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Sample records for metal stress induce

  1. Role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by metal mixture.

    PubMed

    Martín, Silva-Aguilar; Emilio, Rojas; Mahara, Valverde

    2011-01-01

    Metals are ubiquitous pollutants present as mixtures. In particular, mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead is among the leading toxic agents detected in the environment. These metals have carcinogenic and cell-transforming potential. In this study, we used a two step cell transformation model, to determine the role of oxidative stress in transformation induced by a mixture of arsenic-cadmium-lead. Oxidative damage and antioxidant response were determined. Metal mixture treatment induces the increase of damage markers and the antioxidant response. Loss of cell viability and increased transforming potential were observed during the promotion phase. This finding correlated significantly with generation of reactive oxygen species. Cotreatment with N-acetyl-cysteine induces effect on the transforming capacity; while a diminution was found in initiation, in promotion phase a total block of the transforming capacity was observed. Our results suggest that oxidative stress generated by metal mixture plays an important role only in promotion phase promoting transforming capacity.

  2. Advances in metal-induced oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, Klaudia; Valko, Marian

    2011-05-10

    Detailed studies in the past two decades have shown that redox active metals like iron (Fe), copper (Cu), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co) and other metals undergo redox cycling reactions and possess the ability to produce reactive radicals such as superoxide anion radical and nitric oxide in biological systems. Disruption of metal ion homeostasis may lead to oxidative stress, a state where increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) overwhelms body antioxidant protection and subsequently induces DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, protein modification and other effects, all symptomatic for numerous diseases, involving cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, neurological disorders (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), chronic inflammation and others. The underlying mechanism of action for all these metals involves formation of the superoxide radical, hydroxyl radical (mainly via Fenton reaction) and other ROS, finally producing mutagenic and carcinogenic malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) and other exocyclic DNA adducts. On the other hand, the redox inactive metals, such as cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As) and lead (Pb) show their toxic effects via bonding to sulphydryl groups of proteins and depletion of glutathione. Interestingly, for arsenic an alternative mechanism of action based on the formation of hydrogen peroxide under physiological conditions has been proposed. A special position among metals is occupied by the redox inert metal zinc (Zn). Zn is an essential component of numerous proteins involved in the defense against oxidative stress. It has been shown, that depletion of Zn may enhance DNA damage via impairments of DNA repair mechanisms. In addition, Zn has an impact on the immune system and possesses neuroprotective properties. The mechanism of metal-induced formation of free radicals is tightly influenced by the action of cellular antioxidants. Many low-molecular weight antioxidants (ascorbic acid (vitamin C), alpha

  3. Plant responses to abiotic stresses: heavy metal-induced oxidative stress and protection by mycorrhization.

    PubMed

    Schützendübel, Andres; Polle, Andrea

    2002-05-01

    cadmium results in unspecific necrosis. Plants in certain mycorrhizal associations are less sensitive to cadmium stress than non-mycorrhizal plants. Data about antioxidative systems in mycorrhizal fungi in pure culture and in symbiosis are scarce. The present results indicate that mycorrhization stimulated the phenolic defence system in the Paxillus-Pinus mycorrhizal symbiosis. Cadmium-induced changes in mycorrhizal roots were absent or smaller than those in non-mycorrhizal roots. These observations suggest that although changes in rhizospheric conditions were perceived by the root part of the symbiosis, the typical Cd-induced stress responses of phenolics were buffered. It is not known whether mycorrhization protected roots from Cd-induced injury by preventing access of cadmium to sensitive extra- or intracellular sites, or by excreted or intrinsic metal-chelators, or by other defence systems. It is possible that mycorrhizal fungi provide protection via GSH since higher concentrations of this thiol were found in pure cultures of the fungi than in bare roots. The development of stress-tolerant plant-mycorrhizal associations may be a promising new strategy for phytoremediation and soil amelioration measures.

  4. Interaction of laser-induced stress waves with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, A. H.; Fairand, B. P.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of high intensity laser induced stress waves on the hardness and tensile strength of 2024 and 7075 aluminum and on the fatigue properties of 7075 aluminum were investigated. Laser shocking increases the hardness of the underaged 2024-T351 but has little or no effect on the peak aged 2024-T351 and 7075-T651 or the overaged 7075-T73. The fretting fatigue life of fastener joints of 7075-T6 was increased by orders of magnitude by laser shocking the region around the fastener hole; the fatigue crack propagation rates were decreased by laser shocking.

  5. NRF2 Oxidative Stress Induced by Heavy Metals is Cell Type Dependent

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to metallic environmental toxicants has been demonstrated to induce a variety of oxidative stress responses in mammalian cells. The transcription factor Nrf2 is activated in response to oxidative stress and coordinates the expression of antioxidant gene products. In this...

  6. Stress induced half-metallicity in surface defected germanium nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sk, Mahasin Alam; Ng, Man-Fai; Yang, Shuo-Wang; Lim, Kok Hwa

    2012-01-21

    Germanium nanowires (GeNWs) with single, double, quadruple and octuple surface dangling bonds (SDBs) are investigated using density-functional-theory calculations. We show that single SDB defected GeNWs remain semiconducting as their non-defected form while double or multiple SDB defects result in either semiconducting or metallic GeNWs, depending on the defect's locations on the surface. More importantly, we show that the electronic properties of surface defected GeNWs can also be fine-tuned by applying tensile and compressive strains. Upon the right loading, the surface defected GeNWs become half-metallic. In addition, we determine that the surface defected GeNWs can be classified into three classes: (1) GeNWs with zero magnetic moment, which are either metallic or semiconducting; (2) GeNWs with net magnetic moments equal to the number of SDBs, which are semiconducting with distinct spin-up and spin-down configurations; and (3) GeNWs with net magnetic moments significantly lower than the number of SDBs. We also find that only the defected GeNWs that fall under (3) are potentially half-metallic. Our results predict that half-metallic GeNWs can be obtained via engineering of the surface defects and the structures without the presence of impurity dopants.

  7. Electrical-stress-induced transport and surface potential characterizations of metal/ TiO 2/metal planar junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Haeri; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2011-03-01

    Electric-field-induced resistive switching (RS) phenomena in metal oxides have attracted considerable research interest due to their potential use in nonvolatile memory device applications. Intensive investigations have revealed that coupled electron ion dynamics play a key role the RS mechanism. Metal/single crystal junction can be an ideal model system to study how the ionic drift and diffusion can affect the resistance. We investigated transport and local electrical properties of Pt/ Ti O2 single crystal/Ti planar junctions with micron- sized gaps between the electrodes. Scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) showed that negative (positive) electrical stress to the Pt electrodes significantly reduced (hardly affected) the Pt/ Ti O2 contact resistance. The SKPM results also revealed that the electrical stress caused alteration of the local work function of Ti O2 . The comparative investigations of the transport and SKPM results suggested that the electrical stress induced redistribution of ions, resulting in the change of the junction resistance.

  8. Heavy metal stress can prime for herbivore-induced plant volatile emission.

    PubMed

    Winter, Thorsten R; Borkowski, Lena; Zeier, Jürgen; Rostás, Michael

    2012-07-01

    Heavy metals are important pollutants that can severely impact ecological foodwebs. In addition to direct toxic effects, these contaminants have been suggested to disrupt chemical communication channels between plants and insects that rely on volatile organic compounds (VOCs). We investigated how different concentrations of copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd) stress affect the capacity of Zea mays to synthesize VOCs in the presence and absence of herbivorous insects. Hydroponically grown maize exposed to a high and low concentration of either Cu or Cd showed stunted growth and lower photosynthetic capacities. Herbivores feeding on stressed plants also had attenuated growth rates. Heavy metal treatment alone did not induce VOC emission in maize plants; however, the higher Cu dose was found to prime for enhanced volatile production that can be triggered by caterpillar feeding. Cu stress correlated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species in roots and priming of herbivore-induced jasmonic acid in leaves. Plants challenged with Cd and herbivory did not differ in responses compared with herbivore-damaged controls with no heavy metals added to the substrate. For Cu stress, our results support the 'single biochemical mechanism for multiple stressors' model which predicts overlapping signalling and responses to abiotic and biotic stress factors.

  9. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Carcinogenesis Induced by Metals and Xenobiotics

    PubMed Central

    Henkler, Frank; Brinkmann, Joep; Luch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In addition to a wide range of adverse effects on human health, toxic metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can also promote carcinogenesis. The toxicological properties of these metals are partly related to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can induce DNA damage and trigger redox-dependent transcription factors. The precise mechanisms that induce oxidative stress are not fully understood. Further, it is not yet known whether chronic exposures to low doses of arsenic, cadmium or other metals are sufficient to induce mutations in vivo, leading to DNA repair responses and/or tumorigenesis. Oxidative stress can also be induced by environmental xenobiotics, when certain metabolites are generated that lead to the continuous release of superoxide, as long as the capacity to reduce the resulting dions (quinones) into hydroquinones is maintained. However, the specific significance of superoxide-dependent pathways to carcinogenesis is often difficult to address, because formation of DNA adducts by mutagenic metabolites can occur in parallel. Here, we will review both mechanisms and toxicological consequences of oxidative stress triggered by metals and dietary or environmental pollutants in general. Besides causing DNA damage, ROS may further induce multiple intracellular signaling pathways, notably NF-κB, JNK/SAPK/p38, as well as Erk/MAPK. These signaling routes can lead to transcriptional induction of target genes that could promote proliferation or confer apoptosis resistance to exposed cells. The significance of these additional modes depends on tissue, cell-type and is often masked by alternate oncogenic mechanisms being activated in parallel. PMID:24281075

  10. Tight Junction Proteins and Oxidative Stress in Heavy Metals-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José L.; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E (α-tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals. PMID:23710457

  11. Tight junction proteins and oxidative stress in heavy metals-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Molina-Jijón, Eduardo; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Rafael; Bautista-García, Pablo; Debray-García, Yazmin; Namorado, María Del Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Kidney is a target organ for heavy metals. They accumulate in several segments of the nephron and cause profound alterations in morphology and function. Acute intoxication frequently causes acute renal failure. The effects of chronic exposure have not been fully disclosed. In recent years increasing awareness of the consequences of their presence in the kidney has evolved. In this review we focus on the alterations induced by heavy metals on the intercellular junctions of the kidney. We describe that in addition to the proximal tubule, which has been recognized as the main site of accumulation and injury, other segments of the nephron, such as glomeruli, vessels, and distal nephron, show also deleterious effects. We also emphasize the participation of oxidative stress as a relevant component of the renal damage induced by heavy metals and the beneficial effect that some antioxidant drugs, such as vitamin A (all-trans-retinoic acid) and vitamin E ( α -tocopherol), depict on the morphological and functional alterations induced by heavy metals.

  12. Cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by different metallic nanoparticles on human kidney cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Some manufactured nanoparticles are metal-based and have a wide variety of applications in electronic, engineering and medicine. Until now, many studies have described the potential toxicity of NPs on pulmonary target, while little attention has been paid to kidney which is considered to be a secondary target organ. The objective of this study, on human renal culture cells, was to assess the toxicity profile of metallic nanoparticles (TiO2, ZnO and CdS) usable in industrial production. Comparative studies were conducted, to identify whether particle properties impact cytotoxicity by altering the intracellular oxidative status. Results Nanoparticles were first characterized by size, surface charge, dispersion and solubility. Cytotoxicity of NPs was then evaluated in IP15 (glomerular mesangial) and HK-2 (epithelial proximal) cell lines. ZnO and CdS NPs significantly increased the cell mortality, in a dose-dependent manner. Cytotoxic effects were correlated with the physicochemical properties of NPs tested and the cell type used. Analysis of reactive oxygen species and intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized glutathione revealed that particles induced stress according to their composition, size and solubility. Protein involved in oxidative stress such as NF-κb was activated with ZnO and CdS nanoparticles. Such effects were not observed with TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion On glomerular and tubular human renal cells, ZnO and CdS nanoparticles exerted cytotoxic effects that were correlated with metal composition, particle scale and metal solubility. ROS production and oxidative stress induction clearly indicated their nephrotoxic potential. PMID:21371295

  13. Hesperidin ameliorates heavy metal induced toxicity mediated by oxidative stress in brain of Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Haaris Ajmal; Parvez, Suhel

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) induces neurotoxicity owing to its highly deleterious capacity to cross the blood brain barrier (BBB). Recent studies have provided insights on antioxidant properties of bioflavonoids which have emerged as potential therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that hesperidin (HP) ameliorates oxidative stress and may have mitigatory effects in the extent of heavy metal-induced neurotoxicity. Cd (3mg/kg body weight) was administered subcutaneously for 21 days while HP (40 mg/kg body weight) was administered orally once every day. The results of the current investigation demonstrate significant elevated levels of oxidative stress markers such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonyl (PC) along with significant depletion in the activity of non-enzymatic antioxidants like glutathione (GSH) and non-protein thiol (NP-SH) and enzymatic antioxidants in the Cd treated rats' brain. Activity of neurotoxicity biomarkers such as acetylcholinesterase (AchE), monoamine oxidase (MAO) and total ATPase were also altered significantly and HP treatment significantly attenuated the altered levels of oxidative stress and neurotoxicity biomarkers while salvaging the antioxidant sentinels of cells to near normal levels thus exhibiting potent antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on the brain tissue against oxidative damage in Cd treated rodent model.

  14. Heavy metals induce oxidative stress and trigger oxidative stress-mediated heat shock protein (hsp) modulation in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Gyung Soo; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) are induced by a wide range of environmental stressors including heavy metals in aquatic organisms. However, the effect of heavy metals on zooplankton at the molecular level remains still unclear. In this study, we measured the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and the antioxidant enzyme activities for 96 h after exposure to five heavy metals: arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and zinc (Zn) in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes were highly elevated in metal-exposed copepods, indicating that heavy metals can induce oxidative stress by generating ROS, and stimulate the involvement of antioxidant enzymes as cellular defense mechanisms. Subsequently, transcriptional changes in hsp gene families were further investigated in the metal-exposed groups for 96 h. The ROS level and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly increased in Ag-, As-, and Cu-exposed copepods, while they were only slightly elevated in Cd- and Zn-exposed groups. Based on the numbers of significantly modulated hsp genes and their expression levels for 96 h, we measured the effect of heavy metals to stress genes of T. japonicus in the following order: Cu > Zn > Ag > As > Cd, implying that Cu acts as a stronger oxidative stress inducer than other heavy metals. Of them, the expression of hsp20 and hsp70 genes was substantially modulated by exposure to heavy metals, indicating that these genes would provide a sensitive molecular biomarker for aquatic monitoring of heavy metal pollution.

  15. Polyhydroxyfullerene Binds Cadmium Ions and Alleviates Metal-Induced Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Pradhan, Arunava; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Seena, Sahadevan; Pascoal, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    The water-soluble polyhydroxyfullerene (PHF) is a functionalized carbon nanomaterial with several industrial and commercial applications. There have been controversial reports on the toxicity and/or antioxidant properties of fullerenes and their derivatives. Conversely, metals have been recognized as toxic mainly due to their ability to induce oxidative stress in living organisms. We investigated the interactive effects of PHF and cadmium ions (Cd) on the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by exposing cells to Cd (≤5 mg liter−1) in the absence or presence of PHF (≤500 mg liter−1) at different pHs (5.8 to 6.8). In the absence of Cd, PHF stimulated yeast growth up to 10.4%. Cd inhibited growth up to 79.7%, induced intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and promoted plasma membrane disruption in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. The negative effects of Cd on growth were attenuated by the presence of PHF, and maximum growth recovery (53.8%) was obtained at the highest PHF concentration and pH. The coexposure to Cd and PHF decreased ROS accumulation up to 36.7% and membrane disruption up to 30.7% in a dose- and pH-dependent manner. Two mechanisms helped to explain the role of PHF in alleviating Cd toxicity to yeasts: PHF decreased Cd-induced oxidative stress and bound significant amounts of Cd in the extracellular medium, reducing its bioavailability to the cells. PMID:25038095

  16. Heavy metals induce oxidative stress and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice root.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Sonali; Shri, Manju; Misra, Prashant; Lakhwani, Deepika; Bag, Sumit Kumar; Asif, Mehar H; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudro Deo; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2014-06-01

    Industrial growth, ecological disturbances and agricultural practices have contaminated the soil and water with many harmful compounds, including heavy metals. These heavy metals affect growth and development of plants as well as cause severe human health hazards through food chain contamination. In past, studies have been made to identify biochemical and molecular networks associated with heavy metal toxicity and uptake in plants. Studies suggested that most of the physiological and molecular processes affected by different heavy metals are similar to those affected by other abiotic stresses. To identify common and unique responses by different metals, we have studied biochemical and genome-wide modulation in transcriptome of rice (IR-64 cultivar) root after exposure to cadmium (Cd), arsenate [As(V)], lead (Pb) and chromium [Cr(VI)] in hydroponic condition. We observed that root tissue shows variable responses for antioxidant enzyme system for different heavy metals. Genome-wide expression analysis suggests variable number of genes differentially expressed in root in response to As(V), Cd, Pb and Cr(VI) stresses. In addition to unique genes, each heavy metal modulated expression of a large number of common genes. Study also identified cis-acting regions of the promoters which can be determinants for the modulated expression of the genes in response to different heavy metals. Our study advances understanding related to various processes and networks which might be responsible for heavy metal stresses, accumulation and detoxification.

  17. Analysis of thermal stress-induced grain boundary cavitation and notching in narrow Al-Si metallizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Che-Yu; Black, Ronald D.; LaFontaine, William R.

    1988-07-01

    Grain boundary voiding and notching have been found to produce failures in narrow metallizations during thermal aging. The nucleation and growth of grain boundary voids are considered to occur as a result of grain boundary sliding and the subsequent stress-induced mass transport. A proposed model yields the linewidth and temperature dependence of the observed failure rate.

  18. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentation studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.

  19. In Situ TEM Nanoindentation Studies on Stress-Induced Phase Transformations in Metallic Materials

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Y.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-30

    Though abundant phase transformations are in general thermally driven processes, there are many examples wherein stresses can induce phase transformations. We applied numerous in situ techniques, such as in situ x-ray diffraction and neutron diffraction in order to reveal phase transformations. Recently, an in situ nanoindentation technique coupled with transmission electron microscopy demonstrated the capability to directly correlating stresses with phase transformations and microstructural evolutions at a submicron length scale. We briefly review in situ studies on stress-induced diffusional and diffusionless phase transformations in amorphous CuZrAl alloy and NiFeGa shape memory alloy. Moreover, in the amorphous CuZrAl, in situ nanoindentationmore » studies show that the nucleation of nanocrystals (a diffusional process) occurs at ultra-low stresses manifested by a prominent stress drop. In the NiFeGa shape memory alloy, two distinctive types of martensitic (diffusionless) phase transformations accompanied by stress plateaus are observed, including a reversible gradual phase transformation at low stress levels, and an irreversible abrupt phase transition at higher stress levels.« less

  20. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J.; Gall, Kenneth A.; Choudhury, A.; Pikarsky, J.; Andruszkiewicz, Leanne; Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  1. The effect of a constraining metal tube on flux pinning induced stress in a long cylindrical superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaobin; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2012-07-01

    The use of an alloy tube to impose pressure on a superconducting cylinder during magnetizing reduces pinning-induced tensile stress in high temperature superconductors has been well established. In this paper the natural contact state between the superconducting cylinder and the metal tube is modeled. An exact solution is obtained for the isotropic magnetoelastic problem with the superconductor behaving magnetically, and an expression for the contact pressure exerted on the superconductor by the metal tube is obtained. This expression explicitly gives the contribution of the ratio of Young's modulus of the superconductor to that of the metal and the ratio of the internal to external radii of the metal tube. The stress profile in the superconductor, subjected to the restriction of metal tube, with both field cooled activation and pulse field activation is analyzed in terms of the Bean critical-state model. The results show that the metal tube can prevent radial expansion of the superconductor and can reduce the maximum tension for field-cooled and pulsed-field activations. These results are important for the selection of materials as well as the optimization of sizes of the alloy tube.

  2. Subchronic exposure to a mixture of groundwater-contaminating metals through drinking water induces oxidative stress in male rats.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin Hanmantrao; Sarkar, Souvendra Nath; Kataria, Meena; Tripathi, Harish Chandra

    2007-03-01

    The current study examines the oxidative stress-inducing potential of a mixture of metals, representative of groundwater contamination in different areas of India. Male albino rats were exposed to the mixture through drinking water for 90 days at 0, 1, 10 and 100 times the mode concentrations of the metals in contaminated waters and at concentrations equal to their WHO maximum permissible limit (MPL) in drinking water. The endpoints evaluated were lipid peroxidation (LPO), GSH content and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase in heart, liver, kidney and brain. MPL and 1× levels did not induce any alterations. The mixture at 10× and 100× doses increased LPO and decreased GSH level and activities of the antioxidases in kidney, liver and brain, but no alterations were observed in heart. An inverse correlation between LPO and GSH or antioxidaes and a positive correlation between GSH and glutathione peroxidase or glutathione reductase were found in the affected organs. The findings suggest that the mixture induces oxidative stress and decreases antioxidant status in 10× and 100× the mode concentrations of the metals in drinking water.

  3. Alpha-Synuclein Oligomers Interact with Metal Ions to Induce Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Death in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Deas, Emma; Cremades, Nunilo; Angelova, Plamena R.; Ludtmann, Marthe H.R.; Yao, Zhi; Chen, Serene; Horrocks, Mathew H.; Banushi, Blerida; Little, Daniel; Devine, Michael J.; Gissen, Paul; Klenerman, David; Dobson, Christopher M.; Wood, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Protein aggregation and oxidative stress are both key pathogenic processes in Parkinson's disease, although the mechanism by which misfolded proteins induce oxidative stress and neuronal death remains unknown. In this study, we describe how aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-S) from its monomeric form to its soluble oligomeric state results in aberrant free radical production and neuronal toxicity. Results: We first demonstrate excessive free radical production in a human induced pluripotent stem-derived α-S triplication model at basal levels and on application of picomolar doses of β-sheet-rich α-S oligomers. We probed the effects of different structural species of α-S in wild-type rat neuronal cultures and show that both oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-S are capable of generating free radical production, but that only the oligomeric form results in reduction of endogenous glutathione and subsequent neuronal toxicity. We dissected the mechanism of oligomer-induced free radical production and found that it was interestingly independent of several known cellular enzymatic sources. Innovation: The oligomer-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was entirely dependent on the presence of free metal ions as addition of metal chelators was able to block oligomer-induced ROS production and prevent oligomer-induced neuronal death. Conclusion: Our findings further support the causative role of soluble amyloid oligomers in triggering neurodegeneration and shed light into the mechanisms by which these species cause neuronal damage, which, we show here, can be amenable to modulation through the use of metal chelation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 376–391. PMID:26564470

  4. Creep and stress relaxation induced by interface diffusion in metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinfeng; Li, Zhonghua

    2013-03-01

    An analytical solution is developed to predict the creep rate induced by interface diffusion in unidirectional fiber-reinforced and particle reinforced composites. The driving force for the interface diffusion is the normal stress acting on the interface, which is obtained from rigorous Eshelby inclusion theory. The closed-form solution is an explicit function of the applied stress, volume fraction and radius of the fiber, as well as the modulus ratio between the fiber and the matrix. It is interesting that the solution is formally similar to that of Coble creep in polycrystalline materials. For the application of the present solution in the realistic composites, the scale effect is taken into account by finite element analysis based on a unit cell. Based on the solution, a closed-form solution is also given as a description of stress relaxation induced by interfacial diffusion under constant strain. In addition, the analytical solution for the interface stress presented in this study gives some insight into the relationship between the interface diffusion and interface slip. This work was supported by the financial support from the Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 10932007), the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB631003/5), and the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (No. 20100073110006).

  5. Stress-induced self-rolled metal/insulator bifilm microtube with micromesh walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kook-Nyung; Seo, Yeong-Tai; Lee, Min-Ho; Jung, Suk-Won; Kim, Yong-Kweon; Kim, Jung-Mu; Kyeong Seong, Woo

    2013-01-01

    A metal/insulator microtube with micromesh walls was constructed using stress-assisted self-rolling technology. The mesh-sidewall Pt/Ti/SiO2 microtube was self-formed by a tensile-stressed metal Pt/Ti film deposited onto a pre-patterned SiO2 micromesh layer. The microtube measured about 25 µm in diameter and was longer than 7 mm. The sidewall of the microtube was a square mesh, 5-20 µm long, and was electrically connected to electrical pads for electrical conductance measurement. The electrical resistance of the rolled-up microtube was measured to be 250-350 Ω when the microtube resistor's length was around 540 µm. The real-time measurement of the conductance change of the microtube with a Pt resistor could monitor the temperature change generated by heat injection. The microtube with micromesh walls is expected to be an interesting structure that has promising potential for use in electronics, chemical and biological applications.

  6. The effect of heavy metal-induced oxidative stress on the enzymes in white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qihua; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Guiqiu; Yan, Min; Chen, Anwei; Du, Jianjian; Huang, Jian; Yi, Bin; Zhou, Ying; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Prevalence of heavy metals in the living environment causes chemical stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium). However, the mechanisms involved in ROS defense are still under investigation. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of lead- and cadmium-induced oxidative stress on the activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and manganese peroxidase (MnP). A time-dependent change in all enzyme activities was observed following exposure to 50 μM cadmium and 25 μM lead. The lowest values were recorded at 4 h after exposure. Both cadmium and lead inhibited CAT and POD. The cytochrome P450 (CYP450) levels increased under 50-100 μM cadmium or lead exposure and decreased when heavy metal concentration was under 50 μM; this suggested that ROS is not the only factor that alters the CYP450 levels. The cadmium removal rate in the sample containing 900 μM taxifolin (inhibitor of CYP450) and 100 μM cadmium was reduced to 12.34 %, 9.73 % lower than that of 100 μM cadmium-induced sample, indicating CYP450 may play an indirect but key role in the process of clearance of heavy metals. The pH of the substrate solution decreased steadily during the incubation process.

  7. Pollution-induced community tolerance and functional redundancy in a decomposer food web in metal-stressed soil.

    PubMed

    Salminen, J; van Gestel, C A; Oksanen, J

    2001-10-01

    Pollution may lead to the development of pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) in a stressed community. We studied the presence of PICT in soil food webs using soil microcosms. Soil microcosms containing soil invertebrates and microbes were collected from polluted and unpolluted areas and exposed to a range of soil zinc concentrations. A pine seedling was planted in each microcosm to measure the effects of the origin of the community and Zn pollution on above-ground plant production. The effects of the treatments on nutrient content in the soil were also measured. The diversity of soil microarthropods and the soil's mineral nutrient content were low at the Zn-polluted site. We did not observe an increasing Zn tolerance among the soil organisms in the polluted soil. However, low population growth rates of soil invertebrates from the polluted site may indicate the deleterious effects on fitness of long-lasting pollution. In the soil from the nonpolluted site, Zn additions caused changes in the invertebrate food web structure. These changes were explained by the good physiological condition of the animals and their insensitivity to Zn. The fact that the food web structure in soil from the polluted site did not change can be used as a rough indicator of PICT. Structural stability is presumed by the lack of Zn-sensitive species at this site and the inability of populations to acclimate by altering their growth or reproduction patterns in response to changing soil conditions. Although microbial-based soil decomposer systems may have a high functional redundancy, our results indicate that metal stress at the polluted site exceeds the tolerance limits of the system. As a consequence, ecosystem function at this site is endangered. This study also shows that the evolution of metal tolerance by soil decomposer organisms may not be a common reaction to soil pollution, although changes of population and community structure indicated severe metal stress on organisms.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Stress Induced Gene Expression in Caenorhabditis elegans following Exposure to Environmental and Lab Reconstituted Complex Metal Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ranjeet; Pradhan, Ajay; Khan, Faisal Ahmad; Lindström, Pia; Ragnvaldsson, Daniel; Ivarsson, Per; Olsson, Per-Erik; Jass, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Metals are essential for many physiological processes and are ubiquitously present in the environment. However, high metal concentrations can be harmful to organisms and lead to physiological stress and diseases. The accumulation of transition metals in the environment due to either natural processes or anthropogenic activities such as mining results in the contamination of water and soil environments. The present study used Caenorhabditis elegans to evaluate gene expression as an indicator of physiological response, following exposure to water collected from three different locations downstream of a Swedish mining site and a lab reconstituted metal mixture. Our results indicated that the reconstituted metal mixture exerted a direct stress response in C. elegans whereas the environmental waters elicited either a diminished or abrogated response. This suggests that it is not sufficient to use the biological effects observed from laboratory mixtures to extrapolate the effects observed in complex aquatic environments and apply this to risk assessment and intervention. PMID:26168046

  9. Fungi from metal-polluted streams may have high ability to cope with the oxidative stress induced by copper oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Arunava; Seena, Sahadevan; Schlosser, Dietmar; Gerth, Katharina; Helm, Stefan; Dobritzsch, Melanie; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Dobritzsch, Dirk; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2015-04-01

    Increased commercialization of products based on metal oxide nanoparticles increases the likelihood that these nanoparticles will be released into aquatic environments, thus making relevant the assessment of their potential impacts on aquatic biota. Aquatic fungi are distributed worldwide and play a key role in organic matter turnover in freshwater ecosystems. The present study investigated the impacts of copper oxide spherical nanoparticles (CuO-NPs; <50 nm powder, 5 levels ≤200 mg/L) on cellular targets and antioxidant defenses in 5 fungal isolates collected from metal-polluted or nonpolluted streams. The CuO-NPs induced oxidative stress in aquatic fungi, as evidenced by intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and led to plasma membrane damage and DNA strand breaks in a concentration-dependent manner. Effects were more pronounced with a longer exposure time (3 d vs 10 d). Under CuO-NP exposure, mycelia of fungi collected from metal-polluted streams showed less oxidative stress and higher activities of superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase compared with fungi from nonpolluted streams. The latter fungi responded to CuO-NPs with a stronger stimulation of glutathione peroxidase activity. These findings may indicate that fungi isolated from metal-polluted streams had a greater ability to maintain the pool of reduced glutathione than those from nonpolluted streams. Overall, results suggest that populations adapted to metals may develop mechanisms to cope with the oxidative stress induced by metal nanoparticles.

  10. Stress-induced flowering

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Kaede C

    2010-01-01

    Many plant species can be induced to flower by responding to stress factors. The short-day plants Pharbitis nil and Perilla frutescens var. crispa flower under long days in response to the stress of poor nutrition or low-intensity light. Grafting experiments using two varieties of P. nil revealed that a transmissible flowering stimulus is involved in stress-induced flowering. The P. nil and P. frutescens plants that were induced to flower by stress reached anthesis, fruited and produced seeds. These seeds germinated, and the progeny of the stressed plants developed normally. Phenylalanine ammonialyase inhibitors inhibited this stress-induced flowering, and the inhibition was overcome by salicylic acid (SA), suggesting that there is an involvement of SA in stress-induced flowering. PnFT2, a P. nil ortholog of the flowering gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) of Arabidopsis thaliana, was expressed when the P. nil plants were induced to flower under poor-nutrition stress conditions, but expression of PnFT1, another ortholog of FT, was not induced, suggesting that PnFT2 is involved in stress-induced flowering. PMID:20505356

  11. Charge trapping induced drain-induced-barrier-lowering in HfO2/TiN p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors under hot carrier stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Wen-Hung; Chang, Ting-Chang; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Dai, Chih-Hao; Chen, Ching-En; Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Hua-Mao; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2012-04-01

    This letter studies the channel hot carrier stress (CHCS) behaviors on high dielectric constant insulator and metal gate HfO2/TiN p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors. It can be found that the degradation is associated with electron trapping, resulting in Gm decrease and positive Vth shift. However, Vth under saturation region shows an insignificant degradation during stress. To compare that, the CHC-induced electron trapping induced DIBL is proposed to demonstrate the different behavior of Vth between linear and saturation region. The devices with different channel length are used to evidence the trapping-induced DIBL behavior.

  12. Heavy metal and abiotic stress inducible metallothionein isoforms from Prosopis juliflora (SW) D.C. show differences in binding to heavy metals in vitro.

    PubMed

    Usha, B; Venkataraman, Gayatri; Parida, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora is a tree species that grows well in heavy metal laden industrial sites and accumulates heavy metals. To understand the possible contribution of metallothioneins (MTs) in heavy metal accumulation in P. juliflora, we isolated and compared the metal binding ability of three different types of MTs (PjMT1-3). Glutathione S-transferase fusions of PjMTs (GSTMT1-3) were purified from Escherichia coli cells grown in the presence of 0.3 mM cadmium, copper or zinc. Analysis of metal bound fusion proteins using atomic absorption spectrometry showed that PjMT1 bound higher levels of all three heavy metals as compared to PjMT2 and PjMT3. A comparative analysis of the genomic regions (including promoter for all three PjMTs) is also presented. All three PjMTs are induced by H(2)O(2) and ABA applications. PjMT1 and PjMT2 are induced by copper and zinc respectively while PjMT3 is induced by copper, zinc and cadmium. Variation in induction of PjMTs in response to metal exposure and their differential binding to metals suggests that each MT has a specific role in P. juliflora. Of the three MTs analyzed, PjMT1 shows maximum heavy metal sequestration and is thus a potential candidate for use in heavy metal phytoremediation.

  13. Ospdr9, which encodes a PDR-type ABC transporter, is induced by heavy metals, hypoxic stress and redox perturbations in rice roots.

    PubMed

    Moons, Ann

    2003-10-23

    Little is known about the role of pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR)-type ATP-binding (ABC) proteins in plant responses to environmental stresses. We characterised ospdr9, which encodes a rice ABC protein with a reverse (ABC-TMS(6))(2) configuration. Polyethylene glycol and the heavy metals Cd (20 microM) and Zn (30 microM) rapidly and markedly induced ospdr9 in roots of rice seedlings. Hypoxic stress also induced ospdr9 in rice roots, salt stress induced ospdr9 at low levels but cold and heat shock had no effect. The plant growth regulator jasmonic acid, the auxin alpha-naphthalene acetic acid and the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurine triggered ospdr9 expression. The antioxidants dithiothreitol and ascorbic acid rapidly and markedly induced ospdr9 in rice roots; the strong oxidant hydrogen peroxide also induced ospdr9 but at three times lower levels. The results suggested that redox changes may be involved in the abiotic stress response regulation of ospdr9 in rice roots.

  14. Protective effect of chlorophyllin and lycopene from water spinach extract on cytotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by heavy metals in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ui-Jeong; Park, Tae-Sik; Shim, Soon-Mi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the inhibitory effects of ethanol extract of water spinach (EEWS) containing chlorophyll and lycopene on cytotoxicity and oxidative stress in liver induced by heavy metals. The (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) MTT assay and dichlorofluorescein (DCF) assay were conducted to measure cytotoxicity and inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS), respectively. Cytotoxicity was prevented at a concentration of 11.7 mg/L of EEWS. Both sodium copper chlorophyllin (SCC) and lycopene in EEWS were identified by ultraperformance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy (UPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MSn) as major components at m/z 722.64 and 535.45, respectively. The concentrations of SCC and lycopene were 0.12 and 0.04 mg from 100 g of dried powder, respectively. Approximately 99% cytotoxicity induced by Cd was inhibited by EEWS. However, the inhibitory effect attributed to generation of ROS was similar with SCC, lycopene, and EEWS. Our results indicated that EEWS was effective in reducing cytotoxicity and oxidative stress produced by heavy metals in a HepG2 cell. Data suggest that the possible mechanism underlying the preventive action of SCC might be associated with diminished absorption of metal ions by chelating and blocking metal-mediated generation of ROS, while lycopene effects may be attributed to its high number of conjugated dienes that act as most potent singlet oxygen quenchers.

  15. Corrosion Product Film-Induced Stress Facilitates Stress Corrosion Cracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenwen; Zhang, Zhiliang; Ren, Xuechong; Guan, Yongjun; Su, Yanjing

    2015-01-01

    Finite element analyses were conducted to clarify the role of corrosion product films (CPFs) in stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Flat and U-shaped edge-notched specimens were investigated in terms of the CPF-induced stress in the metallic substrate and the stress in the CPF. For a U-shaped edge-notched specimen, the stress field in front of the notch tip is affected by the Young’s modulus of the CPF and the CPF thickness and notch geometry. The CPF-induced tensile stress in the metallic substrate is superimposed on the applied load to increase the crack tip strain and facilitate localized plasticity deformation. In addition, the stress in the CPF surface contributes to the rupture of the CPFs. The results provide physical insights into the role of CPFs in SCC. PMID:26066367

  16. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    DOE PAGES

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; ...

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleteriousmore » nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.« less

  17. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease. Particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Andrea D.; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E.; Schoonen, Martin A. A.

    2014-07-10

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002 m2/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30 min and measured systematically for up to 24 h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  18. Metal-sulfide mineral ores, Fenton chemistry and disease--particle induced inflammatory stress response in lung cells.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Andrea D; Smirnov, Alexander; Tsirka, Stella E; Schoonen, Martin A A

    2015-01-01

    The inhalation of mineral particulates and other earth materials, such as coal, can initiate or enhance disease in humans. Workers in occupations with high particulate exposure, such as mining, are particularly at risk. The ability of a material to generate an inflammatory stress response (ISR), a measure of particle toxicity, is a useful tool in evaluating said exposure risk. ISR is defined as the upregulation of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) normalized to cell viability. This study compares the ISR of A549 human lung epithelial cells after exposure to well-characterized common metal-sulfide ore mineral separates. The evaluation of the deleterious nature of ore minerals is based on a range of particle loadings (serial dilutions of 0.002m(2)/mL stock) and exposure periods (beginning at 30min and measured systematically for up to 24h). There is a wide range in ISR values generated by the ore minerals. The ISR values produced by the sphalerite samples are within the range of inert materials. Arsenopyrite generated a small ISR that was largely driven by cell death. Galena showed a similar, but more pronounced response. Copper-bearing ore minerals generated the greatest ISR, both by upregulating cellular ROS and generating substantial and sustained cell death. Chalcopyrite and bornite, both containing ferrous iron, generated the greatest ISR overall. Particles containing Fenton metals as major constituents produce the highest ISR, while other heavy metals mainly generate cell death. This study highlights the importance of evaluating the chemistry, oxidation states and structure of a material when assessing risk management.

  19. Laser Peening--Strengthening Metals to Improve Fatigue Lifetime and Retard Stress-Induced Corrosion Cracking in Gears, Bolts and Cutter

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L A; Chen, H-L

    2003-08-20

    Laser peening is an emerging modern process that impresses a compressive stress into the surfaces of metals. Treatment can reduce the rate of fatigue cracking and stress-corrosion-cracking in metals (such as gears, bolts and cutters) needed for tunnel boring and other construction & mining applications. Laser peening could also be used to form metals or alloys into a precise shape without yielding and leaving both sulfates in a crack resistant compressive state.

  20. Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) FeMT3 gene in heavy metal stress: protective role of the protein and inducibility of the promoter region under Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) treatments.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Dragana B; Samardzić, Jelena T; Bratić, Ana M; Radin, Ivan P; Gavrilović, Srdjan P; Rausch, Thomas; Maksimović, Vesna R

    2010-03-24

    The protective role in vivo of buckwheat metallothionein type 3 (FeMT3) during metal stress and the responsiveness of its promoter to metal ions were examined. Increased tolerance to heavy metals of FeMT3 producing Escherichia coli and cup1(Delta) yeast cells was detected. The defensive ability of buckwheat MT3 during Cd and Cu stresses was also demonstrated in Nicotiana debneyii leaves transiently expressing FeMT3. In contrast to phytochelatins, the cytoplasmatic localization of FeMT3 was not altered under heavy metal stress. Functional analysis of the corresponding promoter region revealed extremely high inducibility upon Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) treatments. The confirmed defense ability of FeMT3 protein in vivo and the great responsiveness of its promoter during heavy metal exposure make this gene a suitable candidate for biotechnological applications.

  1. Surface stress of stepped chiral metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Rey, M; Pratt, S J; Jenkins, S J

    2009-01-16

    The use of surface stress as a physical probe for examining chiral effects in surfaces is proposed. First-principles calculations of the surface stress in stepped achiral and chiral bcc metal surfaces (Fe, Mo, and W) are presented. When no mirror symmetry is present, principal stress orientations are unconstrained; nevertheless, we find that the stress is smoothly varying along a suitably chosen stereographic zone of surfaces. Stress ellipses for Fe differ qualitatively from those of Mo and W, suggesting that its surface stress has a distinct origin.

  2. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Loren A.; Michel, David J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  3. Heavy metal stress detection and monitoring via LED-induced chlorophyll fluorescence analysis of Zea mays L. seedlings aimed at polluted soil phytoremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia-Neto, Artur S.; Silva, Elias A., Jr.; da Silva, Airon José; do Nascimento, Clístenes W. A.

    2012-03-01

    Chlorophyll fluorescence spectroscopy is employed to detect and study the time evolution of metal stress of Zea mays L. seedlings aiming polluted soil phytoremediation. The chlorophyll fluorescence spectra of intact leaves are analyzed using 405 nm LED excitation. Red (Fr) and far-red (FFr) emissions around 685 nm and 735 nm, respectively, are examined as a function of the heavy metal concentration. The fluorescence ratio Fr/FFr was employed to monitor the effect of heavy metal upon the physiological state of the plants before signs of visual stress became apparent. The chlorophyll fluorescence analysis permitted detection and evaluation of the damage caused by heavy metal soil contamination in the early stages of the plants growing process, which is not feasible using conventional in vitro spectral analysis.

  4. Stress Gradient Induced Strain Localization in Metals: High Resolution Strain Cross Sectioning via Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction (POSTPRINT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    steep train gradient is now highly feasible for certain classes of prob- ems in elastoplastic deformation of solids. In this paper, we em- loy one of...weight ratio, corrosion resistance, and igh temperature property stability 25. Ordinary fatigue and oreign-object-impact damage induced enhanced fatigue

  5. Biomedical implications of heavy metals induced imbalances in redox systems.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bechan; Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals.

  6. Biomedical Implications of Heavy Metals Induced Imbalances in Redox Systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Siddiqi, Nikhat J.

    2014-01-01

    Several workers have extensively worked out the metal induced toxicity and have reported the toxic and carcinogenic effects of metals in human and animals. It is well known that these metals play a crucial role in facilitating normal biological functions of cells as well. One of the major mechanisms associated with heavy metal toxicity has been attributed to generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, which develops imbalance between the prooxidant elements and the antioxidants (reducing elements) in the body. In this process, a shift to the former is termed as oxidative stress. The oxidative stress mediated toxicity of heavy metals involves damage primarily to liver (hepatotoxicity), central nervous system (neurotoxicity), DNA (genotoxicity), and kidney (nephrotoxicity) in animals and humans. Heavy metals are reported to impact signaling cascade and associated factors leading to apoptosis. The present review illustrates an account of the current knowledge about the effects of heavy metals (mainly arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium) induced oxidative stress as well as the possible remedies of metal(s) toxicity through natural/synthetic antioxidants, which may render their effects by reducing the concentration of toxic metal(s). This paper primarily concerns the clinicopathological and biomedical implications of heavy metals induced oxidative stress and their toxicity management in mammals. PMID:25184144

  7. Stress-corrosion cracking in metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Criteria and recommended practices for preventing stress-corrosion cracking from impairing the structural integrity and flightworthiness of space vehicles are presented. The important variables affecting stress-corrosion cracking are considered to be the environment, including time and temperature; metal composition, and structure; and sustained tensile stress. For designing spacecraft structures that are free of stress-corrosion cracking for the service life of the vehicle the following rules apply: (1) identification and control of the environments to which the structure will be exposed during construction, storage, transportation, and use; (2) selection of alloy compositions and tempers which are resistant to stress-corrosion cracking in the identified environment; (3) control of fabrication and other processes which may introduce residual tensile stresses or damage the material; (4) limitation of the combined residual and applied tensile stresses to below the threshold stress level for the onset of cracking throughout the service life of the vehicle; and (5) establishment of a thorough inspection program.

  8. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses.

    PubMed

    Perceval, Olivier; Couillard, Yves; Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette; Giguère, Anik; Campbell, Peter G C

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L( infinity )) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that was most

  9. Is Neurotoxicity of Metallic Nanoparticles the Cascades of Oxidative Stress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Bin; Zhang, YanLi; Liu, Jia; Feng, XiaoLi; Zhou, Ting; Shao, LongQuan

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid development of nanotechnology, metallic (metal or metal oxide) nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used in many fields such as cosmetics, the food and building industries, and bio-medical instruments. Widespread applications of metallic NP-based products increase the health risk associated with human exposures. Studies revealed that the brain, a critical organ that consumes substantial amounts of oxygen, is a primary target of metallic NPs once they are absorbed into the body. Oxidative stress (OS), apoptosis, and the inflammatory response are believed to be the main mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs. Other studies have disclosed that antioxidant pretreatment or co-treatment can reverse the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species, up-regulating the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing the proportion of apoptotic cells, and suppressing the inflammatory response. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs might involve a cascade of events following NP-induced OS. However, additional research is needed to determine whether NP-induced OS plays a central role in the neurotoxicity of metallic NPs, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the correlations among neurotoxic mechanisms and to improve the bio-safety of metallic NP-based products.

  10. Responses and acclimation of Chinese cork oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) to metal stress: the inducible antimony tolerance in oak trees.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiulian; Zheng, Lingyu; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun; Lei, Jingpin; Shi, Shengqing; Shi, Xiang; Li, Huiqing; Li, Qinghe; Wei, Yuan; Chang, Ermei; Jiang, Zeping; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-08-01

    Antimony (Sb) pollution has become a pressing environmental problem in recent years. Trees have been proven to have great potential for the feasible phytomanagement; however, little is known about Sb retention and tolerance in trees. The Chinese cork oak (Quercus variabilis Bl.) is known to be capable of growth in soils containing high concentrations of Sb. This study explored in detail the retention and acclimation of Q. variabilis under moderate and high external Sb levels. Results revealed that Q. variabilis could tolerate and accumulate high Sb (1623.39 mg kg(-1) DW) in roots. Dynamics of Sb retention in leaves, stems, and roots of Q. variabilis were different. Leaf Sb remained at a certain level for several weeks, while in roots and stems, Sb concentrations continued to increase. Sb damaged tree's PSII reaction cores but elicited defense mechanism at the donor side of PSII. It affected the electron transport flow after QA (-) more strongly than the oxygen-evolving complex and light-harvesting pigment-protein complex II. Sb also decreased leaf chlorophyll concentrations and therefore inhibited plant growth. During acclimation to Sb toxicity, Sb concentrations in leaves, stems, and roots decreased, with photosynthetic activity and pigments recovering to normal levels by the end of the experiment. These findings suggest that Sb tolerance in Q. variabilis is inducible. Acclimation seems to be related to homeostasis of Sb in plants. Results of this study can provide useful information for trees breeding and selection of Sb phytomanagement strategies, exploiting the established ability of Q. variabilis to transport, delocalize in the leaves, and tolerate Sb pollutions.

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 are induced differently by metal nanoparticles in human monocytes: The role of oxidative stress and protein tyrosine kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Rong; Mo Yiqun; Zhang Xing; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2008-12-01

    Recently, many studies have shown that nanoparticles can translocate from the lungs to the circulatory system. As a particulate foreign body, nanoparticles could induce host responses such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release which play a major role in tissue destruction and remodeling. However, the direct effects of nanoparticles on leukocytes, especially monocytes, are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to compare the ability of Nano-Co and Nano-TiO{sub 2} to cause alteration of transcription and activity of MMPs and to explore possible mechanisms. We hypothesized that non-toxic doses of some transition metal nanoparticles stimulate an imbalance of MMP/TIMP that cause MMP production that may contribute to their health effects. To test this hypothesis, U937 cells were treated with Nano-Co and Nano-TiO{sub 2} and cytotoxic effects and ROS generation were measured. The alteration of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 after exposure to these metal nanoparticles were subsequently determined. To investigate the potential signaling pathways involved in the Nano-Co-induced MMP activation, the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, AP-1 inhibitor, and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors were also used to pre-treat U937 cells. Our results demonstrated that exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO{sub 2}, at a dose that does not cause cytotoxicity, resulted in ROS generation and up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression{sub ..} Our results also showed dose- and time-related increases in pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 gelatinolytic activities in conditioned media after exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO{sub 2}. Nano-Co-induced pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 activity increases were inhibited by pre-treatment with ROS scavengers or inhibitors. We also demonstrated dose- and time-related decreases in tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 2

  12. Flow stress model in metal cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. T.

    1978-01-01

    A model for the plastic deformation that occurs in metal cutting, based on dislocation mechanics, is presented. The model explains the fundamental deformation structure that develops during machining and is based on the well known Cottrell-Stokes Law, wherein the flow stress is partitioned into two parts; an athermal part which occurs in the shear fronts (or shear bands); and a thermal part which occurs in the lamella regions. The deformation envokes the presence of a cellular dislocation distribution which always exists in the material ahead of the shear process. This 'alien' dislocation distribution either exists in the metal prior to cutting or is produced by the compressive stress field which operates in front of the shear process. The magnitude of the flow stress and direction of the shear are shown to be correlated to the stacking fault energy of the metal being cut. The model is tested with respect to energy consumption rates and found to be consistent with observed values.

  13. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment.

  14. Pressure induced metallization of Germane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Canales, M.; Bergara, A.; Feng, J.; Grochala, W.

    2006-09-01

    Recently reported superconductivity in lithium under pressure has renewed the interest on hydrogen and hydrogen-rich systems in the long standing quest for room temperature superconductivity. Although the required metallization of pure hydrogen cannot be achieved within correct experimental capabilities, chemical precompression exerted by heavier atoms in compounds with a large hydrogen content is expected to imply that lower pressures might be required to attain the metallic transition in these alloys. In this article, we present an ab initio analysis of pressure induced metallization of germane, as a particular case between group IVa hydrides. According to our calculations, metallization of germane is predicted to occur at an experimentally accessible pressure of around 70 GPa, which corresponds to a compression factor of 3.4.

  15. Stress proteins induced by arsenic.

    PubMed

    Del Razo, L M; Quintanilla-Vega, B; Brambila-Colombres, E; Calderón-Aranda, E S; Manno, M; Albores, A

    2001-12-01

    The elevated expression of stress proteins is considered to be a universal response to adverse conditions, representing a potential mechanism of cellular defense against disease and a potential target for novel therapeutics. Exposure to arsenicals either in vitro or in vivo in a variety of model systems has been shown to cause the induction of a number of the major stress protein families such as heat shock proteins (Hsp). Among them are members with low molecular weight, such as metallotionein and ubiquitin, as well as ones with masses of 27, 32, 60, 70, 90, and 110 kDa. In most of the cases, the induction of stress proteins depends on the capacity of the arsenical to reach the target, its valence, and the type of exposure, arsenite being the biggest inducer of most Hsp in several organs and systems. Hsp induction is a rapid dose-dependent response (1-8 h) to the acute exposure to arsenite. Thus, the stress response appears to be useful to monitor the sublethal toxicity resulting from a single exposure to arsenite. The present paper offers a critical review of the capacity of arsenicals to modulate the expression and/or accumulation of stress proteins. The physiological consequences of the arsenic-induced stress and its usefulness in monitoring effects resulting from arsenic exposure in humans and other organisms are discussed.

  16. Comparison of acute oxidative stress on rat lung induced by nano and fine-scale, soluble and insoluble metal oxide particles: NiO and TiO2.

    PubMed

    Horie, Masanori; Fukui, Hiroko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Miyauchi, Arisa; Shichiri, Mototada; Fujita, Katsuhide; Niki, Etsuo; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Morimoto, Yasuo; Iwahashi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to understand the association between metal ion release from nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles and induction of oxidative stress in the lung. NiO nanoparticles have cytotoxic activity through nickel ion release and subsequent oxidative stress. However, the interaction of oxidative stress and nickel ion release in vivo is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of metal ion release on oxidative stress induced by NiO nanoparticles. Additionally, nano and fine TiO(2) particles as insoluble particles were also examined. Rat lung was exposed to NiO and TiO(2) nanoparticles by intratracheal instillation. The NiO nanoparticles released Ni(2+) in dispersion. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected at 1, 24, 72 h and 1 week after instillation. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and HO-1 levels were elevated at 24 and 72 h after instillation in the animals exposed to the NiO nanoparticles. On the other hand, total hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (tHODE), which is an oxidative product of linoleic acid, as well as SP-D and α-tochopherol levels were increased at 72 h and 1 week after instillation. Fine NiO particles, and nano and fine TiO(2) particles did not show lung injury or oxidative stress from 1 h to 1 week after instillation. These results suggest that Ni(2+) release is involved in the induction of oxidative stress by NiO nanoparticles in the lung. Ni(2+) release from NiO nanoparticles is an important factor inoxidative stress-related toxicity, not only in vitro but also in vivo.

  17. Discontinuity stresses in metallic pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The state of the art, criteria, and recommended practices for the theoretical and experimental analyses of discontinuity stresses and their distribution in metallic pressure vessels for space vehicles are outlined. The applicable types of pressure vessels include propellant tanks ranging from main load-carrying integral tank structure to small auxiliary tanks, storage tanks, solid propellant motor cases, high pressure gas bottles, and pressurized cabins. The major sources of discontinuity stresses are discussed, including deviations in geometry, material properties, loads, and temperature. The advantages, limitations, and disadvantages of various theoretical and experimental discontinuity analysis methods are summarized. Guides are presented for evaluating discontinuity stresses so that pressure vessel performance will not fall below acceptable levels.

  18. Transition from stress-driven to thermally activated stress relaxation in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, J. C.; Wang, Yun-Jiang; Zhao, L. Z.; Dai, L. H.; Crespo, D.; Pelletier, J. M.; Keer, L. M.; Yao, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The short-range ordered but long-range disordered structure of metallic glasses yields strong structural and dynamic heterogeneities. Stress relaxation is a technique to trace the evolution of stress in response to a fixed strain, which reflects the dynamic features phenomenologically described by the Kohlrausch-Williams-Watts (KWW) equation. The KWW equation describes a broad distribution of relaxation times with a small number of empirical parameters, but it does not arise from a particular physically motivated mechanistic picture. Here we report an anomalous two-stage stress relaxation behavior in a Cu46Zr46Al8 metallic glass over a wide temperature range and generalize the findings in other compositions. Thermodynamic analysis identifies two categories of processes: a fast stress-driven event with large activation volume and a slow thermally activated event with small activation volume, which synthetically dominates the stress relaxation dynamics. Discrete analyses rationalize the transition mechanism induced by stress and explain the anomalous variation of the KWW characteristic time with temperature. Atomistic simulations reveal that the stress-driven event involves virtually instantaneous short-range atomic rearrangement, while the thermally activated event is the percolation of the fast event accommodated by the long-range atomic diffusion. The insights may clarify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the phenomenological description and shed light on correlating the hierarchical dynamics and structural heterogeneity of amorphous solids.

  19. Cyclic Thermal Stress-Induced Degradation of Cu Metallization on Si3N4 Substrate at -40°C to 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Fengqun; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The high-temperature reliability of active metal brazed copper (AMC) on Si3N4 ceramic substrates used for fabricating SiC high-temperature power modules was investigated under harsh environments. The AMC substrate underwent isothermal storage at 300°C for up to 3000 h and a thermal cycling test at -40°C to 300°C for up to 3000 cycles. During isothermal storage at 300°C, the AMC substrate exhibited high reliability, characterized by very little deformation of the copper (Cu) layer, low crack growth, and low oxidation rate of the Cu layer. Under thermal cycling conditions at -40°C to 300°C, no detachment of the Cu layer was observed even after the maximum 3000 cycles of the experiment. However, serious deformation of the Cu layer occurred and progressed as the number of thermal cycles increased, thus significantly roughening the surface of the Cu metallized layer. The cyclic thermal stress led to a significant increase in the crack growth and oxidation of the Cu layer. The maximum depth of the copper oxides reached up to 5/6 of the Cu thickness. The deformation of the Cu layer was the main cause of the decrease of the bond strength under thermal cycling conditions. The shear strength of the SiC chips bonded on the AMC substrate with a Au-12 wt.%Ge solder decreased from the original 83 MPa to 14 MPa after 3000 cycles. Therefore, the cyclic thermal stress destroyed the Cu oxides and enhanced the oxidation of the Cu layer.

  20. Proteomic responses to metal-induced oxidative stress in hydrothermal vent-living mussels, Bathymodiolus sp., on the Southwest Indian Ridge.

