Science.gov

Sample records for metal sulphate hydrates

  1. Time-development of sulphate hydration in anhydritic swelling rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serafeimidis, Konstantinos

    2015-04-01

    Anhydritic claystones are among the most problematic rocks in tunnelling due to their distinctive swelling properties. They consist of a clay matrix with distributed anhydrite particles, veins and layers and have caused severe damage to numerous tunnels excavated in the Gypsum Keuper formation in North-Western Switzerland and South-Western Germany. The swelling of anhydritic claystones which is mainly attributed to the transformation of anhydrite into gypsum (a chemical process which leads to an increase in the solids of 61 percent), is a markedly time-dependent process. It may take several decades to complete in nature and is therefore important for the design particularly of the final tunnel lining. Anhydrite occurs either in the form of particles or of layers and veins of different thicknesses and spacings. The particles may have an approximately spherical or rather prismatic form, while their size lies within a wide range (from few micrometer to few centimeter). The shape and size of the anhydrite particles and layers are important for the specific surface of anhydrite and thus for the evolution of its hydration over time. In the present contribution we focus on the kinetics of the chemical reactions in sulphatic rocks, limiting ourselves to closed systems, i.e. without investigating the effects of seepage flow and diffusive transport, which may also be important. In order to achieve this, a consistent and comprehensive dissolution and precipitation model has been developed that accounts for arbitrary geometrical forms of anhydrite as well as for the sealing of anhydrite by a layer of gypsum. The investigations have shown that anhydrite dissolution represents the limiting mechanism if anhydrite occurs in the form of larger particles or thicker veins (> 1 millimeter) and there are sufficient nuclei for gypsum growth (e.g. precipitation takes place on of the surfaces of inert minerals). It has also been indicated that the time required for the whole amount of

  2. Hydrated metal ions in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Martin K

    2007-01-01

    Studying metal ion solvation, especially hydration, in the gas phase has developed into a field that is dominated by a tight interaction between experiment and theory. Since the studied species carry charge, mass spectrometry is an indispensable tool in all experiments. Whereas gas-phase coordination chemistry and reactions of bare metal ions are reasonably well understood, systems containing a larger number of solvent molecules are still difficult to understand. This review focuses on the rich chemistry of hydrated metal ions in the gas phase, covering coordination chemistry, charge separation in multiply charged systems, as well as intracluster and ion-molecule reactions. Key ideas of metal ion solvation in the gas phase are illustrated with rare-gas solvated metal ions.

  3. The study of minerals under simulated planetary conditions: Experiments of hydrated sulphates at environmental conditions of martian surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Mateo-Martí, E.; Fernández-Remolar, D.

    2007-08-01

    Minerals on planetary surfaces are usually identified comparing remote infrared spectral data to laboratory mineral databases obtained under terrestrial conditions. However, environmental conditions at other planetary surfaces could produce alterations on the standard mineral spectra. Spectroscopic signals of hydrated magnesium, calcium and hydroxlated iron sulphates have been recently detected on surface of Mars. Some experiments using environmental conditions at the martian surface (temperature and pressure ranges; atmospheric composition, including water vapor content; and ultraviolet radiation) of different sulphates have been performed in order to both, constrain the stability of the hydrated phases and detect any possible modification in their spectra. Experiments have been done in a simulation chamber located in Centro de Astrobiologia, Madrid. The equipment has been developed for a wide range of simulation conditions, including a range of irradiation sources, and the implementation of analytical techniques, including IR and UV spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The equipment consists of a main vacuum chamber with dimensions of 50 cm long x 40 cm diameter, a second internal chamber connected by differential pumping with the main one, and a third side chamber for the gases analysis using a mass spectrometer. Chambers pressures are monitorized by different pirani-penning gauges. A liquid nitrogen cooling system is connected to the sample holder, and a gas system allows the mixing of gases and water.

  4. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  5. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  6. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  7. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  8. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4668 - Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4668 Hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions. (a... hydrated alkaline earth metal salts of metalloid oxyanions (PMN P-94-1557) is subject to reporting...

  10. Estuarine behaviour of metal loads leached from coastal lowland acid sulphate soils.

    PubMed

    Nordmyr, Linda; Osterholm, Peter; Aström, Mats

    2008-09-01

    The estuarine behaviour of the metal load leaching from acid sulphate (AS) soils was studied in a selected river system (the Vörå River), in western Finland. Large amounts of metals were transported with the river and deposited within the estuary, causing highly elevated metal concentrations in both the sediment traps and in the underlying bottom sediments. Among the metals, there was a diverging deposition pattern where Al, Cu, La and U demonstrated a strong association with organic matter and were deposited within approximately 4 km from the river mouth. In contrast, the deposition of Co, Mn, Ni and Zn occurred when pH reached circumneutral conditions further out in the estuary. Yet other metals were not abundantly leached from the AS soils and thus not elevated in the river and estuary (Fe, Ti, Cr, V). Five separate chemical extractions indicated the geochemical speciation of the metals.

  11. Growth and spectral characterization of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) doped zinc sulphate hepta hydrate - a semi organic NLO material.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra Raja, C; Ramamurthi, K; Manimekalai, R

    2012-12-01

    Semi-organic non-linear optical single crystals of ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) doped zinc sulphate hepta hydrate crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique, at room temperature, using de-ionized water as solvent. The modes of vibrations of different molecular groups present in the grown crystal were identified by FT-IR technique. The optical absorbance/transmittance was recorded in the wavelength range of 190-1100 nm. Thermal properties of the grown crystal were studied by thermo gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis. The melting point of the grown crystal was estimated by differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The inclusion of the dopant (EDTA) was confirmed by colorimetric estimation method. The second harmonic generation efficiency is about 30% of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate.

  12. Acid sulphate soil disturbance and metals in groundwater: implications for human exposure through home grown produce.

    PubMed

    Hinwood, Andrea Lee; Horwitz, Pierre; Appleyard, Steve; Barton, Caroline; Wajrak, Magda

    2006-09-01

    A significant emerging environmental problem is the disturbance and oxidation of soils with high levels of iron sulphide minerals resulting in acidification and causing the mobilization of metals into groundwater. This process is occurring in many parts of the world. In Western Australia, impacted groundwater is extracted by residents for domestic use. We sought to establish domestic use patterns of bore water and the concentration of metals. Sixty-seven domestic bore water samples clearly indicated oxidation of sulphidic materials with heavy metal concentrations ranging for aluminium (metals via the consumption of home grown produce. This warrants further investigation in light of increasing acid sulphate soil disturbance in many locations.

  13. Metal pollution of estuarine sediments caused by leaching of acid sulphate soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordmyr, Linda; Åström, Mats; Peltola, Pasi

    2008-01-01

    This study tracks changes in metal distribution in estuarine sediments as a result of leakage from acid sulphate (AS) soil landscapes in the Boreal Zone (Finland). The main objective was to identify the impact of these nasty soils on sediment geochemistry in a biologically sensitive and shallow brackish-water estuary. In order to do this four sediment cores were sampled in a profile extending seawards from the mouth of the Vörå River, which is one of the most heavily AS soil-impacted rivers in Finland and Europe. Two of the cores were rather deep (2.5 m and 4.0 m) and the others were shallow (0.4 m and 0.8 m). The results showed that an appreciable amount of aluminium (Al), cobalt (Co), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) were elevated in the surface and sub-surface of the sampled bottom sediments compared to the deeper sediment background levels. These metals are all known to be abundantly leached from the AS soils. At the site approximately 4 km away from the river mouth, the concentrations of Cd, Co, Mn, Ni and Zn were elevated 5-100 times as compared to the background levels and showed an intriguing cyclic pattern, most likely reflecting seasonal leaching dynamics in the AS soil landscapes. In contrast, metals that are not abundantly leached from AS soils, i.e. chromium (Cr), iron (Fe) and vanadium (V) had consistently low concentrations throughout all sediment cores. The elevated metal concentrations in the top layers of the sediments in the estuary are alarming. The continuous land uplift of the region combined with the episodic rapid declines in pH may result in short and long term extensive release of metals. This, in turn, may have significant effects on the trace-metal contents in the Gulf of Bothnia and the entire Baltic Sea.

  14. Hydrate-based heavy metal separation from aqueous solution

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongchen; Dong, Hongsheng; Yang, Lei; Yang, Mingjun; Li, Yanghui; Ling, Zheng; Zhao, Jiafei

    2016-01-01

    A novel hydrate-based method is proposed for separating heavy metal ions from aqueous solution. We report the first batch of experiments and removal characteristics in this paper, the effectiveness and feasibility of which are verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis and cross-experiment. 88.01–90.82% of removal efficiencies for Cr3+, Cu2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+ were obtained. Further study showed that higher R141b–effluent volume ratio contributed to higher enrichment factor and yield of dissociated water, while lower R141b–effluent volume ratio resulted in higher removal efficiency. This study provides insights into low-energy, intensive treatment of wastewater. PMID:26887357

  15. Hydrated lime for metals immobilization and explosives transformation: Treatability study.

    PubMed

    Martin, W Andy; Larson, S L; Nestler, C C; Fabian, G; O'Connor, G; Felt, D R

    2012-05-15

    Fragmentation grenades contain Composition B (RDX and TNT) within a steel shell casing. There is the potential for off-site migration of high explosives and metals from hand grenade training ranges by transport in surface water and subsurface transport in leachate. This treatability study used bench-scale columns and mesocosm-scale laboratory lysimeters to investigate the potential of hydrated lime as a soil amendment for in situ remediation of explosives and metals stabilization in hand grenade range soils. Compared to the unamended soil there was a 26-92% reduction of RDX in the leachate and runoff water from the lime treated soils and a 66-83% reduction of zinc in the leachate and runoff water samples; where the hand grenade range metals of concern were zinc, iron, and manganese. The amended soil was maintained at the target pH of greater than 10.5 for optimum explosives decomposition. The treatability study indicated a high potential of success for scale-up to an in situ field study.

  16. Metal pollution in Huayuan River in Hunan Province in China by manganese sulphate waste residue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nan; Zheng, Ji-Fang; Ding, De-Xin; Liu, Jun; Yang, Lu-Qing; Yin, Jie; Li, Guang-Yue; Wang, Yong-Dong; Liu, Yu-Long

    2009-10-01

    The Huayuan River in Hunan Province in China is subject to ongoing mining activity with Mn extraction. In this study, the level and environmental significance of metals (including Mn, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Ni and Fe) concentrations in the surface water and river sediments have been investigated along a 187 km reach of the Huayuan River. Using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, we analyzed the characterization of metals in manganese sulphate waste residue (MSWR) deposited along the bank of Huayuan River. The speciation of metals in both sediment and MSWR was established using the BCR-three step sequential extraction procedure. In the water samples, the average concentrations of Mn, Cd and Pb exceeded the acceptable concentrations for drinking water in the WHO Guidelines for drinking water quality, Vol. 1, Recommendations, Geneva (2004) and Chinese (GB 5749-2006) guidelines, respectively. The average concentrations of Mn, Cd, Pb and Zn in the river sediments were found to be considerably higher than the corresponding world average shale values. The percentages of Cd (31.4%), Mn (31.1%), Zn (12.8%) and Pb (8.1%) associated with exchangeable and weak acid fraction in the sediments were higher than other metals. Mn (5.81%), Zn (0.208%), Pb (0.0292%) and Cd (0.0113%) were identified in MSWR by XRF analysis. The percentages of Mn, Cd, Zn and Pb associated with the exchangeable and weak acid soluble fraction in MSWR were 41.9%, 31.1%, 23.8% and 9.8%, respectively. The peak solute and sediment-bound metal concentrations were found at the sites of MSWR deposited along the bank of Huayuan River. The results suggested that MSWR deposited along the bank may have a closely relation with the metal pollution of Huayuan River. The results obtained may be useful to assess both short and long-term environmental impact of the MSWR deposited activities and support decisions for a future remediation of this river.

  17. [Effect of the change in sulphate and dissolved oxygen mass concentration on metal release in old cast iron distribution pipes].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yong-li; Shi, Bao-you; Sun, Hui-fang; Zhang, Zhi-huan; Gu, Jun-nong; Wang, Dong-sheng

    2013-09-01

    To understand the processes of corrosion by-product release and the consequent "red water" problems caused by the variation of water chemical composition in drinking water distribution system, the effect of sulphate and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on total iron release in corroded old iron pipe sections historically transporting groundwater was investigated in laboratory using small-scale pipe section reactors. The release behaviors of some low-level metals, such as Mn, As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni, in the process of iron release were also monitored. The results showed that the total iron and Mn release increased significantly with the increase of sulphate concentration, and apparent red water occurred when sulphate concentration was above 400 mg x L(-1). With the increase of sulfate concentration, the effluent concentrations of As, Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni also increased obviously, however, the effluent concentrations of these metals were lower than the influent concentrations under most circumstances, which indicated that adsorption of these metals by pipe corrosion scales occurred. Increasing DO within a certain range could significantly inhibit the iron release.

  18. Stratification of Metal and Sulphate Loads in Acid Mine Drainage Receiving Water Dams - Variables Regionalization by Cluster Analysis.

    PubMed

    Grande, J A; de la Torre, M L; Valente, T; Fernández, J P; Borrego, J; Santisteban, M; Cerón, J C; Sánchez-Rodas, D

    2015-07-01

    The Sancho Reservoir (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) is nourished by the waters of the river Meca, which is affected by acid mine drainage (AMD) processes from the abandoned Tharsis mine. The aim of the present work is to study the hydrochemical variations in this reservoir, in order to define potential stratification processes in metal load and sulphates. A stratified sampling from the surface, with one meter deep intervals to the bottom of the dam, was performed. The results show a clear stratification of temperature, pH, electric conductivity, dissolved oxygen, metal and sulphate loads associated with depth. There is an increase of metal loads at the bottom of the reservoir, though previous studies only detect iron. The proximity between pH and aluminium suggests that water chemistry is strongly influenced by aluminium precipitation processes. This indicates the buffer effect that aluminium exercises, which precipitates as amorphous or low crystalline phases, introducing hydrogen ions to the system, while alkalinity input tends to raise pH.

  19. Characterization and activity studies of highly heavy metal resistant sulphate-reducing bacteria to be used in acid mine drainage decontamination.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mónica; Faleiro, M Leonor; Barros, Raúl J; Veríssimo, A Raquel; Barreiros, M Alexandra; Costa, M Clara

    2009-07-30

    Biological treatment with sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) has been considered as the most promising alternative for acid mine drainage (AMD) decontamination. Normally, these wastewaters contain high concentrations of sulphate and heavy metals, so the search for SRB highly resistant to metals is extremely important for the development of a bioremediation technology. A SRB consortium resistant to high concentrations of heavy metals (Fe, Cu and Zn), similar to those typically present in AMD, was obtained among several environmental samples, from a wastewater treatment plant. The phylogenetic analysis of the dsr gene sequence revealed that this consortium contains species of SRB affiliated to Desulfovibrio desulfuricans and Desulfobulbus rhabdoformis. The results show that the presence of usually lethal concentrations of Fe (400mg/L), Zn (150 mg/L) and Cu (80 mg/L) is not toxic for the sulphate-reducing bacteria present in this sample. As a consequence, a very good efficiency in terms of sulphate reduction and metals removal was obtained. Both ethanol and lactate can be used by this inoculum as carbon source. With the other samples tested sulphate reduction was inhibited by the presence of copper and zinc. This highly metal resistant consortium will be used to inoculate a bioreactor to carry out AMD decontamination.

  20. Process for obtaining molybdenum as a useful product from molybdeniferous solutions containing alkali metal carbonate, sulphate, hydroxide or hydrogen carbonate and possibly uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Maurel, P.

    1984-02-21

    A process is claimed for obtaining molybdenum as a useful product from aqueous solutions to be purified, according to claim 1 of French patent No. 2,404,601, which contain, besides molybdenum, alkali metal carbonate, sulphate, hydroxide or hydrogen carbonate and which may also contain uranium, and inorganic and/or organic impurities. These solutions are treated at a temperature which is at most equal to the boiling temperature by means of lime to convert the alkali metal carbonate into hydroxide and to precipitate the insoluble calcium salts formed, then separating and washing the first precipitate which essentially contains calcium carbonate, from an alkali metal hydroxide-enriched liquor, which is concentrated by evaporation at the same time as the washing liquor of the first precipitate, to produce an alkali metal hydroxide content which is at most equal to 50%, to produce a second precipitate formed by a mixture of alkali metal molybdate and sulphate, characterized in that said solid mixture is dispersed in an acid aqueous liquor which is heated at from 120/sup 0/C to 250/sup 0/C under pressure to cause precipitation of anhydrous Mo0/sub 3/ which is subsequently separated from the mother liquor which essentially contains alkali metal sulphate.

  1. The mechanism of CO2 hydration: a porous metal oxide nanocapsule catalyst can mimic the biological carbonic anhydrase role.

    PubMed

    Bandeira, Nuno A G; Garai, Somenath; Müller, Achim; Bo, Carles

    2015-11-04

    The mechanism for the hydration of CO2 within a Keplerate nanocapsule is presented. A network of hydrogen bonds across the water layers in the first metal coordination sphere facilitates the proton abstraction and nucleophilic addition of water. The highly acidic properties of the polyoxometalate cluster are crucial for explaining the catalysed hydration.

  2. Evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles by INS techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we will present a detailed methodology for the elucidation of the following aspects of the thermodynamic properties of hydrated metal oxide nanoparticles from high-resolution, low-temperature inelastic neutron scattering (INS) data: (i) the isochoric heat capacity and entropy of the hydration layers both chemi- and physisorbed to the particle surface; (ii) the magnetic contribution to the heat capacity of the nanoparticles. This will include the calculation of the vibrational density of states (VDOS) from the raw INS spectra, and the subsequent extraction of the thermodynamic data from the VDOS. This technique will be described in terms of a worked example namely, cobalt oxide (Co3O4 and CoO). To complement this evaluation of the physical properties of metal oxide nanoparticle systems, we will emphasise the importance of high-resolution, high-energy INS for the determination of the structure and dynamics of the water species, namely molecular (H2O) and dissociated water (OH, hydroxyl), confined to the oxide surfaces. For this component of the chapter we will focus on INS investigations of hydrated isostructural rutile (a-TiO2) and cassiterite (SnO2) nanoparticles. We will complete this discussion of nanoparticle analysis by including an appraisal of the INS instrumentation employed in such studies with particular focus on TOSCA [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), U.K.] and the newly developed spectrometer SEQUOIA [SNS, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), U.S.A].

  3. A Study of the Hydration of the Alkali Metal Ions in Aqueous Solution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The hydration of the alkali metal ions in aqueous solution has been studied by large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS) and double difference infrared spectroscopy (DDIR). The structures of the dimethyl sulfoxide solvated alkali metal ions in solution have been determined to support the studies in aqueous solution. The results of the LAXS and DDIR measurements show that the sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions all are weakly hydrated with only a single shell of water molecules. The smaller lithium ion is more strongly hydrated, most probably with a second hydration shell present. The influence of the rubidium and cesium ions on the water structure was found to be very weak, and it was not possible to quantify this effect in a reliable way due to insufficient separation of the O–D stretching bands of partially deuterated water bound to these metal ions and the O–D stretching bands of the bulk water. Aqueous solutions of sodium, potassium and cesium iodide and cesium and lithium hydroxide have been studied by LAXS and M–O bond distances have been determined fairly accurately except for lithium. However, the number of water molecules binding to the alkali metal ions is very difficult to determine from the LAXS measurements as the number of distances and the temperature factor are strongly correlated. A thorough analysis of M–O bond distances in solid alkali metal compounds with ligands binding through oxygen has been made from available structure databases. There is relatively strong correlation between M–O bond distances and coordination numbers also for the alkali metal ions even though the M–O interactions are weak and the number of complexes of potassium, rubidium and cesium with well-defined coordination geometry is very small. The mean M–O bond distance in the hydrated sodium, potassium, rubidium and cesium ions in aqueous solution have been determined to be 2.43(2), 2.81(1), 2.98(1) and 3.07(1) Å, which corresponds to six-, seven-, eight- and

  4. Communication: Evidence of hydrated electrons injected by a metallic electrode in a high voltage system.

    PubMed

    Perles, Carlos Eduardo; Volpe, Pedro Luiz Onófrio

    2010-12-28

    In this work it a strong evidence of the hydrated electrons production was shown in a film of condensed water, by directing the injection of electrons in localized and/or delocalized water electronic states using a system of high voltage made in laboratory. The results show that the water layers on the silica particles are electrically charged by injection of electrons from a metal electrode when silica is placed in high electric field. This charging process also appears to depend on the thickness of these water layers and of the spatial arrangement required by the silica surface.

  5. Removal of nickel and cadmium from battery waste by a chemical method using ferric sulphate.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Umesh U; Hocheng, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The removal of nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) from spent batteries was studied by the chemical method. A novel leaching system using ferric sulphate hydrate was introduced to dissolve heavy metals in batteries. Ni-Cd batteries are classified as hazardous waste because Ni and Cd are suspected carcinogens. More efficient technologies are required to recover metals from spent batteries to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. The results obtained demonstrate that optimal conditions, including pH, concentration of ferric sulphate, shaking speed and temperature for the metal removal, were 2.5, 60 g/L, 150 rpm and 30 degrees C, respectively. More than 88 (+/- 0.9) and 84 (+/- 2.8)% of nickel and cadmium were recovered, respectively. These results suggest that ferric ion oxidized Ni and Cd present in battery waste. This novel process provides a possibility for recycling waste Ni-Cd batteries in a large industrial scale.

  6. Hydration process of alkaline-earth metal atoms in water clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Nobuhiro; Ishikawa, Haruki; Fuke, Kiyokazu

    2005-10-01

    Ionization potentials (IPs) of water clusters containing alkaline-earth metal atoms are measured by a photoionization threshold method to examine the hydration process of the metal atoms in clusters. IPs of Mg(H 2O) n and Ca(H 2O) n are found to decrease with increasing n and become constant at 3.18 eV for n ⩾ 9 and n ⩾ 8, respectively. The observed constant IP agrees with an estimated photoelectric threshold (3.2 eV) of bulk ice. From the comparison with the results on the theoretical calculations as well as the IPs for alkali atom-water clusters, the anomalous size dependence of IPs is ascribed to the formation of an ion-pair state.

  7. Past and future seasonal variation in pH and metal concentrations in runoff from river basins on acid sulphate soils in Western Finland.

    PubMed

    Saarinen, Tuomas S; Kløve, Bjørn

    2012-01-01

    Drainage of acid sulphate soils (ASS) increases oxidation, leading to extensive leaching of acidity and metals to rivers (Al, Cd, Cr, Fe, Ni and Zn). This is often apparent during high runoff periods in spring and autumn after long dry periods with low groundwater levels and associated ASS oxidation. Regression models were used to study changes in these water quality variables according to various discharge scenarios. The knowledge of seasonal patterns of water quality variables in future is important for planning land use of the catchments in relation to WFD of European Union. The data showed that river water acidity (pH and metals) increased with discharge, with the correlation being strongest in low runoff periods in winter and summer and less clear in spring. With future climate change, river acidity can increase radically, especially during winters following extremely dry summers, and pH and metal peaks may occur even during winter.

  8. Analytical applications of condensed phosphoric acid-III Iodometric determination of sulphur after reduction of sulphate with sodium hypophosphite and either tin metal or potassium iodide in condensed phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, T; Iwahori, H; Ishii, H

    1980-06-01

    Novel methods for the reduction of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide with hypophosphite-tin metal or hypophosphite-iodide in condensed phosphoric acid (CPA) are proposed. The reduction of sulphate with hypophosphite alone does not proceed quantitatively. Sulphate, however, is quantitatively decomposed with hypophosphite when tin metal or potassium iodide is used together with it. The determination of sulphur by the hypophosphite-tin metal-CPA and tin(II)-CPA methods is interfered with by copper on account of the stabilization of copper(I) sulphide, but this interference can be eliminated by adding iodide, e.g. potassium and lead salts. Alum and barytes are quantitatively decomposed within 15 min at 140 and 280 degrees , respectively. The hydrogen sulphide evolved is absorbed in zinc acetate solution at pH 4.5 and then determined by iodometry.

  9. Calcium sulphate in ammonium sulphate solution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, E.C.

    1905-01-01

    Calcium sulphate, at 25?? C., is two-thirds as soluble in dilute (o.i mol per liter) and twice as soluble in concentrated (3 mois per liter) ammonium sulphate solution as in water. The specific electric conductivity of concentrated ammonium sulphate solutions is lessened by saturating with calcium sulphate. Assuming that dissociation of ammonium sulphate takes place into 2NH4?? and SO4" and of calcium sulphate into Ca and SO4" only, and that the conductivity is a measure of such dissociation, the solubility of calcium sulphate in dilute ammonium sulphate solutions is greater than required by the mass-law. The conductivity of the dilute mixtures may be accurately calculated by means of Arrhenius' principle of isohydric solutions. In the data obtained in these calculations, the concentration of non-dissociated calcium sulphate decreases with increasing ammonium sulphate. The work as a whole is additional evidence of the fact that we are not yet in possession of all the factors necessary for reconciling the mass-law to the behavior of electrolytes. The measurements above described were made in the chemical laboratory of the University of Michigan.

  10. Simulation of substrate erosion and sulphate assimilation by Martian low-viscosity lava flows: implications for the genesis of precious metal-rich sulphide mineralisation on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Raphael; Baratoux, David; Gaillard, Fabrice; Fiorentini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    On Earth, high temperature mafic to ultramafic lava flows, such as komatiites and ferropicrites of the Archean and Proterozic eons, can be hosts to Ni-Cu-PGE sulphide mineralisation. Mechanical/thermo-mechanical erosion and assimilation of sulphur-rich crustal rocks is ascribed as the principal mechanism that leads to sulphide supersaturation, batch segregation and subsequent accumulation of metal-enriched magmatic sulphides (e.g., Bekker et al., Science, 2009). In order to investigate the likelihood of the occurrence of similar sulphide mineralisation in extraterrestrial magmatic systems, we numerically modelled erosion and assimilation during the turbulent emplacement of Martian lavas, some of which display chemical and rheological analogies with terrestrial komatiites and ferropicrites, on a variety of consolidated sedimentary sulphate-rich substrates. The modelling approach relies on the integration of i) mathematical lava erosion models for turbulent flows (Williams et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1998), ii) thermodynamic volatile degassing models (Gaillard et al., Space Sci. Rev., 2013), and iii) formulations on the stability of sulphides (Fortin et al., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2015). A series of scenarios are examined in which various Martian mafic to ultramafic mantle-derived melts emplace over, and assimilate consolidated sulphate-rich substrates, such as the sedimentary lithologies (i.e., conglomerates, sandstones and mudstones) recently discovered at the Gale Crater landing site. Our modellings show that lavas emplacing over consolidated sedimentary substrate rather than stiff basaltic crust, are governed by relatively high cooling and substrate erosion rates. The rapid assimilation of sulphate, which serves as a strongly oxidising agent, could result in dramatic sulphur loss due to increased volatile degassing rates at fO2 ≳QFM-1. This effect is further enhanced with increased temperature. Nevertheless, sulphide supersaturation in the way of sulphate

  11. Aromatic Osmacyclopropenefuran Bicycles and Their Relevance for the Metal-Mediated Hydration of Functionalized Allenes.

    PubMed

    Batuecas, María; Castro-Rodrigo, Ruth; Esteruelas, Miguel A; García-Yebra, Cristina; López, Ana M; Oñate, Enrique

    2016-10-24

    The aromatic osmacyclopropenefuran bicycles [OsTp{κ(3) -C(1) ,C(2) ,O-(C(1) H2 C(2) CHC(OEt)O)}(P(i) Pr3 )]BF4 (Tp=hydridotris(1-pyrazolyl)borate) and [OsH{κ(3) -C(1) ,C(2) ,O-(C(1) H2 C(2) CHC(OEt)O)}(CO)(P(i) Pr3 )2 ]BF4 , with the metal fragment in a common vertex between the fused three- and five-membered rings, have been prepared via the π-allene intermediates [OsTp(η(2) -CH2 =CCHCO2 Et)(OCMe2 )(P(i) Pr3 )]BF4 and [OsH(η(2) -CH2 =CCHCO2 Et)(CO)(OH2 )(P(i) Pr3 )2 ]BF4 , and their aromaticity analyzed by DFT calculations. The bicycle containing the [OsH(CO)(P(i) Pr3 )2 ](+) metal fragment is a key intermediate in the [OsH(CO)(OH2 )2 (P(i) Pr3 )2 ]BF4 -catalyzed regioselective anti-Markovnikov hydration of ethyl buta-2,3-dienoate to ethyl 4-hydroxycrotonate.

  12. Sulphates Removal from Acid Mine Drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luptáková, Alena; Mačingová, Eva; Kotuličová, Ingrida; Rudzanová, Dominika

    2016-10-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) are a worldwide problem leading to ecological destruction in river basins and the contamination of water sources. AMD are characterized by low pH and high content of heavy metals and sulphates. In order to minimize negative impacts of AMD appropriate treatment techniques has to be chosen. Treatment processes are focused on neutralizing, stabilizing and removing pollutants. From this reason efficient and environmental friendly methods are needed to be developed in order to reduce heavy metals as well as sulphates. Various methods are used for remediation of acid mine drainage, but any of them have been applied under commercial-scale conditions. Their application depends on geochemical, technical, natural, financial, and other factors. The aim of the present work was to interpret the study of biological methods for sulphates removal from AMD out-flowing from the shaft Pech of the deposit Smolmk in Slovak Republic. In the experimental works AMD were used after removal of heavy metals by precipitation and sorption using the synthetic sorbent Slovakite. The base of the studied method for the sulphates elimination was the anaerobic bacterial sulphate reduction using sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) genera Desulfovibrio. SRB represent a group of bacteria that uses sulphates as a terminal electron acceptor for their metabolism. These bacteria realize the conversion of sulphate to hydrogen sulphide under anaerobic conditions. For the purposes of experiments a few variants of the selective medium DSM-63 culture media were used in term of the sulphates and sodium lactate contents in the selective medium as well as sulphates in the studied AMD.

  13. Toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles in Escherichia coli correlates with conduction band and hydration energies.

    PubMed

    Kaweeteerawat, Chitrada; Ivask, Angela; Liu, Rong; Zhang, Haiyuan; Chang, Chong Hyun; Low-Kam, Cecile; Fischer, Heidi; Ji, Zhaoxia; Pokhrel, Suman; Cohen, Yoram; Telesca, Donatello; Zink, Jeffrey; Mädler, Lutz; Holden, Patricia A; Nel, Andre; Godwin, Hilary

    2015-01-20

    Metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx NPs) are used for a host of applications, such as electronics, cosmetics, construction, and medicine, and as a result, the safety of these materials to humans and the environment is of considerable interest. A prior study of 24 MOx NPs in mammalian cells revealed that some of these materials show hazard potential. Here, we report the growth inhibitory effects of the same series of MOx NPs in the bacterium Escherichia coli and show that toxicity trends observed in E. coli parallel those seen previously in mammalian cells. Of the 24 materials studied, only ZnO, CuO, CoO, Mn2O3, Co3O4, Ni2O3, and Cr2O3 were found to exert significant growth inhibitory effects; these effects were found to relate to membrane damage and oxidative stress responses in minimal trophic media. A correlation of the toxicological data with physicochemical parameters of MOx NPs revealed that the probability of a MOx NP being toxic increases as the hydration enthalpy becomes less negative and as the conduction band energy approaches those of biological molecules. These observations are consistent with prior results observed in mammalian cells, revealing that mechanisms of toxicity of MOx NPs are consistent across two very different taxa. These results suggest that studying nanotoxicity in E. coli may help to predict toxicity patterns in higher organisms.

  14. Sulphate in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul A; Elliott, Aoife; Bowling, Francis G

    2015-03-04

    Sulphate is an obligate nutrient for healthy growth and development. Sulphate conjugation (sulphonation) of proteoglycans maintains the structure and function of tissues. Sulphonation also regulates the bioactivity of steroids, thyroid hormone, bile acids, catecholamines and cholecystokinin, and detoxifies certain xenobiotics and pharmacological drugs. In adults and children, sulphate is obtained from the diet and from the intracellular metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids. Dietary sulphate intake can vary greatly and is dependent on the type of food consumed and source of drinking water. Once ingested, sulphate is absorbed into circulation where its level is maintained at approximately 300 μmol/L, making sulphate the fourth most abundant anion in plasma. In pregnant women, circulating sulphate concentrations increase by twofold with levels peaking in late gestation. This increased sulphataemia, which is mediated by up-regulation of sulphate reabsorption in the maternal kidneys, provides a reservoir of sulphate to meet the gestational needs of the developing foetus. The foetus has negligible capacity to generate sulphate and thereby, is completely reliant on sulphate supply from the maternal circulation. Maternal hyposulphataemia leads to foetal sulphate deficiency and late gestational foetal death in mice. In humans, reduced sulphonation capacity has been linked to skeletal dysplasias, ranging from the mildest form, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, to achondrogenesis Type IB, which results in severe skeletal underdevelopment and death in utero or shortly after birth. Despite being essential for numerous cellular and metabolic functions, the nutrient sulphate is largely unappreciated in clinical settings. This article will review the physiological roles and regulation of sulphate during pregnancy, with a particular focus on animal models of disturbed sulphate homeostasis and links to human pathophysiology.

  15. Sulphate in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Elliott, Aoife; Bowling, Francis G.

    2015-01-01

    Sulphate is an obligate nutrient for healthy growth and development. Sulphate conjugation (sulphonation) of proteoglycans maintains the structure and function of tissues. Sulphonation also regulates the bioactivity of steroids, thyroid hormone, bile acids, catecholamines and cholecystokinin, and detoxifies certain xenobiotics and pharmacological drugs. In adults and children, sulphate is obtained from the diet and from the intracellular metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids. Dietary sulphate intake can vary greatly and is dependent on the type of food consumed and source of drinking water. Once ingested, sulphate is absorbed into circulation where its level is maintained at approximately 300 μmol/L, making sulphate the fourth most abundant anion in plasma. In pregnant women, circulating sulphate concentrations increase by twofold with levels peaking in late gestation. This increased sulphataemia, which is mediated by up-regulation of sulphate reabsorption in the maternal kidneys, provides a reservoir of sulphate to meet the gestational needs of the developing foetus. The foetus has negligible capacity to generate sulphate and thereby, is completely reliant on sulphate supply from the maternal circulation. Maternal hyposulphataemia leads to foetal sulphate deficiency and late gestational foetal death in mice. In humans, reduced sulphonation capacity has been linked to skeletal dysplasias, ranging from the mildest form, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, to achondrogenesis Type IB, which results in severe skeletal underdevelopment and death in utero or shortly after birth. Despite being essential for numerous cellular and metabolic functions, the nutrient sulphate is largely unappreciated in clinical settings. This article will review the physiological roles and regulation of sulphate during pregnancy, with a particular focus on animal models of disturbed sulphate homeostasis and links to human pathophysiology. PMID:25746011

  16. Monitoring of sulphate attack on hardened cement paste studied by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2015-10-01

    The complex matter of external sulphate attack on cement-based construction materials is still not completely understood. The concentration of sulphate is a crucial factor for the formation of secondary phases and phase transitions of cement hydrates due to sulphate ingress into the microstructure. The sulphate attack on building materials for high and low sulphate concentrations was monitored by laboratory experiments. Hardened cement paste consisting of ordinary Portland cement (CEM I) were exposed to aqueous solutions of sodium sulphate for 18 months. Three sample compositions were used for this research, including different supplementary cementitious materials (SCM). The phase composition was determined for different time spans by high resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Cross sections of exposed cement prisms were investigated as a representation of the microstructural profile. Based on the data, a temporal and spatial determination of the stages of the sulphate attack and the deterioration course was possible. Cement matrices blended with slag showed the highest resistance against sulphate attack.

  17. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Fong, Walter L.; Catherino, Henry A.; Kotch, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  18. Selective removal of phosphate from wastewater using hydrated metal oxides dispersed within anionic exchange media.

    PubMed

    Acelas, Nancy Y; Martin, Benjamin D; López, Diana; Jefferson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Hydrated ferric oxide (HFeO), hydrated zirconium oxide (HZrO) and hydrated copper oxide (HCuO) were immobilized within a microporous anion exchange resin (IRA-400), forming hybrid media for enhanced phosphate removal from aqueous systems. Empirical data from batch kinetic trials fitted the pseudo second order mechanism for chemical adsorption and each media was rate limited by intraparticle diffusion overall. These models were also used to predict the adsorption rate constants and the equilibrium adsorption capacities, which ranged from 26.51 to 30.44 mgP g(-1), and from 24.15 to 27.90 mgP g(-1) of media for the calculated and experimental capacities, respectively. The phosphate adsorption behavior by the hybrid materials fit both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms (R(2)>0.94), and the maximum adsorption capacities were 111.1 mgP g(-1) for HFeO, 91.74 mgP g(-1) for HZrO and 74.07 mgP g(-1) for HCuO. The effect of competing ions such as sulfate reduced these capacities to 18.52 mgP g(-1) for HFeO and 18.97 mgP g(-1) for HZrO. Despite this decrease, HFeO was capable of reducing the phosphate in a real wastewater matrix by 83%, and the HZrO media was able to reduce it by 86%, suggesting that such hybrid media have the potential for application at full scale.

  19. Magnesium sulphate salts and the history of water on Mars.

    PubMed

    Vaniman, David T; Bish, David L; Chipera, Steve J; Fialips, Claire I; Carey, J William; Feldman, William C

    2004-10-07

    Recent reports of approximately 30 wt% of sulphate within saline sediments on Mars--probably occurring in hydrated form--suggest a role for sulphates in accounting for equatorial H2O observed in a global survey by the Odyssey spacecraft. Among salt hydrates likely to be present, those of the MgSO4*nH2O series have many hydration states. Here we report the exposure of several of these phases to varied temperature, pressure and humidity to constrain their possible H2O contents under martian surface conditions. We found that crystalline structure and H2O content are dependent on temperature-pressure history, that an amorphous hydrated phase with slow dehydration kinetics forms at <1% relative humidity, and that equilibrium calculations may not reflect the true H2O-bearing potential of martian soils. Mg sulphate salts can retain sufficient H2O to explain a portion of the Odyssey observations. Because phases in the MgSO4*nH2O system are sensitive to temperature and humidity, they can reveal much about the history of water on Mars. However, their ease of transformation implies that salt hydrates collected on Mars will not be returned to Earth unmodified, and that accurate in situ analysis is imperative.

  20. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-06-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  1. Hydrate detection

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, W.P.; Ahlbrandt, T.S.

    1992-01-01

    Project objectives were: (1) to create methods of analyzing gas hydrates in natural sea-floor sediments, using available data, (2) to make estimates of the amount of gas hydrates in marine sediments, (3) to map the distribution of hydrates, (4) to relate concentrations of gas hydrates to natural processes and infer the factors that control hydrate concentration or that result in loss of hydrate from the sea floor. (VC)

  2. Highly efficient removal of heavy metals by polymer-supported nanosized hydrated Fe(III) oxides: behavior and XPS study.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bingjun; Qiu, Hui; Pan, Bingcai; Nie, Guangze; Xiao, Lili; Lv, Lu; Zhang, Weiming; Zhang, Quanxing; Zheng, Shourong

    2010-02-01

    The present study developed a polymer-based hybrid sorbent (HFO-001) for highly efficient removal of heavy metals [e.g., Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cu(II)] by irreversibly impregnating hydrated Fe(III) oxide (HFO) nanoparticles within a cation-exchange resin D-001 (R-SO(3)Na), and revealed the underlying mechanism based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study. HFO-001 combines the excellent handling, flow characteristics, and attrition resistance of conventional cation-exchange resins with the specific affinity of HFOs toward heavy metal cations. As compared to D-001, sorption selectivity of HFO-001 toward Pb(II), Cu(II), and Cd(II) was greatly improved from the Ca(II) competition at greater concentration. Column sorption results indicated that the working capacity of HFO-001 was about 4-6 times more than D-001 with respect to removal of three heavy metals from simulated electroplating water (pH approximately 4.0). Also, HFO-001 is particularly effective in removing trace Pb(II) and Cd(II) from simulated natural waters to meet the drinking water standard, with treatment volume orders of magnitude higher than D-001. The superior performance of HFO-001 was attributed to the Donnan membrane effect exerted by the host D-001 as well as to the impregnated HFO nanoparticles of specific interaction toward heavy metal cations, as further confirmed by XPS study on lead sorption. More attractively, the exhausted HFO-001 beads can be effectively regenerated by HCl-NaCl solution (pH 3) for repeated use without any significant capacity loss.

  3. Temperature-Dependent Electrical Conductivity Measurements on Hydrated and Alkali-metal Intercalated Zeolite LTA and FAU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumoto, Kenji; Suzuki, Yoshinori; Wada, Noboru

    2007-03-01

    Zeolite LTA and FAU films were made from zeolite powders using a hydrothermal method. Electrical conductivity measurement were performed on the zeolite films in temperature range between 180 K and 430 K, using an LCR meter with the sweeping frequency varied from 20 to 1 MHz and drawing the Cole-Cole plots. The resistivities of both hydrated LTA and FAU zeolites increased with increasing the sample temperature from RT to 430 K, which might be caused by loss of water molecules from the pores of zeolite crystals. Also, the resistivities increased with decreasing the sample temperature from RT to 180 K, probably caused by freezing of water molecules in the zeolite. When the dehydrated zeolite samples were intercalated with alkali metals (Rb and K), the resistivities of the samples did not vary much at RT. However, the resistivities of the intercalated zeolite films decreased drastically by four orders of magnitude when the sample temperature was varied from RT to 180 K. We speculate that the dynamics of alkali atoms in the zeolite pores (electron-phonon scattering) may be responsible for the drastic change in the electrical conductivity.

