolyte using highly concentrated lithium salt for a lithium-oxygen battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Togasaki, Norihiro; Momma, Toshiyuki; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2016-03-01

    Stable charge-discharge cycling behavior for a lithium metal anode in a dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-based electrolyte is strongly desired of lithium-oxygen batteries, because the Li anode is rapidly exhausted as a result of side reactions during cycling in the DMSO solution. Herein, we report a novel electrolyte design for enhancing the cycling performance of Li anodes by using a highly concentrated DMSO-based electrolyte with a specific Li salt. Lithium nitrate (LiNO3), which forms an inorganic compound (Li2O) instead of a soluble product (Li2S) on a lithium surface, exhibits a >20% higher coulombic efficiency than lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide, lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide, and lithium perchlorate, regardless of the loading current density. Moreover, the stable cycling of Li anodes in DMSO-based electrolytes depends critically on the salt concentration. The highly concentrated electrolyte 4.0 M LiNO3/DMSO displays enhanced and stable cycling performance comparable to that of carbonate-based electrolytes, which had not previously been achieved. We suppose this enhancement is due to the absence of free DMSO solvent in the electrolyte and the promotion of the desolvation of Li ions on the solid electrolyte interphase surface, both being consequences of the unique structure of the electrolyte.

  19. DNA Damage and Transcriptional Changes in the Gills of Mytilus galloprovincialis Exposed to Nanomolar Doses of Combined Metal Salts (Cd, Cu, Hg)

    PubMed Central

    Varotto, Laura; Domeneghetti, Stefania; Rosani, Umberto; Manfrin, Chiara; Cajaraville, Miren P.; Raccanelli, Stefano; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at an integrated and mechanistic view of the early biological effects of selected metals in the marine sentinel organism Mytilus galloprovincialis, we exposed mussels for 48 hours to 50, 100 and 200 nM solutions of equimolar Cd, Cu and Hg salts and measured cytological and molecular biomarkers in parallel. Focusing on the mussel gills, first target of toxic water contaminants and actively proliferating tissue, we detected significant dose-related increases of cells with micronuclei and other nuclear abnormalities in the treated mussels, with differences in the bioconcentration of the three metals determined in the mussel flesh by atomic absorption spectrometry. Gene expression profiles, determined in the same individual gills in parallel, revealed some transcriptional changes at the 50 nM dose, and substantial increases of differentially expressed genes at the 100 and 200 nM doses, with roughly similar amounts of up- and down-regulated genes. The functional annotation of gill transcripts with consistent expression trends and significantly altered at least in one dose point disclosed the complexity of the induced cell response. The most evident transcriptional changes concerned protein synthesis and turnover, ion homeostasis, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, and intracellular trafficking (transcript sequences denoting heat shock proteins, metal binding thioneins, sequestosome 1 and proteasome subunits, and GADD45 exemplify up-regulated genes while transcript sequences denoting actin, tubulins and the apoptosis inhibitor 1 exemplify down-regulated genes). Overall, nanomolar doses of co-occurring free metal ions have induced significant structural and functional changes in the mussel gills: the intensity of response to the stimulus measured in laboratory supports the additional validation of molecular markers of metal exposure to be used in Mussel Watch programs. PMID:23355883

  20. Solution-based approaches for making high-density sodalite waste forms to immobilize spent electrochemical salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepry, William C.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Pierce, David A.

    2013-11-01

    Three different solution-based approaches were taken to make sodalite minerals as a host for a mixed salt simulating the waste in the electrochemical separations process of nuclear fuel reprocessing. The methods used an aqueous solution of mixed chlorides (simulated waste) but the other reactants varied: (1) Al(OH)3 + NaOH + CS, (2) NaAlO2 + CS, and (3) Al2Si2O7 + NaOH, (CS = colloidal silica). The products were dried, ground, pressed into pellets, and fired at 650-950 °C. In some cases, either 5 or 10 mass% of a Si-Na-B oxide glass sintering aid was introduced at different stages in the process. Method (2) proved the most successful at producing high sodalite fractions (up to 100%) with minimal sintering aid additions and showed high consolidation potential (up to 91.4% of theoretical density) at reduced firing temperatures.