    PubMed

    Cole, Catherine; Coelho, Ana Varela; James, Rachael H; Connelly, Doug; Sheehan, David

    2014-05-01

    Bathymodiolin mussels are amongst the dominant fauna occupying hydrothermal vent ecosystems throughout the World's oceans. This subfamily inhabits a highly ephemeral and variable environment, where exceptionally high concentrations of reduced sulphur species and heavy metals necessitate adaptation of specialised detoxification mechanisms. Whilst cellular responses to common anthropogenic pollutants are well-studied in shallow-water species, they remain limited in deep-sea vent fauna. Bathymodiolus sp. were sampled from two newly-discovered vent sites on the Southwest Indian Ridge (Tiamat and Knuckers Gaff) by the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) Kiel 6000 during the RRS James Cook cruise, JC 067 in November 2011. Here, we use redox proteomics to investigate the effects of tissue metal accumulation on protein expression and thiol oxidation in gill. Following 2D PAGE, we demonstrate a significant difference in intensity in 30 protein spots in this organ between the two vent sites out of 205 matched spots. We also see significant variations in thiol oxidation in 15 spots, out of 143 matched. At Tiamat, 23 protein spots are up-regulated compared to Knuckers Gaff and we identify 5 of these with important roles in metabolism, cell structure, stress response, and redox homeostasis. We suggest that increased metal exposure triggers changes in the proteome, regulating tissue uptake. This is evident both between vent sites and across a chemical gradient within the Knuckers Gaff vent site. Our findings highlight the importance of proteomic plasticity in successful adaptation to the spatially and temporally fluctuating chemical environments that are characteristic of hydrothermal vent habitats.

  1. Nondestructive method for measuring residual stresses in metals, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwebel, C. D.

    1968-01-01

    Nondestructive direct measurement of residual surface stresses in metals can be made because metal under stress has a different electrochemical solution potential than in the unstressed condition. The method uses two matched electrolytic cells to cancel extraneous effects on the actual solution potential of the metal specimen.

  2. Hydrostatic Stress Effects in Metal Plasticity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Christopher D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the 1940s, the theory of plasticity has assumed that hydrostatic stress does not affect the yield or postyield behavior of metals. This assumption is based on the early work of Bridgman. Bridgman found that hydrostatic pressure (compressive stress) does not affect yield behavior until a substantial amount of pressure (greater than 100 ksi) is present. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of hydrostatic tension on yield behavior. Two different specimen geometries were examined: an equal-arm bend specimen and a double edge notch specimen. The presence of a notch is sufficient to develop high enough hydrostatic tensile stresses to affect yield. The von Mises yield function, which does not have a hydrostatic component, and the Drucker-Prager yield function, which includes a hydrostatic component, were used in finite element analyses of the two specimen geometries. The analyses were compared to test data from IN 100 specimens. For both geometries, the analyses using the Drucker-Prager yield function more closely simulated the test data. The von Mises yield function lead to 5-10% overprediction of the force-displacement or force-strain response of the test specimens.

  3. a Simple Interpretation of the Rice Spectral Indices Space for Assessment of Heavy Metal Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Huang, F.; Liu, X. N.

    2016-06-01

    Heavy metal stress will induce the change of the bio-parameters like chlorophyll, nitrogen and water content of rice. In this paper, we analyzed the traditional spectral index which has strong relationship in general with the three bio-parameters using hyperspectral data acquired by ASD. It is found that some indies do not work well when the heavy metal stress exists, however, some indies still has ability to estimate the above three bio-parameters. A new interpretation is proposed to classify the stress level based on both the physical mechanism analysis and the statistic model after we describe and discuss studies on the expression of spectral indices of rice under heavy metal stress. The 3-axes spectral indices spaces, which are constructed of 3 spectral indices sensitive to rice's chlorophyll concentration, nitrogen concentration and water concentration respectively, are used to visualize the linkage between heavy metal stress and spectrum of rice canopy.

  4. Fatigue stress concentration and notch sensitivity in nanocrystalline metals

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Timothy A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Sharon, John A.; O’Brien, Christopher J.; Clark, Blythe G.; Arrington, Christian L.; Pillars, Jamin R.

    2016-03-11

    Recent studies have shown the potential for nanocrystalline metals to possess excellent fatigue resistance compared to their coarse-grained counterparts. Although the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline metals are believed to be particularly susceptible to material defects, a systematic study of the effects of geometric discontinuities on their fatigue performance has not yet been performed. In the present work, nanocrystalline Ni–40 wt%Fe containing both intrinsic and extrinsic defects were tested in tension–tension fatigue. The defects were found to dramatically reduce the fatigue resistance, which was attributed to the relatively high notch sensitivity in the nanocrystalline material. Microstructural analysis within the crack-initiation zones underneath the defects revealed cyclically-induced abnormal grain growth (AGG) as a predominant deformation and crack initiation mechanism during high-cycle fatigue. Furthermore, the onset of AGG and the ensuing fracture is likely accelerated by the stress concentrations, resulting in the reduced fatigue resistance compared to the relatively defect-free counterparts.

  5. Ethylene and Metal Stress: Small Molecule, Big Impact

    PubMed Central

    Keunen, Els; Schellingen, Kerim; Vangronsveld, Jaco; Cuypers, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene is known to mediate a diverse array of signaling processes during abiotic stress in plants. Whereas many reports have demonstrated enhanced ethylene production in metal-exposed plants, the underlying molecular mechanisms are only recently investigated. Increasing evidence supports a role for ethylene in the regulation of plant metal stress responses. Moreover, crosstalk appears to exist between ethylene and the cellular redox balance, nutrients and other phytohormones. This review highlights our current understanding of the key role ethylene plays during responses to metal exposure. Moreover, particular attention is paid to the integration of ethylene within the broad network of plant responses to metal stress. PMID:26870052

  6. Influence of heavy metal stress on antioxidant status and DNA damage in Urtica dioica.

    PubMed

    Gjorgieva, Darinka; Kadifkova Panovska, Tatjana; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals have the potential to interact and induce several stress responses in the plants; thus, effects of heavy metal stress on DNA damages and total antioxidants level in Urtica dioica leaves and stems were investigated. The samples are sampled from areas with different metal exposition. Metal content was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES), for total antioxidants level assessment the Ferric-Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assay was used, and genomic DNA isolation from frozen plant samples was performed to obtain DNA fingerprints of investigated plant. It was found that heavy metal contents in stems generally changed synchronously with those in leaves of the plant, and extraneous metals led to imbalance of mineral nutrient elements. DNA damages were investigated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, and the results demonstrated that the samples exposed to metals yielded a large number of new fragments (total 12) in comparison with the control sample. This study showed that DNA stability is highly affected by metal pollution which was identified by RAPD markers. Results suggested that heavy metal stress influences antioxidant status and also induces DNA damages in U. dioica which may help to understand the mechanisms of metals genotoxicity.

  7. Influence of Heavy Metal Stress on Antioxidant Status and DNA Damage in Urtica dioica

    PubMed Central

    Kadifkova Panovska, Tatjana; Bačeva, Katerina; Stafilov, Trajče

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals have the potential to interact and induce several stress responses in the plants; thus, effects of heavy metal stress on DNA damages and total antioxidants level in Urtica dioica leaves and stems were investigated. The samples are sampled from areas with different metal exposition. Metal content was analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES), for total antioxidants level assessment the Ferric-Reducing Antioxidant Power (FRAP) assay was used, and genomic DNA isolation from frozen plant samples was performed to obtain DNA fingerprints of investigated plant. It was found that heavy metal contents in stems generally changed synchronously with those in leaves of the plant, and extraneous metals led to imbalance of mineral nutrient elements. DNA damages were investigated by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, and the results demonstrated that the samples exposed to metals yielded a large number of new fragments (total 12) in comparison with the control sample. This study showed that DNA stability is highly affected by metal pollution which was identified by RAPD markers. Results suggested that heavy metal stress influences antioxidant status and also induces DNA damages in U. dioica which may help to understand the mechanisms of metals genotoxicity. PMID:23862140

  8. Residual thermal stress control in composite reinforced metal structures. [by mechanical loading of metal component prior to bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Advanced composite materials, composed of boron or graphite fibers and a supporting matrix, make significant structural efficiency improvements available to aircraft and aerospace designers. Residual stress induced during bonding of composite reinforcement to metal structural elements can be reduced or eliminated through suitable modification to the manufacturing processes. The most successful method employed during this program used a steel tool capable of mechanically loading the metal component in compression prior to the adhesive bonding cycle. Compression loading combined with heating to 350 F during the bond cycle can result in creep deformation in aluminum components. The magnitude of the deformation increases with increasing stress level during exposure to 350 F.

  9. The Trier Social Stress Test protocol for inducing psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Birkett, Melissa A

    2011-10-19

    This article demonstrates a psychological stress protocol for use in a laboratory setting. Protocols that allow researchers to study the biological pathways of the stress response in health and disease are fundamental to the progress of research in stress and anxiety. Although numerous protocols exist for inducing stress response in the laboratory, many neglect to provide a naturalistic context or to incorporate aspects of social and psychological stress. Of psychological stress protocols, meta-analysis suggests that the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) is the most useful and appropriate standardized protocol for studies of stress hormone reactivity. In the original description of the TSST, researchers sought to design and evaluate a procedure capable of inducing a reliable stress response in the majority of healthy volunteers. These researchers found elevations in heart rate, blood pressure and several endocrine stress markers in response to the TSST (a psychological stressor) compared to a saline injection (a physical stressor). Although the TSST has been modified to meet the needs of various research groups, it generally consists of a waiting period upon arrival, anticipatory speech preparation, speech performance, and verbal arithmetic performance periods, followed by one or more recovery periods. The TSST requires participants to prepare and deliver a speech, and verbally respond to a challenging arithmetic problem in the presence of a socially evaluative audience. Social evaluation and uncontrollability have been identified as key components of stress induction by the TSST. In use for over a decade, the goal of the TSST is to systematically induce a stress response in order to measure differences in reactivity, anxiety and activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) or sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axis during the task. Researchers generally assess changes in self-reported anxiety, physiological measures (e.g. heart rate), and

  10. Stress induced obesity: lessons from rodent models of stress

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Zachary R.; Abizaid, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Stress was once defined as the non-specific result of the body to any demand or challenge to homeostasis. A more current view of stress is the behavioral and physiological responses generated in the face of, or in anticipation of, a perceived threat. The stress response involves activation of the sympathetic nervous system and recruitment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. When an organism encounters a stressor (social, physical, etc.), these endogenous stress systems are stimulated in order to generate a fight-or-flight response, and manage the stressful situation. As such, an organism is forced to liberate energy resources in attempt to meet the energetic demands posed by the stressor. A change in the energy homeostatic balance is thus required to exploit an appropriate resource and deliver useable energy to the target muscles and tissues involved in the stress response. Acutely, this change in energy homeostasis and the liberation of energy is considered advantageous, as it is required for the survival of the organism. However, when an organism is subjected to a prolonged stressor, as is the case during chronic stress, a continuous irregularity in energy homeostasis is considered detrimental and may lead to the development of metabolic disturbances such as cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes mellitus and obesity. This concept has been studied extensively using animal models, and the neurobiological underpinnings of stress induced metabolic disorders are beginning to surface. However, different animal models of stress continue to produce divergent metabolic phenotypes wherein some animals become anorexic and lose body mass while others increase food intake and body mass and become vulnerable to the development of metabolic disturbances. It remains unclear exactly what factors associated with stress models can be used to predict the metabolic outcome of the organism. This review will explore a variety of rodent stress models and discuss the

  11. On the Stress-Temperature Scaling for Steady-State Flow in Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Pengfei; Chen, Mingwei; Egami, T.

    2010-01-01

    Through computer simulation of steady-state flow in a Zr50Cu40Al10 metallic glass using a set of realistic potentials we found a simple scaling relationship between temperature and stress as they affect viscosity. The scaling relationship provides new insights for the microscopic mechanism of shear flow in the glassy state, in terms of the elastic energy of the applied stress modifying the local energy landscape. The results suggest that the plastic flow and mechanical failure in metallic glasses are consequences of stress-induced glass transition.

  12. Stress-Temperature Scaling for Steady-State Flow in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Pengfei; Chen, Mingwei; Egami, Takeshi

    2010-05-01

    Through computer simulation of steady-state flow in a Zr50Cu40Al10 metallic glass using a set of realistic potentials we find a simple scaling relationship between temperature and stress as they affect viscosity. The scaling relationship provides new insight into the microscopic mechanism of shear flow in the glassy state, in terms of the elastic energy of the applied stress modifying the local energy landscape. The results suggest that the plastic flow and mechanical failure in metallic glasses are consequences of stress-induced glass transition.

  13. Can heavy metal pollution defend seed germination against heat stress? Effect of heavy metals (Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+)) on maize seed germination under high temperature.

    PubMed

    Deng, Benliang; Yang, Kejun; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Zuotong

    2016-09-01

    Heavy metal pollution, as well as greenhouse effect, has become a serious threat today. Both heavy metal and heat stresses can arrest seed germination. What response can be expected for seed germination under both stress conditions? Here, the effects of heavy metals (Cu(2+), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+)) on maize seed germination were investigated at 20 °C and 40 °C. Compared with 20 °C, heat stress induced thermodormancy. However, this thermodormancy could be significantly alleviated by the addition of a low concentration of heavy metals. Heavy metals, as well as heat stress induced H2O2 accumulation in germinating seeds. Interestingly, this low concentration of heavy metal that promoted seed germination could be partly blocked by DMTU (a specific ROS scavenger), irrespective of temperature. Accordingly, H2O2 addition reinforced this promoting effect on seed germination, which was induced by a low concentration of heavy metal. Furthermore, we found that the NADPH oxidase derived ROS was required for seed germination promoted by the heavy metals. Subsequently, treatment of seeds with fluridone (a specific inhibitor of ABA) or ABA significantly alleviated or aggravated thermodormancy, respectively. However, this alleviation or aggravation could be partly attenuated by a low concentration of heavy metals. In addition, germination that was inhibited by high concentrations of heavy metals was also partly reversed by fluridone. The obtained results support the idea that heavy metal-mediated ROS and hormone interaction can finally affect the thermodormancy release or not.

  14. Laser-Induced Transfer of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-10-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metallic micro- and nanostructures based on femtosecond laser-induced transfer of metallic nanodroplets is developed. The size of the transferred droplets depends on the volume of laser-molten metal and can be varied by changing the laser beam focus on the sample surface and the metal film thickness. Controllable fabrication of high quality spherical gold micro- and nanoparticles with sizes between 170 nm and 1500 nm is realized. Fabrication of miscellaneous structures consisting of gold particles as elementary building blocks is demonstrated.

  15. Drug-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Deavall, Damian G.; Martin, Elizabeth A.; Horner, Judith M.; Roberts, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are a byproduct of normal metabolism and have roles in cell signaling and homeostasis. Species include oxygen radicals and reactive nonradicals. Mechanisms exist that regulate cellular levels of ROS, as their reactive nature may otherwise cause damage to key cellular components including DNA, protein, and lipid. When the cellular antioxidant capacity is exceeded, oxidative stress can result. Pleiotropic deleterious effects of oxidative stress are observed in numerous disease states and are also implicated in a variety of drug-induced toxicities. In this paper, we examine the nature of ROS-induced damage on key cellular targets of oxidative stress. We also review evidence implicating ROS in clinically relevant, drug-related side effects including doxorubicin-induced cardiac damage, azidothymidine-induced myopathy, and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. PMID:22919381

  16. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  17. Bioaccumulation and effects of metals on oxidative stress and neurotoxicity parameters in the frogs from the Pelophylax esculentus complex.

    PubMed

    Prokić, Marko D; Borković-Mitić, Slavica S; Krizmanić, Imre I; Mutić, Jelena J; Trifković, Jelena Đ; Gavrić, Jelena P; Despotović, Svetlana G; Gavrilović, Branka R; Radovanović, Tijana B; Pavlović, Slađan Z; Saičić, Zorica S

    2016-10-01

    Metals are involved in the formation of reactive oxygen species and can induce oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of several metals on oxidative stress in the skin and muscle of the Pelophylax esculentus "complex" frogs (parental species Pelophylax ridibundus, Pelophylax lessonae, and their hybrid Pelophylax esculentus) that inhabit the wetland Obedska Bara in Serbia, and the potential use of these species as bioindicator organisms in biomonitoring studies. The biomarkers of oxidative stress (SOD, CAT, GSH-Px, GR, GST activities and GSH, SH concentrations) and cholinesterase activity were investigated. The concentrations of nine metals (Fe, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Cr, Hg, Ni, and Pb) were measured in the water and tissues. Correlations were established between metals and biomarkers in the tissues. The results of metal accumulation distinguished the skin of P. lessonae and muscle of P. ridibundus from other P. esculentus complex species. The oxidative stress biomarkers observed in P. ridibundus and P. esculentus had greater similarity than in P. lessonae. The P. lessonae displayed the highest number of correlations between biomarkers and metals. The results of tissue responses revealed that skin was more susceptible to metal-induced oxidative stress, with only exception of As. In the light of these findings, we can suggest the use of P. esculentus complex species as a biomonitoring species in studies of metal accumulation and metal-induced oxidative stress, but with special emphasis on P. lessonae.

  18. Stress induces transient auditory hypersensitivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Birgit; Haupt, Heidemarie; Joachim, Ricarda; Klapp, Burghard F; Stöver, Timo; Szczepek, Agnieszka J

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to harsh environment induces stress reactions that increase probability of survival. Stress influences the endocrine, nervous and immune systems and affects the functioning of a variety of organs. Numerous researchers demonstrated that a 24-h exposure to an acoustic rodent repellent provokes stress reaction in exposed animals. In addition to the activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, exposed animals had pathological reactions in the reproductive organs, bronchia and skin. Here, we examined the effect of above stress model on the auditory system of Wistar rats. We found that 24-h stress decreases the thresholds and increases the amplitudes of auditory brainstem responses and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Resultant auditory hypersensitivity was transient and most pronounced between 3 and 6h post-stress, returning to control levels one week later. The concentration of corticosterone and tumor necrosis factor alpha was systemically elevated in stressed animals between 3 and 6h post-stress, confirming the activation of the HPA axis. In addition, expression of the HPA-axis-associated genes: glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (Hif1a) was modulated in the auditory tissues. In detail, in the inferior colliculus, we found an up-regulation of GR mRNA 3h post-stress and continuous up-regulation of Hif1a up to 24h post-stress. In the spiral ganglion, we found no differences in gene expression between stressed and control animals. In the organ of Corti, expression of GR mRNA remained stable, whereas that of Hif1a was significantly down-regulated one week after stress. In addition, the expression of an outer hair cell marker prestin was significantly up-regulated 6h post-stress. We conclude that 24-h stress induces transient hypersensitivity of the auditory system and modulates gene expression in a tissue-specific manner. Stress-induced auditory hypersensitivity could have evolutionary consequence by giving animals

  19. Effect of Residual Stresses on the Hardness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bei, Hongbin; Gao, Y. F.; Lu, Zhao Ping; Nieh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation experiments were conducted on Zr-based metallic glass samples, which were elastically and plastically bent in order to investigate the effect of residual stresses on hardness. It was found that tensile residual stress reduced the hardness significantly, while compressive residual stress produced only a small effect on the hardness. These observations are consistent with three-dimensional continuum-plasticity-based finite-element simulations. The hardness was also found to vary more significantly with residual stresses, in particular in tension, than that caused by shear-banding-induced softening, suggesting hardness measurement is a practical method for the evaluation of tensile residual stresses in a metallic glass. Hardness variation in the bent sample was correlated with the residual-stress induced volume dilatation through a free-volume-based model. In this paper, we also present a detailed stress analysis based on yield asymmetry under tension and compression to describe the distribution of residual stresses in bent metallic glass specimens. The calculations agree well with the hardness variations measured experimentally.

  20. Metal Induced Growth of Transition Metal Dichalcogenides at Controlled Locations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhendong; Huang, Qi; Chen, Peng; Guo, Shouhui; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liang, Xuelei; Wang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Metal induced nucleation is adopted to achieve the growth of transition metal dichalcogenides at controlled locations. Ordered arrays of MoS2 and WS2 have successfully been fabricated on SiO2 substrates by using the patterned Pt/Ti dots as the nucleation sites. Uniform MoS2 monolayers with the adjustable size up to 50 μm are grown surrounding these metal patterns and the mobility of such layer is about 0.86 cm2/V·s. The crystalline flakes of WS2 are also fabricated extending from the metal patterns and the electron mobility of these flakes is up to 11.36 cm2/V·s. PMID:27910917

  1. Mechanisms of Nanoparticle-Induced Oxidative Stress and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liying

    2013-01-01

    The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has offered innovative discoveries in the medical, industrial, and consumer sectors. The unique physicochemical and electrical properties of engineered nanoparticles (NP) make them highly desirable in a variety of applications. However, these novel properties of NP are fraught with concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in structural and physicochemical properties of NP can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS generation, one of the most frequently reported NP-associated toxicities. Oxidative stress induced by engineered NP is due to acellular factors such as particle surface, size, composition, and presence of metals, while cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, NP-cell interaction, and immune cell activation are responsible for ROS-mediated damage. NP-induced oxidative stress responses are torch bearers for further pathophysiological effects including genotoxicity, inflammation, and fibrosis as demonstrated by activation of associated cell signaling pathways. Since oxidative stress is a key determinant of NP-induced injury, it is necessary to characterize the ROS response resulting from NP. Through physicochemical characterization and understanding of the multiple signaling cascades activated by NP-induced ROS, a systemic toxicity screen with oxidative stress as a predictive model for NP-induced injury can be developed. PMID:24027766

  2. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Masubuchi, K.

    1973-01-01

    The research is reported concerning the development of a system of mathematical solutions and computer programs for one- and two-dimensional analyses for thermal stresses. Reports presented include: the investigation of thermal stress and buckling of tantalum and columbium sheet; and analysis of two dimensional thermal strains and metal movement during welding.

  3. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity.

  4. Phytochemicals Mediated Remediation of Neurotoxicity Induced by Heavy Metals

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Singh, Shweta; Agrawal, Anju; Siddiqi, Nikhat Jamal; Sharma, Bechan

    2015-01-01

    Almost all the environmental components including both the abiotic and biotic factors have been consistently threatened by excessive contamination of heavy metals continuously released from various sources. Different heavy metals have been reported to generate adverse effects in many ways. Heavy metals induced neurotoxicity and impairment in signalling cascade leading to cell death (apoptosis) has been indicated by several workers. On one hand, these metals are required by the cellular systems to regulate various biological functions of normal cells, while on the other their biomagnification in the cellular systems produces adverse effects. The mechanism by which the heavy metals induce neurotoxicity follows free radicals production pathway(s) specially the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species. These free radicals produced in excess have been shown to create an imbalance between the oxidative and antioxidative systems leading to emergence of oxidative stress, which may cause necrosis, DNA damage, and many neurodegenerative disorders. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge available on the protective role of varied natural products isolated from different herbs/plants in imparting protection against heavy metals (cadmium, lead, arsenic, and mercury) mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26618004

  5. Oxidative Stress Marker and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Draganovic, Dragica; Lucic, Nenad; Jojic, Dragica

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. Hence, research and test of role and significance of oxidative stress in hypertensive disturbance in pregnancy is very important. Aim: Aims of this research were to determine a level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) as oxidative stress marker in blood of pregnant woman with pregnancy induced hypertension and to analyze correlation of TBARS values with blood pressure values in pregnancy induced hypertensive pregnant women. Patients and methods: Research has been performed at the Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, University Clinical Centre in the Republic of Srpska. It covered 100 pregnant women with hypertension and 100 healthy pregnant women of gestation period from 28 to 40 weeks. Level of TBARS is determined as an equivalent of malondialdehyde standard, in accordance with recommendations by producer (Oxi Select TBARS Analisa Kit). Results: Pregnancy induced hypertension is a state of extremely increased oxidative stress. All pregnant women experiencing hypertension had increased TBARS values in medium value interval over 20 µmol, 66%, whereas in group of healthy pregnant women, only 1% experienced increased TBARS value. Pregnant women with difficult preeclampsia (32%) had high TBARS values, over 40 µmol, and with mild PIH, only 4.9% pregnant women. Conclusion: Pregnant women with pregnancy induced hypertension have extremely increased degree of oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation. TBARS values are in positive correlation with blood pressure values, respectively the highest TBARS value were present in pregnant women with the highest blood pressure values. PMID:28210016

  6. Ultrastructural changes and Heat Shock Proteins 70 induced by atmospheric pollution are similar to the effects observed under in vitro heavy metals stress in Conocephalum conicum (Marchantiales--Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Basile, Adriana; Sorbo, Sergio; Conte, Barbara; Cardi, Manuela; Esposito, Sergio

    2013-11-01

    Changes in ultrastructure and induction of Heat Shock Proteins 70 have been studied in Conocephalum conicum (Marchantiales) collected in different urban and country sites in Italy. These results were compared to the effects in vitro of exposition to different heavy metals for several days. At urban sites, cellular ultrastructure was modified, and heavy metals could be observed accumulating in cell walls. Simultaneously, a strong increment in Hsp70 was detected, compared with results observed on control specimens. When C. conicum was exposed to heavy metals in vitro, comparable effects as in polluted sites were observed: Cd and Pb accumulated mostly within parenchyma and, within cells, were absorbed to cell walls or concentrated in vacuoles. Moreover, severe alterations were observed in organelles. Concomitantly, a progressive accumulation of Hsp70 was detected following heavy metals exposition. These effects are discussed in order to describe the dose and time-dependent response to heavy metal stress in C. conicum.

  7. Fatigue stress concentration and notch sensitivity in nanocrystalline metals

    DOE PAGES

    Furnish, Timothy A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Sharon, John A.; ...

    2016-03-11

    Recent studies have shown the potential for nanocrystalline metals to possess excellent fatigue resistance compared to their coarse-grained counterparts. Although the mechanical properties of nanocrystalline metals are believed to be particularly susceptible to material defects, a systematic study of the effects of geometric discontinuities on their fatigue performance has not yet been performed. In the present work, nanocrystalline Ni–40 wt%Fe containing both intrinsic and extrinsic defects were tested in tension–tension fatigue. The defects were found to dramatically reduce the fatigue resistance, which was attributed to the relatively high notch sensitivity in the nanocrystalline material. Microstructural analysis within the crack-initiation zonesmore » underneath the defects revealed cyclically-induced abnormal grain growth (AGG) as a predominant deformation and crack initiation mechanism during high-cycle fatigue. Furthermore, the onset of AGG and the ensuing fracture is likely accelerated by the stress concentrations, resulting in the reduced fatigue resistance compared to the relatively defect-free counterparts.« less

  8. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  9. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGES

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; ...

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  10. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  11. Stress Drops for Potentially Induced Earthquake Sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Beroza, G. C.; Ellsworth, W. L.

    2015-12-01

    Stress drop, the difference between shear stress acting across a fault before and after an earthquake, is a fundamental parameter of the earthquake source process and the generation of strong ground motions. Higher stress drops usually lead to more high-frequency ground motions. Hough [2014 and 2015] observed low intensities in "Did You Feel It?" data for injection-induced earthquakes, and interpreted them to be a result of low stress drops. It is also possible that the low recorded intensities could be a result of propagation effects. Atkinson et al. [2015] show that the shallow depth of injection-induced earthquakes can lead to a lack of high-frequency ground motion as well. We apply the spectral ratio method of Imanishi and Ellsworth [2006] to analyze stress drops of injection-induced earthquakes, using smaller earthquakes with similar waveforms as empirical Green's functions (eGfs). Both the effects of path and linear site response should be cancelled out through the spectral ratio analysis. We apply this technique to the Guy-Greenbrier earthquake sequence in central Arkansas. The earthquakes migrated along the Guy-Greenbrier Fault while nearby injection wells were operating in 2010-2011. Huang and Beroza [GRL, 2015] improved the magnitude of completeness to about -1 using template matching and found that the earthquakes deviated from Gutenberg-Richter statistics during the operation of nearby injection wells. We identify 49 clusters of highly similar events in the Huang and Beroza [2015] catalog and calculate stress drops using the source model described in Imanishi and Ellsworth [2006]. Our results suggest that stress drops of the Guy-Greenbrier sequence are similar to tectonic earthquakes at Parkfield, California (the attached figure). We will also present stress drop analysis of other suspected induced earthquake sequences using the same method.

  12. Transgenic nematodes as biosensors for metal stress in soil pore water samples.

    PubMed

    Anbalagan, Charumathi; Lafayette, Ivan; Antoniou-Kourounioti, Melissa; Haque, Mainul; King, John; Johnsen, Bob; Baillie, David; Gutierrez, Carmen; Martin, Jose A Rodriguez; de Pomerai, David

    2012-03-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans strains carrying stress-reporter green fluorescent protein transgenes were used to explore patterns of response to metals. Multiple stress pathways were induced at high doses by most metals tested, including members of the heat shock, oxidative stress, metallothionein (mtl) and xenobiotic response gene families. A mathematical model (to be published separately) of the gene regulatory circuit controlling mtl production predicted that chemically similar divalent metals (classic inducers) should show additive effects on mtl gene induction, whereas chemically dissimilar metals should show interference. These predictions were verified experimentally; thus cadmium and mercury showed additive effects, whereas ferric iron (a weak inducer) significantly reduced the effect of mercury. We applied a similar battery of tests to diluted samples of soil pore water extracted centrifugally after mixing 20% w/w ultrapure water with air-dried soil from an abandoned lead/zinc mine in the Murcia region of Spain. In addition, metal contents of both soil and soil pore water were determined by ICP-MS, and simplified mixtures of soluble metal salts were tested at equivalent final concentrations. The effects of extracted soil pore water (after tenfold dilution) were closely mimicked by mixtures of its principal component ions, and even by the single most prevalent contaminant (zinc) alone, though other metals modulated its effects both positively and negatively. In general, mixtures containing similar (divalent) metal ions exhibited mainly additive effects, whereas admixture of dissimilar (e.g. trivalent) ions often resulted in interference, reducing overall levels of stress-gene induction. These findings were also consistent with model predictions.

  13. ER stress-induced cell death mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sano, Renata; Reed, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic-reticulum (ER) stress response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by a variety of conditions that disturb folding of proteins in the ER. Eukaryotic cells have developed an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism, the unfolded protein response (UPR), which aims to clear unfolded proteins and restore ER homeostasis. In cases where ER stress cannot be reversed, cellular functions deteriorate, often leading to cell death. Accumulating evidence implicates ER stress-induced cellular dysfunction and cell death as major contributors to many diseases, making modulators of ER stress pathways potentially attractive targets for therapeutics discovery. Here, we summarize recent advances in understanding the diversity of molecular mechanisms that govern ER stress signaling in health and disease. PMID:23850759

  14. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  15. Shocked and Stressed, Metals Get Stronger

    SciTech Connect

    Hackel, L

    2002-03-12

    People who know their way around metalworking are no doubt familiar with peening--using a ball-peen hammer to pound a piece of metal into shape and strengthen it against fatigue failure. For the past 50 years, an industrialized equivalent has been shot peening, in which metal or ceramic beads as large as marbles or as small as salt and pepper grains pneumatically bombard a metal surface. Laser peening, a process based on a superior laser technology developed at Lawrence Livermore, replaces the hammer blows and streams of beads with short blasts of laser light. The end result is a piece of metal with significantly improved performance. Lawrence Livermore and Metal Improvement Company, Inc., won a coveted R and D 100 Award for their laser-peening process in 1998 (see S and TR, October 1998, pp. 12-13). Since that time, they've been developing uses for the technology with a number of industries, including automotive, medical, and aerospace. They've also developed an offshoot technique--laser peenmarking{trademark}--which provides a way to easily and clearly identify parts with a mark that is extremely difficult to counterfeit. Another outgrowth is a new peen-forming technology that allows complex contouring of problematic thick metal components such as the thick sections of large aircraft wings. There have also been spinback applications to the Department of Energy's programs for stockpile stewardship, fuel-efficient vehicles, and long-term nuclear waste storage.

  16. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Semedo, Miguel; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Oliveira, Marta; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Morais, Simone; Ferreira, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Metals are ubiquitous in the environment and accumulate in aquatic organisms and are known for their ability to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aquatic species, oxidative stress mechanisms have been studied by measuring antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative damages in tissues. The aim of this study was to apply and validate a set of oxidative stress biomarkers and correlate responses with metal contents in tissues of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase--CAT, superoxide dismutase--SOD and glutathione S-transferases--GST), oxidative damages (lipid peroxidation--LPO and protein carbonyl content--PCO) and metal content (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and As) in the digestive gland and arm of octopus, collected in the NW Portuguese coast in different periods, were assessed after capture and after 14 days in captivity. CAT and SOD activities were highly responsive to fluctuations in metal concentrations and able to reduce oxidative damage, LPO and PCO in the digestive gland. CAT activity was also positively correlated with SOD and GST activities, which emphasizes that the three enzymes respond in a coordinated way to metal induced oxidative stress. Our results validate the use of oxidative stress biomarkers to assess metal pollution effects in this ecological and commercial relevant species. Moreover, octopus seems to have the ability to control oxidative damage by triggering an antioxidant enzyme coordinated response in the digestive gland.

  17. Influence of particle bombardment on microstructure and internal stresses of refractory metal suicides on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardtke, Ch.; Schilling, W.; Ullmaier, H.

    1991-07-01

    First results on microstructural changes and stress relaxation in thin refractory metal suicide films (TaSi 2 and MoSi 2) caused by particle bombardment are reported. The polycrystalline films had initial tensile stresses of some 10 9 Pa. Exposed to irradiation with Ge ions of 400 keV, both suicides showed a similar stress relaxation behaviour as a function of dose. During room-temperature implantation the initial tensile stress rapidly decreased and turned into compressive stress. Continuous irradiation partly relaxed the compressive stress and resulted in a saturation value of some -10 8 Pa. With increasing implantation temperature, the buildup of compressive stress gradually vanished, leaving only the initial decrease of tensile stress which finally approached zero. Based on microstructural investigations (TEM and X-ray diffraction) it is proposed to explain this behaviour by the combined action of two processes: relaxation of tensile stress by a volume increase due to irradiation-induced amorphization, and Frenkel defect production and relaxation of compressive stress by irradiation-induced densification of amorphous regions and/or Frenkel defect elimination.

  18. Stress induced changes in testis function.

    PubMed

    López-Calderón, A; Ariznavarreta, C; González-Quijano, M I; Tresguerres, J A; Calderón, M D

    1991-01-01

    The mechanism through which chronic stress inhibits the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis has been investigated. Chronic restraint stress decreases testosterone secretion, an effect that is associated with a decrease in plasma gonadotropin levels. In chronically stressed rats there was a decrease in hypothalamic luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) content and the response on plasma gonadotropins to LHRH administration was enhanced. Thus the inhibitory effect of chronic stress on plasma LH and FSH levels seems not to be due to a reduction in pituitary responsiveness to LHRH, but rather to a modification in LHRH secretion. It has been suggested that beta-endorphin might interfere with hypothalamic LHRH secretion during stress. Chronic immobilization did not modify hypothalamic beta-endorphin, while an increase in pituitary beta-endorphin secretion was observed. Since we cannot exclude that changes in beta-endorphin secreted by the pituitary or other opioids may play some role in the stress-induced decrease in LHRH secretion, the effect of naltrexone administration on plasma gonadotropin was studied in chronically stressed rats. Naltrexone treatment did not modify the decrease in plasma concentrations of LH or FSH. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effect of restraint on the testicular axis is exerted at hypothalamic level by some mechanism other than opioids.

  19. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs.

  20. Stress induced neuroendocrine-immune plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Liezmann, Christiane; Stock, Daniel; Peters, Eva M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Research over the past decade has revealed close interaction between the nervous and immune systems in regulation of peripheral inflammation linking psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease and aging. Moreover emerging data suggests that chronic inflammations lead to a pro-inflammatory status underlying premature aging called inflammaging. In this context, the spleen can be seen as a switch board monitoring peripherally derived neuroendocrine-immune mediators in the blood and keeping up a close communication with the central stress response via its mainly sympathetic innervation. The effect aims at balanced and well-timed stress axis activation and immune adaptation in acute peripheral inflammatory events. Constant adjustment to the needs generated by environmental and endogenous challenges is provided by neuroendocrine-immune plasticity. However, maladaptive plasticity induced e.g., by chronic stress-axis activation and excessive non-neuronal derived neuroendocrine mediators may be at the heart of the observed stress sensitivity promote inflammaging under chronic inflammatory conditions. We here review the role of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and neurotrophins as stress mediators modulating the immune response in the spleen and their potential role in inflammaging. PMID:23467333

  1. Acute stress may induce ovulation in women

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This study aims to gather information either supporting or rejecting the hypothesis that acute stress may induce ovulation in women. The formulation of this hypothesis is based on 2 facts: 1) estrogen-primed postmenopausal or ovariectomized women display an adrenal-progesterone-induced ovulatory-like luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in response to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration; and 2) women display multiple follicular waves during an interovulatory interval, and likely during pregnancy and lactation. Thus, acute stress may induce ovulation in women displaying appropriate serum levels of estradiol and one or more follicles large enough to respond to a non-midcycle LH surge. Methods A literature search using the PubMed database was performed to identify articles up to January 2010 focusing mainly on women as well as on rats and rhesus monkeys as animal models of interaction between the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. Results Whereas the HPA axis exhibits positive responses in practically all phases of the ovarian cycle, acute-stress-induced release of LH is found under relatively high plasma levels of estradiol. However, there are studies suggesting that several types of acute stress may exert different effects on pituitary LH release and the steroid environment may modulate in a different way (inhibiting or stimulating) the pattern of response of the HPG axis elicited by acute stressors. Conclusion Women may be induced to ovulate at any point of the menstrual cycle or even during periods of amenorrhea associated with pregnancy and lactation if exposed to an appropriate acute stressor under a right estradiol environment. PMID:20504303

  2. Pressure-induced metallization of silane.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Jia; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Song, Yang; Goncharov, Alexander F; Ahart, Muhtar; Liu, Zhenxian; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2008-01-08

    There is a great interest in electronic transitions in hydrogen-rich materials under extreme conditions. It has been recently suggested that the group IVa hydrides such as methane (CH(4)), silane (SiH(4)), and germane (GeH(4)) become metallic at far lower pressures than pure hydrogen at equivalent densities because the hydrogen is chemically compressed in group IVa hydride compounds. Here we report measurements of Raman and infrared spectra of silane under pressure. We find that SiH(4) undergoes three phase transitions before becoming opaque at 27-30 GPa. The vibrational spectra indicate the material transforms to a polymeric (framework) structure in this higher pressure range. Room-temperature infrared reflectivity data reveal that the material exhibits Drude-like metallic behavior above 60 GPa, indicating the onset of pressure-induced metallization.

  3. Dopant-induced stress in microfabricated silicon devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sievilä, P.; Mäkinen, J.; Tilli, M.; Tittonen, I.

    2013-07-01

    The modification of material characteristics by introducing dopant atoms into a crystal lattice is a fundamental basis for modern micro- and nanosystems technology. In this work, the uneven distribution of dopants is shown to have a remarkable effect on the residual stress and the consequent deformation of released, mechanical silicon structures. In particular, the focus is on segregation of initial dopants inside the bulk silicon which takes place in such fabrication processes as thermal oxidation. A theoretical model based on perceiving the dopant-induced change in Si crystal lattice parameter is developed. We experimentally investigate a series of silicon-on-insulator wafers, including samples with dopant types B, P, and Sb, and concentrations in the range from 1015 to 5 × 1019 atoms cm-3. Released cantilevers are fabricated as test structures and the residual stress is determined by measuring their final curvature. Experimental results are compared with the modelled values obtained utilizing the dopant profiles determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and concentration distribution simulations. The use of lightly doped substrates or the selection of processes not modifying the underlying Si surface (e.g., plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition PECVD or metal deposition) is shown to be an effective solution for minimizing the dopant redistribution-induced stress. Besides the scientific impact, knowledge of the stress generated by dopants is of great significance for industrial manufacturing of a wide range of micro- and nanomechanical systems.

  4. Magnetic field aberration induced by cycle stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    En, Yang; luming, Li; Xing, Chen

    2007-05-01

    Magneto-mechanical effect has been causing people's growing interest because of its relevance to several technology problems. One of them is the variation of surface magnetic field induced by stress concentration under the geomagnetic field. It can be used as an innovative, simple and convenient potential NDE method, called as magnetic memory method. However, whether and how this can be used as a quantitative measurement method, is still a virginal research field where nobody sets foot in. In this paper, circle tensile stress within the elastic region was applied to ferromagnetic sample under geomagnetic field. Experiment results on the relation between surface magnetic field and elastic stress were presented, and a simple model was derived. Simulation of the model was reconciled with the experimental results. This can be of great importance for it provides a brighter future for the promising Magnetic Memory NDE method—the potential possibility of quantitative measurement.

  5. Analysis of thermal stresses and metal movement during welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muraki, T.; Pattee, F. M.; Masubuchi, K.

    1974-01-01

    Finite element computer programs were developed to determine thermal stresses and metal movement during butt welding of flat plates and bead-on-plate welding along the girth of a cylindrical shell. Circular cylindrical shells of 6061 aluminum alloy were used for the tests. Measurements were made of changes in temperature and thermal strains during the welding process.

  6. Tailoring capping layers to reduce stress gradients in copper metallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Conal E.; Priyadarshini, Deepika; Nguyen, Son; Ryan, E. Todd

    2016-12-01

    Capping layers for back-end-of-line metallization, which primarily serve as diffusion barriers to prevent contamination, also play a role in mitigating electromigration in the underlying conductive material. Stress gradients can be generated in copper metallization due to the conditions associated with the capping process. To study the effects of deposition and subsequent annealing on the mechanical response of copper films with various capping schemes, we employed a combination of conventional and glancing incidence X-ray diffraction techniques to quantify the stress gradient maxima. The Cu films with dielectric caps, such as silicon nitride, can exhibit large gradients that decrease slightly with thermal cycling. However, Co and TaN-based metallic capping layers create significantly lower stress gradient maxima in copper features both before and after annealing. The different evolution of stress gradients in Cu films with dielectric and metallic caps due to thermal cycling reveals the interaction of dislocation-mediated, plastic deformation with the cap/Cu interface.

  7. Assessing Cd-induced stress from plant spectral response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kancheva, Rumiana; Georgiev, Georgi

    2014-10-01

    Remote sensing plays a significant role in local, regional and global monitoring of land covers. Ecological concerns worldwide determine the importance of remote sensing applications for the assessment of soil conditions, vegetation health and identification of stress-induced changes. The extensive industrial growth and intensive agricultural land-use arise the serious ecological problem of environmental pollution associated with the increasing anthropogenic pressure on the environment. Soil contamination is a reason for degradation processes and temporary or permanent decrease of the productive capacity of land. Heavy metals are among the most dangerous pollutants because of their toxicity, persistent nature, easy up-take by plants and long biological half-life. This paper takes as its focus the study of crop species spectral response to Cd pollution. Ground-based experiments were performed, using alfalfa, spring barley and pea grown in Cd contaminated soils and in different hydroponic systems under varying concentrations of the heavy metal. Cd toxicity manifested itself by inhibition of plant growth and synthesis of photosynthetic pigments. Multispectral reflectance, absorbance and transmittance, as well as red and far red fluorescence were measured and examined for their suitability to detect differences in plant condition. Statistical analysis was performed and empirical relationships were established between Cd concentration, plant growth variables and spectral response Various spectral properties proved to be indicators of plant performance and quantitative estimators of the degree of the Cd-induced stress.

  8. Managing heavy metal toxicity stress in plants: biological and biotechnological tools.

    PubMed

    Ovečka, M; Takáč, T

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of ion homeostasis in plant cells is a fundamental physiological requirement for sustainable plant growth, development and production. Plants exposed to high concentrations of heavy metals must respond in order to avoid the deleterious effects of heavy metal toxicity at the structural, physiological and molecular levels. Plant strategies for coping with heavy metal toxicity are genotype-specific and, at least to some extent, modulated by environmental conditions. There is considerable interest in the mechanisms underpinning plant metal tolerance, a complex process that enables plants to survive metal ion stress and adapt to maintain growth and development without exhibiting symptoms of toxicity. This review briefly summarizes some recent cell biological, molecular and proteomic findings concerning the responses of plant roots to heavy metal ions in the rhizosphere, metal ion-induced reactions at the cell wall-plasma membrane interface, and various aspects of heavy metal ion uptake and transport in plants via membrane transporters. The molecular and genetic approaches that are discussed are analyzed in the context of their potential practical applications in biotechnological approaches for engineering increased heavy metal tolerance in crops and other useful plants.

  9. Oxidative stress in pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings from metal contaminated environments in northern Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, A.M.M. Sturve, J.; Foerlin, L.; Nyholm, N.E.I.

    2007-11-15

    Metals have been shown to induce oxidative stress in animals. One of the most metal polluted terrestrial environments in Sweden is the surroundings of a sulfide ore smelter plant located in the northern part of the country. Pied flycatcher nestlings (Ficedula hypoleuca) that grew up close to the industry had accumulated amounts of arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead, iron and zinc in their liver tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate if pied flycatcher nestlings in the pollution gradient of the industry were affected by oxidative stress using antioxidant molecules and enzyme activities. The antioxidant assays were also evaluated in search for useful biomarkers in pied flycatchers. This study indicated that nestlings in metal contaminated areas showed signs of oxidative stress evidenced by up regulated hepatic antioxidant defense given as increased glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities and slightly but not significantly elevated lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activities. Stepwise linear regression indicated that lipid peroxidation and CAT activities were influenced mostly by iron, but iron and lead influenced the CAT activity to a higher degree. Positive relationships were found between GST and lead as well as GR activities and cadmium. We conclude that GR, CAT, GST activities and lipid peroxidation levels may function as useful biomarkers for oxidative stress in free-living pied flycatcher nestlings exposed to metal contaminated environments.

  10. Contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-04-01

    The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in living organisms was described more than 60 years ago and virtually immediately it was suggested that ROS were involved in various pathological processes and aging. The state when ROS generation exceeds elimination leading to an increased steady-state ROS level has been called "oxidative stress." Although ROS association with many pathological states in animals is well established, the question of ROS responsibility for the development of these states is still open. Fish represent the largest group of vertebrates and they inhabit a broad range of ecosystems where they are subjected to many different aquatic contaminants. In many cases, the deleterious effects of contaminants have been connected to induction of oxidative stress. Therefore, deciphering of molecular mechanisms leading to such contaminant effects and organisms' response may let prevent or minimize deleterious impacts of oxidative stress. This review describes general aspects of ROS homeostasis, in particular highlighting its basic aspects, modification of cellular constituents, operation of defense systems and ROS-based signaling with an emphasis on fish systems. A brief introduction to oxidative stress theory is accompanied by the description of a recently developed classification system for oxidative stress based on its intensity and time course. Specific information on contaminant-induced oxidative stress in fish is covered in sections devoted to such pollutants as metal ions (particularly iron, copper, chromium, mercury, arsenic, nickel, etc.), pesticides (insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides) and oil with accompanying pollutants. In the last section, certain problems and perspectives in studies of oxidative stress in fish are described.

  11. The release of shear stress in metals under dynamic loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignjevic, Rade; Bourne, Neil

    2013-06-01

    Metals under shock loading relieve shear stress by slip after. This work focuses on the types of loading where a metal initially responds entirely elastically and plasticity with deformation mechanisms developing over time and determined by the material's state and microstructure. Finite kinetics in shock is mirrored in several commonly observed responses including elastic precursor decay and the measurement of shear stress histories during load. FCC and BCC metals have different kinetics, with those of BCC metals slower. A model, under development, is implemented here to depict the behaviour observed by assigning a finite time to the return of the state point from the quasi equilibrium yield surface to the equilibrium yield surface. This delays the softening of the material and reproduces observed response in the weak shock regime. The model is based on the assumption that formation and self-organisation of dislocation structures at various scales maximises dissipation rate (minimize the free energy) in the material. Initial validation of the model is performed on tantalum by comparing stress histories under shock and shock-less loading with experimental data in order to assess its ability to reproduce experimentally observed features.

  12. Mechanically induced residual stresses: Modelling and characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranart, Jean-Claude E.

    Accurate characterisation of residual stress represents a major challenge to the engineering community. This is because it is difficult to validate the measurement and the accuracy is doubtful. It is with this in mind that the current research program concerning the characterisation of mechanically induced residual stresses was undertaken. Specifically, the cold expansion of fastener holes and the shot peening treatment of aerospace alloys, aluminium 7075 and titanium Ti-6Al-4V, are considered. The objective of this study is to characterise residual stresses resulting from cold working using three powerful techniques. These are: (i) theoretical using three dimensional non-linear finite element modelling, (ii) semi-destructive using a modified incremental hole drilling technique and (iii) nondestructive using a newly developed guided wave method supplemented by traditional C-scan measurements. The three dimensional finite element results of both simultaneous and sequential cold expansion of two fastener holes revealed the importance of the separation distance, the expansion level and the loading history upon the development and growth of the plastic zone and unloading residual stresses. It further showed that the commonly adopted two dimensional finite element models are inaccurate and incapable of predicting these residual stresses. Similarly, the dynamic elasto-plastic finite element studies of shot peening showed that the depth of the compressed layer, surface and sub-surface residual stresses are significantly influenced by the shot characteristics. Furthermore, the results reveal that the separation distance between two simultaneously impacting shots governs the plastic zone development and its growth. In the semi-destructive incremental hole drilling technique, the accuracy of the newly developed calibration coefficients and measurement techniques were verified with a known stress field and the method was used to measure peening residual stresses. Unlike

  13. Effect of acute cadmium exposure on metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers of Sparus aurata.

    PubMed

    Souid, Ghada; Souayed, Nouha; Yaktiti, Fatma; Maaroufi, Khira

    2013-03-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential metal which could be toxic in traces for aquatic species. Increasing Cd concentrations in sea water is mainly related to waste waters provided from growing industrial and agricultural activities. The present study investigated the accumulation of Cd (0.5mg/L) in different tissues of Sparus aurata under a short term exposure (2, 4 and 24h) using the atomic absorption. This work investigated also the impact of the metal on oxidative stress biomarkers and acetyl cholinesterase activity (AchE). Our results showed that Cd accumulation in different tissues depends largely on the length of the exposure period to the metal. Indeed, the highest concentrations were obtained after 24h. Cd accumulation in tissues was in the following order: intestines > liver > gills > dorsal muscle. Cadmium administration increased significantly catalase activity (CAT), glutathione level (GSH) and malondialdehyde production (MDA) after 24h of exposure. In contrast, AchE activity was decreased after the same period of exposure to the metal. There were no significant changes in oxidative stress biomarkers after 2 and 4h of exposure, except for superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity which attained the highest level after 4h. These results suggest that short-term exposure of Sparus aurata to Cd (0.5mg/L) induced an important metal accumulation in intestine and a notable oxidative stress response.

  14. Bi-Metallic Composite Structures With Designed Internal Residual Stress Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brice, Craig A.

    2014-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) have a unique ability to recover small amounts of plastic strain through a temperature induced phase change. For these materials, mechanical displacement can be accomplished by heating the structure to induce a phase change, through which some of the plastic strain previously introduced to the structure can be reversed. This paper introduces a concept whereby an SMA phase is incorporated into a conventional alloy matrix in a co-continuous reticulated arrangement forming a bi-metallic composite structure. Through memory activation of the mechanically constrained SMA phase, a controlled residual stress field is developed in the interior of the structure. The presented experimental data show that the memory activation of the SMA composite component significantly changes the residual stress distribution in the overall structure. Designing the structural arrangement of the two phases to produce a controlled residual stress field could be used to create structures that have much improved durability and damage tolerance properties.

  15. The stress analysis of a heavy liquid metal pump impeller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X. D.; Li, X. L.; Zhu, Z. Q.; Li, C. J.; Gao, S.

    2016-05-01

    Lead-based coolant reactor is a promising Generation-IV reactor. In the lead-based coolant reactor, the coolant is liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. The main pump in the reactor is a very important device. It supplies force for the coolant circulation. The liquid metal has a very large density which is about ten times of the water. Also, the viscosity of the coolant is small which is about one sixth of the water. When the pump transports heavy liquid, the blade loading is heavy. The large force can cause the failure of the blade when the fatigue stress exceeds the allowable stress. The impeller fraction is a very serious accident which is strictly prohibited in the nuclear reactor. In this paper, the numerical method is used to simulate the flow field of a heavy liquid metal pump. The SST k-w turbulent model is used in the calculation to get a more precise flow structure. The hydraulic force is obtained with the one way fluid solid coupling. The maximum stress in the impeller is analyzed. The stress in the liquid metal pump is compared with that in the water pump. The calculation results show that the maximum stress of the impeller blade increases with increase of flow rate. In the design of the impeller blade thickness, the impeller strength in large operating condition should be considered. The maximum stress of the impeller blade located in the middle and near the hub of the leading edge. In this position, the blade is easy to fracture. The maximum deformation of the impeller firstly increase with increase of flow rate and then decrease with increase of flow rate. The maximum deformation exists in the middle of the leading edge when in small flow rate and in the out radius of the impeller when in large flow rate. Comparing the stress of the impeller when transporting water and LBE, the maximum stress is almost one-tenth of that in the LBE impeller which is the same ratio of the density. The static stress in different medium is proportional to the pressure

  16. Analytical method for distribution of metallic gasket contact stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiu; Gu, Boqing; Wei, Long; Sun, Jianjun

    2008-11-01

    Metallic gasket seals have been widely used in chemical and petrochemical plants. The failure of sealing system will lead to enormous pecuniary loss, serious environment pollution and personal injury accident. The failure of sealing systems is mostly caused not by the strength of flanges or bolts but by the leakage of the connections. The leakage behavior of bolted flanged connections is related to the gasket contact stress. In particular, the non-uniform distribution of this stress in the radial direction caused by the flange rotational flexibility has a major influence on the tightness of bolted flanged connections. In this paper, based on Warters method and considering the operating pressure, the deformation of the flanges is analyzed theoretically, and the formula for calculating the angle of rotation of the flanges is derived, based on which and the mechanical property of the gasket material, the method for calculating the gasket contact stresses is put forward. The maximum stress at the gasket outer flank calculated by the analytical method is lower than that obtained by numerical simulation, but the mean stresses calculated by the two methods are nearly the same. The analytical method presented in this paper can be used as an engineering method for designing the metallic gasket connections.

  17. Effect of paraquat-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Wiemer, Matthias; Osiewacz, Heinz D.

    2014-01-01

    Aging of biological systems is influenced by various factors, conditions and processes. Among others, processes allowing organisms to deal with various types of stress are of key importance. In particular, oxidative stress as the result of the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the mitochondrial respiratory chain and the accumulation of ROS-induced molecular damage has been strongly linked to aging. Here we view the impact of ROS from a different angle: their role in the control of gene expression. We report a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the fungal aging model Podospora anserina grown on medium containing paraquat (PQ). This treatment leads to an increased cellular generation and release of H2O2, a reduced growth rate, and a decrease in lifespan. The combined challenge by PQ and copper has a synergistic negative effect on growth and lifespan. The data from the transcriptome analysis of the wild type cultivated under PQ-stress and their comparison to those of a longitudinal aging study as well as of a copper-uptake longevity mutant of P. anserina revealed that PQ-stress leads to the up-regulation of transcripts coding for components involved in mitochondrial remodeling. PQ also affects the expression of copper-regulated genes suggesting an increase of cytoplasmic copper levels as it has been demonstrated earlier to occur during aging of P. anserina and during senescence of human fibroblasts. This effect may result from the induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore via PQ-induced ROS, leading to programmed cell death as part of an evolutionary conserved mechanism involved in biological aging and lifespan control. PMID:28357247

  18. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  19. Biomonitor of Environmental Stress: Coral Trace Metal Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grumet, N.; Hughen, K.