  4. Separation of rare earths from transition metals by liquid-liquid extraction from a molten salt hydrate to an ionic liquid phase.

    PubMed

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2014-02-28

    The solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions and their separation from divalent transition metal ions using molten salt hydrates as the feed phase and an undiluted fluorine-free ionic liquid as the extracting phase were investigated in detail. The extractant was tricaprylmethylammonium nitrate, [A336][NO3], and the hydrated melt was calcium nitrate tetrahydrate, Ca(NO3)2·4H2O. The extraction behavior of rare-earth ions was studied for solutions of individual elements, as well as for mixtures of rare earths in the hydrated melt. The influence of different extraction parameters was investigated: the initial metal loading in the feed phase, percentage of water in the feed solution, equilibration time, and the type of hydrated melt. The extraction of rare earths from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O was compared with extraction from CaCl2·4H2O by [A336][Cl] (Aliquat 336). The nitrate system was found to be the better one. The extraction and separation of rare earths from the transition metals nickel, cobalt and zinc were also investigated. Remarkably high separation factors of rare-earth ions over transition metal ions were observed for extraction from Ca(NO3)2·4H2O by the [A336][NO3] extracting phase. Furthermore, rare-earth ions could be separated efficiently from transition metal ions, even in melts with very high concentrations of transition metal ions. Rare-earth oxides could be directly dissolved in the Ca(NO3)2·4H2O phase in the presence of small amounts of Al(NO3)3·9H2O or concentrated nitric acid. The efficiency of extraction after dissolving the rare-earth oxides in the hydrated nitrate melt was identical to extraction from solutions with rare-earth nitrates dissolved in the molten phase. The stripping of the rare-earth ions from the loaded ionic liquid phase and the reuse of the recycled ionic liquid were also investigated in detail.

  5. A QUANTUM MECHANICAL STUDY OF THE PROTONATION AND COVALENT HYDRATION OF QUINAZOLINE IN THE PRESENCE OF METAL CATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have investigated the protonation and reversible covalent hydration of quinazoline in the presence of Li+, Na+, and Ca2+ ions using ab initio quantum mechanical calculations at the MP2/6-31G**//HF/6-31G*level of theory. Proton affinities, enthalpies of hydration at 298.15K (DH...

  6. Infrared spectroscopy of hydrated alkali metal cations: Evidence of multiple photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jordan P.; Lisy, James M.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared predissociation spectra of M+(H2O)4-7, where M = alkali metal, are presented. Hydrogen bonding O-H stretching features are strongly dependent on which fragmentation channel is monitored. Spectra recorded by monitoring the loss of multiple waters show a preference for one absorption feature in the hydrogen-bonded region centered at ˜3430-3500 cm-1, which is assigned to linear-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches. Cyclic- and bent-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches have diminished photodissociation cross sections in the multiple ligand loss channels. Evidence from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus-evaporative ensemble calculations and laser fluence dependence experiments indicates that the multiple water loss channels are primarily the result of multiple photon absorption which we propose could be due to multiple, independent oscillators within a cluster ion each absorbing a photon during a single, 10 ns laser pulse.

  7. Role of sulphate in development.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Paul Anthony

    2013-09-01

    Sulphate contributes to numerous processes in mammalian physiology, particularly during development. Sulphotransferases mediate the sulphate conjugation (sulphonation) of numerous compounds, including steroids, glycosaminoglycans, proteins, neurotransmitters and xenobiotics, transforming their biological activities. Importantly, the ratio of sulphonated to unconjugated molecules plays a significant physiological role in many of the molecular events that regulate mammalian growth and development. In humans, the fetus is unable to generate its own sulphate and therefore relies on sulphate being supplied from maternal circulation via the placenta. To meet the gestational needs of the growing fetus, maternal blood sulphate concentrations double from mid-gestation. Maternal hyposulphataemia has been linked to fetal sulphate deficiency and late gestational fetal loss in mice. Disorders of sulphonation have also been linked to a number of developmental disorders in humans, including skeletal dysplasias and premature adrenarche. While recognised as an important nutrient in mammalian physiology, sulphate is largely unappreciated in clinical settings. In part, this may be due to technical challenges in measuring sulphate with standard pathology equipment and hence the limited findings of perturbed sulphate homoeostasis affecting human health. This review article is aimed at highlighting the importance of sulphate in mammalian development, with basic science research being translated through animal models and linkage to human disorders.

  8. Near-Quantitative Agreement of Model-Free DFT-MD Predictions with XAFS Observations of the Hydration Structure of Highly Charged Transition-Metal Ions.

    PubMed

    Fulton, John L; Bylaska, Eric J; Bogatko, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Cauët, Emilie; Schenter, Gregory K; Weare, John H

    2012-09-20

    First-principles dynamics simulations (DFT, PBE96, and PBE0) and electron scattering calculations (FEFF9) provide near-quantitative agreement with new and existing XAFS measurements for a series of transition-metal ions interacting with their hydration shells via complex mechanisms (high spin, covalency, charge transfer, etc.). This analysis does not require either the development of empirical interparticle interaction potentials or structural models of hydration. However, it provides consistent parameter-free analysis and improved agreement with the higher-R scattering region (first- and second-shell structure, symmetry, dynamic disorder, and multiple scattering) for this comprehensive series of ions. DFT+GGA MD methods provide a high level of agreement. However, improvements are observed when exact exchange is included. Higher accuracy in the pseudopotential description of the atomic potential, including core polarization and reducing core radii, was necessary for very detailed agreement. The first-principles nature of this approach supports its application to more complex systems.

  9. Folic acid improve developmental toxicity induced by aluminum sulphates.

    PubMed

    Yassa, Heba A; George, Safaa M; Mohamed, Heba K

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum sulphate has a significant toxic effects for humans. Aluminum is one of the most abundant metal on the Earth crust. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of short term exposure to aluminum sulphate on the bone development of the fetuses in rats, and if folic acid has a protective role upon that effects or not. Forty female rats were used, ten per group, GI served as negative control (receive nothing except normal feeding and water), GII served as positive control (receive water by gastric gavage), GIII treated with aluminum sulphate orally by gastric gavage and GIV treated with aluminum sulphate with folic acid. Mating occurred and known by presence of vaginal plug in the female rats. Rats were killed on day 18 of gestation.

  10. Effects of inorganic acids and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Xia, Yuguo; Zhang, Li; Chen, Dairong; Jiao, Xiuling

    2015-11-07

    In-depth understanding of the sol-gel process plays an essential role in guiding the preparation of new materials. Herein, the effects of different inorganic acids (HCl, HNO3 and H2SO4) and divalent hydrated metal cations (Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+)) on γ-AlOOH sol-gel process were studied based on experiments and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. In these experiments, the sol originating from the γ-AlOOH suspension was formed only with the addition of HCl and HNO3, but not with H2SO4. Furthermore, the DFT calculations showed that the strong adsorption of HSO4(-) on the surface of the γ-AlOOH particles, and the hydrogen in HSO4(-) pointing towards the solvent lead to an unstable configuration of electric double layer (EDL). In the experiment, the gelation time sequence of γ-AlOOH sol obtained by adding metal ions changed when the ionic strength was equal to or greater than 0.198 mol kg(-1). The DFT calculations demonstrated that the adsorption energy of hydrated metal ions on the γ-AlOOH surface can actually make a difference in the sol-gel process.

  11. Study on third order nonlinear optical properties of a metal organic complex-Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate single crystals grown in silica gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivanandan, T.; Kalainathan, S.

    2015-04-01

    The third order nonlinear optical properties of Monothiourea-cadmium Sulphate Dihydrate crystal were measured using a He-Ne laser (λ=632.8 nm) by a Z-scan technique. The magnitude of nonlinear refractive index (n2) and nonlinear absorption coefficient was found to be 4.4769×10-11 m2/W and 1.233×10-2 m/W respectively. The third order non-linear optical susceptibility χ(3) was found to be in the order of 3.6533×10-2 esu. The negative sign of non-linear refractive index shows the self-defocusing nature of the gel grown crystal. The second-order molecular hyperpolarizability γ of the grown crystal is 1.2822×10-33 esu. Laser damage threshold was measured by using an Nd: YAG laser (1064 nm). Photoconductivity studies of the gel grown crystal revealed that the crystal possesses positive photoconducting nature. The results obtained from Z-scan, laser damage threshold and photoconducting studies reveal that the crystal can be a possible candidate material for photonics device, optical switches, and optical power limiting application.

  12. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  13. Sulphate absorption across biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2016-01-01

    1. Sulphonation is unusual amongst the common Phase II (condensation; synthetic) reactions experienced by xenobiotics, in that the availability of the conjugating agent, sulphate, may become a rate-limiting factor. This sulphate is derived within the body via the oxygenation of sulphur moieties liberated from numerous ingested compounds including the sulphur-containing amino acids. Preformed inorganic sulphate also makes a considerable contribution to this pool. 2. There has been a divergence of opinion as to whether or not inorganic sulphate may be readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and this controversy still continues in some quarters. Even more so, is the vexing question of potential absorption of inorganic sulphate via the lungs and through the skin. 3. This review examines the relevant diverse literature and concludes that sulphate ions may move across biological membranes by means of specific transporters and, although the gastrointestinal tract is by far the major portal of entry, some absorption across the lungs and the skin may take place under appropriate circumstances.

  14. Deterioration of hardened cement paste under combined sulphate-chloride attack investigated by synchrotron XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroh, J.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2016-06-01

    The exact mechanisms of the phase transitions caused by a combined sulphate-chloride attack are discussed controversially. The main points concern the mutual influences of sulphate and chloride ions during the secondary binding processes of these anions within cement hydrate phases. We simulated combined sulphate-chloride attack under laboratory conditions using solutions containing NaCl and Na2SO4 in different concentrations. Three sample compositions were used for the preparation of the specimens. In two of them, 30% of Portland cement was replaced by supplementary cementitious materials (fly ash, slag). The phase distribution in the samples was determined using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The analysis with high spatial resolution allows the localisation of the secondary phase formation in the microstructural profile of the sample. A mechanism of the phase developments under combined sulphate-chloride attack is derived.

  15. Chitosan-coated mesoporous microspheres of calcium silicate hydrate: environmentally friendly synthesis and application as a highly efficient adsorbent for heavy metal ions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Wu, Jin; Zheng, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Xin-Yu; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Chen, Feng

    2014-03-15

    Chitosan-coated calcium silicate hydrate (CSH/chitosan) mesoporous microspheres formed by self-assembly of nanosheets have been synthesized in aqueous solution under ambient conditions without using any toxic surfactant or organic solvent. The method reported herein has advantages of simplicity, low cost and being environmentally friendly. The BET specific surface area of CSH/chitosan mesoporous microspheres is measured to be as high as ~356 m(2) g(-1), which is considerably high among calcium silicate materials. The as-prepared CSH/chitosan mesoporous microspheres are promising adsorbent and exhibit a quick and highly efficient adsorption behavior toward heavy metal ions of Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cr(3+), Pb(2+) Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) in aqueous solution. The adsorption kinetics can be well fitted by the pseudo second-order model. The maximum adsorption amounts of Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Cd(2+) on CSH/chitosan mesoporous microspheres are extremely high, which are 406.6, 400, 796, 425 and 578 mg/g, respectively. The CSH/chitosan adsorbent exhibits the highest affinity for Pb(2+) ions among five heavy metal ions. The adsorption capacities of the CSH/chitosan adsorbent toward heavy metal ions are relatively high compared with those reported in the literature.

  16. Chloral hydrate

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 00 / 006 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF CHLORAL HYDRATE ( CAS No . 302 - 17 - 0 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) August 2000 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance w

  17. Reduction on the anaerobic biological activity inhibition caused by heavy metals and sulphates in effluents through chemical precipitation with soda and lime.

    PubMed

    Alves, L de Carvalho; Cammarota, M C; De França, F P

    2006-12-01

    The School of Chemistry Environmental Technology Laboratory generates 43.4 1 of effluent with low pH (0.7) and high contents of COD (1908 mgO2 l(-1)), phenol (132.1 mg l(-1)), sulfate (36700 mg l(-1)) and heavy metals (28.2 mg Hg l(-1); 82.1 mg Cr(total) l(-1); 30.8 mg Cu l(-1); 57.4 mg Fe(total) l(-1); 16.2 mg Al l(-1)) weekly. These data show that this effluent presents high toxicity for biological treatment, with a physical-chemical step being necessary before a biological step. Preliminary studies showed that the most toxic constituents of the effluent were sulfate, phenol and total chromium. In this work, a chemical precipitation step with sodium hydroxide or lime was evaluated for the toxicity reduction on anaerobic microbial consortium. These experiments were carried out with increasing concentrations of alkalis in the effluent in order to obtain pH initial values of 8-12. Similar results were obtained for COD (15-28%), turbidity (95-98%), phenol (13-24%) and total chromium (99.8-99.9%) removals in each condition studied with soda or lime. Sulfate was only removed by precipitation with lime, obtaining reductions from 84 to 88%. The toxicity on the anaerobic sludge was studied employing specific methanogenic activity (SMA) analysis of raw and treated effluent (after chemical precipitation step). The SMA experiments showed that chemical precipitation at pH 8 reduces the toxic effect of the effluent on anaerobic microbial consortium three times (with soda) and thirteen times (with lime). These results indicate that precipitation with lime is more efficient at toxicity removal, however the produced sludge volume is around two times higher than that produced with soda.

  18. Olefin hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, M.H.D.; Waller, F.J.

    1993-08-03

    An improved process for the hydration of olefins to alcohols is described wherein the improvement comprises contacting said olefins with the catalytic composition comprising a perfluorinated ion-exchange polymer containing sulfonic acid groups supported on an inert carrier wherein said carrier comprises calcined shot coke with a mean pore diameter of about 1,000 Angstroms in the presence of water at a temperature of from about 180 C to about 250 C.

  19. Structures of Hydrated Alkali Metal Cations, M+(H2O)nAr (m = Li, Na, K, rb and Cs, n = 3-5), Using Infrared Photodissociation Spectroscopy and Thermodynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Haochen; van der Linde, Christian; Lisy, James M.

    2014-06-01

    Alkali metal cations play vital roles in chemical and biochemical systems. Lithium is widely used in psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder; Sodium and potassium are essential elements, having major biological roles as electrolytes, balancing osmotic pressure on body cells and assisting the electroneurographic signal transmission; Rubidium has seen increasing usage as a supplementation for manic depression and depression treatment; Cesium doped compounds are used as essential catalysts in chemical production and organic synthesis. Since hydrated alkali metal cations are ubiquitous and the basic form of the alkali metal cations in chemical and biochemical systems, their structural and thermodynamic properties serve as the foundation for modeling more complex chemical and biochemical processes, such as ion transport and ion size-selectivity of ionophores and protein channels. By combining mass spectrometry and infrared photodissociation spectroscopy, we have characterized the structures and thermodynamic properties of the hydrated alkali metal cations, i.e. M+(H2O)nAr, (M = Li, Na, K, Rb and Cs, n = 3-5). Ab initio calculations and RRKM-EE (evaporative ensemble) calculations were used to assist in the spectral assignments and thermodynamic analysis. Results showed that the structures of hydrated alkali metal cations were determined predominantly by the competition between non-covalent interactions, i.e. the water---water hydrogen bonding interactions and the water---cation electrostatic interactions. This balance, however, is very delicate and small changes, i.e. different cations, different levels of hydration and different effective temperatures clearly impact the balance.

  20. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, H.K. Jr.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means for separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means. 7 figs.

  1. Multiple stage multiple filter hydrate store

    DOEpatents

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-05-31

    An improved hydrate store for a metal halogen battery system is disclosed which employs a multiple stage, multiple filter means or separating the halogen hydrate from the liquid used in forming the hydrate. The filter means is constructed in the form of three separate sections which combine to substantially cover the interior surface of the store container. Exit conduit means is provided in association with the filter means for transmitting liquid passing through the filter means to a hydrate former subsystem. The hydrate former subsystem combines the halogen gas generated during the charging of the battery system with the liquid to form the hydrate in association with the store. Relief valve means is interposed in the exit conduit means for controlling the operation of the separate sections of the filter means, such that the liquid flow through the exit conduit means from each of the separate sections is controlled in a predetermined sequence. The three separate sections of the filter means operate in three discrete stages to provide a substantially uniform liquid flow to the hydrate former subsystem during the charging of the battery system. The separation of the liquid from the hydrate causes an increase in the density of the hydrate by concentrating the hydrate along the filter means.

  2. Hydrate habitat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Whoever said there is nothing new under the sun did not delve deeply enough to the bottom of the ocean. There in the Gulf of Mexico, about 150 miles south of New Orleans, scientists have just discovered what could be a new species of centipede—like worms living on or within gas hydrates— mounds of methane ice— rising from the ocean floor.Scientists have previously recognized an association between some bacteria and these hydrates. However, this is the first discovery of a higher life form there.

  3. Luminescence of potassium sulphate crystals doped by Eu3+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koketai, T.; Tussupbekova, A.; Baltabekov, A.; Mussenova, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results of the study some spectral-luminescent properties of potassium sulphate crystals activated europium trivalent ions. The observed changes might be connected with the fact of crystals having Eu3+ ions and NO3 - impurity ions. There was a proposition of the possibility of selective creation of impurity centers with the help of using various salts is normal for all the transition metal ions.

  4. Influence of the hydration by the environmental humidity on the metallic speciation and the photocatalytic activity of Cr/MCM-41

    SciTech Connect

    Elías, Verónica R.; Sabre, Ema V.; Winkler, Elin L.; Andrini, Leandro; Requejo, Félix G.; Casuscelli, Sandra G.; Eimer, Griselda A.

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the environmental humidity on the Cr species deposited on inorganic supports like MCM-41 silicates was analyzed by UV–vis Diffuse Reflectance (UV–vis RD), Electronic Spin Resonance (ESR) and X-ray near-edge (XANES) spectroscopy. Metal speciation could be inferred, finding that prolonged exposure periods under environmental humidity provoked the reduction of the active Cr{sup 6+} species and thus, the decrease of the Cr/MCM-41 photoactivity. After the Ti loading over the Cr modified samples, Cr species and the photoactivity were not notably influenced by the humidity exposure. Thus, it could be concluded that the presence of Ti is important because the TiO{sub 2} cover protects the oxidized Cr species, stabilizing them. - Graphical abstract: The load of Ti on the Cr modified MCM-41 produces a TiO{sub 2} cover that protects the active Cr species from their reduction by the environmental humidity. - Highlights: • Spectroscopic analysis shows presence of Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+} in calcined/re-calcined samples. • Cr{sup 3+} species increase for hydrated samples causing their photoactivity decrease. • Samples with high Cr loadings are more sensitive to environmental humidity presence. • TiO{sub 2} cover protects oxidized Cr species from their reduction by the water. • Ti is important to allow a synergistic effect and to stabilize active Cr{sup 6+}/Cr{sup 5+}.

  5. Ultrathin calcium silicate hydrate nanosheets with large specific surface areas: synthesis, crystallization, layered self-assembly and applications as excellent adsorbents for drug, protein, and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Chen, Feng

    2013-09-09

    A simple and low-cost solution synthesis is reported for low-crystalline 1.4 nm tobermorite-like calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) ultrathin nanosheets with a thickness of ~2.8 nm and with a large specific surface area (SSA), via a reaction-rate-controlled precipitation process. The BET SSA of the CSH ultrathin nanosheets can reach as high as 505 m(2) g(-1) . The CSH ultrathin nanosheets have little cytotoxicity and can be converted to anhydrous calcium silicate (ACS) ultrathin nanosheets with a well preserved morphology via a heat treatment process. The crystallinity of CSH ultrathin nanosheets can be improved by solvothermal treatment in water/ethanol binary solvents or a single solvent of water, producing well-crystalline 1.1 nm tobermorite-like CSH nanobelts or nanosheets. CSH ultrathin nanosheets acting as building blocks can self-assemble into layered nanostructures via three different routes. The CSH ultrathin nanosheets are investigated as promising adsorbents for protein (hemoglobin, Hb), drug (ibuprofen, IBU), and metal ions (Cr(3+) , Ni(2+) , Cu(2+) , Zn(2+) , Cd(2+) , Pb(2+) ). The highest adsorbed percentages of Hb and IBU are found to be 83% and 94%, respectively. The highest adsorption capacities of Hb and IBU are found to be as high as 878 milligram Hb per gram CSH and 2.2 gram IBU per gram CSH, respectively. The ppm level metal ions can be totally adsorbed from aqueous solution in just a few minutes. Thus, the CSH ultrathin nanosheets are a promising candidate as excellent adsorbents in the biomedical field and for waste water treatment. Several empirical laws are summarized based on the adsorption profiles of Hb and IBU using CSH ultrathin nanosheets as the adsorbent. Furthermore, the ACS ultrathin nanosheets as adsorbents for Hb protein and IBU drug are investigated.

  6. Sulphate, more than a nutrient, protects the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii from cadmium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2014-03-01

    Sulphur is an essential macroelement that plays important roles in living organisms. The thiol rich sulphur compounds, such as cysteine, γ-Glu-Cys, glutathione and phytochelatins participate in the tolerance mechanisms against cadmium toxicity. Plants, algae, yeasts and most prokaryotes cover their demand for reduced sulphur by reduction of inorganic sulphate. The aim of this study was to investigate, using a bifactorial experimental design, the effect of different sulphate concentrations in the nutrient solution on cadmium toxicity in the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii. Cell growth, kinetic parameters of sulphate utilization and intracellular concentrations of low-molecular mass thiol compounds were determined. A mathematical model to describe the growth of this microalga based on the effects of sulphate and cadmium was obtained. An ANOVA revealed an interaction between them, 16% of the effect sizes was explained by this interaction. A higher amount of sulphate in the culture medium allowed a higher cadmium tolerance due to an increase in the thiol compound biosynthesis. The amount of low-molecular mass thiol compounds, mainly phytochelatins, synthesized by this microalga was significantly dependent on the sulphate and cadmium concentrations; the higher phytochelatin content was obtained in cultures with 4 mg Cd/L and 1mM sulphate. The maximum EC50 value (based on nominal cadmium concentration) reached for this microalga was 4.46 ± 0.42 mg Cd/L when the sulphate concentration added to the culture medium was also 1mM. An increase in the sulphate concentration, in deficient environments, could alleviate the toxic effect of this metal; however, a relative excess is also negative. The results obtained showed a substrate inhibition for this nutrient. An uncompetitive model for sulphate was chosen to establish the mathematical model that links both factors.

  7. Hydration of highly charged ions.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Randolf, Bernhard R; Rode, Bernd M

    2011-08-01

    Based on a series of ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF MD) simulations, the broad spectrum of structural and dynamical properties of hydrates of trivalent and tetravalent ions is presented, ranging from extreme inertness to immediate hydrolysis. Main group and transition metal ions representative for different parts of the periodic system are treated, as are 2 threefold negatively charged anions. The results show that simple predictions of the properties of the hydrates appear impossible and that an accurate quantum mechanical simulation in cooperation with sophisticated experimental investigations seems the only way to obtain conclusive results.

  8. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  9. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  10. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  11. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  12. 7 CFR 160.10 - Sulphate wood turpentine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sulphate wood turpentine. 160.10 Section 160.10... STANDARDS FOR NAVAL STORES General § 160.10 Sulphate wood turpentine. The designation “sulphate wood... in the sulphate process of cooking wood pulp, and commonly known as sulphate turpentine or...

  13. Effects of the spaces available for cations in strongly acidic cation-exchange resins on the exchange equilibria by quaternary ammonium ions and on the hydration states of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuya; Ohnaka, Kenji; Fujita, Saki; Kishi, Midori; Yuchi, Akio

    2011-10-01

    The spaces (voids) available for cations in the five exchange resins with varying exchange capacities and cross-linking degrees were estimated, on the basis of the additivity of molar volumes of the constituents. Tetraalkylammonium ions (NR(4)(+); R: Me, Et, Pr) may completely exchange potassium ion on the resin having a larger void radius. In contrast, the ratio of saturated adsorption capacity to exchange capacity of the resin having a smaller void radius decreased with an increase in size of NR(4)(+) ions, due to the interionic contacts. Alkali metal ions could be exchanged quantitatively. While the hydration numbers of K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) were independent of the void radius, those of Li(+) and Na(+), especially Na(+), decreased with a decrease in void radius. Interionic contacts between the hydrated ions enhance the dehydration. Multivalent metal ions have the hydration numbers, comparable to or rather greater than those in water. A greater void volume available due to exchange stoichiometry released the interionic contacts and occasionally promoted the involvement of water molecules other than directly bound molecules. The close proximity between ions in the conventional ion-exchange resins having higher exchange capacities may induce varying interactions.

  14. Murine T lymphocytes and T-lymphoma cells produce chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate proteoglycans and free heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycan.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A P; Rider, C C

    1991-01-01

    Normal murine splenic T lymphocytes and T-lymphoma cells were incubated with [35S]sulphate in low-sulphate medium for 4 hr. Gel filtration and SDS-PAGE revealed that the radiolabelled macromolecules secreted by these cells were almost exclusively chondroitin sulphate and heparan sulphate proteoglycans of relatively low molecular weight (MW), 100,000-200,000. Triton X-100 extracts of the cells contained similar proteoglycans. Under the conditions employed the incorporation of radiolabel by cells grown in vivo was equally distributed between cell-retained and secreted fractions, whereas cells grown in vitro retained some 75% of incorporated label. In general heparan sulphate predominated over chondroitin sulphate in both secreted and cell-retained fractions. Cell extracts also contained a minor proportion of free glycosaminoglycan, which is almost exclusively heparan sulphate. These chains, like those incorporated into the proteoglycan, were around 12,000 MW. The T-lymphoma cells RDM-4, whether grown in vitro or in vivo, also incorporated a substantial proportion of [35S]sulphate into a single, cell-retained protein, 100,000 MW. No such radiolabelled protein was detectable in T cells. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1900056

  15. Clathrate hydrates in nature.

    PubMed

    Hester, Keith C; Brewer, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    Scientific knowledge of natural clathrate hydrates has grown enormously over the past decade, with spectacular new findings of large exposures of complex hydrates on the sea floor, the development of new tools for examining the solid phase in situ, significant progress in modeling natural hydrate systems, and the discovery of exotic hydrates associated with sea floor venting of liquid CO2. Major unresolved questions remain about the role of hydrates in response to climate change today, and correlations between the hydrate reservoir of Earth and the stable isotopic evidence of massive hydrate dissociation in the geologic past. The examination of hydrates as a possible energy resource is proceeding apace for the subpermafrost accumulations in the Arctic, but serious questions remain about the viability of marine hydrates as an economic resource. New and energetic explorations by nations such as India and China are quickly uncovering large hydrate findings on their continental shelves.

  16. Thermal properties of lithium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, B. M.; Gustavsson, M.; Karawacki, E.; Lundén, A.

    1997-09-01

    The thermal conductivity and diffusivity of lithium sulphate have been measured simultaneously, using the transient plane source technique over the temperature range 300 - 900 K. The thermal conductivity decreases slowly up to about 640 K, whereupon a distinct rise occurs, indicating the onset of a pre-transitional behaviour, which causes a continuous growth of the conductivity up to the structural phase transition at 851 K, whereupon a very sharp increase occurs. A similar behaviour has been observed for the thermal diffusivity, for which a very sharp dip occurs at the transition point due to the exceptionally large transition enthalpy. The pre-transitional behaviour of heat transport is associated with the librational disorder of the sulphate anions known from Raman scattering studies of both phases (and neutron scattering from the cubic phase), whereas the translational disorder of lithium cations is of hardly any importance. It is thus possible to link the `paddle-wheel' concept of ion migration in the cubic phase to the enhancement of heat transport observed in the `pre-transition' region, as well as to the large difference in heat-transport rates between the monoclinic and cubic phases.

  17. Pressure-oxidation autoclave as an analogue for acid-sulphate alteration in epithermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craw, D.

    2006-07-01

    Gold extraction at the Macraes gold mine in New Zealand involves concentration of pyrite and arsenopyrite, oxidation of those sulphides, then cyanidation. The ore concentrate is predominantly Otago Schist host rock (andesitic composition) with up to 15% sulphides. The oxidation step is conducted on ore concentrate slurry in an autoclave at 225°C and 3,800 kPa oxygen gas pressure with continuous feed. The slurry takes ca. 1 h to pass through the autoclave, during which time the sulphides are almost completely oxidised. Sulphide oxidation causes strong acidification of the slurry, which is maintained at pH of 1-2 by addition of CaCO3. Scales form on walls in the autoclave, with minerals reflecting progressive oxidation and alteration of the ore through the system. The schist in the ore feed has mineralogy similar to propylitically altered andesite: quartz, albite, muscovite, chlorite, and pyrite. Muscovite undergoes almost complete dissolution, with associated precipitation of quartz and alunite (KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6). Other principal minerals deposited and discharged include anhydrite (and/or gypsum), jarosite (KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6), hematite (and/or amorphous iron oxyhydroxide), and amorphous arsenates. Dissolved ferrous iron passes right through the autoclave, and variably hydrated Fe2+and Fe3+sulphate minerals, including rozenite and szomolnokite (both FeSO4.hydrate) and ferricopiapite (Fe5(SO4)6O(OH).hydrate), are formed along the way. The autoclave chemical system resembles acid-sulphate hydrothermal activity in geothermal systems and high-sulphidation epithermal mineral deposits formed in arc environments. These natural acid-sulphate systems are pervaded by volcanic vapours in the near-surface environment, where widespread dissolution of host rocks occurs and deposition of quartz, alunite, and anhydrite is common. Some of the volume loss associated with these natural systems may be due to dissolution of soluble sulphate minerals by later-stage groundwater incursion.

  18. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, Jr., Jerry; Avens, Larry R.; Trujillo, Eddie A.

    1992-01-01

    A process of preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride is provided.

  19. Dehydration of plutonium or neptunium trichloride hydrate

    DOEpatents

    Foropoulos, J. Jr.; Avens, L.R.; Trujillo, E.A.

    1992-03-24

    A process is described for preparing anhydrous actinide metal trichlorides of plutonium or neptunium by reacting an aqueous solution of an actinide metal trichloride selected from the group consisting of plutonium trichloride or neptunium trichloride with a reducing agent capable of converting the actinide metal from an oxidation state of +4 to +3 in a resultant solution, evaporating essentially all the solvent from the resultant solution to yield an actinide trichloride hydrate material, dehydrating the actinide trichloride hydrate material by heating the material in admixture with excess thionyl chloride, and recovering anhydrous actinide trichloride.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic study of sulphated silk proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, P.; Freddi, G.; Arosio, C.; Tsukada, M.; Arai, T.; Taddei, P.

    2007-05-01

    Degummed Bombyx mori ( B. m.) silk fibroin fabric and mutant naked pupa cocoons (Nd-s) consisting of almost pure silk sericin were treated with chlorosulphonic acid in pyridine and investigated by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Untreated silk fibroin and sericin displayed typical spectral features due to characteristic amino acid composition and molecular conformation (prevailing β-sheet with a less ordered structure in sericin). Upon sulphation, the degree of molecular disorder increased in both proteins and new bands appeared. The IR bands at 1049 and 1014 cm -1 were attributed to vibrations of sulphate salts and that at 1385 cm -1 to the νasSO 2 mode of organic covalent sulphates. In the 1300-1180 cm -1 range various contributions of alkyl and aryl sulphate salts, sulphonamides, sulphoamines and organic covalent sulphates, fell. Fibroin covalently bound sulphate groups through the hydroxyl groups of tyrosine and serine, while sericin through the hydroxyl groups of serine, since the δOH vibrations at 1399 cm -1 in IR and at 1408 cm -1 in Raman disappeared almost completely. Finally, the increase of the I850/ I830 intensity ratio of Raman tyrosine doublet in fibroin suggested a change towards a more exposed state of tyrosine residues, in good agreement with the more disordered conformation taken upon sulphation.

  1. Oestrone sulphate, adipose tissue, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, R A; Thomson, M L; Killen, E

    1985-01-01

    Oestrone sulphate, the oestrogen in highest concentration in the plasma, may play a role in the induction and growth of breast cancers. By enzymolysis and radioimmunoassay, oestrone sulphate concentrations were measured in 3 biological fluids. High concentrations of the conjugate (up to 775 nmol/l) were detected in breast cyst fluids from some premenopausal women, the concentrations in blood plasma (0.91-4.45 nmol/l) being much lower. Concentrations in the plasmas from postmenopausal women with (0.23-4.63 nmol/l) or without (0.18-1.27 nmol/l) breast cancer were still lower. Oestrone sulphate concentration in cow's milk or cream (0.49-0.67 nmol/l) was also low: dietary intake in these fluids is probably of little consequence. The capacity of breast tissues for hydrolysis of oestrone sulphate was examined in two ways: In tissue slices incubated with 85 pM (3H) oestrone sulphate solution at 37 degrees C, cancers (131-412 fmol/g tissue/hr) and adipose tissues (23-132 fmol/g tissue/hr) hydrolysed significantly more sulphate than did benign tissues (1-36 fmol/g tissue/hr). In tissue homogenates incubated with 5-25 microM [3H] oestrone sulphate at 37 degrees much higher capacities for hydrolysis (nmol/g tissue/hr) were demonstrated with a Km of 2-16.5 microM: cancers (34-394) and benign tissues (9-485) had significantly higher sulphatase activities than adipose tissues (9-39). On a protein basis, however, the sulphatase activities in the 3 tissues were comparable. It is concluded that oestrone sulphate is present in breast cysts and blood plasma and that in vitro, the conjugated hormone can be hydrolysed by breast tissues. The biological significance of these findings in vivo remains to be established.

  2. Characterization and reactivity assessment of organic substrates for sulphate-reducing bacteria in acid mine drainage treatment.

    PubMed

    Zagury, Gerald J; Kulnieks, Viktors I; Neculita, Carmen M

    2006-08-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), which contains high concentrations of sulphate and dissolved metals, is a serious environmental problem. It can be treated in situ by sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB), but effectiveness of the treatment process depends on the organic substrate chosen to supply the bacteria's carbon source. Six natural organic materials were characterized in order to investigate how well these promote sulphate reduction and metal precipitation by SRB. Maple wood chips, sphagnum peat moss, leaf compost, conifer compost, poultry manure and conifer sawdust were investigated in terms of their carbon (TOC, TIC, DOC) and nitrogen (TKN) content, as well as their easily available substances content (EAS). Single substrates, ethanol, a mixture of leaf compost (30% w/w), poultry manure (18% w/w), and maple wood chips (2% w/w), and the same mixture spiked with formaldehyde were then tested in a 70-day batch experiment to evaluate their performance in sulphate reduction and metal removal from synthetic AMD. Metal removal efficiency in batch reactors was as high as 100% for Fe, 99% for Mn, 99% for Cd, 99% for Ni, and 94% for Zn depending on reactive mixtures. Early metal removal (0-12d) was attributed to the precipitation of (oxy)hydroxides and carbonate minerals. The lowest metal and sulphate removal efficiency was found in the reactor containing poultry manure as the single carbon source despite its high DOC and EAS content. The mixture of organic materials was most effective in promoting sulphate reduction, followed by ethanol and maple wood chips, and single natural organic substrates generally showed low reactivity. Formaldehyde (0.015% (w/v)) provided only temporary bacterial inhibition. Although characterization of substrates on an individual basis provided insight on their chemical make-up, it did not give a clear indication of their ability to promote sulphate reduction and metal removal.

  3. Gas hydrate and humans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    2000-01-01

    The potential effects of naturally occurring gas hydrate on humans are not understood with certainty, but enough information has been acquired over the past 30 years to make preliminary assessments possible. Three major issues are gas hydrate as (1) a potential energy resource, (2) a factor in global climate change, and (3) a submarine geohazard. The methane content is estimated to be between 1015 to 1017 m3 at STP and the worldwide distribution in outer continental margins of oceans and in polar regions are significant features of gas hydrate. However, its immediate development as an energy resource is not likely because there are various geological constraints and difficult technological problems that must be solved before economic recovery of methane from hydrate can be achieved. The role of gas hydrate in global climate change is uncertain. For hydrate methane to be an effective greenhouse gas, it must reach the atmosphere. Yet there are many obstacles to the transfer of methane from hydrate to the atmosphere. Rates of gas hydrate dissociation and the integrated rates of release and destruction of the methane in the geo/hydro/atmosphere are not adequately understood. Gas hydrate as a submarine geohazard, however, is of immediate and increasing importance to humans as our industrial society moves to exploit seabed resources at ever-greater depths in the waters of our coastal oceans. Human activities and installations in regions of gas-hydrate occurrence must take into account the presence of gas hydrate and deal with the consequences of its presence.

  4. Sulphate efflorescences at the geyser near Pinchollo, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciesielczuk, Justyna; Żaba, Jerzy; Bzowska, Grażyna; Gaidzik, Krzysztof; Głogowska, Magdalena

    2013-03-01

    Sulphate mineralization precipitated around a geyser located above the village of Pinchollo, Chivay district and below Hualca Hualca volcano (6025 m a.s.l.) in the Western Cordillera of southern Peru is described. The geyser is one of many manifestations of thermal activity in the Arequipa department. Its age is estimated to be Upper Pleistocene-Holocene, as the discharge point lies at the intersection of a fault system with latitudinal dip-slip fault cutting a volcanic-debris avalanche of probably Pleistocene age. Thermal waters present in the Chivay district are mainly chloride-rich with a neutral pH. They are rich in Li, Sr, and B. The water erupting in the geyser boils at about 85 °C, as it lies at some 4353 m a.s.l. The minerals examined, of various habits and various yellow, orange and white colours were precipitated on the soil and on plants close to the geyser (location 1), on the walls of a 1 m diameter pothole filled with boiling water (location 1a) and at a distance of some 100 m to the west of the geyser (location 2). All are sulphates. Their chemical composition is fairly simple, consisting of Al, Fe, K, Mg, Ca, S, NH4 and O, and all display chemical zoning. But the phase composition is more complex. In all locations, alunogene, copiapite, coquimbite, tschermigite and gypsum are present. Close to the geyser (location 1) magnesium-containing sulphates, namely, boussingaultite and pickeringite also occur. Iron sulphates such as mohrite and rozenite precipitate on the walls of the pothole (location 1a). Sulphates containing potassium such as jarosite, alunite and voltaite-voltaite (Mg) dominate among the efflorescences in location 2, where hematite was also noted. Any quartz and kaolinite or illite/mica admixture identified in some samples derives from adjacent soil. The present geothermal system does not involve the deposition of precious-metal deposits such as those associated with an earlier deep-going epithermal system that scavenged a large volume

  5. Experimental study of the replacement of calcite by calcium sulphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Hövelmann, J.; Álvarez-Lloret, P.; Ibáñez-Velasco, A.; Putnis, A.

    2015-05-01

    Among the most relevant mineral replacement reactions are those involving sulphates and carbonates, which have important geological and technological implications. Here it is shown experimentally that during the interaction of calcite (CaCO3) cleavage surfaces with sulphate-bearing acidic solutions, calcite is ultimately replaced by gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and anhydrite (CaSO4), depending on the reaction temperature. Observations suggest that this occurs most likely via an interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction, in which the substrate is replaced pseudomorphically by the product. At 120 and 200 °C gypsum and/or bassanite (CaSO4·0.5H2O) form as precursor phases for the thermodynamically stable anhydrite. Salinity promotes the formation of less hydrated precursor phases during the replacement of calcite by anhydrite. The reaction stops before equilibrium with respect to calcite is reached and during the course of the reaction most of the bulk solutions are undersaturated with respect to the precipitating phase(s). A mechanism consisting of the dissolution of small amounts of solid in a thin layer of fluid at the mineral-fluid interface and the subsequent precipitation of the product phase from this layer is in agreement with these observations. PHREEQC simulations performed in the framework of this mechanism highlight the relevance of transport and surface reaction kinetics on the volume change associated with the CaCO3-CaSO4 replacement. Under our experimental conditions, this reaction occurs with a positive volume change, which ultimately results in passivation of the unreacted substrate before calcite attains equilibrium with respect to the bulk solution.

  6. Gas Hydrate Nucleation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, R. E.; Zatsepina, O.; Phelps, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    The onset of gas hydrate nucleation is greatly affected by the thermal history of the water that forms its lattice structure. Hydrate formation experiments were performed in a 72 liter pressure vessel by bubbling carbon dioxide through a 1 liter column at hydrate formation pressures (1.4 to 3.7 MPa) and temperatures (275.0 to 278.0 K) to quantify this effect. They show that when even a fraction ( e. g. 20 %) of the water in which hydrate has formed was recently frozen and thawed, the overpressurization for nucleation was reduced by an average of 50 % versus experiments performed in distilled water. In those experiments where a lower overpressure is present when hydrate nucleated, they tended to form on the surface of bubbles, whereas when a higher amount of overpressure was necessary for hydrate to nucleate, they appeared to form abruptly on bubble surfaces as well as from the bulk liquid phase. In approximation of classical nucleation, hydrate formation could be described as occurring by the spontaneous joining together of arising components of the hydrate lattice. In water that was frozen, and kept at a low temperature (< 275 K), molecular simulation models predict the predominance of water molecules organized as penatmeters, a possible subunit of the hydrate lattice. Our results suggest that in nature, initiation of hydrate formation may be strongly influenced by temperature dependant pre-structuring of water molecules prior to their contact with gas.

  7. Biological treatment of acidic coal refuse using sulphate-reducing bacteria with chicken manure as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingliang; Wang, Haixia

    2014-01-01

    The performance of using chicken manure as carbon source to promote sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) activity within acidic coal refuse to prevent the generation of acidic leachate was investigated in batch and column bioreactors. The bioreactors showed satisfactory performance in biological sulphate reduction, evidenced by the increase in effluent pH, high removal efficiencies of sulphate and metals, and the presence of large numbers of SRB. Scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) analysis of the formed precipitate indicated the formation of metal sulphides. Chicken manure was observed to play an important role in this treatment, which could not only provide carbon source but also reduce the adverse effect of strong acidity and metal toxicity on SRB activity. Metal removal could be mainly attributed to sulphides precipitation and sorption to chicken manure. This study indicated that SRB with chicken manure could be a novel alternative used for the prevention of acidic leachate from coal refuse.

  8. Histopathological and microanalytical study of zirconium dioxide and barium sulphate in bone cement.

    PubMed Central

    Keen, C. E.; Philip, G.; Brady, K.; Spencer, J. D.; Levison, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To report the appearances of zirconium dioxide and barium sulphate in interface membranes, synovium, and other tissues around joint prostheses. METHODS: Histological sections from 23 specimens were reviewed by light microscopy and polarisation. Scanning electron microscopy and x ray microanalysis were performed on routinely processed paraffin wax sections. RESULTS: Polyethylene, metals, and polymethylmethacrylate cement debris were easily recognisable. Almost all the cement remnants contained either zirconium dioxide or barium sulphate, confirmed by microanalysis. The contrast media had characteristic light microscopic appearances. Zirconium was identified in macrophages away from cement remnants. CONCLUSION: The presence of radiographic contrast media in tissues around prosthetic joints is common but not widely recognised. Images PMID:1452794

  9. Liquid-liquid extraction of metal ions by neutral phosphoramides. Part I. Extraction of uranyl ions from nitrate and sulphate media. Examination of extracted species by UV/VIS and {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Rodehueser, L.; Rubini, P.R.; Bokolo, K.; Laakel, N.; Delpuech, J.J.

    1992-09-01

    The extraction of uranyl nitrate and uranyl sulphate from aqueous media by the neutral chelating diphosphoramides CH{sub 3}-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (NIPA) and its less hydrophilic homologs R-N[P(O)(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}]{sub 2} (R = -C{sub 12}H{sub 25} (ODIPA) or -C{sub 16}H{sub 33} (OHDIPA)), diluted in CH{sub 3}NO{sub 2} or toluene, has been studied. In the presence of HNO{sub 3}, NaNO{sub 3}, NaCl, and Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} as salting-out agents, extraction is generally excellent. Some of the extracted complex species have been identified by comparing their {sup 31}P NMR and UV/vis spectra with those of pure complexes of known structure. The results are compared with extractions using tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as the complexing agent. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-14

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  11. Method for the photocatalytic conversion of gas hydrates

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.; Bockrath, Bradley C.

    2001-01-01

    A method for converting methane hydrates to methanol, as well as hydrogen, through exposure to light. The process includes conversion of methane hydrates by light where a radical initiator has been added, and may be modified to include the conversion of methane hydrates with light where a photocatalyst doped by a suitable metal and an electron transfer agent to produce methanol and hydrogen. The present invention operates at temperatures below 0.degree. C., and allows for the direct conversion of methane contained within the hydrate in situ.

  12. Influence of respiratory substrate in carbon steel corrosion by a Sulphate Reducing Prokaryote model organism.

    PubMed

    Dall'agnol, Leonardo T; Cordas, Cristina M; Moura, José J G

    2014-06-01

    Sulphate Reducing Prokaryotes (SRP) are an important group of microorganisms involved in biocorrosion processes. Sulphide production is recognized as a fundamental cause of corrosion and nitrate is often used as treatment. The present work analyses the influence of respiratory substrates in the metal, from off-shore installations, SRP influenced corrosion, using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATTC 27774 as model organism, since this can switch from sulphate to nitrate. Open Circuit Potential over 6days in different conditions was measured, showing an increase around 200 and 90mV for the different media. Tafel plots were constructed allowing Ecorr and jcorr calculations. For SRP in sulphate and nitrate media Ecorr values of -824 and -728mV, and jcorr values of 2.5 and 3.7μAcm(-2), respectively, were attained indicating that in nitrate, the resultant corrosion rate is larger than in sulphate. Also, it is shown that the equilibrium of sulphide in the solution/gas phases is a key factor to the evolution of corrosion Nitrate prevents pitting but promotes general corrosion and increases the corrosion potential and iron dissolution 40 times when compared to sulphate. Our results demonstrate that nitrate injection strategy in oil fields has to be considered carefully as option to reduce souring and localized corrosion.

  13. Asymmetric membrane osmotic capsules for terbutaline sulphate.

    PubMed

    Gobade, N G; Koland, Marina; Harish, K H

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate.

  14. Asymmetric Membrane Osmotic Capsules for Terbutaline Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Gobade, N. G.; Koland, Marina; Harish, K. H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design an asymmetric membrane capsule, an osmotic pump-based drug delivery system of ethyl cellulose for controlled release of terbutaline sulphate. asymmetric membrane capsules contains pore-forming water soluble additive, sorbitol in different concentrations in the capsule shell membrane, which after coming in contact with water, dissolves, resulting in an in situ formation of a microporous structure. The terbutaline sulphate is a β-adrenoreceptor agonist widely used in the treatment of asthma. The oral dosage regimen of terbutaline sulphate is 5 mg twice or thrice daily, the plasma half-life is approximate 3-4 h and it produces GI irritation with extensive first pass metabolism. Hence, terbutaline sulphate was chosen as a model drug with an aim to develop controlled release system. Different formulations of ethyl cellulose were prepared by phase inversion technique using different concentrations of sorbitol as pore forming agent. It was found that the thickness of the prepared asymmetric membrane capsules was increased with increase in concentration of ethyl cellulose and pore forming agent, i.e. sorbitol. The dye release study in water and 10% sodium chloride solution indicates that, the asymmetric membrane capsules follow osmotic principle to release content. The pores formed due to sorbitol were confirmed by microscopic observation of transverse section of capsule membrane. Data of in vitro release study of terbutaline sulphate from asymmetric membrane capsules indicated that, the capsules prepared with 10% and 12.5% of ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol released as much as 97.44% and 76.27% in 12 h, respectively with zero order release rate. Hence asymmetric membrane capsule of 10% ethyl cellulose and 25% of sorbitol is considered as optimum for controlled oral delivery of terbutaline sulphate. PMID:23204625

  15. [Adhesion of sulphate-reducing bacteria to steel under cathode polarization].

    PubMed

    Purish, L M; Koptieva, Zh P; Asaulenko, L H; Kozlova, I P

    2006-01-01

    Adhesion of different (as to their corrosion aggression) strains of sulphate-reducing bacteria to steel has been studied under cathode polarization at various potentials: -800, -900, -1000, -1200 mV. It has been established that cathode polarization differently affects the adhesion of strain of sulphate-reducing bacteria with various aggression to steel. Correlation between the bacterial strains aggression and the number of cells adhered to metal have been noted. The cells of aggressive strains of D. indonensis Indonesia and Desulfovibrio sp. Kiev-10 adhered to metal most actively at cathode depolarization (8.0 x 10(7) and 3.5 x 10(7) cell/cm2, respectively). Nonaggressive strains of bacteria D. desulfuricans Kiev-45 and Desulfobulbus sp. Portsmouth adhered to metal in a less quantity. The data obtained prove that the use of cathode protection without allowance for the microbe factor can lead to intensification of the corrosion process.

  16. The impact of sulphate and magnesium on chloride binding in Portland cement paste

    SciTech Connect

    De Weerdt, K.; Orsáková, D.; Geiker, M.R.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of magnesium and sulphate present in sea water on chloride binding in Portland cement paste was investigated. Ground well hydrated cement paste was exposed to MgCl{sub 2}, NaCl, NaCl + MgCl{sub 2}, MgSO{sub 4} + MgCl{sub 2} and artificial sea water solutions with a range of concentrations at 20 °C. Chloride binding isotherms are determined and pH of the solutions were measured. A selection of samples was examined by SEM-EDS to identify phase changes upon exposure. The experimental data were compared with calculations of a thermodynamic model. Chloride binding from sea water was similar to chloride binding for NaCl solutions. The magnesium content in the sea water lead to a slight decrease in pH, but this did not result in a notable increase in chloride binding. The sulphate present in sea water reduces both chloride binding in C–S–H and AFm phases, as the C–S–H incorporates more sulphates instead of chlorides, and part of the AFm phases converts to ettringite.

  17. Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Y. T. Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J.; Lott, Fraser C.; Highwood, Eleanor J.

    2016-12-01

    Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr‑1 of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models. 64% of the studied comparisons would require 25 years or more for detection when no filter and the multi-variate method that has been extensively used for attributing climate change are used, while 66% of the same comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection using a trend-based filter. This highlights the high sensitivity of sulphate aerosol geoengineering detectability to the choice of filter. With the same trend-based filter but a non-stationary method, 80% of the comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection. This does not imply sulphate aerosol geoengineering should be deployed, but suggests that both detection methods could be used for monitoring geoengineering in global, annual mean temperature should it be needed.

  18. Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods.

    PubMed

    Lo, Y T Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J; Lott, Fraser C; Highwood, Eleanor J

    2016-12-15

    Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr(-1) of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models. 64% of the studied comparisons would require 25 years or more for detection when no filter and the multi-variate method that has been extensively used for attributing climate change are used, while 66% of the same comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection using a trend-based filter. This highlights the high sensitivity of sulphate aerosol geoengineering detectability to the choice of filter. With the same trend-based filter but a non-stationary method, 80% of the comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection. This does not imply sulphate aerosol geoengineering should be deployed, but suggests that both detection methods could be used for monitoring geoengineering in global, annual mean temperature should it be needed.

  19. Superconducting oxides containing sulphate and phosphate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Angel Bustamante; Scorzelli, R. B.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Giordanengo, B.; Elmassalami, M.

    1994-12-01

    The effects of partial substitution of Sr and Ca in YBaCuO related materials containing sulphate and phosphate groups have been investigated. 57Fe Mössbauer measurements were performed on samples doped with lat.% 57Fe and the spectral components related to different Cu sites and oxygen vacancies.

  20. Superconducting oxides containing sulphate and phosphate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scorzelli, R. B.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Giordanengo, B.; Elmassalami, M.; Dominguez, A. B.; Bustamante Dominguez, A.

    1994-12-01

    The effects of partial substitution of Sr and Ca in Y-Ba-Cu-O related materials containing sulphate and phosphate groups have been investigated. e57Fe Mössbauer measurements were performed on samples doped with lat. % e57Fe and the spectral components related to different Cu sites and oxygen vacancies.

  1. Detecting sulphate aerosol geoengineering with different methods

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Y. T. Eunice; Charlton-Perez, Andrew J.; Lott, Fraser C.; Highwood, Eleanor J.

    2016-01-01

    Sulphate aerosol injection has been widely discussed as a possible way to engineer future climate. Monitoring it would require detecting its effects amidst internal variability and in the presence of other external forcings. We investigate how the use of different detection methods and filtering techniques affects the detectability of sulphate aerosol geoengineering in annual-mean global-mean near-surface air temperature. This is done by assuming a future scenario that injects 5 Tg yr−1 of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere and cross-comparing simulations from 5 climate models. 64% of the studied comparisons would require 25 years or more for detection when no filter and the multi-variate method that has been extensively used for attributing climate change are used, while 66% of the same comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection using a trend-based filter. This highlights the high sensitivity of sulphate aerosol geoengineering detectability to the choice of filter. With the same trend-based filter but a non-stationary method, 80% of the comparisons would require fewer than 10 years for detection. This does not imply sulphate aerosol geoengineering should be deployed, but suggests that both detection methods could be used for monitoring geoengineering in global, annual mean temperature should it be needed. PMID:27976697

  2. The sulphate-reduction alkalinity pump tested

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick; Petrishcheva, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate precipitation has been suggested to be induced by alkalinity increase during sulphate reduction under anoxic conditions. This mechanism may explain the formation of carbonate deposits in shallow marine environments, either within a redox stratified sediment inhabited by phototrophic microbial mats or in shallow water within the photic zone where sulphidic water is upwelling onto the shelf. The alkalinity pump may work as long as the sulphide is not reoxidized to sulphate, a process that would acidify the surrounding. The alkalinity effect of sulphate reduction was recently tested by Aloisi (2008) for microbial mats using a model approach. He found that sulphate reduction does not significantly increase or even decrease carbonate saturation and is unlikely to have played a significant role through Earth history. The model considers many environmental factors, including the effect of carbonate precipitation itself on the carbonate equilbrium and on the alkalinity. We used a modified version of Aloisi's (2008) model to simulate the saturation states of aragonite, calcite and dolomite without the effects of carbonate precipitation. This is necessary to evaluate the effect of microbial metabolisms exclusively on carbonate saturation, since carbonate precipitation is only the consequence, but not the cause of oversaturation. First results show that the saturation state is increased in the zone of phototrophic CO2 uptake. In contrast, the saturation state is strongly decreased in the zone where dissolved oxygen overlaps with dissolved sulphide. Aerobic sulphide oxidation consumes most of the HS- and dissipates most of the alkalinity produced in the sulphate reduction zone below. Hence, our results are consistent with the findings of Aloisi (2008), and they even more clearly show that sulphate reduction does not induce carbonate precipitation nor contributes to carbonate precipitation in combination with phototrophic CO2 uptake. The alkalinity effect of sulphate

  3. Correlation analysis between sulphate content and leaching of sulphates in recycled aggregates from construction and demolition wastes.

    PubMed

    Barbudo, Auxi; Galvín, Adela P; Agrela, Francisco; Ayuso, Jesús; Jiménez, Jose Ramón

    2012-06-01

    In some recycled aggregates applications, such as component of new concrete or roads, the total content of soluble sulphates should be measured and controlled. Restrictions are usually motivated by the resistance or stability of the new structure, and in most cases, structural concerns can be remedied by the use of techniques such as sulphur-resistant cements. However, environmental risk assessment from recycling and reuse construction products is often forgotten. The purpose of this study is to analyse the content of soluble sulphate on eleven recycled aggregates and six samples prepared in laboratory by the addition of different gypsum percentages. As points of reference, two natural aggregates were tested. An analysis of the content of the leachable amount of heavy metals regulated by European regulation was included. As a result, the correlation between solubility and leachability data allow suggest a limiting gypsum amount of 4.4% on recycled aggregates. This limit satisfies EU Landfill Directive criteria, which is currently used as reference by public Spanish Government for recycled aggregates in construction works.

  4. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-14

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in (1)C4-chair, (2)SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in (4)C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the (2)SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the (1)C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway.

  5. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway. PMID:27412370

  6. Uncovering the Relationship between Sulphation Patterns and Conformation of Iduronic Acid in Heparan Sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Po-Hung; Thieker, David F.; Guerrini, Marco; Woods, Robert J.; Liu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    The L-iduronic acid (IdoA) residue is a critically important structural component in heparan sulphate polysaccharide for the biological functions. The pyranose ring of IdoA is present in 1C4-chair, 2SO-skew boat, and less frequently, in 4C1-chair conformations. Here, we analyzed the conformation of IdoA residue in eight hexasaccharides by NMR. The data demonstrate a correlation between the conformation of IdoA and sulphations in the surrounding saccharide residues. For the 2-O-sulpho IdoA residue, a high degree of sulphation on neighboring residues drives ring dynamics towards the 2SO-skew boat conformer. In contrast, the nonsulphated IdoA residue is pushed towards the 1C4-chair conformer when the neighboring residues are highly sulphated. Our data suggest that the conformation of IdoA is regulated by the sulphation pattern of nearby saccharides that is genetically controlled by the heparan sulphate biosynthetic pathway.

  7. Hydration rate of obsidian.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Long, W

    1976-01-30

    The hydration rates of 12 obsidian samples of different chemical compositions were measured at temperatures from 95 degrees to 245 degrees C. An expression relating hydration rate to temperature was derived for each sample. The SiO(2) content and refractive index are related to the hydration rate, as are the CaO, MgO, and original water contents. With this information it is possible to calculate the hydration rate of a sample from its silica content, refractive index, or chemical index and a knowledge of the effective temperature at which the hydration occurred. The effective hydration temperature can be either measured or approximated from weather records. Rates have been calculated by both methods, and the results show that weather records can give a good approximation to the true EHT, particularly in tropical and subtropical climates. If one determines the EHT by any of the methods suggested, and also measures or knows the rate of hydration of the particular obsidian used, it should be possible to carry out absolute dating to +/- 10 percent of the true age over periods as short as several years and as long as millions of years.

  8. Combustion of Methane Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roshandell, Melika

    A significant methane storehouse is in the form of methane hydrates on the sea floor and in the arctic permafrost. Methane hydrates are ice-like structures composed of water cages housing a guest methane molecule. This caged methane represents a resource of energy and a potential source of strong greenhouse gas. Most research related to methane hydrates has been focused on their formation and dissociation because they can form solid plugs that complicate transport of oil and gas in pipelines. This dissertation explores the direct burning of these methane hydrates where heat from the combustion process dissociates the hydrate into water and methane, and the released methane fuels the methane/air diffusion flame heat source. In contrast to the pipeline applications, very little research has been done on the combustion and burning characteristics of methane hydrates. This is the first dissertation on this subject. In this study, energy release and combustion characteristics of methane hydrates were investigated both theoretically and experimentally. The experimental study involved collaboration with another research group, particularly in the creation of methane hydrate samples. The experiments were difficult because hydrates form at high pressure within a narrow temperature range. The process can be slow and the resulting hydrate can have somewhat variable properties (e.g., extent of clathration, shape, compactness). The experimental study examined broad characteristics of hydrate combustion, including flame appearance, burning time, conditions leading to flame extinguishment, the amount of hydrate water melted versus evaporated, and flame temperature. These properties were observed for samples of different physical size. Hydrate formation is a very slow process with pure water and methane. The addition of small amounts of surfactant increased substantially the hydrate formation rate. The effects of surfactant on burning characteristics were also studied. One finding

  9. Methane Hydrates: Chapter 8

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Yamamoto, Koji; Lee, Sung-Rock; Collett, Timothy S.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Dallimore, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrate is a solid, naturally occurring substance consisting predominantly of methane gas and water. Recent scientific drilling programs in Japan, Canada, the United States, Korea and India have demonstrated that gas hydrate occurs broadly and in a variety of forms in shallow sediments of the outer continental shelves and in Arctic regions. Field, laboratory and numerical modelling studies conducted to date indicate that gas can be extracted from gas hydrates with existing production technologies, particularly for those deposits in which the gas hydrate exists as pore-filling grains at high saturation in sand-rich reservoirs. A series of regional resource assessments indicate that substantial volumes of gas hydrate likely exist in sand-rich deposits. Recent field programs in Japan, Canada and in the United States have demonstrated the technical viability of methane extraction from gas-hydrate-bearing sand reservoirs and have investigated a range of potential production scenarios. At present, basic reservoir depressurisation shows the greatest promise and can be conducted using primarily standard industry equipment and procedures. Depressurisation is expected to be the foundation of future production systems; additional processes, such as thermal stimulation, mechanical stimulation and chemical injection, will likely also be integrated as dictated by local geological and other conditions. An innovative carbon dioxide and methane swapping technology is also being studied as a method to produce gas from select gas hydrate deposits. In addition, substantial additional volumes of gas hydrate have been found in dense arrays of grain-displacing veins and nodules in fine-grained, clay-dominated sediments; however, to date, no field tests, and very limited numerical modelling, have been conducted with regard to the production potential of such accumulations. Work remains to further refine: (1) the marine resource volumes within potential accumulations that can be

  10. Transformations in methane hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Sharma, A.; Burruss, R.C.; Shu, J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed study of pure methane hydrate in a diamond cell with in situ optical, Raman, and x-ray microprobe techniques reveals two previously unknown structures, structure II and structure H, at high pressures. The structure II methane hydrate at 250 MPa has a cubic unit cell of a = 17.158(2) A?? and volume V = 5051.3(13) A??3; structure H at 600 MPa has a hexagonal unit cell of a = 11.980(2) A??, c = 9.992(3) A??, and V = 1241.9(5) A??3. The compositions of these two investigated phases are still not known. With the effects of pressure and the presence of other gases in the structure, the structure II phase is likely to dominate over the known structure I methane hydrate within deep hydrate-bearing sediments underlying continental margins.

  11. Hydrate morphology: Physical properties of sands with patchy hydrate saturation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dai, S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Waite, William F.; Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    The physical properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediments depend on the volume fraction and spatial distribution of the hydrate phase. The host sediment grain size and the state of effective stress determine the hydrate morphology in sediments; this information can be used to significantly constrain estimates of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments, including the coarse-grained sands subjected to high effective stress that are of interest as potential energy resources. Reported data and physical analyses suggest hydrate-bearing sands contain a heterogeneous, patchy hydrate distribution, whereby zones with 100% pore-space hydrate saturation are embedded in hydrate-free sand. Accounting for patchy rather than homogeneous hydrate distribution yields more tightly constrained estimates of physical properties in hydrate-bearing sands and captures observed physical-property dependencies on hydrate saturation. For example, numerical modeling results of sands with patchy saturation agree with experimental observation, showing a transition in stiffness starting near the series bound at low hydrate saturations but moving toward the parallel bound at high hydrate saturations. The hydrate-patch size itself impacts the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments; for example, at constant hydrate saturation, we find that conductivity (electrical, hydraulic and thermal) increases as the number of hydrate-saturated patches increases. This increase reflects the larger number of conductive flow paths that exist in specimens with many small hydrate-saturated patches in comparison to specimens in which a few large hydrate saturated patches can block flow over a significant cross-section of the specimen.

  12. Cryopegs as destabilization factor of intra-permafrost gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvilin, Evgeny; Bukhanov, Boris; Istomin, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic feature of permafrost soils in the Arctic is widespread intra-permafrost unfrozen brine lenses - cryopegs. They are often found in permafrost horizons in the north part of Western Siberia, in particular, on the Yamal Peninsula. Cryopegs depths in permafrost zone can be tens and hundreds of meters from the top of frozen strata. The chemical composition of natural cryopegs is close to sea waters, but is characterized by high mineralization. They have a sodium-chloride primary composition with a minor amount of sulphate. Mineralization of cryopegs brine is often hundreds of grams per liter, and the temperature is around -6…-8 °C. The formation of cryopegs in permafrost is associated with processes of long-term freezing of sediments and cryogenic concentration of salts and salt solutions in local areas. The cryopegs' formation can take place in the course of permafrost evolution at the sea transgressions and regressions during freezing of saline sea sediments. Very important feature of cryopegs in permafrost is their transformation in the process of changing temperature and pressure conditions. As a result, the salinity and chemical composition are changed and in addition the cryopegs' location can be changed during their migration. The cryopegs migration violates the thermodynamic conditions of existence intra-permafrost gas hydrate formations, especially the relic gas hydrates deposits, which are situated in the shallow permafrost up to 100 meters depth in a metastable state [1]. The interaction cryopegs with gas hydrates accumulations can cause decomposition of intra-permafrost hydrates. Moreover, the increasing of salt and unfrozen water content in sedimentary rocks sharply reduce the efficiency of gas hydrates self-preservation in frozen soils. It is confirmed by experimental investigations of interaction of frozen gas hydrate bearing sediments with salt solutions [2]. So, horizons with elevated pressure can appear, as a result of gas hydrate

  13. Methane Hydrates inventory for a warm Paleogene Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahana, R.; Ridgwell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    -state hydrate stability model (Davie and Buffett, 2003) which simulates the vertical profile of methane (hydrates and free gas) in the sediment at a given location. We estimate the Paleogene methane inventory by running the 1D hydrate model on each of GENIE’s Paleogene ocean grid cells. Results with modern methanogenesis rates and Paleogene seafloor temperatures show extremely low volumes of methane hydrates anywhere in the ocean apart from the Arctic, which is not resolved adequately in GENIE. The hydrate model predicts that the warm Paleogene hydrates reservoir size was about an order of magnitude smaller than the modern and therefore not sufficient to cause the negative carbon excursion observed in the geological record. We will also show the sensitivity of the methane volume to a range of temperatures, organic Carbon levels and methanogenesis rates. References: D. Archer, B.A. Buffett and V. Brovkin, (2009) Ocean methane hydrates as a slow tipping point in the global carbon cycle, PNAS 106(49). M.K. Davie, B.A. Buffett, (2003) A steady state model for marine hydrate formation: constraints on methane supply from pore water sulphate profiles, J. Geophys. Res. 108.

  14. Influence of sulphate on the reduction of cadmium toxicity in the microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii.

    PubMed

    Mera, Roi; Torres, Enrique; Abalde, Julio

    2016-06-01

    Cadmium is considered as one of the most hazardous metals for living organism and ecosystems. Environmental factors play an important role since they alter the toxicity of metals by varying the bioavailability of these elements for the organisms. The aim of the present study was to investigate, using the freshwater microalga Chlamydomonas moewusii, the existence of an interaction between cadmium and sulphate as a factor that varied the toxicity of this metal. Different cell parameters such as cell growth, content of chlorophylls and biosynthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were determined. A two-way ANOVA showed that the interaction had a significant effect size of 21% (p<0.001) for the growth of this microalga and around of a 6% on the content of chlorophylls/cell. The effect of this inhibition was that when the concentration of sulphate increased, a lower toxic effect of cadmium on the growth and on the content of chlorophylls was observed. In addition, the increase of sulphate concentration allowed the biosynthesis of a higher amount of PCs and/or PCs with higher chain length. This higher biosynthesis was responsible for the reduction of the toxic effect of cadmium and explained the interaction.

  15. Tetanus toxoid purification: chromatographic procedures as an alternative to ammonium-sulphate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Stojićević, Ivana; Dimitrijević, Ljiljana; Dovezenski, Nebojša; Živković, Irena; Petrušić, Vladimir; Marinković, Emilija; Inić-Kanada, Aleksandra; Stojanović, Marijana

    2011-08-01

    Given an existing demand to establish a process of tetanus vaccine production in a way that allows its complete validation and standardization, this paper focuses on tetanus toxoid purification step. More precisely, we were looking at a possibility to replace the widely used ammonium-sulphate precipitation by a chromatographic method. Based on the tetanus toxin's biochemical characteristics, we have decided to examine the possibility of tetanus toxoid purification by hydrophobic chromatography, and by chromatographic techniques based on interaction with immobilized metal ions, i.e. chelating chromatography and immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We used samples obtained from differently fragmented crude tetanus toxins by formaldehyde treatment (assigned as TTd-A and TTd-B) as starting material for tetanus toxoid purification. Obtained results imply that purification of tetanus toxoid by hydrophobic chromatography represents a good alternative to ammonium-sulphate precipitation. Tetanus toxoid preparations obtained by hydrophobic chromatography were similar to those obtained by ammonium-sulphate precipitation in respect to yield, purity and immunogenicity. In addition, their immunogenicity was similar to standard tetanus toxoid preparation (NIBSC, Potters Bar, UK). Furthermore, the characteristics of crude tetanus toxin preparations had the lowest impact on the final purification product when hydrophobic chromatography was the applied method of tetanus toxoid purification. On the other hand, purifications of tetanus toxoid by chelating chromatography or immobilized metal affinity chromatography generally resulted in a very low yield due to not satisfactory tetanus toxoid binding to the column, and immunogenicity of the obtained tetanus toxoid-containing preparations was poor.

  16. Impact of Lewis base on chemical reactivity and separation efficiency for hydrated fourth-row transition metal (II) complexes: an ONIOM DFT/MM study.

    PubMed

    He, Dingsheng; Ma, Ming

    2014-04-24

    In this paper, two-layer ONIOM combinations of high-level quantum mechanics (QM) and inexpensive molecular mechanics (MM) are successfully used to investigate the structural characters of metal (M, all the transition metals in the fourth period)-H2O-Lewis base (A(-)) complexes. Global and local descriptors of chemical reactivity and selectivity from conceptual density functional theory are employed to show the properties of the active complexes of M(H2O)2A2 and to study the effect of the Lewis base for the separation of transition metal ions. It is shown that chemical potential, hardness, electrophilicity, as well as the dual and multiphilic descriptors are adequate for characterizing the global and local reactivity trends of the M(H2O)2A2 complex. It is found that the reactivity is well localized at the metallic center in M(H2O)2A2 and the dual descriptor (ΔfM(r)) can also be used to characterize the directional attack of the electrophile and nucleophile except for the selectivity of the reaction. On the basis of the values of ωM and Δsk, and the sign of ΔfM(r), the selectivity of the nucleophilic reagent (R(-)) for M(II) in M(H2O)2A2 (from high to low) follows this order: Cu(II) > Ni(II) > Co(II) > Fe(II) ≫ Mn(II) > Zn(II) > Cr(II). The Lewis base (A(-)) improves chemical reactivity and selectivity because of changing the reaction path and forming an intermediate, which possesses the higher antibonding character and the larger HOMO/LUMO gap. NBO or AIMALL analysis and Frontier orbital theory results presented here provided more theoretical support for the above reactivity and selectivity studies.

  17. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structure of two new hydrated alkaline earth metal borates Sr3B6O11(OH)2 and Ba3B6O11(OH)2.

    PubMed

    Heyward, Carla; McMillen, Colin; Kolis, Joseph

    2012-04-02

    Two new hydrated borates Sr(3)B(6)O(11)(OH)(2) (1) and Ba(3)B(6)O(11)(OH)(2) (2) were hydrothermally synthesized. Their structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction and further characterized by IR, powder XRD, and DSC/TGA. Compound 1 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 with unit cell parameters of a = 6.6275(13) Å, b = 6.6706(13) Å, c = 11.393(2) Å, α = 91.06(3)°, β = 94.50(3)°, and γ = 93.12(3)°, while compound 2 crystallizes in the noncentrosymmetric monoclinic space group Pc with a = 6.958(14) Å, b = 7.024(14) Å, c = 11.346(2) Å, and β = 90.10(3)°. In spite of the differences in symmetry and packing of the borate chains, both structures consist of the same fundamental building block (FBB) of a [B(6)O(11)(OH)(2)](-6) unit and three unique alkaline earth metal atoms.

  19. Isotopic archives of sulphate in speleothems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Peter M.; Fairchild, Ian J.; Baker, Andy; Baldini, James U. L.; McDermott, Frank

    2008-05-01

    The hemispheric impact of industrial emissions upon atmospheric sulphur loading is reflected in the sulphur depositional history recorded in cores from ice sheets. However, these do not reveal regional variations. Recently deposited speleothems are used here as archives of regional sulphur depositional history at two locations within the United Kingdom and Ireland. δ34S-SO4 and δ18O-SO4 present within speleothem carbonate are measured for the first time as part of a dual isotope approach to decode the speleothem sulphur record. The largely refractory nature of δ34S-SO4 under oxidising conditions enables source provenance of atmospheric SO2, whereas the complex cycles of isotopic exchange and fractionation during incorporation of oxygen into sulphate molecules enable δ18O-SO4 signatures to yield insights into ambient environmental conditions and biogeochemical cycling in the ecosystem above the cave. δ34S-SO4 values extracted from speleothem carbonate formed within Browns Folly Mine, UK, range from +3.5 to +5.5‰ and δ18O-SO4 +10.3 to +13.7‰. Both signatures lie within the range expected from sulphate deposition in industrial locations and reflect the transfer of sulphate into speleothem calcite with little fractionation. However, δ18O-SO4 signatures at Crag Cave, western Ireland, are isotopically heavier than expected and approach isotopic equilibrium with δ18O-H2O under reducing conditions. Dual isotope analysis of δ34S-SO4 and δ18O-SO4 optimises the correct identification of sulphur sources and biogeochemical cycling prior to incorporation into the speleothem record. At carefully selected cave sites where drip water flowpaths into the cave remain oxic, speleothems hold the potential to retain records of atmospheric sulphur loading at the local and regional scale.

  20. Activity of sulphate reducing bacteria according to COD/SO4(2-) ratio of acrylonitrile wastewater containing high sulphate.

    PubMed

    Byun, I G; Lee, T H; Kim, Y O; Song, S K; Park, T J

    2004-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the biodegradability of acrylonitrile wastewater, microbial inhibition effect of acrylonitrile wastewater on removal efficiency and the activity of sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) according to COD/sulphate ratio. Acrylonitrile wastewater was hardly biodegradable in a biodegradability test, however, SRB activity was 57% for overall consumption of electron donor and it was relatively high value compared to 17% of reference test with glucose. COD removal of acrylonitrile wastewater was improved to 57% and 61% from 20% as the COD/sulphate ratio were 0.5 and 0.3 by sulphate addition to acrylonitrile wastewater. First order reaction rate constants k on organic removal of acrylonitrile wastewater were 0.001, 0.004 and 0.004 at each COD/sulphate ratio of 0.9, 0.5 and 0.3. Thus it was suggested that the activity of SRB was a significant factor for removing organics and sulphate simultaneously in acrylonitrile wastewater.

  1. Effect of the addition of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the batch biological sulphate reduction using grass cellulose as carbon source.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2013-12-01

    Mineral mining generates acidic, saline, metal-rich mine waters, often referred to as acid mine drainage (AMD). Treatment of AMD and recovering saleable products during the treatment process are a necessity since water is, especially in South Africa, a scarce commodity. The aim of the study presented here was to investigate the effect of zero valent iron (Fe(0)) on the biological removal of sulphate from AMD in batch reactors. The performance of the reactors was assessed by means of sulphate reduction, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acid (VFA) utilisation and volatile suspended solids (VSS) concentration. To this end, three batch reactors, A, B and C (volume 2.5 L), were operated similarly with the exception of the addition of grass cuttings and iron filings. Reactors A and B received twice as much grass (100 g) as C (50 g). Reactor A received no iron filings to act as a control, while reactors B and C received 50-g iron filings for the experimental duration. The results showed that Fe(0) appears to provide sustained sulphate removal when sufficient grass substrate is available. In reactors A and C, sulphate removal efficiency was higher when the COD concentration was lower due to utilisation. In reactor B, sulphate removal efficiency was accompanied by an accumulation of COD as hydrogen (H2) provided by the Fe(0) was utilised for sulphate reduction. Furthermore, these results showed the potential of Fe(0) to enhance the participation of microorganisms in sulphate reduction.

  2. Effect of hygroscopicity of the metal salt on the formation and air stability of lyotropic liquid crystalline mesophases in hydrated salt-surfactant systems.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Cemal; Barım, Gözde; Dag, Ömer

    2014-11-01

    It is known that alkali, transition metal and lanthanide salts can form lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) mesophases with non-ionic surfactants (such as CiH2i+1(OCH2CH2)jOH, denoted as CiEj). Here we combine several salt systems and show that the percent deliquescence relative humidity (%DRH) value of a salt is the determining parameter in the formation and stability of the mesophases and that the other parameters are secondary and less significant. Accordingly, salts can be divided into 3 categories: Type I salts (such as LiCl, LiBr, LiI, LiNO3, LiClO4, CaCl2, Ca(NO3)2, MgCl2, and some transition metal nitrates) have low %DRH and form stable salt-surfactant LLC mesophases in the presence of a small amount of water, type II salts (such as some sodium and potassium salts) that are moderately hygroscopic form disordered stable mesophases, and type III salts that have high %DRH values, do not form stable LLC mesophases and leach out salt crystals. To illustrate this effect, a large group of salts from alkali and alkaline earth metals were investigated using XRD, POM, FTIR, and Raman techniques. Among the different salts investigated in this study, the LiX (where X is Cl(-), Br(-), I(-), NO3(-), and ClO4(-)) and CaX2 (X is Cl(-), and NO3(-)) salts were more prone to establish LLC mesophases because of their lower %DRH values. The phase behavior with respect to concentration, stability, and thermal behavior of Li(I) systems were investigated further. It is seen that the phase transitions among different anions in the Li(I) systems follow the Hofmeister series.

  3. Crystal structures and hydrogen bonding in the isotypic series of hydrated alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) complexes with 4-amino­phenyl­arsonic acid

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D.

    2017-01-01

    The structures of the alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) complex salts with 4-amino­phenyl­arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) manifest an isotypic series with the general formula [M 2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], with M = K {poly[di-μ3-4-amino­phenyl­arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dipotassium], [K2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (I)}, Rb {poly[di-μ3-4-amino­phenyl­arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Rb2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (II)}, and Cs {poly[di-μ3-4-amino­phenyl­arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Cs2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (III)}, in which the repeating structural units lie across crystallographic mirror planes containing two independent and different metal cations and a bridging water mol­ecule, with the two hydrogen p-arsanilate ligands and the second water mol­ecule lying outside the mirror plane. The bonding about the two metal cations in all complexes is similar, one five-coordinate, the other progressing from five-coordinate in (I) to eight-coordinate in both (II) and (III), with overall M—O bond-length ranges of 2.694 (5)–3.009 (7) (K), 2.818 (4)–3.246 (4) (Rb) and 2.961 (9)–3.400 (10) Å (Cs). The additional three bonds in (II) and (III) are the result of inter-metal bridging through the water ligands. Two-dimensional coordination polymeric structures with the layers lying parallel to (100) are generated through a number of bridging bonds involving the water mol­ecules (including hydrogen-bonding inter­actions), as well as through the arsanilate O atoms. These layers are linked across [100] through amine N—H⋯O hydrogen bonds to arsonate and water O-atom acceptors, giving overall three-dimensional network structures. PMID:28217343

  4. Crystal structures and hydrogen bonding in the isotypic series of hydrated alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) complexes with 4-amino-phenyl-arsonic acid.

    PubMed

    Smith, Graham; Wermuth, Urs D

    2017-02-01

    The structures of the alkali metal (K, Rb and Cs) complex salts with 4-amino-phenyl-arsonic acid (p-arsanilic acid) manifest an isotypic series with the general formula [M2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], with M = K {poly[di-μ3-4-amino-phenyl-arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dipotassium], [K2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (I)}, Rb {poly[di-μ3-4-amino-phenyl-arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Rb2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (II)}, and Cs {poly[di-μ3-4-amino-phenyl-arsonato-tri-μ2-aqua-dirubidium], [Cs2(C6H7AsNO3)2(H2O)3], (III)}, in which the repeating structural units lie across crystallographic mirror planes containing two independent and different metal cations and a bridging water mol-ecule, with the two hydrogen p-arsanilate ligands and the second water mol-ecule lying outside the mirror plane. The bonding about the two metal cations in all complexes is similar, one five-coordinate, the other progressing from five-coordinate in (I) to eight-coordinate in both (II) and (III), with overall M-O bond-length ranges of 2.694 (5)-3.009 (7) (K), 2.818 (4)-3.246 (4) (Rb) and 2.961 (9)-3.400 (10) Å (Cs). The additional three bonds in (II) and (III) are the result of inter-metal bridging through the water ligands. Two-dimensional coordination polymeric structures with the layers lying parallel to (100) are generated through a number of bridging bonds involving the water mol-ecules (including hydrogen-bonding inter-actions), as well as through the arsanilate O atoms. These layers are linked across [100] through amine N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to arsonate and water O-atom acceptors, giving overall three-dimensional network structures.

  5. Dynamics of protein hydration water.

    PubMed

    Wolf, M; Emmert, S; Gulich, R; Lunkenheimer, P; Loidl, A

    2015-09-01

    We present the frequency- and temperature-dependent dielectric properties of lysozyme solutions in a broad concentration regime, measured at subzero temperatures, and compare the results with measurements above the freezing point of water and on hydrated lysozyme powder. Our experiments allow examining the dynamics of unfreezable hydration water in a broad temperature range. The obtained results prove the bimodality of the hydration shell dynamics. In addition, we find indications of a fragile-to-strong transition of hydration water.

  6. Breast cyst fluid heparan sulphate is distinctively N-sulphated depending on apocrine or flattened type.

    PubMed

    Mannello, Ferdinando; Maccari, Francesca; Ligi, Daniela; Santi, Martina; Gatto, Francesco; Linhardt, Robert J; Galeotti, Fabio; Volpi, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Breast cyst fluid (BCF) contained in gross cists is involved with its many biomolecules in different stages of breast cystic development. Type I apocrine and type II flattened cysts are classified based on biochemical, morphological and hormonal differences, and their different patterns of growth factors and active biocompounds may require different regulation. In a previous paper, hyaluronic acid in a very low content and chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate were identified and characterized in BCF. In this new study, various apocrine and flattened BCFs were analyzed for HS concentration and disaccharide pattern. Apocrine HS was found specifically constituted of N-acetyl groups contrary to flattened HS richer in N-sulphate disaccharides with an overall N-acetylated/N-sulphated ratio significantly increased in apocrine compared with flattened (13.5 vs 3.7). Related to this different structural features, the charge density significantly decreased (~-30%) in apocrine versus flattened BCFs. Finally, no significant differences were observed for HS amount (~0.9-1.3 µg ml(-1) ) between the two BCF types even if a greater content was determined for flattened samples. The specifically N-sulphated sequences in flattened BCF HS can exert biologic capacity by regulating growth factors activity. On the other hand, we cannot exclude a peculiar regulation of the activity of biomolecules in apocrine BCF by HS richer in N-acetylated disaccharides. In fact, the different patterns of growth factors and active biocompounds in the two types of cysts may require different regulation by specific sequences in the HS backbone possessing specific structural characteristics and distinctive chemical groups.