    2006-12-01

    Tropical reef corals are extremely sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and, as a result of environmental degradation and global climate change, coral reefs around the globe are severely threatened. Increased human population and development in tropical regions is leading to higher turbidity and silt loading from terrestrial runoff, increased pesticides and nutrients from agricultural land-use and sewage, and the release of toxic trace metals to coastal waters from industrial pollution. The uptake of these metals and nutrients within the coral skeletal aragonite is a sensitive biomonitor of environmental stresses on coral health. We analyzed 18 trace metals from the surface of coral skeletons collected in Bermuda, Indonesia and Belize to assess a range of threats to coral reef health - including climate change, agricultural runoff and pesticides, and coastal development and tourism. This surface sample network also includes samples representing 4 different coral species. Trace metal analysis was performed on an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) to a high degree of accuracy and precision at extremely low (ppb) concentrations using a protocol we developed for samples less than 2 mg. Proper cleaning techniques were employed to minimize blank level concentrations for ultra-trace metal ICP-MS solution analysis. However, Zn/Ca and Ni/Ca concentrations remain below analytical detection limits. Initial results indicate that sea surface temperature proxies (e.g., Sr/Ca, B/Ca and Mg/Ca) display similar ratios between the different sites, whereas those metals associated with anthropogenic activities, such as Co, Pb and Cu, are site-specific and are linked to individual environmental stressors. Results from this study will be applied to down core trace metal records in the future. In doing so, we aim to understand the impacts of compounding environmental stresses on coral health, and to identify regional threshold values beyond which corals

  20. Protective effect of curcumin against heavy metals-induced liver damage.

    PubMed

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2014-07-01

    Occupational or environmental exposures to heavy metals produce several adverse health effects. The common mechanism determining their toxicity and carcinogenicity is the generation of oxidative stress that leads to hepatic damage. In addition, oxidative stress induced by metal exposure leads to the activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2/Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1/antioxidant response elements (Nrf2/Keap1/ARE) pathway. Since antioxidant and chelating agents are generally used for the treatment of heavy metals poisoning, this review is focused on the protective role of curcumin against liver injury induced by heavy metals. Curcumin has shown, in clinical and preclinical studies, numerous biological activities including therapeutic efficacy against various human diseases and anti-hepatotoxic effects against environmental or occupational toxins. Curcumin reduces the hepatotoxicity induced by arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead and mercury, prevents histological injury, lipid peroxidation and glutathione (GSH) depletion, maintains the liver antioxidant enzyme status and protects against mitochondrial dysfunction. The preventive effect of curcumin on the noxious effects induced by heavy metals has been attributed to its scavenging and chelating properties, and/or to the ability to induce the Nrf2/Keap1/ARE pathway. However, additional research is needed in order to propose curcumin as a potential protective agent against liver damage induced by heavy metals.

  1. Stress state in turbopump bearing induced by shrink fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, P.; Zee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The stress generated by shrink fitting in bearing-like geometries is studied. The feasibility of using strain gages to determine the strain induced by shrink fitting process is demonstrated. Results from a ring with a uniform cross section reveal the validity of simple stress mechanics calculations for determining the stress state induced in this geometry by shrink fitting.

  2. [Oxidative stress in plants exposed to heavy metals].

    PubMed

    Rucińiska-Sobkowiak, Renata

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been involved in the toxicity of heavy metals in different plant species. Exposure to metal ions can intensify the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as: superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals or hydrogen peroxide. These species can react with cellular components (lipids, proteins, nucleic acids) and cause lipid peroxidation, membrane damage and inactivation of enzymes thus affect many physiological processes as well as cell viability. Plants have evolved a complex array of mechanisms to maintain low ROS level and avoid the detrimental effects of excessively high ROS concentrations. This antioxidant network includes numerous soluble (ascorbate, glutathione) and membrane (tocopherol) compounds as well as enzymes involved in ROS scavenging (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase). ROS must be efficiently detoxified to ameliorate the harmful effects of heavy metals in the cells. However they cannot be eliminated completely because plants use ROS as second messengers in signal transduction cascades in diverse physiological processes.

  3. Frank loop formation in irradiated metals in response to applied and internal stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Garner, F.A.; Brager, H.R.

    1980-04-01

    The Frank loop and dislocation microstructures developed in three face-centered cubic alloys during fast reactor irradiation have been examined to determine the influence of applied and internally-generated stress on loop evolution. It is shown that anisotropic stresses generate a corresponding anisotropy of Frank loop populations on the four close-packed planes. The loop populations thus represent a microstructural record of the irradiation creep processes in action. The ease of interpreting this record depends on the relative magnitudes of external and internal stresses. Metals with low irradiation creep rates which also undergo concurrent and substantial phase changes during irradiation are subject to large and indeterminate levels of internally-generated stress which render the microstructural record uninterpretable with respect to the applied stress state. When the internally-generated stresses are small in comparison to the externally-applied stresses, a clear record of the SIPA (Stress-Induced-Preferential-Absorption) growth mechanism of irradiation creep is imprinted at low neutron fluences in the density and sizes of loops present on each set of close-packed planes. This record fades at higher fluences when the continued anisotropic formation, growth and unfaulting of Frank loops generates a corresponding anisotropy in the resultant free dislocation network, a process which alters the competition of sinks for point defects.

  4. Evaluation of weld metal 82 and weld metal 152 stress corrosion cracking susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Psaila-Dombrowski, M.J.; Sarver, J.M.; Doherty, P.E.; Schneider, W.G.

    1995-12-31

    Welds are often an area of concern in steam generators (SG) because of the different materials in the welds, the residual stresses which result from the welding process and subsequent operational stresses. In general a weld is composed of a base metal, weld metal and the heat affected zone (HAZ). This study investigated the corrosion performance of welds connecting the divider plate to the weld buildup in a welded-in divider plate (WIDP) design. The materials of interest were Alloy 690 plate, Weld Metals (WM) 82 and WM 152. Weld test samples were fabricated in a manner that is consistent with SG fabrication practices in which WM 152 is used to attach the Alloy 690 plate to the WM 82 weld buildup. Round tensile specimens were used to evaluate WIDP welds. Specimens were manufactured parallel to the weld fusion lines, hence, the gauge length of each specimen contained either the base metal or a metal and a HAZ. Use of specimens of this orientation permitted evaluation of all the materials contained in the specimen for stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility, not just the weakest materials. Constant extension rate tests were performed in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) primary water chemistry and faulted primary water chemistry at 343 C and a strain rate of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} sec{sup {minus}1}. No SCC was found in any specimen in either environment.

  5. Interindividual differences in stress sensitivity: basal and stress-induced cortisol levels differentially predict neural vigilance processing under stress.

    PubMed

    Henckens, Marloes J A G; Klumpers, Floris; Everaerd, Daphne; Kooijman, Sabine C; van Wingen, Guido A; Fernández, Guillén

    2016-04-01

    Stress exposure is known to precipitate psychological disorders. However, large differences exist in how individuals respond to stressful situations. A major marker for stress sensitivity is hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis function. Here, we studied how interindividual variance in both basal cortisol levels and stress-induced cortisol responses predicts differences in neural vigilance processing during stress exposure. Implementing a randomized, counterbalanced, crossover design, 120 healthy male participants were exposed to a stress-induction and control procedure, followed by an emotional perception task (viewing fearful and happy faces) during fMRI scanning. Stress sensitivity was assessed using physiological (salivary cortisol levels) and psychological measures (trait questionnaires). High stress-induced cortisol responses were associated with increased stress sensitivity as assessed by psychological questionnaires, a stronger stress-induced increase in medial temporal activity and greater differential amygdala responses to fearful as opposed to happy faces under control conditions. In contrast, high basal cortisol levels were related to relative stress resilience as reflected by higher extraversion scores, a lower stress-induced increase in amygdala activity and enhanced differential processing of fearful compared with happy faces under stress. These findings seem to reflect a critical role for HPA-axis signaling in stress coping; higher basal levels indicate stress resilience, whereas higher cortisol responsivity to stress might facilitate recovery in those individuals prone to react sensitively to stress.

  6. Stress and Reliability Analysis of a Metal-Ceramic Dental Crown

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anusavice, Kenneth J; Sokolowski, Todd M.; Hojjatie, Barry; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1996-01-01

    Interaction of mechanical and thermal stresses with the flaws and microcracks within the ceramic region of metal-ceramic dental crowns can result in catastrophic or delayed failure of these restorations. The objective of this study was to determine the combined influence of induced functional stresses and pre-existing flaws and microcracks on the time-dependent probability of failure of a metal-ceramic molar crown. A three-dimensional finite element model of a porcelain fused-to-metal (PFM) molar crown was developed using the ANSYS finite element program. The crown consisted of a body porcelain, opaque porcelain, and a metal substrate. The model had a 300 Newton load applied perpendicular to one cusp, a load of 30ON applied at 30 degrees from the perpendicular load case, directed toward the center, and a 600 Newton vertical load. Ceramic specimens were subjected to a biaxial flexure test and the load-to-failure of each specimen was measured. The results of the finite element stress analysis and the flexure tests were incorporated in the NASA developed CARES/LIFE program to determine the Weibull and fatigue parameters and time-dependent fracture reliability of the PFM crown. CARES/LIFE calculates the time-dependent reliability of monolithic ceramic components subjected to thermomechanical and/Or proof test loading. This program is an extension of the CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures) computer program.

  7. Differences in metabolism between the biofilm and planktonic response to metal stress.

    PubMed

    Booth, Sean C; Workentine, Matthew L; Wen, Jing; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Vogel, Hans J; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J; Weljie, Aalim M

    2011-07-01

    Bacterial biofilms are known to withstand the effects of toxic metals better than planktonic cultures of the same species. This phenomenon has been attributed to many features of the sessile lifestyle not present in free-swimming populations, but the contribution of intracellular metabolism has not been previously examined. Here, we use a combined GC-MS and (1)H NMR metabolomic approach to quantify whole-cell metabolism in biofilm and planktonic cultures of the multimetal resistant bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens exposed to copper ions. Metabolic changes in response to metal exposure were found to be significantly different in biofilms compared to planktonic cultures. Planktonic metabolism indicated an oxidative stress response that was characterized by changes to the TCA cycle, glycolysis, pyruvate and nicotinate and niacotinamide metabolism. Similar metabolic changes were not observed in biofilms, which were instead dominated by shifts in exopolysaccharide related metabolism suggesting that metal stress in biofilms induces a protective response rather than the reactive changes observed for the planktonic cells. From these results, we conclude that differential metabolic shifts play a role in biofilm-specific multimetal resistance and tolerance. An altered metabolic response to metal toxicity represents a novel addition to a growing list of biofilm-specific mechanisms to resist environmental stress.

  8. Variation in oxidative stress indices of two green seaweeds growing under different heavy metal stresses.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Gehan A; Ismail, Mona M

    2017-02-01

    Concentrations of nine heavy metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn) were determined in the green seaweed species Cladophora glomerata and Ulva compressa collected from El-Mex and Sidi Kirayr locations. The heavy metal concentrations in algal tissues were in direct correlation with their soluble concentrations in seawater with the descending order: Femetal contamination led to apparent alternation in algal thalli morphology. The results showed that C. glomerata had a superior adaptation to metal stress than U. compressa, due to its ability to produce non-enzymatic and enzymatic compounds for scavenging of the produced reactive oxygen species. The recorded contents of the oxidative stress indices (phenols, antioxidant activity, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and ascorbic acid) and the antioxidant enzymes (catalase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) were higher in both tested seaweeds from El-Mex bay. Additionally, the estimated metal pollution index and pollution load index for the tested algae and seawaters ensured their ability as metal pollution bioindicators for monitoring marine environment quality and as biomarkers for oxidative damage assessment.

  9. Inhibitory Activity Of Curcumin Derivatives Towards Metal-free And Metal-induced Amyloid-β Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kochi, Akiko; Lee, Hyuck Jin; Vithanarachchi, Sashiprabha M; Padmini, Vediappen; Allen, Matthew J; Lim, Mi Hee

    2015-01-01

    When Alzheimer's disease (AD) progresses, several pathological features arise including accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates [e.g., amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques], metal ion dyshomeostasis, and oxidative stress. These characteristics are recently suggested to be interconnected through a potential factor, metal-associated Aβ (metal-Aβ) species. The role of metal-Aβ species in AD pathogenesis remains unclear, however. To elucidate the contribution of metal-Aβ species to AD pathology, as well as to develop small molecules as chemical tools and/or theranostic (therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for this disease, curcumin (Cur), a natural product from turmeric, and its derivatives have been studied towards both metal-free and metal-induced Aβ aggregation. Although Cur has indicated anti-amyloidogenic activities and antioxidant properties, its biological use has been hindered due to low solubility and stability in physiologically relevant conditions. Herein, we report the reactivity of Cur and its derivatives (Gd-Cur, a potential multimodal Aβ imaging agent; Cur-S, a water soluble derivative of Cur that has substitution at the phenolic hydroxyls) with metal-free Aβ and metal-Aβ species. Our results and observations indicate that Gd-Cur could modulate Cu(II)-triggered Aβ aggregation more noticeably over metal-free or Zn(II)-induced analogues; however, Cur-S was not observed to noticeably modulate Aβ aggregation with and without metal ions. Overall, our studies present information that could aid in optimizing the molecular scaffold of Cur for the development of chemical tools or theranostics for metal-Aβ species.

  10. DHEA administration modulates stress-induced analgesia in rats.

    PubMed

    Cecconello, Ana Lúcia; Torres, Iraci L S; Oliveira, Carla; Zanini, Priscila; Niches, Gabriela; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques

    2016-04-01

    An important aspect of adaptive stress response is the pain response suppression that occurs during or following stress exposure, which is often referred to as acute stress-induced analgesia. Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) participates in the modulation of adaptive stress response, changing the HPA axis activity. The effect of DHEA on the HPA axis activity is dependent on the state and uses the same systems that participate in the regulation of acute stress-induced analgesia. The impact of DHEA on nociception has been studied; however, the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia is not known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DHEA on stress-induced analgesia and determine the best time for hormone administration in relation to exposure to stressor stimulus. The animals were stressed by restraint for 1h in a single exposure and received treatment with DHEA by a single injection before the stress or a single injection after the stress. Nociception was assessed with a tail-flick apparatus. Serum corticosterone levels were measured. DHEA administered before exposure to stress prolonged the acute stress-induced analgesia. This effect was not observed when the DHEA was administered after the stress. DHEA treatment in non-stressed rats did not alter the nociceptive threshold, suggesting that the DHEA effect on nociception is state-dependent. The injection of DHEA had the same effect as exposure to acute stress, with both increasing the levels of corticosterone. In conclusion, acute treatment with DHEA mimics the response to acute stress indexed by an increase in activity of the HPA axis. The treatment with DHEA before stress exposure may facilitate adaptive stress response, prolonging acute stress-induced analgesia, which may be a therapeutic strategy of interest to clinics.

  11. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: An NDE Tool for the Residual Stress Assessment of Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2000-01-01

    During manufacturing, certain propulsion components that will be used in a cyclic fatigue environment are fabricated to contain compressive residual stresses on their surfaces because these stresses inhibit the nucleation of cracks. Overloads and elevated temperature excursions cause the induced residual stresses to dissipate while the component is still in service, lowering its resistance to crack initiation. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has focused on employing the Thermoelastic Stress Analysis technique (TSA, also recognized as SPATE: Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission) as a tool for monitoring the residual stress state of propulsion components. TSA is based on the fact that materials experience small temperature changes when they are compressed or expanded. When a structure is cyclically loaded (i.e., cyclically compressed and expanded), the resulting surface-temperature profile correlates to the stress state of the structure s surface. The surface-temperature variations resulting from a cyclic load are measured with an infrared camera. Traditionally, the temperature amplitude of a TSA signal has been theoretically defined to be linearly dependent on the cyclic stress amplitude. As a result, the temperature amplitude resulting from an applied cyclic stress was assumed to be independent of the cyclic mean stress.

  12. Detection of Infrared Photons Using the Electronic Stress in Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Datskou, I.; Egert, C.M.; Rjic, S.

    1999-04-05

    It is well known that the work function of metals decreases when they are placed in a nonpolar liquid. A similar decrease occurs when the metal is placed into contact with a semiconductor forming a Schottky barrier. We report on a new method for detecting photons using the stress caused by photo-electrons emitted from a metal film surface in contact with a semiconductor microstructure. The photoelectrons diffuse into the microstructure and produce an electronic stress. The photon detection results from the measurement of the photo-induced bending of the microstructure. Internal photoemission has been used in the past to detect photons, however, in those cases the detection was accomplished by measuring the current due to photoelectrons and not due to electronic stress. Small changes in position (displacement) of microstructures are routinely measured in atomic force microscopy (AFM) where atomic imaging of surfaces relies on the measurement of small changes (< l0{sup -9} m) in the bending of microcantilevers. In the present work we studied the photon response of Si microcantilevers coated with a thin film of Pt. The Si microcantilevers were 500 nm thick and had a 30 nm layer of Pt. Photons with sufficient energies produce electrons from the platinum-silicon interface which diffuse into the Si and produce an electronic stress. Since the excess charge carriers cause the Si microcantilever to contract in length but not the Pt layer, the bimaterial microcantilever bends. In our present studies we used the optical detection technique to measure the photometric response of Pt-Si microcantilevers as a function of photon energy. The charge carriers responsible for the photo-induced stress in Si, were produced via internal photoemission using a diode laser with wavelength {lambda} = 1550 nm.

  13. Effect of stress at dosing on organophosphate and heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Jortner, Bernard S.

    2008-11-15

    This paper reviews recent studies assessing the effect of well-defined, severe, transient stress at dosing on two classical models of toxicity. These are the acute (anticholinesterase) toxicity seen following exposure to the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos, and the nephrotoxicity elicited by the heavy metal depleted uranium, in rats. Stress was induced by periods of restraint and forced swimming in days to weeks preceding toxicant exposure. Forced swimming was far more stressful, as measured by marked, if transient, elevation of plasma corticosterone. This form of stress was administered immediately prior to administration of chlorpyrifos or depleted uranium. Chlorpyrifos (single 60 mg/kg subcutaneously) elicited marked inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase 4-day post-dosing. Depleted uranium (single intramuscular doses of 0.1, 0.3 or 1.0 mg/kg uranium) elicited dose-dependent increase in kidney concentration of the metal, with associated injury to proximal tubular epithelium and increases in serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine during the 30-day post-dosing period. Stress at dosing had no effect on these toxicologic endpoints.

  14. Sub-lethal metal stress response of larvae of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mario H; Noriega, Fernando G

    2014-06-01

    Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) has adapted to urban environments; the urbanisation process provides suitable habitats for this disease vector subsequently increasing the probability of the transmission of pathogens in high-density environments. Urban environments provide metal stressed larval habitats. However, little is known about the physiological cost of metal stress or how this might affect the performance of this mosquito species. This study aims to characterise the sub-lethal physiological consequences of metal stress in Aedes aegypti. Various parameters of mosquito physiology under larval metal stress are assessed including larval metallothionein expression and the effects of larval metal stress on adult performance and their progeny. Results show that environmentally relevant larval metal stress compromises larval and adult development and performance, and results in larval metal tolerance along with an increase in lipid consumption. These performance costs are coupled to a dramatic increase in metallothionein expression in the midgut. Metal stress results in lowered adult body mass and neutral storage lipids at emergence, starvation tolerance, fecundity and starvation tolerance of offspring compared to non-metal stressed individuals. Ironically, larval metal stress results in increased adult longevity. Together, these findings indicate that even low levels of environmentally relevant larval metal stress have considerable physiological consequences for this important disease vector.

  15. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  16. Stress response dysregulation and stress-induced analgesia in nicotine dependent men and women.

    PubMed

    al'Absi, Mustafa; Nakajima, Motohiro; Grabowski, John

    2013-04-01

    Alterations in the stress response and endogenous pain regulation mechanisms may contribute directly and indirectly to maintenance of nicotine dependence and relapse. We examined the extent to which nicotine dependence alters endogenous pain regulatory systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, cardiovascular activity, and stress-induced analgesia. Smokers and nonsmokers attended a laboratory session that included assessment of hormonal and cardiovascular responses to stress. Smokers smoked at their regular rate prior to the session. The hand cold pressor and heat thermal pain tests were completed twice, once after acute stress (public speaking and math tasks) and the other after rest. While smokers and nonsmokers exhibited significant hormonal and cardiovascular responses to stress, smokers exhibited blunted stress responses relative to nonsmokers. They also exhibited diminished stress-induced analgesia. Results demonstrate altered stress response and diminished stress-induced analgesia among chronic smokers, and suggest that these dysregulated physiological responding may contribute to altered endogenous pain regulation.

  17. Relationship between proline and Hg2+-induced oxidative stress in a tolerant rice mutant.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijuan; Zeng, Bin; Sun, Zongxiu; Zhu, Cheng

    2009-05-01

    There has been little agreement regarding the mechanism by which proline reduces heavy metal stress. The present work examines the relationship between Hg(2+)-induced oxidative stress and proline accumulation in rice and explores the possible mechanisms through which proline protects against Hg(2+) stress. The effect of proline on alleviation of Hg(2+) toxicity was studied by spectrophotography and enzymatic methods. Hg(2+) induced oxidative stress in rice by increasing lipid peroxidation. Pretreatment of the rice with 2 mM proline for 12 h profoundly alleviated Hg(2+)-induced lipid peroxidation and minimized H(2)O(2) accumulation. Proline pretreatment significantly reduced (p < 0.01) the Hg(2+) content in rice leaves. A comparison of the effects of proline pretreatment on H(2)O(2) accumulation by Hg(2+) and aminotrazole suggested that proline protected cells from Hg(2+)-induced oxidative stress by scavenging reactive oxygen species. The present work demonstrates a protective effect of proline on Hg(2+) toxicity through detoxifying reactive oxygen species, rather than chelating metal ions or maintaining the water balance under Hg(2+) stress.

  18. A tomato stem cell extract, containing antioxidant compounds and metal chelating factors, protects skin cells from heavy metal-induced damages.

    PubMed

    Tito, Annalisa; Carola, Antonietta; Bimonte, Marida; Barbulova, Ani; Arciello, Stefania; de Laurentiis, Francesco; Monoli, Irene; Hill, Jacqueline; Gibertoni, Simone; Colucci, Gabriella; Apone, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metals can cause several genotoxic effects on cells, including oxidative stress, DNA sequence breakage and protein modification. Among the body organs, skin is certainly the most exposed to heavy metal stress and thus the most damaged by the toxic effects that these chemicals cause. Moreover, heavy metals, in particular nickel, can induce the over-expression of collagenases (enzymes responsible for collagen degradation), leading to weakening of the skin extracellular matrix. Plants have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to protect their cells from heavy metal toxicity, including the synthesis of metal chelating proteins and peptides, such as metallothioneins and phytochelatins (PC), which capture the metals and prevent the damages on the cellular structures. To protect human skin cells from heavy metal toxicity, we developed a new cosmetic active ingredient from Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) cultured stem cells. This product, besides its high content of antioxidant compounds, contained PC, effective in the protection of skin cells towards heavy metal toxicity. We have demonstrated that this new product preserves nuclear DNA integrity from heavy metal damages, by inducing genes responsible for DNA repair and protection, and neutralizes the effect of heavy metals on collagen degradation, by inhibiting collagenase expression and inducing the synthesis of new collagen.

  19. Stress-induced phase transformation and optical coupling of silver nanoparticle superlattices into mechanically stable nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Binsong; Wen, Xiaodong; Li, Ruipeng; Wang, Zhongwu; Clem, Paul G; Fan, Hongyou

    2014-06-24

    One-dimensional silver materials display unique optical and electrical properties with promise as functional blocks for a new generation of nanoelectronics. To date, synthetic approaches and property engineering of silver nanowires have primarily focused on chemical methods. Here we report a simple physical method of metal nanowire synthesis, based on stress-induced phase transformation and sintering of spherical Ag nanoparticle superlattices. Two phase transformations of nanoparticles under stress have been observed at distinct length scales. First, the lattice dimensions of silver nanoparticle superlattices may be reversibly manipulated between 0-8 GPa compressive stresses to enable systematic and reversible changes in mesoscale optical coupling between silver nanoparticles. Second, stresses greater than 8 GPa induced an atomic lattice phase transformation, which induced sintering of silver nanoparticles into micron-length scale nanowires. The nanowire synthesis mechanism displays a dependence on both nanoparticle crystal surface orientation and presence of particular grain boundaries to enable nanoparticle consolidation into nanowires.

  20. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Trace Metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Stephen (Technical Monitor); VanderWal, Randall L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; West, Joseph R., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    An alternative approach for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) determination of trace metal determination in liquids is demonstrated. The limits of detection (LOD) for the technique ranged from 10 ppb to 10 ppm for 15 metals metals (Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Hg, Pb) tested.

  1. Finite element analyses of tool stresses in metal cutting processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kistler, B.L.

    1997-01-01

    In this report, we analytically predict and examine stresses in tool tips used in high speed orthogonal machining operations. Specifically, one analysis was compared to an existing experimental measurement of stresses in a sapphire tool tip cutting 1020 steel at slow speeds. In addition, two analyses were done of a carbide tool tip in a machining process at higher cutting speeds, in order to compare to experimental results produced as part of this study. The metal being cut was simulated using a Sandia developed damage plasticity material model, which allowed the cutting to occur analytically without prespecifying the line of cutting/failure. The latter analyses incorporated temperature effects on the tool tip. Calculated tool forces and peak stresses matched experimental data to within 20%. Stress contours generally agreed between analysis and experiment. This work could be extended to investigate/predict failures in the tool tip, which would be of great interest to machining shops in understanding how to optimize cost/retooling time.

  2. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Adam S.; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-01-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, disruption, confrontations, isolation, or neglect in the social environment can each be major stressors. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to mental and physical health. In contrast, social support can ameliorate stress-induced physiological and immunological deficits, reducing the risk of subsequent psychological distress and improving an individual's overall well-being. For better clinical treatment of these physiological and mental pathologies, it is necessary to understand the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced pathologies as well as determine the underlying biological mechanisms that regulate social buffering of the stress system. A number of ethologically relevant animal models of social stress and species that form strong adult social bonds have been utilized to study the etiology, treatment, and prevention of stress-related disorders. While undoubtedly a number of biological pathways contribute to the social buffering of the stress response, the convergence of evidence denotes the regulatory effects of oxytocin in facilitating social bond-promoting behaviors and their effect on the stress response. Thus, oxytocin may be perceived as a common regulatory element of the social environment, stress response, and stress-induced risks on mental and physical health. PMID:22178036

  3. Macroscopic tensile plasticity by scalarizating stress distribution in bulk metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Dong, Jie; Huan, Yong; Wang, Yong Tian; Wang, Wei-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The macroscopic tensile plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is highly desirable for various engineering applications. However, upon yielding, plastic deformation of BMGs is highly localized into narrow shear bands and then leads to the “work softening” behaviors and subsequently catastrophic fracture, which is the major obstacle for their structural applications. Here we report that macroscopic tensile plasticity in BMG can be obtained by designing surface pore distribution using laser surface texturing. The surface pore array by design creates a complex stress field compared to the uniaxial tensile stress field of conventional glassy specimens, and the stress field scalarization induces the unusual tensile plasticity. By systematically analyzing fracture behaviors and finite element simulation, we show that the stress field scalarization can resist the main shear band propagation and promote the formation of larger plastic zones near the pores, which undertake the homogeneous tensile plasticity. These results might give enlightenment for understanding the deformation mechanism and for further improvement of the mechanical performance of metallic glasses. PMID:26902264

  4. Malonate induces the assembly of cytoplasmic stress granules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xue; Gao, Xingjie; Ge, Lin; Cui, Xiaoteng; Su, Chao; Yang, Wendong; Sun, Xiaoming; Zhang, Wei; Yao, Zhi; Yang, Xi; Yang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Malonate, a classic inhibitor of respiratory electron transport chain, induces mitochondrial stress. Stress granules (SGs) are a kind of dynamic foci structure during stress. The study on the connection of mitochondrial stress and SG assembly is still limited. Here, we demonstrated that malonate treatment leads to SG formation and translation inhibition, apart from mitochondrial stress, including enhanced ROS formation, reduced mitochondrial Δψm and ATP level. The phosphorylation levels of eIF2α and 4EBP1 protein were affected upon mitochondrial dysfunction. However, knockdown of 4EBP1 affected SG formation, rather than eIF2α. In addition, an increase of ATP level under mitochondrial stress enhanced malonate-induced SG aggregation. Overall, malonate stimulation triggers mitochondrial stress and induces the assembly of non-canonical cellular SGs via 4EBP1 pathway.

  5. Abiotic stresses induce different localizations of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kovinich, Nik; Kayanja, Gilbert; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S; Grotewold, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins are induced in plants in response to abiotic stresses such as drought, high salinity, excess light, and cold, where they often correlate with enhanced stress tolerance. Numerous roles have been proposed for anthocyanins induced during abiotic stresses including functioning as ROS scavengers, photoprotectants, and stress signals. We have recently found different profiles of anthocyanins in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants exposed to different abiotic stresses, suggesting that not all anthocyanins have the same function. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of other studies and show that anthocyanins induced in Arabidopsis in response to various abiotic stresses have different localizations at the organ and tissue levels. These studies provide a basis to clarify the role of particular anthocyanin species during abiotic stress. PMID:26179363

  6. Stress, stress-induced cortisol responses, and eyewitness identification performance.

    PubMed

    Sauerland, Melanie; Raymaekers, Linsey H C; Otgaar, Henry; Memon, Amina; Waltjen, Thijs T; Nivo, Maud; Slegers, Chiel; Broers, Nick J; Smeets, Tom

    2016-07-01

    In the eyewitness identification literature, stress and arousal at the time of encoding are considered to adversely influence identification performance. This assumption is in contrast with findings from the neurobiology field of learning and memory, showing that stress and stress hormones are critically involved in forming enduring memories. This discrepancy may be related to methodological differences between the two fields of research, such as the tendency for immediate testing or the use of very short (1-2 hours) retention intervals in eyewitness research, while neurobiology studies insert at least 24 hours. Other differences refer to the extent to which stress-responsive systems (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) are stimulated effectively under laboratory conditions. The aim of the current study was to conduct an experiment that accounts for the contemporary state of knowledge in both fields. In all, 123 participants witnessed a live staged theft while being exposed to a laboratory stressor that reliably elicits autonomic and glucocorticoid stress responses or while performing a control task. Salivary cortisol levels were measured to control for the effectiveness of the stress induction. One week later, participants attempted to identify the thief from target-present and target-absent line-ups. According to regression and receiver operating characteristic analyses, stress did not have robust detrimental effects on identification performance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 The Authors Behavioral Sciences & the Law Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Heavy metal-induced glutathione accumulation and its role in heavy metal detoxification in Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Piao; Liu, Liang; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Zhao, Meihua; Huang, Chao; Li, Ningjie; Wei, Zhen; Wu, Haipeng; Zhang, Chen; Lai, Mingyong; He, Yibin

    2014-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium are known to be vital hyperaccumulation species for heavy metal removal with admirable intracellular bioaccumulation capacity. This study analyzes the heavy metal-induced glutathione (GSH) accumulation and the regulation at the intracellular heavy metal level in P. chrysosporium. P. chrysosporium accumulated high levels of GSH, accompanied with high intracellular concentrations of Pb and Cd. Pb bioaccumulation lead to a narrow range of fluctuation in GSH accumulation (0.72-0.84 μmol), while GSH plummeted under Cd exposure at the maximum value of 0.37 μmol. Good correlations between time-course GSH depletion and Cd bioaccumulation were determined (R (2) > 0.87), while no significant correlations have been found between GSH variation and Pb bioaccumulation (R (2) < 0.38). Significantly, concentration-dependent molar ratios of Pb/GSH ranging from 0.10 to 0.18 were observed, while molar ratios of Cd/GSH were at the scope of 1.53-3.32, confirming the dominant role of GSH in Cd chelation. The study also demonstrated that P. chrysosporium showed considerable hypertolerance to Pb ions, accompanied with demand-driven stimulation in GSH synthesis and unconspicuous generation of reactive oxygen stress. GSH plummeted dramatically response to Cd exposure, due to the strong affinity of GSH to Cd and the involvement of GSH in Cd detoxification mechanism mainly as Cd chelators. Investigations into GSH metabolism and its role in ameliorating metal toxicity can offer important information on the application of the microorganism for wastewater treatment.

  8. Heavy-metal-induced reactive oxygen species: phytotoxicity and physicochemical changes in plants.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Pourrut, Bertrand; Dumat, Camille; Nadeem, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Pinelli, Eric

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the industrial revolution, anthropogenic activities have enhanced there distribution of many toxic heavy metals from the earth's crust to different environmental compartments. Environmental pollution by toxic heavy metals is increasing worldwide, and poses a rising threat to both the environment and to human health.Plants are exposed to heavy metals from various sources: mining and refining of ores, fertilizer and pesticide applications, battery chemicals, disposal of solid wastes(including sewage sludge), irrigation with wastewater, vehicular exhaust emissions and adjacent industrial activity.Heavy metals induce various morphological, physiological, and biochemical dysfunctions in plants, either directly or indirectly, and cause various damaging effects. The most frequently documented and earliest consequence of heavy metal toxicity in plants cells is the overproduction of ROS. Unlike redox-active metals such as iron and copper, heavy metals (e.g, Pb, Cd, Ni, AI, Mn and Zn) cannot generate ROS directly by participating in biological redox reactions such as Haber Weiss/Fenton reactions. However, these metals induce ROS generation via different indirect mechanisms, such as stimulating the activity of NADPH oxidases, displacing essential cations from specific binding sites of enzymes and inhibiting enzymatic activities from their affinity for -SH groups on the enzyme.Under normal conditions, ROS play several essential roles in regulating the expression of different genes. Reactive oxygen species control numerous processes like the cell cycle, plant growth, abiotic stress responses, systemic signalling, programmed cell death, pathogen defence and development. Enhanced generation of these species from heavy metal toxicity deteriorates the intrinsic antioxidant defense system of cells, and causes oxidative stress. Cells with oxidative stress display various chemical,biological and physiological toxic symptoms as a result of the interaction between ROS and

  9. Assessment of fission-gas-induced transient swelling in metallic fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Sevy, R H; Cahalan, J E

    1985-03-01

    A model for fission-gas-induced transient swelling in metallic fuel is described. An observation that the strength of metallic fuel becomes very small at a temperature several hundred degrees below the solidus forms the basis for an assumption that, above this temperature, the fuel proceeds through a series of stress-free equilibrium states for a large range of heating rates. Gas bubble coalescence and growth and any effects from ingested sodium are ignored such that the model may tend to underestimate swelling in some circumstances. The fuel swelling model is used to predict the reactivity effect of fission-gas-induced axial expansion of metallic fuel during transient overpower excursions. Comparisons to oxide fuel behavior are made. Sensitivity of results to metallic fuel modeling assumptions are assessed in a parametric study.

  10. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  11. Experimentally induced stress validated by EMG activity.

    PubMed

    Luijcks, Rosan; Hermens, Hermie J; Bodar, Lonneke; Vossen, Catherine J; Van Os, Jim; Lousberg, Richel

    2014-01-01

    Experience of stress may lead to increased electromyography (EMG) activity in specific muscles compared to a non-stressful situation. The main aim of this study was to develop and validate a stress-EMG paradigm in which a single uncontrollable and unpredictable nociceptive stimulus was presented. EMG activity of the trapezius muscles was the response of interest. In addition to linear time effects, non-linear EMG time courses were also examined. Taking into account the hierarchical structure of the dataset, a multilevel random regression model was applied. The stress paradigm, executed in N = 70 subjects, consisted of a 3-minute baseline measurement, a 3-minute pre-stimulus stress period and a 2-minute post-stimulus phase. Subjects were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. EMG activity during the entire experiment was conform a priori expectations: the pre-stimulus phase showed a significantly higher mean EMG activity level compared to the other two phases, and an immediate EMG response to the stimulus was demonstrated. In addition, the analyses revealed significant non-linear EMG time courses in all three phases. Linear and quadratic EMG time courses were significantly modified by subjective anticipatory stress level, measured just before the start of the stress task. Linking subjective anticipatory stress to EMG stress reactivity revealed that subjects with a high anticipatory stress level responded with more EMG activity during the pre-stimulus stress phase, whereas subjects with a low stress level showed an inverse effect. Results suggest that the stress paradigm presented here is a valid test to quantify individual differences in stress susceptibility. Further studies with this paradigm are required to demonstrate its potential use in mechanistic clinical studies.

  12. Horizontal stresses induced by vertical processes in planetary lithospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerdt, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the state of stress in the elastic lithosphere is of fundamental importance for planetary geophysics, as it is the link between the observed geologic structures on the surface and the processes which form and modify these structures. As such, it can provide valuable constraints for the difficult problem of determining interior structure and processes. On the Earth, most large scale, organized deformation can be related to lateral tectonics associated with plate dynamics; however, the tectonics on many extraterrestrial bodies (such as the Moon, Mars, and most of the outer-planet satellites) appears to be primarily vertical in nature, and the horizontal stresses induced by vertical motions and loads are expected to dominate the deformation of their lithospheres. The largest stress contributions from vertical loading come from the flexure of the lithosphere, which induces both bending moments and membrane stresses. We are concerned here only with nonflexural changes in the state of stress induced by processes such as sedimentary and volcanic deposition, erosional denudation, and changes in the thermal gradient that induce uplift or subsidence. This analysis is important both for evaluating stresses for specific regions in which the vertical stress history can be estimated, as well as for applying the proper loading conditions to global stress models. It is also of interest for providing a reference state of stress for interpreting stress measurements in the crust of the Earth.

  13. Biological effects of laser-induced stress waves

    SciTech Connect

    Doukas, A.; Lee, S.; McAuliffe, D.

    1995-12-31

    Laser-induced stress waves can be generated by one of the following mechanisms: Optical breakdown, ablation or rapid heating of an absorbing medium. These three modes of laser interaction with matter allow the investigation of cellular and tissue responses to stress waves with different characteristics and under different conditions. The most widely studied phenomena are those of the collateral damage seen in photodisruption in the eye and in 193 run ablation of cornea and skin. On the other hand, the therapeutic application of laser-induced stress waves has been limited to the disruption of noncellular material such as renal stones, atheromatous plaque and vitreous strands. The effects of stress waves to cells and tissues can be quite disparate. Stress waves can fracture tissue, damage cells, and increase the permeability of the plasma membrane. The viability of cell cultures exposed to stress waves increases with the peak stress and the number of pulses applied. The rise time of the stress wave also influences the degree of cell injury. In fact, cell viability, as measured by thymidine incorporation, correlates better with the stress gradient than peak stress. Recent studies have also established that stress waves induce a transient increase of the permeability of the plasma membrane in vitro. In addition, if the stress gradient is below the damage threshhold, the cells remain viable. Thus, stress waves can be useful as a means of drug delivery, increasing the intracellular drug concentration and allowing the use of drugs which are impermeable to the cell membrane. The present studies show that it is important to create controllable stress waves. The wavelength tunability and the micropulse structure of the free electron laser is ideal for generating stress waves with independently adjustable parameters, such as rise time, duration and peak stress.

  14. Shear stress-driven refreshing capability of plastic deformation in nanolayered metals.

    PubMed

    Yan, J W; Zhu, X F; Yang, B; Zhang, G P

    2013-04-12

    Severely localized deformation within shear bands can occur much more easily in a metal with nanoscale microstructures, such as nanograined and nanolayered materials. Based on atomic-scale observations, here we show that such locally large deformation (the continuous thinning of the layers) within the indentation-induced shear bands of the Cu/Au nanolayers is essentially attributed to the large shear stress component along the interface, which can refresh the capability of the interface to absorb incoming dislocations through unlocking the product of the dislocation-interface reaction. The results have implications for understanding the interface-mediated mechanisms of plastic deformation and for the engineering application of severe plastic deformation processing of metals at nanoscales.

  15. Substructural organization, dislocation plasticity and harmonic generation in cyclically stressed wavy slip metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantrell, John H.

    2004-03-01

    Organized substructural arrangements of dislocations formed in wavy slip, face-centred-cubic metals during cyclic stress-induced fatigue are shown analytically to engender a substantial nonlinearity in the microelastic-plastic deformation resulting from an impressed stress perturbation. The non-Hookean stress-strain relationship is quantified by a material nonlinearity parameter b that for a given fatigue state is highly sensitive to the volume fractions of veins and persistent slip bands (PSBs), PSB internal stresses, dislocation multipole configurations, dislocation loop lengths, dipole heights and the densities of secondary dislocations in the substructures. The effects on b of vacancy, microcrack and macrocrack formation are also addressed. The connection between b and acoustic harmonic generation is obtained. The model is applied to calculations of b for fatigued polycrystalline nickel as a function of per cent life to fracture. For cyclic stress-controlled loading at 241 MPa, the model predicts a monotonic increase in b of ca. 360% over the fatigue life. For strain-controlled loading at a total strain of 1.75 × 10-3, a monotonic increase in b of ca. 375% over the fatigue life is predicted.

  16. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7.

    PubMed

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-09-29

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments.

  17. Heavy Metal Induced Antibiotic Resistance in Bacterium LSJC7

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songcan; Li, Xiaomin; Sun, Guoxin; Zhang, Yingjiao; Su, Jianqiang; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotics and heavy metals prevails in the environment, and may play an important role in disseminating bacterial antibiotic resistance, but the selective effects of heavy metals on bacterial antibiotic resistance is largely unclear. To investigate this, the effects of heavy metals on antibiotic resistance were studied in a genome-sequenced bacterium, LSJC7. The results showed that the presence of arsenate, copper, and zinc were implicated in fortifying the resistance of LSJC7 towards tetracycline. The concentrations of heavy metals required to induce antibiotic resistance, i.e., the minimum heavy metal concentrations (MHCs), were far below (up to 64-fold) the minimum inhibition concentrations (MIC) of LSJC7. This finding indicates that the relatively low heavy metal levels in polluted environments and in treated humans and animals might be sufficient to induce bacterial antibiotic resistance. In addition, heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance was also observed for a combination of arsenate and chloramphenicol in LSJC7, and copper/zinc and tetracycline in antibiotic susceptible strain Escherichia coli DH5α. Overall, this study implies that heavy metal induced antibiotic resistance might be ubiquitous among various microbial species and suggests that it might play a role in the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance in metal and antibiotic co-contaminated environments. PMID:26426011

  18. Sertraline induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Couch, Letha; Iyer, Advait; Wu, Yuanfeng; Li, Quan-Zhen; Guo, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Sertraline is used for the treatment of depression, and is also used for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity, with mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis being underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used microarray and other biochemical and molecular analyses to identify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a novel molecular mechanism. HepG2 cells were exposed to sertraline and subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that ER stress is among the significantly affected biological changes. We confirmed the increased expression of ER stress makers by real-time PCR and Western blots. The expression of typical ER stress markers such as PERK, IRE1α, and CHOP was significantly increased. To study better ER stress-mediated drug-induced liver toxicity; we established in vitro systems for monitoring ER stress quantitatively and efficiently, using Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as ER stress reporters. These in vitro systems were validated using well-known ER stress inducers. In these two reporter assays, sertraline inhibited the secretion of Gluc and SEAP. Moreover, we demonstrated that sertraline-induced apoptosis was coupled to ER stress and that the apoptotic effect was attenuated by 4-phenylbutyrate, a potent ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we showed that the MAP4K4-JNK signaling pathway contributed to the process of sertraline-induced ER stress. In summary, we demonstrated that ER stress is a mechanism of sertraline-induced liver toxicity.

  19. Stress antagonizes morphine-induced analgesia in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, J.; Shannon, L.; Heybach, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Exposure to restraint stress resulted in antagonism of the analgesic effect of administered morphine in adult male rats. This antagonism of morphine-induced analgesia by restraint stress was not affected by adrenalectomy one day prior to testing, suggesting that stress-induced secretion of corticosteroids is not critical to this antagonism. In addition, parenteral administration of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) mimicked the effect of stress in antagonizing morphine's analgesic efficacy. The hypothesis that ACTH is an endogenous opiate antagonist involved in modulating pain sensitivity is supported.

  20. Transition metal-induced degradation of a pharmaceutical compound in reversed-phase liquid chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinggang; He, Brian Lingfeng; Zhang, Jin; Huang, Yande; Kleintop, Brent; Raglione, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Drug degradation that occurs in HPLC analysis, during either sample preparation or chromatographic separation, can greatly impact method robustness and result accuracy. In this work, we report a case study of drug dimerization in HPLC analysis where proximate causes were attributed to either the LC columns or the HPLC instrument. Solution stress studies indicated that the same pseudo-dimeric degradants could also be formed rapidly when the compound was exposed to certain oxidative transition metal ions, such as Cu(II) and Fe(III). Two pseudo-dimeric degradants were isolated from transition metal stressed samples and their structures were elucidated. A degradation pathway was proposed, whereby the degradation was initiated through transition metal-induced single electron transfer oxidation. Further studies confirmed that the dimerization was induced by trace transition metals in the HPLC flow path, which could arise from either the stainless steel frits in the LC column or stainless steel tubing in the HPLC instrument. Various procedures to prevent transition metal-induced drug degradation were explored, and a general strategy to mitigate such risks is briefly discussed.

  1. Aluminum Induces Oxidative Stress Genes in Arabidopsis thaliana1

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Keith D.; Schott, Eric J.; Sharma, Yogesh K.; Davis, Keith R.; Gardner, Richard C.

    1998-01-01

    Changes in gene expression induced by toxic levels of Al were characterized to investigate the nature of Al stress. A cDNA library was constructed from Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with Al for 2 h. We identified five cDNA clones that showed a transient induction of their mRNA levels, four cDNA clones that showed a longer induction period, and two down-regulated genes. Expression of the four long-term-induced genes remained at elevated levels for at least 48 h. The genes encoded peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, blue copper-binding protein, and a protein homologous to the reticuline:oxygen oxidoreductase enzyme. Three of these genes are known to be induced by oxidative stresses and the fourth is induced by pathogen treatment. Another oxidative stress gene, superoxide dismutase, and a gene for Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor were also induced by Al in A. thaliana. These results suggested that Al treatment of Arabidopsis induces oxidative stress. In confirmation of this hypothesis, three of four genes induced by Al stress in A. thaliana were also shown to be induced by ozone. Our results demonstrate that oxidative stress is an important component of the plant's reaction to toxic levels of Al. PMID:9449849

  2. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    Arginine deiminase as a novel therapy for prostate cancer induces autophagy and caspase-independent apoptosis. Cancer Research, 69(2):700-708...TITLE: Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell death in prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Richard Bold, MD...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Metabolic stress induced by arginine deprivation induces autophagy cell 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER death in prostate cancer 5b

  3. The effect of weld stresses on weld quality. [stress fields and metal cracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chihoski, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    A narrow heat source raises the temperature of a spot on a solid piece of material like metal. The high temperature of the spot decreases with distance from the spot. This is true whether the heat source is an arc, a flame, an electron beam, a plasma jet, a laser beam, or any other source of intense, narrowly defined heat. Stress and strain fields around a moving heat source are organized into a coherent visible system. It is shown that five stresses act across the weld line in turn as an arc passes. Their proportions and positions are considerably altered by weld parameters or condition changes. These pushes and pulls affect the metallurgical character and integrity of the weld area even when there is no apparent difference between after-the-fact examples.

  4. Differential gene expressions in arbuscular mycorrhizal-colonized tomato grown under heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Ouziad, Fouad; Hildebrandt, Ulrich; Schmelzer, Elmon; Bothe, Hermann

    2005-06-01

    -colonized roots. A suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) Library from hyphae of the AMF G. intraradices grown in high versus low Zn++ provided none of the genes which were down-regulated at the plant side (mt or Nramp genes). In contrast, several gene sequences coding for enzymes potentially catalysing the detoxification of reactive oxygen species were found. Thus the fungal cells in the symbiosis may primarily have to cope with the heavy metal-induced oxidative stress.

  5. Drilling-induced core fractures and in situ stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongyi; Schmitt, Douglas R.

    1998-03-01

    The relationship between the shapes of drilling-induced core fractures and the in situ state of stress is developed. The stress concentrations at the well bore bottom are first determined using a complete three-dimensional finite element analysis. Existing in situ compressional stresses generate large tensions in the immediate vicinity of the bottom hole which are sufficient to rupture the rock. Tensile fracture trajectories within these concentrated stress fields are predicted using a simple model of fracture propagation. These modeled fracture trajectories resemble well the observed shapes of drilling-induced core disking, petal, and petal-centerline fractures. Further, this agreement suggests that both the shape of the drilling-induced fracture and the location at which it initiates depends on the in situ stress state existing in the rock mass prior to drilling; the core fractures contain substantial information on in situ stress conditions. In all faulting regimes the coring-induced fractures initiate near the bit cut except for most cases under thrust faulting regime where the fracture initiates on the well bore axis. Further, under thrust faulting conditions only disk fractures appear possible. Both petal and disking fractures can be produced in strike-slip and normal faulting regimes depending upon the relative magnitudes between the least compressive horizontal principal stress and the vertical overburden stress. The predicted fracture shapes are in good qualitative agreement with observations of drilling-induced fractures described in the literature from laboratory experiments and field programs in which in situ stresses are measured by other means. The relationship of the morphology of coring induced fractures and in situ stresses suggests that the fractures can be used as independent complementary indicators in identifying stress regimes.

  6. Stress-induced changes in wheat grain composition and quality.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stresses such as drought, salinity, waterlogging, and high temperature cause a myriad of changes in the metabolism of plants, and there is a lot of overlap in these changes in plants in response to different stresses such as drought and salinity. These stress-induced metabolic changes cause impaired crop growth thereby resulting in poor yield. The metabolic changes taking place in several plant species due to a particular abiotic stress have been revealed from the whole plant to the molecular level by researchers, but most studies have focused on organs such as leaf, stem, and root. Information on such stress-induced changes in seed or grains is infrequent in the literature. From the information that is available, it is now evident that abiotic stress can induce considerable changes in the composition and quality of cereal grains including those of wheat, the premier staple food crop in the world. Thus, the present review discusses how far different types of stresses, mainly salinity, drought, high temperature, and waterlogging, can alter the wheat grain composition and quality. By fully uncovering the stress-induced changes in the nutritional values of wheat grains it would be possible to establish whether balanced supplies of essential nutrients are available to the human population from the wheat crop grown on stress-affected areas.

  7. Evaluation of the metal phytoextraction potential of crop legumes. Regulation of the expression of O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase under metal stress.

    PubMed

    Pajuelo, E; Carrasco, J A; Romero, L C; Chamber, M A; Gotor, C

    2007-09-01

    The metal phytoextraction potential of three legumes belonging to different genera has been studied under greenhouse conditions. Legumes accumulate As and metals mainly in roots, although translocation to shoot is observed. Alfalfa did accumulate the highest concentrations of As and metals in shoots and aerial biomass was less affected by the toxic elements, indicating its good behaviour in phytoextraction. Clover accumulated less metal, but showed larger biomass. EDTA addition enhanced Pb phytoextraction up to levels similar to those described for plants proposed in phytoremediation. The regulation of O-acetylserine (thiol)lyase from legumes under metal stress has been analysed to test the possibility of establishing a possible correlation between the expression of OASTL in the presence of the metals and the metal accumulation in legume plant tissues. Cd and Pb(EDTA) produce the strongest increases of OASTL activity, with the higher enhancement seen in roots, in parallel with the higher metal accumulation. Arsenic produced an increase of root enzyme activity, whereas Cu produced a decrease, mainly in shoots. Western blots using antibodies against an A. THALIANA cytosolic OAS-TL recognised up to five protein bands in crude extracts from LOTUS and clover. A low molecular weight isoform of 32 kDa was induced in the presence of Cd and Pb. A partial RT-PCR sequence from clover has been obtained, showing 86 - 97 % identity with other described OASTLs. The PCR fragment has been used to analyse OASTL mRNA levels of legumes under metal stress. OASTL transcripts were increased by As, Cd, and Pb, especially in roots, where metal accumulation was maximal, while Cu produced a decrease in the transcript levels.

  8. Polyamines and heavy metal stress: the antioxidant behavior of spermine in cadmium- and copper-treated wheat leaves.

    PubMed

    Groppa, María D; Tomaro, María L; Benavides, María P

    2007-04-01

    Polyamine metabolism, as well as spermine (Spm) antioxidant properties, were studied in wheat leaves under Cd2+ or Cu2+ stress. The oxidative damage produced by both metals was evidenced by an increased of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and a significant decrease in glutathione under both metal treatments. Ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities were reduced by both metals to values ranging from 30% to 64% of the control values. Conversely, copper produced a raise in superoxide dismutase activity. The high putrescine (Put) content detected under Cd2+ stress (282% over the control) was induced by the increased activity of both enzymes involved in Put biosynthesis, arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC). However, only ODC activity was increased in wheat leaves subjected to Cu2+ stress, leading to a lower Put rise (89% over the controls). Spermidine (Spd) content was not affected by metal treatments, while Spm was significantly reduced. Pretreatment with Spm completely reverted the metals-induced TBARS increase whereas metals-dependent H2O2 deposition on leaf segments (revealed using diaminobenzidine), was considerably reduced in Spm pretreated leaf segments. This polyamine failed to reverse the depletion in APOX activity and glutathione (GSH) content produced by Cd2+ and Cu2+, although it showed an efficient antioxidant behavior in the restoration of GR activity to control values. These results suggest that Spm could be exerting a certain antioxidant function by protecting the tissues from the metals-induced oxidative damage, though this effect was not enough to completely avoid Cd2+ and Cu2+ effect on certain antioxidant enzymes, though the precise mechanism of protection still needs to be elucidated.

  9. Paint coating characterization for thermoelastic stress analysis of metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. F.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Quinn, S.; Burguete, R. L.

    2010-08-01

    In thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) it is normal practice to coat metallic specimens with black paint to enhance and standardize the surface emissivity. It is assumed that the paint coating has no effect on the thermal emission from the specimen, but it is well known that the response is sensitive to paint coating thickness, particularly at higher frequencies. In this paper the effects of loading frequency and paint coating thickness on the thermoelastic response are investigated. The thermoelastic response is compared to theory, and optimum test conditions and coating characteristics are suggested. The motivation for the work is to develop a TSA-based means of residual stress assessment, where the measurement of much smaller temperature changes than those that are resolved in standard TSA is required; therefore the analysis is much more sensitive to the effects of the paint coating. However, the work presented in this paper is relevant to a wide range of TSA investigations and presents data that will be of interest to all practitioners of TSA.

  10. Salubrious effects of oxytocin on social stress-induced deficits.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam S; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-03-01

    Social relationships are a fundamental aspect of life, affecting social, psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. While positive social interactions can attenuate stress and promote health, the social environment can also be a major source of stress when it includes social disruption, confrontation, isolation, or neglect. Social stress can impair the basal function and stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, impairing function of multiple biological systems and posing a risk to mental and physical health. In contrast, social support can ameliorate stress-induced physiological and immunological deficits, reducing the risk of subsequent psychological distress and improving an individual's overall well-being. For better clinical treatment of these physiological and mental pathologies, it is necessary to understand the regulatory mechanisms of stress-induced pathologies as well as determine the underlying biological mechanisms that regulate social buffering of the stress system. A number of ethologically relevant animal models of social stress and species that form strong adult social bonds have been utilized to study the etiology, treatment, and prevention of stress-related disorders. While undoubtedly a number of biological pathways contribute to the social buffering of the stress response, the convergence of evidence denotes the regulatory effects of oxytocin in facilitating social bond-promoting behaviors and their effect on the stress response. Thus, oxytocin may be perceived as a common regulatory element of the social environment, stress response, and stress-induced risks on mental and physical health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior.

  11. Caffeine attenuated ER stress-induced leptin resistance in neurons.

    PubMed

    Hosoi, Toru; Toyoda, Keisuke; Nakatsu, Kanako; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-05-21

    Exposing the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to stress causes the accumulation of unfolded proteins, and subsequently results in ER stress. ER stress may be involved in various disorders such as obesity, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. Leptin is an important circulating hormone, that inhibits food intake and accelerates energy consumption, which suppresses body weight gain. Recent studies demonstrated that leptin resistance is one of the main factors involved in the development of obesity. We and other groups recently reported the role of ER stress in the development of leptin resistance. Therefore, identifying drugs that target ER stress may be a promising fundamental strategy for the treatment of obesity. In the present study, we investigated whether caffeine could affect ER stress and the subsequent development of leptin resistance. We showed that caffeine exhibited chaperone activity, which attenuated protein aggregation. Caffeine also inhibited the ER stress-induced activation of IRE1 and PERK, which suggested the attenuation of ER stress. Moreover, caffeine markedly improved ER stress-induced impairments in the leptin-induced phosphorylation of STAT3. Therefore, these results suggest caffeine may have pharmacological properties that ameliorate leptin resistance by reducing ER stress.

  12. Neurobiology of Stress-Induced Reproductive Dysfunction In Female Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Centeno, Maria Luisa; Cameron, Judy L.