  7. Tinospora cordifolia consumption ameliorates changes in kidney chondroitin sulphate/dermatan sulphate in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Chilkunda, Nandini D; Salimath, Paramahans V

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is known to alter kidney extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Chondroitin sulphate (CS)/dermatan sulphate (DS), an ECM component, which plays an essential role in kidney is altered during diabetes. The focus of this study has been to examine the effect of Tinospora cordifolia (TC) consumption, a potent plant widely used to treat diabetes, on kidney CS/DS. Experimentally induced diabetic rats were fed with diet containing TC at 2·5 and 5 % levels and the effect of it on kidney CS/DS was examined. The CS/DS content and CS:heparan sulphate ratio which was decreased during diabetic condition were ameliorated in TC-fed groups. Disaccharide composition analysis of CS/DS by HPLC showed that decreases in 'E' units and degree of sulphation were modulated in 5 % TC-fed groups. Apparent molecular weight of purified CS/DS from the control rat kidney was found to be 38 kDa which was decreased to 29 kDa in diabetic rat kidney. Rats in 5 % TC-fed groups showed chain length of 38 kDa akin to control rats. Expression of chondroitin 4-O-sulfotransferase-1, dermatan 4-O-sulfotransferase-1 and N-acetylgalactosamine 4 sulphate 6-O-sulfotransferase, enzymes involved in the synthesis of 'E' units which was reduced during diabetic condition, was significantly contained in the 5 % TC-fed group. Purified CS/DS from 5 % TC-fed group was able to bind higher amounts of ECM components, namely type IV collagen and laminin, when compared with untreated diabetic rats. The present results demonstrate that consumption of a diet containing TC at the 5 % level modulates changes in kidney CS/DS which were due to diabetes.

  8. [Hydration in clinical practice].

    PubMed

    Maristany, Cleofé Pérez-Portabella; Segurola Gurruchaga, Hegoi

    2011-01-01

    Water is an essential foundation for life, having both a regulatory and structural function. The former results from active and passive participation in all metabolic reactions, and its role in conserving and maintaining body temperature. Structurally speaking it is the major contributer to tissue mass, accounting for 60% of the basis of blood plasma, intracellular and intersticial fluid. Water is also part of the primary structures of life such as genetic material or proteins. Therefore, it is necessary that the nurse makes an early assessment of patients water needs to detect if there are signs of electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration can be a very serious problem, especially in children and the elderly. Dehydrations treatment with oral rehydration solution decreases the risk of developing hydration disorders, but even so, it is recommended to follow preventive measures to reduce the incidence and severity of dehydration. The key to having a proper hydration is prevention. Artificial nutrition encompasses the need for precise calculation of water needs in enteral nutrition as parenteral, so the nurse should be part of this process and use the tools for calculating the patient's requirements. All this helps to ensure an optimal nutritional status in patients at risk. Ethical dilemmas are becoming increasingly common in clinical practice. On the subject of artificial nutrition and hydration, there isn't yet any unanimous agreement regarding hydration as a basic care. It is necessary to take decisions in consensus with the health team, always thinking of the best interests of the patient.

  9. Aluminum Sulfate 18 Hydrate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    A chemical laboratory information profile (CLIP) of the chemical, aluminum sulfate 18 hydrate, is presented. The profile lists physical and harmful properties, exposure limits, reactivity risks, and symptoms of major exposure for the benefit of teachers and students using the chemical in the laboratory.

  10. Improved lead recovery and sulphate removal from used lead acid battery through electrokinetic technique.

    PubMed

    Soundarrajan, C; Sivasankar, A; Maruthamuthu, S; Veluchamy, A

    2012-05-30

    This paper presents improvement in lead (Pb) recovery and sulphate removal from used Pb acid battery (ULAB) through Electrokinetic technique, a process aimed to eliminate environmental pollution that arises due to emission of gases and metal particles from the existing high temperature pyrometallurgical process. Two different cell configurations, (1) one with Nafion membrane placed between anode and middle compartments and Agar membrane between cathode and middle compartments and (2) another with only Agar membrane placed between both sides of the middle compartments were designed for the Pb and sulphate separation from ULAB. This paper concludes that the cell with only Agar membranes performed better than the cell with Nafion and Agar membranes in combinations and also explains the mechanism underlying the chemical and electrochemical processes in the cell.

  11. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  12. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  13. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  14. 21 CFR 520.62 - Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. 520.62 Section 520.62 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Aminopentamide hydrogen sulphate tablets. (a) Chemical name. 4-(Dimethylamino)-2,2-diphenylvaleramide...

  15. Sulphate release from building rubble of WWII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekiffer, Beate; Wessolek, Gerd; Vogeler, Iris; Brettholle, Mareike

    2010-05-01

    Sulphate concentration in the upper aquifer of Berlin, Germany is increasing continuously since 40 years. In downtown Berlin they particular exceed the precaution values of drinking water ordinance. We assume that the main source of sulphate in the groundwater is technogenic material, which is part of building rubble from WW II bombing. Nearly 115 Mio t of this material have been deposited in Berlin. Our aim is, ­ to identify rubble components which contain S and to quantify the S-pool of this material ­ to identify factors, influencing the release of SO4 and ­ to predict sulphate release from building rubble of WW II We analyzed total and water soluble S of various components and the fine earth fraction of the soils containing the rubble. We investigated the influence of physical and chemical parameters on the release of SO4 using unsaturated column experiments (With an automatic percolation system). Thereby, the particle size, the flow rate and the pH of the solution has been varied. Among the components, slag shows the highest total S-contents of up to 0,7% . Lignite Coal-ashes from Lusatia, Germany are also rich in SO4. The total S of brick varies between 0,01% and 0,3%. Mortar shows S-Values between 0,08 and 0,12%. In 75% of all samples show total S of less than 0,14%. There was no significant correlation between total S-amount and water-soluble SO4, which is caused by different chemical compounds in the samples. In the percolation experiments technogenic components with grain size <2mm cause a higher density, resulting in a lower percolation velocity. The concentration of ions in the according leachate is higher than in the leachate of coarse fraction (2 - 20mm). Gypsum-rich material (10%) released constant SO4 -concentration over the whole experiment. Slag-rich material released high initial SO4-concentrations which then fastly decreased. We concluded, that the kind of technogenic component and its grain size strongly influences the release of SO4 to the

  16. Sulphate release from construction and demolition material in soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Stefan; Wessolek, Gerd

    2013-04-01

    In Berlin and many other cities soils are heavily influenced by anthropogenic activities and deposited substrates. A widespread technical substrate in technosols is construction and demolition material from residential and industrial buildings. Existing rubble landfills without sealing facilities pose threats to ground water quality. In the central city of Berlin rising sulphate concentrations of groundwaters (up to 1200 mg/L) are measured since more than two decades. Previous studies point out that the high sulphate concentrations are mainly attributed to World War II rubble. The major part of debris was deposited in form of landfills and contains approximately 0.3 wt% gypsum. The scope of our research is to determine mechanisms of sulphate release from debris material, interactions between sulphate release, soil hydraulic properties and potential sinks of sulphur. To estimate equilibrium concentration and kinetics of sulphate release of various debris components batch and column experiments are conducted. The same method is applied to determine potential adsorptive character of common debris components. To analyse the impacts of soil hydraulic properties on sulphate leaching we carry out soil column experiments with defined upper and lower boundary conditions, varying water flow velocity and induced preferential flow. Simultaneously we monitor sulphate concentration of soil leachate in a 2 m³ lysimeter. First results of the batch experiments show that gypsum from broken stucco is the main source of sulphate in the observed technosols. Other components as mortar and slag show a quite low sulphate release. Similar results are found within the column experiments. For brigs medium and strongly time dependent sulphate release is determined. Concentrations up to 1500 mg/L are measured in the soil leachate from the lysimeter.

  17. Steroid hormone sulphation in lead workers.

    PubMed Central

    Apostoli, P; Romeo, L; Peroni, E; Ferioli, A; Ferrari, S; Pasini, F; Aprili, F

    1989-01-01

    The metabolism of steroid hormones has been investigated in 10 workers exposed to lead and in 10 non-exposed subjects to determine whether lead interferes with the first or second phase reactions of steroid hormone biotransformation, or both. In the exposed workers blood lead concentrations (PbB) ranged from 45 to 69 micrograms/100 ml; in the controls PbB was less than 25 micrograms/100 ml. No statistical differences were found for the total amount of the urinary hormone metabolites, but a drop of about 50% was observed for the sulphated portion. It is suggested that lead interferes with the mechanisms of sulphoconjugation through an effect on the cytosol enzymes sulphotransferase and sulphokinase. PMID:2930732

  18. Magnesium sulphate as a new desensitizing agent.

    PubMed

    Liu, G H; Morimoto, M

    1991-07-01

    Various desensitizing agents have been used in clinics to solve the problem of dentinal hypersensitivity (DH), but none of them has been shown to be consistently effective. We here introduce a new type of desensitizing agent, i.e. 4% magnesium sulphate with iontophoresis at 2mA for 3 min. These optimal conditions were determined by animal experiments, while only a minor effect on dentinal issues was observed within 4 weeks after the treatment. When this desensitizing agent was used to treat DH, the cure rate of 62.4% remained steady within the 25-week observation period, while some effect was achieved in all the subjects who participated in the study.

  19. Overview: Nucleation of clathrate hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warrier, Pramod; Khan, M. Naveed; Srivastava, Vishal; Maupin, C. Mark; Koh, Carolyn A.

    2016-12-01

    Molecular level knowledge of nucleation and growth of clathrate hydrates is of importance for advancing fundamental understanding on the nature of water and hydrophobic hydrate formers, and their interactions that result in the formation of ice-like solids at temperatures higher than the ice-point. The stochastic nature and the inability to probe the small length and time scales associated with the nucleation process make it very difficult to experimentally determine the molecular level changes that lead to the nucleation event. Conversely, for this reason, there have been increasing efforts to obtain this information using molecular simulations. Accurate knowledge of how and when hydrate structures nucleate will be tremendously beneficial for the development of sustainable hydrate management strategies in oil and gas flowlines, as well as for their application in energy storage and recovery, gas separation, carbon sequestration, seawater desalination, and refrigeration. This article reviews various aspects of hydrate nucleation. First, properties of supercooled water and ice nucleation are reviewed briefly due to their apparent similarity to hydrates. Hydrate nucleation is then reviewed starting from macroscopic observations as obtained from experiments in laboratories and operations in industries, followed by various hydrate nucleation hypotheses and hydrate nucleation driving force calculations based on the classical nucleation theory. Finally, molecular simulations on hydrate nucleation are discussed in detail followed by potential future research directions.

  20. Methane Clathrate Hydrate Prospecting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N.; Romanovsky, V.

    2003-01-01

    A method of prospecting for methane has been devised. The impetus for this method lies in the abundance of CH4 and the growing shortages of other fuels. The method is intended especially to enable identification of subpermafrost locations where significant amounts of methane are trapped in the form of methane gas hydrate (CH4(raised dot)6H2O). It has been estimated by the U.S. Geological Survey that the total CH4 resource in CH4(raised dot) 6H2O exceeds the energy content of all other fossil fuels (oil, coal, and natural gas from non-hydrate sources). Also, CH4(raised dot)6H2O is among the cleanest-burning fuels, and CH4 is the most efficient fuel because the carbon in CH4 is in its most reduced state. The method involves looking for a proxy for methane gas hydrate, by means of the combination of a thermal-analysis submethod and a field submethod that does not involve drilling. The absence of drilling makes this method easier and less expensive, in comparison with prior methods of prospecting for oil and natural gas. The proposed method would include thermoprospecting in combination with one more of the other non-drilling measurement techniques, which could include magneto-telluric sounding and/or a subsurface-electrical-resistivity technique. The method would exploit the fact that the electrical conductivity in the underlying thawed region is greater than that in the overlying permafrost.

  1. Concrete under sulphate attack: an isotope study on sulphur sources.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Florian; Bauer, Christoph; Klammer, Dietmar; Böttcher, Michael E; Leis, Albrecht; Escher, Peter; Dietzel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The formation of secondary sulphate minerals such as thaumasite, ettringite and gypsum is a process causing severe damage to concrete constructions. A major key to understand the complex reactions, involving concrete deterioration is to decipher the cause of its appearance, including the sources of the involved elements. In the present study, sulphate attack on the concrete of two Austrian tunnels is investigated. The distribution of stable sulphur isotopes is successfully applied to decipher the source(s) of sulphur in the deteriorating sulphate-bearing minerals. Interestingly, δ(34)S values of sulphate in local groundwater and in the deteriorating minerals are mostly in the range from+14 to+27 ‰. These δ(34)S values match the isotope patterns of regional Permian and Triassic marine evaporites. Soot relicts from steam- and diesel-driven trains found in one of the tunnels show δ(34)S values from-3 to+5 ‰, and are therefore assumed to be of minor importance for sulphate attack on the concretes. In areas of pyrite-containing sedimentary rocks, the δ(34)S values of sulphate from damaged concrete range between-1 and+11 ‰. The latter range reflects the impact of sulphide oxidation on local groundwater sulphate.

  2. Purification and characterization of heparan sulphate proteoglycan from bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Y; Yu, G; Gunay, N S; Linhardt, R J

    1999-01-01

    A heparan sulphate proteoglycan was purified from adult bovine brain tissues and its structure was characterized. The major heparan sulphate proteoglycan from whole bovine brain had a molecular mass of >200 kDa on denaturing SDS/PAGE and a core protein size of 66 kDa following the removal of glycosaminoglycan chains. Fractionation on DEAE-Sephacel showed that this proteoglycan consisted of three major forms having high, intermediate and low overall charge. All core proteins were identical in size and reacted with heparan sulphate proteoglycan-stub antibody and an antibody made to a synthetic peptide based on rat glypican. The three forms of proteoglycans had identical peptide maps and their amino acid compositional analysis did not match any of the known glypicans. The internal sequence of a major peptide showed only 37.5% sequence similarity with human glypican 5. The glycosaminoglycan chain sizes of the three forms of this proteoglycan, determined after beta-elimination by PAGE, were identical. The disaccharide compositional analysis on the heparan sulphate chains from the three forms of the proteoglycan, determined by treatment with a mixture of heparin lyases followed by high-resolution capillary electrophoresis, showed that they differed primarily by degree of sulphation. The most highly sulphated proteoglycan isolated had a disaccharide composition similar to heparan sulphate glycosaminoglycans found in brain tissue. Based on their sensitivity to low pH nitrous acid treatment, the N-sulphate groups in these proteoglycans were found to be primarily in the smaller glycosaminoglycan chains. The heparan sulphate proteoglycans were also heavily glycosylated with O-linked glycans and no glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor could be detected. PMID:10585858

  3. Global occurrences of gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    2001-01-01

    Natural gas hydrate is found worldwide in sediments of outer continental margins of all oceans and in polar areas with continuous permafrost. There are currently 77 localities identified globally where geophysical, geochemical and/or geological evidence indicates the presence of gas hydrate. Details concerning individual gas-hydrate occurrences are compiled at a new world-wide-web (www) site (http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/globalhydrate). This site has been created to facilitate global gas-hydrate research by providing information on each of the localities where there is evidence for gas hydrate. Also considered are the implications of gas hydrate as a potential (1) energy resource, (2) factor in global climate change, and (3) geohazard.

  4. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  5. Effects of glycerol on human skin damaged by acute sodium lauryl sulphate treatment.

    PubMed

    Atrux-Tallau, Nicolas; Romagny, Céline; Padois, Karine; Denis, Alain; Haftek, Marek; Falson, Françoise; Pirot, Fabrice; Maibach, Howard I

    2010-08-01

    Glycerol, widely used as humectant, is known to protect against irritants and to accelerate recovery of irritated skin. However, most studies were done with topical formulations (i.e. emulsions) containing glycerol in relatively high amounts, preventing drawing conclusions from direct effects. In this study, acute chemical irritations were performed on the forearm with application of a 10% sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) aqueous solution under occlusion for 3 h. Then, glycerol aqueous solutions from 1 to 10% were applied under occlusion for 3 h. After elimination of moist excess consecutive to occlusive condition, in ambient air for 15 and 30 min, skin barrier function was investigated by dual measurement of skin hydration and transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Treatments with SLS solution under occlusion significantly increased TEWL and decreased skin hydration as assessed by capacitance measurements. The SLS irritant property was raised by the occlusion and the water barrier function as well as water content appeared impaired. Recovery with glycerol at low doses was remarkable through a mechanism that implies its hygroscopic properties and which is saturable. This precocious effect acts through skin rehydration by enhancing water-holding capacity of stratum corneum that would facilitate the late physiological repair of impaired skin barrier. Thus, glycerol appears to substitute for natural moisturizing factors that have been washed out by the detergent action of SLS, enhancing skin hydration but without restoring skin barrier function as depicted by TEWL values that remained high. Thus, irritant contact dermatitis treated with glycerol application compensate for skin dehydration, favouring physiological process to restore water barrier function of the impaired skin. Empirical use of glycerol added topical formulations onto detergent altered skin was substantiated in the present physicochemical approach.

  6. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  7. Toxicity of a mancozeb containing formulation and Cd-sulphate to chicken embryos after administration as single compounds or in combination.

    PubMed

    Keseru, M; Fejes, S; Budai, P; Várnagy, L

    2003-01-01

    Environmental pollution of metal modelled by cadmium-sulphate and a 80% mancozeb containing fungicide formulation (Dithane M-45) were studied on chicken embryos after administration as a single compounds or in combination. The test materials were injected into the air-chamber in a volume of 0.1 ml/egg on day 0 of incubation. The concentration of cadmium-sulphate was 0.01%. The applied concentration of Dithane M-45 fungicide was 0.2%. Evaluation was done on day 19 of the hatching period. The individual administration of cadmium-sulphate and the 80% mancozeb containing fungicide formulation did not cause a significant reduction in body weight as compared to the control data. Embryonic mortality increased at all individual treated groups and reached almost a 35% rate. After the individual administration of pesticide, the number of chicken embryos with developmental anomalies did not differ markedly from the control. After the combined administration of cadmium-sulphate and the 80% mancozeb containing fungicide formulation (Dithane M-45) on day 0 of the hatching period embryonic mortality markedly increased. 88% of the treated embryos were dead. Results from the combined administration of cadmium-sulphate and an 80% mancozeb containing fungicide formulation (Dithane M-45) caused higher embryomortality with respect to individual toxicity test of cadmium-sulphate and fungicide in our study.

  8. Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine and recovery of barium as a barium salt mixture.

    PubMed

    Vadapalli, Viswanath R K; Zvimba, John N; Mulopo, Jean; Motaung, Solly

    2013-01-01

    Sulphate removal from sodium sulphate-rich brine using barium hydroxide and recovery of the barium salts has been investigated. The sodium sulphate-rich brine treated with different dosages of barium hydroxide to precipitate barium sulphate showed sulphate removal from 13.5 g/L to less than 400 mg/L over 60 min using a barium to sulphate molar ratio of 1.1. The thermal conversion of precipitated barium sulphate to barium sulphide achieved a conversion yield of 85% using coal as both a reducing agent and an energy source. The recovery of a pure mixture of barium salts from barium sulphide, which involved dissolution of barium sulphide and reaction with ammonium hydroxide resulted in recovery of a mixture of barium carbonate (62%) and barium hydroxide (38%), which is a critical input raw material for barium salts based acid mine drainage (AMD) desalination technologies. Under alkaline conditions of this barium salt mixture recovery process, ammonia gas is given off, while hydrogen sulfide is retained in solution as bisulfide species, and this provides basis for ammonium hydroxide separation and recovery for reuse, with hydrogen sulfide also recoverable for further industrial applications such as sulfur production by subsequent stripping.

  9. Effect of temperature on the durability of class C fly ash belite cement in simulated radioactive liquid waste: synergy of chloride and sulphate ions.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-06-15

    The durability of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) in simulated radioactive liquid waste (SRLW) rich in a mixed sodium chloride and sulphate solution is presented here. The effect of the temperature and potential synergic effect of chloride and sulfate ions are discussed. This study has been carried out according to the Koch-Steinegger test, at the temperature of 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C during a period of 180 days. The durability has been evaluated by the changes of the flexural strength of mortar, fabricated with this cement, immersed in a simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulfate (0.5M), chloride (0.5M) and sodium (1.5M) ions--catalogued like severely aggressive for the traditional Portland cement--and demineralised water, which was used as reference. The reaction mechanism of sulphate, chloride and sodium ions with the mortar was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution, and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the chloride binding and formation of Friedel's salt was inhibited by the presence of sulphate. Sulphate ion reacts preferentially with the calcium aluminate hydrates forming non-expansive ettringite which precipitated inside the pores; the microstructure was refined and the mechanical properties enhanced. This process was faster and more marked at 40 degrees C.

  10. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  11. X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated specimens.

    PubMed

    Zierold, K

    1983-01-01

    The preparation of frozen-hydrated bulk specimens and sections for X-ray microanalysis starts with cryofixation, which is done either by rapid immersion into liquid propane, propane jet fixation or metal mirror fixation. Bulk specimens appropriate for the analysis in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are obtained by cryofracturing the samples, coating, usually by a thin carbon layer, and cold transfer into the cold stage of the microscope. The X-ray microanalysis of bulk specimens is affected by an internal space charge which makes quantification difficult. Frozen-hydrated dry cut sections, varying in thickness between 60 and 2000 nm, are prepared by means of cryoultramicrotomy. After cold transfer into the cold stage of a scanning electron microscope or a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) the sections are analyzed in the frozen-hydrated and freeze-dried state. The reliability of the results with regard to structural recognizability and X-ray spectra depends considerably on the state of hydration. Particularly ultrathin sections in STEM show very low contrast and a great mass loss in the frozen-hydrated state in comparison with the freeze-dried state. In spite of the available concepts for quantification of X-ray data to obtain physiologically important wet weight concentrations of diffusible elements, the radiation damage at present turns out to be the most serious problem for X-ray microanalysis of frozen-hydrated sections.

  12. Genetics of sulphate assimilation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe (a short review).

    PubMed

    Simonics, T; Bánszky, Luca; Maráz, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Sulphur plays an important role in yeasts, especially in the biosynthesis of methionine and cysteine. The inorganic sulphur source, sulphate, is taken up by the cells via the sulphate-permease(s). After its transport, it is activated and subsequently reduced to sulphide or serves as a donor for sulphurylation reactions. Selenate anion (SeO4(2-)), which has the same metabolic pathway as sulphate, is toxic for the cells of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We isolated selenate resistant mutants which cannot utilize sulphate, therefore they need organic sulphur source for growth. One of the selenate resistant mutants was successively transformed with S. pombe genomic libraries and the gene complementing the selenate resistance was identified as that of coding for the ATP-sulphurylase enzyme.

  13. Interactions of Organic Additives with Ionic Crystal Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füredi-Milhofer, H.; Sikirić, M.; Tunik, L.; Filipović-Vinceković, N.; Garti, N.

    The interactions of two groups of hydrated model crystals, calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (DCPD) vs. octacalcium phosphate (OCP) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) vs. calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) with different organic additives are considered. DCPD precipitates as platelet-like crystals with the dominant faces shielded by hydrated layers and charged lateral faces. In the second system COM has charged surfaces, while all faces of COD are covered with layers containing water molecules. The organic molecules tested include negatively charged, flexible and rigid small and macromolecules (glutamic and aspartic acid, citrate, hexaammonium polyphosphate, phytate and polyaspartate) and anionic surfactants (sodium dodecyl sulphate, SDS, sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate, AOT, sodium cholate NaC and disodium oleoamido PEG-2 sulfosuccinate, PEG). Two types of effects have been demonstrated: (1) Effect on crystal growth morphology: Flexible organic molecules with high charge density and anionic surfactants affected the growth morphology of DCPD and COM by selectively interacting with the charged lateral faces while rigid molecules (phytate, polyaspartate) specifically recognized the dominant (010) face of DCPD due to structural and stereochemical compatibility. (2) Effect on phase composition: Anionic surfactants at concentrations above the cmc promoted growth of OCP and COD respectively by selectively adsorbing at, and inhibiting growth oif nuclei of DCPD and/or COM, which were dominant in the respective control systems. The effect was especially pronounced in the calcium oxalate precipitation system, where in some cases complete reversal of the phase composition occurred. The important role of the hydrated layer, as part of the structure of the investigated crystal hydrates, in the above crystal additive interactions is discussed.

  14. Equilibrium studies of cobalt(II) extraction with 2-pyridineketoxime from mixed sulphate/chloride solution.

    PubMed

    Wieszczycka, Karolina; Krupa, Marta; Wojciechowska, Aleksandra; Wojciechowska, Irmina; Olszanowski, Andrzej

    In present paper the equilibrium of cobalt extraction with 1-(2-pyridyl)tridecan-1-one oxime from the chloride/sulphate solutions was studied. The presented results indicated that extraction depends on a number of process variables, including the pH, metal and Cl(-) concentration in the aqueous feed, and concentration of the oxime in the organic phase. The created cobalt-complexes with the 2-pyridine ketoxime were stable and only concentrated HCl was found to be a suitable stripping agent for coordinated metal. The separation of Co(II) from Zn(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) was also studied, but the selective recovery of the metals was possible using the multi-stage stripping process.

  15. ADR salt pill design and crystal growth process for hydrated magnetic salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor); DiPirro, Michael J. (Inventor); Canavan, Edgar R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A process is provided for producing a salt pill for use in very low temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators (ADRs). The method can include providing a thermal bus in a housing. The thermal bus can include an array of thermally conductive metal conductors. A hydrated salt can be grown on the array of thermally conductive metal conductors. Thermal conductance can be provided to the hydrated salt.

  16. Sorption of endosulphan sulphate in soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Raja; Atwater, James W; Hall, Ken J; Parkinson, Paula

    2011-12-01

    Sorption of endosulphan sulphate in soil organic matter was investigated using Standard Elliot soil humic acid (HA) and soil fulvic acid (FA) at two ionic strengths (0.001 and 0.01). It was observed that divalent calcium ion and ionic strength affect the sorption of endosulphan sulphate in HA. All the experiments were carried out at pH 6.7 +/- 0.1. In the presence and absence of calcium (ionic strength 0.001), the solubility enhancement method was used to estimate the sorption coefficients of endosulphan sulphate in HA. For FA, the solubility enhancement method was used to estimate the sorption coefficients at an ionic strength of 0.001 (in the presence of calcium) and 0.01. The presence of calcium was found to significantly enhance (alpha = 0.01) the solubility of endosulphan sulphate in HA. Sorption coefficients at pH 6.7, obtained using the solubility enhancement method, were found to be 10-21 L/g in HA and 6 L/g in FA (in the presence of calcium). Increase in ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.01 decreased the sorption of endosulphan sulphate in HA. The effect of ionic strength and calcium on the sorption of endosulphan sulphate was most satisfactorily explained on the basis of the Donnan volume.

  17. Effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement blended with siliceous fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Deschner, Florian; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank; Neubauer, Jürgen

    2013-10-15

    The effect of temperature on the hydration of Portland cement pastes blended with 50 wt.% of siliceous fly ash is investigated within a temperature range of 7 to 80 °C. The elevation of temperature accelerates both the hydration of OPC and fly ash. Due to the enhanced pozzolanic reaction of the fly ash, the change of the composition of the C–S–H and the pore solution towards lower Ca and higher Al and Si concentrations is shifted towards earlier hydration times. Above 50 °C, the reaction of fly ash also contributes to the formation of siliceous hydrogarnet. At 80 °C, ettringite and AFm are destabilised and the released sulphate is partially incorporated into the C–S–H. The observed changes of the phase assemblage in dependence of the temperature are confirmed by thermodynamic modelling. The increasingly heterogeneous microstructure at elevated temperatures shows an increased density of the C–S–H and a higher coarse porosity. -- Highlights: •The reaction of quartz powder at 80 °C strongly enhances the compressive strength. •Almost no strength increase of fly ash blended OPC at 80 °C was found after 2 days. •Siliceous hydrogarnet is formed upon the reaction of fly ash at high temperatures. •Temperature dependent change of the system was simulated by thermodynamic modelling. •Destabilisation of ettringite above 50 °C correlates with sulphate content of C–S–H.

  18. Ductile flow of methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    Compressional creep tests (i.e., constant applied stress) conducted on pure, polycrystalline methane hydrate over the temperature range 260-287 K and confining pressures of 50-100 MPa show this material to be extraordinarily strong compared to other icy compounds. The contrast with hexagonal water ice, sometimes used as a proxy for gas hydrate properties, is impressive: over the thermal range where both are solid, methane hydrate is as much as 40 times stronger than ice at a given strain rate. The specific mechanical response of naturally occurring methane hydrate in sediments to environmental changes is expected to be dependent on the distribution of the hydrate phase within the formation - whether arranged structurally between and (or) cementing sediments grains versus passively in pore space within a sediment framework. If hydrate is in the former mode, the very high strength of methane hydrate implies a significantly greater strain-energy release upon decomposition and subsequent failure of hydrate-cemented formations than previously expected.

  19. Comparative study on the impact of copper sulphate and copper nitrate on the detoxification mechanisms in Typha latifolia.

    PubMed

    Lyubenova, Lyudmila; Bipuah, Hanif; Belford, Ebenezer; Michalke, Bernhard; Winkler, Barbro; Schröder, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The present study focused on cupric sulphate and cupric nitrate uptake in Typha latifolia and the impact of these copper species on the plant's detoxification capacity. When the plants were exposed to 10, 50 and 100 μM cupric sulphate or cupric nitrate, copper accumulation in T. latifolia roots and shoots increased with rising concentration of the salts. Shoot to root ratios differed significantly depending on the form of copper supplementation, e.g. if it was added as cupric (II) sulphate or cupric (II) nitrate. After incubation with 100 μM of cupric sulphate, up to 450 mg Cu/kg fresh weight (FW) was accumulated, whereas the same concentration of cupric nitrate resulted in accumulation of 580 mg/kg FW. Furthermore, significant differences in the activity of some antioxidative enzymes in Typha roots compared to the shoots, which are essential in the plant's reaction to cope with metal stress, were observed. The activity of peroxidase (POX) in roots was increased at intermediate concentrations (10 and 50 μM) of CuSO4, whereas it was inhibited at the same Cu(NO3)2 concentrations. Ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) increased their enzyme activity intensely, which may be an indication for copper toxicity in T. latifolia plants. Besides, fluorodifen conjugation by glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) was increased up to sixfold, especially in roots.

  20. Some thermodynamical aspects of protein hydration water

    SciTech Connect

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2015-06-07

    We study by means of nuclear magnetic resonance the self-diffusion of protein hydration water at different hydration levels across a large temperature range that includes the deeply supercooled regime. Starting with a single hydration shell (h = 0.3), we consider different hydrations up to h = 0.65. Our experimental evidence indicates that two phenomena play a significant role in the dynamics of protein hydration water: (i) the measured fragile-to-strong dynamic crossover temperature is unaffected by the hydration level and (ii) the first hydration shell remains liquid at all hydrations, even at the lowest temperature.

  1. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; D'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-03-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured.

  2. Understanding silicate hydration from quantitative analyses of hydrating tricalcium silicates

    PubMed Central

    Pustovgar, Elizaveta; Sangodkar, Rahul P.; Andreev, Andrey S.; Palacios, Marta; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Flatt, Robert J.; d'Espinose de Lacaillerie, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    Silicate hydration is prevalent in natural and technological processes, such as, mineral weathering, glass alteration, zeolite syntheses and cement hydration. Tricalcium silicate (Ca3SiO5), the main constituent of Portland cement, is amongst the most reactive silicates in water. Despite its widespread industrial use, the reaction of Ca3SiO5 with water to form calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) still hosts many open questions. Here, we show that solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of 29Si-enriched triclinic Ca3SiO5 enable the quantitative monitoring of the hydration process in terms of transient local molecular composition, extent of silicate hydration and polymerization. This provides insights on the relative influence of surface hydroxylation and hydrate precipitation on the hydration rate. When the rate drops, the amount of hydroxylated Ca3SiO5 decreases, thus demonstrating the partial passivation of the surface during the deceleration stage. Moreover, the relative quantities of monomers, dimers, pentamers and octamers in the C-S-H structure are measured. PMID:27009966

  3. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  4. 6-Sulphated Chondroitins Have a Positive Influence on Axonal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Rachel; Rosahl, Thomas W.; Whiting, Paul J.; Fawcett, James W.; Kwok, Jessica C. F.

    2011-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (CSPGs) upregulated in the glial scar inhibit axon regeneration via their sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Chondroitin 6-sulphotransferase-1 (C6ST-1) is upregulated after injury leading to an increase in 6-sulphated GAG. In this study, we ask if this increase in 6-sulphated GAG is responsible for the increased inhibition within the glial scar, or whether it represents a partial reversion to the permissive embryonic state dominated by 6-sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Using C6ST-1 knockout mice (KO), we studied post-injury changes in chondroitin sulphotransferase (CSST) expression and the effect of chondroitin 6-sulphates on both central and peripheral axon regeneration. After CNS injury, wild-type animals (WT) showed an increase in mRNA for C6ST-1, C6ST-2 and C4ST-1, but KO did not upregulate any CSSTs. After PNS injury, while WT upregulated C6ST-1, KO showed an upregulation of C6ST-2. We examined regeneration of nigrostriatal axons, which demonstrate mild spontaneous axon regeneration in the WT. KO showed many fewer regenerating axons and more axonal retraction than WT. However, in the PNS, repair of the median and ulnar nerves led to similar and normal levels of axon regeneration in both WT and KO. Functional tests on plasticity after the repair also showed no evidence of enhanced plasticity in the KO. Our results suggest that the upregulation of 6-sulphated GAG after injury makes the extracellular matrix more permissive for axon regeneration, and that the balance of different CSs in the microenvironment around the lesion site is an important factor in determining the outcome of nervous system injury. PMID:21747937

  5. Value of periangiography hydration.

    PubMed

    Kerstein, M D; Puyau, F A

    1984-11-01

    The value of contrast dye to the planning and evaluation of cardiovascular disease cannot be overestimated. However, adverse renal sequellae may cause the surgeon to hesitate in obtaining an arteriogram, especially in patients with compromised renal function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of renal dysfunction in patients requiring angiography. Standard contrast angiography for cerebral or peripheral vascular disease was administered to 150 consecutive patients (89 men and 61 women), with an average age of 63.3 years (range 49 to 89 years). All patients received 100 to 150 ml of dye, with a concentration of approximately 50% iodine. Patients were hydrated with 0.5 N saline/5% dextrose, intravenously, for 8 hours before the procedure (1 to 3 ml/kg/hr). In 31 patients (11 women and 20 men) the serum BUN and/or creatinine levels were elevated (mean BUN value of 48 +/- 9 mg/dl; mean creatinine level of 2.8 +/- 0.6 mg/dl). The patients with abnormal renal function received an additional 300 to 500 ml of intravenous fluid, plus 20 to 40 mg intravenous furosemide, 1 hour before roentgenography to establish a diuresis. All patients were hydrated for 6 hours after angiography with the same solution at the same rate (1 to 3 ml/kg/hr). There were no episodes of compromised renal or cardiopulmonary dysfunction because of contrast angiography. In no patient did the BUN or creatinine level rise, nor was there evidence of acute tubular necrosis, as documented by oliguria and abnormal cells in the urine. Angiography is a safe procedure, even with patients who may have compromised renal function, if appropriate prehydration/posthydration and diuretic measures are undertaken.

  6. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulphidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, DR. Jennifer; Yu, DR. Hang; Steele, Joshua; Dawson, Katherine; Sun, S; Chourey, Karuna; Pan, Chongle; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Orphan, V

    2013-01-01

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyse important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulphiderich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization because of decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulphide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulphidic (> 1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5 270 nM), cobalt (0.5 6 nM), molybdenum (10 5600 nM) and tungsten (0.3 8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalysing anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulphate-reducing bacteria. Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrophilic microorganisms. Overall, our data suggest that AOM consortia use specialized biochemical strategies to overcome the challenges of metal availability in sulphidic environments.

  7. Standard enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Burylev, B.P.

    1995-03-01

    Available experimental data on standard enthalpies of formation of alkali metal hydroxide hydrates have been summarized. Using equations derived, the authors have calculated previously unknown enthalpies of formation of some lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium, and cesium hydroxide hydrates. Taking into account the contribution of water to the enthalpies of formation of monohydrates, the authors have estimated the enthalpies of formation of francium hydroxide hydrates FrOH{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, FrOH{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O, and FrOH{center_dot}3H{sub 2}O (-745.8, -1085.8, and -1515.8 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively).

  8. Hydration reactions of cement combinations containing vitrified incinerator fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Thomas D.; Dhir, Ravindra K

    2004-05-01

    One treatment option for municipal solid waste incinerator fly ash (IFA) is vitrification. The process yields a material containing reduced levels of trace metals relative to the original ash. The material is glassy and potentially suitable as a cement component in concrete. This paper examines the vitrification of an IFA and studies the hydration reactions of combinations of this vitrified material and Portland cement (PC). Isothermal conduction calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry (TG) and scanning electron microscopy were employed to study the hydration reactions. As the levels of vitrified ash increase, the quantities of AFt phase produced decrease, whilst quantities of AFm phase increase, due to the reduced levels of sulfate in the vitrified ash. The levels of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel (inferred from estimates of quantities of gel-bound water) remain constant at 28 days regardless of vitrified ash content, indicating that the material is contributing toward the formation of this product.

  9. Studies on the metabolism of oestrone sulphate. Comparative perfusions of oestrone and oestrone sulphate through isolated rat livers

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Michael; Grochtmann, Wilhelm; Napp, Mechthild; Breuer, Heinz

    1977-01-01

    The metabolism of [4-14C]oestrone and of [6,7-3H2]oestrone sulphate was studied during cyclic perfusion and once-through perfusion of the isolated rat liver. The following results were obtained. 1. As shown by once-through perfusion, the two steroids are metabolized differently during the first passage through the organ. [4-14C]Oestrone was taken up by the liver and partly delivered as oestradiol-17β and oestriol into the medium. After uptake of [6,7-3H2]oestrone sulphate, only oestrone, liberated by hydrolysis, was delivered into the medium; no oestradiol-17β or oestriol could be detected in the medium after one passage through the organ. This indicates that intracellular oestrone, which was taken up as such, and oestrone, which derived from intracellular hydrolysis, may be metabolized in different compartments of the liver cell. 2. The results of the cyclic perfusion showed that intracellular oestrone is preferentially conjugated with glucuronic acid, and subsequently excreted into the bile. Intracellular oestrone sulphate is preferably reduced to oestradiol sulphate, thus indicating that oestrone sulphate is a better substrate for the 17β-hydroxy steroid oxidoreductase than is oestrone. 3. Albumin-bound oestrone sulphate acts as a large reservoir, and in contrast with free oestrone is protected from enzyme attack by its strong binding to albumin. 4. Oestrone sulphate is partly converted into the hormonally active oestrone by liver tissue. This suggests that liver not only inactivates oestrogens, but also provides the organism with oestrone, which is subsequently readily taken up by other organs. PMID:597232

  10. Coupled Fe and S Isotope Evidence for Archaean Microbial Fe(III) and Sulphate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, C.; Vance, D.

    2004-12-01

    The development of transition metal stable isotope geochemistry over recent years, fuelled by advances in analytical technology, has permitted new approaches to established geochemical problems. One such application is the understanding and tracing of early Earth biogeochemistry, with a particular emphasis on the activities of primitive microbial life, where evidence from traditional isotope systems has so far been equivocal. The earliest forms of microbial respiration are thought to involve sulphate or Fe (III) reduction, {e.g. 1,2} or perhaps both, and as such combined Fe-S isotope systems provide a potentially powerful tool to trace these processes. Here we report a Zn-Fe-S data set from sulphide and pyrite grains from the 2.7 Ga Belingwe Belt, associated with sulphate reducing microbial communities. Analyses of individual mm size sulphide and pyrite grains show large depletions of light Fe isotopes, as well as a large variation in Fe isotope composition with a range of -0.7 to -2.7 \\permil. Furthermore these variations are correlated with depletions in light S isotopes measured from the same samples, which range in isotope composition from -3 to -18 \\permil 3. Zn isotopes also show significant positive fractionations, up to 0.8\\permil, particularly in organic rich black shales. The most striking feature of our dataset is a tight correlation between sulphur and iron isotopes. This relationship is most readily explained in terms of a reducing sedimentary environment. In modern anoxic sediments dissimilatory bacterial Fe (III) reduction, and further down the sediment column, sulphate reduction produce solubilised light Fe2+ and S2-, which in solution together immediately react to form isotopically depleted sulphides and ultimately pyrite. Experimental constraints4 and measurements of natural pyrite from modern sedimentary settings (S. Severmann, pers comm) demonstrate that the solid sulphide produced is light in Fe. We will present a quantitative diagenetic

  11. Fractionation of bamboo hemicelluloses by graded saturated ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ying; Zhang, Bing; Qi, Xian-Ming; Peng, Feng; Yao, Chun-Li; Sun, Run-Cang

    2015-09-20

    The hemicelluloses were isolated with 10% KOH at 25°C from dewaxed and delignified bamboo powder. The alkali-soluble hemicelluloses from Sinocalamus affinis were fractionated by ammonium sulphate precipitation method. The bamboo alkali-soluble hemicelluloses yielded seven hemicellulosic fractions obtained at 0, 5, 15, 25, 40, 55, and 70% saturation with ammonium sulphate. It was found that the more branched hemicelluloses were precipitated at higher ammonium sulphate concentrations (55 and 70%), the more linear hemicelluloses were precipitated at lower ammonium sulphate concentrations (0, 5, 15, 25, and 40%). The molecular weights of hemicellulosic fractions become lower from 35,270 (H0) to 18,680 (H70)gmol(-1) with the increasing concentrations of saturated ammonium sulphate from 0 to 70%. Based on the FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C and 2D HSQC NMR studies, the alkali-soluble hemicelluloses were 4-O-methyl-glucuronoarabinoxylans composed of the (1→4)-linked β-d-xylopyranosyl backbone with branches at O-3 of α-L-arabinofuranosyl or at O-2 of 4-O-methyl-α-d-glucuronic acid.

  12. Reservoir controls on the occurrence and production of gas hydrates in nature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy Scott

    2014-01-01

    modeling has shown that concentrated gas hydrate occurrences in sand reservoirs are conducive to existing well-based production technologies. The resource potential of gas hydrate accumulations in sand-dominated reservoirs have been assessed for several polar terrestrial basins. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assigned an in-place resource of 16.7 trillion cubic meters of gas for hydrates in sand-dominated reservoirs on the Alaska North Slope. In a more recent assessment, the USGS indicated that there are about 2.42 trillion cubic meters of technically recoverable gas resources within concentrated, sand-dominated, gas hydrate accumulations in northern Alaska. Estimates of the amount of in-place gas in the sand dominated gas hydrate accumulations of the Mackenzie Delta Beaufort Sea region of the Canadian arctic range from 1.0 to 10 trillion cubic meters of gas. Another prospective gas hydrate resources are those of moderate-to-high concentrations within sandstone reservoirs in marine environments. In 2008, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management estimated that the Gulf of Mexico contains about 190 trillion cubic meters of gas in highly concentrated hydrate accumulations within sand reservoirs. In 2008, the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation reported on a resource assessment of gas hydrates in which they estimated that the volume of gas within the hydrates of the eastern Nankai Trough at about 1.1 trillion cubic meters, with about half concentrated in sand reservoirs. Because conventional production technologies favor sand-dominated gas hydrate reservoirs, sand reservoirs are considered to be the most viable economic target for gas hydrate production and will be the prime focus of most future gas hydrate exploration and development projects.

  13. Crowding induced collective hydration of biological macromolecules over extended distances

    PubMed Central

    King, John T.; Arthur, Evan J.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy reveals picosecond protein and hydration dynamics of crowded hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) labeled with a metal-carbonyl vibrational probe covalently attached to a solvent accessible His residue. HEWL is systematically crowded alternatively with polyethylene glycol (PEG) or excess lysozyme in order to distinguish the chemically inert polymer from the complex electrostatic profile of the protein crowder. The results are threefold: (1) A sharp dynamical jamming-like transition is observed in the picosecond protein and hydration dynamics that is attributed to an independent-to-collective hydration transition induced by macromolecular crowding that slows the hydration dynamics up to an order of magnitude relative to bulk water; (2) The interprotein distance at which the transition occurs suggests collective hydration of proteins over distances of 30-40 Å; and (3) Comparing the crowding effects of PEG400 to our previously reported experiments using glycerol exposes fundamental differences between small and macromolecular crowding agents. PMID:24341684

  14. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    PubMed

    Friedman, I; Pierce, K L; Obradovich, J D; Long, W D

    1973-05-18

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  15. Obsidian Hydration: A New Paleothermometer

    SciTech Connect

    Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Riciputi, Lee R; Cole, David R; Fayek, Mostafa; Elam, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    The natural hydration of obsidian was first proposed as a dating technique for young geological and archaeological specimens by Friedman and Smith (1960), who noted that the thickness of the hydrated layer on obsidian artifacts increases with time. This approach is, however, sensitive to temperature and humidity under earth-surface conditions. This has made obsidian hydration dating more difficult, but potentially provides a unique tool for paleoclimatic reconstructions. In this paper we present the first successful application of this approach, based on combining laboratory-based experimental calibrations with archaeological samples from the Chalco site in the Basin of Mexico, dated using stratigraphically correlated 14C results and measuring hydration depths by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The resultant data suggest, first, that this approach is viable, even given the existing uncertainties, and that a cooling trend occurred in the Basin of Mexico over the past 1450 yr, a result corroborated by other paleoclimatic data.

  16. Obsidian hydration dates glacial loading?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.; Pierce, K.L.; Obradovich, J.D.; Long, W.D.

    1973-01-01

    Three different groups of hydration rinds have been measured on thin sections of obsidian from Obsidian Cliff, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming . The average thickness of the thickest (oldest) group of hydration rinds is 16.3 micrometers and can be related to the original emplacement of the flow 176,000 years ago (potassium-argon age). In addition to these original surfaces, most thin sections show cracks and surfaces which have average hydration rind thicknesses of 14.5 and 7.9 micrometers. These later two hydration rinds compare closely in thickness with those on obsidian pebbles in the Bull Lake and Pinedale terminal moraines in the West Yellowstone Basin, which are 14 to 15 and 7 to 8 micrometers thick, respectively. The later cracks are thought to have been formed by glacial loading during the Bull Lake and Pinedale glaciations, when an estimated 800 meters of ice covered the Obsidian Cliff flow.

  17. Microwave assisted synthesis of nano sized sulphate doped hydroxyapatite

    SciTech Connect

    Alshemary, Ammar Z.; Goh, Yi-Fan; Akram, Muhammad; Razali, Ili Rabihah; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq; Hussain, Rafaqat

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Phase pure nano-sized sulphur doped hydroxyapatite has been synthesized. ► TEM analysis confirmed formation of needle shaped structure. ► Lattice parameters and cell volume increased with increase in sulphate doping. ► Crystallite size decreased as sulphate content inside the structure increased. ► Degree of crystallinity decreased with increase in sulphate substitution. - Abstract: Inorganic sulphate is required by all mammalian cells to function properly, it is the fourth most abundant anion in the human plasma. Sulphate ions are the major source of sulphur which is considered an important element for sustenance of life as it is present in the essential amino and is required by cells to function properly. In this study we have successfully substituted sulphate ions (SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}) into hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6−x}(SO{sub 4}){sub x}(OH){sub 2−x}) lattice via ion exchange process with phosphate group. Concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions was varied between X = 0.05–0.5, using (Ca (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O), ((NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4}) and (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) as starting materials. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform IR spectroscopy (FTIR), showed that the substitution of SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions into the lattice resulted in peak broadening and reduced peak height due to the amorphous nature and reduced crystallinity of the resulting HA powder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission electron microscopy (FESEM) analysis confirmed the formation of needle shaped particles of 41 nm size with homogenous and uniform distribution of element within the HA structure.

  18. Hydrate formation and growth in pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jong-Won; Santamarina, J. Carlos

    2012-04-01

    Gas hydrates consist of guest gas molecules encaged in water cages. Methane hydrate forms in marine and permafrost sediments. In this study, we use optical, mechanical and electrical measurements to monitor hydrate formation and growth in small pores to better understand the hydrate pore habit in hydrate-bearing sediments. Hydrate formation in capillary tubes exposes the complex and dynamic interactions between nucleation, gas diffusion and gas solubility. The observation of hydrate growth in a droplet between transparent plates shows that the hydrate shell does not grow homogeneously but advances in the form of lobes that invade the water phase; in fact, the hydrate shell must be discontinuous and possibly cracked to justify the relatively fast growth rates observed in these experiments. Volume expansion during hydrate formation causes water to flow out of menisci; expelled water either spreads on the surface of water-wet substrates and forms a thin hydrate sheet, or remains next to menisci when substrates are oil-wet. Hydrate formation is accompanied by ion exclusion, yet, there is an overall increase in electrical resistance during hydrate formation. Hydrate growth may become salt-limited in trapped water conditions; in this case, aqueous brine and gas CH4 may be separated by hydrate and the three-phase system remains stable within the pore space of sediments.

  19. Crystallization of a polymorphic hydrate system.

    PubMed

    Tian, F; Qu, H; Louhi-Kultanen, M; Rantanen, J

    2010-02-01

    Nitrofurantoin can form two monohydrates, which have the same chemical composition and molar ratio of water, but differ in the crystal arrangements. The two monohydrates (hydrates I and II) could be produced independently via evaporative crystallization, where supersaturation and solvent composition were both found to have an effect. Hydrate I showed much slower crystallization than hydrate II. During cooling crystallization, the nucleation and growth of hydrate II was again dominant, consuming all supersaturation and leading to no hydrate I formation. Seeding of hydrate I during cooling crystallization was also applied, but the hydrate I seeds were not able to initiate its nucleation rather than dissolving into crystallizing solution. Although solubility tests revealed that hydrate II is more stable than hydrate I due to its lower solubility (110 +/- 4 and 131 +/- 12 microg/mL for hydrates II and I, respectively), this difference is rather small. Therefore, the small free energy difference between the two hydrates, together with the slow crystallization of hydrate I, both lead to a hindrance of hydrate I formation. Furthermore, the crystal structure of hydrate II demonstrated a higher H-bonding extent than hydrate I, suggesting its more favorable crystallization. This is in good agreement with experimental results.

  20. Airway Hydration and COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunava; Boucher, R.C.; Tarran, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the prevalent causes of worldwide mortality and encompasses two major clinical phenotypes, i.e., chronic bronchitis (CB) and emphysema. The most common cause of COPD is chronic tobacco inhalation. Research focused on the chronic bronchitic phenotype of COPD has identified several pathological processes that drive disease initiation and progression. For example, the lung’s mucociliary clearance (MCC) system performs the critical task of clearing inhaled pathogens and toxic materials from the lung. MCC efficiency is dependent on: (i) the ability of apical plasma membrane ion channels such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) to maintain airway hydration; (ii) ciliary beating; and, (iii) appropriate rates of mucin secretion. Each of these components is impaired in CB and likely contributes to the mucus stasis/accumulation seen in CB patients. This review highlights the cellular components responsible for maintaining MCC and how this process is disrupted following tobacco exposure and with CB. We shall also discuss existing therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic bronchitis and how components of the MCC can be used as biomarkers for the evaluation of tobacco or tobacco-like-product exposure. PMID:26068443

  1. Sulphate metabolism of selenate-resistant Schizosaccharomyces pombe mutants.

    PubMed

    Bánszky, Luca; Simonics, Tibor; Maráz, Anna

    2003-10-01

    Selenate-resistant mutants were obtained from several strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The obtained mutants all belonged to the same genetic complementation group. They were low in sulphate uptake activity and in ATP sulphurylase activity. They grew on medium containing sulphite, thiosulphate, cysteine or glutathione but not methionine as the sole source of sulphur. From these results, the mutants were concluded to carry mutations in the ATP sulphurylase gene. Inability of the mutants to utilize methionine as a sulphur source is rationalized by the absence of the reverse transsulphurylation pathway in this organism; wild type strains must utilize methionine as a sulphur source after it is degraded to give rise to sulphate.

  2. Gas-Phase Hydration Thermochemistry of Sodiated and Potassiated Nucleic Acid Bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH o n , ΔS o n , and ΔG o n , for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  3. Gas-phase hydration thermochemistry of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases.

    PubMed

    Wincel, Henryk

    2012-09-01

    Hydration reactions of sodiated and potassiated nucleic acid bases (uracil, thymine, cytosine, and adenine) produced by electrospray have been studied in a gas phase using the pulsed ion-beam high-pressure mass spectrometer. The thermochemical properties, ΔH(o)(n), ΔS(o)(n), and ΔG(o)(n), for the hydrated systems were obtained from hydration equilibrium measurement. The structural aspects of the hydrated complexes are discussed in conjunction with available literature data. The correlation between water binding energies in the hydrated complexes and the corresponding metal ion affinities of nucleobases suggests that a significant (if not dominant) amount of the canonical structure of cytosine undergoes tautomerization during electrospray ionization, and the thermochemical values for cationized cytosine probably correspond to a mixture of tautomeric complexes.

  4. Tetrahydrofuran hydrate decomposition characteristics in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yongchen; Wang, Pengfei; Wang, Shenglong; Zhao, Jiafei; Yang, Mingjun

    2016-12-01

    Many tetrahydrofuran (THF) hydrate properties are similar to those of gas hydrates. In the present work THF hydrate dissociation in four types of porous media is studied. THF solution was cooled to 275.15 K with formation of the hydrate under ambient pressure, and then it dissociated under ambient conditions. THF hydrate dissociation experiments in each porous medium were conducted three times. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to obtain images. Decomposition time, THF hydrate saturation and MRI mean intensity (MI) were measured and analyzed. The experimental results showed that the hydrate decomposition time in BZ-4 and BZ-3 was similar and longer than that in BZ-02. In each dissociation process, the hydrate decomposition time of the second and third cycles was shorter than that of the first cycle in BZ-4, BZ-3, and BZ-02. The relationship between THF hydrate saturation and time is almost linear.

  5. Energy resource potential of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2002-01-01

    The discovery of large gas hydrate accumulations in terrestrial permafrost regions of the Arctic and beneath the sea along the outer continental margins of the world's oceans has heightened interest in gas hydrates as a possible energy resource. However, significant to potentially insurmountable technical issues must be resolved before gas hydrates can be considered a viable option for affordable supplies of natural gas. The combined information from Arctic gas hydrate studies shows that, in permafrost regions, gas hydrates may exist at subsurface depths ranging from about 130 to 2000 m. The presence of gas hydrates in offshore continental margins has been inferred mainly from anomalous seismic reflectors, known as bottom-simulating reflectors, that have been mapped at depths below the sea floor ranging from about 100 to 1100 m. Current estimates of the amount of gas in the world's marine and permafrost gas hydrate accumulations are in rough accord at about 20,000 trillion m3. Disagreements over fundamental issues such as the volume of gas stored within delineated gas hydrate accumulations and the concentration of gas hydrates within hydrate-bearing strata have demonstrated that we know little about gas hydrates. Recently, however, several countries, including Japan, India, and the United States, have launched ambitious national projects to further examine the resource potential of gas hydrates. These projects may help answer key questions dealing with the properties of gas hydrate reservoirs, the design of production systems, and, most important, the costs and economics of gas hydrate production.

  6. NATURAL GAS HYDRATES STORAGE PROJECT PHASE II. CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Rogers

    1999-09-27

    DOE Contract DE-AC26-97FT33203 studied feasibility of utilizing the natural-gas storage property of gas hydrates, so abundantly demonstrated in nature, as an economical industrial process to allow expanded use of the clean-burning fuel in power plants. The laboratory work achieved breakthroughs: (1) Gas hydrates were found to form orders of magnitude faster in an unstirred system with surfactant-water micellar solutions. (2) Hydrate particles were found to self-pack by adsorption on cold metal surfaces from the micellar solutions. (3) Interstitial micellar-water of the packed particles were found to continue forming hydrates. (4) Aluminum surfaces were found to most actively collect the hydrate particles. These laboratory developments were the bases of a conceptual design for a large-scale process where simplification enhances economy. In the design, hydrates form, store, and decompose in the same tank in which gas is pressurized to 550 psi above unstirred micellar solution, chilled by a brine circulating through a bank of aluminum tubing in the tank employing gas-fired refrigeration. Hydrates form on aluminum plates suspended in the chilled micellar solution. A low-grade heat source, such as 110 F water of a power plant, circulates through the tubing bank to release stored gas. The design allows a formation/storage/decomposition cycle in a 24-hour period of 2,254,000 scf of natural gas; the capability of multiple cycles is an advantage of the process. The development costs and the user costs of storing natural gas in a scaled hydrate process were estimated to be competitive with conventional storage means if multiple cycles of hydrate storage were used. If more than 54 cycles/year were used, hydrate development costs per Mscf would be better than development costs of depleted reservoir storage; above 125 cycles/year, hydrate user costs would be lower than user costs of depleted reservoir storage.

  7. Chronic barium intoxication disrupts sulphated proteoglycan synthesis: a hypothesis for the origins of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Purdey, Mark

    2004-01-01

    High level contamination by natural and industrial sources of the alkali earth metal, barium (Ba) has been identified in the ecosystems/workplaces that are associated with high incidence clustering of multiple sclerosis (MS) and other neurodegenerative diseases such as the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Analyses of ecosystems supporting the most renowned MS clusters in Saskatchewan, Sardinia, Massachusetts, Colorado, Guam, NE Scotland demonstrated consistently elevated levels of Ba in soils (mean: 1428 ppm) and vegetation (mean: 74 ppm) in relation to mean levels of 345 and 19 ppm recorded in MS-free regions adjoining. The high levels of Ba stemmed from local quarrying for Ba ores and/or use of Ba in paper/foundry/welding/textile/oil and gas well related industries, as well as from the use of Ba as an atmospheric aerosol spray for enhancing/refracting the signalling of radio/radar waves along military jet flight paths, missile test ranges, etc. It is proposed that chronic contamination of the biosystem with the reactive types of Ba salts can initiate the pathogenesis of MS; due to the conjugation of Ba with free sulphate, which subsequently deprives the endogenous sulphated proteoglycan molecules (heparan sulfates) of their sulphate co partner, thereby disrupting synthesis of S-proteoglycans and their crucial role in the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signalling which induces oligodendrocyte progenitors to maintain the growth and structural integrity of the myelin sheath. Loss of S-proteoglycan activity explains other key facets of MS pathogenesis; such as the aggregation of platelets and the proliferation of superoxide generated oxidative stress. Ba intoxications disturb the sodium-potassium ion pump--another key feature of the MS profile. The co-clustering of various neurodegenerative diseases in these Ba-contaminated ecosystems suggests that the pathogenesis of all of these diseases could pivot upon a

  8. Redox chemistry of sulphate and uranium in a phosphogypsum tailings dump.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, Fanos; Antoniou, Stella; Pashalidis, Ioannis

    2010-08-01

    The present study aims to assess the effect of redox conditions existing within the tailings dump on the stability of phosphogypsum (e.g. sulphate reduction) and uranium(VI). Phosphogypsum sampling and in-situ measurements were carried out at a coastal tailings dump in Vasiliko Cyprus, pH, E(H) and solubility experiments were performed in simulated laboratory systems and thermodynamic calculations using MINTEQA2. Generally, in the open tailings dump oxidizing conditions predominate stabilizing sulphur and uranium in their hexavalent oxidation states. On the other hand, after the application of a soil/vegetative cover and in the presence of natural organic matter, anoxic conditions prevail (E(H) < -70 mV) resulting in S(VI) and U(VI) reduction to S(-II) and U(IV), respectively. Although, the sulphide anion can form very insoluble compounds with heavy metal ions (e.g. Cd(II), Pb(II) etc.) and U(IV) oxide has very low solubility, partial reduction of sulphate to sulphide within gypsum may affect the stability of phosphogypsum resulting in enhanced erosion of the material by rain- and seawater and washing out of contaminants in particulate/colloidal form.

  9. Stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate in intravenous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dołhań, Agnieszka; Jelińska, Anna; Bębenek, Marcelina

    2014-01-01

    Stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate in intravenous solutions was studied. Chromatographic separation and quantitative determination were performed by using a high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-DAD detection. During the stability study, poly(vinylchloride) minibags were filled with a solution containing 5 mg of ceftiofur sodium or cefquinome sulphate and diluted to 0.2 mg/mL with suitable intravenous solution depending on the test conditions. The solutions for the study were protected from light and stored at room temperature (22°C), refrigerated (6°C), frozen (-20°C) for 30 days, and then thawed at room temperature. A comparison of results obtained at 22°C and 6°C for the same intravenous solutions showed that temperature as well as components of solutions and their concentration had an influence on the stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate. It was found that ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate dissolved in intravenous solutions used in this study may be stored at room temperature and at 6°C for up to 48 h.

  10. Stability of Ceftiofur Sodium and Cefquinome Sulphate in Intravenous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jelińska, Anna; Bębenek, Marcelina

    2014-01-01

    Stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate in intravenous solutions was studied. Chromatographic separation and quantitative determination were performed by using a high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-DAD detection. During the stability study, poly(vinylchloride) minibags were filled with a solution containing 5 mg of ceftiofur sodium or cefquinome sulphate and diluted to 0.2 mg/mL with suitable intravenous solution depending on the test conditions. The solutions for the study were protected from light and stored at room temperature (22°C), refrigerated (6°C), frozen (−20°C) for 30 days, and then thawed at room temperature. A comparison of results obtained at 22°C and 6°C for the same intravenous solutions showed that temperature as well as components of solutions and their concentration had an influence on the stability of ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate. It was found that ceftiofur sodium and cefquinome sulphate dissolved in intravenous solutions used in this study may be stored at room temperature and at 6°C for up to 48 h. PMID:25025091

  11. Electrochemical studies of zinc nickel codeposition in sulphate bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abou-Krisha, Mortaga M.

    2005-11-01

    The electrodeposition of Zn-Ni alloys from a sulphate bath was studied under different conditions. The bath had the composition 0.40 M sodium sulphate, 0.01 M sulphuric acid, 0.16 M boric acid, 0.20 M zinc sulphate and 0.20 M nickel sulphate. It is found that the plating bath temperature has a great effect on the cyclic voltammograms, galvanostatic measurements during electrodeposition, and consequently linear polarization resistance for corrosion study and the alloy composition. Under the examined conditions, the electrodeposition of the alloys was of anomalous type. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the alloys consisted of the δ-phase (Ni 3Zn 22) or a mixture of the two phases δ and γ (Ni 5Zn 21). The comparison between Ni deposition and Zn-Ni codeposition revealed that the remarkable inhibition of Ni deposition takes place due to the presence of Zn 2+ in the plating bath. The Ni deposition starts at -0.85 V in the bath of Ni deposition only, but the deposition starts at more negative potentials in the codeposition bath although the concentration of Ni 2+ is the same in the both baths.

  12. Stromal accumulation of chondroitin sulphate in mammary tumours of dogs

    PubMed Central

    Hinrichs, U; Rutteman, G R; Nederbragt, H

    1999-01-01

    To contribute to the investigation of the composition of the extracellular matrix in epithelial tumours, mammary gland tissues of dogs (including tumours, hyperplasias and normal tissue as well as metastatic lesions in lymph nodes and lung) were studied histochemically and immunohistochemically for distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (s-GAGs). The formaline-fixed tissue was stained by alcian blue at pH 5.8, using the ‘critical electrolyte concentration’ to study the degree of sulphation of s-GAGs. s-GAGs were characterized by degradation with enzymes and nitrous acid and by immunohistochemistry with two anti-chondroitin sulphate monoclonal antibodies. The light microscopic investigation of s-GAG deposits revealed a limited number of patterns of their distribution. The main s-GAGs found in the mammary gland tumours of dogs and in metastatic lesions were chondroitin sulphate (CS) and heparin/heparan sulphate (HEP/HS). CS accumulated in diffuse structures between epithelial cells as well as around clusters of tumour cells. The latter pattern, possibly representing a mesenchymal reaction to the tumour, was present in 74% of the tumours, and in 67% of these, highly sulphated CS was present. A diffuse accumulation of CS was present almost exclusively in complex and mixed tumours; because of the expression of the 3B3 epitope for CS in immature cartilage the spindle cells of complex tumours are argued to be the precursors of the cartilage in mixed tumours. HEP/HS was stored mainly in mast cells that were found in increased numbers in hyperplasias and tumours. By pretreatment of microscopic slides with chondroitinase AC or ABC immunostaining of fibronectin could be made possible in areas in which CS was abundantly present, suggesting that CS may mask fibronectin epitopes. It is concluded that CS with different degrees of sulphation is the most important s-GAG in the extracellular matrix of mammary tumours of dogs. CS and other s-GAGs accumulate at different

  13. Oral chondroprotection with nutraceuticals made of chondroitin sulphate plus glucosamine sulphate in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bottegoni, Carlo; Muzzarelli, Riccardo A A; Giovannini, Francesca; Busilacchi, Alberto; Gigante, Antonio

    2014-08-30

    Oral supplementation of chondroitin sulphate plus glucosamine helps repair the articular surface in osteoarthritis. Chondroitin-S reduces the concentration of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and transcription factor involved in inflammation. GlcN.S enhances cartilage specific matrix components and prevents collagen degeneration in chondrocytes by inhibiting hydrolytic enzymes, and preventing the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Chondroitin-S plus GlcN.S are slow-acting drugs that alleviate pain and partly restore joint function in OA patients. Orally administered pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin-S plus GlcN.S stabilize the joint space narrowing and significantly decrease the number of patients with new erosive OA. They are safe and no adverse events have ever been reported; they are recommended by EULAR and OARSI. The cost/effectiveness of the oral chondroitin-S plus GlcN.S therapy derives from the reduction of costs for physiotherapy, and for gastroprotective and non-steroidal drugs. The synergistic association of these two world-widely preferred nutraceuticals is a step forward in the management of OA.

  14. Hydration water in dynamics of a hydrated beta-lactoglobulin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Longeville, S.

    2007-02-01

    Incoherent spin-echo signals of a hydrated β-lactoglobulin protein were investigated, at 275 and 293 K. The intermediate scattering functions I(Q,t) were divided in two contributions from surface water and protein, respectively. On one hand, the dynamics of the surface water follows a KWW stretched exponential function (the exponent is ~0.5), on the other hand, that of the protein follows a single exponential. The present results are consistent with our previous results of hydrated C-phycocyanin combining elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering and by molecular dynamics simulation.

  15. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  16. Well log evaluation of natural gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.

    1992-10-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, in which a solid-water-lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure. Gas hydrates are globally widespread in permafrost regions and beneath the sea in sediment of outer continental margins. While methane, propane, and other gases can be included in the clathrate structure, methane hydrates appear to be the most common in nature. The amount of methane sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are speculative and range over three orders of magnitude from about 100,000 to 270,000,000 trillion cubic feet. The amount of gas in the hydrate reservoirs of the world greedy exceeds the volume of known conventional gas reserves. Gas hydrates also represent a significant drilling and production hazard. A fundamental question linking gas hydrate resource and hazard issues is: What is the volume of gas hydrates and included gas within a given gas hydrate occurrence? Most published gas hydrate resource estimates have, of necessity, been made by broad extrapolation of only general knowledge of local geologic conditions. Gas volumes that may be attributed to gas hydrates are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters, including the areal extent ofthe gas-hydrate occurrence, reservoir thickness, hydrate number, reservoir porosity, and the degree of gas-hydrate saturation. Two of the most difficult reservoir parameters to determine are porosity and degreeof gas hydrate saturation. Well logs often serve as a source of porosity and hydrocarbon saturation data; however, well-log calculations within gas-hydrate-bearing intervals are subject to error. The primary reason for this difficulty is the lack of quantitative laboratory and field studies. The primary purpose of this paper is to review the response of well logs to the presence of gas hydrates.

  17. Dissociation heat transfer characteristics of methane hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Holder, G.D.

    1987-02-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial heat transfer phenomenon during the dissociation of gas hydrates is essential in modeling the hydrate dissociation process. Such knowledge has applications in natural gas processing, storage, or transportation; in the drilling and recovery of oil and gas in the presence of gas hydrates; in the desalination of sea water; and in the production of natural gas from hydrate reservoirs. The process of hydrate dissociation is a unique phenomenon in which gas and water are simultaneously produced at the dissociated hydrate surface and play an important role in the mechanism of heat transfer to hydrates. An earlier study of propane hydrate dissociation showed that hydrate dissociation is a heat-transfer-limited process and somewhat similar to the nucleate boiling of liquids. In the present study, heat transfer limitations for methane hydrate dissociation were studied for two reasons. First, a comparison of the results of this study with propane hydrate was desired. Second, the effect of hydrate structure and gas molecule type on the rate of heat transfer during hydrate dissociation was sought.

  18. Sulphation of proteins secreted by a human hepatoma-derived cell line. Sulphation of N-linked oligosaccharides on alpha 2HS-glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Hortin, G; Green, E D; Baenziger, J U; Strauss, A W

    1986-01-01

    Several human glycoproteins, including alpha 1-antitrypsin, alpha 1-acid glycoprotein, transferrin, caeruloplasmin and alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, synthesized by the hepatoma-derived cell line HepG2 were observed to contain covalently linked sulphate. These proteins were estimated to contain about 0.1 mol of sulphate/mol of protein. The most abundant of the sulphated glycoproteins, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, was analysed in detail. All of the sulphate on this protein was attached to N-linked oligosaccharides which contained sialic acid and resisted release by endoglycosidase H. Several independent analytical approaches established that approx. 10% of the molecules of alpha 2HS-glycoprotein contained sulphate. Our results suggest that a number of human plasma proteins contain small amounts of sulphate linked to oligosaccharides. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3017304

  19. A preliminary study of the effects of glucosamine sulphate and chondroitin sulphate on surgically treated and untreated focal cartilage damage.

    PubMed

    Kamarul, T; Ab-Rahim, S; Tumin, M; Selvaratnam, L; Ahmad, T S

    2011-03-15

    The effects of Glucosamine Sulphate (GS) and Chondroitin Sulphate (CS) on the healing of damaged and repaired articular cartilage were investigated. This study was conducted using 18 New Zealand white rabbits as experimental models. Focal cartilage defects, surgically created in the medial femoral condyle, were either treated by means of autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) or left untreated as controls. Rabbits were then divided into groups which received either GS+/-CS or no pharmacotherapy. Three rabbits from each group were sacrificed at 12 and 24 weeks post-surgery. Knees dissected from rabbits were then evaluated using gross quantification of repair tissue, glycosaminoglycan (GAG) assays, immunoassays and histological assessments. It was observed that, in contrast to untreated sites, surfaces of the ACI-repaired sites appeared smooth and continuous with the surrounding native cartilage. Histological examination demonstrated a typical hyaline cartilage structure; with proteoglycans, type II collagen and GAGs being highly expressed in repair areas. The improved regeneration of these repair sites was also noted to be significant over time (6 months vs. 3 months) and in GS and GS+CS groups compared to the untreated (without pharmacotherapy) group. Combination of ACI and pharmacotherapy (with glucosamine sulphate alone/ or with chondroitin sulphate) may prove beneficial for healing of damaged cartilage, particularly in relation to focal cartilage defects.

  20. A Post-Genomic View of the Ecophysiology, Catabolism and Biotechnological Relevance of Sulphate-Reducing Prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Venceslau, Sofia S; Wöhlbrand, Lars; Voordouw, Gerrit; Wall, Judy D; Pereira, Inês A C

    2015-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction is the unifying and defining trait of sulphate-reducing prokaryotes (SRP). In their predominant habitats, sulphate-rich marine sediments, SRP have long been recognized to be major players in the carbon and sulphur cycles. Other, more recently appreciated, ecophysiological roles include activity in the deep biosphere, symbiotic relations, syntrophic associations, human microbiome/health and long-distance electron transfer. SRP include a high diversity of organisms, with large nutritional versatility and broad metabolic capacities, including anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons. Elucidation of novel catabolic capacities as well as progress in the understanding of metabolic and regulatory networks, energy metabolism, evolutionary processes and adaptation to changing environmental conditions has greatly benefited from genomics, functional OMICS approaches and advances in genetic accessibility and biochemical studies. Important biotechnological roles of SRP range from (i) wastewater and off gas treatment, (ii) bioremediation of metals and hydrocarbons and (iii) bioelectrochemistry, to undesired impacts such as (iv) souring in oil reservoirs and other environments, and (v) corrosion of iron and concrete. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of SRPs focusing mainly on works published after 2000. The wealth of publications in this period, covering many diverse areas, is a testimony to the large environmental, biogeochemical and technological relevance of these organisms and how much the field has progressed in these years, although many important questions and applications remain to be explored.

  1. Gas Hydrate and Pore Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinivella, Umberta; Giustiniani, Michela

    2014-05-01

    Many efforts have been devoted to quantify excess pore pressures related to gas hydrate dissociation in marine sediments below the BSR using several approaches. Dissociation of gas hydrates in proximity of the BSR, in response to a change in the physical environment (i.e., temperature and/or pressure regime), can liberate excess gas incrising the local pore fluid pressure in the sediment, so decreasing the effective normal stress. So, gas hydrate dissociation may lead to excess pore pressure resulting in sediment deformation or failure, such as submarine landslides, sediment slumping, pockmarks and mud volcanoes, soft-sediment deformation and giant hummocks. Moreover, excess pore pressure may be the result of gas hydrate dissociation due to continuous sedimentation, tectonic uplift, sea level fall, heating or inhibitor injection. In order to detect the presence of the overpressure below the BSR, we propose two approachs. The fist approach models the BSR depth versus pore pressure; in fact, if the free gas below the BSR is in overpressure condition, the base of the gas hydrate stability is deeper with respect to the hydrostatic case. This effect causes a discrepancy between seismic and theoretical BSR depths. The second approach models the velocities versus gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and pore pressure, considering the approximation of the Biot theory in case of low frequency, i.e. seismic frequency. Knowing the P and S seismic velocity from seismic data analysis, it is possibile to jointly estimate the gas hydrate and free gas concentrations and the pore pressure regime. Alternatively, if the S-wave velocity is not availbale (due to lack of OBS/OBC data), an AVO analysis can be performed in order to extract information about Poisson ratio. Our modeling suggests that the areas characterized by shallow waters (i.e., areas in which human infrastructures, such as pipelines, are present) are significantly affected by the presence of overpressure condition

  2. Compact apparatus for photogeneration of hydrated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, E.; Schmidt, K.

    1970-01-01

    Flash-photolysis instrument generates hydrated electrons and studies their reactions. It has a three-dimensional, multiple-reaction cell and the capacity to produce up to .1 micromole hydrated electron in a single 40 microsec light pulse.

  3. Natural Gas Hydrates Update 1998-2000

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    Significant events have transpired on the natural gas hydrate research and development front since "Future Supply Potential of Natural Gas Hydrates" appeared in Natural Gas 1998 Issues and Trends and in the Potential Gas Committee's 1998 biennial report.

  4. Methods to determine hydration states of minerals and cement hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Thorell, Alva; Wadsö, Lars

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes a novel approach to the quantitative investigation of the impact of varying relative humidity (RH) and temperature on the structure and thermodynamic properties of salts and crystalline cement hydrates in different hydration states (i.e. varying molar water contents). The multi-method approach developed here is capable of deriving physico-chemical boundary conditions and the thermodynamic properties of hydrated phases, many of which are currently missing from or insufficiently reported in the literature. As an example the approach was applied to monosulfoaluminate, a phase typically found in hydrated cement pastes. New data on the dehydration and rehydration of monosulfoaluminate are presented. Some of the methods used were validated with the system Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}–H{sub 2}O and new data related to the absorption of water by anhydrous sodium sulfate are presented. The methodology and data reported here should permit better modeling of the volume stability of cementitious systems exposed to various different climatic conditions.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate-Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-30

    properties of key hydrated cement constituent calcium-silicate-hydrate (CSH) at the molecular, nanometer scale level. Due to complexity, still unknown...public release; distribution is unlimited. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Hydrated Calcium-Silicate- Hydrate (CSH) Cement Molecular Structure The views... Cement Molecular Structure Report Title Multi-scale modeling of complex material systems requires starting from fundamental building blocks to

  6. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq).

  7. How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

    2011-04-01

    Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

  8. Hydration Gibbs free energies of open and closed shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide cations from polarizable molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Marjolin, Aude; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Clavaguéra, Carine; Ren, Pengyu Y; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Dognon, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    The hydration free energies, structures, and dynamics of open- and closed-shell trivalent lanthanide and actinide metal cations are studied using molecular dynamics simulations (MD) based on a polarizable force field. Parameters for the metal cations are derived from an ab initio bottom-up strategy. MD simulations of six cations solvated in bulk water are subsequently performed with the AMOEBA polarizable force field. The calculated first-and second shell hydration numbers, water residence times, and free energies of hydration are consistent with experimental/theoretical values leading to a predictive modeling of f-elements compounds.

  9. Natural gas hydrates; vast resource, uncertain future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    2001-01-01

    Gas hydrates are naturally occurring icelike solids in which water molecules trap gas molecules in a cagelike structure known as a clathrate. Although many gases form hydrates in nature, methane hydrate is by far the most common; methane is the most abundant natural gas. The volume of carbon contained in methane hydrates worldwide is estimated to be twice the amount contained in all fossil fuels on Earth, including coal.

  10. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-06-06

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  11. Hydration and Thermal Expansion in Anatase Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Li, Qiang; Ren, Yang; Fan, Longlong; Chen, Jun; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2016-08-01

    A tunable thermal expansion is reported in nanosized anatase by taking advantage of surface hydration. The coefficient of thermal expansion of 4 nm TiO2 along a-axis is negative with a hydrated surface and is positive without a hydrated surface. High-energy synchrotron X-ray pair distribution function analysis combined with ab initio calculations on the specific hydrated surface are carried out to reveal the local structure distortion that is responsible for the unusual negative thermal expansion.

  12. A controlled, three-part trial to investigate the barrier function and skin hydration properties of six skin protectants.

    PubMed

    Hoggarth, Andrew; Waring, Mike; Alexander, James; Greenwood, Amanada; Callaghan, Theresa

    2005-12-01

    In the treatment of incontinence dermatitis, a skin protectant primarily prevents skin breakdown due to moisture and biological irritants in urine and feces. To assess the barrier and skin hydration properties of six currently available skin protectants with different formulations, a controlled, three-phase study was conducted at a research facility in the UK among 18 healthy volunteers. The study addressed each product's efficacy against insult from a known irritant (sodium lauryl sulphate), skin hydration potential, and maintenance of skin barrier and barrier efficacy against maceration. Using white petrolatum (glycerin) as the positive control and untreated sites as the negative control, the results show that each one of the products tested has different performance properties. Products containing petrolatum demonstrated protection against irritants (P = 0.006 at 24 hours) and maceration (P < 0.005) and provided some skin hydration. Products containing dimethicone varied in protection against irritants (P < 0.005, or P > or = 0.806 at 24 hours) and have good skin hydration potential and low barrier efficacy (P > 0.500). Zinc oxide-based products showed protection against irritants (P < 0.005) but poor skin hydration and barrier properties to prevent maceration (P = 0.262). Overall, only the water-in-oil petrolatum- based product performed effectively within all the parameters tested. This study suggests that skin barrier protection involves more than the inclusion of an active barrier ingredient. Further testing and use of barrier products in the clinical setting will provide additional evidence for appropriate product selection.

  13. 77 FR 40032 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Fossil Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Purpose of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is...

  14. 75 FR 9886 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of methane hydrate...

  15. Optimization study for Pb(II) and COD sequestration by consortium of sulphate-reducing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Anamika; Bishnoi, Narsi R.; Gupta, Asha

    2016-04-01

    In this study, initial minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of Pb(II) ions was analysed to check optimum concentration of Pb(II) ions at which the growth of sulphate-reducing consortium (SRC) was found to be maximum. 80 ppm of Pb(II) ions was investigated as minimum inhibitory concentration for SRC. Influence of electron donors such as lactose, sucrose, glucose and sodium lactate was examined to investigate best carbon source for growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. Sodium lactate was found to be the prime carbon source for SRC. Later optimization of various parameters was executed using Box-Behnken design model of response surface methodology to explore the effectiveness of three independent operating variables, namely, pH (5.0-9.0), temperature (32-42 °C) and time (5.0-9.0 days), on dependent variables, i.e. protein content, precipitation of Pb(II) ions, and removal of COD by SRC biomass. Maximum removal of COD and Pb(II) was observed to be 91 and 98 %, respectively, at pH 7.0 and temperature 37 °C and incubation time 7 days. According to response surface analysis and analysis of variance, the experimental data were perfectly fitted to the quadratic model, and the interactive influence of pH, temperature and time on Pb(II) and COD removal was highly significant. A high regression coefficient between the variables and response (r 2 = 0.9974) corroborate eminent evaluation of experimental data by second-order polynomial regression model. SEM and Fourier transform infrared analysis was performed to investigate morphology of PbS precipitates, sorption mechanism and involved functional groups in metal-free and metal-loaded biomass of SRC for Pb(II) binding.