    2012-01-01

    It is now well accepted that stress can precipitate mental and physical illness. However, it is becoming clear that given the same stress, some individuals are very vulnerable and will succumb to illness while others are more resilient and cope effectively, rather than becoming ill. This difference between individuals is called stress sensitivity. Stress-sensitivity of an individual appears to be influenced by genetically inherited factors, early life (even prenatal) stress, and by the presence or absence of factors that provide protection from stress. In comparison to other stress-related diseases, the concept of sensitivity versus resilience to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction has received relatively little attention. The studies presented herein were undertaken to begin to identify stable characteristics and the neural underpinnings of individuals with sensitivity to stress-induced reproductive dysfunction. Female cynomolgus macaques with normal menstrual cycles either stop ovulating (Stress Sensitive) or to continue to ovulate (Stress Resilient) upon exposure to a combined metabolic and psychosocial stress. However, even in the absence of stress, the stress sensitive animals have lower secretion of the ovarian steroids, estrogen and progesterone, have higher heart rates, have lower serotonin function, have fewer serotonin neurons and lower expression of pivotal serotonin-related genes, have lower expression of 5HT2A and 2C genes in the hypothalamus, have higher gene expression of GAD67 and CRH in the hypothalamus and have reduced GnRH transport to the anterior pituitary. Altogether, the results suggest that the neurobiology of reproductive circuits in stress sensitive individuals is compromised. We speculate that with the application of stress, the dysfunction of these neural systems becomes exacerbated and reproductive function ceases. PMID:18931961

  13. Acute restraint stress induces endothelial dysfunction: role of vasoconstrictor prostanoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Carda, Ana P P; Marchi, Katia C; Rizzi, Elen; Mecawi, André S; Antunes-Rodrigues, José; Padovan, Claudia M; Tirapelli, Carlos R

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that acute stress would induce endothelial dysfunction. Male Wistar rats were restrained for 2 h within wire mesh. Functional and biochemical analyses were conducted 24 h after the 2-h period of restraint. Stressed rats showed decreased exploration on the open arms of an elevated-plus maze (EPM) and increased plasma corticosterone concentration. Acute restraint stress did not alter systolic blood pressure, whereas it increased the in vitro contractile response to phenylephrine and serotonin in endothelium-intact rat aortas. NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME; nitric oxide synthase, NOS, inhibitor) did not alter the contraction induced by phenylephrine in aortic rings from stressed rats. Tiron, indomethacin and SQ29548 reversed the increase in the contractile response to phenylephrine induced by restraint stress. Increased systemic and vascular oxidative stress was evident in stressed rats. Restraint stress decreased plasma and vascular nitrate/nitrite (NOx) concentration and increased aortic expression of inducible (i) NOS, but not endothelial (e) NOS. Reduced expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1, but not COX-2, was observed in aortas from stressed rats. Restraint stress increased thromboxane (TX)B(2) (stable TXA(2) metabolite) concentration but did not affect prostaglandin (PG)F2α concentration in the aorta. Restraint reduced superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, whereas concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were not affected. The major new finding of our study is that restraint stress increases vascular contraction by an endothelium-dependent mechanism that involves increased oxidative stress and the generation of COX-derived vasoconstrictor prostanoids. Such stress-induced endothelial dysfunction could predispose to the development of cardiovascular diseases.

  14. The diversity of nitric oxide function in plant responses to metal stress.

    PubMed

    He, Huyi; He, Longfei; Gu, Minghua

    2014-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) emerges as signalling molecule, which is involved in diverse physiological processes in plants. High mobility metal interferes with NO signaling. The exogenous NO alleviates metal stress, whereas endogenous NO contributes to metal toxicity in plants. Owing to different cellular localization and concentration, NO may act as multifunctional regulator in plant responses to metal stress. It not only plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression, but serves as a long-distance signal. Through tight modulation of redox signaling, the integration among NO, reactive oxygen species and stress-related hormones in plants determines whether plants stimulate death pathway or activate survival signaling.

  15. FMRFamide signaling promotes stress-induced sleep in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Olivia; Xiong, Jianmei; Nelson, Matthew D; Raizen, David M; Williams, Julie A

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced sleep in response to cellular stress is a conserved adaptive behavior across multiple species, but the mechanism of this process is poorly understood. Drosophila melanogaster increases sleep following exposure to septic or aseptic injury, and Caenorhabditis elegans displays sleep-like quiescence following exposure to high temperatures that stress cells. We show here that, similar to C. elegans, Drosophila responds to heat stress with an increase in sleep. In contrast to Drosophila infection-induced sleep, heat-induced sleep is not sensitive to the time-of-day of the heat pulse. Moreover, the sleep response to heat stress does not require Relish, the NFκB transcription factor that is necessary for infection-induced sleep, indicating that sleep is induced by multiple mechanisms from different stress modalities. We identify a sleep-regulating role for a signaling pathway involving FMRFamide neuropeptides and their receptor FR. Animals mutant for either FMRFamide or for the FMRFamide receptor (FR) have a reduced recovery sleep in response to heat stress. FR mutants, in addition, show reduced sleep responses following infection with Serratia marcescens, and succumb to infection at a faster rate than wild-type controls. Together, these findings support the hypothesis that FMRFamide and its receptor promote an adaptive increase in sleep following stress. Because an FMRFamide-like neuropeptide plays a similar role in C. elegans, we propose that FRMFamide neuropeptide signaling is an ancient regulator of recovery sleep which occurs in response to cellular stress.

  16. R&D 100, 2016: Stress-Induced Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Hongyou; Brennan, Tom; Wise, Jack; Liu, Sheng; Hickman, Randy

    2016-11-07

    Stress-induced fabrication (SIF) uses compressive mechanical stress to create new nanomaterials with lower production costs and enhanced materials performance compared to traditional fabrication routes. Simple, innovative, and with more degrees of freedom than current chemical synthesis methods, SIF uses physical force instead of chemistry applied to form new nanomaterials with precisely controlled structure and tunable properties.

  17. R&D 100, 2016: Stress-Induced Fabrication

    ScienceCinema

    Fan, Hongyou; Brennan, Tom; Wise, Jack; Liu, Sheng; Hickman, Randy

    2016-12-09

    Stress-induced fabrication (SIF) uses compressive mechanical stress to create new nanomaterials with lower production costs and enhanced materials performance compared to traditional fabrication routes. Simple, innovative, and with more degrees of freedom than current chemical synthesis methods, SIF uses physical force instead of chemistry applied to form new nanomaterials with precisely controlled structure and tunable properties.

  18. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  19. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  20. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling.

  1. Heat stress-induced life span extension in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shama, S; Lai, C Y; Antoniazzi, J M; Jiang, J C; Jazwinski, S M

    1998-12-15

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited life span that can be measured by the number of times individual cells divide. Several genetic manipulations have been shown to prolong the yeast life span. However, environmental effects that extend longevity have been largely ignored. We have found that mild, nonlethal heat stress extended yeast life span when it was administered transiently early in life. The increased longevity was due to a reduction in the mortality rate that persisted over many cell divisions (generations) but was not permanent. The genes RAS1 and RAS2 were necessary to observe this effect of heat stress. The RAS2 gene is consistently required for maintenance of life span when heat stress is chronic or in its extension when heat stress is transient or absent altogether. RAS1, on the other hand, appears to have a role in signaling life extension induced by transient, mild heat stress, which is distinct from its life-span-curtailing effect in the absence of stress and its lack of involvement in the response to chronic heat stress. This distinction between the RAS genes may be partially related to their different effects on growth-promoting genes and stress-responsive genes. The ras2 mutation clearly hindered resumption of growth and recovery from stress, while the ras1 mutation did not. The HSP104 gene, which is largely responsible for induced thermotolerance in yeast, was necessary for life extension induced by transient heat stress. An interaction between mitochondrial petite mutations and heat stress was found, suggesting that mitochondria may be necessary for life extension by transient heat stress. The results raise the possibility that the RAS genes and mitochondria may play a role in the epigenetic inheritance of reduced mortality rate afforded by transient, mild heat stress.

  2. Cadmium and mercury cause an oxidative stress-induced endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Matthew B; Baynes, John W

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the ability of cadmium and mercury ions to cause endothelial dysfunction in bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. Exposure of monolayers for 48 h to metal concentrations greater than 3-5 microM produced profound cytotoxicity (increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage), a permeability barrier failure, depletion of glutathione and ATP and almost complete inhibition of the activity of key thiol enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In contrast, metal concentrations less than 1-2 microM induced increases in glutathione and thiol-enzyme activities with minimal changes in LDH leakage, barrier function and ATP content. At shorter incubation times (24 h or less), high concentrations of cadmium caused glutathione induction rather than depletion. Thus, oxidative stress and cytotoxicity induced by lower concentrations of the metal ions stimulate compensatory responses, including increased synthesis of glutathione, which presumably preserved the activity of key thiol enzymes, however these responses were not sustainable at higher metal ion concentrations. We conclude, while high concentrations of heavy metals are cytotoxic, lower concentration induce a compensatory protective response, which may explain threshold effects in metal-ion toxicity.

  3. Stress Inducement: The Silent Combat Multiplier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-19

    Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College Fort Leavenworth, Kansas First Term AY 91-92 Approved for PNbfic Rcke...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED IU. ABSTRACT (Ma&tmum2OworW) SEE ATTACHED 14. SUBJECT TERMS IS. NUMBER OF PAGES STRESS PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF...advantage by taking actions which increase enemy stress levels. The psychological dimensions of the modern battlefield are examined to determine if factors

  4. Influence of engineered interfaces on residual stresses and mechanical response in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, Steven M.; Wilt, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Because of the inherent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch between fiber and matrix within metal and intermetallic matrix composite systems, high residual stresses can develop under various thermal loading conditions. These conditions include cooling from processing temperature to room temperature as well as subsequent thermal cycling. As a result of these stresses, within certain composite systems, radial, circumferential, and/or longitudinal cracks have been observed to form at the fiber matrix interface region. A number of potential solutions for reducing this thermally induced residual stress field have been proposed recently. Examples of some potential solutions are high CTE fibers, fiber preheating, thermal anneal treatments, and an engineered interface. Here the focus is on designing an interface (by using a compensating/compliant layer concept) to reduce or eliminate the thermal residual stress field and, therefore, the initiation and propagation of cracks developed during thermal loading. Furthermore, the impact of the engineered interface on the composite's mechanical response when subjected to isothermal mechanical load histories is examined.

  5. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  6. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility.

  7. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Steeves, Arthur F.; Stewart, James C.

    1981-01-01

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  8. Overlapping double etch technique for evaluation of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1980-05-28

    A double overlapping etch zone technique for evaluation of the resistance of metallic alloys to stress corrosion cracking is described. The technique involves evaluating the metallic alloy along the line of demarcation between an overlapping double etch zone and single etch zone formed on the metallic alloy surface.

  9. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    PubMed Central

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems. PMID:27488954

  10. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals.

    PubMed

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F; O'Mullane, Anthony P; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-04

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  11. Ionic imbalance induced self-propulsion of liquid metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavabeti, Ali; Daeneke, Torben; Chrimes, Adam F.; O'Mullane, Anthony P.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Mitchell, Arnan; Khoshmanesh, Khashayar; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2016-08-01

    Components with self-propelling abilities are important building blocks of small autonomous systems and the characteristics of liquid metals are capable of fulfilling self-propulsion criteria. To date, there has been no exploration regarding the effect of electrolyte ionic content surrounding a liquid metal for symmetry breaking that generates motion. Here we show the controlled actuation of liquid metal droplets using only the ionic properties of the aqueous electrolyte. We demonstrate that pH or ionic concentration gradients across a liquid metal droplet induce both deformation and surface Marangoni flow. We show that the Lippmann dominated deformation results in maximum velocity for the self-propulsion of liquid metal droplets and illustrate several key applications, which take advantage of such electrolyte-induced motion. With this finding, it is possible to conceive the propulsion of small entities that are constructed and controlled entirely with fluids, progressing towards more advanced soft systems.

  12. Physiological characterization of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii acclimated to chronic stress induced by Ag, Cd, Cr, Cu and Hg ions.

    PubMed

    Nowicka, Beatrycze; Pluciński, Bartosz; Kuczyńska, Paulina; Kruk, Jerzy

    2016-08-01

    Acclimation to heavy metal-induced stress is a complex phenomenon. Among the mechanisms of heavy metal toxicity, an important one is the ability to induce oxidative stress, so that the antioxidant response is crucial for providing tolerance to heavy metal ions. The effect of chronic stress induced by ions of five heavy metals, Ag, Cu, Cr (redox-active metals) Cd, Hg (nonredox-active metals) on the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined at two levels - the biochemical (content of photosynthetic pigments and prenyllipid antioxidants, lipid peroxidation) and the physiological (growth rate, photosynthesis and respiration rates, induction of nonphotochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence). The expression of the genes which encode the enzymes participating in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (APX1, CAT1, FSD1, MSD1) was measured. The other gene measured was one required for plastoquinone and α-tocopherol biosynthesis (VTE3). The application of heavy metal ions partly inhibited growth and biosynthesis of chlorophyll. The growth inhibition was accompanied by enhanced lipid peroxidation. An increase in the content of prenyllipid antioxidants was observed in cultures exposed to Cr2O7(2-), Cd(2+) (α- and γ-tocopherol and plastoquinone) and Cu(2+) (only tocopherols). The induction of nonphotochemical quenching was enhanced in cultures exposed to Cu(2+), Cr2O7(2-) and Cd(2+), as compared to the control. Chronic heavy metal-induced stress led to changes in gene expression dependent on the type and concentration of heavy metal ions. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzymes was usually accompanied by the up-regulation of the VTE3 gene.

  13. Electrophobic interaction induced impurity clustering in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Long; Jiang, W.; Lu, Guang-Hong; Aguiar, J. A.; Liu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concept of electrophobic interaction, analogous to hydrophobic interaction, for describing the behavior of impurity atoms in a metal, a 'solvent of electrons'. We demonstrate that there exists a form of electrophobic interaction between impurities with closed electron shell structure, which governs their dissolution behavior in a metal. Using He, Be and Ar as examples, we predict by first-principles calculations that the electrophobic interaction drives He, Be or Ar to form a close-packed cluster with a clustering energy that follows a universal power-law scaling with the number of atoms (N) dissolved in a free electron gas, as well as W or Al lattice, as Ec is proportional to (N2/3-N). This new concept unifies the explanation for a series of experimental observations of close-packed inert-gas bubble formation in metals, and significantly advances our fundamental understanding and capacity to predict the solute behavior of impurities in metals, a useful contribution to be considered in future material design of metals for nuclear, metallurgical, and energy applications.

  14. Physiological and biochemical mechanisms associated with trehalose-induced copper-stress tolerance in rice

    PubMed Central

    Mostofa, Mohammad Golam; Hossain, Mohammad Anwar; Fujita, Masayuki; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the possible mechanisms of trehalose (Tre) in improving copper-stress (Cu-stress) tolerance in rice seedlings. Our findings indicated that pretreatment of rice seedlings with Tre enhanced the endogenous Tre level and significantly mitigated the toxic effects of excessive Cu on photosynthesis- and plant growth-related parameters. The improved tolerance induced by Tre could be attributed to its ability to reduce Cu uptake and decrease Cu-induced oxidative damage by lowering the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde in Cu-stressed plants. Tre counteracted the Cu-induced increase in proline and glutathione content, but significantly improved ascorbic acid content and redox status. The activities of major antioxidant enzymes were largely stimulated by Tre pretreatment in rice plants exposed to excessive Cu. Additionally, increased activities of glyoxalases I and II correlated with reduced levels of methylglyoxal in Tre-pretreated Cu-stressed rice plants. These results indicate that modifying the endogenous Tre content by Tre pretreatment improved Cu tolerance in rice plants by inhibiting Cu uptake and regulating the antioxidant and glyoxalase systems, and thereby demonstrated the important role of Tre in mitigating heavy metal toxicity. Our findings provide a solid foundation for developing metal toxicity-tolerant crops by genetic engineering of Tre biosynthesis. PMID:26073760

  15. Environmental stress induces trinucleotide repeat mutagenesis in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Santillan, Beatriz A.; Yotnda, Patricia; Wilson, John H.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic mutability of microsatellite repeats is implicated in the modification of gene function and disease phenotype. Studies of the enhanced instability of long trinucleotide repeats (TNRs)—the cause of multiple human diseases—have revealed a remarkable complexity of mutagenic mechanisms. Here, we show that cold, heat, hypoxic, and oxidative stresses induce mutagenesis of a long CAG repeat tract in human cells. We show that stress-response factors mediate the stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM) of CAG repeats. We show further that SIM of CAG repeats does not involve mismatch repair, nucleotide excision repair, or transcription, processes that are known to promote TNR mutagenesis in other pathways of instability. Instead, we find that these stresses stimulate DNA rereplication, increasing the proportion of cells with >4 C-value (C) DNA content. Knockdown of the replication origin-licensing factor CDT1 eliminates both stress-induced rereplication and CAG repeat mutagenesis. In addition, direct induction of rereplication in the absence of stress also increases the proportion of cells with >4C DNA content and promotes repeat mutagenesis. Thus, environmental stress triggers a unique pathway for TNR mutagenesis that likely is mediated by DNA rereplication. This pathway may impact normal cells as they encounter stresses in their environment or during development or abnormal cells as they evolve metastatic potential. PMID:25775519

  16. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  17. Stress proteins are induced by space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences such as space radiations and microgravity. Almost all organisms possess essential recognition and response systems for environmental changes. The famous one of cellular stress responses is the gene induction of heat shock protein (HSP). HSP expression is increased under elevated temperatures, and also increased by other sources of cellular stress, including ionizing radiation, oxidative injury, osmotic stress and the unfolded protein response. HSPs assist in the folding and maintenance of newly translated proteins, the refolding of denatured proteins and the further unfolding of misfolded or destabilized proteins to protect the cell from crisis. Based on our space experiment, we report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of HSP expression after exposure to space environment.

  18. Probing opto-mechanical stresses within azobenzene-containing photosensitive polymer films by a thin metal film placed above.

    PubMed

    Yadavalli, Nataraja Sekhar; Korolkov, Denis; Moulin, Jean-François; Krutyeva, Margarita; Santer, Svetlana

    2014-07-23

    Azo-modified photosensitive polymers offer the interesting possibility to reshape bulk polymers and thin films by UV-irradiation while being in the solid glassy state. The polymer undergoes considerable mass transport under irradiation with a light interference pattern resulting in the formation of surface relief grating (SRG). The forces inscribing this SRG pattern into a thin film are hard to assess experimentally directly. In the current study, we are proposing a method to probe opto-mechanical stresses within polymer films by characterizing the mechanical response of thin metal films (10 nm) deposited on the photosensitive polymer. During irradiation, the metal film not only deforms along with the SRG formation but ruptures in a regular and complex manner. The morphology of the cracks differs strongly depending on the electrical field distribution in the interference pattern, even when the magnitude and the kinetics of the strain are kept constant. This implies a complex local distribution of the opto-mechanical stress along the topography grating. In addition, the neutron reflectivity measurements of the metal/polymer interface indicate the penetration of a metal layer within the polymer, resulting in a formation of a bonding layer that confirms the transduction of light-induced stresses in the polymer layer to a metal film.

  19. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  20. Stress-induced obesity and the emotional nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dallman, Mary F

    2010-03-01

    Stress and emotional brain networks foster eating behaviors that can lead to obesity. The neural networks underlying the complex interactions among stressors, body, brain and food intake are now better understood. Stressors, by activating a neural stress-response network, bias cognition toward increased emotional activity and degraded executive function. This causes formed habits to be used rather than a cognitive appraisal of responses. Stress also induces secretion of glucocorticoids, which increases motivation for food, and insulin, which promotes food intake and obesity. Pleasurable feeding then reduces activity in the stress-response network, reinforcing the feeding habit. These effects of stressors emphasize the importance of teaching mental reappraisal techniques to restore responses from habitual to thoughtful, thus battling stress-induced obesity.

  1. Melatonin ameliorates chronic mild stress induced behavioral dysfunctions in mice.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Seenu; Kumar, Mayank; Manda, Kailash

    2013-07-02

    Melatonin, a neurohormone, is known to regulate several physiological functions, especially the circadian homeostasis, mood and behavior. Chronic exposure to stress is involved in the etiology of human affective disorders, and depressed patients have been reported to show changes in the circadian rhythms and nocturnal melatonin concentration. The present study was conducted to evaluate a possible beneficial action of chronic night-time melatonin treatment against chronic mild stress (CMS) induced behavioral impairments. As expected in the present study, the stress exposed mice showed reduced weight gain, hedonic deficit, cognitive deficits and decreased mobility in behavioral despair test. Interestingly, CMS exposed mice showed less anxiety. Chronic night-time melatonin administration significantly ameliorated the stress-induced behavioral disturbances, especially the cognitive dysfunction and depressive phenotypes. In conclusion, the present findings suggest the mitigating role of melatonin against CMS-induced behavioral changes, including the cognitive dysfunctions and reaffirm its potential role as an antidepressant.

  2. Acute psychological stress-induced water intoxication.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sagarika; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S; Asaduzzaman, S; Peters, John R

    2005-01-01

    Excessive water drinking is a recognised feature of schizophrenia. We present here a case of excessive water drinking precipitated by acute psychological stress. A 52-year-old woman, with no previous mental health problems, was found in a state of altered consciousness and was profoundly hyponatraemic. She had consumed excess amount of water due to severe mental stress. She was treated with hypertonic saline followed by fluid restrictions. The water intoxication had caused brain damage which led to behavioural changes and impaired cognition. We describe the pathophysiology of water intoxication.

  3. Pho4 mediates phosphate acquisition in Candida albicans and is vital for stress resistance and metal homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeh, Mélanie A. C.; Kastora, Stavroula L.; Day, Alison M.; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen M.; Tarrant, Emma; Waldron, Kevin J.; Banks, A. Peter; Bain, Judith M.; Lydall, David; Veal, Elizabeth A.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Erwig, Lars P.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Quinn, Janet

    2016-01-01

    During interactions with its mammalian host, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans is exposed to a range of stresses such as superoxide radicals and cationic fluxes. Unexpectedly, a nonbiased screen of transcription factor deletion mutants revealed that the phosphate-responsive transcription factor Pho4 is vital for the resistance of C. albicans to these diverse stresses. RNA-Seq analysis indicated that Pho4 does not induce stress-protective genes directly. Instead, we show that loss of Pho4 affects metal cation toxicity, accumulation, and bioavailability. We demonstrate that pho4Δ cells are sensitive to metal and nonmetal cations and that Pho4-mediated polyphosphate synthesis mediates manganese resistance. Significantly, we show that Pho4 is important for mediating copper bioavailability to support the activity of the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase Sod1 and that loss of Sod1 activity contributes to the superoxide sensitivity of pho4Δ cells. Consistent with the key role of fungal stress responses in countering host phagocytic defenses, we also report that C. albicans pho4Δ cells are acutely sensitive to macrophage-mediated killing and display attenuated virulence in animal infection models. The novel connections between phosphate metabolism, metal homeostasis, and superoxide stress resistance presented in this study highlight the importance of metabolic adaptation in promoting C. albicans survival in the host. PMID:27385340

  4. Dyadic coping, insecure attachment, and cortisol stress recovery following experimentally induced stress.

    PubMed

    Meuwly, Nathalie; Bodenmann, Guy; Germann, Janine; Bradbury, Thomas N; Ditzen, Beate; Heinrichs, Markus

    2012-12-01

    Evidence for the stress-buffering effects of social support in intimate relationships raises important questions about whether partner support promotes recovery in physiological systems implicated in physical health. The present study examined (a) whether observed dyadic coping enhances cortisol stress recovery and (b) whether a stressed partner's self-reported attachment anxiety and avoidance moderate these effects. Stress was experimentally induced by asking either the man or woman in 123 heterosexual couples to participate in a standardized public speaking task. Stressed individuals recovered faster from stress the more positive dyadic coping they received from the partner, with women high in attachment anxiety benefiting less from these behaviors. Attachment avoidance did not moderate these associations. This study highlights the value of examining the interplay between partners' behaviors and attachment orientations in order to understand the impact of stress on close relationships and partners' health.

  5. Metal-leachate-induced conjugate protein instability.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Osborne, Brandi; Singh, Satish K; Wang, Wei

    2012-08-01

    During the scale-up of an ultrafiltration/diafiltration (UF/DF) step for a protein-based conjugate vaccine, significant precipitation was observed at room temperature. It was found that a specific type of metal hosebarb fitting used in the UF/DF system, when placed in the conjugate solution, caused the precipitation. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry analysis showed significant amounts of Ni(II), Zn(II), and Cu(II) present in the conjugate solution. A kinetic study showed that the concentration of these metal ions gradually increased with increasing incubation time with a corresponding decrease in conjugate concentration. Direct spiking of trace amounts of NiCl₂, ZnCl₂, and CuCl₂ into the conjugate solution also caused precipitation, and spiking studies showed that the metal ions caused precipitation of the conjugate but not of the carrier protein, antigen, or carrier protein + linker. The precipitation was found to be significantly dependent on buffer species but not solution pH and led to an irreversible loss of tertiary structure even after dissolution in and removal of guanidine hydrochloride. The precipitation is likely the result of formation of transition-metal complexes with histidine residues on the antigen peptide, which may involve both intraconjugate and interconjugate antigens. Such complexation may lead to formation of multimers that may exceed the solubility limit.

  6. Phloroglucinol Attenuates Free Radical-induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    So, Mi Jung; Cho, Eun Ju

    2014-01-01

    The protective role of phloroglucinol against oxidative stress and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) was investigated in vitro and in cell culture. Phloroglucinol had strong and concentration-dependent radical scavenging effects against nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions (O2−), and hydroxyl radicals. In this study, free radical generators were used to induce oxidative stress in LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells. Treatment with phloroglucinol attenuated the oxidative stress induced by peroxyl radicals, NO, O2−, and peroxynitrite. Phloroglucinol also increased cell viability and decreased lipid peroxidation in a concentration-dependent manner. WI-38 human diploid fibroblast cells were used to investigate the protective effect of phloroglucinol against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced SIPS. Phloroglucinol treatment attenuated H2O2-induced SIPS by increasing cell viability and inhibited lipid peroxidation, suggesting that treatment with phloroglucinol should delay the aging process. The present study supports the promising role of phloroglucinol as an antioxidative agent against free radical-induced oxidative stress and SIPS. PMID:25320709

  7. Angina and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit J.; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2015-01-01

    Objective Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is a common phenomenon in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and an emerging prognostic factor. Mental stress ischemia is correlated with ambulatory ischemia. However, whether it is related to angina symptoms during daily life has not been examined. Methods We assessed angina-frequency (past month) in 98 post-myocardial infarction (MI) subjects (age 18-60 years) using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire. Patients underwent [99mTc]sestamibi SPECT perfusion imaging at rest, after mental stress, and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed-difference score (SDS), the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, CAD-severity, depressive, anger and anxiety symptoms, each 1-point increase in mental-stress SDS was associated with 1.73-unit increase in the angina-frequency score (95% CI: 0.09-3.37) and 17% higher odds of being in a higher angina-frequency category (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.00-1.38). Depressive symptoms were associated with 12% higher odds of being in a higher angina-frequency category (OR: 1.12, 95% CI: 1.03-1.21). In contrast, exercise/pharmacological stress-induced SDS was not associated with angina-frequency. Conclusion Among young and middle-aged post-MI patients, myocardial ischemia induced by mental stress in the lab, but not by exercise/pharmacological stress, is associated with higher frequency of retrospectively reported angina during the day. Psychosocial stressors related to mental stress ischemia may be important contributory factor to daily angina. PMID:25727240

  8. Grain boundary induced compositional stresses in non-stoichiometric oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandowara, Sunil

    For non-stoichiometric oxide thin films (e.g. ceria and titania) in constrained geometries the variation in oxygen partial pressures lead to stresses, thus termed compositional stresses. In this study, the compositional stresses were investigated in the nanocrystalline ceria films for temperature, microstructrual and doping effects to better understand stress generation and control mechanism. First, a theoretical model was developed to relate the core-space charge model for defect chemistry to compositional stresses. The ceria films grown on inert substrates by MOCVD (metal organic chemical vapor deposition) were subjected to high temperature redox annealing cycles and the compositional stresses were measured by monitoring substrate curvature through MOSS (Multi-beam optical stress sensor) and oxygen partial pressure by an in situ YSZ sensor. For the low temperature range (<550°C), the compositional stress increased with decreasing grain size implying that the stresses are induced at the GB core. The measured apparent enthalpies were lower (0.2--0.5 eV) and space charge potential were higher (˜0.83--0.87 V) than generally reported values (˜0.3--0.4 V). For very small film thicknesses ( hf < 250 nm), the increasing compositional stresses with increasing film thickness suggest that importance of the space charge regions associated with oxygen deficient surfaces and the reduction induced surface reconstructions. For doped films, the compositional stresses measured were significantly lower and apparent enthalpies were higher compare to undoped films, most likely due to extrinsic nature of defect chemistry and dopant vacancy pairing. The compositional stresses increased with decreasing grain size implying that the stresses were induced by GB core in the doped case as well. At higher temperatures (>550°C), the GB core may be undergoing phase transformation resulting in reversal of compositional stresses direction. The phase transformation is associated with the GB

  9. Temporal pore pressure induced stress changes during injection and depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Birgit; Heidbach, Oliver; Schilling, Frank; Fuchs, Karl; Röckel, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Induced seismicity is observed during injection of fluids in oil, gas or geothermal wells as a rather immediate response close to the injection wells due to the often high-rate pressurization. It was recognized even earlier in connection with more moderate rate injection of fluid waste on a longer time frame but higher induced event magnitudes. Today, injection-related induced seismicity significantly increased the number of events with M>3 in the Mid U.S. However, induced seismicity is also observed during production of fluids and gas, even years after the onset of production. E.g. in the Groningen gas field production was required to be reduced due to the increase in felt and damaging seismicity after more than 50 years of exploitation of that field. Thus, injection and production induced seismicity can cause severe impact in terms of hazard but also on economic measures. In order to understand the different onset times of induced seismicity we built a generic model to quantify the role of poro-elasticity processes with special emphasis on the factors time, regional crustal stress conditions and fault parameters for three case studies (injection into a low permeable crystalline rock, hydrothermal circulation and production of fluids). With this approach we consider the spatial and temporal variation of reservoir stress paths, the "early" injection-related induced events during stimulation and the "late" production induced ones. Furthermore, in dependence of the undisturbed in situ stress field conditions the stress tensor can change significantly due to injection and long-term production with changes of the tectonic stress regime in which previously not critically stressed faults could turn to be optimally oriented for fault reactivation.

  10. Proline accumulation in lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf.) due to heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Handique, G K; Handique, A K

    2009-03-01

    Toxic heavy metals viz. lead, mercury and cadmium induced differential accumulation of proline in lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf.) grown in soil amended with 50, 100, 200, 350 and 500 mg kg(-1) of the metals have been studied. Proline accumulation was found to be metal specific, organ specific and linear dose dependant. Further, proline accumulation following short term exposure (two months after transplantation) was higher than long term exposure (nine months after transplantation). Proline accumulation following short term exposure was 2.032 to 3.839 micro moles g(-1) for cadmium (50-200 mg kg(-1)); the corresponding range for mercury was 1.968 to 5.670 micro moles g(-1) and 0.830 to 4.567 micro moles g(-1) for lead (50-500 mg kg(-1) for mercury and lead). Proline accumulation was consistently higher in young tender leaf than old leaf, irrespective of the metal or duration of exposure. For cadmium treatment proline level was 2.032 to 3.839 micro moles g(-1) for young leaves while the corresponding value for old leaf was 1.728 to 2.396 micro moles g(-1) following short term exposure. The same trend was observed for the other two metals and duration of exposure. For control set proline accumulation in root was 0.425 micro moles g(-1) as against 0.805 and 0.533 micro moles g(-1) in young and old leaves respectively indicating that proline accumulation in root are lower than leaves, under both normal and stressed condition.

  11. Cellular and Molecular Basis for Stress-Induced Depression

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Seon; Wei, Jing; Qin, Luye; Kim, Yong; Yan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress plays a crucial role in the development of psychiatric diseases, such as anxiety and depression. Dysfunction of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) has been linked to the cognitive and emotional deficits induced by stress. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular determinants in mPFC for stress-associated mental disorders. Here we show that chronic restraint stress induces the selective loss of p11 (also known as annexin II light chain, S100A10), a multifunctional protein binding to 5-HT receptors, in layer II/III neurons of the prelimbic cortex (PrL), as well as depression-like behaviors, both of which are reversed by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the tricyclic class of antidepressant (TCA) agents. In layer II/III of the PrL, p11 is highly concentrated in dopamine D2 receptor-expressing (D2+) glutamatergic neurons. Viral expression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons alleviates the depression-like behaviors exhibited by genetically manipulated mice with D2+ neuron-specific or global deletion of p11. In stressed animals, overexpression of p11 in D2+ PrL neurons rescues depression-like behaviors by restoring glutamatergic transmission. Our results have identified p11 as a key molecule in a specific cell type that regulates stress-induced depression, which provides a framework for the development of new strategies to treat stress-associated mental illnesses. PMID:27457815

  12. Hydrophobic substances induce water stress in microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhaganna, Prashanth; Volkers, Rita J. M.; Bell, Andrew N. W.; Kluge, Kathrin; Timson, David J.; McGrath, John W.; Ruijssenaars, Harald J.; Hallsworth, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitous noxious hydrophobic substances, such as hydrocarbons, pesticides and diverse industrial chemicals, stress biological systems and thereby affect their ability to mediate biosphere functions like element and energy cycling vital to biosphere health. Such chemically diverse compounds may have distinct toxic activities for cellular systems; they may also share a common mechanism of stress induction mediated by their hydrophobicity. We hypothesized that the stressful effects of, and cellular adaptations to, hydrophobic stressors operate at the level of water : macromolecule interactions. Here, we present evidence that: (i) hydrocarbons reduce structural interactions within and between cellular macromolecules, (ii) organic compatible solutes – metabolites that protect against osmotic and chaotrope‐induced stresses – ameliorate this effect, (iii) toxic hydrophobic substances induce a potent form of water stress in macromolecular and cellular systems, and (iv) the stress mechanism of, and cellular responses to, hydrophobic substances are remarkably similar to those associated with chaotrope‐induced water stress. These findings suggest that it may be possible to devise new interventions for microbial processes in both natural environments and industrial reactors to expand microbial tolerance of hydrophobic substances, and hence the biotic windows for such processes. PMID:21255365

  13. Gravity-induced stresses in stratified rock masses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Amadei, B.; Swolfs, H.S.; Savage, W.Z.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents closed-form solutions for the stress field induced by gravity in anisotropic and stratified rock masses. These rocks are assumed to be laterally restrained. The rock mass consists of finite mechanical units, each unit being modeled as a homogeneous, transversely isotropic or isotropic linearly elastic material. The following results are found. The nature of the gravity induced stress field in a stratified rock mass depends on the elastic properties of each rock unit and how these properties vary with depth. It is thermodynamically admissible for the induced horizontal stress component in a given stratified rock mass to exceed the vertical stress component in certain units and to be smaller in other units; this is not possible for the classical unstratified isotropic solution. Examples are presented to explore the nature of the gravity induced stress field in stratified rock masses. It is found that a decrease in rock mass anisotropy and a stiffening of rock masses with depth can generate stress distributions comparable to empirical hyperbolic distributions previously proposed in the literature. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Strategies to ameliorate abiotic stress-induced plant senescence.

    PubMed

    Gepstein, Shimon; Glick, Bernard R

    2013-08-01

    The plant senescence syndrome resembles, in many molecular and phenotypic aspects, plant responses to abiotic stresses. Both processes have an enormous negative global agro-economic impact and endanger food security worldwide. Premature plant senescence is the main cause of losses in grain filling and biomass yield due to leaf yellowing and deteriorated photosynthesis, and is also responsible for the losses resulting from the short shelf life of many vegetables and fruits. Under abiotic stress conditions the yield losses are often even greater. The primary challenge in agricultural sciences today is to develop technologies that will increase food production and sustainability of agriculture especially under environmentally limiting conditions. In this chapter, some of the mechanisms involved in abiotic stress-induced plant senescence are discussed. Recent studies have shown that crop yield and nutritional values can be altered as well as plant stress tolerance through manipulating the timing of senescence. It is often difficult to separate the effects of age-dependent senescence from stress-induced senescence since both share many biochemical processes and ultimately result in plant death. The focus of this review is on abiotic stress-induced senescence. Here, a number of the major approaches that have been developed to ameliorate some of the effects of abiotic stress-induced plant senescence are considered and discussed. Some approaches mimic the mechanisms already used by some plants and soil bacteria whereas others are based on development of new improved transgenic plants. While there may not be one simple strategy that can effectively decrease all losses of crop yield that accrue as a consequence of abiotic stress-induced plant senescence, some of the strategies that are discussed already show great promise.

  15. Swim-stress-induced antinociception in young rats.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, H. C.; Kitchen, I.

    1989-01-01

    1. Opioid and non-opioid mechanisms have been implicated in the phenomenon of stress-induced antinociception in adult rodents. We have studied stress-induced antinociception in developing rats and characterized differences in the neurochemical basis of this effect in pre- and post-weanling animals. 2. Twenty and 25 day old rats were stressed using warm water (20 degrees C) swimming for 3 or 10 min periods and antinociception was assessed by the tail immersion test (50 degrees C). 3. A 3 min swim in 20 and 25 day old rats produced marked antinociception which was blocked by naloxone, Mr 1452, 16-methyl cyprenorphine and levallorphan but not Mr 1453 or N-methyl levallorphan. The delta-opioid receptor antagonist ICI 174,864 attenuated stress-induced antinociception in 25 day old rats but was without effect in 20 day old animals. 4. A 10 min swim in 25 day old rats produced antinociception which was non-opioid in nature. In contrast, antinociception was not observed in 20 day old rats after a 10 min swim-stress. 5. Pretreatment of animals with dexamethasone blocked 3 min swim-stress antinociception in 20 and 25 day old animals but had no effect on antinociception induced by a 10 min swim. 6. Swim-stress-induced antinociception can be observed in young rats and dissociated into opioid and non-opioid types dependent on the duration of swimming stress. The non-opioid type appears to develop more slowly and cannot be observed in preweanling rats. The opioid type is a predominantly mu-receptor phenomenon in preweanling animals but delta-receptor components are observable in postweanling rats. PMID:2720296

  16. Chewing gum and impasse-induced self-reported stress.

    PubMed

    Torney, Laura K; Johnson, Andrew J; Miles, Christopher

    2009-12-01

    An insoluble anagram task [Zellner, D., Loaiza, S., Gonzalez, Z., Pita, J., Morales, J., Pecora, D., et al. (2006). Food selection changes under stress. Physiology and Behaviour, 87, 789-793] was used to investigate the proposition that chewing gum reduces self-rated stress [Scholey, A., Haskell, C., Robertson, B., Kennedy, D., Milne, A., & Wetherell, M. (2009). Chewing gum alleviates negative mood and reduces cortisol during acute laboratory psychological stress. Physiology and Behaviour, 97, 304-312]. Using a between-participants design, 40 participants performed an insoluble anagram task followed by a soluble anagram task. These tasks were performed with or without chewing gum. Self-rated measures were taken at baseline, post-stressor, and post-recovery task. The insoluble anagram task was found to amplify stress in terms of increases in self-rated stress and reductions in both self-rated calmness and contentedness. However, chewing gum was found not to mediate the level of stress experienced. Furthermore, chewing gum did not result in superior performance on the soluble anagram task. The present study fails to generalise the findings of Scholey et al. to an impasse-induced stress that has social components. The explanation for the discrepancy with Scholey et al. is unclear; however, it is suggested that the impossibility of the insoluble anagram task may negate any secondary stress reducing benefits arising from chewing gum-induced task improvement.

  17. Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress Modulation with Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Debevec, Tadej; Millet, Grégoire P.; Pialoux, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress, defined as an imbalance between prooxidants and antioxidants, resulting in molecular damage and disruption of redox signaling, is associated with numerous pathophysiological processes and known to exacerbate chronic diseases. Prolonged systemic hypoxia, induced either by exposure to terrestrial altitude or a reduction in ambient O2 availability is known to elicit oxidative stress and thereby alter redox balance in healthy humans. The redox balance modulation is also highly dependent on the level of physical activity. For example, both high-intensity exercise and inactivity, representing the two ends of the physical activity spectrum, are known to promote oxidative stress. Numerous to-date studies indicate that hypoxia and exercise can exert additive influence upon redox balance alterations. However, recent evidence suggests that moderate physical activity can attenuate altitude/hypoxia-induced oxidative stress during long-term hypoxic exposure. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on hypoxia-related oxidative stress modulation by different activity levels during prolonged hypoxic exposures and examine the potential mechanisms underlying the observed redox balance changes. The paper also explores the applicability of moderate activity as a strategy for attenuating hypoxia-related oxidative stress. Moreover, the potential of such moderate intensity activities used to counteract inactivity-related oxidative stress, often encountered in pathological, elderly and obese populations is also discussed. Finally, future research directions for investigating interactive effects of altitude/hypoxia and exercise on oxidative stress are proposed. PMID:28243207

  18. Electric-field-induced rotation of Brownian metal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel; Ramos, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    We describe the physical mechanism responsible for the rotation of Brownian metal nanowires suspended in an electrolyte exposed to a rotating electric field. The electric field interacts with the induced charge in the electrical double layer at the metal-electrolyte interface, causing rotation due to the torque on the induced dipole and to the induced-charge electro-osmotic flow around the particle. Experiments demonstrate that the primary driving mechanism is the former of these two. Our analysis contrasts with previous work describing the electrical manipulation of metallic particles with electric fields, which neglected the electrical double layer. Theoretical values for the rotation speed are calculated and good agreement with experiments is found.

  19. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  20. Stress responses and metal tolerance of Chlamydomonas acidophila in metal-enriched lake water and artificial medium.

    PubMed

    Spijkerman, Elly; Barua, Deepak; Gerloff-Elias, Antje; Kern, Jürgen; Gaedke, Ursula; Heckathorn, Scott A

    2007-07-01

    Chlamydomonas acidophila faces high heavy-metal concentrations in acidic mining lakes, where it is a dominant phytoplankton species. To investigate the importance of metals to C. acidophila in these lakes, we examined the response of growth, photosynthesis, cell structure, heat-shock protein (Hsp) accumulation, and metal adsorption after incubation in metal-rich lake water and artificial growth medium enriched with metals (Fe, Zn). Incubation in both metal-rich lake water and medium caused large decreases in photosystem II function (though no differences among lakes), but no decrease in growth rate (except for medium + Fe). Concentrations of small Hsps were higher in algae incubated in metal-rich lake-water than in metal-enriched medium, whereas Hsp60 and Hsp70A were either less or equally expressed. Cellular Zn and Fe contents were lower, and metals adsorbed to the cell surface were higher, in lake-water-incubated algae than in medium-grown cells. The results indicate that high Zn or Fe levels are likely not the main or only contributor to the low primary production in mining lakes, and multiple adaptations of C. acidophila (e.g., high Hsp levels, decreased metal accumulation) increase its tolerance to metals and permit survival under such adverse environmental conditions. Supposedly, the main stress factor present in the lake water is an interaction between low P and high Fe concentrations.

  1. Ultraviolet-induced erasable photochromism in bilayer metal oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakado, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nakazawa, Akira

    2011-09-01

    We demonstrate that the optical transmittance of bilayer samples consisting of pyrolytically coated amorphous Mg-Sn-O and metal oxide films such as In 2O 3 and SnO 2 decreases upon ultraviolet illumination, but can be recovered by annealing in air at ˜300 ∘C. Spectral, structural, and compositional studies suggest that this photochromic phenomenon is induced by photoelectronic excitation in the Mg-Sn-O film, electron injection into the metal oxide, which becomes negatively charged, and subsequent formation of metallic particles, which absorb and/or scatter visible light.

  2. Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Tye A; Anderson, Todd W; Širović, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound). These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur.

  3. Intermittent Noise Induces Physiological Stress in a Coastal Marine Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Tye A.; Anderson, Todd W.; Širović, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise in the ocean has increased substantially in recent decades, and motorized vessels produce what is likely the most common form of underwater noise pollution. Noise has the potential to induce physiological stress in marine fishes, which may have negative ecological consequences. In this study, physiological effects of increased noise (playback of boat noise recorded in the field) on a coastal marine fish (the giant kelpfish, Heterostichus rostratus) were investigated by measuring the stress responses (cortisol concentration) of fish to increased noise of various temporal dynamics and noise levels. Giant kelpfish exhibited acute stress responses when exposed to intermittent noise, but not to continuous noise or control conditions (playback of recorded natural ambient sound). These results suggest that variability in the acoustic environment may be more important than the period of noise exposure for inducing stress in a marine fish, and provide information regarding noise levels at which physiological responses occur. PMID:26402068

  4. Heavy-metal stress and developmental patterns of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Teresa E; Charvat, Iris

    2004-11-01

    The rate of global deposition of Cd, Pb, and Zn has decreased over the past few decades, but heavy metals already in the soil may be mobilized by local and global changes in soil conditions and exert toxic effects on soil microorganisms. We examined in vitro effects of Cd, Pb, and Zn on critical life stages in metal-sensitive ecotypes of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, including spore germination, presymbiotic hyphal extension, presymbiotic sporulation, symbiotic extraradical mycelium expansion, and symbiotic sporulation. Despite long-term culturing under the same low-metal conditions, two species, Glomus etunicatum and Glomus intraradices, had different levels of sensitivity to metal stress. G. etunicatum was more sensitive to all three metals than was G. intraradices. A unique response of increased presymbiotic hyphal extension occurred in G. intraradices exposed to Cd and Pb. Presymbiotic hyphae of G. intraradices formed presymbiotic spores, whose initiation was more affected by heavy metals than was presymbiotic hyphal extension. In G. intraradices grown in compartmentalized habitats with only a portion of the extraradical mycelium exposed to metal stress, inhibitory effects of elevated metal concentrations on symbiotic mycelial expansion and symbiotic sporulation were limited to the metal-enriched compartment. Symbiotic sporulation was more sensitive to metal exposure than symbiotic mycelium expansion. Patterns exhibited by G. intraradices spore germination, presymbiotic hyphal extension, symbiotic extraradical mycelium expansion, and sporulation under elevated metal concentrations suggest that AM fungi may be able to survive in heavy metal-contaminated environments by using a metal avoidance strategy.

  5. Heavy-Metal Stress and Developmental Patterns of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowska, Teresa E.; Charvat, Iris

    2004-01-01

    The rate of global deposition of Cd, Pb, and Zn has decreased over the past few decades, but heavy metals already in the soil may be mobilized by local and global changes in soil conditions and exert toxic effects on soil microorganisms. We examined in vitro effects of Cd, Pb, and Zn on critical life stages in metal-sensitive ecotypes of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi, including spore germination, presymbiotic hyphal extension, presymbiotic sporulation, symbiotic extraradical mycelium expansion, and symbiotic sporulation. Despite long-term culturing under the same low-metal conditions, two species, Glomus etunicatum and Glomus intraradices, had different levels of sensitivity to metal stress. G. etunicatum was more sensitive to all three metals than was G. intraradices. A unique response of increased presymbiotic hyphal extension occurred in G. intraradices exposed to Cd and Pb. Presymbiotic hyphae of G. intraradices formed presymbiotic spores, whose initiation was more affected by heavy metals than was presymbiotic hyphal extension. In G. intraradices grown in compartmentalized habitats with only a portion of the extraradical mycelium exposed to metal stress, inhibitory effects of elevated metal concentrations on symbiotic mycelial expansion and symbiotic sporulation were limited to the metal-enriched compartment. Symbiotic sporulation was more sensitive to metal exposure than symbiotic mycelium expansion. Patterns exhibited by G. intraradices spore germination, presymbiotic hyphal extension, symbiotic extraradical mycelium expansion, and sporulation under elevated metal concentrations suggest that AM fungi may be able to survive in heavy metal-contaminated environments by using a metal avoidance strategy. PMID:15528529

  6. Validation of Suggestion-Induced Stress

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-10-01

    AQ Integrated (Iata collect jonl —-.--——- monitor i.nfl,conversion, and ana~s systcm for——. — ;;; ;Ilo~~io l~ JE ~~i~XE=sfi=fiY~ln:~l report , 1 July...IJankart, C.P. Effect of threat a]ld unccrt:~illty on mastery of stress. .Journal of Experimental Psycl’ology, 1969, 79(3), 473-479. .._— — Ferguson , R.J...explanation” ( Ferguson , 1966, p. 161). All changes, whether psycho- physiologicalor artifactual,must be properly interpreted. A-12 Some of the factors

  7. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Davids, P. S.; Intravia, F; Dalvit, Diego A.

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  8. Gender differences in neural correlates of stress-induced anxiety.

    PubMed

    Seo, Dongju; Ahluwalia, Aneesha; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2017-01-02

    Although gender differences have been identified as a crucial factor for understanding stress-related anxiety and associated clinical disorders, the neural mechanisms underlying these differences remain unclear. To explore gender differences in the neural correlates of stress-induced anxiety, the current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine brain responses in 96 healthy men and women with commensurable levels of trait anxiety as they engaged in a personalized guided imagery paradigm to provoke stress and neutral-relaxing experiences. During the task, a significant gender main effect emerged, with men displaying greater responses in the caudate, cingulate gyrus, midbrain, thalamus, and cerebellum. In contrast, women showed greater responses in the posterior insula, temporal gyrus, and occipital lobe. Additionally, a significant anxiety ratings × gender interaction from whole-brain regression analyses was observed in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, left inferior parietal lobe, left temporal gyrus, occipital gyrus, and cerebellum (P < 0.05, whole-brain family-wise error corrected), with positive associations between activity in these regions and stress-induced anxiety in women, but negative associations in men, indicating that men and women differentially use neural resources when experiencing stress-induced anxiety. The findings suggest that in response to stress, there is a greater use of the medial prefrontal-parietal cortices in experiencing subjective anxiety in women, while decreased use of this circuit was associated with increased subjective anxiety states in men. The current study has implications for understanding gender-specific differences in stress-induced anxiety and vulnerability to stress-related clinical disorders, and for developing more effective treatment strategies tailored to each gender. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Study of inducer load and stress, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A program of analysis, design, fabrication and testing has been conducted to develop computer programs for predicting rocket engine turbopump inducer hydrodynamic loading, stress magnitude and distribution, and vibration characteristics. Methods of predicting blade loading, stress, and vibration characteristics were selected from a literature search and used as a basis for the computer programs. An inducer, representative of typical rocket engine inducers, was designed, fabricated, and tested with special instrumentation selected to provide measurements of blade surface pressures and stresses. Data from the tests were compared with predicted values and the computer programs were revised as required to improve correlation. For Volume 1 see N71-20403. For Volume 2 see N71-20404.

  10. Repeated social defeat stress induces chronic hyperthermia in rats.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Sota; Oka, Takakazu; Mera, Takashi; Tsuji, Sadatoshi

    2010-08-04

    Psychological stressors are known to increase core body temperature (T(c)) in laboratory animals. Such single stress-induced hyperthermic responses are typically monophasic, as T(c) returns to baseline within several hours. However, studies on the effects of repeated psychological stress on T(c) are limited. Therefore, we measured T(c) changes in male Wistar rats after they were subjected to 4 social defeat periods (each period consisting of 7 daily 1h stress exposures during the light cycle followed by a stress-free day). We also assessed affective-like behavioral changes by elevated plus maze and forced swim tests. In the stressed rats, the first social defeat experience induced a robust increase in T(c) (+1.3 degrees C). However, the T(c) of these rats was not different from control animals during the subsequent dark period. In comparison, after 4 periods of social defeat, stressed rats showed a small but significantly higher (+0.2-0.3 degree C) T(c) versus control rats during both light and dark periods. Stressed rats did not show increased anxiety-like behavior versus control rats as assessed by the elevated plus maze test. However, in the forced swim test, the immobility time of stressed rats was significantly longer versus control rats, suggesting an increase in depression-like behavior. Furthermore, hyperthermia and depression-like behavior were still observed 8 days after cessation of the final social defeat session. These results suggest that repeated social defeat stress induces a chronic hyperthermia in rats that is associated with behavior resembling depression but not anxiety.

  11. Stress induced telomere shortening: longer life with less mutations?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mutations accumulate as a result of DNA damage and imperfect DNA repair machinery. In higher eukaryotes the accumulation and spread of mutations is limited in two primary ways: through p53-mediated programmed cell death and cellular senescence mediated by telomeres. Telomeres shorten at every cell division and cell stops dividing once the shortest telomere reaches a critical length. It has been shown that the rate of telomere attrition is accelerated when cells are exposed to DNA damaging agents. However the implications of this mechanism are not fully understood. Results With the help of in silico model we investigate the effect of genotoxic stress on telomere attrition and apoptosis in a population of non-identical replicating cells. When comparing the populations of cells with constant vs. stress-induced rate of telomere shortening we find that stress induced telomere shortening (SITS) increases longevity while reducing mutation rate. Interestingly, however, the effect takes place only when genotoxic stresses (e.g. reactive oxygen species due to metabolic activity) are distributed non-equally among cells. Conclusions Our results for the first time show how non-equal distribution of metabolic load (and associated genotoxic stresses) combined with stress induced telomere shortening can delay aging and minimize mutations. PMID:24580844

  12. Silver nanoparticles induce endoplasmatic reticulum stress response in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Christen, Verena; Capelle, Martinus; Fent, Karl

    2013-10-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) find increasing applications, and therefore humans and the environment are increasingly exposed to them. However, potential toxicological implications are not sufficiently known. Here we investigate effects of AgNPs (average size 120 nm) on zebrafish in vitro and in vivo, and compare them to human hepatoma cells (Huh7). AgNPs are incorporated in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) and Huh7, and in zebrafish embryos. In ZFL cells AgNPs lead to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) stress response, and TNF-α. Transcriptional alterations also occur in pro-apoptotic genes p53 and Bax. The transcriptional profile differed in ZFL and Huh7 cells. In ZFL cells, the ER stress marker BiP is induced, concomitant with the ER stress marker ATF-6 and spliced XBP-1 after 6 h and 24 h exposure to 0.5 g/L and 0.05 g/L AgNPs, respectively. This indicates the induction of different pathways of the ER stress response. Moreover, AgNPs induce TNF-α. In zebrafish embryos exposed to 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs hatching was affected and morphological defects occurred at high concentrations. ER stress related gene transcripts BiP and Synv are significantly up-regulated after 24 h at 0.1 and 5 mg/L AgNPs. Furthermore, transcriptional alterations occurred in the pro-apoptotic genes Noxa and p21. The ER stress response was strong in ZFL cells and occurred in zebrafish embryos as well. Our data demonstrate for the first time that AgNPs lead to induction of ER stress in zebrafish. The induction of ER stress can have several consequences including the activation of apoptotic and inflammatory pathways. - Highlights: • Effects of silver nanoparticles (120 nm AgNPs) are investigated in zebrafish. • AgNPs induce all ER stress reponses in vitro in zebrafish liver cells. • AgNPs induce weak ER stress in zebrafish embryos. • AgNPs induce oxidative stress and transcripts of pro-apoptosis genes.

  13. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  14. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer’s-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  15. Calculation of radiation-induced creep and stress relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagakawa, Johsei

    1995-08-01

    Numerical calculation based on a computer simulation of point defect kinetics under stress was performed to predict radiation-induced deformation in an Inconel X-750 bolt in a LWR core and for a 316 stainless steel blanket in experimental fusion reactors with the water-coolant scenario. Although the displacement rate is rather low, modest irradiation creep with nearly linear stress dependence was predicted below 200 MPa at 300°C in the LWR core. This low stress dependence causes significant stress relaxation, which coincides with the experimental data to 2 dpa. An almost equal amount of enhanced irradiation creep strain was predicted at 60°C in both solution annealed and cold worker 316 stainless steel in the water-cooled blanket. The stress relaxation is practically not expected without irradiation in both the cases, but the calculation predicts that it is definitely expected under irradiation.

  16. Aneuploidy-induced cellular stresses limit autophagic degradation

    PubMed Central

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vasile, Eliza; White, Eileen; Amon, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    An unbalanced karyotype, a condition known as aneuploidy, has a profound impact on cellular physiology and is a hallmark of cancer. Aneuploid cells experience a number of stresses that are caused by aneuploidy-induced proteomic changes. How the aneuploidy-associated stresses affect cells and whether cells respond to them are only beginning to be understood. Here we show that autophagosomal cargo such as protein aggregates accumulate within lysosomes in aneuploid cells. This causes a lysosomal stress response. Aneuploid cells activate the transcription factor TFEB, a master regulator of autophagic and lysosomal gene expression, thereby increasing the expression of genes needed for autophagy-mediated protein degradation. Accumulation of autophagic cargo within the lysosome and activation of TFEB-responsive genes are also observed in cells in which proteasome function is inhibited, suggesting that proteotoxic stress causes TFEB activation. Our results reveal a TFEB-mediated lysosomal stress response as a universal feature of the aneuploid state. PMID:26404941

  17. Aneuploidy-induced cellular stresses limit autophagic degradation.

    PubMed

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vasile, Eliza; White, Eileen; Amon, Angelika

    2015-10-01

    An unbalanced karyotype, a condition known as aneuploidy, has a profound impact on cellular physiology and is a hallmark of cancer. Aneuploid cells experience a number of stresses that are caused by aneuploidy-induced proteomic changes. How the aneuploidy-associated stresses affect cells and whether cells respond to them are only beginning to be understood. Here we show that autophagosomal cargo such as protein aggregates accumulate within lysosomes in aneuploid cells. This causes a lysosomal stress response. Aneuploid cells activate the transcription factor TFEB, a master regulator of autophagic and lysosomal gene expression, thereby increasing the expression of genes needed for autophagy-mediated protein degradation. Accumulation of autophagic cargo within the lysosome and activation of TFEB-responsive genes are also observed in cells in which proteasome function is inhibited, suggesting that proteotoxic stress causes TFEB activation. Our results reveal a TFEB-mediated lysosomal stress response as a universal feature of the aneuploid state.

  18. Gravity-induced stresses near a vertical cliff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, W.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The exact solution for gravity-induced stresses beneath a vertical cliff presented here has application to the design of cut slopes in rock, compares favorably with published photoelastic and finite-element results for this problem, and satisfies the condition that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface, except at the bottom corner where stress concentrations exist. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are tensile away from the bottom of the cliff-effects caused by movement below the cliff in response to the gravity loading of the cliff. Also, it is shown that along the top of the cliff normal stresses reduce to those predicted for laterally constrained flat-lying topography. ?? 1993.

  19. Reducing stress-induced birefringence in optical fiber ribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Várallyay, Z.; Arashitani, Y.; Varga, G.

    2011-01-01

    Coated and ribboned optical fibers are liable to external stress of the coating materials which may induce additional birefringence in the fiber glass. This residual stress in the coating may increase the polarization mode dispersion (PMD) of the fibers with a value well above allowed in modern, optical telecommunication systems. We report our numerical efforts on reducing the stress caused birefringence in fiber ribbons optimizing the geometry as well as the material parameters of the coating materials. We found that changing the cross-sectional geometry of the fiber ribbon such as edge shape or the ratio of primary and secondary coatings may lead to significant stress and constitutively PMD reduction in optical fibers. Changing the stiffness or the glass transition temperature (GTT) of the different components may also yield optimal conditions for stress reduction according to our finite element analyzes.

  20. Calnexin deficiency and endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zuppini, Anna; Groenendyk, Jody; Cormack, Lori A; Shore, Gordon; Opas, Michal; Bleackley, R Chris; Michalak, Marek

    2002-02-26

    In this study, we used calnexin-deficient cells to investigate the role of this protein in ER stress-induced apoptosis. We found that calnexin-deficient cells are relatively resistant to ER stress-induced apoptosis. However, caspase 3 and 8 cleavage and cytochrome c release were unchanged in these cells, indicating that ER to mitochondria "communication" during apoptotic stimulation is not affected in the absence of calnexin. The Bcl-2:Bax ratio was also not significantly changed in calnexin-deficient cells regardless of whether the ER stress was induced with thapsigargin or not. Ca(2+) homeostasis and ER morphology were unaffected by the lack of calnexin, but ER stress-induced Bap31 cleavage was significantly inhibited. Immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Bap31 forms complexes with calnexin, which may play a role in apoptosis. The results suggest that calnexin may not play a role in the initiation of the ER stress but that the protein has an effect on later apoptotic events via its influence on Bap31 function.

  1. Bovine retinal pericytes are resistant to glucose-induced oxidative stress in vitro.

    PubMed

    Agardh, Carl-David; Hultberg, Björn; Nayak, Ramesh C; Farthing-Nayak, Pamela; Agardh, Elisabet

    2005-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is a sight-threatening complication of diabetes, and loss of pericytes represents early signs of its development. We tested the hypothesis that high glucose levels may induce signs of oxidative stress in cultured bovine retinal pericytes. Pericytes were exposed to either normal (5.5 mM) or high (22 mM) glucose levels for 1, 3, and 5 days. Signs of oxidative stress were measured by expression of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase using real-time RTPCR. To elucidate the role of oxidative stress, we also measured glutathione (GSH) concentration in the cells and investigated the impact of thiol-reactive metal ions and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on intracellular GSH. Despite the stimulation with high glucose, thiol-reactive metal ions, or H(2)O(2), there was no clear increased expression of antioxidant enzymes or influence of GSH levels. Lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde level) was increased in bovine aortic smooth muscle cells, but not in bovine retinal pericytes. The data indicate that pericytes do not develop oxidative stress in response to hyperglycemia. However, it is not definitively excluded that oxidative stress may occur after longer time periods of glucose stimulation.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis of metal ion-induced protein assembly.

    PubMed

    Herr, Andrew B; Conrady, Deborah G

    2011-01-01

    A large number of biological systems are regulated by metal ion-induced protein assembly. This phenomenon can play a critical role in governing protein function and triggering downstream biological responses. We discuss the basic thermodynamic principles of linked equilibria that pertain to metal ion-induced dimerization and describe experimental approaches useful for studying such systems. The most informative techniques for studying these systems are sedimentation velocity and sedimentation equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation, although a wide range of other spectroscopic, chromatographic, or qualitative approaches can provide a wealth of useful information. These experimental procedures are illustrated with examples from two systems currently under study: zinc-induced assembly of a staphylococcal protein responsible for intercellular adhesion in bacterial biofilms and calcium-induced dimerization of a human nucleotidase.

  3. Differential metal response and regulation of human heavy metal-inducible genes.

    PubMed

    Murata, M; Gong, P; Suzuki, K; Koizumi, S

    1999-07-01

    A number of heavy metal-inducible genes have been reported, but their ranges of response to various metal species are not well known. It is also unclear if these genes are regulated through common mechanisms. To answer these questions, we compared induction kinetics of human metal-inducible genes including the MT-IIA (coding for a metallothionein isoform), hsp70 (coding for the 70-kDa heat-shock protein), and c-fos genes in HeLa cells exposed to Zn, Cd, Ag, Hg, Cu(II), Co, or Ni ions. Transcripts from these three genes were increased after exposure to wide ranges of metals, but each gene was unique in its induction kinetics. Generally, induction was observed at lower metal concentrations in the order of MT-IIA, hsp70, and c-fos. These genes also showed differential responses in time course: more rapid induction was observed in the order of c-fos, hsp70, and MT-IIA after exposure to Zn or Cd. Since the metal-responsive element (MRE) and heat shock element (HSE) of the MT-IIA and hsp70 genes, respectively, are thought to be the cis-acting DNA elements that mediate metal response, we compared the properties of proteins that specifically bind to these elements. MRE-binding activity was detected only in the extract from cells exposed to Zn. By contrast, HSE-binding activity was detected in extracts from cells treated with Zn, Cd, Ag, and Cu. The former was also activated by Zn in vitro, while the latter was not. Each of these DNA-binding activities showed no affinity to the recognition sequence of the other. These results demonstrate that the human metal-inducible genes have broad ranges of response to a variety of heavy metals, but suggest that they are probably regulated through independent mechanisms.

  4. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses. PMID:24212283

  5. Adaptation of intertidal biofilm communities is driven by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weipeng; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Tian, Renmao; Cao, Huiluo; Gao, Zhaoming; Li, Yongxin; Yu, Li; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2013-11-11

    Marine organisms in intertidal zones are subjected to periodical fluctuations and wave activities. To understand how microbes in intertidal biofilms adapt to the stresses, the microbial metagenomes of biofilms from intertidal and subtidal zones were compared. The genes responsible for resistance to metal ion and oxidative stresses were enriched in both 6-day and 12-day intertidal biofilms, including genes associated with secondary metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, signal transduction and extracellular polymeric substance metabolism. In addition, these genes were more enriched in 12-day than 6-day intertidal biofilms. We hypothesize that a complex signaling network is used for stress tolerance and propose a model illustrating the relationships between these functions and environmental metal ion concentrations and oxidative stresses. These findings show that bacteria use diverse mechanisms to adapt to intertidal zones and indicate that the community structures of intertidal biofilms are modulated by metal ion and oxidative stresses.

  6. Characteristics of EMI generated by negative metal-positive dielectric voltage stresses due to spacecraft charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaky, R. C.; Inouye, G. T.

    1985-01-01

    Charging of spacecraft surfaces by the environmental plasma can result in differential potentials between metallic structure and adjacent dielectric surfaces in which the relative polarity of the voltage stress is either negative dielectric/positive metal or negative metal/positive dielectric. Negative metal/positive dielectric is a stress condition that may arise if relatively large areas of spacecraft surface metals are shadowed from solar UV and/or if the UV intensity is reduced as in the situation in which the spacecraft is entering into or leaving eclipse. The results of experimental studies of negative metal/positive dielectric systems are given. Information is given on: enhanced electron emission I-V curves; e(3) corona noise vs e(3) steady-state current; the localized nature of e(3) and negative metal arc discharge currents; negative metal arc discharges at stress thresholds below 1 kilovolt; negative metal arc discharge characteristics; dependence of blowoff arc discharge current on spacecraft capacitance to space (linear dimension); and damage to second surface mirrors due to negative metal arcs.

  7. Residual stress brazing process induced in hybrid package for ISP applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Riccardo; Coppola, Francesco; Gasbarri, Paolo; Lecci, Umberto

    2010-03-01

    One of the most used components in the RF transmission devices mounted on satellite antennas are the ISP modules. They are designed by exploiting hybrid materials technology to improve their operative characteristics. In particular they are made up of a metallic carrier, a ceramic substrate, a metallic frame and a metallic cover. Inside the ceramic substrate metallic circuits and vias they are allocated to connect microelectronic components fixed on the external surface of the substrate of RF transmission modules. Metallic cover is one of the most delicate elements of the package because it must provide for the tightness of the assembly. The cover is welded to the frame by seam-welding technique. In order to assembly ceramic substrate and metallic frame a brazing process must be carried out. This brazing process introduces residual stresses at the end of the welding process. These residual stresses induced by the thermal cycles could cause crack growth and eventually a component fracture during the operating life of the satellite. In order to foresee their criticality, qualification tests, based on MIL standard, are mandatory. This MIL procedure establishes that the package must be thermally cycled with 500 cycles in the range of 223K≤398K. On account of this, thermal loads, associated to thermal cycles, may cause fractures in ceramic substrate and the failure of electronic components. In this paper a numerical approach able to simulate all the brazing process and to evaluate numerically all the stresses inside the ISP module will be proposed. Parametric studies on thermal loadings and on geometrical characteristics of the brazing subcomponents such as the metallic carrier, the ceramic substrate, the metallic frame and the metallic cover in order to evaluate maximum and critical stresses will be also presented. To perform such numerical analysis laboratory tests such as DMA have been carried out and detailed in the paper. The aim of these tests is to characterize

  8. Laser-induced torques in metallic ferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimuth, Frank; Blügel, Stefan; Mokrousov, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We study laser-induced torques in bcc Fe, hcp Co, and L 10 FePt based on first-principles electronic structure calculations and the Keldysh nonequilibrium formalism. We find that the torques have two contributions, one from the inverse Faraday effect (IFE) and one from the optical spin-transfer torque (OSTT). Depending on the ferromagnet at hand and on the quasiparticle broadening the two contributions may be of similar magnitude, or one contribution may dominate over the other. Additionally, we determine the nonequilibrium spin polarization in order to investigate its relation to the torque. We find the torques and the perpendicular component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization to be odd in the helicity of the laser light, while the spin polarization that is induced parallel to the magnetization is helicity independent. The parallel component of the nonequilibrium spin polarization is orders of magnitude larger than the perpendicular component. In the case of hcp Co we find good agreement between the calculated laser-induced torque and a recent experiment.

  9. Normal Cellular Prion Protein Protects against Manganese-induced Oxidative Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christopher J.; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Saetveit, Nathan J.; Houk, Robert. S.; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2012-01-01

    The normal prion protein is abundantly expressed in the CNS, but its biological function remains unclear. The prion protein has octapeptide repeat regions that bind to several divalent metals, suggesting that the prion proteins may alter the toxic effect of environmental neurotoxic metals. In the present study, we systematically examined whether prion protein modifies the neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn) by comparing the effect of Mn on mouse neural cells expressing prion protein (PrPC -cells) and prion-knockout (PrPKO -cells). Exposure to Mn (10 μM-1 mM) for 24 hr produced a dose-dependent cytotoxic response in both PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells. Interestingly, PrPC -cells (EC50 117.6μM) were more resistant to Mn-induced cytotoxicity, as compared to PrPKO -cells (EC50 59.9μM), suggesting a protective role for PrPC against Mn neurotoxicity. Analysis of intracellular Mn levels showed less Mn accumulation in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Furthermore, Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS generation were significantly attenuated in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Measurement of antioxidant status revealed similar basal levels of glutathione (GSH) in PrPC -cells and PrPKO -cells; however, Mn treatment caused greater depletion of GSH in PrPKO -cells. Mn-induced mitochondrial depolarization and ROS production were followed by time- and dose-dependent activation of the apoptotic cell death cascade involving caspase-9 and -3. Notably, DNA fragmentation induced by both Mn treatment and oxidative stress-inducer hydrogen peroxide (100μM) was significantly suppressed in PrPC -cells as compared to PrPKO -cells. Together, these results demonstrate that prion protein interferes with divalent metal Mn uptake and protects against Mn-induced oxidative stress and apoptotic cell death. PMID:17483122

  10. Hyperaccumulators, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and stress of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Miransari, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Use of plants, with hyperaccumulating ability or in association with soil microbes including the symbiotic fungi, arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), are among the most common biological methods of treating heavy metals in soil. Both hyperaccumulating plants and AM fungi have some unique abilities, which make them suitable to treat heavy metals. Hyperaccumulator plants have some genes, being expressed at the time of heavy metal pollution, and can accordingly localize high concentration of heavy metals to their tissues, without showing the toxicity symptoms. A key solution to the issue of heavy metal pollution may be the proper integration of hyperaccumulator plants and AM fungi. The interactions between the soil microbes and the host plant can also be important for the treatment of soils polluted with heavy metals.

  11. Validating a Model for Welding Induced Residual Stress Using High-Energy X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mach, J. C.; Budrow, C. J.; Pagan, D. C.; Ruff, J. P. C.; Park, J.-S.; Okasinski, J.; Beaudoin, A. J.; Miller, M. P.

    2017-03-01

    Integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) provides a pathway to advance performance in structures through the use of physically-based models to better understand how manufacturing processes influence product performance. As one particular challenge, consider that residual stresses induced in fabrication are pervasive and directly impact the life of structures. For ICME to be an effective strategy, it is essential that predictive capability be developed in conjunction with critical experiments. In the present work, simulation results from a multi-physics model for gas metal arc welding are evaluated through x-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. A test component was designed with intent to develop significant gradients in residual stress, be representative of real-world engineering application, yet remain tractable for finely spaced strain measurements with positioning equipment available at synchrotron facilities. The experimental validation lends confidence to model predictions, facilitating the explicit consideration of residual stress distribution in prediction of fatigue life.

  12. Roll-Bonded 300M/1010 Steel Metal-Metal Laminates: Forgeability, Toughness, Fatigue, and Stress Corrosion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    Charpy Impact Testing of Sheet Metal" Proc. Am. Soc. Testing Hats., 57, 1273 (1957). 6. S. V. Arnold, "Notch Sensitivity and Resistance to Tearing of...80-C-0575 ATC REPORT NO. R-92000/2CR-20 Roll-Bonded 300M /1010 Steel Metal-Metal Laminates: Forgeaility, Toughness, Fatigue, and Stress Corrosion L. E...process, the transverse flow of thp layers and interleaves being completely stable in the 300M /1010 system. 7 effects of forging on the mechanical

  13. Induction of engineered residual stresses fields and enhancement of fatigue life of high reliability metallic components by laser shock processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Porro, J. A.; Díaz, M.; Ruiz de Lara, L.; Correa, C.; Gil-Santos, A.; Peral, D.

    2013-02-01

    Laser shock processing (LSP) is being increasingly applied as an effective technology for the improvement of metallic materials mechanical and surface properties in different types of components as a means of enhancement of their corrosion and fatigue life behavior. As reported in previous contributions by the authors, a main effect resulting from the application of the LSP technique consists on the generation of relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Additional results accomplished by the authors in the line of practical development of the LSP technique at an experimental level (aiming its integral assessment from an interrelated theoretical and experimental point of view) are presented in this paper. Concretely, follow-on experimental results on the residual stress profiles and associated surface properties modification successfully reached in typical materials (especially Al and Ti alloys characteristic of high reliability components in the aerospace, nuclear and biomedical sectors) under different LSP irradiation conditions are presented along with a practical correlated analysis on the protective character of the residual stress profiles obtained under different irradiation strategies. Additional remarks on the improved character of the LSP technique over the traditional "shot peening" technique in what concerns depth of induced compressive residual stresses fields are also made through the paper.

  14. Association between Anger and Mental Stress-Induced Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Pimple, Pratik; Shah, Amit; Rooks, Cherie; Bremner, J. Douglas; Nye, Jonathon; Ibeanu, Ijeoma; Murrah, Nancy; Shallenberger, Lucy; Kelley, Mary; Raggi, Paolo; Vaccarino, Viola

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia is associated with adverse prognosis in coronary artery disease patients. Anger is thought to be a trigger of acute coronary syndromes and is associated with increased cardiovascular risk; however, little direct evidence exists for a link between anger and myocardial ischemia. Methods [99mTc]sestamibi single-photon emission tomography was performed at rest, after mental stress (a social stressor with a speech task), and after exercise/pharmacological stress. Summed scores of perfusion abnormalities were obtained by observer-independent software. A summed difference score, the difference between stress and rest scores, was used to quantify myocardial ischemia under both stress conditions. The Spielberger's State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory was used to assess different anger dimensions. Results The mean age was 50 years, 50% were female and 60% were non-white. After adjusting for demographic factors, smoking, coronary artery disease severity, depressive and anxiety symptoms, each interquartile range increment in state-anger score was associated with 0.36 units adjusted increase in ischemia as measured by the summed difference score (95% CI: 0.14-0.59); the corresponding association for trait-anger was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.21-1.69). Anger expression scales were not associated ischemia. None of the anger dimensions were related to ischemia during exercise/pharmacological stress. Conclusion Anger, both as an emotional state and as a personality trait, is significantly associated with propensity to develop myocardial ischemia during mental stress, but not during exercise/pharmacological stress. Patients with this psychological profile may be at increased risk for silent ischemia induced by emotional stress and this may translate into worse prognosis. PMID:25497256

  15. Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial fragmentation in frataxin-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lefevre, Sophie; Sliwa, Dominika; Rustin, Pierre; Camadro, Jean-Michel; Santos, Renata

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yeast frataxin-deficiency leads to increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress induces complete mitochondrial fragmentation in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress increases mitochondrial fragmentation in patient fibroblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of mitochondrial fission in {Delta}yfh1 induces oxidative stress resistance. -- Abstract: Friedreich ataxia (FA) is the most common recessive neurodegenerative disease. It is caused by deficiency in mitochondrial frataxin, which participates in iron-sulfur cluster assembly. Yeast cells lacking frataxin ({Delta}yfh1 mutant) showed an increased proportion of fragmented mitochondria compared to wild-type. In addition, oxidative stress induced complete fragmentation of mitochondria in {Delta}yfh1 cells. Genetically controlled inhibition of mitochondrial fission in these cells led to increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we present evidence that in yeast frataxin-deficiency interferes with mitochondrial dynamics, which might therefore be relevant for the pathophysiology of FA.

  16. Parkinson disease protein DJ-1 binds metals and protects against metal-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Björkblom, Benny; Adilbayeva, Altynai; Maple-Grødem, Jodi; Piston, Dominik; Ökvist, Mats; Xu, Xiang Ming; Brede, Cato; Larsen, Jan Petter; Møller, Simon Geir

    2013-08-02

    The progressive loss of motor control due to reduction of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and decreased striatal dopamine levels are the classically described features of Parkinson disease (PD). Neuronal damage also progresses to other regions of the brain, and additional non-motor dysfunctions are common. Accumulation of environmental toxins, such as pesticides and metals, are suggested risk factors for the development of typical late onset PD, although genetic factors seem to be substantial in early onset cases. Mutations of DJ-1 are known to cause a form of recessive early onset Parkinson disease, highlighting an important functional role for DJ-1 in early disease prevention. This study identifies human DJ-1 as a metal-binding protein able to evidently bind copper as well as toxic mercury ions in vitro. The study further characterizes the cytoprotective function of DJ-1 and PD-mutated variants of DJ-1 with respect to induced metal cytotoxicity. The results show that expression of DJ-1 enhances the cells' protective mechanisms against induced metal toxicity and that this protection is lost for DJ-1 PD mutations A104T and D149A. The study also shows that oxidation site-mutated DJ-1 C106A retains its ability to protect cells. We also show that concomitant addition of dopamine exposure sensitizes cells to metal-induced cytotoxicity. We also confirm that redox-active dopamine adducts enhance metal-catalyzed oxidation of intracellular proteins in vivo by use of live cell imaging of redox-sensitive S3roGFP. The study indicates that even a small genetic alteration can sensitize cells to metal-induced cell death, a finding that may revive the interest in exogenous factors in the etiology of PD.

  17. Effect of Underlayers on the Stress of Cu Films Prepared Using Ionized Metal Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Wu, J. J.; Qi, D. X.; Qian, Y.; Li, W. H.; Foo, P. D.

    We investigated the effect of barrier metals, Ta, TaN and multi-stacked Ta/TaN, on the stress of the late deposited Cu film using ionised-metal plasma (IMP) technique. It was found that the stress of the IMP Cu film is sensitive to the strain or lattice mismatch of the barrier layer underneath. The nitrogen composition incorporated into Ta barrier layer causes tensile strain in the barrier and also the stress in the late deposited Cu film. The Cu film deposited on a multi-stacked Ta/TaN barrier showed the smallest stress due to relaxation of strain in the multi-layer barrier. In addition, the stress was also found sensitive to the annealing temperature. The abrupt change in the stress at high annealing temperatures coincides well with the formation of Cu3Si compound.

  18. Stress in the Adult Rat Exacerbates Muscle Pain Induced by Early-Life Stress

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Pedro; Green, Paul G.; Levine, Jon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Early-life stress and exposure to stressful stimuli play a major role in the development of chronic widespread pain in adults. However, how they interact in chronic pain syndromes remains unclear. Methods Dams and neonatal litters were submitted to a restriction of nesting material (neonatal limited bedding, NLB) for one week. As adults, these rats were exposed to a painless sound stress protocol. The involvement of sympathoadrenal catecholamines, interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis alpha (TNFα) in nociception, was evaluated through of behavioral and ELISA assays, surgical interventions and intrathecal antisense treatments. Results Adult NLB rats exhibited mild muscle hyperalgesia, which was markedly aggravated by sound stress (peaking 15 days after exposure). Adrenal medullectomy did not modify hyperalgesia in NLB rats but prevented its aggravation by sound stress. Sustained administration of epinephrine to NLB rats mimicked sound stress effect. Intrathecal treatment with antisense directed to IL-6-receptor subunit gp130, but not to TNFα type 1 receptor (TNFR1), inhibited hyperalgesia in NLB rats. However, antisense against either gp130 or TNFR1 inhibited sound stress-induced enhancement of hyperalgesia. Compared to control rats, NLB rats exhibit increased plasma levels of IL-6 but decreased levels of TNFα, whereas sound stress increases IL-6 plasma levels in control but not in NLB rats. Conclusions Early-life stress induces a persistent elevation of IL-6, hyperalgesia and susceptibility to chronic muscle pain, which is unveiled by exposure to stress in adults. This probably depends on an interaction between adrenal catecholamines and pro-inflammatory cytokines acting at muscle nociceptor level. PMID:23706525

  19. Fluid Production Induced Stress Analysis Surrounding an Elliptic Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Harshad Rajendra

    Hydraulic fracturing is an effective technique used in well stimulation to increase petroleum well production. A combination of multi-stage hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling has led to the recent boom in shale gas production which has changed the energy landscape of North America. During the fracking process, highly pressurized mixture of water and proppants (sand and chemicals) is injected into to a crack, which fractures the surrounding rock structure and proppants help in keeping the fracture open. Over a longer period, however, these fractures tend to close due to the difference between the compressive stress exerted by the reservoir on the fracture and the fluid pressure inside the fracture. During production, fluid pressure inside the fracture is reduced further which can accelerate the closure of a fracture. In this thesis, we study the stress distribution around a hydraulic fracture caused by fluid production. It is shown that fluid flow can induce a very high hoop stress near the fracture tip. As the pressure gradient increases stress concentration increases. If a fracture is very thin, the flow induced stress along the fracture decreases, but the stress concentration at the fracture tip increases and become unbounded for an infinitely thin fracture. The result from the present study can be used for studying the fracture closure problem, and ultimately this in turn can lead to the development of better proppants so that prolific well production can be sustained for a long period of time.

  20. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Riad, Sandra; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin (CisPt) is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death). Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death). PMID:25685789

  1. Environmental stresses induce health-promoting phytochemicals in lettuce.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myung-Min; Carey, Edward E; Rajashekar, C B

    2009-07-01

    Plants typically respond to environmental stresses by inducing antioxidants as a defense mechanism. As a number of these are also phytochemicals with health-promoting qualities in the human diet, we have used mild environmental stresses to enhance the phytochemical content of lettuce, a common leafy vegetable. Five-week-old lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) plants grown in growth chambers were exposed to mild stresses such as heat shock (40 degrees C for 10 min), chilling (4 degrees C for 1d) or high light intensity (800 micromolm(-2)s(-1) for 1d). In response to these stresses, there was a two to threefold increase in the total phenolic content and a significant increase in the antioxidant capacity. The concentrations of two major phenolic compounds in lettuce, chicoric acid and chlorogenic acid, increased significantly in response to all the stresses. Quercetin-3-O-glucoside and luteolin-7-O-glucoside were not detected in the control plants, but showed marked accumulations following the stress treatments. The results suggest that certain phenolic compounds can be induced in lettuce by environmental stresses. Of all the stress treatments, high light produced the greatest accumulation of phenolic compounds, especially following the stress treatments during the recovery. In addition, key genes such as phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), l-galactose dehydrogenase (l-GalDH), and gamma-tocopherol methyltransferase (gamma-TMT) involved in the biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, and alpha-tocopherol, respectively, were rapidly activated by chilling stress while heat shock and high light did not appear to have an effect on the expression of PAL and gamma-TMT. However, l-GalDH was consistently activated in response to all the stresses. The results also show that these mild environmental stresses had no adverse effects on the overall growth of lettuce, suggesting that it is possible to use mild environmental stresses to successfully improve the phytochemical content

  2. Stress Induced Mechano-electrical Writing-Reading of Polymer Film Powered by Contact Electrification Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Calmeiro, Tomás R.; Igreja, Rui; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mechano-electrical writing and reading in polyaniline (PANI) thin film are demonstrated via metal-polymer contact electrification mechanism (CEM). An innovative conception for a non-destructive self-powered writable-readable data sheet is presented which can pave the way towards new type of stress induced current harvesting devices. A localized forced deformation of the interface has been enacted by pressing the atomic force microscopic probe against the polymer surface, allowing charge transfer between materials interfaces. The process yields a well-defined charge pattern by transmuting mechanical stress in to readable information. The average of output current increment has been influenced from 0.5 nA to 15 nA for the applied force of 2 nN to 14 nN instead of electrical bias. These results underscore the importance of stress-induced current harvesting mechanism and could be scaled up for charge patterning of polymer surface to writable-readable data sheet. Time evolutional current distribution (TECD) study of the stress-induced patterned PANI surface shows the response of readability of the recorded data with time.

  3. Stress Induced Mechano-electrical Writing-Reading of Polymer Film Powered by Contact Electrification Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Goswami, Sumita; Nandy, Suman; Calmeiro, Tomás R.; Igreja, Rui; Martins, Rodrigo; Fortunato, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mechano-electrical writing and reading in polyaniline (PANI) thin film are demonstrated via metal-polymer contact electrification mechanism (CEM). An innovative conception for a non-destructive self-powered writable-readable data sheet is presented which can pave the way towards new type of stress induced current harvesting devices. A localized forced deformation of the interface has been enacted by pressing the atomic force microscopic probe against the polymer surface, allowing charge transfer between materials interfaces. The process yields a well-defined charge pattern by transmuting mechanical stress in to readable information. The average of output current increment has been influenced from 0.5 nA to 15 nA for the applied force of 2 nN to 14 nN instead of electrical bias. These results underscore the importance of stress-induced current harvesting mechanism and could be scaled up for charge patterning of polymer surface to writable-readable data sheet. Time evolutional current distribution (TECD) study of the stress-induced patterned PANI surface shows the response of readability of the recorded data with time. PMID:26786701

  4. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) INDUCED LUNG INJURY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress participates in particulate matter (PM) induced acute lung injury.
    Elizabeth S. Roberts1, Judy L. Richards2, Kevin L. Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC, 2US Environmental Protection Agency, NHEERL, RTP, NC.
    Epidemiol...

  5. Neuromodulator and Emotion Biomarker for Stress Induced Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Simeng; Wang, Wei; Huang, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    Affective disorders are a leading cause of disabilities worldwide, and the etiology of these many affective disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder is due to hormone changes, which includes hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis in the peripheral nervous system and neuromodulators in the central nervous system. Consistent with pharmacological studies indicating that medical treatment acts by increasing the concentration of catecholamine, the locus coeruleus (LC)/norepinephrine (NE) system is regarded as a critical part of the central “stress circuitry,” whose major function is to induce “fight or flight” behavior and fear and anger emotion. Despite the intensive studies, there is still controversy about NE with fear and anger. For example, the rats with LC ablation were more reluctant to leave a familiar place and took longer to consume the food pellets in an unfamiliar place (neophobia, i.e., fear in response to novelty). The reason for this discrepancy might be that NE is not only for flight (fear), but also for fight (anger). Here, we try to review recent literatures about NE with stress induced emotions and their relations with mental disorders. We propose that stress induced NE release can induce both fear and anger. “Adrenaline rush or norepinephrine rush” and fear and anger emotion might act as biomarkers for mental disorders. PMID:27051536

  6. Does aspirin-induced oxidative stress cause asthma exacerbation?

    PubMed Central

    Kacprzak, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    Aspirin-induced asthma (AIA) is a distinct clinical syndrome characterized by severe asthma exacerbations after ingestion of aspirin or other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The exact pathomechanism of AIA remains unknown, though ongoing research has shed some light. Recently, more and more attention has been focused on the role of aspirin in the induction of oxidative stress, especially in cancer cell systems. However, it has not excluded the similar action of aspirin in other inflammatory disorders such as asthma. Moreover, increased levels of 8-isoprostanes, reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in expired breath condensate in steroid-naïve patients with AIA compared to AIA patients treated with steroids and healthy volunteers, has been observed. This review is an attempt to cover aspirin-induced oxidative stress action in AIA and to suggest a possible related pathomechanism. PMID:26170841

  7. FEM simulation of residual stresses induced by laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyre, P.; Sollier, A.; Chaieb, I.; Berthe, L.; Bartnicki, E.; Braham, C.; Fabbro, R.

    2003-08-01

    Benefits from laser Peening have been demonstrated several times in fields like fatigue, wear or stress corrosion cracking. However, in spite of recent work on the calculation of residual stresses, very few authors have considered a finite element method (FEM) approach to predict laser-induced mechanical effect. This comes mainly from the high strain rates involved during LP (10^6 s^{-1}), that necessitate the precise determination of dynamic properties, and also from the possible combination of thermal and mechanical loadings in the case of LP without protective coatings. In this paper, we aim at presenting a global approach of the problem, starting from the determination of loading conditions and dynamic yield strengths, to finish with FEM calculation of residual stress fields induced on a 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel and a 7075 aluminium alloy.

  8. Improving crop tolerance to heavy metal stress by polyamine application.

    PubMed

    Soudek, Petr; Ursu, Marina; Petrová, Šárka; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2016-12-15

    Many areas have been heavily contaminated by heavy metals from industry and are not suitable for food production. The consumption of contaminated foods represents a health risk in humans, although some heavy metals are essential at low concentrations. Increasing the concentrations of essential elements in foods is one goal to improve nutrition. The aim of this study was to increase the accumulation of heavy metals in plant foods by the external application of putrescine. The levels of cadmium, zinc and iron were measured in different vegetables grown in hydroponic medium supplemented with heavy metals and compared with those grown in a reference medium. The estimated daily intake, based on the average daily consumption for various vegetable types, and the influence of polyamines on metal uptake were calculated.

  9. OXIDATIVE STRESS 3 Is a Chromatin-Associated Factor Involved in Tolerance to Heavy Metals and Oxidative Stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cDNA expression library from Brassica juncea was introduced into the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe to select for transformants tolerant to cadmium. Transformants expressing OXIDATIVE STRESS 3 (OXS3) or OXS3-Like cDNA exhibited enhanced tolerance to a range of metals and oxidizing chemica...

  10. Thermal elasto-plastic stress analysis during laser heating of a metal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yanbei; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2008-03-01

    During laser heating of a metal material, the continuity of material confines its free expansion, thermal stresses arise. On one hand the thermal expansion of the heated zone of the material increases with the increase of temperature, the thermal stress level increases correspondingly; on the other hand the mechanical properties of the material will change with the increase of temperature, especially the elastic modulus, yield strength and tensile strength drop significantly, which is the so-called thermal softening problem. Due to the effect of the two factors, as the heating time or the intensity of the laser beam increases, it is possible that the stress levels of the heated zone of the material exceed the yield strength, which leads the material to come into a plastic stage. Thus, a thermal plastic problem occurs. In this study, thermal elasto-plastic stresses during laser heating of a metal plate are computed by the finite element method (FEM) based on thermal elasto-plastic constitutive theory. The mechanical behaviors of the metal material during the laser heating are analyzed. By the analysis of the results, it is found that thermal expansion leads to the increase of stress level early during the laser irradiating, and thermal softening causes the decrease of stress levels in the plastic zone and the slow growth and even decrease of stress levels in elastic zone later. The radial stresses are all compressive stresses, and the hoop stresses are compressive stresses within about the laser spot and are tensile stresses at other place. This work may be beneficial to the laser processing of metal materials.

  11. GaN Stress Evolution During Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Amano, H.; Chason, E.; Figiel, J.; Floro, J.A.; Han, J.; Hearne, S.; Hunter, J.; Tsong, I.

    1998-10-14

    The evolution of stress in gallium nitride films on sapphire has been measured in real- time during metal organic chemical vapor deposition. In spite of the 161%0 compressive lattice mismatch of GaN to sapphire, we find that GaN consistently grows in tension at 1050"C. Furthermore, in-situ stress monitoring indicates that there is no measurable relaxation of the tensile growth stress during annealing or thermal cycling.

  12. Predicting stress-induced velocity anisotropy in rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Mavko, G.; Mukerji, T.; Godfrey, N.

    1995-07-01

    A simple transformation, using measured isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S} versus hydrostatic pressure, is presented for predicting stress-induced seismic velocity anisotropy in rocks. The compliant, crack-like portions of the pore space are characterized by generalized compressional and shear compliances that are estimated form the isotropic V{sub P} and V{sub S}. The physical assumption that the compliant porosity is crack-like means that the pressure dependence of the generalized compliances is governed primarily by normal tractions resolved across cracks and defects. This allows the measured pressure dependence to be mapped form the hydrostatic stress state to any applied nonhydrostatic stress. Predicted P- and S-wave velocities agree reasonably well with uniaxial stress data for Barre Granite and Massillon Sandstone. While it is mechanically similar to methods based on idealized ellipsoidal cracks, the approach is relatively independent of any assumed crack geometry and is not limited to small crack densities.

  13. Contribution of glutathione to the control of cellular redox homeostasis under toxic metal and metalloid stress.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Luis E; Sobrino-Plata, Juan; Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Carrasco-Gil, Sandra; Flores-Cáceres, M Laura; Ortega-Villasante, Cristina; Escobar, Carolina

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of toxic metals and metalloids, such as cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), or arsenic (As), as a consequence of various anthropogenic activities, poses a serious threat to the environment and human health. The ability of plants to take up mineral nutrients from the soil can be exploited to develop phytoremediation technologies able to alleviate the negative impact of toxic elements in terrestrial ecosystems. However, we must select plant species or populations capable of tolerating exposure to hazardous elements. The tolerance of plant cells to toxic elements is highly dependent on glutathione (GSH) metabolism. GSH is a biothiol tripeptide that plays a fundamental dual role: first, as an antioxidant to mitigate the redox imbalance caused by toxic metal(loid) accumulation, and second as a precursor of phytochelatins (PCs), ligand peptides that limit the free ion cellular concentration of those pollutants. The sulphur assimilation pathway, synthesis of GSH, and production of PCs are tightly regulated in order to alleviate the phytotoxicity of different hazardous elements, which might induce specific stress signatures. This review provides an update on mechanisms of tolerance that depend on biothiols in plant cells exposed to toxic elements, with a particular emphasis on the Hg-triggered responses, and considering the contribution of hormones to their regulation.

  14. N-acetylcysteine attenuates dimethylnitrosamine induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Sathish, Priya; Paramasivan, Vijayalakshmi; Palani, Vivekanandan; Sivanesan, Karthikeyan

    2011-03-05

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of various hepatic disorders and hence screening for a good hepatoprotective and antioxidant agent is the need of the hour. The present study was aimed to investigate the hepatoprotective and antioxidant property of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) induced oxidative stress and hepatocellular damage in male Wistar albino rats. Administration of single dose of DMN (5mg/kg b.w.; i.p.) resulted in significant elevation in the levels of serum aspartate transaminase and alanine transaminase, indicating hepatocellular damage. Oxidative stress induced by DMN treatment was confirmed by an elevation in the status of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduction in the activities of enzymic antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase and in the levels of non-enzymic antioxidants, reduced glutathione, vitamin-C and vitamin-E in the liver tissue. DMN induced oxidative stress and hepatocellular membrane instability was further substantiated by a decline in the status of the membrane bound ATPases in the liver tissue. Post-treatment with NAC (50mg/kg b.w.; p.o.) for 7days effectively protected against the DMN induced insult to liver by preventing the elevation in the status of the serum marker enzymes and LPO, and restoring the activities of both the enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidants and membrane bound ATPases towards normalcy. These results demonstrate that NAC acts as a good hepatoprotective and antioxidant agent in attenuating DMN induced oxidative stress and hepatocellular damage.

  15. Extracytoplasmic Stress Responses Induced by Antimicrobial Cationic Polyethylenimines

    PubMed Central

    Lander, Blaine A.; Checchi, Kyle D.; Koplin, Stephen A.; Smith, Virginia F.; Domanski, Tammy L.; Isaac, Daniel D.; Lin, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    The ability of an antimicrobial, cationic polyethylenimine (PEI+) to induce the three known extracytoplasmic stress responses of Escherichia coli was quantified. Exposure of E. coli to PEI+ in solution revealed specific, concentration-dependent induction of the Cpx extracytoplasmic cellular stress response, ~2.0-2.5 fold at 320 μg/mL after 1.5 hours without significant induction of the σE or Bae stress responses. In comparison, exposure of E. coli to a non-antimicrobial polymer, polyethylene oxide (PEO), resulted in no induction of the three stress responses. The antimicrobial small molecule vanillin, a known membrane pore-forming compound, was observed to cause specific, concentration-dependent induction of the σE stress response, ~6-fold at 640 μg/mL after 1.5 hours, without significant induction of the Cpx or Bae stress responses. The different stress response induction profiles of PEI+ and vanillin suggest that although both are antimicrobial compounds, they interact with the bacterial membrane and extracytoplasmic area by unique mechanisms. EPR studies of liposomes containing spin-labeled lipids exposed to PEI+, vanillin, and PEO reveal that PEI+ and PEO increased membrane stability whereas vanillin was found to have no effect. PMID:22797865

  16. Stress-Induced Activation of Heterochromatic Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tittel-Elmer, Mireille; Bucher, Etienne; Broger, Larissa; Mathieu, Olivier; Paszkowski, Jerzy; Vaillant, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Constitutive heterochromatin comprising the centromeric and telomeric parts of chromosomes includes DNA marked by high levels of methylation associated with histones modified by repressive marks. These epigenetic modifications silence transcription and ensure stable inheritance of this inert state. Although environmental cues can alter epigenetic marks and lead to modulation of the transcription of genes located in euchromatic parts of the chromosomes, there is no evidence that external stimuli can globally destabilize silencing of constitutive heterochromatin. We have found that heterochromatin-associated silencing in Arabidopsis plants subjected to a particular temperature regime is released in a genome-wide manner. This occurs without alteration of repressive epigenetic modifications and does not involve common epigenetic mechanisms. Such induced release of silencing is mostly transient, and rapid restoration of the silent state occurs without the involvement of factors known to be required for silencing initiation. Thus, our results reveal new regulatory aspects of transcriptional repression in constitutive heterochromatin and open up possibilities to identify the molecular mechanisms involved. PMID:21060865

  17. First-principles local stress in crystalline and amorphous metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, D. M.; Ojha, Madhusudan; Egami, T.

    2013-10-01

    Atomic size is perhaps the most commonly used concept to describe material properties. Advances in the understanding of materials are hindered by the available choices of simplifying concepts that can be used. However, the precise definition of atomic size is not easy, and often controversial. Atomic level stress provides a new interpretive tool that draws on the rich formalism of solid mechanics for use with density functional calculations to advance a deeper understanding of the properties of materials. We discuss atomic level stresses in liquids and glasses and make comparisons with ordered and disordered crystals. Somewhat surprisingly, even ordered compounds that are under no macroscopic stress and whose individual atoms are completely relaxed, i.e., no force acting on them, can have substantial atomic level stresses. On top of concepts such as the ionicity or covalency, the atomic level stresses add to the arsenal of analysis tools that are available to interpret the results of density functional calculations.

  18. Heavy Metal Stress and Some Mechanisms of Plant Defense Response

    PubMed Central

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants. PMID:25688377

  19. Heavy metal stress and some mechanisms of plant defense response.

    PubMed

    Emamverdian, Abolghassem; Ding, Yulong; Mokhberdoran, Farzad; Xie, Yinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented bioaccumulation and biomagnification of heavy metals (HMs) in the environment have become a dilemma for all living organisms including plants. HMs at toxic levels have the capability to interact with several vital cellular biomolecules such as nuclear proteins and DNA, leading to excessive augmentation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This would inflict serious morphological, metabolic, and physiological anomalies in plants ranging from chlorosis of shoot to lipid peroxidation and protein degradation. In response, plants are equipped with a repertoire of mechanisms to counteract heavy metal (HM) toxicity. The key elements of these are chelating metals by forming phytochelatins (PCs) or metallothioneins (MTs) metal complex at the intra- and intercellular level, which is followed by the removal of HM ions from sensitive sites or vacuolar sequestration of ligand-metal complex. Nonenzymatically synthesized compounds such as proline (Pro) are able to strengthen metal-detoxification capacity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes. Another important additive component of plant defense system is symbiotic association with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. AM can effectively immobilize HMs and reduce their uptake by host plants via binding metal ions to hyphal cell wall and excreting several extracellular biomolecules. Additionally, AM fungi can enhance activities of antioxidant defense machinery of plants.

  20. Intraspecific traits change biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning under metal stress.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Isabel; Pascoal, Cláudia; Cássio, Fernanda

    2011-08-01

    Studies investigating the impacts of biodiversity loss on ecosystem processes have often reached different conclusions, probably because insufficient attention has been paid to some aspects including (1) which biodiversity measure (e.g., species number, species identity or trait) better explains ecosystem functioning, (2) the mechanisms underpinning biodiversity effects, and (3) how can environmental context modulates biodiversity effects. Here, we investigated how species number (one to three species) and traits of aquatic fungal decomposers (by replacement of a functional type from an unpolluted site by another from a metal-polluted site) affect fungal production (biomass accumulation) and plant litter decomposition in the presence and absence of metal stress. To examine the putative mechanisms that explain biodiversity effects, we determined the contribution of each fungal species to the total biomass produced in multicultures by real-time PCR. In the absence of metal, positive diversity effects were observed for fungal production and leaf decomposition as a result of species complementarity. Metal stress decreased diversity effects on leaf decomposition in assemblages containing the functional type from the unpolluted site, probably due to competitive interactions between fungi. However, dominance effect maintained positive diversity effects under metal stress in assemblages containing the functional type from the metal-polluted site. These findings emphasize the importance of intraspecific diversity in modulating diversity effects under metal stress, providing evidence that trait-based diversity measures should be incorporated when examining biodiversity effects.

  1. [Exercise-induced shear stress: Physiological basis and clinical impact].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Iván; Romero, Fernando; Saavedra, María Javiera

    2016-01-01

    The physiological regulation of vascular function is essential for cardiovascular health and depends on adequate control of molecular mechanisms triggered by endothelial cells in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli induced by blood flow. Endothelial dysfunction is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease, where an imbalance between synthesis of vasodilator and vasoconstrictor molecules is one of its main mechanisms. In this context, the shear stress is one of the most important mechanical stimuli to improve vascular function, due to endothelial mechanotransduction, triggered by stimulation of various endothelial mechanosensors, induce signaling pathways culminating in increased bioavailability of vasodilators molecules such as nitric oxide, that finally trigger the angiogenic mechanisms. These mechanisms allow providing the physiological basis for the effects of exercise on vascular health. In this review it is discussed the molecular mechanisms involved in the vascular response induced by shear stress and its impact in reversing vascular injury associated with the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in our population.

  2. Induced groundwater flux by increases in the aquifer's total stress.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2015-01-01

    Fluid-filled granular soils experience changes in total stress because of earth and oceanic tides, earthquakes, erosion, sedimentation, and changes in atmospheric pressure. The pore volume may deform in response to the changes in stress and this may lead to changes in pore fluid pressure. The transient fluid flow can therefore be induced by the gradient in excess pressure in a fluid-saturated porous medium. This work demonstrates the use of stochastic methodology in prediction of induced one-dimensional field-scale groundwater flow through a heterogeneous aquifer. A closed-form of mean groundwater flux is developed to quantify the induced field-scale mean behavior of groundwater flow and analyze the impacts of the spatial correlation length scale of log hydraulic conductivity and the pore compressibility. The findings provided here could be useful for the rational planning and management of groundwater resources in aquifers that contain lenses with large vertical aquifer matrix compressibility values.

  3. Stress-induced analgesia and endogenous opioid peptides: the importance of stress duration.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Drupad; Hamid, Abdul; Friedman, Theodore C; Nguyen, Khanh; Tseng, Andy; Marquez, Paul; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2011-01-15

    Stress is known to elicit pain relief, a phenomenon referred to as stress-induced analgesia. Based on stress parameters, opioid and non-opioid intrinsic pain inhibitory systems can be activated. In the present study, we assessed whether changing the duration of stress would affect the involvement of endogenous opioids in antinociception elicited by swim in warm water (32 °C), known to be opioid-mediated. Using mice lacking beta-endorphin, enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates, we assessed the role of each opioid peptide in antinociception induced by a short (3 min) vs. long (15 min) swim. Mice were tested for baseline hot plate latency, exposed to swim (3 or 15 min) in warm water (32 °C) and then tested for antinociception at 5, 15 and 30 min. Our results revealed that both swim paradigms induced significant antinociception in wild-type mice. However, the short swim failed to induce antinociception in beta-endorphin-deficient mice, illustrating that beta-endorphin is important in this form of stress-induced antinociception. On the other hand, antinociception elicited by the long swim was only slightly reduced in beta-endorphin-deficient mice despite pretreatment with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the antinociception elicited by the long swim. Nevertheless, a delayed hyperalgesic response developed in mice lacking beta-endorphin following exposure to either swim paradigm. On the other hand, mice lacking enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates expressed a comparable antinociceptive response and did not exhibit the delayed hyperalgesic response. Together, our results suggest that the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin not only mediates antinociception induced by the short swim but also prevents the delayed hyperalgesic response elicited by either swim paradigm.

  4. Stress-induced analgesia and endogenous opioid peptides: the importance of stress duration

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Drupad; Hamid, Abdul; Friedman, Theodore C.; Nguyen, Khanh; Tseng, Andy; Marquez, Paul; Lutfy, Kabirullah

    2010-01-01

    Stress is known to elicit pain relief, a phenomenon referred to as stress-induced analgesia. Based on stress parameters, opioid and non-opioid intrinsic pain inhibitory systems can be activated. In the present study, we assessed whether changing the duration of stress would affect the involvement of endogenous opioids in antinociception elicited by swim in warm water (32°C), known to be opioid-mediated. Using mice lacking beta-endorphin, enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates, we assessed the role of each opioid peptide in antinociception induced by a short (3 min) vs. long (15 min) swim. Mice were tested for baseline hot plate latency, exposed to swim (3 or 15 min) in warm water (32°C) and then tested for antinociception at 5, 15 and 30 min. Our results revealed that both swim paradigms induced significant antinociception in wild-type mice. However, the short swim failed to induce antinociception in beta-endorphin-deficient mice, illustrating that beta-endorphin is important in this form of stress-induced antinociception. On the other hand, antinociception elicited by the long swim was only slightly reduced in beta-endorphin-deficient mice despite pretreatment with naloxone, a non-selective opioid receptor antagonist, significantly attenuated the antinociception elicited by the long swim. Nevertheless, a delayed hyperalgesic response developed in mice lacking beta-endorphin following exposure to either swim paradigm. On the other hand, mice lacking enkephalins or dynorphins and their respective wild-type littermates expressed a comparable antinociceptive response and did not exhibit the delayed hyperalgesic response. Together, our results suggest that the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin not only mediates antinociception induced by the short swim but also prevents the delayed hyperalgesic response elicited by either swim paradigm. PMID:21044625

  5. Selective Metallization Induced by Laser Activation: Fabricating Metallized Patterns on Polymer via Metal Oxide Composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jihai; Zhou, Tao; Wen, Liang

    2017-02-28

    Recently, metallization on polymer substrates has been given more attention due to its outstanding properties of both plastics and metals. In this study, the metal oxide composite of copper-chromium oxide (CuO·Cr2O3) was incorporated into the polymer matrix to design a good laser direct structuring (LDS) material, and the well-defined copper pattern (thickness =10 μm) was successfully fabricated through selective metallization based on 1064 nm near-infrared pulsed laser activation and electroless copper plating. We also prepared polymer composites incorporated with CuO and Cr2O3; however, these two polymer composites both had very poor capacity of selective metallization, which has no practical value for LDS technology. In our work, the key reasons causing the above results were systematically studied and elucidated using XPS, UV-vis-IR, optical microscopy, SEM, contact angle, ATR FTIR, and so on. The results showed that 54.0% Cu(2+) in the polymer composite of CuO·Cr2O3 (the amount =5 wt %) is reduced to Cu(0) (elemental copper) after laser activation (irradiation); however, this value is only 26.8% for the polymer composite of CuO (the amount =5 wt %). It was confirmed that to achieve a successful selective metallization after laser activation, not only was the new formed Cu(0) (the catalytic seeds) the crucial factor, but the number of generated Cu(0) catalytic seeds was also important. These two factors codetermined the final results of the selective metallization. The CuO·Cr2O3 is very suitable for applications of fabricating metallic patterns (e.g., metal decoration, circuit) on the inherent pure black or bright black polymer materials via LDS technology, which has a prospect of large-scale industrial applications.

  6. Antioxidant effect of vitamin E treatment on some heavy metals-induced renal and testicular injuries in male mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Attar, Atef M.

    2010-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals in water, air and soil are global problems that are a growing threat to humanity. Heavy metals are widely distributed in the environment and some of them occur in food, water, air and tissues even in the absence of occupational exposure. The antioxidant and protective influences of vitamin E on a mixture of some heavy metals (Pb, Hg, Cd and Cu)-induced oxidative stress and renal and testicular injuries were evaluated in male mice. Exposure of mice to these heavy metals in drinking water for seven weeks resulted in statistical increases of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid concentrations. The levels of glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutases (SOD) in kidney and testis tissues were significantly declined. Moreover, the histopathological evaluation of kidney and testis showed severe changes in mice treated with these heavy metals. Administration of vitamin E protected the kidney and testis of mice exposed to heavy metals as evidenced by appearance of normal histological structures, insignificant changes in the values of plasma creatinine, urea and uric acid, and the levels of kidney GSH and SOD, while the levels of testis GSH and SOD were notably decreased. These data suggest that the administration of vitamin E protects against heavy metals-induced renal and testicular oxidative stress and injuries. PMID:23961105

  7. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  8. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  9. Characterization of an inducible oxidative stress system in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Bol, D K; Yasbin, R E

    1990-06-01

    Exponentially growing cells of Bacillus subtilis demonstrated inducible protection against killing by hydrogen peroxide when prechallenged with a nonlethal dose of this oxidative agent. Cells deficient in a functional recE+ gene product were as much as 100 times more sensitive to the H2O2 but still exhibited an inducible protective response. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide also induced the recE(+)-dependent DNA damage-inducible (din) genes, the resident prophage, and the product of the recE+ gene itself. Thus hydrogen peroxide is capable of inducing the SOS-like or SOB system of B. subtilis. However, the induction of this DNA repair system by other DNA-damaging agents is not sufficient to activate the protective response to hydrogen peroxide. Therefore, at least one more regulatory network (besides the SOB system) that responds to oxidative stress must exist. Furthermore, the data presented indicate that a functional catalase gene is necessary for this protective response.

  10. Stress induced reversible crystal transition in poly(butylene succinate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guoming; Zheng, Liuchun; Zhang, Xiuqin; Li, Chuncheng; Wang, Dujin

    2015-03-01

    The plastic deformation mechanism of semi-crystalline polymers is a long-studied topic, which is crucial for establishing structure/property relationships. For polymers with stress induced crystal transition, some open questions still need to be answered, such as on which stage of plastic deformation does the crystal transition take place, and more importantly, what happens on the lamellar structure during crystal transition. In this talk, stress-induced reversible crystal transition in poly(butylene succinate) was systematically investigated by in-situ WAXS and SAXS. A ``lamellar thickening'' phenomenon was observed during stretching, which was shown to mainly originated from the reversible crystal transition. This mechanism was shown to be valid in poly(ethylene succinate). The critical stress for the transition was measured in a series of PBS-based crystalline-amorphous multi-block copolymers. Interestingly, these PBS copolymers exhibited identical critical stress independent of amorphous blocks. The universal critical stress for crystal transition was interpreted through a single-microfibril-stretching mechanism. The work is financially supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51203170).

  11. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  12. Comparative study of metal induced phospholipid modifications in the heavy metal tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii and implications for the fungal membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Bernat, Przemysław; Różalska, Sylwia; Nykiel, Justyna; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-01-01

    In this work we compared the effect of five heavy metals: Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni and Cu on phospholipid composition of the ubiquitous soil fungus Paecilomyces marquandii, originating from a strongly metal polluted area and characterized by high tolerance to these elements. Cd, Ni and Cu caused an increase in phosphatidylcholine (PC). Only Pb decreased PC content, which was accompanied by a significant rise in the phosphatidic acids (PA) level, probably due to activation of phospholipase D which hydrolyzes PC to PA. This could result in membrane fluidity disturbance, and thus affect its integrity. The assessment of propidium iodide influx showed strong disturbance of membrane integrity for Cu and Pb stressed mycelia, whereas mycelia treated with Ni were impermeable to this dye. The results obtained revealed a strong Cu and Pb toxicity involving disruption of membrane integrity. Pb action was reflected by lipid composition, whereas changes in Cu treated mycelia did not completely elucidate its harmful effect on the membrane, which was most probably caused by Cu induced lipid peroxidation. Zn did not induce quantitative changes in PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) but caused changes in phospholipid lipid saturation, which appears to be important for fungus adaptation to the presence of metals. The enhanced PC content balanced by higher PC saturation can help in the maintenance of proper membrane fluidity and result in alleviating the Cd and Ni induced stress. These results will allow to clarify the mechanism of Pb toxicity and help to elucidate the cellular basis of fungal membrane adaptation to heavy metals.

  13. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Deli, Chariklia K.; Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Leontsini, Diamanda; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z.; Mastorakos, George; Fatouros, Ioannis G.