  16. Sulphate-climate coupling over the past 300,000 years in inland Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Yoshinori; Uemura, Ryu; Motoyama, Hideaki; Suzuki, Toshitaka; Miyake, Takayuki; Hirabayashi, Motohiro; Hondoh, Takeo

    2012-10-04

    Sulphate aerosols, particularly micrometre-sized particles of sulphate salt and sulphate-adhered dust, can act as cloud condensation nuclei, leading to increased solar scattering that cools Earth's climate. Evidence for such a coupling may lie in the sulphate record from polar ice cores, but previous analyses of melted ice-core samples have provided only sulphate ion concentrations, which may be due to sulphuric acid. Here we present profiles of sulphate salt and sulphate-adhered dust fluxes over the past 300,000 years from the Dome Fuji ice core in inland Antarctica. Our results show a nearly constant flux of sulphate-adhered dust through glacial and interglacial periods despite the large increases in total dust flux during glacial maxima. The sulphate salt flux, however, correlates inversely with temperature, suggesting a climatic coupling between particulate sulphur and temperature. For example, the total sulphate salt flux during the Last Glacial Maximum averages 5.78 mg m(-2) yr(-1), which is almost twice the Holocene value. Although it is based on a modern analogue with considerable uncertainties when applied to the ice-core record, this analysis indicates that the glacial-to-interglacial decrease in sulphate would lessen the aerosol indirect effects on cloud lifetime and albedo, leading to an Antarctic warming of 0.1 to 5 kelvin.

  17. Stable isotope fractionation related to technically enhanced bacterial sulphate degradation in lignite mining sediments.

    PubMed

    Knöller, Kay; Jeschke, Christina; Simon, André; Gast, Martin; Hoth, Nils

    2012-01-01

    A mine dump aquifer in the Lusatian lignite mining district, Germany, is contaminated with acid mine drainage (AMD). The only natural process that can counteract the effects of the contamination is bacterial sulphate reduction. The technical measures chosen to handle the contamination include the injection of glycerol into the aquifer to supply electron donors and to accelerate the growth and activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria. An initial assessment of the hydrochemical conditions in the aquifer showed that sulphate concentrations are subject to alteration due to flow-related processes. Consequently, the decision whether sulphate reduction is occurring in the investigated aquifer section was based on the stable isotopic composition of dissolved sulphate and sulphide, which were used in combination with sulphate concentrations. The significant enrichment of both heavy sulphur and heavy oxygen in the remaining sulphate pool and a characteristic isotope fractionation pattern are a clear evidence for the activity of sulphate-reducing bacteria utilising the injected glycerol as an electron donor. This activity seemed to intensify over the observation period. The spatial distribution of sulphate reduction activity, however, appeared to be highly inhomogeneous. Rather than occurring ubiquitously, sulphate reduction activity seemed to concentrate in a defined reaction zone. Regardless of the inhomogeneous distribution, the overall turnover of sulphate during the period of investigation proves the applicability of this enhanced natural attenuation method to handle the restoration of aquifers contaminated with AMD.

  18. Development of the Methane Hydrate Burning Experimental Equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, S.

    2010-12-01

    There is a need to increase understanding among Japanese citizens about the importance as a potential future energy source of the great quantity of methane hydrate deposits sleeping on the sea bed around Japan. With cooperation from the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation (JOGMEC), the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), and the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) we studied the possibility of using presentations where it was possible to handle actual methane hydrate, videos and active presentations such as experiments in order to increase the public interest in and understanding of methane hydrate. Furthermore, for the benefit of those people who would like to visit the exhibition but are unable to do so due to distance or other physical barriers, we looked into making the presentation materials portable and having a moving exhibition. Currently methane hydrate combustion experiments and exhibition performances are being held at the Hidaka Port New Energy Park (The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc.) in Gobo, Wakayama with approximately 3,000 visitors monthly.

  19. The effect of magnesium on partial sulphate removal from mine water as gypsum.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Emma-Tuulia; Rämö, Jaakko; Lassi, Ulla

    2015-08-15

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of magnesium on the removal efficiency of sulphate as gypsum from mine water. The precipitation conditions were simulated with MINEQL + software and the simulation results were compared with the results from laboratory jar test experiments. Both the simulation and the laboratory results showed that magnesium in the mine water was maintaining sulphate in a soluble form as magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) at pH 9.6. Thus magnesium was preventing the removal of sulphate as gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). However, change in the lime precipitation pH from 9.6 to 12.5 resulted in magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH)2) precipitation and improved sulphate removal. Additionally, magnesium hydroxide could act as seed crystals for gypsum precipitation or co-precipitate sulphate further enhancing the removal of sulphate from mine water.

  20. Is Br2 hydration hydrophobic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz-Torres, A.; Gamboa-Suárez, A.; Bernal-Uruchurtu, M. I.

    2017-02-01

    The spectroscopic properties of bromine in aqueous systems suggest it can behave as either hydrophilic or hydrophobic solute. In small water clusters, the halogen bond and the hydrogen-halogen interaction are responsible for its specific way of binding. In water hydrates, it is efficiently hosted by two different cages forming the crystal structure and it has been frequently assumed that there is little or no interaction between the guest and the host. Bromine in liquid solution poses a challenging question due to its non-negligible solubility and the large blue shift measured in its absorption spectra. Using a refined semi-empirical force field, PM3-PIF, we performed a Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics study of bromine in liquid water. Here we present a detailed study in which we retrieved the most representative hydration structures in terms of the most frequent positions around bromine and the most common water orientations. Albeit being an approximate description of the total hydration phenomenon, it captures the contribution of the leading molecular interactions in form of the recurrent structures. Our findings confirm that the spectroscopic signature is mainly caused by the closest neighbors. The dynamics of the whole first hydration shell strongly suggests that the external molecules in that structure effectively isolate the bulk from the presence of bromine. The solvation structure fluctuates from a hydrophilic to a hydrophobic-like environment along the studied trajectory.

  1. Attraction between hydrated hydrophilic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanduč, Matej; Schneck, Emanuel; Netz, Roland R.

    2014-08-01

    According to common knowledge, hydrophilic surfaces repel via hydration forces while hydrophobic surfaces attract, but mounting experimental evidence suggests that also hydrophilic surfaces can attract. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations at prescribed water chemical potential we study the crossover from hydration repulsion to hydrophobic attraction for planar polar surfaces of varying stiffness and hydrogen-bonding capability. Rescaling the partial charges of the polar surface groups, we cover the complete spectrum from very hydrophobic surfaces (characterized by contact angles θ ≃ 135°) to hydrophilic surfaces exhibiting complete wetting (θ = 0°). Indeed, for a finite range θadh < θ < 90°, we find a regime where hydrophilic surfaces attract at sub-nanometer separation and stably adhere without intervening water. The adhesive contact angle θadh depends on surface type and lies in the range 65° < θadh < 80°, in good agreement with experiments. Analysis of the total number of hydrogen bonds (HBs) formed by water and surface groups rationalizes this crossover between hydration repulsion and hydrophilic attraction in terms of a subtle balance: Highly polar surfaces repel because of strongly bound hydration water, less polar hydrophilic surfaces attract because water-water HBs are preferred over surface-water HBs. Such solvent reorganization forces presumably underlie also other important phenomena, such as selective ion adsorption to interfaces as well as ion pair formation.

  2. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows.

    PubMed

    Friedman, I

    1968-02-23

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  3. Hydration rind dates rhyolite flows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, I.

    1968-01-01

    Hydration of obsidian has been used to date rhyolite flows, containing obsidian or porphyritic glass, at Glass Mountain (Medicine Lake Highlands) and Mono Lake, California. The method is simple and rapid and can be used to date flows that erupted between 200 and approximately 200,000 years ago.

  4. Terahertz sensing of corneal hydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Tewari, Priyamvada; Bourges, Jean Louis; Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Bennett, David B; Taylor, Zachary D; Lee, H; Brown, Elliott R; Grundfest, Warren S; Culjat, Martin O

    2010-01-01

    An indicator of ocular health is the hydrodyanmics of the cornea. Many corneal disorders deteriorate sight as they upset the normal hydrodynamics of the cornea. The mechanisms include the loss of endothelial pump function of corneal dystophies, swelling and immune response of corneal graft rejection, and inflammation and edema, which accompany trauma, burn, and irritation events. Due to high sensitivity to changes of water content in materials, a reflective terahertz (300 GHz and 3 THz) imaging system could be an ideal tool to measure the hydration level of the cornea. This paper presents the application of THz technology to visualize the hydration content across ex vivo porcine corneas. The corneas, with a thickness variation from 470 - 940 µm, were successfully imaged using a reflective pulsed THz imaging system, with a maximum SNR of 50 dB. To our knowledge, no prior studies have reported on the use of THz in measuring hydration in corneal tissues or other ocular tissues. These preliminary findings indicate that THz can be used to accurately sense hydration levels in the cornea using a pulsed, reflective THz imaging system.

  5. Barium sulphate in a Saharan CV chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, R. D.

    1994-07-01

    Acfer 086 (CV3) was recovered from the Sahara in 1989. A thin section was studied for weathering products. During routine microprobe analysis a phase was found containing Ba and S in approximate 1:1 atomic ratio. The only other element detected at more than trace level was Fe (less than 2%), possibly from surrounding Fe-rich phases. It is concluded that the only likely mineral with this chemistry is barytes, BaSO4. The barytes occurs as isolated, 1-10-micron, irregularly shaped grains. It is present exclusively in inclusions, both metal/C-rich and chondrules and chondrule fragments. None were observed in the matrix. At its highest the barytes density reached greater than 50 grains in an area measuring 300 x 200 microns. At present, whether the barytes is terrestrial or meteoritic remains unclear. Reasons for both cases are given and discussed. While it is an intriguing possibility that the barytes in Acfer 086 may be a primary meteoritic mineral, and considerable evidence would support this view, it must be treated with great caution. Although texturally it is unlike a secondary phase and there are difficulties with the introduction of barytes by groundwater, this cannot be dismissed. The high and variable Ba contents of the Acfer/El Djouf Saharan CR chondrites are strong evidence for the formation of secondary barytes during residence on the desert floor. If terrestrial, the presence and distribution pattern of barytes in Acfer 086 has potentially important consequences for chemical and isotopic analyses of many elements in both bulk and inclusions of meteorite finds from the deserts of the world.

  6. Physicochemical and in vitro deposition properties of salbutamol sulphate/ipratropium bromide and salbutamol sulphate/excipient spray dried mixtures for use in dry powder inhalers.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Deirdre O; Corrigan, Owen I; Healy, Anne Marie

    2006-09-28

    The physicochemical and aerodynamic properties of spray dried powders of the drug/drug mixture salbutamol sulphate/ipratropium bromide were investigated. The in vitro deposition properties of spray dried salbutamol sulphate and the spray dried drug/excipient mixtures salbutamol sulphate/lactose and salbutamol sulphate/PEG were also determined. Spray drying ipratropium bromide monohydrate resulted in a crystalline material from both aqueous and ethanolic solution. The product spray dried from aqueous solution consisted mainly of ipratropium bromide anhydrous. There was evidence of the presence of another polymorphic form of ipratropium bromide. When spray dried from ethanolic solution the physicochemical characterisation suggested the presence of an ipratropium bromide solvate with some anhydrous ipratropium bromide. Co-spray drying salbutamol sulphate with ipratropium bromide resulted in amorphous composites, regardless of solvent used. Particles were spherical and of a size suitable for inhalation. Twin impinger studies showed an increase in the fine particle fraction (FPF) of spray dried salbutamol sulphate compared to micronised salbutamol sulphate. Co-spray dried salbutamol sulphate:ipratropium bromide 10:1 and 5:1 systems also showed an increase in FPF compared to micronised salbutamol sulphate. Most co-spray dried salbutamol sulphate/excipient systems investigated demonstrated FPFs greater than that of micronised drug alone. The exceptions to this were systems containing PEG 4000 20% or PEG 20,000 40% both of which had FPFs not significantly different from micronised salbutamol sulphate. These two systems were crystalline unlike most of the other spray dried composites examined which were amorphous in nature.

  7. [Spectrophotometric determination of trace cadmium in polyferric sulphate flocculent].

    PubMed

    Zheng, H; Gao, J; Yu, Z

    2000-08-01

    A new sensitive method for determining trace cadmium in polyferric sulphate flocculent is proposed in the paper. The new sensitive method is spectrophotometric method. The color reagents are the butylrhodamin B and potassium iodide. The surfactant is the polyvingl alcohol(PVA). The maximum absorbency wavelength is 607 nm. The molar absorptivity is 4.99 x 10(5) L.mol-1.cm-1. The sandell sensitivity is 2.25 x 10(-4) micrograms Cd2+.cm-2. The Beer's law is obeyed for Cd(II) in the range of 0-1.5 micrograms.25 mL-1. The recovery is 96%-105% and the sample processing procedure is simple. This method has been applied to determination of trace Cd(II) in polyferric sulphate flocculent. The determining results are satisfactory.

  8. Thermal properties of methane gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, William F.

    2007-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which molecules of a “guest” species occupy and stabilize cages formed by water molecules. Similar to ice in appearance (fig. 1), gas hydrates are stable at high pressures and temperatures above freezing (0°C). Methane is the most common naturally occurring hydrate guest species. Methane hydrates, also called simply “gas hydrates,” are extremely concentrated stores of methane and are found in shallow permafrost and continental margin sediments worldwide. Brought to sea-level conditions, methane hydrate breaks down and releases up to 160 times its own volume in methane gas. The methane stored in gas hydrates is of interest and concern to policy makers as a potential alternative energy resource and as a potent greenhouse gas that could be released from sediments to the atmosphere and ocean during global warming. In continental margin settings, methane release from gas hydrates also is a potential geohazard and could cause submarine landslides that endanger offshore infrastructure. Gas hydrate stability is sensitive to temperature changes. To understand methane release from gas hydrate, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a laboratory investigation of pure methane hydrate thermal properties at conditions relevant to accumulations of naturally occurring methane hydrate. Prior to this work, thermal properties for gas hydrates generally were measured on analog systems such as ice and non-methane hydrates or at temperatures below freezing; these conditions limit direct comparisons to methane hydrates in marine and permafrost sediment. Three thermal properties, defined succinctly by Briaud and Chaouch (1997), are estimated from the experiments described here: - Thermal conductivity, λ: if λ is high, heat travels easily through the material. - Thermal diffusivity, κ: if κ is high, it takes little time for the temperature to rise in the material. - Specific heat, cp: if cp is high, it takes a great deal of heat to

  9. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  10. Physical activity, hydration and health.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Ascensión; Manonelles, Pedro; Palacios, Nieves; Wärnberg, Julia; Casajús, José A; Pérez, Margarita; Aznar, Susana; Benito, Pedro J; Martínez-Gomez, David; Ortega, Francisco B; Ortega, Eduardo; Urrialde, Rafael

    2014-06-01

    Since the beginning of mankind, man has sought ways to promote and preserve health as well as to prevent disease. Hydration, physical activity and exercise are key factors for enhancing human health. However, either a little dose of them or an excess can be harmful for health maintenance at any age. Water is an essential nutrient for human body and a major key to survival has been to prevent dehydration. However, there is still a general controversy regarding the necessary amount to drink water or other beverages to properly get an adequate level of hydration. In addition, up to now the tools used to measure hydration are controversial. To this end, there are several important groups of variables to take into account such as water balance, hydration biomarkers and total body water. A combination of methods will be the most preferred tool to find out any risk or situation of dehydration at any age range. On the other hand, physical activity and exercise are being demonstrated to promote health, avoiding or reducing health problems, vascular and inflammatory disea ses and helping weight management. Therefore, physical activity is also being used as a pill within a therapy to promote health and reduce risk diseases, but as in the case of drugs, dose, intensity, frequency, duration and precautions have to be evaluated and taken into account in order to get the maximum effectiveness and success of a treatment. On the other hand, sedentariness is the opposite concept to physical activity that has been recently recognized as an important factor of lifestyle involved in the obesogenic environment and consequently in the risk of the non-communicable diseases. In view of the literature consulted and taking into account the expertise of the authors, in this review a Decalogue of global recommendations is included to achieve an adequate hydration and physical activity status to avoid overweight/obesity consequences.

  11. Ammonium sulphate precipitation overestimates titres of anti-peptide antisera.

    PubMed

    Roth, B; Barkas, T

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation by 50% final saturation of ammonium sulphate, a method commonly used to estimate titres and affinity constants of antibodies, was found consistently to overestimate the titre of anti-peptide antisera when compared with other antibody precipitants. The effect could not be attributed to non-IgG fractions, and similar overestimations were found when pure IgG was used. We suggest that the lower values represent a more physiologically relevant estimation.

  12. Antifertility effects of tetradecyl sodium sulphate in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, R E; Nevin, R S; Allen, D J; Jones, C D; Goettel, M E; Burck, P J

    1983-07-01

    Acrosin and acrosomal hyaluronidase were inhibited by tetradecyl sodium sulphate (TDSS) in vitro at concentrations of less than 10(-4) M. TDSS prevented the removal in vitro of the cumulus oophorus by testicular hyaluronidase and the zona pellucida by acrosin. TDSS had a contraceptive effect in rabbits when administered intravaginally before coitus or released at levels of 1-3 micrograms/day from intrauterine silicone rubber devices.

  13. Sulphate and desertification signals in Middle Eastern temperature trends

    SciTech Connect

    Nasrallah, H.A.; Balling, R.C. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of Middle Eastern annual temperature anomalies over the past 40 years reveals statistically significant warming over this time period of 0.07 C per decade. The warming is most pronounced over the spring season and least apparent in the winter season. Spatial analysis reveals a positive relationship between Middle Eastern warming and the degree of human-induced desertification and a negative relationship between local warming and the atmospheric concentration of sulphate.

  14. Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

    1992-06-01

    The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

  15. Gas hydrate reservoir characteristics and economics

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Burruss, R.C.; Lee, Myung W.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the DOE-funded USGS Gas Hydrate Program is to assess the production characteristics and economic potential of gas hydrates in northern Alaska. The objectives of this project for FY-1992 will include the following: (1) Utilize industry seismic data to assess the distribution of gas hydrates within the nearshore Alaskan continental shelf between Harrison Bay and Prudhoe Bay; (2) Further characterize and quantify the well-log characteristics of gas hydrates; and (3) Establish gas monitoring stations over the Eileen fault zone in northern Alaska, which will be used to measure gas flux from destabilized hydrates.

  16. Physicochemical properties, cytotoxicity, and antimicrobial activity of sulphated zirconia nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Mftah, Ae; Alhassan, Fatah H; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat; Webster, Thomas J; Sh-eldin, Mohammed; Rasedee, Abdullah; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Rashid, Shah Samiur

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle sulphated zirconia with Brønsted acidic sites were prepared here by an impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 hours. The characterization was completed using X-ray diffraction, thermal gravimetric analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Brunner-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, the anticancer and antimicrobial effects were investigated for the first time. This study showed for the first time that the exposure of cancer cells to sulphated zirconia nanoparticles (3.9–1,000 μg/mL for 24 hours) resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, as determined by (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Similar promising results were observed for reducing bacteria functions. In this manner, this study demonstrated that sulphated zirconia nanoparticles with Brønsted acidic sites should be further studied for a wide range of anticancer and antibacterial applications. PMID:25632233

  17. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The "standard" and "quick look" Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  18. Handbook of gas hydrate properties and occurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Kuustraa, V.A.; Hammershaimb, E.C.

    1983-12-01

    This handbook provides data on the resource potential of naturally occurring hydrates, the properties that are needed to evaluate their recovery, and their production potential. The first two chapters give data on the naturally occurring hydrate potential by reviewing published resource estimates and the known and inferred occurrences. The third and fourth chapters review the physical and thermodynamic properties of hydrates, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of hydrates that are discussed include dissociation energies and a simplified method to calculate them; phase diagrams for simple and multi-component gases; the thermal conductivity; and the kinetics of hydrate dissociation. The final chapter evaluates the net energy balance of recovering hydrates and shows that a substantial positive energy balance can theoretically be achieved. The Appendices of the Handbook summarize physical and thermodynamic properties of gases, liquids and solids that can be used in designing and evaluating recovery processes of hydrates. 158 references, 67 figures, 47 tables.

  19. Well log characterization of natural gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Lee, Myung W.

    2011-01-01

    In the last 25 years we have seen significant advancements in the use of downhole well logging tools to acquire detailed information on the occurrence of gas hydrate in nature: From an early start of using wireline electrical resistivity and acoustic logs to identify gas hydrate occurrences in wells drilled in Arctic permafrost environments to today where wireline and advanced logging-while-drilling tools are routinely used to examine the petrophysical nature of gas hydrate reservoirs and the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates within various complex reservoir systems. The most established and well known use of downhole log data in gas hydrate research is the use of electrical resistivity and acoustic velocity data (both compressional- and shear-wave data) to make estimates of gas hydrate content (i.e., reservoir saturations) in various sediment types and geologic settings. New downhole logging tools designed to make directionally oriented acoustic and propagation resistivity log measurements have provided the data needed to analyze the acoustic and electrical anisotropic properties of both highly inter-bedded and fracture dominated gas hydrate reservoirs. Advancements in nuclear-magnetic-resonance (NMR) logging and wireline formation testing have also allowed for the characterization of gas hydrate at the pore scale. Integrated NMR and formation testing studies from northern Canada and Alaska have yielded valuable insight into how gas hydrates are physically distributed in sediments and the occurrence and nature of pore fluids (i.e., free-water along with clay and capillary bound water) in gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs. Information on the distribution of gas hydrate at the pore scale has provided invaluable insight on the mechanisms controlling the formation and occurrence of gas hydrate in nature along with data on gas hydrate reservoir properties (i.e., permeabilities) needed to accurately predict gas production rates for various gas hydrate

  20. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cortes, D.D.; Martin, A.I.; Yun, T.S.; Francisca, F.M.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2009-01-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortes, Douglas D.; Martin, Ana I.; Yun, Tae Sup; Francisca, Franco M.; Santamarina, J. Carlos; Ruppel, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    A thorough understanding of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for evaluating phase transformation processes that would accompany energy production from gas hydrate deposits and for estimating regional heat flow based on the observed depth to the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. The coexistence of multiple phases (gas hydrate, liquid and gas pore fill, and solid sediment grains) and their complex spatial arrangement hinder the a priori prediction of the thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing sediments. Previous studies have been unable to capture the full parameter space covered by variations in grain size, specific surface, degree of saturation, nature of pore filling material, and effective stress for hydrate-bearing samples. Here we report on systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of air dry, water- and tetrohydrofuran (THF)-saturated, and THF hydrate-saturated sand and clay samples at vertical effective stress of 0.05 to 1 MPa (corresponding to depths as great as 100 m below seafloor). Results reveal that the bulk thermal conductivity of the samples in every case reflects a complex interplay among particle size, effective stress, porosity, and fluid-versus-hydrate filled pore spaces. The thermal conductivity of THF hydrate-bearing soils increases upon hydrate formation although the thermal conductivities of THF solution and THF hydrate are almost the same. Several mechanisms can contribute to this effect including cryogenic suction during hydrate crystal growth and the ensuing porosity reduction in the surrounding sediment, increased mean effective stress due to hydrate formation under zero lateral strain conditions, and decreased interface thermal impedance as grain-liquid interfaces are transformed into grain-hydrate interfaces.

  2. Pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria: Rapid hydrate growth versus slow hydrate dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, N.; Bohrmann, G.; Ruffine, L.; Pape, T.; Riboulot, V.; Colliat, J.-L.; De Prunelé, A.; Dennielou, B.; Garziglia, S.; Himmler, T.; Marsset, T.; Peters, C. A.; Rabiu, A.; Wei, J.

    2014-04-01

    In previous works, it has been suggested that dissolution of gas hydrate can be responsible for pockmark formation and evolution in deep water Nigeria. It was shown that those pockmarks which are at different stages of maturation are characterized by a common internal architecture associated to gas hydrate dynamics. New results obtained by drilling into gas hydrate-bearing sediments with the MeBo seafloor drill rig in concert with geotechnical in situ measurements and pore water analyses indicate that pockmark formation and evolution in the study area are mainly controlled by rapid hydrate growth opposed to slow hydrate dissolution. On one hand, positive temperature anomalies, free gas trapped in shallow microfractures near the seafloor and coexistence of free gas and gas hydrate indicate rapid hydrate growth. On the other hand, slow hydrate dissolution is evident by low methane concentrations and almost constant sulfate values 2 m above the Gas Hydrate Occurrence Zone.

  3. Improved Design and Fabrication of Hydrated-Salt Pills

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shirron, Peter J.; DiPirro, Michael J.; Canavan, Edgar R.

    2011-01-01

    A high-performance design, and fabrication and growth processes to implement the design, have been devised for encapsulating a hydrated salt in a container that both protects the salt and provides thermal conductance between the salt and the environment surrounding the container. The unitary salt/container structure is known in the art as a salt pill. In the original application of the present design and processes, the salt is, more specifically, a hydrated paramagnetic salt, for use as a refrigerant in a very-low-temperature adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The design and process can also be applied, with modifications, to other hydrated salts. Hydrated paramagnetic salts have long been used in ADRs because they have the desired magnetic properties at low temperatures. They also have some properties, disadvantageous for ADRs, that dictate the kind of enclosures in which they must be housed: Being hydrated, they lose water if exposed to less than 100-percent relative humidity. Because any dehydration compromises their magnetic properties, salts used in ADRs must be sealed in hermetic containers. Because they have relatively poor thermal conductivities in the temperature range of interest (<0.1 K), integral thermal buses are needed as means of efficiently transferring heat to and from the salts during refrigeration cycles. A thermal bus is typically made from a high-thermal-conductivity met al (such as copper or gold), and the salt is configured to make intimate thermal contact with the metal. Commonly in current practice (and in the present design), the thermal bus includes a matrix of wires or rods, and the salt is grown onto this matrix. The density and spacing of the conductors depend on the heat fluxes that must be accommodated during operation.

  4. Transcriptional response of Medicago truncatula sulphate transporters to arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis with and without sulphur stress.

    PubMed

    Casieri, Leonardo; Gallardo, Karine; Wipf, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Sulphur is an essential macronutrient for plant growth, development and response to various abiotic and biotic stresses due to its key role in the biosynthesis of many S-containing compounds. Sulphate represents a very small portion of soil S pull and it is the only form that plant roots can uptake and mobilize through H(+)-dependent co-transport processes implying sulphate transporters. Unlike the other organically bound forms of S, sulphate is normally leached from soils due to its solubility in water, thus reducing its availability to plants. Although our knowledge of plant sulphate transporters has been growing significantly in the past decades, little is still known about the effect of the arbuscular mycorrhiza interaction on sulphur uptake. Carbon, nitrogen and sulphur measurements in plant parts and expression analysis of genes encoding putative Medicago sulphate transporters (MtSULTRs) were performed to better understand the beneficial effects of mycorrhizal interaction on Medicago truncatula plants colonized by Glomus intraradices at different sulphate concentrations. Mycorrhization significantly promoted plant growth and sulphur content, suggesting increased sulphate absorption. In silico analyses allowed identifying eight putative MtSULTRs phylogenetically distributed over the four sulphate transporter groups. Some putative MtSULTRs were transcribed differentially in roots and leaves and affected by sulphate concentration, while others were more constitutively transcribed. Mycorrhizal-inducible and -repressed MtSULTRs transcripts were identified allowing to shed light on the role of mycorrhizal interaction in sulphate uptake.

  5. Search for memory effects in methane hydrate: structure of water before hydrate formation and after hydrate decomposition.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Piers; Soper, Alan K; Thompson, Helen; Westacott, Robin E; Creek, Jefferson L; Hobson, Greg; Koh, Carolyn A

    2005-10-22

    Neutron diffraction with HD isotope substitution has been used to study the formation and decomposition of the methane clathrate hydrate. Using this atomistic technique coupled with simultaneous gas consumption measurements, we have successfully tracked the formation of the sI methane hydrate from a water/gas mixture and then the subsequent decomposition of the hydrate from initiation to completion. These studies demonstrate that the application of neutron diffraction with simultaneous gas consumption measurements provides a powerful method for studying the clathrate hydrate crystal growth and decomposition. We have also used neutron diffraction to examine the water structure before the hydrate growth and after the hydrate decomposition. From the neutron-scattering curves and the empirical potential structure refinement analysis of the data, we find that there is no significant difference between the structure of water before the hydrate formation and the structure of water after the hydrate decomposition. Nor is there any significant change to the methane hydration shell. These results are discussed in the context of widely held views on the existence of memory effects after the hydrate decomposition.

  6. Preface to the special issue on gas hydrate drilling in the Eastern Nankai Trough

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yamamoto, Koji; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Methane hydrate traps enormous amounts of methane in frozen deposits in continental margin sediments, and these deposits have long been targeted for studies investigating their potential as an energy resource. As a concentrated form of methane that occurs at shallower depths than conventional and most unconventional gas reservoirs, methane hydrates could be a readily accessible source of hydrocarbons for countries hosting deposits within their Exclusive Economic Zones. Japan is one such country, and since 2001 the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (referred to as MH21) has conducted laboratory, modeling, and field-based programs to study methane hydrates as an energy resource. The MH21 consortium is funded by the Japanese Ministry of Trade and Industry (METI) and led by the Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Oil Corporation (JOGMEC) and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST).

  7. Imaging hydrated microbial extracellular polymers: Comparative analysis by electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dohnalkova, A.C.; Marshall, M. J.; Arey, B. W.; Williams, K. H.; Buck, E. C.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2011-01-01

    Microbe-mineral and -metal interactions represent a major intersection between the biosphere and geosphere but require high-resolution imaging and analytical tools for investigating microscale associations. Electron microscopy has been used extensively for geomicrobial investigations and although used bona fide, the traditional methods of sample preparation do not preserve the native morphology of microbiological components, especially extracellular polymers. Herein, we present a direct comparative analysis of microbial interactions using conventional electron microscopy approaches of imaging at room temperature and a suite of cryogenic electron microscopy methods providing imaging in the close-to-natural hydrated state. In situ, we observed an irreversible transformation of the hydrated bacterial extracellular polymers during the traditional dehydration-based sample preparation that resulted in their collapse into filamentous structures. Dehydration-induced polymer collapse can lead to inaccurate spatial relationships and hence could subsequently affect conclusions regarding nature of interactions between microbial extracellular polymers and their environment.

  8. Formation of magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) cement pastes using sodium hexametaphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Tingting; Vandeperre, Luc J.; Cheeseman, Christopher R.

    2014-11-15

    Magnesium silicate hydrate (M-S-H) gel is formed by the reaction of brucite with amorphous silica during sulphate attack in concrete and M-S-H is therefore regarded as having limited cementing properties. The aim of this work was to form M-S-H pastes, characterise the hydration reactions and assess the resulting properties. It is shown that M-S-H pastes can be prepared by reacting magnesium oxide (MgO) and silica fume (SF) at low water to solid ratio using sodium hexametaphosphate (NaHMP) as a dispersant. Characterisation of the hydration reactions by x-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis shows that brucite and M-S-H gel are formed and that for samples containing 60 wt.% SF and 40 wt.% MgO all of the brucites react with SF to form M-S-H gel. These M-S-H cement pastes were found to have compressive strengths in excess of 70 MPa.

  9. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, Mark P.; Kedl, Robert J.

    1985-01-01

    This invention is a process for formation of a gas hydrate to be used as a cool storage medium using a refrigerant in water. Mixing of the immiscible refrigerant and water is effected by addition of a surfactant and agitation. The difficult problem of subcooling during the process is overcome by using the surfactant and agitation and performance of the process significantly improves and approaches ideal.

  10. Well log evaluation of gas hydrate saturations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    1998-01-01

    The amount of gas sequestered in gas hydrates is probably enormous, but estimates are highly speculative due to the lack of previous quantitative studies. Gas volumes that may be attributed to a gas hydrate accumulation within a given geologic setting are dependent on a number of reservoir parameters; one of which, gas-hydrate saturation, can be assessed with data obtained from downhole well logging devices. The primary objective of this study was to develop quantitative well-log evaluation techniques which will permit the calculation of gas-hydrate saturations in gas-hydrate-bearing sedimentary units. The `standard' and `quick look' Archie relations (resistivity log data) yielded accurate gas-hydrate and free-gas saturations within all of the gas hydrate accumulations assessed in the field verification phase of the study. Compressional wave acoustic log data have been used along with the Timur, modified Wood, and the Lee weighted average acoustic equations to calculate accurate gas-hydrate saturations in this study. The well log derived gas-hydrate saturations calculated in the field verification phase of this study, which range from as low as 2% to as high as 97%, confirm that gas hydrates represent a potentially important source of natural gas.

  11. Gas hydrate resources of northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    Large amounts of natural gas, composed mainly of methane, can occur in arctic sedimentary basins in the form of gas hydrates under appropriate temperature and pressure conditions. Gas hydrates are solids, composed of rigid cages of water molecules that trap molecules of gas. These substances are regarded as a potential unconventional source of natural gas because of their enormous gas-storage capacity. Most published gas hydrate resource estimates are highly simplified and based on limited geological data. The gas hydrate resource assessment for northern Alaska presented in this paper is based on a "play analysis" scheme, in which geological factors controlling the accumulation and preservation of gas hydrates are individually evaluated and risked for each hydrate play. This resource assessment identified two gas hydrate plays; the in-place gas resources within the gas hydrates of northern Alaska are estimated to range from 6.7 to 66.8 trillion cubic metres of gas (236 to 2,357 trillion cubic feet of gas), at the 0.50 and 0.05 probability levels respectively. The mean in-place hydrate resource estimate for northern Alaska is calculated to be 16.7 trillion cubic metres of gas (590 trillion cubic feet of gas). If this assessment is valid, the amount of natural gas stored as gas hydrates in northern Alaska could be almost seven times larger then the estimated total remaining recoverable conventional natural gas resources in the entire United States.

  12. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Hydrogen as a substrate for methanogenesis and sulphate reduction in anaerobic saltmarsh sediment.

    PubMed

    Abram, J W; Nedwell, D B

    1978-04-27

    Hydrogen gas stimulated sulphate reduction in a saltmarsh sediment and the importance of H2 transferred from organotrophic bacteria to the sulphate-reducers is discussed. beta-fluorolactate inhibited sulphate reduction whether lactate, ethanol or hydrogen was being used as growth substrate. When added to sediment beta-fluorolactate inhibited sulphate reduction with a consequent increase in methane production. Addition of H2 stimulated methanogenesis in sediment and this stimulation was greater if CO2 was also present. Hydrogen availability was the primary limitation of methanogenesis but the low concentration of dissolved CO2 in seawater may limit methane production even if H2 is available. The removal of inhibition of methanogenesis by the use of fluorolactate to suppress sulphate reduction or by the provision of hydrogen indicates competitive inhibition of methanogens by sulphate reducers utilizing transferred hydrogen.

  14. Characterization of non-stoichiometric hydration and the dehydration behavior of sitafloxacin hydrate.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuya; Araki, Tetsuya; Kitaoka, Hiroaki; Terada, Katsuhide

    2012-01-01

    Sitafloxacin (STFX) hydrate is a non-stoichiometric hydrate. The hydration state of STFX hydrate varies non-stoichiometrically depending on the relative humidity and temperature, though X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) of STFX hydrate was not affected by storing at low and high relative humidities. The detailed properties of crystalline water of STFX hydrate were estimated in terms of hygroscopicity, thermal analysis combined with X-ray powder diffractometry, crystallography and density functional theory (DFT) calculation. STFX hydrate changed the water contents continuously and reversibly from an equivalent amount of dihydrate through that of sesquihydrate depending on the relative humidity at 25°C. Thermal analysis and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) simultaneous measurement also revealed that STFX hydrate dehydrated into a hydrated state equivalent to monohydrate by heating up to 100°C, whereas XRPD patterns were slightly affected. This indicated that the crystal structure of STFX hydrate was retained at the dehydration level of monohydrate. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis showed that two STFX molecules and four water molecule sites were contained in an asymmetric unit. STFX molecules formed a channel structure where water molecules were included. At the partially dehydrated state, at least two of four water molecules were considered to be disordered in occupancy and/or coordinates. Insight into the crystal structure of STFX hydrate stored at low and high relative humidities and geometry of the hydrogen bond were helpful to estimate the origin of non-stoichiometric hydration of STFX hydrate.

  15. Study of Formation Mechanisms of Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jia-Sheng; Wu, Cheng-Yueh; Hsieh, Bieng-Zih

    2015-04-01

    Gas hydrates, which had been found in subsurface geological environments of deep-sea sediments and permafrost regions, are solid crystalline compounds of gas molecules and water. The estimated energy resources of hydrates are at least twice of that of the conventional fossil fuel in the world. Gas hydrates have a great opportunity to become a dominating future energy. In the past years, many laboratory experiments had been conducted to study chemical and thermodynamic characteristics of gas hydrates in order to investigate the formation and dissociation mechanisms of hydrates. However, it is difficult to observe the formation and dissociation of hydrates in a porous media from a physical experiment directly. The purpose of this study was to model the dynamic formation mechanisms of gas hydrate in porous media by reservoir simulation. Two models were designed for this study: 1) a closed-system static model with separated gas and water zones; this model was a hydrate equilibrium model to investigate the behavior of the formation of hydrates near the initial gas-water contact; and 2) an open-system dynamic model with a continuous bottom-up gas flow; this model simulated the behavior of gas migration and studied the formation of hydrates from flowed gas and static formation water in porous media. A phase behavior module was developed in this study for reservoir simulator to model the pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) behavior of hydrates. The thermodynamic equilibriums and chemical reactions were coupled with the phase behavior module to have functions modelling the formation and dissociation of hydrates from/to water and gas. The simulation models used in this study were validated from the code-comparison project proposed by the NETL. According to the modelling results of the closed-system static model, we found that predominated location for the formation of hydrates was below the gas-water contact (or at the top of water zone). The maximum hydrate saturation

  16. Nitric oxide degradation of heparin and heparan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, R E; Ghael, D; Li, M; Bhagat, D D; Arrigo, L M; Cowman, M K; Dweck, H S; Rosenfeld, L

    1997-01-01

    NO is a bioactive free radical produced by NO synthase in various tissues including vascular endothelium. One of the degradation products of NO is HNO2, an agent known to degrade heparin and heparan sulphate. This report documents degradation of heparin by cultured endothelial-cell-derived as well as exogenous NO. An exogenous narrow molecular-mass preparation of heparin was recovered from the medium of cultured endothelial cells using strong-anion exchange. In addition, another narrow molecular-mass preparation of heparin was gassed with exogenous NO under argon. Degradation was evaluated by gel-filtration chromatography. Since HNO2 degrades heparin under acidic conditions, the reaction with NO gas was studied under various pH conditions. The results show that the degradation of exogenous heparin by endothelial cells is inhibited by NO synthase inhibitors. Exogenous NO gas at concentrations as low as 400 p.p.m. degrades heparin and heparan sulphate. Exogenous NO degrades heparin at neutral as well as acidic pH. Endothelial-cell-derived NO, as well as exogenous NO gas, did not degrade hyaluronan, an unrelated glycosaminoglycan that resists HNO2 degradation. Peroxynitrite, a metabolic product of the reaction of NO with superoxide, is an agent that degrades hyaluronan; however, peroxynitrite did not degrade heparin. Thus endothelial-cell-derived NO is capable of degrading heparin and heparan sulphate via HNO2 rather than peroxynitrite. These observations may be relevant to various pathophysiological processes in which extracellular matrix is degraded, such as bone development, apoptosis, tissue damage from inflammatory responses and possible release of growth factors and cytokines. PMID:9182706

  17. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the

  18. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  19. Structural characteristics of hydration sites in lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Soda, Kunitsugu; Shimbo, Yudai; Seki, Yasutaka; Taiji, Makoto

    2011-06-01

    A new method is presented for determining the hydration site of proteins, where the effect of structural fluctuations in both protein and hydration water is explicitly considered by using molecular dynamics simulation (MDS). The whole hydration sites (HS) of lysozyme are composed of 195 single HSs and 38 clustered ones (CHS), and divided into 231 external HSs (EHS) and 2 internal ones (IHS). The largest CHSs, 'Hg' and 'Lβ', are the IHSs having 2.54 and 1.35 mean internal hydration waters respectively. The largest EHS, 'Clft', is located in the cleft region. The real hydration structure of a CHS is an ensemble of multiple structures. The transition between two structures occurs through recombinations of some H-bonds. The number of the experimental X-ray crystal waters is nearly the same as that of the estimated MDS hydration waters for 70% of the HSs, but significantly different for the rest of HSs.

  20. Fundamentals and applications of gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Carolyn A; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Wu, David T

    2011-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of gas hydrate formation and decomposition processes is critical in many energy and environmental areas and has special importance in flow assurance for the oil and gas industry. These areas represent the core of gas hydrate applications, which, albeit widely studied, are still developing as growing fields of research. Discovering the molecular pathways and chemical and physical concepts underlying gas hydrate formation potentially can lead us beyond flowline blockage prevention strategies toward advancing new technological solutions for fuel storage and transportation, safely producing a new energy resource from natural deposits of gas hydrates in oceanic and arctic sediments, and potentially facilitating effective desalination of seawater. The state of the art in gas hydrate research is leading us to new understanding of formation and dissociation phenomena that focuses on measurement and modeling of time-dependent properties of gas hydrates on the basis of their well-established thermodynamic properties.