    2017-01-01

    Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty. PMID:28106721

  14. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress Responses in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Deli, Chariklia K; Vlachopoulos, Dimitris; Gracia-Marco, Luis; Leontsini, Diamanda; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Mastorakos, George; Fatouros, Ioannis G

    2017-01-17

    Adults demonstrate an upregulation of their pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms in response to acute exercise while systematic exercise training enhances their antioxidant capacity, thereby leading to a reduced generation of free radicals both at rest and in response to exercise stress. However, less information exists regarding oxidative stress responses and the underlying mechanisms in the pediatric population. Evidence suggests that exercise-induced redox perturbations may be valuable in order to monitor exercise-induced inflammatory responses and as such training overload in children and adolescents as well as monitor optimal growth and development. The purpose of this review was to provide an update on oxidative stress responses to acute and chronic exercise in youth. It has been documented that acute exercise induces age-specific transient alterations in both oxidant and antioxidant markers in children and adolescents. However, these responses seem to be affected by factors such as training phase, training load, fitness level, mode of exercise etc. In relation to chronic adaptation, the role of training on oxidative stress adaptation has not been adequately investigated. The two studies performed so far indicate that children and adolescents exhibit positive adaptations of their antioxidant system, as adults do. More studies are needed in order to shed light on oxidative stress and antioxidant responses, following acute exercise and training adaptations in youth. Available evidence suggests that small amounts of oxidative stress may be necessary for growth whereas the transition to adolescence from childhood may promote maturation of pro- and anti-oxidant mechanisms. Available evidence also suggests that obesity may negatively affect basal and exercise-related antioxidant responses in the peripubertal period during pre- and early-puberty.

  15. Distinct mechanisms are utilized to induce stress sensor gadd45b by different stress stimuli.

    PubMed

    Zumbrun, Steven D; Hoffman, Barbara; Liebermann, Dan A

    2009-12-01

    The GADD45 family of proteins consists of three small proteins, GADD45A, GADD45B, and GADD45G, implicated in modulating the cellular response to genotoxic/physiological stressors. Despite similarities in sequence, structure and function, each gadd45 gene is induced differentially by different stress stimuli. Studies on stress-mediated induction of the gadd45 genes have predominantly focused on gadd45a, with knowledge of gadd45b and gadd45g regulation lacking. To generate a more complete understanding of the regulation of gadd45 genes, a comprehensive analysis of stress-mediated induction of human gadd45b has been carried out using human RKO colorectal carcinoma cells as a model system. Novel data indicate that gadd45b induction in RKO cells is regulated by distinct mechanisms in a stress-specific manner. Methylmethane sulfonate (MMS), a DNA alkylating agent, induces gadd45b transcription through a cohort of both constitutive and inducible bound factors, including NFY, Sp1 and Egr1. In contrast, in a hyperosmotic environment generated with sorbitol, gadd45b mRNA is induced exclusively by mRNA stabilization. These findings indicate that the stress-mediated induction of gadd45b is largely distinct from gadd45a. Furthermore, data obtained provide a novel paradigm for stress-response gene induction, indicating that gadd45b induction by distinct stressors, in the same cell type and under the same experimental settings, is differentially regulated at the level of mRNA transcription or mRNA stability. Importantly, this study also provides the groundwork to further examine the regulation of gadd45b expression in in vivo settings using animal models and tissues obtained from normal individuals and cancer patients prior to and after chemotherapeutic intervention.

  16. Neural circuit for psychological stress-induced hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Psychological stress-induced hyperthermia (PSH) is a basic physiological stress response to increase physical performances to defend homeostasis and life from stressors, such as natural enemies. However, excessive and long-lasting stressors can lead to chronic hyperthermia, particularly recognized in humans as a psychosomatic symptom called “psychogenic fever.” The sympathetic and neuroendocrine responses that can contribute to PSH include brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis, cutaneous vasoconstriction, tachycardia and glucocorticoid secretion. Research on the central circuits underlying these stress responses has recently revealed several fundamental circuit mechanisms including hypothalamomedullary pathways driving the sympathetic stress responses. Psychological stress activates a monosynaptic glutamatergic excitatory neurotransmission from the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) to sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral medullary raphe region (rMR) to drive BAT thermogenesis and tachycardia, leading to the development of PSH. This glutamatergic neurotransmission could be potentiated by orexin neurons in the lateral hypothalamus through their projections to the rMR. Psychological stress also activates another monosynaptic pathway from the DMH to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus to stimulate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis for the secretion of glucocorticoids. PSH is independent from the prostaglandin-mediated trigger mechanism for inflammation-induced fever, and several forebrain regions are considered to provide stress-driven inputs to the DMH to activate the sympathetic- and neuroendocrine-driving neurons. The circuit mechanism of PSH based on animal experiments would be relevant to understandings of the etiology of psychogenic fever in humans. This review describes the current understandings of the central circuit mechanism of PSH with recent important progress in research. PMID:27227049

  17. ER stress induces NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Lebeaupin, C; Proics, E; de Bieville, C H D; Rousseau, D; Bonnafous, S; Patouraux, S; Adam, G; Lavallard, V J; Rovere, C; Le Thuc, O; Saint-Paul, M C; Anty, R; Schneck, A S; Iannelli, A; Gugenheim, J; Tran, A; Gual, P; Bailly-Maitre, B

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of chronic liver disease is constantly increasing, owing to the obesity epidemic. However, the causes and mechanisms of inflammation-mediated liver damage remain poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is an initiator of cell death and inflammatory mechanisms. Although obesity induces ER stress, the interplay between hepatic ER stress, NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death signaling has not yet been explored during the etiology of chronic liver diseases. Steatosis is a common disorder affecting obese patients; moreover, 25% of these patients develop steatohepatitis with an inherent risk for progression to hepatocarcinoma. Increased plasma LPS levels have been detected in the serum of patients with steatohepatitis. We hypothesized that, as a consequence of increased plasma LPS, ER stress could be induced and lead to NLRP3 inflammasome activation and hepatocyte death associated with steatohepatitis progression. In livers from obese mice, administration of LPS or tunicamycin results in IRE1α and PERK activation, leading to the overexpression of CHOP. This, in turn, activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, subsequently initiating hepatocyte pyroptosis (caspase-1, -11, interleukin-1β secretion) and apoptosis (caspase-3, BH3-only proteins). In contrast, the LPS challenge is blocked by the ER stress inhibitor TUDCA, resulting in: CHOP downregulation, reduced caspase-1, caspase-11, caspase-3 activities, lowered interleukin-1β secretion and rescue from cell death. The central role of CHOP in mediating the activation of proinflammatory caspases and cell death was characterized by performing knockdown experiments in primary mouse hepatocytes. Finally, the analysis of human steatohepatitis liver biopsies showed a correlation between the upregulation of inflammasome and ER stress markers, as well as liver injury. We demonstrate here that ER stress leads to hepatic NLRP3 inflammasome pyroptotic death, thus contributing as a novel mechanism of

  18. Stress Induced Branching of Growing Crystals on Curved Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Christian; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel

    2016-04-01

    If two-dimensional crystals grow on a curved surface, the Gaussian curvature of the surface induces elastic stress and affects the growth pathway. The elastic stress can be alleviated by incorporating defects or, if this is energetically unfavorable, via an elastic instability which leads to anisotropic growth with branched ribbonlike structures. This instability provides a generic route to grow defect-free crystals on curved surfaces. Depending on the elastic properties of the crystal and the geometric properties of the surface, different growth morphologies with two-, four-, and sixfold symmetry develop. Using a phase field crystal type modeling approach, we provide a microscopic understanding of the morphology selection.

  19. Stress-induced phase transformation in nanocrystalline UO2

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, Blas Pedro; Desai, Tapan

    2009-01-01

    We report a stress-induced phase transfonnation in stoichiometric UO{sub 2} from fluorite to the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} structure using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. MD simulations, performed on nanocrystalline microstructure under constant-stress tensile loading conditions, reveal a heterogeneous nucleation of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} phase at the grain boundaries followed by the growth of this phase towards the interior of the grain. The DFT calculations confinn the existence of the {alpha}-PbO{sub 2} structure, showing that it is energetically favored under tensile loading conditions.

  20. Physiological changes induced by chromium stress in plants: an overview.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Shamsul; Khalique, Gulshan; Irfan, Mohammad; Wani, Arif Shafi; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Ahmad, Aqil

    2012-07-01

    This article presents an overview of the mechanism of chromium (Cr) stress in plants. Toxic effects of Cr on plant growth and development depend primarily on its valence state. Cr(VI) is highly toxic and mobile whereas Cr(III) is less toxic. Cr-induced oxidative stress involves induction of lipid peroxidation in plants that cause severe damage to cell membranes which includes degradation of photosynthetic pigments causing deterioration in growth. The potential of plants with the adequacy to accumulate or to stabilize Cr compounds for bioremediation of Cr contamination has gained engrossment in recent years.

  1. Response to metal stress of Nicotiana langsdorffii plants wild-type and transgenic for the rat glucocorticoid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Fuoco, Roger; Bogani, Patrizia; Capodaglio, Gabriele; Del Bubba, Massimo; Abollino, Ornella; Giannarelli, Stefania; Spiriti, Maria Michela; Muscatello, Beatrice; Doumett, Saer; Turetta, Clara; Zangrando, Roberta; Zelano, Vincenzo; Buiatti, Marcello

    2013-05-01

    Recently our findings have shown that the integration of the gene coding for the rat gluco-corticoid receptor (GR receptor) in Nicotiana langsdorffii plants induced morphophysiological effects in transgenic plants through the modification of their hormonal pattern. Phytohormones play a key role in plant responses to many different biotic and abiotic stresses since a modified hormonal profile up-regulates the activation of secondary metabolites involved in the response to stress. In this work transgenic GR plants and isogenic wild type genotypes were exposed to metal stress by treating them with 30ppm cadmium(II) or 50ppm chromium(VI). Hormonal patterns along with changes in key response related metabolites were then monitored and compared. Heavy metal up-take was found to be lower in the GR plants. The transgenic plants exhibited higher values of S-abscisic acid (S-ABA) and 3-indole acetic acid (IAA), salicylic acid and total polyphenols, chlorogenic acid and antiradical activity, compared to the untransformed wild type plants. Both Cd and Cr treatments led to an increase in hormone concentrations and secondary metabolites only in wild type plants. Analysis of the results suggests that the stress responses due to changes in the plant's hormonal system may derive from the interaction between the GR receptor and phytosteroids, which are known to play a key role in plant physiology and development.

  2. Soy protein reduces paraquat-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Hisa; Otaka, Yukiko; Igarashi, Kiharu; Takenaka, Asako

    2002-08-01

    The effect of soy protein, soy isoflavones and saponins on paraquat (PQ)-induced oxidative stress was investigated in rats. Rats were fed experimental diets containing casein (CAS), soy protein (SPI), and casein with soy isoflavones and saponins (CAS + IS). The diets were supplemented or not with 0.025% paraquat (CAS + PQ, SPI + PQ, and CAS + IS + PQ). The protective effects of soy protein, soy isoflavones, and saponins on paraquat-induced oxidative stress were examined. Ingestion of soy protein generally mitigated the lung enlargement (P = 0.076), loss of body weight (P = 0.051) and oxidation of liver lipid (P = 0.043) and glutathione (P = 0.035) induced by paraquat, although soy isoflavones and saponins did not. To determine whether soy protein exerted its antioxidative effects by preventing paraquat absorption from digestive organs, rats were fed CAS or SPI diets and orally administered a 12.5 g/L paraquat solution. Plasma, urine, and fecal paraquat concentrations did not differ between the two groups, indicating that soy protein did not prevent paraquat absorption. The present study suggests that intake of soy protein itself, but not soy isoflavones and saponins, reduces paraquat-induced oxidative stress in rats, although this effect was not due to reduced absorption of paraquat from digestive organs.

  3. Role of Oxidative Stress in Drug-Induced Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hosohata, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    The kidney plays a primary role in maintaining homeostasis and detoxification of numerous hydrophilic xenobiotics as well as endogenous compounds. Because the kidney is exposed to a larger proportion and higher concentration of drugs and toxins than other organs through the secretion of ionic drugs by tubular organic ion transporters across the luminal membranes of renal tubular epithelial cells, and through the reabsorption of filtered toxins into the lumen of the tubule, these cells are at greater risk for injury. In fact, drug-induced kidney injury is a serious problem in clinical practice and accounts for roughly 20% of cases of acute kidney injury (AKI) among hospitalized patients. Therefore, its early detection is becoming more important. Usually, drug-induced AKI consists of two patterns of renal injury: acute tubular necrosis (ATN) and acute interstitial nephritis (AIN). Whereas AIN develops from medications that incite an allergic reaction, ATN develops from direct toxicity on tubular epithelial cells. Among several cellular mechanisms underlying ATN, oxidative stress plays an important role in progression to ATN by activation of inflammatory response via proinflammatory cytokine release and inflammatory cell accumulation in tissues. This review provides an overview of drugs associated with AKI, the role of oxidative stress in drug-induced AKI, and a biomarker for drug-induced AKI focusing on oxidative stress. PMID:27809280

  4. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  5. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marcelo; Aschner, Michael; Rocha, Joao B.T.

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have been reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the classically

  6. Mercury heavy-metal-induced physiochemical changes and genotoxic alterations in water hyacinths [Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.)].

    PubMed

    Malar, Srinivasan; Sahi, Shivendra Vikram; Favas, Paulo J C; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2015-03-01

    Mercury heavy metal pollution has become an important environmental problem worldwide. Accumulation of mercury ions by plants may disrupt many cellular functions and block normal growth and development. To assess mercury heavy metal toxicity, we performed an experiment focusing on the responses of Eichhornia crassipes to mercury-induced oxidative stress. E. crassipes seedlings were exposed to varying concentrations of mercury to investigate the level of mercury ions accumulation, changes in growth patterns, antioxidant defense mechanisms, and DNA damage under hydroponics system. Results showed that plant growth rate was significantly inhibited (52 %) at 50 mg/L treatment. Accumulation of mercury ion level were 1.99 mg/g dry weight, 1.74 mg/g dry weight, and 1.39 mg/g dry weight in root, leaf, and petiole tissues, respectively. There was a decreasing trend for chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids with increasing the concentration of mercury ions. Both the ascorbate peroxidase and malondialdehyde contents showed increased trend in leaves and roots up to 30 mg/L mercury treatment and slightly decreased at the higher concentrations. There was a positive correlation between heavy metal dose and superoxide dismutase, catalase, and peroxidase antioxidative enzyme activities which could be used as biomarkers to monitor pollution in E. crassipes. Due to heavy metal stress, some of the normal DNA bands were disappeared and additional bands were amplified compared to the control in the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) profile. Random amplified polymorphic DNA results indicated that genomic template stability was significantly affected by mercury heavy metal treatment. We concluded that DNA changes determined by random amplified polymorphic DNA assay evolved a useful molecular marker for detection of genotoxic effects of mercury heavy metal contamination in plant species.

  7. Laser transfer of diamond nanopowder induced by metal film blistering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Alloncle, P.; Konov, V. I.; Sentis, M.

    2009-03-01

    Blister-based laser induced forward transfer (BB-LIFT) is a promising technique to produce surface microstructures of various advanced materials including inorganic and organic micro/nanopowders, suspensions and biological micro-objects embedded in life sustaining medium. The transferred material is spread over a thin metal film irradiated from the far side by single laser pulses through a transparent support. Interaction of the laser pulse with the metal-support interface under optimized conditions causes formation of a quickly expanding blister. Fast movement of the free metal surface provides efficient material transfer, which has been investigated for the case of diamond nanopowder and diamond-containing suspension. The unique features of the given technique are universality, simplicity and efficient isolation of the transferred material from the ablation products and laser heating.

  8. Contribution of proteomic studies towards understanding plant heavy metal stress response

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Zahed; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of plant proteome composition is an inevitable process to cope with the environmental challenges including heavy metal (HM) stress. Soil and water contaminated with hazardous metals not only cause permanent and irreversible health problems, but also result substantial reduction in crop yields. In course of time, plants have evolved complex mechanisms to regulate the uptake, mobilization, and intracellular concentration of metal ions to alleviate the stress damages. Since, the functional translated portion of the genome plays an essential role in plant stress response, proteomic studies provide us a finer picture of protein networks and metabolic pathways primarily involved in cellular detoxification and tolerance mechanism. In the present review, an attempt is made to present the state of the art of recent development in proteomic techniques and significant contributions made so far for better understanding the complex mechanism of plant metal stress acclimation. Role of metal stress-related proteins involved in antioxidant defense system and primary metabolism is critically reviewed to get a bird’s-eye view on the different strategies of plants to detoxify HMs. In addition to the advantages and disadvantages of different proteomic methodologies, future applications of proteome study of subcellular organelles are also discussed to get the new insights into the plant cell response to HMs. PMID:23355841

  9. Assessing Tolerance to Heavy-Metal Stress in Arabidopsis thaliana Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Remy, Estelle; Duque, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Heavy-metal soil contamination is one of the major abiotic stress factors that, by negatively affecting plant growth and development, severely limit agricultural productivity worldwide. Plants have evolved various tolerance and detoxification strategies in order to cope with heavy-metal toxicity while ensuring adequate supply of essential micronutrients at the whole-plant as well as cellular levels. Genetic studies in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been instrumental in elucidating such mechanisms. The root assay constitutes a very powerful and simple method to assess heavy-metal stress tolerance in Arabidopsis seedlings. It allows the simultaneous determination of all the standard growth parameters affected by heavy-metal stress (primary root elongation, lateral root development, shoot biomass, and chlorophyll content) in a single experiment. Additionally, this protocol emphasizes the tips and tricks that become particularly useful when quantifying subtle alterations in tolerance to a given heavy-metal stress, when simultaneously pursuing a large number of plant lines, or when testing sensitivity to a wide range of heavy metals for a single line.

  10. Superconductivity of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchihashi, Takashi

    2016-11-01

    Recent progress in superconducting metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon is reviewed, mainly focusing on the results of the author’s group. After a brief introduction of an ultrahigh-vacuum (UHV)-low-temperature (LT)-compatible electron transport measurement system, direct observation of the zero resistance state for the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface is described, which demonstrates the existence of a superconducting transition in this class of two-dimensional (2D) materials. The measurement and analysis of the temperature dependence of the critical current density indicate that a surface atomic step works as a Josephson junction. This identification is further confirmed by LT-scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) observation of Josephson vortices trapped at atomic steps on the Si(111)-(\\sqrt{7} × \\sqrt{3} )-In surface. These experiments reveal unique features of metal-induced surface reconstructions on silicon that may be utilized to explore novel superconductivity.

  11. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  12. Osmium Metal Studied under High Pressure and Nonhydrostatic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Weinberger,M.; Tolbert, S.; Kavner, A.

    2008-01-01

    Interest in osmium as an ultra-incompressible material and as an analog for the behavior of iron at high pressure has inspired recent studies of its mechanical properties. We have measured elastic and plastic deformation of Os metal at high pressures using in situ high pressure x-ray diffraction in the radial geometry. We show that Os has the highest yield strength observed for any pure metal, supporting up to 10 GPa at a pressure of 26 GPa. Furthermore, our data indicate changes in the nonhydrostatic apparent c/a ratio and clear lattice preferred orientation effects at pressures above 15 GPa.

  13. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-01-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  14. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  16. Evaluation of Interface Property and DC Characteristics Enhancement in Nanoscale n-Channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Using Stress Memorization Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po Chin; Lein Wu, San; Jinn Chang, Shoou; Huang, Yao Tsung; Kuo, Cheng Wen; Chang, Ching Yao; Cheng, Yao Chin; Cheng, Osbert

    2010-09-01

    In this letter, the advanced 40 nm technology n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor devices using the stress memorization technique (SMT) are presented. We demonstrate that SMT process would not affect the electrical characteristics of devices and can introduce higher tensile stress on channels, which enhances drive current. Through charge pumping measurement, it can be verified that SMT does not affect Si/SiO2 interface quality. Moreover, SMT-induced higher tensile stress decreases not only scattering coefficient but also tunneling attenuation length, resulting in smaller input-referred noise, which represents an intrinsic advantage of low-frequency noise performance.

  17. Neurotoxicity induced by arsenic in Gallus Gallus: Regulation of oxidative stress and heat shock protein response.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Panpan; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wen; Chai, Hongliang; Xing, Houjuan; Xing, Mingwei

    2017-01-01

    Arsenic, a naturally occurring heavy metal pollutant, is one of the functioning risk factors for neurological toxicity in humans. However, little is known about the effects of arsenic on the nervous system of Gallus Gallus. To investigate whether arsenic induce neurotoxicity and influence the oxidative stress and heat shock proteins (Hsps) response in chickens, seventy-two 1-day-old male Hy-line chickens were treated with different doses of arsenic trioxide (As2O3). The histological changes, antioxidant enzyme activity, and the expressions of Hsps were detected. Results showed slightly histology changes were obvious in the brain tissues exposure to arsenic. The activities of Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) were decreased compared to the control, whereas the malondialdehyde (MDA) content was increased gradually along with increase in diet-arsenic. The mRNA levels of Hsps and protein expressions of Hsp60 and Hsp70 were up-regulated. These results suggested that sub-chronic exposure to arsenic induced neurotoxicity in chickens. Arsenic exposure disturbed the balance of oxidants and antioxidants. Increased heat shock response tried to protect chicken brain tissues from tissues damage caused by oxidative stress. The mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by arsenic include oxidative stress and heat shock protein response in chicken brain tissues.

  18. Joule-Heating-Induced Damage in Cu-Al Wedge Bonds Under Current Stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Yu-Min; Ouyang, Fan-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Copper wires are increasingly used to replace gold wires in wire-bonding technology owing to their better electrical properties and lower cost. However, not many studies have been conducted on electromigration-induced failure of Cu wedge bonds on Al metallization. In this study, we investigated the failure mechanism of Cu-Al wedge bonds under high current stressing from 4 × 104 A/cm2 to 1 × 105 A/cm2 at ambient temperature of 175°C. The resistance evolution of samples during current stressing and the microstructure of the joint interface between the Cu wire and Al-Si bond pad were examined. The results showed that abnormal crack formation accompanying significant intermetallic compound growth was observed at the second joint of the samples, regardless of the direction of electric current for both current densities of 4 × 104 A/cm2 and 8 × 104 A/cm2. We propose that this abnormal crack formation at the second joint is mainly due to the higher temperature induced by the greater Joule heating at the second joint for the same current stressing, because of its smaller bonded area compared with the first joint. The corresponding fluxes induced by the electric current and chemical potential difference between Cu and Al were calculated and compared to explain the failure mechanism. For current density of 1 × 105 A/cm2, the Cu wire melted within 0.5 h owing to serious Joule heating.

  19. [Research of antioxidant defence system under alimentary induced oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Iu V; Mal'tsev, G Iu; Vasil'ev, A V

    2004-01-01

    Alimentary induced oxidative stress and its corrections in children and adults with homocysteine metabolism disorder are urgent problems for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease prophylactics. For determination antioxidant status GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities were detected. Effectiveness of Se-contained antioxidant complex "Selenec" was determined in experimental model with pubertal male Wistar rats. Including high value of methionine to semipurified diet with pyridoxine and folate deficiency induced oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation substances were increased in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aortal endothelium and myocardium. GSH-Px, SOD, GSH-reductase, catalase activities decreased significant compared to control. "Selenec" supplementation caused a decrease of thiobarbituric-reactive substances level, increasing SOD and catalase activity and decreasing GSH-Px and GSH-reductase activity in blood, liver, intestine mucous tunic, aorta and myocardium.

  20. Stress-induced curvature engineering in surface-micromachined devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksyuk, Vladimir A.; Pardo, Flavio; Bishop, David J.

    1999-03-01

    Residual stress and stress gradients play an important role in determining equilibrium shape and behavior of various Si surface-micromachined devices under applied loads. This is particularly true for system having large-area plates and long beams where curvature resulting from stress can lead to significant deviations from stress-free shape. To gain better understanding of these properties, we have measured the equilibrium shapes of various structures built on the MCNC MUMPs using an interferometric profiler. The structures were square plates and long beams composed of various combinations of polysilicon an oxide layers. Some of the structures had additional MUMPs metal layer on top, while on others in-house chromium-gold stacks of varying thickness have been deposited. Temperature dependence of the curvature was measured for some plates. We have used these data in conjunction with simple models to significantly improve the performance of our micromachined devices. While for some structures such as large area reflectors the curvature had to be minimized, it could be advantageously exploited by others, for example vertical actuators for self-assembly.

  1. Observations of impact-induced molten metal-silicate partitioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, Linda R.; Ahrens, Thomas J.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of molten mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB)-molybdenum (Mo) interactions produced by shock experiments provide insight into impact and differentiation processes involving metal-silicate partitioning. Analysis of fragments recovered from experiments (achieving MORB liquid shock pressures from 0.8 to 6 GPa) revealed significant changes in the composition of the MORB and Mo due to reaction of the silicate and metal liquids on a short time scale (less than 13 s). The FeO concentration of the shocked liquid decreases systematically with increasing pressure. In fact, the most highly shocked liquid (6 GPa) contains only 0.1 wt% FeO compared to an initial concentration of 9 wt% in the MORB. We infer from the presence of micrometer-sized Fe-, Si- and Mo-rich metallic spheres in the shocked glass that the Fe and Si oxides in the MORB were reduced in an estimated oxygen fugacity of 10(exp -17) bar and subsequently alloyed with the Mo. The in-situ reduction of FeO in the shocked molten basalt implies that shock-induced reduction of impact melt should be considered a viable mechanism for the formation of metallic phases. Similar metallic phases may form during impact accretion of planets and in impacted material found on the lunar surface and near terrestrial impact craters. In particular, the minute, isolated Fe particles found in lunar soils may have formed by such a process. Furthermore, the metallic spheres within the shocked glass have a globular texture similar to the textures of metallic spheroids from lunar samples and the estimated, slow cooling rate of less than or equal to 140 C/s for our spheres is consistent with the interpretation that the lunar spheroids formed by slow cooling within a melted target.

  2. Stress does not inhibit induced vitellogenesis in juvenile rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwindt, A.R.; Feist, G.W.; Schreck, C.B.

    2007-01-01

    Vitellogenin (Vtg) is a widely used biomarker for xenoestrogen exposure in male fishes. In female fishes Vtg can be negatively affected by stress independent of declines in estrogen. However, few data are available on the effect of stress in male fish abnormally producing Vtg, such as when exposed to xenoestrogens. The objective for these studies was to determine the effects of stress on fish forced to produce Vtg. Three weeks prior to the experiment immature juvenile rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, were acclimated to the experimental tanks and fed a maintenance ration. We induced Vtg synthesis by injecting 17??-estradiol (E2) 7 days prior to experimentation. Treatments in duplicate tanks were: (1) no stressor; (2) stressor; (3) E 2; (4) E2 and stressor. Plasma was collected at time = 0 for baseline measurements from eight fish per tank and Vtg was significantly elevated in treated fish compared to uninjected controls. Water was drained from the stressor tanks then refilled to a level that just covered the backs of the fish. Eight fish were sampled again at 4 and 9 h, and 1, 7, and 14 days of continuous stress. Stressor tanks were refilled with water to pre-stress levels and the fish were sampled after another 2 weeks. Cortisol was significantly elevated from the unstressed fish at 4 h; however, plasma Vtg in the E 2-stimulated fish was not affected by the stressor at any timepoint. These results indicate that fish capture procedures employed in the field or caging experiments likely do not lead to false negative results when plasma Vtg is used as a biomarker for xenoestrogen exposure. It also suggests that the energetic load induced by stress is insufficient to cause a reduction in Vtg, during a continuous E2 administration, at least within the timepoints examined in this study. ?? 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  3. Overloaded training increases exercise-induced oxidative stress and damage.

    PubMed

    Palazzetti, Stephane; Richard, Marie-Jeanne; Favier, Alain; Margaritis, Irene

    2003-08-01

    We hypothesized that overloaded training (OT) in triathlon would induce oxidative stress and damage on muscle and DNA. Nine male triathletes and 6 male sedentary subjects participated in this study. Before and after a 4-week OT, triathletes exercised for a duathlon. Blood ratio of reduced vs. oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), leukocyte DNA damage, creatine kinase (CK), and CK-MB mass in plasma, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte and plasma glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activities, and plasma total antioxidant status (TAS) were measured before and after OT in pre- and postexercise situations. Triathletes were overloaded in response to OT. In rest conditions, OT induced plasma GSH-Px activity increase and plasma TAS decrease (both p < 0.05). In exercise conditions, OT resulted in higher exercise-induced variations of blood GSH/GSSG ratio, TBARS level (both p < 0.05), and CK-MB mass (p < 0.01) in plasma; and decreased TAS response (p < 0.05). OT could compromise the antioxidant defense mechanism with respect to exercise-induced response. The resulting increased exercise-induced oxidative stress and further cellular susceptibility to damage needs more study.

  4. Cyclic Stress-Strain Studies of Metals in Torsion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1940-12-01

    give a uniform stress distribution for th,at part of the specimen .on which the twist uas measured. IQ the cyclic” torsion tests data for a shearing...In the tensile and the, com- pressive tests, strains, were measured, over 2-i.~h g-e leugths usiag the I.larteLnsmirror .= tensometer - ~?hree-iach gage...considered. thus far.., Except foy the ~irst part of the firs”t cz?cle, a li~e~~ relati-onship between shearing stress aad strain was not obtained”. What

  5. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Silymarin, a characterized extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), suppresses cellular inflammation. To define how this occurs, transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies were performed in human liver and T cell lines. Cellular stress and metabolic pathways were modulated within 4 h of silymarin treatment: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed silymarin suppression of glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Anti-inflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 h) silymarin exposure, with suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory mRNAs and signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO). Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that silymarin inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while silymarin inhibition of mTOR required DDIT4. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Thus, natural products activate stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory cellular phenotype. Natural products like silymarin may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation. PMID:26186142

  6. Inheritance of stress-induced, ATF-2-dependent epigenetic change.

    PubMed

    Seong, Ki-Hyeon; Li, Dong; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2011-06-24

    Atf1, the fission yeast homolog of activation transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), contributes to heterochromatin formation. However, the role of ATF-2 in chromatin assembly in higher organisms remains unknown. This study reveals that Drosophila ATF-2 (dATF-2) is required for heterochromatin assembly, whereas the stress-induced phosphorylation of dATF-2, via Mekk1-p38, disrupts heterochromatin. The dATF-2 protein colocalized with HP1, not only on heterochromatin but also at specific loci in euchromatin. Heat shock or osmotic stress induced phosphorylation of dATF-2 and resulted in its release from heterochromatin. This heterochromatic disruption was an epigenetic event that was transmitted to the next generation in a non-Mendelian fashion. When embryos were exposed to heat stress over multiple generations, the defective chromatin state was maintained over multiple successive generations, though it gradually returned to the normal state. The results suggest a mechanism by which the effects of stress are inherited epigenetically via the regulation of a tight chromatin structure.

  7. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  8. Ultrashort Laser Pulse Induced Electromagnetic Stress on Biological Macromolecular Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    ULTRASHORT LASER PULSE INDUCED ~~~~~ ELECTROMAGNET IC STRESS ON BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULAR SYSTEMS Adam P. Bruckner , Ph.D. ( i~iiCJ. Michael ...AFSC, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. Dr. John Taboada (RZL) was the Laboratory Project Scientjst..in...Charge When U.S. Goverrijie~t drawings...available to the general public , including foreignnations. Thi s technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publ i-cation. OHN TABOADA , Ph.D

  9. Soil Liquefaction Resulting from Blast-Induced Spherical Stress Waves

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    on vibration sensitive. two phase materials like loose saturated sands, there can be elastic strain in the water phase but plastic strain in the sand...similar behaviour. Liquefaction can be induced by a variety of loading menhanisms including monotonic stress changes, earthquakes, and blast vibrations ...A sandstone bedrock is estimated to lie between 8 and 9 m below the ground surface with a series of folded shale layers over the sandstone. The top

  10. Metals, Metallothioneins and Oxidative Stress in Blood of Autistic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vergani, Laura; Cristina, Lanza; Paola, Rivaro; Luisa, Abelmoschi M.; Shyti, Genti; Edvige, Veneselli; Giuseppe, Minniti; Elena, Grasselli; Laura, Canesi; Adriana, Voci

    2011-01-01

    Many factors have been implicated in autism onset, including excess or deficiency in toxic or essential metals and impaired antioxidant systems. Protection towards the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is afforded by antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, SOD, catalase, CAT, glutathione peroxidase, GPx), and non-enzymatic…

  11. Insight into the oxidative stress induced by lead and/or cadmium in blood, liver and kidneys.

    PubMed

    Matović, Vesna; Buha, Aleksandra; Ðukić-Ćosić, Danijela; Bulat, Zorica

    2015-04-01

    Besides being important occupational hazards, lead and cadmium are nowadays metals of great environmental concern. Both metals, without any physiological functions, can induce serious adverse health effects in various organs and tissues. Although Pb and Cd are non-redox metals, one of the important mechanisms underlying their toxicity is oxidative stress induction as a result of the generation of reactive species and/or depletion of the antioxidant defense system. Considering that the co-exposure to both metals is a much more realistic scenario, the effects of these metals on oxidative status when simultaneously present in the organism have become one of the contemporary issues in toxicology. This paper reviews short and long term studies conducted on Pb or Cd-induced oxidative stress in blood, liver and kidneys as the most prominent target organs of the toxicity of these metals and proposes the possible molecular mechanisms of the observed effects. The review is also focused on the results obtained for the effects of the combined treatment with Pb and Cd on oxidative status in target organs and on the mechanisms of their possible interactions.

  12. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) alleviate heavy metal-induced toxicity in Leucaena leucocephala seedlings: A physiochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, P; Jayaraj, M; Manikandan, R; Geetha, N; Rene, Eldon R; Sharma, N C; Sahi, S V

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the role of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnONPs) in reversing oxidative stress symptoms induced by heavy metal (Cd and Pb) exposure in Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit. Seedling growth was significantly enhanced with the augmentation of ZnONPs following Cd and Pb exposure. Heavy metal accumulations were recorded as 1253.1 mg Cd per kg DW and 1026.8 mg Pb per kg DW for the respective treatments. Results demonstrated that ZnONPs augmentation caused an increase in photosynthetic pigment and total soluble protein contents while a significant decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA-lipid peroxidation) content in leaves. Antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POX) were, in turn, elevated in heavy metal-exposed leaves amended with ZnONPs. The ameliorating effect of ZnO nanoparticles on oxidative stress induced toxicity was also confirmed by the reduced MDA content and the elevated level of antioxidative enzyme activities in leaf tissues of L. leucocephala seedlings. Further, addition of ZnONPs in combination with Cd and Pb metals induced distinct genomic alterations such as presence of new DNA bands and/or absence of normal bands in the RAPD pattern of the exposed plants. This study uniquely suggests a potential role of zinc oxide nanoparticles in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated media.

  13. Per capita interactions and stress tolerance drive stress-induced changes in biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions

    PubMed Central

    Baert, Jan M.; Janssen, Colin R.; Sabbe, Koen; De Laender, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    Environmental stress changes the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functions, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Because species interactions shape biodiversity–ecosystem functioning relationships, changes in per capita interactions under stress (as predicted by the stress gradient hypothesis) can be an important driver of stress-induced changes in these relationships. To test this hypothesis, we measure productivity in microalgae communities along a diversity and herbicide gradient. On the basis of additive partitioning and a mechanistic community model, we demonstrate that changes in per capita interactions do not explain effects of herbicide stress on the biodiversity–productivity relationship. Instead, assuming that the per capita interactions remain unaffected by stress, causing species densities to only change through differences in stress tolerance, suffices to predict the stress-induced changes in the biodiversity–productivity relationship and community composition. We discuss how our findings set the stage for developing theory on how environmental stress changes biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions. PMID:27534986

  14. Per capita interactions and stress tolerance drive stress-induced changes in biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions.

    PubMed

    Baert, Jan M; Janssen, Colin R; Sabbe, Koen; De Laender, Frederik

    2016-08-18

    Environmental stress changes the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functions, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Because species interactions shape biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships, changes in per capita interactions under stress (as predicted by the stress gradient hypothesis) can be an important driver of stress-induced changes in these relationships. To test this hypothesis, we measure productivity in microalgae communities along a diversity and herbicide gradient. On the basis of additive partitioning and a mechanistic community model, we demonstrate that changes in per capita interactions do not explain effects of herbicide stress on the biodiversity-productivity relationship. Instead, assuming that the per capita interactions remain unaffected by stress, causing species densities to only change through differences in stress tolerance, suffices to predict the stress-induced changes in the biodiversity-productivity relationship and community composition. We discuss how our findings set the stage for developing theory on how environmental stress changes biodiversity effects on ecosystem functions.

  15. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-03-15

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA.

  16. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress among women requesting induced abortion

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence and pattern of traumatic experiences, to assess the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), to identify risk factors for PTSD and PTSS, and to analyse the association of PTSD and PTSS with concomitant anxiety and depressive symptoms in women requesting induced abortion. Methods A Swedish multi-centre study of women requesting an induced abortion. The Screen Questionnaire – Posttraumatic Stress Disorder was used for research diagnoses of PTSD and PTSS. Anxiety and depressive symptoms were evaluated by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Results Of the 1514 respondents, almost half reported traumatic experiences. Lifetime- and point prevalence of PTSD were 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.8–8.5) and 4% (95% CI: 3.1–5.2), respectively. The prevalence of PTSS was 23% (95% CI: 21.1–25.4). Women who reported symptoms of anxiety or depression when requesting abortion were more likely to have ongoing PTSD or PTSS. Also single-living women and smokers displayed higher rates of ongoing PTSD. Conclusions Although PTSD is rare among women who request an induced abortion, a relatively high proportion suffers from PTSS. Abortion seeking women with trauma experiences and existing or preexisting mental disorders need more consideration and alertness when counselled for termination. PMID:23978220

  17. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Pączka, Aleksandra; Mołoń, Mateusz; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2013-12-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is used as a cryoprotectant for the preservation of cells, including yeast, and as a solvent for chemical compounds. We report that DMSO induces oxidative stress in the yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae wt strain EG-103 and its mutants Δsod1, Δsod2, and Δsod1 Δsod2 were used. Yeast were subjected to the action of 1-14% DMSO for 1 h at 28 °C. DMSO induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of yeast growth, the effect being more pronounced for mutants devoid of SOD (especially Δsod1 Δsod2). Cell viability was compromised. DMSO-concentration-dependent activity loss of succinate dehydrogenase, a FeS enzyme sensitive to oxidative stress, was observed. DMSO enhanced formation of reactive oxygen species, estimated with dihydroethidine in a concentration-dependent manner, the effect being again more pronounced in mutants devoid of superoxide dismutases. The content of cellular glutathione was increased with increasing DMSO concentrations, which may represent a compensatory response. Membrane fluidity, estimated by fluorescence polarization of DPH, was decreased by DMSO. These results demonstrate that DMSO, although generally considered to be antioxidant, induces oxidative stress in yeast cells.

  18. Metallothionein mRNA expression and cadmium tolerance in metal-stressed and reference populations of the springtail Orchesella cincta.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Ellers, Jacintha; Roelofs, Dick; van Straalen, Nico M

    2005-10-01

    Metal contamination in soil ecosystems is a permanent and often strong selection pressure. The present study investigates metal tolerance in 17 Orchesella cincta (Collembola) populations from metal-contaminated and reference sites, and combines analyses at the phenotypic and molecular level. Metal tolerance was phenotypically assayed by measuring survival times of laboratory cultures during exposure to cadmium. Comparisons of survival curves showed that five out of eight metal-stressed populations tested evolved increased cadmium tolerance (Stolberg, Plombieres, Hoboken, Hygum and Gusum). In addition, the role of the metallothionein (MT) gene in cadmium tolerance of O. cincta was studied by means of quantitative RT-PCR. The constitutive and Cd-induced MT mRNA expression of the laboratory cultures was measured. Results show that the mean constitutive MT mRNA expression of populations from polluted sites was significantly higher than of populations from reference sites. However, no correlation between MT mRNA expression levels after laboratory exposure to cadmium and field cadmium concentrations was observed. Furthermore, no relation between survival rate during exposure to cadmium and MT mRNA expression was detected. Our results suggest that constitutive MT mRNA expression plays a role in early protection against cadmium toxicity, and indicate that mechanisms other then MT up-regulation are involved in tolerance to prolonged exposure to cadmium.

  19. Role of metal nanoparticles on porosification of silicon by metal induced etching (MIE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Shailendra K.; Yogi, Priyanka; Yadav, Pooja; Mishra, Suryakant; Pandey, Haardik; Rai, Hari Mohan; Kumar, Vivek; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-06-01

    Porosification of silicon (Si) by metal induced etching (MIE) process has been studied here to understand the etching mechanism. The etching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of electron transfer from Si to metal ion (Ag+) and metal to H2O2. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the etching process has been investigated by studying the effect of AgNPs coverage on surface porosity. A quantitative analysis of SEM images, done using Image J, shows a direct correlation between AgNPs coverage and surface porosity after the porosification. Density of Si nanowires (NWs) also varies as a function of AgNPs fractional coverage which reasserts the fact that AgNPs governs the porosification process during MIE. The Raman and PL spectrum show the presence of Si NSs in the samples.

  20. Giant Electroresistance in Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal Tunnel Junctions Induced by Ferroelectric Fringe Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sungchul; Jeon, Youngeun; Jin, Hanbyul; Lee, Jung-Yong; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Nam; Eom, Daejin; Park, Kibog

    2016-01-01

    An enormous amount of research activities has been devoted to developing new types of non-volatile memory devices as the potential replacements of current flash memory devices. Theoretical device modeling was performed to demonstrate that a huge change of tunnel resistance in an Edge Metal-Insulator-Metal (EMIM) junction of metal crossbar structure can be induced by the modulation of electric fringe field, associated with the polarization reversal of an underlying ferroelectric layer. It is demonstrated that single three-terminal EMIM/Ferroelectric structure could form an active memory cell without any additional selection devices. This new structure can open up a way of fabricating all-thin-film-based, high-density, high-speed, and low-power non-volatile memory devices that are stackable to realize 3D memory architecture. PMID:27476475

  1. Mid-Ventricular Variant of Dobutamine-Induced Stress Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chandraprakasam, Satish; Kanuri, Swapna; Hunter, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Dobutamine stress testing is a commonly used modality in detecting and estimating the prognosis in coronary artery disease (CAD). Although it is well tolerated by most patients, adverse events have been reported. Rarely, transient wall motion abnormalities can occur in the absence of obstructive CAD to suggest stress cardiomyopathy. Case Presentation: We report a 48-year-old female with intermittent chest pain. Her physical exam, cardiac enzymes and transthoracic echocardiogram were unremarkable. She underwent dobutamine stress echocardiogram to rule out obstructive CAD. After 40 micrograms (mcg)/kg/minute and 0.5 mg atropine, she complained of intense chest pain and became hypertensive. Stress echocardiogram demonstrated mid-anterior and mid-septal hypokinesis. Emergent coronary angiogram demonstrated normal coronaries. Left ventricular angiogram in the right anterior oblique projection revealed mid-ventricular ballooning during systole with apical and basal hypercontractility. Patient demonstrated excellent recovery with expectant management. Conclusions: The mechanism of mid-variant of Dobutamine-induced stress cardiomyopathy remains unclear. We think that multiple mechanisms are involved and this risk should be considered in patients with comorbid psychiatric conditions and with use of centrally acting stimulants. PMID:26425489

  2. Somatic embryogenesis - Stress-induced remodeling of plant cell fate.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Attila

    2015-04-01

    Plants as sessile organisms have remarkable developmental plasticity ensuring heir continuous adaptation to the environment. An extreme example is somatic embryogenesis, the initiation of autonomous embryo development in somatic cells in response to exogenous and/or endogenous signals. In this review I briefly overview the various pathways that can lead to embryo development in plants in addition to the fertilization of the egg cell and highlight the importance of the interaction of stress- and hormone-regulated pathways during the induction of somatic embryogenesis. Somatic embryogenesis can be initiated in planta or in vitro, directly or indirectly, and the requirement for dedifferentiation as well as the way to achieve developmental totipotency in the various systems is discussed in light of our present knowledge. The initiation of all forms of the stress/hormone-induced in vitro as well as the genetically provoked in planta somatic embryogenesis requires extensive and coordinated genetic reprogramming that has to take place at the chromatin level, as the embryogenic program is under strong epigenetic repression in vegetative plant cells. Our present knowledge on chromatin-based mechanisms potentially involved in the somatic-to-embryogenic developmental transition is summarized emphasizing the potential role of the chromatin to integrate stress, hormonal, and developmental pathways leading to the activation of the embryogenic program. The role of stress-related chromatin reorganization in the genetic instability of in vitro cultures is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity.

  3. Injection-induced seismicity on basement faults including poroelastic stressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. W.; Segall, P.

    2016-04-01

    Most significant induced earthquakes occur on faults within the basement beneath sedimentary cover. In this two-dimensional plane strain numerical study, we examine the full poroelastic response of basement faults to fluid injection into overlying strata, considering both (1) the permeability of the fault zone and (2) the hydraulic connectivity of the faults to the target horizon. Given hydraulic and mechanical properties, we compute the spatiotemporal change in Coulomb stress, which we separate into (1) the change in poroelastic stresses Δτs+fΔσn, where Δτs and Δσn are changes in shear and normal stress (Δτs>0 and Δσn>0 both favor slip), and (2) the change in pore pressure fΔp. Pore pressure diffusion into hydraulically connected, permeable faults dominates their mechanical stability. For hydraulically isolated or low-permeability faults, however, poroelastic stresses transmitted to deeper basement levels can trigger slip, even without elevated pore pressure. The seismicity rate on basement fault zones is predicted using the model of Dieterich (1994). High seismicity rates can occur on permeable, hydraulically connected faults due to direct pore pressure diffusion. Lower rates are predicted on isolated steeply dipping normal faults, caused solely by poroelastic stressing. In contrast, seismicity on similarly oriented reverse faults is inhibited.

  4. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  5. Metal induced changes in trivalent chromium resistant Alcaligenes faecalis VITSIM2.

    PubMed

    Matilda, Shiny C; Shanthi, Chittibabu

    2017-02-20

    The changes induced in bacterial strains under stress conditions provide an insight into metal resistance strategies. Trivalent chromium resistant bacterium were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and designated as Alcaligenes faecalis VITSIM2. The growth pattern was monitored. The organism also showed resistance to copper, cadmium, and certain antibiotics. The differentially expressed proteins in SDS PAGE were identified by mass spectrometry as flagellin and 50S ribosomal L36 protein. The morphological changes were identified by scanning electron microscopy. The changes in the cell wall content were estimated by peptidoglycan analysis and transformation of phosphates was detected by (31) P NMR. Flow cytometry was employed to measure the membrane integrity, esterase activity and intracellular pH. In conclusion spectrum of proteomic, physiological, and morphological alterations was observed that aid the organism to overcome chromium stress.

  6. Value added phytoremediation of metal stressed soils using phosphate solubilizing microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratishtha; Kumar, Vipin

    2017-01-01

    The presence of heavy metals in the soil is a matter of growing concern due to their toxic and non-biodegradable nature. Lack of effectiveness of various conventional methods due to economic and technical constraints resulted in the search for an eco-friendly and cost-effective biological techniques for heavy metal removal from the environment. Until now, phytoremediation has emerged as an innovative technique to address the problem. However, the efficiency of phytoremediation process is hindered under the high metal concentration conditions. Hence, phosphate solubilizing microbes (PSM) assisted phytoremediation technique is gaining more insight as it can reduce the contamination load even under elevated metal stressed conditions. These microbes convert heavy metals into soluble and bioavailable forms, which consequently facilitate phytoremediation. Several studies have reported that the use of microbial consortium for remediation is considered more effective as compared to single strain pure culture. Therefore, this review paper focuses on the current trends in research related to PSM mediated uptake of heavy metal by plants. The efficiency of PSM consortia in enhancing the phytoremediation process has also been reviewed. Moreover, the role of phosphatase enzymes in the mineralization of organic forms of phosphate in soil is further discussed. Biosurfactant mediated bioremediation of metal polluted soils is a matter of extensive research nowadays. Hence, the recent advancement of using biosurfactants in enhanced phytoremediation of metal stressed soils is also described.

  7. Shielding, but not zeroing of the ambient magnetic field reduces stress-induced analgesia in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Choleris, E; Del Seppia, C; Thomas, A W; Luschi, P; Ghione, G; Moran, G R; Prato, F S

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic field exposure was consistently found to affect pain inhibition (i.e. analgesia). Recently, we showed that an extreme reduction of the ambient magnetic and electric environment, by mu-metal shielding, also affected stress-induced analgesia (SIA) in C57 mice. Using CD1 mice, we report here the same findings from replication studies performed independently in Pisa, Italy and London, ON, Canada. Also, neither selective vector nulling of the static component of the ambient magnetic field with Helmholtz coils, nor copper shielding of only the ambient electric field, affected SIA in mice. We further show that a pre-stress exposure to the mu-metal box is necessary for the anti-analgesic effects to occur. The differential effects of the two near-zero magnetic conditions may depend on the elimination (obtained only by mu-metal shielding) of the extremely weak time-varying component of the magnetic environment. This would provide the first direct and repeatable evidence for a behavioural and physiological effect of very weak time-varying magnetic fields, suggesting the existence of a very sensitive magnetic discrimination in the endogenous mechanisms that underlie SIA. This has important implications for other reported effects of exposures to very weak magnetic fields and for the theoretical work that considers the mechanisms underlying the biological detection of weak magnetic fields. PMID:11798436

  8. Probing oxidative stress: Small molecule fluorescent sensors of metal ions, reactive oxygen species, and thiols

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, Lynne M.; Franz, Katherine J.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a common feature shared by many diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Factors that contribute to cellular oxidative stress include elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, diminished availability of detoxifying thiols, and the misregulation of metal ions (both redox-active iron and copper as well as non-redox active calcium and zinc). Deciphering how each of these components interacts to contribute to oxidative stress presents an interesting challenge. Fluorescent sensors can be powerful tools for detecting specific analytes within a complicated cellular environment. Reviewed here are several classes of small molecule fluorescent sensors designed to detect several molecular participants of oxidative stress. We focus our review on describing the design, function and application of probes to detect metal cations, reactive oxygen species, and intracellular thiol-containing compounds. In addition, we highlight the intricacies and complications that are often faced in sensor design and implementation. PMID:23440254

  9. A 100-kW metal wind turbine blade basic data, loads and stress analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherritt, A. W.; Gaidelis, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    A rotor loads computer program was used to define the steady state and cyclic loads acting on 60 ft long metal blades designed for the ERDA/NASA 100 kW wind turbine. Blade load and stress analysis used to support the structural design are presented. For the loading conditions examined, the metal blades are structurally adequate for use, within the normal operating range, as part of the wind turbine system.

  10. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  11. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-11-10

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80-400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50-220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts.

  12. Electron Beam Induced Artifacts During in situ TEM Deformation of Nanostructured Metals

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Rohit; Rentenberger, Christian; Rajagopalan, Jagannathan

    2015-01-01

    A critical assumption underlying in situ transmission electron microscopy studies is that the electron beam (e-beam) exposure does not fundamentally alter the intrinsic deformation behavior of the materials being probed. Here, we show that e-beam exposure causes increased dislocation activation and marked stress relaxation in aluminum and gold films spanning a range of thicknesses (80–400 nanometers) and grain sizes (50–220 nanometers). Furthermore, the e-beam induces anomalous sample necking, which unusually depends more on the e-beam diameter than intensity. Notably, the stress relaxation in both aluminum and gold occurs at beam energies well below their damage thresholds. More remarkably, the stress relaxation and/or sample necking is significantly more pronounced at lower accelerating voltages (120 kV versus 200 kV) in both the metals. These observations in aluminum and gold, two metals with highly dissimilar atomic weights and properties, indicate that e-beam exposure can cause anomalous behavior in a broad spectrum of nanostructured materials, and simultaneously suggest a strategy to minimize such artifacts. PMID:26552934

  13. Residual stress and fracture characteristics of zirconia/metal(Ni, SUS304) functionally gradient materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Yeon-Gil; Choi, Sung-Churl; Paik, Un-Gyu

    1995-09-01

    To analyze the residual stress and the fracture behavior of FGMs. disc-type TZP/Ni- and TZP/SUS304-FGM were hot passed, and compared with MM& The continuous interface and the microstructure of FGMs were characterized with EPMA, optical microscopy and SEM. The defect-like cracks in the FGMs induced by the preferential shear stress have been shown to cause fracture. This fact has well corresponded to the analysis of the residual stress distribution by FEM.

  14. Separating triggered and stress-change induced seismcity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, J.

    2013-12-01

    Once a major earthquake occurs, it usually not only triggers a sequence of many aftershock, but also changes the tectonic stress field in the regions nearby. According to the rate and state law (Dieterich, 1994), such stress changes result in a permanent change of the seismicity rate, increment or decrement. However, since aftershock sequence lasts quite a long time before it decays off, it is hard tell whether the high level of seismicity after a big earthquake is the continuation of the aftershock activity or caused by the changes of stress due this big earthquake. In this study, by making use of the space-time ETAS model (Ogata, 1998) and the stochastic declustering method (Zhuang et al., 2002, 2004), I developed a method to separate the seismicity induced by stress-change from the aftershock activity in a probability manner. For example, it is found that the probabilities that Lushan earthquakes belong the background seismcity, aftershock of the Wenchuan earthquake, are stress-change induced seismcity are, respectively, 38% and 12%, 50%. References Dieterich, J.H. (1994) A constitutive law for rate of earthquake production and its application to earthquake clustering, J. Geophys. Res. , 99 , 2601-2618. Ogata, Y. (1998. Space-time point-process models for earthquake occur- rences, Ann. Inst. Stat. Math., 50, 379-402. Zhuang J., Ogata Y. and Vere-Jones D. (2004). Analyzing earthquake clustering features by using stochastic reconstruction. Journal of Geophysical Research, 109, No. B5, B05301, doi:10.1029/2003JB002879. Zhuang J., Ogata Y. and Vere-Jones D. (2002). Stochastic declustering of space-time earthquake occurrences. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 97: 369-380.

  15. Stress-Induced Martensite in Front of Crack Tips in NiTi Shape Memory Alloys: Modeling Versus Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maletta, C.; Young, M. L.

    2011-07-01

    NiTi-based shape memory alloys (SMAs) exhibit an unusual stress distribution at the crack tip as compared to common engineering materials, due to a stress-induced martensitic transformation resulting from highly localized stresses. Understanding the fracture mechanics of NiTi-based SMAs is critical to many of their applications. Here, we develop an analytical model, which predicts the boundaries of the transformation region in the crack tip vicinity of NiTi-based SMAs. The proposed model is based on a recent analytical approach which uses modified linear elastic fracture mechanics concepts to predict the crack tip stress distribution and transformation region in SMAs but, unfortunately, it applies only to the plane stress condition. To overcome this limitation, the proposed model accounts for stress triaxiality, which plays an important role in restricting crack tip plastic deformations in common ductile metals as well as the stress-induced martensite in NiTi SMAs. The effects of triaxial stress at the crack tip are taken into account by including a new parameter, the transformation constraint factor, which is based on the plastic constraint factor of elasto-plastic materials. The predictions of the model are compared with synchrotron x-ray micro-diffraction observations and satisfactory agreement is observed between the two results. Finally, the evolution of crack tip transformation boundaries during fracture tests of miniature compact tension specimens is predicted and the effects of applied load and crack length are discussed.

  16. Heavy metals in wild house mice from coal-mining areas of Colombia and expression of genes related to oxidative stress, DNA damage and exposure to metals.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Castilla, Angélica; Olivero-Verbel, Jesús; Marrugo-Negrete, José

    2014-03-01

    Coal mining is a source of pollutants that impact on environmental and human health. This study examined the metal content and the transcriptional status of gene markers associated with oxidative stress, metal transport and DNA damage in livers of feral mice collected near coal-mining operations, in comparison with mice obtained from a reference site. Mus musculus specimens were caught from La Loma and La Jagua, two coal-mining sites in the north of Colombia, as well as from Valledupar (Cesar Department), a city located 100km north of the mines. Concentrations in liver tissue of Hg, Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu and As were determined by differential stripping voltammetry, and real-time PCR was used to measure gene expression. Compared with the reference group (Valledupar), hepatic concentrations of Cd, Cu and Zn were significantly higher in animals living near mining areas. In exposed animals, the mRNA expression of NQ01, MT1, SOD1, MT2, and DDIT3 was 4.2-, 7.3-, 2.5-, 4.6- and 3.4-fold greater in coal mining sites, respectively, than in animals from the reference site (p<0.05). These results suggest that activities related to coal mining may generate pollutants that could affect the biota, inducing the transcription of biochemical markers related to oxidative stress, metal exposure, and DNA damage. These changes may be in part linked to metal toxicity, and could have implications for the development of chronic disease. Therefore, it is essential to implement preventive measures to minimize the effects of coal mining on its nearby environment, in order to protect human health.

  17. Soyasaponin Bb Protects Rat Hepatocytes from Alcohol-Induced Oxidative Stress by Inducing Heme Oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Lijie, Zhu; Ranran, Fu; Xiuying, Liu; Yutang, He; Bo, Wang; Tao, Ma

    2016-01-01

    Background: It has been known that oxidative stress induced by alcohol played a crucial role in the formation of alcoholic liver disease. Although the formation mechanisms underlying liver injury induced by alcohol still remained largely unknown, it has been considered that oxidative stress played a core role in the pathogenesis of hepatocyte damage. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of soyasaponin Bb (Ss-Bb) on oxidative stress in alcohol-induced rat hepatocyte injury. Results: It has been shown that the administration of Ss-Bb could significantly restore antioxidant activity in BRL 3A cells. Moreover, the impaired liver function and morphology changes resulting from ethanol exposure were improved by Ss-Bb treatment. Treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) indicated a critical role of HO-1 in mediating the protective role. Finally, we found that pretreatment with Ss-Bb to ethanol exposure cells increased the expression level of HO-1. Conclusion: It was suggested that Ss-Bb may protect against alcohol-induced hepatocyte injury through ameliorating oxidative stress, and the induction of HO-1 was an important protective mechanism. SUMMARY Effects of soyasaponin Bb was investigated on oxidative stress in rat hepatocytesCell viability and antioxidant capacities were evaluated to determine the effectsThe expression level of HO-1 was measured to reveal the proptective mechanisms PMID:27867273

  18. Vinca alkaloid drugs promote stress-induced translational repression and stress granule formation

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Witold; Fay, Marta M.; Kedersha, Nancy; Zabel, Maciej; Anderson, Paul; Ivanov, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy drugs is a serious therapeutic problem and its underlying molecular mechanisms are complex. Stress granules (SGs), cytoplasmic ribonucleoprotein complexes assembled in cells exposed to stress, are implicated in various aspects of cancer cell metabolism and survival. SGs promote the survival of stressed cells by reprogramming gene expression and inhibiting pro-apoptotic signaling cascades. We show that the vinca alkaloid (VA) class of anti-neoplastic agents potently activates a SG-mediated stress response program. VAs inhibit translation initiation by simultaneous activation of eIF4E-BP1 and phosphorylation of eIF2α, causing polysome disassembly and SG assembly. VA-induced SGs contain canonical SG components but lack specific signaling molecules. Blocking VA-induced SG assembly by inactivating eIF4EBP1 or inhibiting eIF2α phosphorylation decreases cancer cell viability and promotes apoptosis. Our data describe previously unappreciated effects of VAs on cellular RNA metabolism and illuminate the roles of SGs in cancer cell survival. PMID:27083003

  19. Stress-induced crack path in Aji granite under tensile stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Yozo; Sano, Osam; Murashige, Naokuni; Mizuta, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Koji

    1992-12-01

    The double-torsion test using Aji granite was carried out to investigate the interaction between stress-induced crack path and mineral grains. Crack velocities were controlled at range 10-7 m/s to 10-1 m/s. After the stressed specimens were dyed, we checked the crack path by thin section analysis, using an optical microscope. The stress-induced crack path was divided into two types, transgranular and intergranular cracks, and each path was subdivided with respect to mineral grains. In spite of the extensive range of crack velocities, the ratios between the transgranular and intergranular crack lengths did not change. The crack paths were all jagged, and often showed detour around the grain boundary when faced with obstacles like hard grains or preexisting cracks. That is to say, quartz grain played an important role as an obstacle. Feldspar grain could change the crack path because of its cleavage plane. Biolite grain had a serious effect on the path even if its constitution ratio is very small. Fractal dimensions of the crack paths were calculated by three methods, as indicators of surface roughness. The fractal dimensions were shown in a slight trend with the change of crack velocity. This trend can be explained from the point of limited cracking rate in stress corrosion.

  20. Isolation and characterization of the Agvip1 gene and response to abiotic and metal ions stresses in three celery cultivars.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Chen, Yi-Yun; Wang, Feng; Xu, Zhi-Sheng; Jiang, Qian; Xiong, Ai-Sheng

    2014-09-01

    VIP1, a VirE2-interacting protein 1, specifically interacts with VirE2 and acts as a molecular adaptor in Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. This protein is widely used in plant genetic engineering. In this study, we cloned the Agvip1 gene that encodes the AgVIP1 protein from three celery (Apium graveolens) cultivars, namely, "Liuhe Huangxinqin", "Jinnan Shiqin", and "Ventura". The sequence analysis indicated that the Agvip1 gene from the three celery cultivars contained 768 bp Open Reading Frame and encoded with 255 amino acid residues. The N-terminal of AgVIP1 contained RNA recognition motif superfamily, a conserved domain. The Agvip1 gene in three cultivars had very high homology. The phylogenetic tree of VIP1-like proteins was constructed among celery and other plant species, showing that VIP1-like proteins from Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum tuberosum in Solanaceae had the shortest evolutionary relationship with AgVIP1 from A. graveolens in Apiaceae. Quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that the Agvip1 gene had tissue-specific expression, mainly in the celery root. The expression analysis showed that the Agvip1 gene was induced by abiotic stresses differently in three celery cultivars. In "Liuhe Huangxinqin", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated under hot, cold stresses. In "Jinnan Shiqin", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated obviously under cold, drought treatments. However, in "Ventura", the Agvip1 gene was up-regulated under salt stress. The Agvip1 was also induced after metal ions treatments in three celery cultivars. These findings will provide more information on the Agvip1 gene and AgVIP1 protein, and enhance the understanding of the Agvip1 gene regulatory mechanisms under abiotic and metal ions stresses in celery.

  1. Indium and indium tin oxide induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Christen, Verena; Furrer, Gerhard; Fent, Karl

    2014-10-07

    Indium and indium tin oxide (ITO) are extensively used in electronic technologies. They may be introduced into the environment during production, use, and leaching from electronic devices at the end of their life. At present, surprisingly little is known about potential ecotoxicological implications of indium contamination. Here, molecular effects of indium nitrate (In(NO3)3) and ITO nanoparticles were investigated in vitro in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) cells and in zebrafish embryos and novel insights into their molecular effects are provided. In(NO3)3 led to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of transcripts of pro-apoptotic genes and TNF-α in vitro at a concentration of 247 μg/L. In(NO3)3 induced the ER stress key gene BiP at mRNA and protein level, as well as atf6, which ultimately led to induction of the important pro-apoptotic marker gene chop. The activity of In(NO3)3 on ER stress induction was much stronger than that of ITO, which is explained by differences in soluble free indium ion concentrations. The effect was also stronger in ZFL cells than in zebrafish embryos. Our study provides first evidence of ER stress and oxidative stress induction by In(NO3)3 and ITO indicating a critical toxicological profile that needs further investigation.

  2. Cloning and Characterization of a Novel Drosophila Stress Induced DNase

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Chang-Soo; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Tang, Xiaolei; Anchondo, Brenda; Magallanes, Diego; Aguilera, Renato J.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster flies mount an impressive immune response to a variety of pathogens with an efficient system comprised of both humoral and cellular responses. The fat body is the main producer of the anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) with anti-pathogen activity. During bacterial infection, an array of secreted peptidases, proteases and other enzymes are involved in the dissolution of debris generated by pathogen clearance. Although pathogen destruction should result in the release a large amount of nucleic acids, the mechanisms for its removal are still not known. In this report, we present the characterization of a nuclease gene that is induced not only by bacterial infection but also by oxidative stress. Expression of the identified protein has revealed that it encodes a potent nuclease that has been named Stress Induced DNase (SID). SID belongs to a family of evolutionarily conserved cation-dependent nucleases that degrade both single and double-stranded nucleic acids. Down-regulation of sid expression via RNA interference leads to significant reduction of fly viability after bacterial infection and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that SID protects flies from the toxic effects of excess DNA/RNA released by pathogen destruction and from oxidative damage. PMID:25083901

  3. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; ...

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective massmore » transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.« less

  4. Metal intercalation-induced selective adatom mass transport on graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang; Hupalo, Myron; Lin, Hai -Qing; Ho, Kai -Ming; Thiel, Patricia A.; Tringides, Michael C.

    2016-03-29

    Recent experiments indicate that metal intercalation is a very effective method to manipulate the graphene-adatom interaction and control metal nanostructure formation on graphene. A key question is mass transport, i.e., how atoms deposited uniformly on graphene populate different areas depending on the local intercalation. Using first-principles calculations, we show that partially intercalated graphene, with a mixture of intercalated and pristine areas, can induce an alternating electric field because of the spatial variations in electron doping, and thus, an oscillatory electrostatic potential. As a result, this alternating field can change normal stochastic adatom diffusion to biased diffusion, leading to selective mass transport and consequent nucleation, on either the intercalated or pristine areas, depending on the charge state of the adatoms.

  5. Cancer Evolution under Drug-Induced Stress-Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Austin, Robert H.

    2011-03-01

    The lack of long term success in eliminating cancer cells while avoiding the evolution of drug resistance indicates that our understanding of how cells evolve in response to stress is still incomplete. We interpret this not as a failure of the current approaches, but rather as an indication that new research venues should be undertaken, where conventional wisdom is challenged in order to drive forward our understanding of cancer. Of particular importance, we believe that the powerful role of evolution in the origin of drug resistance is ill-understood. We do not ask whether evolution occurs, but rather how. We do not describe molecular mechanisms underlying drug resistance at the single cell level, but rather ask how does resistance spread in cancerous tissues and metastatic lesions. We attempt to answer these questions by studying the population-wide dynamics of drug evolution and the collective stress response of cancer cells in a microfluidics device. We use microfluidics technologies to impose high levels of stress on cancer cell metapopulation by create smoothly varying gradients of either oxygen, chemotherapeutic drug, nutrient or pH. We present long-term studies of the adaptation of tumorigenic cancer cells to drug- induced stress gradients. Partially supported by and performance at NCI U54CA143803, CNF ECS-0335765, NSF PHY- 0750323, and NSERC.

  6. Polyamines induce adaptive responses in water deficit stressed cucumber roots.

    PubMed

    Kubiś, Jan; Floryszak-Wieczorek, Jolanta; Arasimowicz-Jelonek, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of exogenous polyamines (PAs) on the membrane status and proline level in roots of water stressed cucumber (Cucumis sativus cv. Dar) seedlings. It was found that water shortage resulted in an increase of membrane injury, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity, lipid peroxidation and proline concentration in cucumber roots during progressive dehydration. PA pretreatment resulted in a distinct reduction of the injury index, and this effect was reflected by a lower stress-evoked LOX activity increase and lipid peroxide levels at the end of the stress period. In contrast, PA-supplied stressed roots displayed a higher proline accumulation. The presented results suggest that exogenous PAs are able to alleviate water deficit-induced membrane permeability and diminish LOX activity. Observed changes were accompanied by an accumulation of proline, suggesting that the accumulation of this osmolyte might be another possible mode of action for PAs to attain higher membrane stability, and in this way mitigate water deficit effects in roots of cucumber seedlings.

  7. Oxidative-stress-induced epigenetic changes in chronic diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Feng, Biao; Ruiz, Michael Anthony; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2013-03-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development and progression of chronic diabetic complications. Diabetes causes mitochondrial superoxide overproduction in the endothelial cells of both large and small vessels. This increased superoxide production causes the activation of several signal pathways involved in the pathogenesis of chronic complications. In particular, endothelial cells are major targets of glucose-induced oxidative damage in the target organs. Oxidative stress activates cellular signaling pathways and transcription factors in endothelial cells including protein kinase C (PKC), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), forkhead box O (FOXO), and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB). Oxidative stress also causes DNA damage and activates DNA nucleotide excision repair enzymes including the excision repair cross complimenting 1(ERCC1), ERCC4, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Augmented production of histone acetyltransferase p300, and alterations of histone deacetylases, including class III deacetylases sirtuins, are also involved in this process. Recent research has found that small noncoding RNAs, like microRNA, are a new kind of regulator associated with chronic diabetic complications. There are extensive and complicated interactions and among these molecules. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the role of oxidative stress in the development of diabetic complications in relation to epigenetic changes such as acetylation and microRNA alterations.

  8. Thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. E.; Cohen, D.; Rousseau, C. Q.; Hyer, M. W.; Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermally induced stresses and deformations in layered, orthotropic tubes are studied. The motivation for studying tubes is their likely application for use in space structures. Tubes are a strong candidate for this application because of their high structural efficiency, as measured by stiffness per unit weight, and their relative ease of fabrication. Also, tubes have no free edges to deteriorate or delaminate. An anticipated thermal condition for tubes in space is a circumferential temperature gradient. This type of gradient will introduce dimensional changes into the structure and may cause stresses large enough to cause damage to the material. There are potentially large differences in temperatures at different circumferential locations on the tube. Because of this, the effects of temperature dependent material properties on the stresses and deformations may be important. The study is composed of three parts: experiments to determine the functional form of the circumferential gradient and to measure tube deflections; an elasticity solution to compute the stresses and deformations; and an approximate approach to determine the effects of temperature dependent material properties.

  9. Tomato leaf spatial expression of stress-induced Asr genes.

    PubMed

    Maskin, Laura; Maldonado, Sara; Iusem, Norberto D

    2008-12-01

    Asr1 and Asr2 are water stress-inducible genes belonging to the Asr gene family, which transcriptionally regulate a sugar transporter gene, at least in grape. Using an in situ RNA hybridization methodology, we determined that, in basal conditions, expression of Asr2 in tomato leaves is detected in the phloem tissue, particularly in companion phloem cells. When plants are exposed to water stress, Asr2 expression is contained in companion cells but expands occasionally to mesophyll cells. In contrast, Asr1 transcript localization seems to be sparse in leaf vascular tissue under both non-stress and stress conditions. The occurrence of Asr transcripts precisely in companion cells is in accordance with the cell type specificity reported for hexose-transporter protein molecules in grape encoded by the only Asr-target gene known to date. The results are discussed in light of the reported scarcity of plasmodesmata between companion cells and the rest of leaf tissue in the family Solanaceae.

  10. The stress-induced surface wave velocity variations in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalvier, Agustin; Bittner, James; Evani, Sai Kalyan; Popovics, John S.

    2017-02-01

    This investigation studies the behavior of surface wave velocity in concrete specimens subjected to low levels of compressive and tensile stress in beams from applied flexural loads. Beam specimen is loaded in a 4-point-load bending configuration, generating uniaxial compression and tension stress fields at the top and bottom surfaces of the beam, respectively. Surface waves are generated through contactless air-coupled transducers and received through contact accelerometers. Results show a clear distinction in responses from compression and tension zones, where velocity increases in the former and decreases in the latter, with increasing load levels. These trends agree with existing acoustoelastic literature. Surface wave velocity tends to decrease more under tension than it tends to increase under compression, for equal load levels. It is observed that even at low stress levels, surface wave velocity is affected by acoustoelastic effects, coupled with plastic effects (stress-induced damage). The acoustoelastic effect is isolated by means of considering the Kaiser effect and by experimentally mitigating the viscoelastic effects of concrete. Results of this ongoing investigation contribute to the overall knowledge of the acoustoelastic behavior of concrete. Applications of this knowledge may include structural health monitoring of members under flexural loads, improved high order modelling of materials, and validation of results seen in dynamic acoustoelasticity testing.

  11. Analytical Modeling of Surface Roughness, Hardness and Residual Stress Induced by Deep Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Frederico C.; Abrão, Alexandre M.; Denkena, Berend; Breidenstein, Bernd; Mörke, Tobias

    2017-02-01

    Deep rolling is a mechanical surface treatment that can significantly alter the features of metallic components and despite the fact that it has been used for a long time, to date the influence of the interaction among the principal process parameters has not been thoroughly understood. Aiming to fulfill this gap, this work addresses the effect of deep rolling on surface finish and mechanical properties from the analytical and experimental viewpoints. More specifically, the influence of deep rolling pressure and number of passes on surface roughness, hardness and residual stress induced on AISI 1060 steel is investigated. The findings indicate that the surface roughness after deep rolling is closely related to the yield strength of the work material and the available models can satisfactorily predict the former parameter. Better agreement between the mathematical and experimental hardness values is achieved when a single deep rolling pass is employed, as well as when the yield strength of the work material increases. Compressive residual stress is generally induced after deep rolling, irrespectively of the selected heat treatment and deep rolling parameters. Finally, the model proposed to predict residual stress provides results closest to the experimental data especially when the annealed material is considered.

  12. Analytical Modeling of Surface Roughness, Hardness and Residual Stress Induced by Deep Rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, Frederico C.; Abrão, Alexandre M.; Denkena, Berend; Breidenstein, Bernd; Mörke, Tobias

    2016-12-01

    Deep rolling is a mechanical surface treatment that can significantly alter the features of metallic components and despite the fact that it has been used for a long time, to date the influence of the interaction among the principal process parameters has not been thoroughly understood. Aiming to fulfill this gap, this work addresses the effect of deep rolling on surface finish and mechanical properties from the analytical and experimental viewpoints. More specifically, the influence of deep rolling pressure and number of passes on surface roughness, hardness and residual stress induced on AISI 1060 steel is investigated. The findings indicate that the surface roughness after deep rolling is closely related to the yield strength of the work material and the available models can satisfactorily predict the former parameter. Better agreement between the mathematical and experimental hardness values is achieved when a single deep rolling pass is employed, as well as when the yield strength of the work material increases. Compressive residual stress is generally induced after deep rolling, irrespectively of the selected heat treatment and deep rolling parameters. Finally, the model proposed to predict residual stress provides results closest to the experimental data especially when the annealed material is considered.

  13. Chemical Detection Based on Adsorption-Induced and Photo-Induced Stresses in MEMS Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.

    1999-04-05

    Recently there has been an increasing demand to perform real-time in-situ chemical detection of hazardous materials, contraband chemicals, and explosive chemicals. Currently, real-time chemical detection requires rather large analytical instrumentation that are expensive and complicated to use. The advent of inexpensive mass produced MEMS (micro-electromechanical systems) devices opened-up new possibilities for chemical detection. For example, microcantilevers were found to respond to chemical stimuli by undergoing changes in their bending and resonance frequency even when a small number of molecules adsorb on their surface. In our present studies, we extended this concept by studying changes in both the adsorption-induced stress and photo-induced stress as target chemicals adsorb on the surface of microcantilevers. For example, microcantilevers that have adsorbed molecules will undergo photo-induced bending that depends on the number of absorbed molecules on the surface. However, microcantilevers that have undergone photo-induced bending will adsorb molecules on their surfaces in a distinctly different way. Depending on the photon wavelength and microcantilever material, the microcantilever can be made to bend by expanding or contracting the irradiated surface. This is important in cases where the photo-induced stresses can be used to counter any adsorption-induced stresses and increase the dynamic range. Coating the surface of the microstructure with a different material can provide chemical specificity for the target chemicals. However, by selecting appropriate photon wavelengths we can change the chemical selectivity due to the introduction of new surface states in the MEMS device. We will present and discuss our results on the use of adsorption-induced and photo-induced bending of microcantilevers for chemical detection.

  14. Metabolic Stress Induced by Arginine Deprivation Induces Autophagy Cell Death in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    arginine deiminase W81XWH-08-1-0385 1 AUG 2010 - 31 JUL 2011Annual01-08-2011 University of California, Davis Davis, CA 95618 Metabolic Stress Induced...J Coates, T Bowles, J Sutcliffe, R Jung, R Gandour-Edwards, R Bold, HJ Kung. Arginine deiminase : a novel therapy for prostate cancer and a tool to...R Jung, R Gandour-Edwards, R Bold, HJ Kung. Arginine deiminase induces autophagic cell death in human prostate cancer. EMBO Conference: Autophagy

  15. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-10-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications.

  16. Flaw-induced plastic-flow dynamics in bulk metallic glasses under tension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, S. H.; Yue, T. M.; Tsui, C. P.; Chan, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inheriting amorphous atomic structures without crystalline lattices, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are known to have superior mechanical properties, such as high strength approaching the ideal value, but are susceptible to catastrophic failures. Understanding the plastic-flow dynamics of BMGs is important for achieving stable plastic flow in order to avoid catastrophic failures, especially under tension, where almost all BMGs demonstrate limited plastic flow with catastrophic failure. Previous findings have shown that the plastic flow of BMGs displays critical dynamics under compression tests, however, the plastic-flow dynamics under tension are still unknown. Here we report that power-law critical dynamics can also be achieved in the plastic flow of tensile BMGs by introducing flaws. Differing from the plastic flow under compression, the flaw-induced plastic flow under tension shows an upward trend in the amplitudes of the load drops with time, resulting in a stable plastic-flow stage with a power-law distribution of the load drop. We found that the flaw-induced plastic flow resulted from the stress gradients around the notch roots, and the stable plastic-flow stage increased with the increase of the stress concentration factor ahead of the notch root. The findings are potentially useful for predicting and avoiding the catastrophic failures in tensile BMGs by tailoring the complex stress fields in practical structural-applications. PMID:27779221

  17. Asbestos-induced disruption of calcium homeostasis induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Alan J; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; He, Chao; Murthy, Shuhba; Carter, A Brent

    2014-11-28

    Although the mechanisms for fibrosis development remain largely unknown, recent evidence indicates that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) may act as an important fibrotic stimulus in diseased lungs. ER stress is observed in lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. In this study we evaluated if ER stress and the UPR was present in macrophages exposed to chrysotile asbestos and if ER stress in macrophages was associated with asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Macrophages exposed to chrysotile had elevated transcript levels of several ER stress genes. Macrophages loaded with the Ca(2+)-sensitive dye Fura2-AM showed that cytosolic Ca(2+) increased significantly within minutes after chrysotile exposure and remained elevated for a prolonged time. Chrysotile-induced increases in cytosolic Ca(2+) were partially inhibited by either anisomycin, an inhibitor of passive Ca(2+) leak from the ER, or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxyl)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA-AM), an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator known to deplete ER Ca(2+) stores. Anisomycin inhibited X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing and reduced immunoglobulin-binding protein (BiP) levels, whereas BAPTA-AM increased XBP1 splicing and BiP expression, suggesting that ER calcium depletion may be one factor contributing to ER stress in cells exposed to chrysotile. To evaluate ER stress in vivo, asbestos-exposed mice showed fibrosis development, and alveolar macrophages from fibrotic mice showed increased expression of BiP. Bronchoalveolar macrophages from asbestosis patients showed increased expression of several ER stress genes compared with normal subjects. These findings suggest that alveolar macrophages undergo ER stress, which is associated with fibrosis development.

  18. Hypoxia inducible factors and the response to hypoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Majmundar, Amar J.; Wong, Waihay J.; Simon, M. Celeste

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen (O2) is an essential nutrient that serves as a key substrate in cellular metabolism and bioenergetics. In a variety of physiological and pathological states, organisms encounter insufficient O2 availability, or hypoxia. In order to cope with this stress, evolutionarily conserved responses are engaged. In mammals, the primary transcriptional response to hypoxic stress is mediated by the Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs). While canonically regulated by prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing enzymes (PHDs), the HIFα subunits are intricately responsive to numerous other factors including Factor Inhibiting HIF-1α (FIH1), sirtuins, and metabolites. These transcription factors function in normal tissue homeostasis and impinge on critical aspects of disease progression and recovery. Insights from basic HIF biology are being translated into pharmaceuticals targeting the HIF pathway. PMID:20965423

  19. Mitochondrial control of cell death induced by hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Criollo, Alfredo; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Maiuri, M Chiara; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Lavandero, Sergio; Kroemer, Guido

    2007-01-01

    HeLa and HCT116 cells respond differentially to sorbitol, an osmolyte able to induce hypertonic stress. In these models, sorbitol promoted the phenotypic manifestations of early apoptosis followed by complete loss of viability in a time-, dose-, and cell type-specific fashion, by eliciting distinct yet partially overlapping molecular pathways. In HCT116 but not in HeLa cells, sorbitol caused the mitochondrial release of the caspase-independent death effector AIF, whereas in both cell lines cytochrome c was retained in mitochondria. Despite cytochrome c retention, HeLa cells exhibited the progressive activation of caspase-3, presumably due to the prior activation of caspase-8. Accordingly, caspase inhibition prevented sorbitol-induced killing in HeLa, but only partially in HCT116 cells. Both the knock-out of Bax in HCT116 cells and the knock-down of Bax in A549 cells by RNA interference reduced the AIF release and/or the mitochondrial alterations. While the knock-down of Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L) sensitized to sorbitol-induced killing, overexpression of a Bcl-2 variant that specifically localizes to mitochondria (but not of the wild-type nor of a endoplasmic reticulum-targeted form) strongly inhibited sorbitol effects. Thus, hyperosmotic stress kills cells by triggering different molecular pathways, which converge at mitochondria where pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family exert their control.

  20. Oxidative stress in alcohol-induced rat parotid sialadenosis.

    PubMed

    Campos, Sara Cristina Gonçalves; Moreira, Denise Aparecida Corrêa; Nunes, Terezinha D'Avila e Silva; Colepicolo, Pio; Brigagão, Maísa Ribeiro Pereira Lima

    2005-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the oxidative status of rat parotid and submandibular glands. To identify the endogenous response to ethanol ingestion, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined. In addition, the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol was supplied to the animals in order to estimate its action in ethanol-associated glandular damage. The thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and the protein carbonyl (PC) content, both markers of cellular oxidative stress on lipid and protein structures, respectively, were recorded. Animals subjected to alcohol ingestion showed a low body growth rate with concomitant enlargement of absolute and relative parotid wet weight, compared with pair-fed calorie-controlled rats. Parotid glands of ethanol-treated animals showed increased SOD and GPx activity, and alpha-tocopherol was able to reduce their activities to the control levels. TBARS and PC were enhanced after chronic ethanol treatment in rat parotids. Supplemental alpha-tocopherol suppressed the oxidative ethanol-induced damage in lipid without affecting induced protein oxidation. Submandibular glands revealed no alterations in the weight, enzymatic and oxidative parameters tested due to ethanol and/or alpha-tocopherol ingestion. These findings indicate the involvement of oxidative stress in parotid gland sialadenosis due to ethanol consumption and the capability of alpha-tocopherol to halt lipid damage, although this low-molecular antioxidant compound leads to neither increased glandular weight nor protein oxidation in ethanol-induced parotid alterations.

  1. Inflammatory stress potentiates emodin-induced liver injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Can; Gao, Dan; Li, Xiao-Fei; Li, Chun-Yu; Li, Rui-Sheng; Zhao, Yan-Ling; Li, Na; Jia, Ge-Liu-Chang; Pang, Jing-Yao; Cui, He-Rong; Ma, Zhi-Jie; Xiao, Xiao-He; Wang, Jia-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicines containing emodin, widely used for the treatment of hepatitis in clinic, have been reported with hepatotoxicity in individuals. A modest inflammatory stress potentiating liver injury has been linked to the idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (IDILI). In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) interacts with emodin could synergize to cause liver injury in rats. Emodin (ranging from 20, 40, to 80 mg/kg), which is in the range of liver protection, was administered to rats, before LPS (2.8 mg/kg) or saline vehicle treatment. The biochemical tests showed that non-toxic dosage of LPS coupled with emodin caused significant increases of plasma ALT and AST activities as compared to emodin alone treated groups (P < 0.05). In addition, with LPS or emodin alone could not induce any changes in ALT and AST activity, as compared with the control group (0.5% CMC-Na treatment). Meanwhile, the plasma proinflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 increased significantly in the emodin/LPS groups compared to either emodin groups or the LPS (P < 0.05). Histological analysis showed that liver damage was only found in emodin/LPS cotreatmented rat livers samples. These results indicate that non-toxic dosage of LPS potentiates the hepatotoxicity of emodin. This discovery raises the possibility that emodin and herbal medicines containing it may induce liver injury in the inflammatory stress even in their therapeutic dosages. PMID:26557087

  2. Stress-induced cleavage of Myc promotes cancer cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ngouenet, Celine; Anderson, Sarah; Brabletz, Thomas; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical in Myc-induced tumor progression. Here we report that cancer cells evade death under stress by activating calpain-mediated proteolysis of Myc. This generates Myc-nick, a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive cleavage product of Myc. We found conversion of Myc into Myc-nick in cell lines and tissues derived from multiple cancers. In colon cancer, the production of Myc-nick is enhanced under stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation. Under these conditions, ectopic expression of Myc-nick promotes anchorage-independent growth and cell survival at least in part by promoting autophagy. Myc-nick also delays colon cancer cell death after treatment with chemotherapeutic drugs such as etoposide, cisplatin, and imatinib. Furthermore, colon cancer cells expressing a cleavage-resistant form of Myc undergo extensive apoptosis but are rescued by overexpression of Myc-nick. We also found that ectopic expression of Myc-nick results in the induction of the actin-bundling protein fascin, formation of filopodia, and increased cell motility—all mediators of tumor metastasis. Myc-nick-induced survival, autophagy, and motility require Myc box II (MBII), a region of Myc-nick that recruits acetyltransferases that in turn modify cytoplasmic proteins, including α-tubulin and ATG3. Our results suggest that Myc-nick-induced survival and motility contribute to colon cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24696454

  3. Acute hypertension induces oxidative stress in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Poulet, Roberta; Gentile, Maria T; Vecchione, Carmine; Distaso, Maria; Aretini, Alessandra; Fratta, Luigi; Russo, Giovanni; Echart, Cinara; Maffei, Angelo; De Simoni, Maria G; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2006-02-01

    Arterial hypertension is not only a major risk factor for cerebrovascular accidents, such as stroke and cerebral hemorrhage, but is also associated to milder forms of brain injury. One of the main causes of neurodegeneration is the increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) that is also a common trait of hypertensive conditions, thus suggesting that such a mechanism could play a role even in the onset of hypertension-evoked brain injury. To investigate this issue, we have explored the effect of acute-induced hypertensive conditions on cerebral oxidative stress. To this aim, we have developed a mouse model of transverse aortic coarctation (TAC) between the two carotid arteries, which imposes acutely on the right brain hemisphere a dramatic increase in blood pressure. Our results show that hypertension acutely induced by aortic coarctation induces a breaking of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and reactive astrocytosis through hyperperfusion, and evokes trigger factors of neurodegeneration such as oxidative stress and inflammation, similar to that observed in cerebral hypoperfusion. Moreover, the derived brain injury is mainly localized in selected brain areas controlling cognitive functions, such as the cortex and hippocampus, and could be a consequence of a defect in the BBB permeability. It is noteworthy to emphasize that, even if these latter events are not enough to produce ischemic/hemorrhagic injury, they are able to alter mechanisms fundamental for maintaining normal brain function, such as protein synthesis, which has a prominent role for memory formation and cortical plasticity.

  4. Residual Stress In Sheet Metal Parts Made By Incremental Forming Process

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shigekazu; Nakamura, Tamotsu; Hayakawa, Kunio; Nakamura, Hideo; Motomura, Kazuo

    2007-05-17

    Incremental sheet metal forming, which uses a CNC forming stylus, is new flexible forming process not requiring the use of any expensive dies. We have applied the incremental forming process to dental prosthesis. This new process, however, posed difficult problems. After removing the outer portion of the incremental formed sheet metal part, the inner part is distorted. In this paper, the residual stress in the sheet metal part obtained by incremental forward stretch forming operations has been examined. Numerical simulations were conducted for solid elements. When small rigid ball slides on the metal sheet with a certain vertical feed, tension residual stress is produced in the upper layer of the sheet and compression stress in the lower. Then, the resultant moments throughout the sheet cause negative spring-back when the outer portion is removed. A systematic study of the behavior was conducted in this paper. Parameters considered included the tool radius and the vertical tool feed rate. The tip radius of forming stylus has a significant influence on the residual stress. The smaller radius of forming stylus, the larger bending force becomes. And new process with double forming styluses is examined to reduce the bending force.

  5. Red and blue lights induced oxidative stress tolerance promote cadmium rhizocomplexation in Oryza sativa.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) accumulation and related stress responses have been investigated in red, blue and white lights exposed Oryza sativa L. cv MTU 7029. Cd translocation was reduced significantly by red and blue lights. Increase in amount of organic acids, thiols, and nutrients in the roots that cause Cd rhizocomplexation was the reason for reduction in Cd translocation. These effects were due to higher efficiency to perform photosynthesis and transpiration under red or blue lights compare with white light during Cd stress. Increased photosynthetic assimilate turnover was witnessed as a function of sugar content. Amount of redox regulators such as glutathione and ascorbate were also increased under red and blue light exposure. Together with up regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities, these metabolites ensured redox balance in presence of reactive oxygen species produced due to Cd toxicity. Protection of photosynthesis from Cd inducible oxidative stress ensured supplies of sugar intermediates essential for the synthesis of metal chelators in roots. Therefore, it was inferred that red and blue lights promote Cd rhizocomplexation and ameliorated Cd stress in rice seedlings.

  6. Early transcriptional responses to mercury: a role for ethylene in mercury-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Montero-Palmero, M Belén; Martín-Barranco, Amanda; Escobar, Carolina; Hernández, Luis E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of plant tolerance to mercury (Hg) is important for developing phytoremediation strategies of Hg-contaminated soils. The early responses of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) seedlings to Hg were studied using transcriptomics analysis. A Medicago truncatula microarray was hybridized with high-quality root RNA from M. sativa treated with 3 μM Hg for 3, 6 and 24 h. The transcriptional pattern data were complementary to the measurements of root growth inhibition, lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) accumulation and NADPH-oxidase activity as stress indexes. Of 559 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), 91% were up-regulated. The majority of DEGs were shared between the 3 and 6 h (60%) time points, including the 'stress', 'secondary metabolism' and 'hormone metabolism' functional categories. Genes from ethylene metabolism and signalling were highly represented, suggesting that this phytohormone may be relevant for metal perception and homeostasis. Ethylene-insensitive alfalfa seedlings preincubated with the ethylene signalling inhibitor 1-methylcyclopronene and Arabidopsis thaliana ein2-5 mutants confirmed that ethylene participates in the early perception of Hg stress. It modulates root growth inhibition, NADPH-oxidase activity and Hg-induced apoplastic H2 O2 accumulation. Therefore, ethylene signalling attenuation could be useful in future phytotechnological applications to ameliorate stress symptoms in Hg-polluted plants.

  7. The role of intracellular zinc in chromium(VI)-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Emil; Cervinka, Miroslav

    2006-09-25

    Several studies have demonstrated that zinc is required for the optimal functioning of the skin. Changes in intracellular zinc concentrations have been associated with both improved protection of skin cells against various noxious factors as well as with increased susceptibility to external stress. Still, little is known about the role of intracellular zinc in hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI))-induced skin injury. To address this question, the effects of zinc deficiency or supplementation on Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, DNA injury and cell death were investigated in human diploid dermal fibroblasts during 48 h. Zinc levels in fibroblasts were manipulated by pretreatment of cells with 100 microM ZnSO4 and 4 or 25 microM zinc chelator TPEN. Cr(VI) (50, 10 and 1 microM) was found to produce time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity resulting in oxidative stress, suppression of antioxidant systems and activation of p53-dependent apoptosis which is reported for the first time in this model in relation to environmental Cr(VI). Increased intracellular zinc partially attenuated Cr(VI)-induced cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis by enhancing cellular antioxidant systems while inhibiting Cr(VI)-dependent apoptosis by preventing the activation of caspase-3. Decreased intracellular zinc enhanced cytotoxic effects of all the tested Cr(VI) concentrations, leading to rapid loss of cell membrane integrity and nuclear dispersion--hallmarks of necrosis. These new findings suggest that Cr(VI) as a model environmental toxin may damage in deeper regions residing skin fibroblasts whose susceptibility to such toxin depends among others on their intracellular Zn levels. Further investigation of the impact of Zn status on skin cells as well as any other cell populations exposed to Cr(VI) or other heavy metals is warranted.

  8. Quantitative proteomics of heavy metal stress responses in Sydney rock oysters.

    PubMed

    Muralidharan, Sridevi; Thompson, Emma; Raftos, David; Birch, Gavin; Haynes, Paul A

    2012-03-01

    Currently, there are few predictive biomarkers in key biomonitoring species, such as oysters, that can detect heavy metal pollution in coastal waterways. Several attributes make oysters superior to other organisms for positive biomonitoring of heavy metal pollution. In particular, they are filter feeders with a high capacity for bioaccumulation. In this study, we used two proteomics approaches, namely label-free shotgun proteomics based on SDS-PAGE gel separation and gas phase fractionation, to investigate the heavy metal stress responses of Sydney rock oysters. Protein samples were prepared from haemolymph of oysters exposed to 100 μg/L of PbCl(2), CuCl(2), or ZnCl(2) for 4 days in closed aquaria. Peptides were identified using a Bivalvia protein sequence database, due to the unavailability of a complete oyster genome sequence. Statistical analysis revealed 56 potential biomarker proteins, as well as several protein biosynthetic pathways to be greatly impacted by metal stress. These have the potential to be incorporated into bioassays for prevention and monitoring of heavy metal pollution in Australian oyster beds. The study confirms that proteomic analysis of biomonitoring species is a promising approach for assessing the effects of environmental pollution, and our experiments have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying oyster stress responses.

  9. Effect of metal stress on life history divergence and quantitative genetic architecture in a wolf spider.

    PubMed

    Hendrickx, F; Maelfait, J-P; Lens, L

    2008-01-01

    Effects and consequences of stress exposure on life history strategies and quantitative genetic variation in wild populations remain poorly understood. We here study whether long-term exposure to heavy metal pollution may result in alternative life history strategies and alter quantitative genetic properties in natural populations of the wolf spider Pirata piraticus. Offspring originating from a reference and a metal contaminated population and their reciprocal hybrid cross were bred in a half-sib mating scheme and subsequently reared in cadmium contaminated vs. clean environment. Results from this experiment provided evidence for a genetically based reduced growth rate and increased egg size in the contaminated population. Growth rate reduction in response to cadmium contamination was only observed for the reference population. Animal model analysis revealed that heritability for growth rate was large for the reference population under reference conditions, but much lower under metal stressed conditions, caused by a strong decrease in additive genetic variance. Heritability for growth of the metal contaminated population was very low, even under reference conditions. Initial size of the offspring was primarily determined by maternal effects, whereas egg size produced by the offspring was determined by both sire and dam effects, indicating that egg size determination is under control of the female genotype. In conclusion, these results show that metal stress can not only affect life history variation in natural populations, but also decreases the expression as well as the of the amount of genetic variation for particular life history traits.

  10. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Cai, Lei; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propulsion rate (SPR), Guth injury score, cortisol, gastrointestinal hormones (calcitonin-gene-related peptide and motilin) and oxidative stress markers (superoxide dismutase and malondialde hyde) in blood plasma as well as gastric mucosa homogenate with or without melatonin. The pathological examination of gastric mucosa was also performed. Results The GRR and SPR were improved by noise stress compared with control (P < 0.05). The pathological examination and Guth injury score revealed gastric stress ulcer. Moreover, the levels of cortisol, motilin and malondialdehyde in blood plasma and malondialdehyde in gastric mucosa homogenate were increased by noise stress (P < 0.05). CGRP and superoxide dismutase activity in both of blood plasma and gastric mucosa homogenate were significantly decreased (P< 0.05). Furthermore, melatonin reversed changes in GRR, SPR, pathological examination, Guth injury score, cortisol, motilin, CGRP, superoxide dismutase activity and malondialdehyde (P < 0.05). Conclusions Melatonin is effective in reversing the GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The underlying mechanism may be involved in oxidative stress and gastrointestinal hormones. PMID:25537679

  11. Method of inducing surface ensembles on a metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Miller, S.S.

    1987-10-02

    A method of inducing surface ensembles on a transition metal catalyst used in the conversion of a reactant gas or gas mixture, such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen into hydrocarbons (the Fischer-Tropsch reaction) is disclosed which comprises adding a Lewis base to the syngas (CO + H/sub 2/) mixture before reaction takes place. The formation of surface ensembles in this manner restricts the number and types of reaction pathways which will be utilized, thus greatly narrowing the product distribution and maximizing the efficiency of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Similarly, amines may also be produced by the conversion of reactant gas or gases, such as nitrogen, hydrogen, or hydrocarbon constituents.

  12. Thermoelectric assessment of laser peening induced effects on a metallic biomaterial Ti6Al4V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón, H.; Barriuso, S.; Porro, J. A.; González-Carrasco, J. L.; Ocaña, J. L.

    2014-03-01

    Laser peening has recently emerged as a useful technique to overcome detrimental effects associated to another wellknown surface modification processes such as shot peening or grit blasting used in the biomedical field. It is worth to notice that besides the primary residual stress effect, thermally induced effects might also cause subtle surface and subsurface microstructural changes that might influence corrosion resistance. Moreover, since maximum loads use to occur at the surface, they could also play a critical role in the fatigue strength. In this work, plates of Ti-6Al-4V alloy of 7 mm in thickness were modified by laser peening without using a sacrificial outer layer. Irradiation by a Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (9.4 ns pulse length) working in fundamental harmonic at 2.8 J/pulse and with water as confining medium was used. Laser pulses with a 1.5 mm diameter at an equivalent overlapping density (EOD) of 5000 cm-2 were applied. Attempts to analyze the global induced effects after laser peening were addressed by using the contacting and non-contacting thermoelectric power (TEP) techniques. It was demonstrated that the thermoelectric method is entirely insensitive to surface topography while it is uniquely sensitive to subtle variations in thermoelectric properties, which are associated with the different material effects induced by different surface modification treatments. These results indicate that the stress-dependence of the thermoelectric power in metals produces sufficient contrast to detect and quantitatively characterize regions under compressive residual stress based on their thermoelectric power contrast with respect to the surrounding intact material. However, further research is needed to better separate residual stress effects from secondary material effects, especially in the case of low-conductivity engineering materials like titanium alloys.

  13. Sex and stress: Men and women show different cortisol responses to psychological stress induced by the Trier social stress test and the Iowa singing social stress test.

    PubMed

    Reschke-Hernández, Alaine E; Okerstrom, Katrina L; Bowles Edwards, Angela; Tranel, Daniel

    2017-01-02

    Acute psychological stress affects each of us in our daily lives and is increasingly a topic of discussion for its role in mental illness, aging, cognition, and overall health. A better understanding of how such stress affects the body and mind could contribute to the development of more effective clinical interventions and prevention practices. Over the past 3 decades, the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) has been widely used to induce acute stress in a laboratory setting based on the principles of social evaluative threat, namely, a judged speech-making task. A comparable alternative task may expand options for examining acute stress in a controlled laboratory setting. This study uses a within-subjects design to examine healthy adult participants' (n = 20 men, n = 20 women) subjective stress and salivary cortisol responses to the standard TSST (involving public speaking and math) and the newly created Iowa Singing Social Stress Test (I-SSST). The I-SSST is similar to the TSST but with a new twist: public singing. Results indicated that men and women reported similarly high levels of subjective stress in response to both tasks. However, men and women demonstrated different cortisol responses; men showed a robust response to both tasks, and women displayed a lesser response. These findings are in line with previous literature and further underscore the importance of examining possible sex differences throughout various phases of research, including design, analysis, and interpretation of results. Furthermore, this nascent examination of the I-SSST suggests a possible alternative for inducing stress in the laboratory. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Stress-Induced Antinociception in Fish Reversed by Naloxone

    PubMed Central

    Wolkers, Carla Patrícia Bejo; Barbosa Junior, Augusto; Menescal-de-Oliveira, Leda; Hoffmann, Anette

    2013-01-01

    Pain perception in non-mammalian vertebrates such as fish is a controversial issue. We demonstrate that, in the fish Leporinus macrocephalus, an imposed restraint can modulate the behavioral response to a noxious stimulus, specifically the subcutaneous injection of 3% formaldehyde. In the first experiment, formaldehyde was applied immediately after 3 or 5 min of the restraint. Inhibition of the increase in locomotor activity in response to formaldehyde was observed, which suggests a possible restraint-induced antinociception. In the second experiment, the noxious stimulus was applied 0, 5, 10 and 15 min after the restraint, and both 3 and 5 min of restraint promoted short-term antinociception of approximately 5 min. In experiments 3 and 4, an intraperitoneal injection of naloxone (30 mg.kg−1) was administered 30 min prior to the restraint. The 3- minute restraint-induced antinociception was blocked by pretreatment with naloxone, but the corresponding 5-minute response was not. One possible explanation for this result is that an opioid and a non-preferential μ–opioid and/or non-opioid mechanism participate in this response modulation. Furthermore, we observed that both the 3- and 5- minutes restraint were severely stressful events for the organism, promoting marked increases in serum cortisol levels. These data indicate that the response to a noxious stimulus can be modulated by an environmental stressor in fish, as is the case in mammals. To our knowledge, this study is the first evidence for the existence of an endogenous antinociceptive system that is activated by an acute standardized stress in fish. Additionally, it characterizes the antinociceptive response induced by stress in terms of its time course and the opioid mediation, providing information for understanding the evolution of nociception modulation. PMID:23936261

  15. Che-1-induced inhibition of mTOR pathway enables stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Desantis, Agata; Bruno, Tiziana; Catena, Valeria; De Nicola, Francesca; Goeman, Frauke; Iezzi, Simona; Sorino, Cristina; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Bossi, Gianluca; Federico, Vincenzo; La Rosa, Francesca; Ricciardi, Maria Rosaria; Lesma, Elena; De Meo, Paolo D'Onorio; Castrignanò, Tiziana; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Pisani, Francesco; Chesi, Marta; Bergsagel, P Leif; Floridi, Aristide; Tonon, Giovanni; Passananti, Claudio; Blandino, Giovanni; Fanciulli, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key protein kinase that regulates cell growth, metabolism, and autophagy to maintain cellular homeostasis. Its activity is inhibited by adverse conditions, including nutrient limitation, hypoxia, and DNA damage. In this study, we demonstrate that Che-1, a RNA polymerase II-binding protein activated by the DNA damage response, inhibits mTOR activity in response to stress conditions. We found that, under stress, Che-1 induces the expression of two important mTOR inhibitors, Redd1 and Deptor, and that this activity is required for sustaining stress-induced autophagy. Strikingly, Che-1 expression correlates with the progression of multiple myeloma and is required for cell growth and survival, a malignancy characterized by high autophagy response. PMID:25770584

  16. Dynamic Pressure Induced Transformation Toughening and Strengthening in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    subject materials to uniaxial-stress loading up to 30 GPa and nano -to-micro-second duration, allowing studies of the influence of stress-states and... zirconium -based bulk metallic glass, MS&T Conference, Pittsburg, October 2009. Mechanical Behavior of bulk metallic glass and tungsten composite over...we are able to subject materials to uniaxial-stress loading up to 30 GPa and nano -to-micro-second duration, allowing studies of the influence of

  17. Stress-relief displacements induced by drilling--applications to holographic measurements of in situ stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ahrens, T.J.; Smither, C.L.

    1992-04-24

    The holographic stressmeter is an instrument which has been developed at Caltech to allow determination of the complete stress tensor from in situ borehole measurements. The stressmeter uses double-exposure holographic interferometry to record the displacements induced by the drilling of a small sidehole into the borehole wall. The local stresses, which are the result of the far-field stresses, concentrated at the borehole, cause deformation of the surface of the borehole wall in the vicinity of the sidehole. The first part of this study uses a thin infinite elastic plate subjected to plane stress at infinity to model the displacements at the borehole wall. However, the existence of some holograms which were difficult to model closely led us to examine the validity of this model. In order to investigate the problem further, we performed a two-dimensional finite element analysis for an elastic box with a terminated hole. We varied the dimensions of the hole to see what effect the radius and depth of the hole might have on the displacements. The plate model predicts that the depth of the hole should have no effect on the horizontal components of displacement, but the finite element results show that the magnitude of both components of the displacement depends on the depth of the sidehole. After considering these results, we developed a new model for the analysis of stress-relief displacements, following the work of Youngdahl and Sternberg (1965). For holes with a depth-to-diameter ratio greater than unity, the simple plane stress elastic plate solution breaks down and does not adequately model the displacements at the surface of the body and near the hole. Since these are the areas most critical to calculate accurately with the holographic technique, the revised model does a better job of fitting the observed data.

  18. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism.

  19. Simple metal under tensile stress: layer-dependent herringbone reconstruction of thin potassium films on graphite

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Feng; Kulju, Sampo; Koskinen, Pekka; Akola, Jaakko; Palmer, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    While understanding the properties of materials under stress is fundamentally important, designing experiments to probe the effects of large tensile stress is difficult. Here tensile stress is created in thin films of potassium (up to 4 atomic layers) by epitaxial growth on a rigid support, graphite. We find that this “simple” metal shows a long-range, periodic “herringbone” reconstruction, observed in 2- and 3- (but not 1- and 4-) layer films by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Such a pattern has never been observed in a simple metal. Density functional theory (DFT)simulations indicate that the reconstruction consists of self-aligned stripes of enhanced atom density formed to relieve the tensile strain. At the same time marked layer-dependent charging effects lead to substantial variation in the apparent STM layer heights. PMID:25959681

  20. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  1. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  2. Whole-genome transcriptional analysis of heavy metal stresses inCaulobacter crescentus

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ping; Brodie, Eoin L.; Suzuki, Yohey; McAdams, Harley H.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2005-09-21

    The bacterium Caulobacter crescentus and related stalkbacterial species are known for their distinctive ability to live in lownutrient environments, a characteristic of most heavy metal contaminatedsites. Caulobacter crescentus is a model organism for studying cell cycleregulation with well developed genetics. We have identified the pathwaysresponding to heavy metal toxicity in C. crescentus to provide insightsfor possible application of Caulobacter to environmental restoration. Weexposed C. crescentus cells to four heavy metals (chromium, cadmium,selenium and uranium) and analyzed genome wide transcriptional activitiespost exposure using a Affymetrix GeneChip microarray. C. crescentusshowed surprisingly high tolerance to uranium, a possible mechanism forwhich may be formation of extracellular calcium-uranium-phosphateprecipitates. The principal response to these metals was protectionagainst oxidative stress (up-regulation of manganese-dependent superoxidedismutase, sodA). Glutathione S-transferase, thioredoxin, glutaredoxinsand DNA repair enzymes responded most strongly to cadmium and chromate.The cadmium and chromium stress response also focused on reducing theintracellular metal concentration, with multiple efflux pumps employed toremove cadmium while a sulfate transporter was down-regulated to reducenon-specific uptake of chromium. Membrane proteins were also up-regulatedin response to most of the metals tested. A two-component signaltransduction system involved in the uranium response was identified.Several differentially regulated transcripts from regions previously notknown to encode proteins were identified, demonstrating the advantage ofevaluating the transcriptome using whole genome microarrays.

  3. Involvement of Potassium Transport Systems in the Response of Synechocystis PCC 6803 Cyanobacteria to External pH Change, High-Intensity Light Stress and Heavy Metal Stress.

    PubMed

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Segalla, Anna; Sato, Yuki; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Szabo, Ildiko; Uozumi, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    The unicellular photosynthetic cyanobacterium, able to survive in varying environments, is the only prokaryote that directly converts solar energy and CO2 into organic material and is thus relevant for primary production in many ecosystems. To maintain the intracellular and intrathylakoid ion homeostasis upon different environmental challenges, the concentration of potassium as a major intracellular cation has to be optimized by various K(+)uptake-mediated transport systems. We reveal here the specific and concerted physiological function of three K(+)transporters of the plasma and thylakoid membranes, namely of SynK (K(+)channel), KtrB (Ktr/Trk/HKT) and KdpA (Kdp) in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, under specific stress conditions. The behavior of the wild type, single, double and triple mutants was compared, revealing that only Synk contributes to heavy metal-induced stress, while only Ktr/Kdp is involved in osmotic and salt stress adaptation. With regards to pH shifts in the external medium, the Kdp/Ktr uptake systems play an important role in the adaptation to acidic pH. Ktr, by affecting the CO2 concentration mechanism via its action on the bicarbonate transporter SbtA, might also be responsible for the observed effects concerning high-light stress and calcification. In the case of illumination with high-intensity light, a synergistic action of Kdr/Ktp and SynK is required in order to avoid oxidative stress and ensure cell viability. In summary, this study dissects, using growth tests, measurement of photosynthetic activity and analysis of ultrastructure, the physiological role of three K(+)transporters in adaptation of the cyanobacteria to various environmental changes.

  4. Phyto-adaptogens protect against environmental stress-induced death of embryos from the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Boon-Niermeijer, E K; van den Berg, A; Wikman, G; Wiegant, F A

    2000-10-01

    The main purpose of the studies presented in this paper is twofold: 1) to evaluate whether phyto-adaptogens (Acanthopanax senticosus and Rhodiola rosea) are able to exert a protective action against stress-induced death of embryos of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis; and 2) whether a possible protective action by phyto-adaptogens can be explained by the induction of heat shock proteins. Enhancement in resistance by phyto-adaptogens was studied by applying plant extracts for a period of 20 hours to 3-day old larvae of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Subsequently they were exposed to a high and toxic dose of different environmental stressors. The following stress conditions were selected: a physical stress condition (heat shock: 43 degrees C for 4 minutes), an oxidative stress condition (superoxide radicals induced by menadione (600 microM for 2 hours)) and heavy metal-induced stress (copper (150 microM for 1 hour) or cadmium (20 microM during 1 hour)). Both Acanthopanax and Rhodiola exert a strong protective action against a lethal heat shock. These adaptogens also significantly protect against the negative effect of superoxide radicals as induced by menadione. With respect to the protective action against exposure to heavy metals a small but significant protection was observed against intoxication with copper or cadmium by the phyto-adaptogens. In summary, there appears to be a difference in efficiency in enhancing resistance to the various stress conditions used (heat shock>menadione>copper>cadmium). Based on the results presented in this paper, we can conclude that phyto-adaptogens are able to enhance the resistance against the different stress conditions tested in developing individuals of Lymnaea. Although the degree to which resistance is enhanced appears to depend on the type of stressor applied, our results confirm the definition of phyto-adaptogens as being universal enhancers of non-specific resistance against different kinds of stress conditions. With

  5. ATM deficiency induces oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Stoica, George; Yan, Mingshan; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Lynn, William S; Wong, Paul K Y

    2005-12-01

    ATM kinase, the product of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene, is activated by genomic damage. ATM plays a crucial role in cell growth and development. Here we report that primary astrocytes isolated from ATM-deficient mice grow slowly, become senescent, and die in culture. However, before reaching senescence, these primary Atm(-/-) astrocytes, like Atm(-/-) lymphocytes, show increased spontaneous DNA synthesis. These astrocytes also show markers of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including increased levels of heat shock proteins (HSP70 and GRP78), malondialdehyde adducts, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, procaspase 12 cleavage, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). In addition, HSP70 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are upregulated in the cerebella of ATM-deficient mice. This increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation is seen primarily in cerebellar astrocytes, or Bergmann glia, near degenerating Purkinje cells. ERK1/2 activation and astrogliosis are also found in other parts of the brain, for example, the cortex. We conclude that ATM deficiency induces intrinsic growth defects, oxidative stress, ER stress, and ERKs activation in astrocytes.

  6. Inducibility of a molecular bioreporter system by heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Klimowski, L.; Rayms-Keller, A.; Olson, K.E.; Yang, R.S.H.; Tessari, J.; Carlson, J.; Beaty, B.

    1996-02-01

    The authors have developed a molecular bioreporter model for detecting an invertebrate response to heavy metals in streams. The bioreporter system, pMt2-luc, utilizes a Drosophila melanogaster metallothionein promoter to regulate luciferase expression in stably transformed mosquito cells.The LucC5 clone, which was isolated from pMt2-luc transformed, hygromycin-resistant C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) cells, demonstrated a 12-fold increase in luciferase-specific activity 48 h after exposure to 13 ppm copper (Cu). In addition to Cu, exposure of LucC5 cells to 19 ppm lead (Pb) or 3 ppm mercury (Hg) for 48 h induced luciferase expression threefold and fourfold, respectively. Exposures of up to 30 ppm arsenic (As), 8 ppm cadmium (Cd), 7 ppm chromium (Cr), or 5 ppm nickel (Ni) had no effect on luciferase induction. LucC5 cells exposed to metal mixtures of 13 ppm Cu and 19 ppm Pb yielded an additive response with a 14-fold increase in luciferase expression. When organic chemicals such as phenol (3 ppm) were mixed with 13 ppm Cu, 19 ppm Pb, or 3 ppm Hg a significant reduction in luciferase activity was noted. Additionally, atomic absorption spectroscopy suggested that two of the metals, Cu and Pb, show marked differences in accumulation within the LucC5 cell line.