  1. Transformation of external sulphate and its effect on phosphorus mobilization in Lake Moshui, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fenfang; Zou, Jiajia; Hua, Yumei; Zhang, Shaohui; Liu, Guanglong; Zhu, Duanwei

    2015-11-01

    Average concentrations of sulphate in lakes continue to increase sharply. The response of phosphorus to sulphate input is of great importance due to the relationship between eutrophication and ecological health. A four-week experiment was conducted under simulated conditions using samples from a heavily polluted lake, Lake Moshui, in Wuhan, China, to examine the influence of external sulphate on phosphorus release and the transformation of sulphate. The results showed that the diffusion of sulphate into the sediments promoted the proliferation of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and the reduction of sulphate. Acetic acid was consumed due to sulphate reduction. The soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) and soluble Fe measured with diffusive equilibration in thin-films (DET) probes increased significantly after the input of sulphate. The content of SRP was consistent with the variation in both the SRB number and the S(0) content in the sediments. The maximum SRP concentration of 100.43 mg L(-1) was recorded 3 cm below the sediment-water interface on the 29th d, which was more than twice the value of the control. There was a positive correlation between concentrations of Fe and SRP in the overlying water and the pore water of the sediments.

  2. Stable isotopic evidence for anaerobic maintained sulphate discharge in a polythermal glacier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, A. H.

    2016-03-01

    To understand the sources and sinks of sulphate and associated biogeochemical processes in a High Arctic environment, late winter snowpacks, the summer melt-waters and rock samples were collected and analysed for major ions and stable isotope tracers (δ18O, δ34S). The SO42bar/Clbar ratio reveal that more than 87% of sulphate (frequently > 95%) of total sulphate carried by the subglacial runoff and proglacial streams was derived from non-snowpack sources. The proximity of non-snowpack sulphate δ34S (∼8-19‰) to the δ34S of the major rocks in the vicinity (∼-6 to +18‰) suggest that the non-snowpack sulphate was principally derived from rock weathering. Furthermore, Ca2++Mg2+/SO42ˉ molar shows that sulphate acquisition in the meltwaters was controlled by two major processes: 1) coupled-sulphide carbonate weathering (molar ratio ∼ 2) and, 2) re-dissolution of secondary salts (molar ratio ∼ 1). The δ34S-SO4 = +19.4‰ > δ34S-S of rock, accompanied by increased sulphate concentration also indicates an input from re-dissolution of secondary salts. Overall, δ18O composition of these non-snowpack sulphate (-11.9 to -2.2‰) mostly stayed below the threshold δ18O value (-6.7 to -3.3‰) for minimum O2 condition, suggesting that certain proportion of sulphate was regularly supplied from anaerobic sulphide oxidation.

  3. Collagen fibril formation in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dombi, G W; Halsall, H B

    1985-01-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used to weaken both the electrostatic and the hydrophobic interactions during collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro. The rate and extent of fibril formation as well as fibril morphology were affected by SDS concentration. Both the formation of large fibrils at 0.3 mM-SDS and the complete cessation of fibril formation at 0.5 mM-SDS were considered to be the result of SDS-induced conformational changes in the non-helical telopeptides. A possible mechanism of SDS interaction with the N-terminal and the distal region of the C-terminal telopeptides is offered. Images Fig. 5. PMID:4026797

  4. 1H-n.m.r. investigation of naturally occurring and chemically oversulphated dermatan sulphates. Identification of minor monosaccharide residues.

    PubMed Central

    Bossennec, V; Petitou, M; Perly, B

    1990-01-01

    The 1H-n.m.r. spectra of various dermatan sulphate preparations present, besides the major signals of the basic disaccharide unit, several other minor signals. We have assigned most of them by n.m.r., using two-dimensional proton-proton double-quantum-correlation and nuclear-Overhauser-effect spectroscopy experiments. This allowed us to identify 2-O-sulphated L-iduronic acid and D-glucuronic acid residues as well as 6-sulphated N-acetylgalactosamine (presumably 4-O-sulphated as well). 2-O-Sulphated iduronic acid was present to similar extents (6-10% of total uronic acids) in pig skin dermatan sulphate and pig intestine dermatan sulphate, whereas glucuronic acid represented 17% of the uronic acid of pig skin dermatan sulphate and was virtually absent (1%) from the other preparation. 6-O-Sulphated N-acetylgalactosamine was present in minor amounts in pig intestine dermatan sulphate only. The influence of sulphation of iduronic acid units on their conformation was assessed by using chemically oversulphated pig intestine dermatan sulphate. Introduction of sulphate groups in this unit in dermatan sulphate tends to shift the conformational equilibrium towards the 1C4 conformer. PMID:2339978

  5. The sulphated carbohydrate-protein linkage region isolated from chondroitin 4-sulphate chains of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamada, S; Oyama, M; Kinugasa, H; Nakagawa, T; Kawasaki, T; Nagasawa, S; Khoo, K H; Morris, H R; Dell, A; Sugahara, K

    1995-05-01

    Inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor (ITI) in human plasma has a unique structural architecture composed of three polypeptide chains (H1, H2 and L chains), which are linked to each other through a chondroitin 4-sulphate chain. The structure of the carbohydrate-protein linkage region of the chondroitin 4-sulphate chain attached to the L chain was investigated. The peptide-chondroitin sulphate fraction was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography after exhaustive digestion with lysyl endopeptidase and then V8 protease. The chondroitin 4-sulphate chain was released from the peptides by beta-elimination using NaB3H4 and then digested with chondroitinase ABC. These treatments resulted in a single 3H-labelled hexasaccharide alditol fraction derived from the linkage region which had been associated with the L chain. Chemical and enzymatic analyses as well as fast-atom bombardment-mass spectrometry (FAB-MS) analysis revealed that the 3H-labelled hexasaccharide alditol had the following structure: delta HexA-alpha 1-3GalNAc(4-sulphate)beta 1-4GlcA beta 1-3Gal(4-sulphate)beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Xyl-ol (where delta HexA is 4-deoxy-alpha-L-threo-hex-4-enepyranosyluronic acid and Xyl-ol is xylitol). The structure contained the novel 4-sulphated Gal residue, which was previously demonstrated in a linkage hexasaccharide isolated from chondroitin 4-sulphate of rat chondrosarcoma (Sugahara et al., J. Biol. Chem., 263, 10168-10174, 1988) and of whale cartilage (Sugahara et al., Eur. J. Biochem., 202, 805-811, 1991). The above disulphated hexasaccharide alditol was the only component detected in the linkage region fraction of the chondroitin 4-sulphate chain of ITI, which implies some biological significance of this novel structure.

  6. Potential geologic hazards of Arctic gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Collett, T.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Sediments of the Arctic region may contain enormous quantities of natural gas in the form of gas hydrates, which are crystalline substances composed of water and mostly methane gas. These ice-like substances are generally found in two distinct environments: (1) offshore in sediments of outer continental margins and (2) nearshore and onshore in areas associated with the occurrence of permafrost. Recently, US, Canadian, and Soviet researchers have described numerous drilling and production problems attributed to the presence of gas hydrates, including uncontrolled gas releases during drilling, collapsed casings, and gas leakage to the surface. When the drill bit penetrates a gas hydrate, the drilling mud, unless cooled significantly by the operator, will become highly gasified as the hydrate decomposes. The hydrate adjacent to the well bore will continue to decompose and gasify the drilling mud as long as drilling and/or production introduces heat into the hydrate-bearing interval. The production of hot fluids from depth through the permafrost and gas hydrate-bearing intervals adversely raises formation temperatures, thus decomposing the gas hydrates. If the disassociated, free gas is trapped behind the casing, reservoir pressures may substantially increase and cause the casing to collapse. In several wells in northern Alaska, the disassociated free gas has leaked to the surface outside the conductor casing. An additional drilling hazard associated with gas hydrates results from the sealing attributes of hydrates, which may trap large volumes of over pressured free gas at shallow depths. Even though documented problems attributed to the presence of gas hydrates have been relatively few, it is likely that as exploration and development activity moves farther offshore into deeper water (>300 m) and to higher latitudes in the Arctic, the frequency of gas hydrate-related problems will increase.

  7. Gas hydrates of outer continental margins

    SciTech Connect

    Kvenvolden, K.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances in which a rigid framework of water molecules traps molecules of gas, mainly methane. Gas-hydrate deposits are common in continental margin sediment in all major oceans at water depths greater than about 300 m. Thirty-three localities with evidence for gas-hydrate occurrence have been described worldwide. The presence of these gas hydrates has been inferred mainly from anomalous lacoustic reflectors seen on marine seismic records. Naturally occurring marine gas hydrates have been sampled and analyzed at about tensites in several regions including continental slope and rise sediment of the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. Except for some Gulf of Mexico gas hydrate occurrences, the analyzed gas hydrates are composed almost exclusively of microbial methane. Evidence for the microbial origin of methane in gas hydrates includes (1) the inverse relation between methane occurence and sulfate concentration in the sediment, (2) the subparallel depth trends in carbon isotopic compositions of methane and bicarbonate in the interstitial water, and (3) the general range of {sup 13}C depletion ({delta}{sub PDB}{sup 13}C = {minus}90 to {minus}60 {per thousand}) in the methane. Analyses of gas hydrates from the Peruvian outer continental margin in particular illustrate this evidence for microbially generated methane. The total amount of methane in gas hydrates of continental margins is not known, but estimates of about 10{sup 16} m{sup 3} seem reasonable. Although this amount of methane is large, it is not yet clear whether methane hydrates of outer continental margins will ever be a significant energy resource; however, these gas hydrates will probably constitute a drilling hazard when outer continental margins are explored in the future.

  8. Natural gas hydrate occurrence and issues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Naturally occurring gas hydrate is found in sediment of two regions: (1) continental, including continental shelves, at high latitudes where surface temperatures are very cold, and (2) submarine outer continental margins where pressures are very high and bottom-water temperatures are near 0??C. Continental gas hydrate is found in association with onshore and offshore permafrost. Submarine gas hydrate is found in sediment of continental slopes and rises. The amount of methane present in gas hydrate is thought to be very large, but the estimates that have been made are more speculative than real. Nevertheless, at the present time there has been a convergence of ideas regarding the amount of methane in gas hydrate deposits worldwide at about 2 x 1016 m3 or 7 x 1017 ft3 = 7 x 105 Tcf [Tcf = trillion (1012) ft3]. The potentially large amount of methane in gas hydrate and the shallow depth of gas hydrate deposits are two of the principal factors driving research concerning this substance. Such a large amount of methane, if it could be commercially produced, provides a potential energy resource for the future. Because gas hydrate is metastable, changes of surface pressure and temperature affect its stability. Destabilized gas hydrate beneath the sea floor leads to geologic hazards such as submarine mass movements. Examples of submarine slope failures attributed to gas hydrate are found worldwide. The metastability of gas hydrate may also have an effect on climate. The release of methane, a 'greenhouse' gas, from destabilized gas hydrate may contribute to global warming and be a factor in global climate change.

  9. Polycrystalline methane hydrate: Synthesis from superheated ice, and low-temperature mechanical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    We describe a new and efficient technique to grow aggregates of pure methane hydrate in quantities suitable for physical and material properties testing. Test specimens were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with granulated H2O ice, and then warming the reactants to promote the reaction CH4(g) + 6H2O(s???1) ??? CH4??6H2O (methane hydrate). Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface on ice grain surfaces, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above the ice melting point and up to 290 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 h. The resulting material is pure, cohesive, polycrystalline methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random orientation. Synthesis conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature while reaction progressed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the unreacted portions of ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, showed that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting are easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably to temperatures well above its ordinary melting point while reacting to form hydrate. Direct observations of the hydrate growth process in a small, high-pressure optical cell verified these conclusions and revealed additional details of the hydrate growth process. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T = 140-200 K, Pc = 50-100 MPa, and ?? = 10-4 10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to an unusually high degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing

  10. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    DOE PAGES

    Gabitto, Jorge F.; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Memore » thane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 10 16   m 3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.« less

  11. Physical Properties of Gas Hydrates: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Gabitto, Jorge; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Methane gas hydrates in sediments have been studied by several investigators as a possible future energy resource. Recent hydrate reserves have been estimated at approximately 1016?m3 of methane gas worldwide at standard temperature and pressure conditions. In situ dissociation of natural gas hydrate is necessary in order to commercially exploit the resource from the natural-gas-hydrate-bearing sediment. The presence of gas hydrates in sediments dramatically alters some of the normal physical properties of the sediment. These changes can be detected by field measurements and by down-hole logs. An understanding of the physical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments is necessary for interpretation of geophysical data collected in field settings, borehole, and slope stability analyses; reservoir simulation; and production models. This work reviews information available in literature related to the physical properties of sediments containing gas hydrates. A brief review of the physical properties of bulk gas hydrates is included. Detection methods, morphology, and relevant physical properties of gas-hydrate-bearing sediments are also discussed.

  12. Desalination utilizing clathrate hydrates (LDRD final report).

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Blake Alexander; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2008-01-01

    Advances are reported in several aspects of clathrate hydrate desalination fundamentals necessary to develop an economical means to produce municipal quantities of potable water from seawater or brackish feedstock. These aspects include the following, (1) advances in defining the most promising systems design based on new types of hydrate guest molecules, (2) selection of optimal multi-phase reactors and separation arrangements, and, (3) applicability of an inert heat exchange fluid to moderate hydrate growth, control the morphology of the solid hydrate material formed, and facilitate separation of hydrate solids from concentrated brine. The rate of R141b hydrate formation was determined and found to depend only on the degree of supercooling. The rate of R141b hydrate formation in the presence of a heat exchange fluid depended on the degree of supercooling according to the same rate equation as pure R141b with secondary dependence on salinity. Experiments demonstrated that a perfluorocarbon heat exchange fluid assisted separation of R141b hydrates from brine. Preliminary experiments using the guest species, difluoromethane, showed that hydrate formation rates were substantial at temperatures up to at least 12 C and demonstrated partial separation of water from brine. We present a detailed molecular picture of the structure and dynamics of R141b guest molecules within water cages, obtained from ab initio calculations, molecular dynamics simulations, and Raman spectroscopy. Density functional theory calculations were used to provide an energetic and molecular orbital description of R141b stability in both large and small cages in a structure II hydrate. Additionally, the hydrate of an isomer, 1,2-dichloro-1-fluoroethane, does not form at ambient conditions because of extensive overlap of electron density between guest and host. Classical molecular dynamics simulations and laboratory trials support the results for the isomer hydrate. Molecular dynamics simulations

  13. Observations related to tetrahydrofuran and methane hydrates for laboratory studies of hydrate-bearing sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.Y.; Yun, T.S.; Santamarina, J.C.; Ruppel, C.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction among water molecules, guest gas molecules, salts, and mineral particles determines the nucleation and growth behavior of gas hydrates in natural sediments. Hydrate of tetrahydrofuran (THF) has long been used for laboratory studies of gas hydrate-bearing sediments to provide close control on hydrate concentrations and to overcome the long formation history of methane hydrate from aqueous phase methane in sediments. Yet differences in the polarizability of THF (polar molecule) compared to methane (nonpolar molecule) raise questions about the suitability of THF as a proxy for methane in the study of hydrate-bearing sediments. From existing data and simple macroscale experiments, we show that despite its polar nature, THF's large molecular size results in low permittivity, prevents it from dissolving precipitated salts, and hinders the solvation of ions on dry mineral surfaces. In addition, the interfacial tension between water and THF hydrate is similar to that between water and methane hydrate. The processes that researchers choose for forming hydrate in sediments in laboratory settings (e.g., from gas, liquid, or ice) and the pore-scale distribution of the hydrate that is produced by each of these processes likely have a more pronounced effect on the measured macroscale properties of hydrate-bearing sediments than do differences between THF and methane hydrates themselves.

  14. Catastrophic growth of gas hydrates in the presence of kinetic hydrate inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cha, Minjun; Shin, Kyuchul; Seo, Yutaek; Shin, Ju-Young; Kang, Seong-Pil

    2013-12-27

    The effect of the concentration of kinetic hydrate inhibitors, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), and polyvinylcaprolactam (PVCap) on the onset and growth of synthetic natural gas hydrates is investigated by measuring the hydrate onset time and gas consumption rate. Although the hydrate onset time is extended by increasing the concentration from 0.5 to 3.0 wt % for both PVP and PVCap, the growth rate of hydrates shows that the different tendency depends on the type of kinetic hydrate inhibitor and its concentration. For PVCap solution, the hydrate growth was slow for more than 1000 min after the onset at the concentration of 0.5 and 1.5 wt %. However, the growth rate becames almost 8 times faster at the concentration of 3.0 wt %, representing the catastrophic growth of hydrate just after the hydrate onset. (13)C NMR spectra of hydrates formed at 3.0 wt % of PVP and PVCap indicate the existence of both structures I and II. Cage occupancy of methane in large cages of structure II decreases significantly when compared to that for pure water. These results suggest that increasing the concentration of KHI up to 3.0 wt % may induce the earlier appearance of catastrophic hydrate growth and the existence of metastable structure I; thus, there needs to be an upper limit for using KHI to manage the formation of gas hydrates.

  15. Waters of Hydration of Cupric Hydrates: A Comparison between Heating and Absorbance Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlag, Rebecca; Nyasulu, Frazier

    2011-01-01

    The empirical formulas of four cupric hydrates are determined by measuring the absorbance in aqueous solution. The Beer-Lambert Law is verified by constructing a calibration curve of absorbance versus known Cu[superscript 2+](aq) concentration. A solution of the unknown hydrate is prepared by using 0.2-0.3 g of hydrate, and water is added such…

  16. CE study of neuroprotective humanin peptide and its derivatives: interactions with phosphate, sulphate, alkylsulphonates and sulphated-beta-CD.

    PubMed

    Havel, Josef; Li, Rong; Macka, Mirek

    2008-02-01

    Humanin (HN), Met-Ala-Pro-Arg-Gly-Phe-Ser-Cys-Leu-Leu-Leu-Leu-Thr-Ser-Glu-IIe-Asp-Leu-Pro-Val-Lys-Arg-Arg-Ala, recently discovered in the human brain, is an important neuroprotective peptide. Some derivatives of HN show even higher biological activity, for example [G-14]-HN, where Ser at position 14 is replaced with Gly. As structurally related HN peptide derivatives have similar chemical properties, their separation by CE is difficult. In this work, the electrophoretic behaviour of HN derivatives including [G-14]-HN, a tryptophan HN derivative [W-14]-HN, several other HN derivatives and HN fragments was studied. While phosphate buffer was used as the general BGE, the effects of the buffer concentration and various additives were examined, including sulphate, heptane sulphonate, 2-morpholinoethanesulphonic acid N-[tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl]-2-aminoethane sulphonic acid (TES), sulphated-beta-CD and beta-CD. Separation efficiency of 200,000 theoretical plates was achieved in a BGE of 80 mM phosphate at pH 2.5 where seven out of nine major peaks were partially separated. By investigating the influence of concentration of the interrogated ions on peptides migration, the association between positively charged protonated sites of peptides and various anions was proved. Especially a strong interaction with phosphate, sulphate and sulphonate groups was established. Conditional stability constant of the [Pep(z+), (H(2)PO(4)(-))(n)](z - n) ion associate (n = 1) for [G-14]-HN equals to log K approximately 1.78.

  17. Kinetic and thermodynamics of the removal of Zn2+ and Cu2+ from aqueous solution by sulphate and phosphate-modified Bentonite clay.

    PubMed

    Olu-Owolabi, Bamidele I; Unuabonah, Emmanuel I

    2010-12-15

    The modification of pristine Bentonite clay with sulphate and phosphate anions was found to increase its cation-exchange capacity (CEC), adsorption capacity and overall pseudo-second order kinetic rate constant for the adsorption of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+). Modification with sulphate and phosphate anion decreased the specific surface area of pristine Bentonite clay. Phosphate-modified Bentonite clay was found to give the highest adsorption capacity for both metal ions. The adsorption process was observed to be endothermic and spontaneous in nature for both metal ions with Zn(2+) being more adsorbed. Modification with phosphate anion increased the spontaneity of the adsorption process. The effective modification of pristine Bentonite clay with sulphate anion was confirmed from hypochromic shifts in the range of 13-18 cm(-1) which is typical of physisorption while modification with phosphate anion was confirmed by its hyperchromic shifts typical of chemisorption in the infrared red region using Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Using the model efficiency indicator, kinetic data were found to show very strong fit to the pseudo-second order kinetic model implying that the adsorption of Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) were basically by chemisorption.

  18. In situ thermolysis of magnetic nanoparticles using non-hydrated iron oleate complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng Meng; Kim, Do Kyung

    2012-02-01

    A novel strategy for the fabrication of nanostructured materials based on preparation of metallic surfactants is presented and some examples are demonstrated in this article. The suggested synthetic procedure of metal oleate is universal, potentially able to produce bulk quantities, and can be applicable to the synthesis of other metal oxide and metal nanoparticles. In general, organometallic compounds are quite expensive and are mostly classified as a highly toxic substance. In this study, we used simple, inexpensive, and eco-friendly approaches to prepare the metallic surfactants. As an example, non-hydrated iron oleate (FeOl) complexes are prepared as precursors for the in situ-fabricated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by thermolysis. The different coordination of the non-hydrated FeOl complexes are directly relating to the competition between nucleation and crystal growth. The in situ preparation of SPIONs involves the reaction of metal nitrate and carboxylic acid at 120 °C to synthesize the non-hydrated FeOl complexes and following the thermolysis of FeOl at 300 °C in non-coordination solvent. The coordination modes and distinct thermal behaviors of intermediates non-hydrated FeOl complexes are comparatively investigated by means of thermo-analytic techniques complimented by differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The potential chemical structures of non-hydrated FeOl and their reaction mechanism by thermolysis were elucidated. The resulting lipid-coated SPIONs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, FTIR, differential temperature analysis, and TGA. These data suggested a bimodal interaction of organic shell and nanoparticle surface, with chemically absorbed inner layer and physically absorbed outer layer of carboxylic acid.

  19. Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan and embryonic brain enlargement in the chick.

    PubMed

    Gato, A; Moro, J A; Alonso, M I; Pastor, J F; Represa, J J; Barbosa, E

    1993-07-01

    Previous studies of the early development of the neural tube have shown the existence of an intraneural fluid, which causes a positive pressure inside this primordium, and seems to play a key role in the early development of the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the composition and synthesis of this intraneural fluid. By using a sequential method, which includes fixation with glutaraldehyde plus cetylpyridinium chloride, opening the neural cavity after critical point drying and scanning electron microscopy analysis, we found a water-soluble extracellular matrix that filled up the brain vesicles of chick embryos at the earliest stages of the neural tube. An ultrastructural study of the neural epithelium during these stages revealed the existence of a secretion process in the neural cells toward the apical side, the future neural cavity. An immunocytochemical study to assess the nature of the secreted material has shown that the intraneural matrix contains chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan, which appeared homogeneously distributed throughout the neural cavity. Our findings demonstrate that the intraneural liquid is a fluid of complex composition and includes chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan as an osmotically active molecule. This suggests a morphogenetic role for the proteoglycan during early brain enlargement. The neural ectoderm is a polarized epithelium from early developmental stages and secretes the intraneural matrix.

  20. Hydration Dynamics of Biomolecules from Co-solvents to Crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubarych, Kevin

    Biomolecules self-assemble into complex functional structures with high fidelity largely due to interactions between the macromolecules and water. Once folded, the dynamics of water molecules in the vicinity of extended macromolecular interfaces can be altered relative to the bulk, leading to complex, heterogeneous and distance-dependent transport properties near these surfaces. Using a strategy based on transition metal carbonyl vibrational probes covalently conjugated to the protein surface, we have been able to use ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to probe the dynamics from this most important perspective. In a series of studies, we have found these probes to be primarily sensitive to the orientational dynamics of the hydrating water molecules, and have studied both protein/water and membrane/water interfaces. Several key finding have emerged, including a modest 2-3-fold slowdown of hydration water's reorientational dynamics relative to the bulk, and a dynamical transition that occurs due to collective hydration induced by macromolecular crowding. We will summarize our progress to-date, as well as present our newest results on the effects of ions and the dynamical signatures of preferential solvation.

  1. Probable Occurrence of Gas Hydrates Along the Continental Margins of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramprasad, T.

    2004-12-01

    reflection data acquired by oil majors in India have been examined and inferred the probable presence of bottom simulating reflections (BSR) in the offshore areas of India. The depths of the BSRs on several seismic profiles in the offshore regions of Goa and Saurashtra (west coast), Krishna-Godavari and Mahanadi (east coast) of India and the Northern Andaman Sea are within the zone of computed gas hydrate stability. Assuming the depth of BSR observed from seismic data as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, the geothermal gradient values have been computed. Most of the values are in close agreement with the observed geothermal gradient data. Sediment thickness and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content maps were prepared from the compiled data, which were used as constraints in assessing the GHSZ thickness and the probable occurrence of gas hydrates in the marine sediments in Indian offshore. The non-geophysical proxies, derived from the analysis of 5m long sediment cores, such as chlorine anomalies, reduction trend of sulphate concentration, enrichment of methane and abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria, fomenters and nitrate reducing bacteria with depth provide indirect clue for the occurrence of gas hydrates at deeper depths. The high-resolution seismic data and sediment cores longer than 20m, perhaps would enhance the understanding of occurrence of gas hydrates in the marine sediments.

  2. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Liange; Samper, Javier; Montenegro, Luis; Fernández, Ana María

    2010-05-01

    SummaryUnsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl - data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred

  3. A coupled THMC model of a heating and hydration laboratory experiment in unsaturated compacted FEBEX bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.; Fernandez, A.M.

    2010-05-01

    Unsaturated compacted bentonite is foreseen by several countries as a backfill and sealing material in high-level radioactive waste repositories. The strong interplays between thermal (T), hydrodynamic (H), mechanical (M) and chemical (C) processes during the hydration stage of a repository call for fully coupled THMC models. Validation of such THMC models is prevented by the lack of comprehensive THMC experiments and the difficulties of experimental methods to measure accurately the chemical composition of bentonite porewater. We present here a non-isothermal multiphase flow and multicomponent reactive solute transport model for a deformable medium of a heating and hydration experiment performed on a sample of compacted FEBEX bentonite. Besides standard solute transport and geochemical processes, the model accounts for solute cross diffusion and thermal and chemical osmosis. Bentonite swelling is solved with a state-surface approach. The THM model is calibrated with transient temperature, water content and porosity data measured at the end of the experiment. The reactive transport model is calibrated with porewater chemical data derived from aqueous extract data. Model results confirm that thermal osmosis is relevant for the hydration of FEBEX bentonite while chemical osmosis can be safely neglected. Dilution and evaporation are the main processes controlling the concentration of conservative species. Dissolved cations are mostly affected by calcite dissolution-precipitation and cation exchange reactions. Dissolved sulphate is controlled by gypsum/anhydrite dissolution-precipitation. pH is mostly buffered by protonation/deprotonation via surface complexation. Computed concentrations agree well with inferred aqueous extract data at all sections except near the hydration boundary where cation data are affected by a sampling artifact. The fit of Cl{sup -} data is excellent except for the data near the heater. The largest deviations of the model from inferred aqueous

  4. Methane hydrate research at NETL: Research to make methane production from hydrates a reality

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Link, D.D.; English, N.

    2007-03-01

    Research is underway at NETL to understand the physical properties of methane hydrates. Five key areas of research that need further investigation have been identified. These five areas, i.e. thermal properties of hydrates in sediments, kinetics of natural hydrate dissociation, hysteresis effects, permeability of sediments to gas flow and capillary pressures within sediments, and hydrate distribution at porous scale, are important to the production models that will be used for producing methane from hydrate deposits. NETL is using both laboratory experiments and computational modeling to address these five key areas. The laboratory and computational research reinforce each other by providing feedback. The laboratory results are used in the computational models and the results from the computational modeling is used to help direct future laboratory research. The data generated at NETL will be used to help fulfill The National Methane Hydrate R&D Program of a “long-term supply of natural gas by developing the knowledge and technology base to allow commercial production of methane from domestic hydrate deposits by the year 2015” as outlined on the NETL Website [NETL Website, 2005. http://www.netl.doe.gov/scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/index.html]. Laboratory research is accomplished in one of the numerous high-pressure hydrate cells available ranging in size from 0.15 mL to 15 L in volume. A dedicated high-pressure view cell within the Raman spectrometer allows for monitoring the formation and dissociation of hydrates. Thermal conductivity of hydrates (synthetic and natural) at a certain temperature and pressure is performed in a NETL-designed cell. Computational modeling studies are investigating the kinetics of hydrate formation and dissociation, modeling methane hydrate reservoirs, molecular dynamics simulations of hydrate formation, dissociation, and thermal properties, and Monte Carlo simulations of hydrate formation and dissociation.

  5. X-ray crystal structure and vibrational spectra of hydrazides and their metal complexes. Part I. Catena-poly[di-μ-aqua-(μ-maleic hydrazidato- O)sodium] hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzyk-Ociepa, Barbara

    2007-05-01

    The catena-poly[di-μ-aqua-(μ-maleic hydrazidato- O)sodium] hydrate, [Na(MH) (H 2O) 2] n·H 2O is examined using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The crystals are monoclinic, space group C2/c, with a = 14.321(4), b = 16.114(5), c = 6.547(1) Å, β = 104.11(2) and Z = 4. In title complex, each sodium ion is coordinated by two oxygen atoms of two water molecules, one oxygen atom of the maleic hydrazidato, two oxygen atoms of two water molecules from an adjacent [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] unit and one oxygen atom of the maleic hydrazidato from an adjacent [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] unit too. It is interesting that the sodium ion is not bonded by O-deprotonated oxygen atom but by carbonyl oxygen atom of maleic hydrazidato. The infrared and Raman spectra for maleic hydrazide (MH), its deuterated derivative (MD) and [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] n·H 2O are reported. The theoretical wavenumbers, infrared intensities and Raman scattering activities have been calculated using density functional (B3LYP) method with the 6-311++G(d,p) for MH and MD and 6-311++G(d,p)/LanL2DZ for [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] n·H 2O basis sets. The calculated potential energy distribution has proved to be of great help in assigning the infrared and Raman spectra maleic hydrazide, its deuterated derivative and [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] n·H 2O. The isotope replacements were very helpful in correlation of observed bands and of the theoretically calculated normal vibrations. The results from natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses for keto-hydroxy, diketo and dihydroxy forms of MH as well as for the theoretical model of [Na(MH)(H 2O) 2] n·H 2O are compared.

  6. Structural study of hydrated/dehydrated manganese thiophene-2,5-diphosphonate metal organic frameworks, Mn2(O3P-C4H2S-PO3)·2H2O.

    PubMed

    Rueff, Jean-Michel; Perez, Olivier; Pautrat, Alain; Barrier, Nicolas; Hix, Gary B; Hernot, Sylvie; Couthon-Gourvès, Hélène; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2012-10-01

    Synthesis of thiophene-2,5-diphosphonic acid 2 is reported, and its use for synthesis of the original pristine materials Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 3 is reported. The structure of material 3 has been fully resolved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 3 crystallizes in a monoclinic cell (space group P2) with the following parameters: a = 11.60(1) Å, b = 4.943(5) Å, c = 19.614(13) Å, β = 107.22°. A noticeable feature of the structure of compound 3 is the orientation of the thiophene heterocycles that adopt two different orientations in two successive layers (along c). Thermal analysis of compound 3 indicates that the water molecules are easily removed from 160 to 230 °C while the dehydrated structure is stable up to 500 °C. The dehydrated compound obtained from 3 can be rehydrated to give the polymorphic compound Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3))·2H(2)O 4, which crystallizes in an orthorhombic cell (space group Pnam) with the following parameters: a = 7.5359(3) Å, b = 7.5524(3) Å, c = 18.3050(9) Å. The main difference between the structures of 3 and 4 arises from both the orientation of the thiophene rings (herringbone-type organization in 4) and the structure of the inorganic layers. The thiophene-2,5-diphosphonic acid moieties engaged in materials 3 and 4 adopt a different orientation likely due to rotation around the P-C bonds and via the dehydrated state 5, which is likely more flexible than the hydrated states. Study of the magnetic properties performed on compound 3 and 4 and on the dehydrated compounds Mn(2)(O(3)P-C(4)H(2)S-PO(3)) 5 complemented by the structural study has permitted us to characterize the antiferromagnetic ground state of sample 3, a weak ferromagnetic component in sample 4, and complete paramagnetic behavior in sample 5.

  7. DNA hydration studied by neutron fiber diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, W.; Forsyth, V.T.; Mahendrasingam, A.; Langan, P.; Pigram, W.J.

    1994-12-31

    The development of neutron high angle fiber diffraction to investigate the location of water around the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) double-helix is described. The power of the technique is illustrated by its application to the D and A conformations of DNA using the single crystal diffractometer, D19, at the Institute Laue-Langevin, Grenoble and the time of flight diffractometer, SXD, at the Rutherford Appleton ISIS Spallation Neutron Source. These studies show the existence of bound water closely associated with the DNA. The patterns of hydration in these two DNA conformations are quite distinct and are compared to those observed in X-ray single crystal studies of two-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides. Information on the location of water around the DNA double-helix from the neutron fiber diffraction studies is combined with that on the location of alkali metal cations from complementary X-ray high angle fiber diffraction studies at the Daresbury Laboratory SRS using synchrotron radiation. These analyses emphasize the importance of viewing DNA, water and ions as a single system with specific interactions between the three components and provide a basis for understanding the effect of changes in the concentration of water and ions in inducing conformations] transitions in the DNA double-helix.

  8. Synthesis of polycrystalline methane hydrate, and its phase stability and mechanical properties at elevated pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    1997-01-01

    Test specimens of methane hydrate were grown under static conditions by combining cold, pressurized CH4 gas with H2O ice grains, then warming the system to promote the reaction CH4 (g) + 6H2O (s???l) ??? CH4??6H2O. Hydrate formation evidently occurs at the nascent ice/liquid water interface, and complete reaction was achieved by warming the system above 271.5 K and up to 289 K, at 25-30 MPa, for approximately 8 hours. The resulting material is pure methane hydrate with controlled grain size and random texture. Fabrication conditions placed the H2O ice well above its melting temperature before reaction completed, yet samples and run records showed no evidence for bulk melting of the ice grains. Control experiments using Ne, a non-hydrate-forming gas, verified that under otherwise identical conditions, the pressure reduction and latent heat associated with ice melting is easily detectable in our fabrication apparatus. These results suggest that under hydrate-forming conditions, H2O ice can persist metastably at temperatures well above its melting point. Methane hydrate samples were then tested in constant-strain-rate deformation experiments at T= 140-200 K, Pc= 50-100 MPa, and ????= 10-4-10-6 s-1. Measurements in both the brittle and ductile fields showed that methane hydrate has measurably different strength than H2O ice, and work hardens to a higher degree compared to other ices as well as to most metals and ceramics at high homologous temperatures. This work hardening may be related to a changing stoichiometry under pressure during plastic deformation; x-ray analyses showed that methane hydrate undergoes a process of solid-state disproportionation or exsolution during deformation at conditions well within its conventional stability field.

  9. Organic substrates as electron donors in permeable reactive barriers for removal of heavy metals from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Kijjanapanich, P; Pakdeerattanamint, K; Lens, P N L; Annachhatre, A P

    2012-12-01

    This research was conducted to select suitable natural organic substrates as potential carbon sources for use as electron donors for biological sulphate reduction in a permeable reactive barrier (PRB). A number of organic substrates were assessed through batch and continuous column experiments under anaerobic conditions with acid mine drainage (AMD) obtained from an abandoned lignite coal mine. To keep the heavy metal concentration at a constant level, the AMD was supplemented with heavy metals whenever necessary. Under anaerobic conditions, sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) converted sulphate into sulphide using the organic substrates as electron donors. The sulphide that was generated precipitated heavy metals as metal sulphides. Organic substrates, which yielded the highest sulphate reduction in batch tests, were selected for continuous column experiments which lasted over 200 days. A mixture of pig-farm wastewater treatment sludge, rice husk and coconut husk chips yielded the best heavy metal (Fe, Cu, Zn and Mn) removal efficiencies of over 90%.

  10. Gas hydrates in the ocean environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.

    2002-01-01

    A GAS HYDRATE, also known as a gas clathrate, is a gas-bearing, icelike material. It occurs in abundance in marine sediments and stores immense amounts of methane, with major implications for future energy resources and global climate change. Furthermore, gas hydrate controls some of the physical properties of sedimentary deposits and thereby influences seafloor stability.

  11. 78 FR 26337 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  12. 78 FR 37536 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. The Federal... of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice on potential applications of...

  13. 76 FR 59667 - Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Methane... Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee. Federal... of the Committee: The purpose of the Methane Hydrate Advisory Committee is to provide advice...

  14. Massive Volcanic SO2 Oxidation and Sulphate Aerosol Deposition in Cenozoic North America

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of sulphur dioxide (SO2) into the atmosphere. SO2 is oxidized to sulphate and can subsequently form sulphate aerosol, which can affect the Earth's radiation balance, biologic productivity and high-altitude ozone co...

  15. Effect of aerobic exercise against vanadyl sulphate-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Fatemeh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Kargarfard, Mehdi; Eshraghi-Jazi, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ardeshir; Shirdavani, Soheila

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Vanadium compounds are insulin like drugs which are accompanied with nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity as their major side effects. Aerobic exercise is well known as an approach to reduce the side effects of many drugs. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the role of aerobic exercise against vanadyl sulphate induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity in male rats. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. Group I had aerobic exercise on a treadmill 5 days/week for 6 weeks. Group II received vanadyl sulphate (50 mg/kg/week; i.p.) for 6 weeks. Group III had combination of exercise and vanadyl sulphate therapy as groups 1 and 2. At the end of study, blood samples were obtained, and the animals were sacrificed for the tissues injury determination. Results: Vanadyl sulphate alone increased serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), and kidney weight (KW) and kidney tissue damage score (KTDS) (P<0.05). These observations revealed nephrotoxicity induced by vanadyl sulphate, although exercise training did not attenuate these results. In addition, vanadyl sulphate alone induced liver tissue damage score and exercise training intensified it insignificantly, while the serum levels of aspartate amino transferase and alanine amino transferase were greater in exercise alone group than others groups. Conclusion: Aerobic exercise could not attenuate vanadyl sulphate induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. These findings must be considered when vanadyl sulphate is suggested as insulin like drug. PMID:27689120

  16. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Steve Runyon; Richard Sigal; Bill Liddell; Thomas Williams; George Moridis

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. Hot Ice No. 1 was planned to test the Ugnu and West Sak sequences for gas hydrates and a concomitant free gas accumulation on Anadarko's 100% working interest acreage in section 30 of Township 9N, Range 8E of the Harrison Bay quadrangle of the North Slope of Alaska. The Ugnu and West Sak intervals are favorably positioned in the hydrate-stability zone over an area extending from Anadarko's acreage westward to the vicinity of the aforementioned gas-hydrate occurrences. This suggests that a large, north-to-south trending gas-hydrate accumulation may exist in that area. The presence of gas shows in the Ugnu and West Sak reservoirs in wells situated eastward and down dip of the Hot Ice location indicate that a free-gas accumulation may be trapped by gas hydrates. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was designed to core from the surface to the base of the West Sak interval using the revolutionary and new

  17. In-situ characterization of gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerz, T.; Brueckmann, W.; Linke, P.; Tuerkay, M.

    2003-04-01

    Gas hydrates are a dynamic reservoir in the marine carbon cycle and a periodically large and focussed source of methane probably constituting the largest carbon reservoir on earth. Therefore an important issue in gas hydrate research is the need for better tools to remotely estimate the volume and stability conditions of marine gas hydrate in the near sub-surface. It is also crucial to precisely determine the hydrate stability conditions in the near sub-surface, where gas hydrates are most susceptible to dissolution under changing P/T conditions. Our knowledge about the occurrence, spatial distribution, and life-cycle of gas hydrates in marine sediments is mainly derived from indirect geophysical and geochemical evidence. In a few instances gas hydrates have also been directly observed and sampled at the sea floor. For regional or global estimates of hydrate volumes and stability conditions however, new techniques for ground-truthing and calibration of geophysical, biological and geochemical methods are needed. During the OTEGA cruise with RV SONNE to Hydrate Ridge off Oregon a new device for in-situ characterization of gas hydrates was deployed and tested for the first time. The tool, HDSD (Hydrate Detection and Stability Determination) is being developed as part of Cooperative Research Center (SFB) 574 "Volatiles and Fluids in Subduction Zones". It is designed to identify and quantify small volumes of near-surface gas hydrate through continuous in-situ thermal and resistivity monitoring in a defined volume of sediment while it is slowly heated to destabilize gas hydrates embedded in it. In its current configuration HDSD is delivered to the seafloor by a video-guided GEOMAR BC Lander system. The sediment volume to be tested for the presence and abundance of gas hydrates is first isolated by a rectangular experiment chamber that is pushed into the upper 30cm of sediment. A "stinger", centrally mounted in the chamber and equipped with two arrays of sensors, provides

  18. Solubility of hematite revisited: effects of hydration.

    PubMed

    Jang, Je-Hun; Dempsey, Brian A; Burgos, William D

    2007-11-01

    Measured pH and dissolved ferric iron concentration ([Fe(III)diss]) in contact with well-characterized hematite indicated an equilibrium with hematite immediately after synthesis, but [Fe(III)diss] increased with hydration time to be consistent with the predicted solubility of goethite or hydrous ferric oxide (HFO), hydrated analogues of hematite. X-ray diffraction did not detect structural modification of hematite after 190 days of hydration, but Mössbauer spectroscopy detected hydration that penetrated several crystalline layers. When the hematite suspension was diluted with water, solids were invariably identified as hematite, but [Fe(III)diss] and pH indicated an equilibrium with goethite or HFO. This is the first experimental confirmation that the interfacial hydration of anhydrous hematite results in higher solubility than predicted by bulk thermodynamic properties of hematite. Correspondence of the results with previously published measurements and implications for environmental chemistry of ferric oxides are also discussed.