  7. Rutin inhibits amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Lin; Li, Ya-Nan; Zhang, He; Su, Ya-Jing; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zi-Ping; Wang, Shao-Wei; Xu, Peng-Xin; Wang, Yu-Jiong; Liu, Rui-Tian

    2015-10-01

    Recent evidence showed that amylin deposition is not only found in the pancreas in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients, but also in other peripheral organs, such as kidneys, heart and brain. Circulating amylin oligomers that cross the blood-brain barrier and accumulate in the brain may be an important contributor to diabetic cerebral injury and neurodegeneration. Moreover, increasing epidemiological studies indicate that there is a significant association between T2DM and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amylin and β-amyloid (Aβ) may share common pathophysiology and show strikingly similar neurotoxicity profiles in the brain. To explore the potential effects of rutin on AD, we here investigated the effect of rutin on amylin aggregation by thioflavin T dyeing, evaluated the effect of rutin on amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity by the MTT assay, and assessed oxidative stress, as well as the generation of nitric oxide (NO) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in neuronal cells. Our results showed that the flavonoid antioxidant rutin inhibited amylin-induced neurocytotoxicity, decreased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), NO, glutathione disulfide (GSSG), malondialdehyde (MDA) and pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β, attenuated mitochondrial damage and increased the GSH/GSSG ratio. These protective effects of rutin may have resulted from its ability to inhibit amylin aggregation, enhance the antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and reduce inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity. These in vitro results indicate that rutin is a promising natural product for protecting neuronal cells from amylin-induced neurotoxicity and oxidative stress, and rutin administration could be a feasible therapeutic strategy for preventing AD development and protecting the aging brain or slowing neurodegenerative processes.

  8. Age-related effects of chronic restraint stress on ethanol drinking, ethanol-induced sedation, and on basal and stress-induced anxiety response.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Macarena Soledad; Fabio, María Carolina; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Virgolini, Miriam B; De Giovanni, Laura N; Hansen, Cristian; Wille-Bille, Aranza; Nizhnikov, Michael E; Spear, Linda P; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Adolescents are sensitive to the anxiolytic effect of ethanol, and evidence suggests that they may be more sensitive to stress than adults. Relatively little is known, however, about age-related differences in stress modulation of ethanol drinking or stress modulation of ethanol-induced sedation and hypnosis. We observed that chronic restraint stress transiently exacerbated free-choice ethanol drinking in adolescent, but not in adult, rats. Restraint stress altered exploration patterns of a light-dark box apparatus in adolescents and adults. Stressed animals spent significantly more time in the white area of the maze and made significantly more transfers between compartments than their non-stressed peers. Behavioral response to acute stress, on the other hand, was modulated by prior restraint stress only in adults. Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor stimulation in an open field. Stress increased the duration of loss of the righting reflex after a high ethanol dose, yet this effect was similar at both ages. Ethanol-induced sleep time was much higher in adult than in adolescent rats, yet stress diminished ethanol-induced sleep time only in adults. The study indicates age-related differences that may increase the risk for initiation and escalation in alcohol drinking.

  9. Age-related effects of chronic restraint stress on ethanol drinking, ethanol-induced sedation, and on basal and stress-induced anxiety response

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Macarena Soledad; Fabio, María Carolina; Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Virgolini, Miriam B.; De Giovanni, Laura N.; Hansen, Cristian; Wille-Bille, Aranza; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Linda P.; Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are sensitive to the anxiolytic effect of ethanol, and evidence suggests that they may be more sensitive to stress than adults. Relatively little is known, however, about age-related differences in stress modulation of ethanol drinking or stress modulation of ethanol-induced sedation and hypnosis. We observed that chronic restraint stress transiently exacerbated free-choice ethanol drinking in adolescent, but not in adult, rats. Restraint stress altered exploration patterns of a light-dark box apparatus in adolescents and adults. Stressed animals spent significantly more time in the white area of the maze and made significantly more transfers between compartments than their non-stressed peers. Behavioral response to acute stress, on the other hand, was modulated by prior restraint stress only in adults. Adolescents, unlike adults, exhibited ethanol-induced motor stimulation in an open field. Stress increased the duration of loss of the righting reflex after a high ethanol dose, yet this effect was similar at both ages. Ethanol-induced sleep time was much higher in adult than in adolescent rats, yet stress diminished ethanol-induced sleep time only in adults. The study indicates age-related differences that may increase the risk for initiation and escalation in alcohol drinking. PMID:26830848

  10. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  11. Effects of combined drought and heavy metal stresses on xylem structure and hydraulic conductivity in red maple (Acer rubrum L.).

    PubMed

    de Silva, Nayana Dilini Gardiyehewa; Cholewa, Ewa; Ryser, Peter

    2012-10-01

    The effects of heavy metal stress, drought stress, and their combination on xylem structure in red maple (Acer rubrum) seedlings were investigated in an outdoor pot experiment. As metal-contaminated substrate, a mixture of 1.5% slag with sand was used, with Ni, Cu, Co, and Cr as the main contaminants. Plants grown on contaminated substrate had increased leaf metal concentrations. The two stresses reduced plant growth in an additive manner. The effects of metal and drought stresses on xylem characteristics were similar to each other, with a reduced proportion of xylem tissue, reduced conduit density in stems, and reduced conduit size in the roots. This resulted, in both stems and roots, in reductions in hydraulic conductance, xylem-specific conductivity, and leaf-specific conductivity. The similarity of the responses to the two stresses suggests that the plants' response to metals was actually a drought response, probably due to the reduced water uptake capacity of the metal-exposed roots. The only plant responses specific to metal stress were decreasing trends of stomatal density and chlorophyll content. In conclusion, the exposure to metals aggravates water stress in an additive manner, making the plants more vulnerable to drought.

  12. Death-associated odors induce stress in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Thiago Acosta; Koakoski, Gessi; da Motta, Adriana Costa; Piato, Angelo Luis; Barreto, Rodrigo Egydio; Volpato, Gilson Luiz; Barcellos, Leonardo José Gil

    2014-04-01

    Living animals exploit information released from dead animals to conduct adaptive biological responses. For instance, a recently published study has shown that avoidance behavior is triggered by death-associated odors in zebrafish. Stress can clearly act as an adaptive response that allows an organism to deal with an imminent threat. However, it has not been demonstrated whether these chemical cues are stressful for fish. Here, we confirmed that dead zebrafish scents induce defensive behavior in live conspecifics. Additionally, we show for the first time in fish that these scents increase cortisol in conspecifics. To reach this conclusion, firstly, we exposed zebrafish to multi-sensorial cues (e.g., visual, tactile, chemical cues) from dead conspecifics that displayed defensive behaviors and increased cortisol. Also, when we limited zebrafish to chemical cues from dead conspecifics, similar responses arose. These responses coincide with the decaying destruction of epidermal cells, indicating that defensive and stress responses could take place as an effect of substances emanating from decaying flesh, as well as alarm substance released due to rupture of epidermal cells. Taken together, these results illustrate that living zebrafish utilize cues from dead conspecific to avoid or to cope with danger and ensure survival.

  13. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (acetovanillone) induces oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara . E-mail: dario.ghigo@unito.it

    2006-05-01

    Apocynin (acetovanillone) is often used as a specific inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In N11 glial cells, apocynin induced, in a dose-dependent way, a significant increase of both malonyldialdehyde level (index of lipid peroxidation) and lactate dehydrogenase release (index of a cytotoxic effect). Apocynin evoked also, in a significant way, an increase of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration and a decrease of the intracellular glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio, accompanied by augmented efflux of glutathione and glutathione disulfide. Apocynin induced the activation of both pentose phosphate pathway and tricarboxylic acid cycle, which was blocked when the cells were incubated with glutathione together with apocynin. The cell incubation with glutathione prevented also the apocynin-induced increase of malonyldialdehyde generation and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Apocynin exerted an oxidant effect also in a cell-free system: indeed, in aqueous solution, it evoked a faster oxidation of the thiols glutathione and dithiothreitol, and elicited the generation of reactive oxygen species, mainly superoxide anions. Our results suggest that apocynin per se can induce an oxidative stress and exert a cytotoxic effect in N11 cells and other cell types, and that some effects of apocynin in in vitro and in vivo experimental models should be interpreted with caution.

  14. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  15. Effects of Kombucha on oxidative stress induced nephrotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Trichloroethylene (TCE) may induce oxidative stress which generates free radicals and alters antioxidants or oxygen-free radical scavenging enzymes. Methods Twenty male albino rats were divided into four groups: (1) the control group treated with vehicle, (2) Kombucha (KT)-treated group, (3) TCE-treated group and (4) KT/TCE-treated group. Kidney lipid peroxidation, glutathione content, nitric oxide (NO) and total blood free radical concentrations were evaluated. Serum urea, creatinine level, gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities were also measured. Results TCE administration increased the malondiahyde (MDA) and NO contents in kidney, urea and creatinine concentrations in serum, total free radical level in blood and GGT and LDH activities in serum, whereas it decreased the glutathione (GSH) level in kidney homogenate. KT administration significantly improved lipid peroxidation and oxidative stress induced by TCE. Conclusion The present study indicates that Kombucha may repair damage caused by environmental pollutants such as TCE and may be beneficial to patient suffering from renal impairment. PMID:19943946

  16. Modeling of stress-induced curvature in surface-micromachined devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, William D.; Bright, Victor M.; Elvin, Alex A.; Koester, David A.

    1997-09-01

    This paper compares measured to modeled stress-induced curvature of simple piston micromirrors. Two similar flexure-beam micromirror designs were fabricate using the 11th DARPA-supported multi-user MEMS processes (MUMPs) run. The test devices vary only in the MUMPs layers used for fabrication. In one case the mirror plate is the 1.5 micrometers thick Poly2 layer. The other mirror design employs stacked Poly1 and Poly2 layers for a total thickness of 3.5 micrometers . Both mirror structures are covered with the standard MUMPs metallization of approximately 200 angstrom of chromium and 0.5 micrometers of gold. Curvature of these devices was measured to within +/- 5 nm with a computer controlled microscope laser interferometer system. As intended, the increased thickness of the stacked polysilicon layers reduces the mirror curvature by a factor of 4. The two micromirror designs were modeled using IntelliCAD, a commercial CAD system for MEMS. The basis of analysis was the finite element method. Simulated results using MUMPs 11 film parameters showed qualitative agreement with measured data, but obvious quantitative differences. Subsequent remeasurement of the metal stress and use of the new value significantly improved model agreement with the measured data. The paper explores the effect of several film parameters on the modeled structures. Implications for MEMS film metrology, and test structures are considered.

  17. cDNA cloning of heat shock protein 90 gene and protein expression pattern in response to heavy metal exposure and thermal stress in planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ke-Xue; Chen, Guang-Wen; Liu, De-Zeng

    2012-06-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) is an abundant and highly conserved molecular chaperone, playing important roles in multiple cellular stress responses. The full-length cDNA of planarian Dugesia japonica Hsp90 (designated DjHsp90) was firstly cloned using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. It is 2,354 bp, including an open reading frame (ORF) of 2,148 bp encoding a polypeptide of 715 amino acids with all five HSP90 family signatures. We sequenced the ORF sequences from genomic DNA, and found only one intron (48 bp) existed in Djhsp90 gene structure. We used western blot and immunohistochemistry to analyze the expression pattern of DjHsp90 in response to heavy metal exposure and thermal stress at the protein level. Our results show that low doses of heavy metals and elevated culture temperature induced, but high doses of heavy metals and severe heat shock inhibited DjHsp90 expression. In response to heavy metals and thermal stress, DjHsp90-positive cells only appeared in the parenchymal tissue under epidermis cells along the bilateral from head to tail. These positive cells are presumably sensor cells that can detect external environment changes. Our work provides basic data for the study of stress responses in planarians.

  18. Calculation of Stress Intensity Factors for Interfacial Cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Stress intensity factors for interfacial cracks in Fiber Metal Laminates (FML) are computed by using the displacement ratio method recently developed by Sun and Qian (1997, Int. J. Solids. Struct. 34, 2595-2609). Various FML configurations with single and multiple delaminations subjected to different loading conditions are investigated. The displacement ratio method requires the total energy release rate, bimaterial parameters, and relative crack surface displacements as input. Details of generating the energy release rates, defining bimaterial parameters with anisotropic elasticity, and selecting proper crack surface locations for obtaining relative crack surface displacements are discussed in the paper. Even though the individual energy release rates are nonconvergent, mesh-size-independent stress intensity factors can be obtained. This study also finds that the selection of reference length can affect the magnitudes and the mode mixity angles of the stress intensity factors; thus, it is important to report the reference length used with the calculated stress intensity factors.

  19. Stress-induced variation in evolution: from behavioural plasticity to genetic assimilation

    PubMed Central

    Badyaev, Alexander V

    2005-01-01

    Extreme environments are closely associated with phenotypic evolution, yet the mechanisms behind this relationship are poorly understood. Several themes and approaches in recent studies significantly further our understanding of the importance that stress-induced variation plays in evolution. First, stressful environments modify (and often reduce) the integration of neuroendocrinological, morphological and behavioural regulatory systems. Second, such reduced integration and subsequent accommodation of stress-induced variation by developmental systems enables organismal ‘memory’ of a stressful event as well as phenotypic and genetic assimilation of the response to a stressor. Third, in complex functional systems, a stress-induced increase in phenotypic and genetic variance is often directional, channelled by existing ontogenetic pathways. This accounts for similarity among individuals in stress-induced changes and thus significantly facilitates the rate of adaptive evolution. Fourth, accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variation might be a common property of locally adapted and complex organismal systems, and extreme environments facilitate the phenotypic expression of this variance. Finally, stress-induced effects and stress-resistance strategies often persist for several generations through maternal, ecological and cultural inheritance. These transgenerational effects, along with both the complexity of developmental systems and stressor recurrence, might facilitate genetic assimilation of stress-induced effects. Accumulation of phenotypically neutral genetic variance by developmental systems and phenotypic accommodation of stress-induced effects, together with the inheritance of stress-induced modifications, ensure the evolutionary persistence of stress–response strategies and provide a link between individual adaptability and evolutionary adaptation. PMID:16024341

  20. Realization of highly crystallographic three-dimensional nanosheets by a stress-induced oriented-diffusion method

    SciTech Connect

    Gharooni, M.; Hosseini, M.; Mohajerzadeh, S. Taghinejad, M.; Taghinejad, H.; Abdi, Y.

    2014-07-28

    Morphologically controlled nanostructures have been increasingly important because of their strongly shape dependent physical and chemical properties. Formation of nanoscale silicon based structures that employ high levels of strain, intentional, and unintentional twins or grain boundaries can be dramatically different from the commonly conceived bulk processes. We report, realization of highly crystallographic 3D nanosheets with unique morphology and ultra-thin thickness by a stress-induced oriented-diffusion method, based on plasma processing of metal layer deposited on Si substrate and its post deep reactive ion etching. Annealing in plasma ambient creates rod-like metal alloy precursors which induce stress at its interface with Si substrate due to the mismatch of lattice constants. This stress opens facilitated gateways for orientated-diffusion of metal atoms in 〈110〉 directions and leads to formation of NSs (nanosheets) with [111] crystalline essence. Nanosheets are mainly triangular, hexagonal, or pseudo hexagonal in shape and their thicknesses are well controlled from several to tens of nanometers. The structural and morphological evolution of features were investigated in detail using transmission electron microscope, atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope and possible mechanism is proposed to explain the formation of the thermodynamically unfavorable morphology of nanosheets. Significant photoemission capability of NSs was also demonstrated by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  1. Local adaptation of microbial communities to heavy metal stress in polluted sediments of Lake Erie.

    PubMed

    Hoostal, Matthew J; Bidart-Bouzat, M Gabriela; Bouzat, Juan L

    2008-07-01

    Microbial communities must balance the assimilation of biologically necessary metals with resistance to toxic metal concentrations. To investigate the impact of heavy metal contaminants on microbial communities, we performed two experiments measuring extracellular enzyme activities (EEA) in polluted and unpolluted sediments of Lake Erie. In the first experiment, inoculations with moderate concentrations of copper and zinc appreciably diminished EEA from uncontaminated sites, whereas EEA from contaminated sediments increased or were only negligibly affected. In the second experiment, we compared the effects of three separate metals (i.e. copper, arsenic, and cadmium) on microbial community metabolism in polluted and unpolluted locations. Although copper and arsenic elicited differential effects by inhibiting EEA only in unpolluted sediments, cadmium inhibited EEA in both polluted and unpolluted sediments. Multivariate analyses of EEA from polluted sediments revealed direct associations among hydrolytic enzymes and inverse or absent associations between hydrolases and oxidases; these associations demonstrated resilience to heavy metal stress. In contrast, addition of heavy metals to unpolluted sediments appeared to have a higher impact on the multivariate pattern of EEA associations as revealed by an increase in the number of associations, more inverse relationships, and potential enzymatic trade-offs. The results of this study suggest community-level adaptations through the development of resistance mechanisms to the types and local levels of heavy metals in the environment.

  2. Abscisic acid-deficient sit tomato mutant responses to cadmium-induced stress.

    PubMed

    Pompeu, Georgia B; Vilhena, Milca B; Gratão, Priscila L; Carvalho, Rogério F; Rossi, Mônica L; Martinelli, Adriana P; Azevedo, Ricardo A

    2017-03-01

    There is a very effective cross-talk between signals triggered by reactive oxygen species and hormonal responses in plants, activating proteins/enzymes likely to be involved in stress tolerance. Abscisic acid (ABA) is known as a stress hormone that takes part in the integration of signals. This work aimed to characterize the biochemical response and ultrastructural changes induced by cadmium (Cd) in the Micro-Tom (MT) sitiens ABA-deficient mutant (sit) and its wild-type (MT) counterpart. MT and sit plants were grown over a 96-h period in the presence of Cd (0, 10, and 100 μM CdCl2). The overall results indicated increases in lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide content and in the activities of the key antioxidant enzymes such as catalase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase in both genotypes. On the other hand, no alteration was observed in chlorophyll content, while the activity of another antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase, remained constant or even decreased in the presence of Cd. Roots and shoots of the sit mutant and MT were analyzed by light and transmission electron microscopy in order to characterize the structural changes caused by the exposure to this metal. Cd caused a decrease in intercellular spaces in shoots and a decrease in cell size in roots of both genotypes. In leaves, Cd affected organelle shape and internal organization of the thylakoid membranes, whereas noticeable increase in the number of mitochondria and vacuoles in MT and sit roots were observed. These results add new information that should help unravel the relative importance of ABA in regulating the cell responses to stressful conditions induced by Cd apart from providing the first characterization of this mutant to oxidative stress.

  3. Live-cell Imaging Approaches for the Investigation of Xenobiotic-Induced Oxidant Stress

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Oxidant stress is arguably a universal feature in toxicology. Research studies on the role of oxidant stress induced by xenobiotic exposures have typically relied on the identification of damaged biomolecules using a variety of conventional biochemical and molecular t...

  4. Environmental pollutants and lifestyle factors induce oxidative stress and poor prenatal development.

    PubMed

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H

    2014-07-01

    Developmental toxicity caused by exposure to a mixture of environmental pollutants has become a major health concern. Human-made chemicals, including xenoestrogens, pesticides and heavy metals, as well as unhealthy lifestyle behaviours, mainly tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and medical drug abuse, are major factors that adversely influence prenatal development and increase susceptibility of offspring to diseases. There is evidence to suggest that the developmental toxicological mechanisms of chemicals and lifestyle factors involve the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cellular oxidative damage. Overproduction of ROS induces oxidative stress, a state where increased ROS generation overwhelms antioxidant protection and subsequently leads to oxidative damage of cellular macromolecules. Data on the involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanism of developmental toxicity following exposure to environmental pollutants are reviewed in an attempt to provide an updated basis for future studies on the toxic effect of such pollutants, particularly the notion of increased risk for developmental toxicity due to combined and cumulative exposure to various environmental pollutants. The aims of such studies are to better understand the mechanisms by which environmental pollutants adversely affect conceptus development and to elucidate the impact of cumulative exposures to multiple pollutants on post-natal development and health outcomes. Developmental toxicity caused by exposure to mixture of environmental pollutants has become a major health concern. Human-made chemicals, including xenoestrogens, pesticides and heavy metals, as well as unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, mainly tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and medical drug abuse, are major factors that adversely influence prenatal development and increase the susceptibility of offspring to development complications and diseases. There is evidence to suggest that the developmental toxicological mechanisms

  5. Catalase activity as a biomarker for mild-stress-induced robustness in Bacillus weihenstephanensis.

    PubMed

    den Besten, Heidy M W; Effraimidou, Styliani; Abee, Tjakko

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to survive and grow in changing environments by activating stress adaptation mechanisms which may enhance bacterial robustness. Stress-induced enhanced robustness complicates the predictability of microbial inactivation. Using psychrotolerant Bacillus weihenstephanensis strain KBAB4 as a model, we investigated the impact of the culturing temperature on mild-oxidative-stress-induced (cross-)protection toward multiple stresses, including severe oxidative, heat, and acid stresses. Culturing at a refrigeration temperature (7°C) compared to the optimal growth temperature (30°C) affected both the robustness level of B. weihenstephanensis and the oxidative stress adaptive response. Scavengers of reactive oxygen species have a crucial role in adaptation to oxidative stresses, and this points to a possible predictive role in mild-oxidative-stress-induced robustness. Therefore, the catalase activity was determined upon mild oxidative stress treatment and was demonstrated to be significantly correlated with the robustness level of mild-stress-treated cells toward severe oxidative and heat stresses but not toward severe acid stress for cells grown at both refrigeration and optimal temperatures. The quantified correlations supported the predictive quality of catalase activity as a biomarker and also underlined that the predictive quality is stress specific. Biomarkers that are able to predict stress-induced enhanced robustness can be used to better understand stress adaptation mechanisms and might allow the design of effective combinations of hurdles to control microbial behavior.

  6. Stress-driven crystallization via shear-diffusion transformations in a metallic glass at very low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunwei; Li, Ju; Lo, Yu-Chieh; Qian, Xiaofeng; Ma, Evan

    2015-06-01

    At elevated temperatures, glasses crystallize via thermally activated diffusion. However, metallic glasses can also undergo deformation-induced crystallization at very low temperatures. Here we demonstrate the crystallization of A l50F e50 metallic glasses under cyclic deformation at 50 K using molecular dynamics simulations and reveal the underlying atomic-scale processes. We demonstrate that stress-driven nonaffine atomic rearrangements, or shear diffusion transformation (SDT) events, lead to successive metabasin-to-metabasin transitions and long-range ordering. We also illustrate that the nucleation and growth of the crystal proceed via collective attachment of ordered clusters, advancing the amorphous/crystal interface in an intermittent manner. The cooperative nature of the steplike crystallization is attributed to the large activation volume of Eshelby transformations which generate as a by-product nonaffine diffusive atomic displacements that accumulate over loading cycles. The dual nature of shear (affine) and diffusion (nonaffine) in low-temperature stress-driven SDT events thus unifies inelasticity with crystallization.

  7. Protective Effects of Carvacrol against Oxidative Stress Induced by Chronic Stress in Rat's Brain, Liver, and Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Samarghandian, Saeed; Farkhondeh, Tahereh; Samini, Fariborz; Borji, Abasalt

    2016-01-01

    Restraint stress may be associated with elevated free radicals, and thus, chronic exposure to oxidative stress may cause tissue damage. Several studies have reported that carvacrol (CAR) has a protective effect against oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the protective effects of CAR on restraint stress induced oxidative stress damage in the brain, liver, and kidney. For chronic restraint stress, rats were kept in the restrainers for 6 h every day, for 21 consecutive days. The animals received systemic administrations of CAR daily for 21 days. To evaluate the changes of the oxidative stress parameters following restraint stress, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) activities were measured in the brain, liver, and kidney. In the stressed animals that received vehicle, the MDA level was significantly higher (P < 0.001) and the levels of GSH and antioxidant enzymes were significantly lower than the nonstressed animals (P < 0.001). CAR ameliorated the changes in the stressed animals as compared with the control group (P < 0.001). This study indicates that CAR can prevent restraint stress induced oxidative damage. PMID:26904286

  8. Metal Ions, Not Metal-Catalyzed Oxidative Stress, Cause Clay Leachate Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Koehl, Jennifer L.; Solanky, Dipesh; Haydel, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Aqueous leachates prepared from natural antibacterial clays, arbitrarily designated CB-L, release metal ions into suspension, have a low pH (3.4–5), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and H2O2, and have a high oxidation-reduction potential. To isolate the role of pH in the antibacterial activity of CB clay mixtures, we exposed three different strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7 to 10% clay suspensions. The clay suspension completely killed acid-sensitive and acid-tolerant E. coli O157:H7 strains, whereas incubation in a low-pH buffer resulted in a minimal decrease in viability, demonstrating that low pH alone does not mediate antibacterial activity. The prevailing hypothesis is that metal ions participate in redox cycling and produce ROS, leading to oxidative damage to macromolecules and resulting in cellular death. However, E. coli cells showed no increase in DNA or protein oxidative lesions and a slight increase in lipid peroxidation following exposure to the antibacterial leachate. Further, supplementation with numerous ROS scavengers eliminated lipid peroxidation, but did not rescue the cells from CB-L-mediated killing. In contrast, supplementing CB-L with EDTA, a broad-spectrum metal chelator, reduced killing. Finally, CB-L was equally lethal to cells in an anoxic environment as compared to the aerobic environment. Thus, ROS were not required for lethal activity and did not contribute to toxicity of CB-L. We conclude that clay-mediated killing was not due to oxidative damage, but rather, was due to toxicity associated directly with released metal ions. PMID:25502790

  9. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Skipper, Anthony; Sims, Jennifer N; Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-02

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium. Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay). The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG₂ cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG₂ cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05) was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG₂) cells.

  10. Three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model for ferromagnetic material in low intensity magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Le; Liu, Xin'en; Jia, Dong; Niu, Hongpan

    2016-09-01

    Metal magnetic memory (MMM) technique is a promising tool for inspecting early damage in ferromagnetic components due to its high sensitivity to stress in weak geomagnetic field. However, the quantitative analysis methods for the MMM haven't been sufficiently studied yet for absence of a reasonable constitutive model. A three-dimensional stress-induced magnetic anisotropic constitutive model is proposed in this paper to study magneto-mechanical coupling effect of the MMM. The model is developed in principal stress space and a linear relation between magnetization and magnetic field is employed for low intensity magnetic field. As a result, stress-induced magnetic anisotropy is represented by stress dependence of magnetic permeability in different directions, which is simple and convenient for applications in the MMM technique. Based on the model, the effect of stress on magnetic permeability and surface magnetic field is computed and compared with experimental data for a tensioned ferromagnetic specimen in low intensity magnetic field. The good consistency implies the validity of the proposed model.

  11. Glacially induced stresses in sedimentary rocks of northern Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trzeciak, Maciej; Dąbrowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    During the Pleistocene large continental ice sheets developed in Scandinavia and North America. Ice-loading caused bending of the lithosphere and outward flow in the mantle. Glacial loading is one of the most prominent tectono-mechanical event in the geological history of northern Poland. The Pomeranian region was subjected several times to a load equivalent of more than 1 km of rocks, which led to severe increase in both vertical and horizontal stresses in the upper crustal rocks. During deglaciation a rapid decrease in vertical stress is observed, which leads to destabilization of the crust - most recent postglacial faults scarps in northern Sweden indicate glacially induced earthquakes of magnitude ~Mw8. The presence of the ice-sheet altered as well the near-surface thermal structure - thermal gradient inversion is still observable in NW Poland. The glacially related processes might have left an important mark in the sedimentary cover of northern Poland, especially with regard to fracture reopening, changes in stress state, and damage development. In the present study, we model lithospheric bending caused by glacial load, but our point of interest lies in the overlying sediments. Typical glacial isostatic studies model the response of (visco-) elastic lithosphere over viscoelastic or viscous asthenosphere subjected to external loads. In our model, we introduce viscoelastic sedimentary layers at the top of this stack and examine the stress relaxation patterns therein. As a case study for our modelling, we used geological profiles from northern Poland, near locality of Wejherowo, which are considered to have unconventional gas potential. The Paleozoic profile of this area is dominated by almost 1 km thick Silurian-Ordovician shale deposits, which are interbedded with thin and strong limestone layers. This sequence is underlain by Cambrian shales and sandstones, and finally at ~3 km depth - Precambrian crystalline rocks. Above the Silurian there are approximately

  12. Thermo-mechanical relaxation of stresses in a glass-metal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, O. N.; Solonenko, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the evaluation of the stress-strain state in an infinite layered cylindrical junction of glass with steel. Structural changes in the glass behavior are described by the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin-Moynihan model. The relaxation processes in the glass have been presented by the temperature regime depending of the fictive temperature Tf, the relaxation time τ' or the viscosity η and the thermal expansion coefficient α(1). The calculations of the stress components in the glass have been made by using the viscoelastic model. The presented model allows to find the optimal annealing conditions for the creation of the glass- metal composite material.

  13. Concurrent tailoring of fabrication process and interphase layer to reduce residual stresses in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is presented to reduce the residual matrix stresses in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) by optimizing the fabrication process and interphase layer characteristics. The response of the fabricated MMC was simulated based on nonlinear micromechanics. Application cases include fabrication tailoring, interphase tailoring, and concurrent fabrication-interphase optimization. Two composite systems, silicon carbide/titanium and graphite/copper, are considered. Results illustrate the merits of each approach, indicate that concurrent fabrication/interphase optimization produces significant reductions in the matrix residual stresses and demonstrate the strong coupling between fabrication and interphase tailoring.

  14. Maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced hypomyelination, synaptic alterations, and learning impairment in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ayumi; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Hayashi, Sakurako; Sato, Yuichi; Azuma, Kagaku; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2016-11-15

    Maternal chewing during prenatal stress attenuates both the development of stress-induced learning deficits and decreased cell proliferation in mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus. Hippocampal myelination affects spatial memory and the synaptic structure is a key mediator of neuronal communication. We investigated whether maternal chewing during prenatal stress ameliorates stress-induced alterations of hippocampal myelin and synapses, and impaired development of spatial memory in adult offspring. Pregnant mice were divided into control, stress, and stress/chewing groups. Stress was induced by placing mice in a ventilated restraint tube, and was initiated on day 12 of pregnancy and continued until delivery. Mice in the stress/chewing group were given a wooden stick to chew during restraint. In 1-month-old pups, spatial memory was assessed in the Morris water maze, and hippocampal oligodendrocytes and synapses in CA1 were assayed by immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy. Prenatal stress led to impaired learning ability, and decreased immunoreactivity of myelin basic protein (MBP) and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) in the hippocampal CA1 in adult offspring. Numerous myelin sheath abnormalities were observed. The G-ratio [axonal diameter to axonal fiber diameter (axon plus myelin sheath)] was increased and postsynaptic density length was decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region. Maternal chewing during stress attenuated the prenatal stress-induced impairment of spatial memory, and the decreased MBP and CNPase immunoreactivity, increased G-ratios, and decreased postsynaptic-density length in the hippocampal CA1 region. These findings suggest that chewing during prenatal stress in dams could be an effective coping strategy to prevent hippocampal behavioral and morphologic impairments in their offspring.

  15. Azadirachta indica Attenuates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E.; Othman, Mohamed S.; Aref, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of methanolic leaves extract of Azadirachta indica (MLEN, 500 mg/kg bwt) on cisplatin- (CP-) induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. CP (5 mg/kg bwt) was injected intraperitoneally and MLEN was given by gastric gavage for 5 days before or after CP injection. After 5 days of CP injection, CP-induced injury of the renal tissue was evidenced (i) as histopathological damage of the renal tissue, (ii) as increases in serum uric acid, urea, and creatinine, (iii) as increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), (iv) as decreases in the level of glutathione and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase, and (v) as increase in the expression of nuclear factor kappa B and apoptosis in kidney tissues. However, the oral administration of MLEN to CP-intoxicated rats for 5 days brought back MDA, NO production, and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants to near normalcy. Moreover, the histological observations evidenced that neem extract effectively rescues the kidney from CP-mediated oxidative damage. Furthermore, PCR results for caspase-3 and caspase-9 and Bax genes showed downregulation in MLEN treated groups. Therefore, Azadirachta indica can be considered a potential candidate for protection of nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin. PMID:25162019

  16. Glutathione depletion due to copper-induced phytochelatin synthesis causes oxidative stress in Silene cucubalus

    SciTech Connect

    Ric De Vos, C.H.; Vonk, M.J.; Vooijs, R.; Schat, H. )

    1992-03-01

    The relation between loss of glutathione due to metal-induced phytochelatin synthesis and oxidative stress was studied in the roots of copper-sensitive and tolerant Silene cucubalus (L.) Wib., resistant to 1 and 40 micromolar Cu, respectively. The amount of nonprotein sulfhydryl compounds other then glutathione was taken as a measure of phytochelatins. At a supply of 20 micromolar Cu, which is toxic for sensitive plants only, phytochelatin synthesis and loss of total glutathione were observed only in sensitive plants within 6 h of exposure. When the plants were exposed to a range of copper concentrations for 3 d, a marked production of phytochelatins in sensitive plants was already observed at 0.5 micromolar Cu, whereas the production in tolerant plants was negligible at 40 micromolar or lower. The highest production in tolerant plants was only 40% of that in sensitive plants. In both varieties, the synthesis of phytochelatins was coupled to a loss of glutathione. Copper at toxic concentrations caused oxidative stress, as was evidenced by both the accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and a shift in the glutathione redox couple to a more oxidized state. Depletion of glutathione by pretreatment with buthionine sulfoximine significantly increased the oxidative damage by copper. At a comparably low glutathione level, cadmium had no effect on either lipid peroxidation or the glutathione redox couple in buthionine sulfoximine-treated plants. These results indicate that copper may specifically cause oxidative stress by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione due to phytochelatin synthesis.

  17. Earthquake-induced static stress change in promoting volcanic eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonali, Fabio Luca; Tibaldi, Alessandro; Corazzato, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work is to study how earthquakes could favour new eruptions, focusing the attention on earthquake-induced static effects in two different case sites, where 9 seismic events with Mw ≥ 8 occurred in the last century: the Alaska-Aleutian and Chilean volcanic arcs. We followed a novel approach that resolves the earthquake-induced static stress change normal to the magma pathway of each volcano instead of considering the general crustal volume. We also considered other parameters that may contribute to control eruptions, such as magma composition and viscosity, magma chamber depth and local tectonic settings. The dataset includes a total of 51 eruptions following the earthquakes; 33 represent first new eruptions occurred at each single volcano. Comparison of the eruption rate before and after each earthquake suggests that 26 out of the 33 first new eruptions have a positive relation with the studied earthquakes; 13 out of 26 represent awakening events, which are first new eruptions occurred at volcanoes with non-continuous eruptive activity that had no eruptions in the five years before the earthquake. The sensitivity analysis performed for the 2010 Chile earthquake shows that the N-S- and NE-SW-striking magma pathways suffered a larger unclamping in comparison with those striking NW-SE and E-W. Magma pathway geometry contributes to control the magnitude of the static stress change induced by large earthquakes, with differences of up to 8 times among magma-feeding planes of different orientation at the same volcano. This range of diverse values is larger for the volcanoes closer to the epicentre. The possible error in the estimate of magma chamber depth has a minimum effect on the results since the sensitivity analysis shows that the range of stress changes with depth is about 1.5 orders of magnitude smaller than the range linked to variations in the magma pathway strike. Results suggest that unclamping effect promoted eruptions that occurred at non

  18. [Attenuation of chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages following physical exercise].

    PubMed

    Ma, Qiang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Hong-Tao; Chao, Fu-Huan

    2002-10-25

    The long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and the plasma glucocorticoids level were observed in rats to study the effects of physical exercise on chronic stress-induced hippocampal damages. Eight-week spontaneous wheel running exercise could attenuate the suppression of LTP induced by 21-day restraint stress, and maintain the normal plasma glucocorticoids levels. It is suggested that long-term physical exercise may protect the hippocampus from stress-induced damages.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Stress-Induced Myocardial Injury in a Rat Model Simulating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Xu, Feifei; Tao, Tianqi; Song, Dandan; Li, Dong; Li, Yuzhen; Guo, Yucheng; Liu, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying myocardial injury induced by simulated PTSD. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: control group (n = 18) and PTSD group (n = 30). The PTSD model was replicated using the single prolonged stress (SPS) method. On the 14th day poststress, the apoptotic cells in myocardium were assessed using both TUNEL method and transmission electron microscopy; the protein levels of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) molecules were measured by using Western blotting analysis. Results Exposure to SPS resulted in characteristic morphologic changes of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, TUNEL staining was also indicative of the elevated apoptosis rate of cardiomyocytes from the SPS rats (30.69% versus 7.26%, p < .001). Simulated PTSD also induced ERS in myocardium, demonstrated by up-regulation of protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (0.64 versus 0.26, p = .017), calreticulin (p = .040), and CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (0.95 versus 0.43, p = .047), phosphorylation of protein kinase RNA–like ER kinase (p = .003), and caspase 12 activation (0.30 versus 0.06, p < .001) in myocardium from the SPS rats. The ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax decreased significantly in myocardium from the SPS rats (p = .005). Conclusions The ERS-related apoptosis mediated by the protein kinase RNA–like ER kinase/CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein and caspase 12 pathways may be associated with myocardial injury in a rat model simulating PTSD. This study may advance our understanding of how PTSD contributes to myocardial injury on a molecular level. PMID:27359173

  20. Metallomics and NMR-based metabolomics of Chlorella sp. reveal the synergistic role of copper and cadmium in multi-metal toxicity and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenlin; Tan, Nicole G J; Fu, Baohui; Li, Sam F Y

    2015-03-01

    Industrial wastewaters often contain high levels of metal mixtures, in which metal mixtures may have synergistic or antagonistic effects on aquatic organisms. A combination of metallomics and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR)-based metabolomics was employed to understand the consequences of multi-metal systems (Cu, Cd, Pb) on freshwater microalgae. Morphological characterization, cell viability and chlorophyll a determination of metal-spiked Chlorella sp. suggested synergistic effects of Cu and Cd on growth inhibition and toxicity. While Pb has no apparent effect on Chlorella sp. metabolome, a substantial decrease of sucrose, amino acid content and glycerophospholipid precursors in Cu-spiked microalgae revealed Cu-induced oxidative stress. Addition of Cd to Cu-spiked cultures induced more drastic metabolic perturbations, hence we confirmed that Cu and Cd synergistically influenced photosynthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and membrane degradation. Total elemental analysis revealed a significant decrease in K, and an increase in Na, Mg, Zn and Mn concentrations in Cu-spiked cultures. This indicated that Cu is more toxic to Chlorella sp. as compared to Cd or Pb, and the combination of Cu and Cd has a strong synergistic effect on Chlorella sp. oxidative stress induction. Oxidative stress is confirmed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis, which demonstrated a drastic decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio solely in Cu-spiked cultures. Interestingly, we observed Cu-facilitated Cd and Pb bioconcentration in Chlorella sp. The absence of phytochelatins and an increment of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) yields in Cu-spiked cultures suggested that the mode of bioconcentration of Cd and Pb is through adsorption of free metals onto the algal EPS rather than intracellular chelation to phytochelatins.

  1. Quercetin prevents chronic unpredictable stress induced behavioral dysfunction in mice by alleviating hippocampal oxidative and inflammatory stress.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vineet; Parashar, Arun; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-15

    It is now evident that chronic stress is associated with anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction and very few studies have focused on identifying possible methods to prevent these stress-induced disorders. Previously, we identified abundance of quercetin in Urtica dioica extract, which efficiently attenuated stress related complications. Therefore, current study was designed to investigate the effect of quercetin on chronic unpredicted stress (CUS) induced behavioral dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in the mouse hippocampus. Animals were subjected to unpredicted stress for 21days, during which 30mg/kg quercetin was orally administered to them. Effect of CUS and quercetin treatment on animal behavior was assessed between day 22-26. Afterward, the hippocampus was processed to evaluate neuronal damage, oxidative and inflammatory stress. Results revealed that stressed animals were highly anxious (Elevated Plus Maze and Open Field), showed depressive-like behavior (sucrose preference task), performed poorly in short-term and long-term associative memory task (passive avoidance step-through task) and displayed reduced locomotion (open field). Quercetin alleviated behavioral dysfunction in chronically stressed animals. Compared to CUS, quercetin treatment significantly reduced anxiety, attenuated depression, improved cognitive dysfunction and normalized locomotor activity. Further, CUS elevated the levels of oxidative stress markers (TBARS, nitric oxide), lowered antioxidants (total thiol, catalase), enhanced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β and COX-2) in the hippocampus and damaged hippocampal neurons. Quercetin treatment significantly lowered oxidative and inflammatory stress and prevented neural damage. In conclusion, quercetin can efficiently prevent stress induced neurological complications by rescuing brain from oxidative and inflammatory stress.

  2. Extinction-induced neuroplasticity attenuates stress-induced cocaine seeking: a state-dependent learning hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Self, David W; Choi, Kwang-Ho

    2004-09-01

    Chronic drug use weakens excitatory neocortical input to the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We previously reported that extinction training, a form of inhibitory learning that progressively reduces cocaine-seeking behaviour when reward is withheld, reverses this deficit by up-regulating GluR1 and GluR2/3 subunits of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors in the NAc. The level of GluR1 up-regulation is positively associated with a reduction in cocaine seeking, suggesting that extinction-induced up-regulation in AMPA receptors in the NAc opposes motivational influences that maintain cocaine seeking. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that over-expression of GluR1 and GluR2 in the NAc facilitates extinction of cocaine self-administration. Furthermore, a single extinction training session conducted during GluR1 and GluR2 over-expression strongly and selectively attenuates the ability of an environmental stressor to trigger relapse to cocaine seeking long after GluR1 and GluR2 over-expression declines. These results could suggest that excitatory input to the NAc promotes extinction learning, but only when memory is recalled under stressful situations. Recent studies indicate that both environmental stress and the frustrative stress of withholding reward during extinction of drug self-administration induce similar neurochemical events in the NAc. These neurochemical events could impose a "state-dependency" on extinction learning such that subsequent exposure to stress acts as a cue to enhance retrieval of extinction memory. Our results suggest that extinction-induced up-regulation in NAc AMPA receptors acts reciprocally to facilitate state-dependent extinction learning, as stressful situations evoke extinction memories that exert powerful inhibitory control over drug-seeking behaviour. These results may have important therapeutic implications for behaviour-based approaches aimed at treating drug addiction.

  3. Contour forming of metals by laser peening

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Lloyd; Harris, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for forming shapes and contours in metal sections by generating laser induced compressive stress on the surface of the metal workpiece. The laser process can generate deep compressive stresses to shape even thick components without inducing unwanted tensile stress at the metal surface. The precision of the laser-induced stress enables exact prediction and subsequent contouring of parts. A light beam of 10 to 100 J/pulse is imaged to create an energy fluence of 60 to 200 J/cm.sup.2 on an absorptive layer applied over a metal surface. A tamping layer of water is flowed over the absorptive layer. The absorption of laser light causes a plasma to form and consequently creates a shock wave that induces a deep residual compressive stress into the metal. The metal responds to this residual stress by bending.

  4. Observation of radiation induced changes in stress and electrical properties in MOS devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, D. C.; Lowry, L.; Macwilliams, K. P.; Barnes, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Strain measurements using X-ray diffraction were performed on irradiated commercial and radiation-hardened metal gate CMOS devices in addition to polysilicon gate NMOS devices. I-V curves were taken and V(ot) and V(it) were separated using the subthreshold slope method for all devices. A correlation has been shown to exist between physical strain relaxation and the electrical properties as a function of radiation dose and recovery. Data shown suggest that the physical response (strain relaxation) in the silicon at the oxide interface is a measure of the type of damage induced and the recovery mechanism. Postradiation measurements of Delta V(it) and Delta V(ot) taken immediately after irradiation support the conclusions of V. Zekeriya and T.-P. Ma (1983) and K. Kasama et al. (1986, 1987); compressive stress at the silicon/SiO2 interface does reduce radiation damage in the device.

  5. Containerless study of metal evaporation by laser induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1987-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) detection of atomic vapors was used to study evaporation from electromagnetically levitated and CW CO2 laser-heated molybdenum spheres and resistively-heated tungsten filaments. Electromagnetic (EM) levitation in combination with laser heating of tungsten, zirconium, and aluminum specimens was also investigated. LIF intensity vs temperature data were obtained for molybdenum atoms and six electronic states of atomic tungsten, at temperatures up to the melting point of each metal. The detected fraction of the emitted radiation was reduced by self-absorption effects at the higher experimental temperatures. Vaporization enthalpies derived from data for which less than half the LIF intensity was self-absorbed were -636 + or - 24 kJ/g-mol for Mo and 831 + or - 32 kJ/g-mol for W. Space-based applications of EM levitation in combination with radiative heating are discussed.

  6. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-18

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  7. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  8. Magnetic-stress-assisted damping of magnetization precession in multilayered metallic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastrukov, Sergey; Yong Khoo, Jun; Lukianchuk, Boris; Molodtsova, Irina

    2013-09-01

    Micromagnetic dynamics of spin relaxation in multilayered metallic films of stacked microelectronic devices is modeled by a modified Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a newly introduced form of damping torque owing its origin to coupling between precessing magnetization-vector and stress-tensor of combined intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic anisotropy. Based on the magnetization energy loss equation, the exponential relaxation time as a function of precession frequency and angle of applied rf-field is obtained, depending upon two parameters of intrinsic and extrinsic damping torques acting on precessing magnetization. It is shown that theoretically obtained from the Gabor uncertainty relation the FMR linewidth, originating from the above magnetic-stress-assisted damping of magnetization precession, provides proper account for the empirical non-linear linewidth-vs-frequency curves deduced from recent in-plane FMR measurements on multilayered ultrathin films of ferromagnetic metals.

  9. Dietary inclusion of local salt substitutes induces oxidative stress and renal dysfunction in rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele J; Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Araoye, Obafemi O; Oyeleye, Sunday I

    2014-01-01

    Our earlier report has shown that salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo) contain some toxic heavy metals. This study, therefore, investigated the effect of the dietary inclusion of salt substitutes (Obu-Otoyo), namely, salt "A" and "B", on biomarkers of oxidative stress and renal function in rats. Salt "A", which has a gray color, is the product of a process in which ash is produced by burning palm kernel shaft soaked in water overnight and extracting the residue to produce the salt substitute while Salt "B", which has a white color, is a rock salt mined from a local site at Ilobu town, Osun-State, Nigeria. Salt substitutes were fed to normal rats as dietary inclusion at 0.5% and 1.0% for 21 days. The dietary inclusion of the salt substitutes caused a significant (p<0.05) increase in plasma activities of creatinine, urea, uric acid, and blood urea nitrogen compared with the control. Meanwhile, the dietary inclusion of the salt substitutes caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in renal superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione level, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase activities with a concomitant increase in the malondialdehyde level compared with the control. Furthermore, there was a significant (p<0.05) increase in the concentrations of heavy metals, such as Pb, Co, Cu, Fe, Zn and Cr, in kidney of rats fed with the salt substitute Obu-Otoyo. Therefore, this finding indicates that Obu-Otoyo induces nephrotoxicity in rats. The nephrotoxicity of Obu-Otoyo could be attributed to the induction of oxidative stress as a result of the presence of some heavy metals, suggesting possible health hazards in subjects who consume it.

  10. Physical Exercise Counteracts Stress-induced Upregulation of Melanin-concentrating Hormone in the Brain and Stress-induced Persisting Anxiety-like Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces anxiety disorders, whereas physical exercise is believed to help people with clinical anxiety. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms underlying stress-induced anxiety and its counteraction by exercise using an established animal model of anxiety. Mice treated with restraint for 2 h daily for 14 days exhibited anxiety-like behaviors, including social and nonsocial behavioral symptoms, and these behavioral impairments lasted for more than 12 weeks after the stress treatment was removed. Despite these lasting behavioral changes, wheel-running exercise treatment for 1 h daily from post-stress days 1 - 21 counteracted anxiety-like behaviors, and these anxiolytic effects of exercise persisted for more than 2 months, suggesting that anxiolytic effects of exercise stably induced. Repeated restraint treatment up-regulated the expression of the neuropeptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus, and basolateral amygdala, the brain regions important for emotional behaviors. In an in vitro study, treatment of HT22 hippocampal cells with glucocorticoid increased MCH expression, suggesting that MCH upregulation can be initially triggered by the stress hormone, corticosterone. In contrast, post-stress treatment with wheel-running exercise reduced the stress-induced increase in MCH expression to control levels in the lateral hypothalamus, hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Administration of an MCH receptor antagonist (SNAP94847) to stress-treated mice was therapeutic against stress-induced anxiety-like behaviors. These results suggest that repeated stress produces long-lasting anxiety-like behaviors and upregulates MCH in the brain, while exercise counteracts stress-induced MCH expression and persisting anxiety-like behaviors. PMID:27574483

  11. Stress-induced stimulation of choline transport in cultured choroid plexus epithelium exposed to low concentrations of cadmium.

    PubMed

    Young, Robin K; Villalobos, Alice R A

    2014-03-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier and accumulates essential minerals and heavy metals. Choroid plexus is cited as being a "sink" for heavy metals and excess minerals, serving to minimize accumulation of these potentially toxic agents in the brain. An understanding of how low doses of contaminant metals might alter transport of other solutes in the choroid plexus is limited. Using primary cultures of epithelial cells isolated from neonatal rat choroid plexus, our objective was to characterize modulation of apical uptake of the model organic cation choline elicited by low concentrations of the contaminant metal cadmium (CdCl₂). At 50-1,000 nM, cadmium did not directly decrease or increase 30-min apical uptake of 10 μM [(3)H]choline. However, extended exposure to 250-500 nM cadmium increased [(3)H]choline uptake by as much as 75% without marked cytotoxicity. In addition, cadmium induced heat shock protein 70 and heme oxygenase-1 protein expression and markedly induced metallothionein gene expression. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine attenuated stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Conversely, an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) enhanced stimulation of choline uptake and induction of stress proteins. Cadmium also activated ERK1/2 MAP kinase. The MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 diminished ERK1/2 activation and attenuated stimulation of choline uptake. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 activation abated stimulation of choline uptake in cells exposed to cadmium with BSO. These data indicate that in the choroid plexus, exposure to low concentrations of cadmium may induce oxidative stress and consequently stimulate apical choline transport through activation of ERK1/2 MAP kinase.

  12. Laminated metal composite formed from low flow stress layers and high flow stress layers using flow constraining elements and method of making same

    SciTech Connect

    Syn, C.K.; Lesuer, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    This invention relates to a laminated metal composite, comprising alternating layers of low flow stress material and high flow stress material, and formed using flow constraining elements around each low flow stress layer; and a method of making same. A composite is a combination of at least two chemically distinct materials with a distinct interface separating the two materials. A metal matrix composite (MMC) is a composite material composed of a metal and a nonmetallic reinforcing agent such as silicon carbide (SiC) or graphite in continuous or discontinuous fiber, whisker, or discrete particulate form. A laminate is a material composed of several bonded layers. It is possible to have a laminate composed of multi-layers of a single type of material bonded to each other. However, such a laminate would not be considered to be a composite. The term {open_quotes}laminated metal composite{close_quotes} (LMC), as used herein, is intended to include a structural material composed of: (1) layers of metal or metal alloys interleaved with (2) a different metal, a metal alloy, or a metal matrix composite (MMC) containing strengthening agents.

  13. Thermal diffusion by Brownian-motion-induced fluid stress.

    PubMed

    Kreft, Jennifer; Chen, Yeng-Long

    2007-08-01

    The Ludwig-Soret effect, the migration of a species due to a temperature gradient, has been extensively studied without a complete picture of its cause emerging. Here we investigate the dynamics of DNA and spherical particles subjected to a thermal gradient using a combination of Brownian dynamics and the lattice Boltzmann method. We observe that the DNA molecules will migrate to colder regions of the channel, an observation also made in experiments. In fact, the thermal diffusion coefficient found agrees quantitatively with the experimentally measured value. We also observe that the thermal diffusion coefficient decreases as the radius of the studied spherical particles increases. Furthermore, we observe that the thermal-fluctuation-fluid-momentum-flux coupling induces a gradient in the stress which leads to thermal migration in both systems.

  14. Tamoxifen inhibits mitochondrial oxidative stress damage induced by copper orthophenanthroline.

    PubMed

    Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Correa, Francisco; Díaz-Ruiz, Jorge Luis; Chávez, Edmundo

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we studied the effect of tamoxifen and cyclosporin A on mitochondrial permeability transition caused by addition of the thiol-oxidizing pair Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline. The findings indicate that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A circumvent the oxidative membrane damage manifested by matrix Ca(2+) release, mitochondrial swelling, and transmembrane electrical gradient collapse. Furthermore, it was found that tamoxifen and cyclosporin A prevent the generation of TBARs promoted by Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline, as well as the inactivation of the mitochondrial enzyme aconitase and disruption of mDNA. Electrophoretic analysis was unable to demonstrate a cross-linking reaction between membrane proteins. Yet, it was found that Cu(2+) -orthophenanthroline induced the generation of reactive oxygen species. It is thus plausible that membrane leakiness is due to an oxidative stress injury.

  15. Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (Takotsubo)--broken heart and mind?

    PubMed

    Redfors, Björn; Shao, Yangzhen; Omerovic, Elmir

    2013-01-01

    Stress-induced cardiomyopathy (SIC), also known as Takotsubo cardiomyopathy, is characterized by severe but potentially reversible regional left ventricular wall motion abnormalities, ie, akinesia, in the absence of explanatory angiographic evidence of a coronary occlusion. The typical pattern is that of an akinetic apex with preserved contractions in the base, but other variants are also common, including basal or midmyocardial akinesia with preserved apical function. The pathophysiology of SIC remains largely unknown but catecholamines are believed to play a pivotal role. The diverse array of triggering events that have been linked to SIC are arbitrarily categorized as either emotional or somatic stressors. These categories can be considered as different elements of a continuous spectrum, linked through the interface of neurology and psychiatry. This paper reviews our current knowledge of SIC, with focus on the intimate relationship between the brain and the heart.

  16. Laser-induced stress transients: applications for molecular delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Lee, Shun; Zhang, Hong; McAuliffe, Daniel J.; Douki, Tina; Doukas, Apostolos G.

    1995-05-01

    Lasers can be used to enhance the delivery of a number of molecules. Other investigators have demonstrated local release of molecules from liposomes following laser irradiation, microbeam disruption of the cell membrane to increase cell transport, microbeam ablation of the zona pellucida surrounding the ovum to increase the chances of fertilization, and increased transcutaneous transport following ablation of the stratum corneum. Our experiments have shown that laser-induced stress transients can be utilized as a vector for intracellular delivery of molecules that may or may not normally cross the cell membrane. These two conditions have been tested with Photofrin and DNA. This technology may have applications in cell and molecular biology, cancer therapy, gene therapy, and others.

  17. Stress waves generated in thin metallic films by a Q-switched ruby laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Investigation results on stress waves generated by Q-switched ruby laser irradiated thin metal films under confinement, studied over a wide range of film materials and film thicknesses, are reviewed. The results indicate that the dependence on these parameters is much weaker than is predicted by heat transfer estimations commonly used to describe the interaction of laser irradiation with unconfined bulk-solid surfaces.

  18. Lycium barbarum Polysaccharides Reduce Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Xiaozhong; Zhou, Junlai; Ma, Tao; Chai, Qiongxia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialdehyde (MDA), super oxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) level of rats were measured. The results showed that the body weight of rats in LBP treated groups were not significantly different from that in the normal control group before and after the experiment (P > 0.05). After exhaustive exercise, the mean endurance time of treadmill running to exhaustion of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly prolonged compared with that in the normal control group. MDA levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly decreased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). SOD and GPX levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly increased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). Together, these results indicate that LBP was effective in preventing oxidative stress after exhaustive exercise. PMID:21541044

  19. Architectural switch in plant photosynthetic membranes induced by light stress.

    PubMed

    Herbstová, Miroslava; Tietz, Stefanie; Kinzel, Christopher; Turkina, Maria V; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2012-12-04

    Unavoidable side reactions of photosynthetic energy conversion can damage the water-splitting photosystem II (PSII) holocomplex embedded in the thylakoid membrane system inside chloroplasts. Plant survival is crucially dependent on an efficient molecular repair of damaged PSII realized by a multistep repair cycle. The PSII repair cycle requires a brisk lateral protein traffic between stacked grana thylakoids and unstacked stroma lamellae that is challenged by the tight stacking and low protein mobility in grana. We demonstrated that high light stress induced two main structural changes that work synergistically to improve the accessibility between damaged PSII in grana and its repair machinery in stroma lamellae: lateral shrinkage of grana diameter and increased protein mobility in grana thylakoids. It follows that high light stress triggers an architectural switch of the thylakoid network that is advantageous for swift protein repair. Studies of the thylakoid kinase mutant stn8 and the double mutant stn7/8 demonstrate the central role of protein phosphorylation for the structural alterations. These findings are based on the elaboration of mathematical tools for analyzing confocal laser-scanning microscopic images to study changes in the sophisticated thylakoid architecture in intact protoplasts.

  20. The NFKB Inducing Kinase Modulates Hematopoiesis During Stress.

    PubMed

    González-Murillo, África; Fernández, Lucía; Baena, Sara; Melen, Gustavo J; S