  19. Production of biodiesel from mixed waste vegetable oil using an aluminium hydrogen sulphate as a heterogeneous acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Kasirajan; Sivakumar, Pandian; Suganya, Tamilarasan; Renganathan, Sahadevan

    2011-08-01

    Al(HSO(4))(3) heterogeneous acid catalyst was prepared by the sulfonation of anhydrous AlCl(3). This catalyst was employed to catalyze transesterification reaction to synthesis methyl ester when a mixed waste vegetable oil was used as feedstock. The physical and chemical properties of aluminum hydrogen sulphate catalyst were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, energy dispersive X-ray (EDAX) analysis and titration method. The maximum conversion of triglyceride was achieved as 81 wt.% with 50 min reaction time at 220°C, 16:1 molar ratio of methanol to oil and 0.5 wt.% of catalyst. The high catalytic activity and stability of this catalyst was related to its high acid site density (-OH, Brönsted acid sites), hydrophobicity that prevented the hydration of -OH group, hydrophilic functional groups (-SO(3)H) that gave improved accessibility of methanol to the triglyceride. The fuel properties of methyl ester were analyzed. The fuel properties were found to be observed within the limits of ASTM D6751.

  20. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Rasch, Philip J.; Tilmes, S.; Turco, Richard P.; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy; Garcia, Rolando R.

    2010-01-01

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of ‘acid rain’ that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  1. An overview of geoengineering of climate using stratospheric sulphate aerosols.

    PubMed

    Rasch, Philip J; Tilmes, Simone; Turco, Richard P; Robock, Alan; Oman, Luke; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Stenchikov, Georgiy L; Garcia, Rolando R

    2008-11-13

    We provide an overview of geoengineering by stratospheric sulphate aerosols. The state of understanding about this topic as of early 2008 is reviewed, summarizing the past 30 years of work in the area, highlighting some very recent studies using climate models, and discussing methods used to deliver sulphur species to the stratosphere. The studies reviewed here suggest that sulphate aerosols can counteract the globally averaged temperature increase associated with increasing greenhouse gases, and reduce changes to some other components of the Earth system. There are likely to be remaining regional climate changes after geoengineering, with some regions experiencing significant changes in temperature or precipitation. The aerosols also serve as surfaces for heterogeneous chemistry resulting in increased ozone depletion. The delivery of sulphur species to the stratosphere in a way that will produce particles of the right size is shown to be a complex and potentially very difficult task. Two simple delivery scenarios are explored, but similar exercises will be needed for other suggested delivery mechanisms. While the introduction of the geoengineering source of sulphate aerosol will perturb the sulphur cycle of the stratosphere signicantly, it is a small perturbation to the total (stratosphere and troposphere) sulphur cycle. The geoengineering source would thus be a small contributor to the total global source of 'acid rain' that could be compensated for through improved pollution control of anthropogenic tropospheric sources. Some areas of research remain unexplored. Although ozone may be depleted, with a consequent increase to solar ultraviolet-B (UVB) energy reaching the surface and a potential impact on health and biological populations, the aerosols will also scatter and attenuate this part of the energy spectrum, and this may compensate the UVB enhancement associated with ozone depletion. The aerosol will also change the ratio of diffuse to direct energy

  2. DMS Sulphate and MSA as tracers of marine biogenic productivity in an Arctic snowpack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiuta, V.; Norman, A.; Marshall, S.

    2007-12-01

    Sources, seasonal patterns, and spatial variations of snowpack sulphate of the Prince of Wales Icefield, Ellesmere Island were assessed using δ34S values along with major ion and MSA concentrations. Snowpack sulphate concentrations and δ34S values diminished with elevation and inland distance suggesting that the proximal North Water Polynya was the major sulphate source with additional sources affecting specific regions. Snowpack δ34S values in depth profile reflected seasonal cycles of marine biogenic, anthropogenic, and sea-salt aerosols with appreciable contributions of marine biogenic sulphate to virtually every depth horizon. A proximal April/May marine biogenic source was indicated, with DMS oxidation occurring near the marine boundary layer, and the possibility of additional oxidation at higher atmospheric levels. Depositional patterns of DMS sulphate and MSA indicate they were oxidized from DMS at different elevations in the atmosphere and that their deposition routes differed.

  3. Isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage as measure of bacterial oxidation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, B.E.; Wheeler, M.C.; Nordstrom, D.K.

    1984-01-01

    The formation of acid waters by oxidation of pyrite-bearing ore deposits, mine tailing piles, and coal measures is a complex biogeochemical process and is a serious environmental problem. We have studied the oxygen and sulphur isotope geochemistry of sulphides, sulphur, sulphate and water in the field and in experiments to identify sources of oxygen and reaction mechanisms of sulphate formation. Here we report that the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate in acid mine drainage shows a large variation due to differing proportions of atmospheric- and water-derived oxygen from both chemical and bacterially-mediated oxidation. 18O-enrichment of sulphate results from pyrite oxidation facilitated by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in aerated environments. Oxygen isotope analysis may therefore be useful in monitoring the effectiveness of abatement programmes designed to inhibit bacterial oxidation. Sulphur isotopes show no significant fractionation between pyrite and sulphate, indicating the quantitative insignificance of intermediate oxidation states of sulphur under acid conditions. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  4. Gypsum precipitation/dissolution as an explanation of the decrease of sulphate concentration during seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis-Yagües, V.; Boluda-Botella, N.; Ruiz-Beviá, F.

    2000-02-01

    The precipitation of gypsum during the intrusion of seawater in a coastal aquifer is shown to be a possible cause of the decrease of the sulphate concentration with respect to the conservative freshwater/seawater mixing observed in many field studies. Results of previously published laboratory column experiments and the application of a multicomponent reactive transport model show that gypsum precipitates during the first stages of seawater intrusion, causing a decrease in sulphate concentration. As the resultant front advances, the water becomes undersaturated with respect to gypsum when the content of seawater <50%. At that point, water samples exhibit a deficit of sulphate of several mmol/l, in the range of the field values reported in papers on intrusion in coastal aquifers. Thus, in addition to bacterial sulphate reduction by organic matter, gypsum precipitation is a possible explanation for the non-conservative behaviour of sulphate during seawater intrusion.

  5. Application of anaerobic biological treatment for sulphate removal in viscose industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Parravicini, V; Svardal, K; Kroiss, H

    2007-01-01

    Long term lab-scale and bench-scale experiments were performed to investigate the feasibility of the anaerobic process to treat wastewater from a pulp and viscose fibre industry. Anaerobic wastewater treatment enables an advantageous combination of COD, sulphate and zinc removal from viscose wastewater. The aim of the investigations was to evaluate the influence of the free sulphide concentration on COD and sulphate removal efficiency and on the substrate competition between sulphate reducing and methanogenic bacteria. Since the wastewater did not contain enough COD for complete sulphate removal it was of major interest to determine favourable process conditions to steer the substrate competition in favour of sulphate reduction. Further experiments at bench-scale permitted us to evaluate applicable COD-loading rates and gain fundamental information about process stability and optimization for large-scale implementation. The present work will deal with the most relevant experimental results achieved and with important technological aspects of anaerobic treatment of viscose wastewater.

  6. Compound Natural Gas Hydrate: A Natural System for Separation of Hydrate-Forming Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. D.; Osegovic, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Natural processes that separate materials from a mixture may exert a major influence on the development of the atmospheres and surfaces of planets, moons, and other planetary bodies. Natural distillation and gravity separation, amongst others, are well known means of differentiating materials through liquid-gas partitioning. One of the least known attributes of clathrate (gas) hydrates is their potential effect on the evolution of planetary system oceans and atmospheres. Gas hydrates separate gases from mixtures of gases by concentrating preferred hydrate-forming materials (HFM) guests within the water-molecule cage structure of crystalline hydrate. Different HFMs have very different fields of stability. When multiple hydrate formers are present, a preference series based on their selective uptake exists. Compound hydrate, which is formed from two or more species of HFM, extract preferred HFM from a mixture in very different proportions to their relative percentages of the original mixture. These compound hydrates can have different formation and dissociation conditions depending on the evolution of the environment. That is, the phase boundary of the compound hydrate that is required for dissociation lies along a lower pressure - higher temperature course. Compound hydrates respond to variations in temperature, pressure, and HFM composition. On Earth, the primary naturally occurring hydrate of interest to global climate modeling is methane hydrate. Oceanic hydrate on Earth is the largest store of carbon in the biosphere that is immediately reactive to environmental change, and is capable of releasing large amounts of methane into the atmosphere over a short geological time span. Hydrate formation is essentially metastable and is very sensitive to environmental change and to gas flux. Where natural variations in temperature and pressure varies so that hydrate will form and dissociate in some cyclical manner, such as in oceans where sea level is capable of rising and

  7. The addition of organic carbon and nitrate affects reactive transport of heavy metals in sandy aquifers.

    PubMed

    Satyawali, Yamini; Seuntjens, Piet; Van Roy, Sandra; Joris, Ingeborg; Vangeel, Silvia; Dejonghe, Winnie; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-04-25

    Organic carbon introduction in the soil to initiate remedial measures, nitrate infiltration due to agricultural practices or sulphate intrusion owing to industrial usage can influence the redox conditions and pH, thus affecting the mobility of heavy metals in soil and groundwater. This study reports the fate of Zn and Cd in sandy aquifers under a variety of plausible in-situ redox conditions that were induced by introduction of carbon and various electron acceptors in column experiments. Up to 100% Zn and Cd removal (from the liquid phase) was observed in all the four columns, however the mechanisms were different. Metal removal in column K1 (containing sulphate), was attributed to biological sulphate reduction and subsequent metal precipitation (as sulphides). In the presence of both nitrate and sulphate (K2), the former dominated the process, precipitating the heavy metals as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In the presence of sulphate, nitrate and supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)) (K3), metal removal was also due to precipitation as hydroxides and/or carbonates. In abiotic column, K4, (with supplemental iron (Fe(OH)(3)), but no nitrate), cation exchange with soil led to metal removal. The results obtained were modeled using the reactive transport model PHREEQC-2 to elucidate governing processes and to evaluate scenarios of organic carbon, sulphate and nitrate inputs.

  8. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Oil-field engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in Arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored the HOT ICE No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was designed, constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. Unfortunately, no gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is

  9. Overview on Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Burger; Deepak Gupta; Patrick Jacobs; John Shillinglaw

    2003-06-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline, ice-like compounds of gas and water molecules that are formed under certain thermodynamic conditions. Hydrate deposits occur naturally within ocean sediments just below the sea floor at temperatures and pressures existing below about 500 meters water depth. Gas hydrate is also stable in conjunction with the permafrost in the Arctic. Most marine gas hydrate is formed of microbially generated gas. It binds huge amounts of methane into the sediments. Worldwide, gas hydrate is estimated to hold about 1016 kg of organic carbon in the form of methane (Kvenvolden et al., 1993). Gas hydrate is one of the fossil fuel resources that is yet untapped, but may play a major role in meeting the energy challenge of this century. In June 2002, Westport Technology Center was requested by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare a ''Best Practices Manual on Gas Hydrate Coring, Handling and Analysis'' under Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41327. The scope of the task was specifically targeted for coring sediments with hydrates in Alaska, the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and from the present Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) drillship. The specific subjects under this scope were defined in 3 stages as follows: Stage 1: Collect information on coring sediments with hydrates, core handling, core preservation, sample transportation, analysis of the core, and long term preservation. Stage 2: Provide copies of the first draft to a list of experts and stakeholders designated by DOE. Stage 3: Produce a second draft of the manual with benefit of input from external review for delivery. The manual provides an overview of existing information available in the published literature and reports on coring, analysis, preservation and transport of gas hydrates for laboratory analysis as of June 2003. The manual was delivered as draft version 3 to the DOE Project Manager for distribution in July 2003. This Final Report is provided for records purposes.

  10. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-06-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-07-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.

  12. Unusual Recognition and Separation of Hydrated Metal Sulfates [M2(μ-SO4)2(H2O)n, M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] by a Ditopic Receptor.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Tamal Kanti; Dutta, Ranjan; Ghosh, Pradyut

    2016-04-04

    A ditopic receptor L1, having metal binding bis(2-picolyl) donor and anion binding urea group, is synthesized and explored toward metal sulfate recognition via formation of dinuclear assembly, (L1)2M2(SO4)2. Mass spectrometric analysis, (1)H-DOSY NMR, and crystal structure analysis reveal the existence of a dinuclear assembly of MSO4 with two units of L1. (1)H NMR study reveals significant downfield chemical shift of -NH protons of urea moiety of L1 selectively with metal sulfates (e.g., ZnSO4, CdSO4) due to second-sphere interactions of sulfate with the urea moiety. Variable-temperature (1)H NMR studies suggest the presence of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction toward metal sulfate recognition in solution state, whereas intermolecular H-bonding interactions are observed in solid state. In contrast, anions in their tetrabutylammonium salts fail to interact with the urea -NH probably due to poor acidity of the tertiary butyl urea group of L1. Metal sulfate binding selectivity in solution is further supported by isothermal titration calorimetric studies of L1 with different Zn salts in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), where a binding affinity is observed for ZnSO4 (Ka = 1.23 × 10(6)), which is 30- to 50-fold higher than other Zn salts having other counteranions in DMSO. Sulfate salts of Cd(II)/Co(II) also exhibit binding constants in the order of ∼1 × 10(6) as in the case of ZnSO4. Positive role of the urea unit in the selectivity is confirmed by studying a model ligand L2, which is devoid of anion recognition urea unit. Structural characterization of four MSO4 [M = Zn(II), Cd(II), Co(II), Mn(II)] complexes of L1, that is, complex 1, [(L1)2(Zn)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 2, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Cd)2(μ-SO4)2]; complex 3, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Co)2(μ-SO4)2]; and complex 4, [(L1)2(H2O)2(Mn)2(μ-SO4)2], reveal the formation of sulfate-bridged eight-membered crownlike binuclear complexes, similar to one of the concentration-dependent dimeric forms of MSO4 as observed in solid state

  13. Antimicrobial activity of flavanoid sulphates and other fractions of Argyreia speciosa (Burm.f) Boj.

    PubMed

    Habbu, P V; Mahadevan, K M; Shastry, R A; Manjunatha, H

    2009-02-01

    Antimicrobial activity of flavanoid sulphates and different fractions of A. speciosa root was studied against bacteria, fungi and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37 Rv sensitive strain by in vitro and in vivo assays. Flavanoid sulphates such as quercetin 3'7 di-O methyl 3- sulphate and kaempferol 7-O methyl 3-sulphate were isolated from the n-butanol fraction of 80% methanolic extract of the plant. The structures of the isolated flavanoids were confirmed by spectral studies. Ethyl acetate (EAAS) fraction and flavanoid sulphates inhibited the growth of M. tuberculosis Rv sensitive strain at MIC values 50 and 25 microg/ml, respectively. Ethanolic fraction (EtAS) showed significant inhibition of gram positive organism with a MIC of 31.25 microg/ml. More inhibition was observed with a less MIC (2 microg/ml) for flavanoid sulphates against Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram negative organism and it is almost comparable with the standards. Interestingly, chloroform fraction alone exhibited significant antifungal activity with a MIC of 100 microg/ml. A synergistic effect between flavanoids sulphates and commercially available antitubercular drugs was observed with FIC index of 0.443 +/- 0.245, 0.487 +/- 0.247 for isoniazid and 0.468 +/- 0.333, 0.417 +/- 0.345 for rifampicin, whereas EAAS fraction showed partial synergistic effect. A synergistic effect was observed for EAAS fraction and flavanoids sulphates with FIC index < 0.5 with antibiotics. Hemolysis assay on RBCs suggested that EAAS and flavanoids sulphates exhibited least cellular toxicity to erythrocytes as compared to chloramphenicol. In vivo studies in mice infected with K. pneumoniae demonstrated that on day 10 post treatment of different fractions and isolated compounds of A. speciosa, about 60% of the animals treated with EAAS, 70% of animals treated with flavanoids sulphates and 40% of animals treated with EtAS were survived.

  14. Massive volcanic SO(2) oxidation and sulphate aerosol deposition in Cenozoic North America.

    PubMed

    Bao, Huiming; Yu, Shaocai; Tong, Daniel Q

    2010-06-17

    Volcanic eruptions release a large amount of sulphur dioxide (SO(2)) into the atmosphere. SO(2) is oxidized to sulphate and can subsequently form sulphate aerosol, which can affect the Earth's radiation balance, biologic productivity and high-altitude ozone concentrations, as is evident from recent volcanic eruptions. SO(2) oxidation can occur via several different pathways that depend on its flux and the atmospheric conditions. An investigation into how SO(2) is oxidized to sulphate-the oxidation product preserved in the rock record-can therefore shed light on past volcanic eruptions and atmospheric conditions. Here we use sulphur and triple oxygen isotope measurements of atmospheric sulphate extracted from tuffaceous deposits to investigate the specific oxidation pathways from which the sulphate was formed. We find that seven eruption-related sulphate aerosol deposition events have occurred during the mid-Cenozoic era (34 to 7 million years ago) in the northern High Plains, North America. Two extensively sampled ash beds display a similar sulphate mixing pattern that has two distinct atmospheric secondary sulphates. A three-dimensional atmospheric sulphur chemistry and transport model study reveals that the observed, isotopically discrete sulphates in sediments can be produced only in initially alkaline cloudwater that favours an ozone-dominated SO(2) oxidation pathway in the troposphere. Our finding suggests that, in contrast to the weakly acidic conditions today, cloudwater in the northern High Plains may frequently have been alkaline during the mid-Cenozoic era. We propose that atmospheric secondary sulphate preserved in continental deposits represents an unexploited geological archive for atmospheric SO(2) oxidation chemistry linked to volcanism and atmospheric conditions in the past.

  15. Surface enhanced raman spectroscopy studies on triglycine sulphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parameswari, A.; Mohamed Asath, R.; Premkumar, R.; Milton Franklin Benial, A.

    2017-01-01

    Adsorption characteristics of triglycine sulphate (TGS) on silver (Ag) surface were investigated based on density functional theory calculations and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) technique. The single crystals of TGS were grown by slow evaporation method. Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were prepared by solution combustion method and characterized. The calculated and observed structural parameters of TGS molecule were compared. Raman and SERS spectra for TGS single crystal were studied experimentally and validated theoretically. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) analysis was carried out for TGS and TGS adsorbed on Ag surface. The second harmonic generation measurements confirm the nonlinear optical (NLO) activity of the TGS molecule. SERS spectral analysis reveals that the TGS adsorbed as tilted orientation on the silver surface. The theoretical and experimental results evidence the suitability of the grown TGS single crystal for optoelectronic applications.

  16. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Lloveras, P.; Stern-Taulats, E.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Crossley, S.; Li, W.; Pomjakushin, V.; Planes, A.; Mañosa, Ll.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-01-01

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices. PMID:26607989

  17. Bioactivity and applications of sulphated polysaccharides from marine microalgae.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Maria Filomena de Jesus; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa; Bernardo de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda

    2013-01-23

    Marine microalgae have been used for a long time as food for humans, such as Arthrospira (formerly, Spirulina), and for animals in aquaculture. The biomass of these microalgae and the compounds they produce have been shown to possess several biological applications with numerous health benefits. The present review puts up-to-date the research on the biological activities and applications of polysaccharides, active biocompounds synthesized by marine unicellular algae, which are, most of the times, released into the surrounding medium (exo- or extracellular polysaccharides, EPS). It goes through the most studied activities of sulphated polysaccharides (sPS) or their derivatives, but also highlights lesser known applications as hypolipidaemic or hypoglycaemic, or as biolubricant agents and drag-reducers. Therefore, the great potentials of sPS from marine microalgae to be used as nutraceuticals, therapeutic agents, cosmetics, or in other areas, such as engineering, are approached in this review.

  18. Bioactivity and Applications of Sulphated Polysaccharides from Marine Microalgae

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus Raposo, Maria Filomena; de Morais, Rui Manuel Santos Costa; de Morais, Alcina Maria Miranda Bernardo

    2013-01-01

    Marine microalgae have been used for a long time as food for humans, such as Arthrospira (formerly, Spirulina), and for animals in aquaculture. The biomass of these microalgae and the compounds they produce have been shown to possess several biological applications with numerous health benefits. The present review puts up-to-date the research on the biological activities and applications of polysaccharides, active biocompounds synthesized by marine unicellular algae, which are, most of the times, released into the surrounding medium (exo- or extracellular polysaccharides, EPS). It goes through the most studied activities of sulphated polysaccharides (sPS) or their derivatives, but also highlights lesser known applications as hypolipidaemic or hypoglycaemic, or as biolubricant agents and drag-reducers. Therefore, the great potentials of sPS from marine microalgae to be used as nutraceuticals, therapeutic agents, cosmetics, or in other areas, such as engineering, are approached in this review. PMID:23344113

  19. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate.

    PubMed

    Lloveras, P; Stern-Taulats, E; Barrio, M; Tamarit, J-Ll; Crossley, S; Li, W; Pomjakushin, V; Planes, A; Mañosa, Ll; Mathur, N D; Moya, X

    2015-11-26

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices.

  20. Giant barocaloric effects at low pressure in ferrielectric ammonium sulphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloveras, P.; Stern-Taulats, E.; Barrio, M.; Tamarit, J.-Ll.; Crossley, S.; Li, W.; Pomjakushin, V.; Planes, A.; Mañosa, Ll.; Mathur, N. D.; Moya, X.

    2015-11-01

    Caloric effects are currently under intense study due to the prospect of environment-friendly cooling applications. Most of the research is centred on large magnetocaloric effects and large electrocaloric effects, but the former require large magnetic fields that are challenging to generate economically and the latter require large electric fields that can only be applied without breakdown in thin samples. Here we use small changes in hydrostatic pressure to drive giant inverse barocaloric effects near the ferrielectric phase transition in ammonium sulphate. We find barocaloric effects and strengths that exceed those previously observed near magnetostructural phase transitions in magnetic materials. Our findings should therefore inspire the discovery of giant barocaloric effects in a wide range of unexplored ferroelectric materials, ultimately leading to barocaloric cooling devices.

  1. Biological effects of inhaled magnesium sulphate whiskers in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Hori, H; Kasai, T; Haratake, J; Ishimatsu, S; Oyabu, T; Yamato, H; Higashi, T; Tanaka, I

    1994-01-01

    Male Wistar rats were exposed to two types of magnesium sulphate whiskers by inhalation for six hours a day, five days a week, for four weeks (sub-chronic study), or for one year (chronic study) to clarify the biological effects of the whiskers. There were few whiskers detected in the rat lungs even at one day after the exposure, suggesting that they are dissolved and eliminated rapidly from the lungs. To measure the clearance rate of the whiskers from the lungs, an intratracheal instillation was performed in golden hamsters. The half life of the whiskers in the lung was determined as 17.6 minutes by temporally measuring the magnesium concentration up to 80 minutes after the instillation. A histopathological examination indicated a frequent occurrence of adenoma and carcinoma in the year after chronic exposure, but it was not significantly different between exposed and control rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8044250

  2. Multifunctional chondroitin sulphate for cartilage tissue-biomaterial integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-An; Varghese, Shyni; Sharma, Blanka; Strehin, Iossif; Fermanian, Sara; Gorham, Justin; Fairbrother, D. Howard; Cascio, Brett; Elisseeff, Jennifer H.

    2007-05-01

    A biologically active, high-strength tissue adhesive is needed for numerous medical applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Integration of biomaterials or implants with surrounding native tissue is crucial for both immediate functionality and long-term performance of the tissue. Here, we use the biopolymer chondroitin sulphate (CS), one of the major components of cartilage extracellular matrix, to develop a novel bioadhesive that is readily applied and acts quickly. CS was chemically functionalized with methacrylate and aldehyde groups on the polysaccharide backbone to chemically bridge biomaterials and tissue proteins via a twofold covalent link. Three-dimensional hydrogels (with and without cells) bonded to articular cartilage defects. In in vitro and in vivo functional studies this approach led to mechanical stability of the hydrogel and tissue repair in cartilage defects.

  3. Intravesical chondroitin sulphate for interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, DB; Curry, D; Cartwright, C; Downey, P; Pahuja, A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is a chronic inflammatory condition of the bladder. Bladder instillation is one avenue of treatment but evidence for its effectiveness is limited. Chondroitin sulphate solution 2.0% (Urocyst) is a glycosaminoglycan (GAG) replenishment therapy instilled for patients with IC/PBS. We assessed its effectiveness for treating IC/PBS in Northern Ireland. Methods Patients with IC/PBS were assessed with the O'Leary-Sant interstitial cystitis index score and global response assessment questionnaire prior to commencing treatment. Assessment with these questionnaires was performed after 6 treatments (10 weeks) and again after 10 treatments (24 weeks). Assessment end points were pain, urgency, symptom score and problem score. Results Data was collected on 10 patients, 9 female and 1 male. 6 patients had failed RIMSO-50 dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) 50% treatment prior. At baseline the mean pain score was 6.6, urgency score 7.00, symptom score 13.5 and problem score 12.5. After 24 weeks the mean pain score fell to 2.0, urgency score to 1.80, symptom score to 6.89 and problem score to 5.67. At 10 weeks the global response to treatment was 100%. Nocturia was the first symptom to improve with urgency and pain following. No side effects were noted during instillation and all patients tolerated the treatments. Conclusion IC/PBS is a difficult disease to treat. It requires a multimodal approach. We found that intravesical chondroitin sulphate reduced pain, urgency and O'Leary-Sant symptom and problem scores in patients with IC/PBS. All patients tolerated the treatment and no side effects were reported. PMID:26668417

  4. Methane Recovery from Hydrate-bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlos Santamarina; Costas Tsouris

    2011-04-30

    Gas hydrates are crystalline compounds made of gas and water molecules. Methane hydrates are found in marine sediments and permafrost regions; extensive amounts of methane are trapped in the form of hydrates. Methane hydrate can be an energy resource, contribute to global warming, or cause seafloor instability. This study placed emphasis on gas recovery from hydrate bearing sediments and related phenomena. The unique behavior of hydrate-bearing sediments required the development of special research tools, including new numerical algorithms (tube- and pore-network models) and experimental devices (high pressure chambers and micromodels). Therefore, the research methodology combined experimental studies, particle-scale numerical simulations, and macro-scale analyses of coupled processes. Research conducted as part of this project started with hydrate formation in sediment pores and extended to production methods and emergent phenomena. In particular, the scope of the work addressed: (1) hydrate formation and growth in pores, the assessment of formation rate, tensile/adhesive strength and their impact on sediment-scale properties, including volume change during hydrate formation and dissociation; (2) the effect of physical properties such as gas solubility, salinity, pore size, and mixed gas conditions on hydrate formation and dissociation, and it implications such as oscillatory transient hydrate formation, dissolution within the hydrate stability field, initial hydrate lens formation, and phase boundary changes in real field situations; (3) fluid conductivity in relation to pore size distribution and spatial correlation and the emergence of phenomena such as flow focusing; (4) mixed fluid flow, with special emphasis on differences between invading gas and nucleating gas, implications on relative gas conductivity for reservoir simulations, and gas recovery efficiency; (5) identification of advantages and limitations in different gas production strategies with

  5. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a

  6. Diffusion of CO2 During Hydrate Formation and Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    Franklin M. Orr, Jr.

    2002-08-20

    Experiments were performed to measure the rate of diffusion of CO2 through hydrate films. Hydrate films were created in a capillary tube, and the growth of the hydrate film was measured. Difficulties were encountered in creating hydrate repeatedly, and some non-uniform growth of the films was observed. Sufficient observations were obtained to demonstrate that hydrate growth occurs preferentially on the hydrate/water side of the interface, rather than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Diffusion coefficients were estimated from observations of the rate of growth of the hydrate film along with estimates of the solubility of CO2 in water and of the concentration gradient across the hydrate layer. The experimental observations indicate that hydrate formation occurs much more rapidly at the hydrate water interface than at the hydrate/CO2 interface. Any growth of hydrate at the CO2/hydrate interface was too slow to be observed at the time scale of the experiments. That observation is consistent with the idea that CO2 can move more easily through the hydrate, presumably by hopping between hydrate cages, than water can move through the hydrate, presumably by lattice hopping. Estimated diffusion coefficients were in the range 1-3E-06 cm2/sec. Those values are about an order of magnitude lower than the diffusion coefficient for CO2 in liquid water, but four orders of magnitude larger than the value for diffusion of CO2 in a solid. The rate of diffusion through the hydrate controls both the creation of new hydrate at the hydrate/water interface and the rate at which CO2 dissolves in the liquid water and diffuses away from the hydrate layer. Formation of a hydrate layer reduces the rate at which CO2 dissolves in liquid water.

  7. Mass fractionation of noble gases in synthetic methane hydrate: Implications for naturally occurring gas hydrate dissociation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Andrew G.; Stern, Laura; Pohlman, John W.; Ruppel, Carolyn; Moscati, Richard J.; Landis, Gary P.

    2013-01-01

    As a consequence of contemporary or longer term (since 15 ka) climate warming, gas hydrates in some settings may presently be dissociating and releasing methane and other gases to the ocean-atmosphere system. A key challenge in assessing the impact of dissociating gas hydrates on global atmospheric methane is the lack of a technique able to distinguish between methane recently released from gas hydrates and methane emitted from leaky thermogenic reservoirs, shallow sediments (some newly thawed), coal beds, and other sources. Carbon and deuterium stable isotopic fractionation during methane formation provides a first-order constraint on the processes (microbial or thermogenic) of methane generation. However, because gas hydrate formation and dissociation do not cause significant isotopic fractionation, a stable isotope-based hydrate-source determination is not possible. Here, we investigate patterns of mass-dependent noble gas fractionation within the gas hydrate lattice to fingerprint methane released from gas hydrates. Starting with synthetic gas hydrate formed under laboratory conditions, we document complex noble gas fractionation patterns in the gases liberated during dissociation and explore the effects of aging and storage (e.g., in liquid nitrogen), as well as sampling and preservation procedures. The laboratory results confirm a unique noble gas fractionation pattern for gas hydrates, one that shows promise in evaluating modern natural gas seeps for a signature associated with gas hydrate dissociation.

  8. Detection and Production of Methane Hydrate

    SciTech Connect

    George Hirasaki; Walter Chapman; Gerald Dickens; Colin Zelt; Brandon Dugan; Kishore Mohanty; Priyank Jaiswal

    2011-12-31

    This project seeks to understand regional differences in gas hydrate systems from the perspective of as an energy resource, geohazard, and long-term climate influence. Specifically, the effort will: (1) collect data and conceptual models that targets causes of gas hydrate variance, (2) construct numerical models that explain and predict regional-scale gas hydrate differences in 2-dimensions with minimal 'free parameters', (3) simulate hydrocarbon production from various gas hydrate systems to establish promising resource characteristics, (4) perturb different gas hydrate systems to assess potential impacts of hot fluids on seafloor stability and well stability, and (5) develop geophysical approaches that enable remote quantification of gas hydrate heterogeneities so that they can be characterized with minimal costly drilling. Our integrated program takes advantage of the fact that we have a close working team comprised of experts in distinct disciplines. The expected outcomes of this project are improved exploration and production technology for production of natural gas from methane hydrates and improved safety through understanding of seafloor and well bore stability in the presence of hydrates. The scope of this project was to more fully characterize, understand, and appreciate fundamental differences in the amount and distribution of gas hydrate and how this would affect the production potential of a hydrate accumulation in the marine environment. The effort combines existing information from locations in the ocean that are dominated by low permeability sediments with small amounts of high permeability sediments, one permafrost location where extensive hydrates exist in reservoir quality rocks and other locations deemed by mutual agreement of DOE and Rice to be appropriate. The initial ocean locations were Blake Ridge, Hydrate Ridge, Peru Margin and GOM. The permafrost location was Mallik. Although the ultimate goal of the project was to understand processes

  9. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, Elinor; Huang, Baiyu; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  10. [The outcome of hydration in functional dysphonia].

    PubMed

    García Real, T; García Real, A; Díaz Román, T; Cañizo Fernández Roldán, A

    2002-01-01

    Functional dysphonia has high prevalence among professional voice users. Different aspects should be considered in vocal therapy. One of them is hydration. The aim of the present study is to assess the effect of hydration on a few aspect of vocal dysfunction. 75 subjects were distributed into three different groups. 23 participated as a control group, 27 received hydration treatment and 25 received hydration treatment plus voice training. Dryness, mucosity, phonatory effort, hoarseness, fundamental frequency (Fo), maximum phonatory time (MPT), time of speech and laryngeal status were the variables evaluated at time 0 and 14 days later, immediately after the completion of the treatment of each group. Statistical differences regarding dryness (p = 0.003) and hoarseness (p = 0.033) were found between the control group and the groups receiving treatment. There were no statistical differences in severity and frequency of variables measured at time 0 at 14 days later in the control group. However, all variables except laryngeal status, improved significantly in the groups receiving hydration alone. Only clinical variables improved in the combined group. These findings indicated a therapeutic benefit of hydration, with or without voice training, for functional dysphonia. Further studies using acoustic and stroboscopic analysis are required in order to define the effect of hydration on the compliance of glottic sphincter.

  11. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  12. Multiphasic finite element modeling of concrete hydration

    SciTech Connect

    Buffo-Lacarriere, L.; Sellier, A. . E-mail: alain.sellier@insa-toulouse.fr; Escadeillas, G.; Turatsinze, A.

    2007-02-15

    This paper presents a model predicting the development of hydration and its consequences on temperature and water content. As it considers the effects of climatic conditions, the proposed model is a promising tool to evaluate the temperature, hydric and hydration fields of structures in situ. The hydration model predicts the hydration evolution of several main species (not only clinker but also mineral additions like fly ash or silica fume for instance). For each component, the modeling considers hydration development and chemical interaction between reactions. It also takes into account temperature and water content effects on reaction kinetics through thermal and hydric activation. Hydration development in turn modifies the thermal and hydric states of material. The result is a numerical model coupling hydration, and the thermal and hydric states of cement-based material. The model was tested on a 27 m{sup 3} concrete block in situ equipped with temperature sensors situated in the core and close to the face exposed to solar radiation.

  13. Prospecting for marine gas hydrate resources

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Shipp, Craig; Reichel, Thomas; Shelander, Dianna; Saeki, Tetsuo; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; Collett, Timothy S.; McConnell, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As gas hydrate energy assessment matures worldwide, emphasis has evolved away from confirmation of the mere presence of gas hydrate to the more complex issue of prospecting for those specific accumulations that are viable resource targets. Gas hydrate exploration now integrates the unique pressure and temperature preconditions for gas hydrate occurrence with those concepts and practices that are the basis for conventional oil and gas exploration. We have aimed to assimilate the lessons learned to date in global gas hydrate exploration to outline a generalized prospecting approach as follows: (1) use existing well and geophysical data to delineate the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), (2) identify and evaluate potential direct indications of hydrate occurrence through evaluation of interval of elevated acoustic velocity and/or seismic events of prospective amplitude and polarity, (3) mitigate geologic risk via regional seismic and stratigraphic facies analysis as well as seismic mapping of amplitude distribution along prospective horizons, and (4) mitigate further prospect risk through assessment of the evidence of gas presence and migration into the GHSZ. Although a wide range of occurrence types might ultimately become viable energy supply options, this approach, which has been tested in only a small number of locations worldwide, has directed prospect evaluation toward those sand-hosted, high-saturation occurrences that were presently considered to have the greatest future commercial potential.

  14. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2003-12-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the US have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by maurer Technology, noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R and D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. They plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. They also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. They are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. They hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, the goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  15. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Buddy King

    2004-03-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the second year of a three-year endeavor being sponsored by Maurer Technology, Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the DOE. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. We plan to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. We also plan to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope is to drill and core a well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 and 2004. We are also using an on-site core analysis laboratory to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well is being drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that will have minimal footprint and environmental impact. We hope to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data to allow reservoir models to be calibrated. Ultimately, our goal is to form an objective technical and economic evaluation of reservoir potential in Alaska.

  16. In Situ Immobilization of Heavy-Metal Contaminated Soil

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    formed . After some period of time, it is necessary to regenerate the greensand with potassium permanganate. 6. Other Additives a. Hydrated Lime ...and other additives consisting of hydrated lime , silylated silica gel, insoluble starch xanthate, Metal Sorb-7 and ferrous sulfate; for a total of 21...5 Molecular Sieves Valfor Z84-326 Valfor 200 Greensand Raw Greensand Mn Greensand Other Addititives Hydrated Lime Silylated Silica Gel Insoluble

  17. Methane in shallow subsurface sediments at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone offshore western Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, Carolyn A.; James, Rachael H.; Sapart, Célia Julia; Stott, Andrew W.; Wright, Ian C.; Berndt, Christian; Westbrook, Graham K.; Connelly, Douglas P.

    2017-02-01

    Offshore western Svalbard plumes of gas bubbles rise from the seafloor at the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (LLGHSZ; ∼400 m water depth). It is hypothesized that this methane may, in part, come from dissociation of gas hydrate in the underlying sediments in response to recent warming of ocean bottom waters. To evaluate the potential role of gas hydrate in the supply of methane to the shallow subsurface sediments, and the role of anaerobic oxidation in regulating methane fluxes across the sediment-seawater interface, we have characterised the chemical and isotopic compositions of the gases and sediment pore waters. The molecular and isotopic signatures of gas in the bubble plumes (C1/C2+ = 1 × 104; δ13C-CH4 = -55 to -51‰; δD-CH4 = -187 to -184‰) are similar to gas hydrate recovered from within sediments ∼30 km away from the LLGHSZ. Modelling of pore water sulphate profiles indicates that subsurface methane fluxes are largely at steady state in the vicinity of the LLGHSZ, providing no evidence for any recent change in methane supply due to gas hydrate dissociation. However, at greater water depths, within the GHSZ, there is some evidence that the supply of methane to the shallow sediments has recently increased, which is consistent with downslope retreat of the GHSZ due to bottom water warming although other explanations are possible. We estimate that the upward diffusive methane flux into shallow subsurface sediments close to the LLGHSZ is 30,550 mmol m-2 yr-1, but it is <20 mmol m-2 yr-1 in sediments further away from the seafloor bubble plumes. While anaerobic oxidation within the sediments prevents significant transport of dissolved methane into ocean bottom waters this amounts to less than 10% of the total methane flux (dissolved + gas) into the shallow subsurface sediments, most of which escapes AOM as it is transported in the gas phase.

  18. Dynamics of hydration water in protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Teixeira, J.; Bradley, K. F.; Chen, S. H.

    1992-06-01

    Incoherent quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of in vivo deuterated C-phycocyanin, at different levels of hydration, have been made. We show that the mobility at high temperature, (sim 300 K) of the water molecules near the protein surface can be described by relatively simple models. At full hydration the high temperature data can be interpreted using a model where each water molecule is diffusing in a confined space of 3 Å in radius. At low hydration, and 298 K, the diffusional behaviour is typical of jump diffusion with a residence time 10 times larger than the one in bulk water at the same temperature.

  19. Tapping methane hydrates for unconventional natural gas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppel, Carolyn

    2007-01-01

    Methane hydrate is an icelike form of concentrated methane and water found in the sediments of permafrost regions and marine continental margins at depths far shallower than conventional oil and gas. Despite their relative accessibility and widespread occurrence, methane hydrates have never been tapped to meet increasing global energy demands. With rising natural gas prices, production from these unconventional gas deposits is becoming economically viable, particularly in permafrost areas already being exploited for conventional oil and gas. This article provides an overview of gas hydrate occurrence, resource assessment, exploration, production technologies, renewability, and future challenges.

  20. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars.

    PubMed

    Milton, D J

    1974-02-15

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate, CO(2) . 6H(2)O. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 degrees and 10 degrees C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4 percent (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  1. Carbon dioxide hydrate and floods on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milton, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Ground ice on Mars probably consists largely of carbon dioxide hydrate. This hydrate dissociates upon release of pressure at temperatures between 0 and 10 C. The heat capacity of the ground would be sufficient to produce up to 4% (by volume) of water at a rate equal to that at which it can be drained away. Catastrophic dissociation of carbon dioxide hydrate during some past epoch when the near-surface temperature was in this range would have produced chaotic terrain and flood channels.

  2. Clathrate hydrates in cometary nuclei and porosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoluchowski, R.

    1988-01-01

    Possible mechanisms of formation and decomposition of CO2-clathrate hydrate in cometary nuclei are discussed. As far as it is known, this is the only clathrate hydrate which is unstable at low temperatures. Calculation shows that, in accord with other evidence, neither volume nor grain boundary diffusion in the clathrate lattice can be responsible for the rate of these reactions and that a surface mechanism with the attendant sensitivity to pressure must play a crucial role. Density changes accompanying CO2-clathrate decomposition and formation can lead to microporosity and enhanced brittleness or even to fracture of cometary nuclei at low temperatures. Other clathrate hydrates and mixed clathrates are also discussed.

  3. Pregnenolone sulphate-independent inhibition of TRPM3 channels by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Yasser; Tumova, Sarka; Green, Ben L; Seymour, Victoria A L; Woods, Daniel M; Agarwal, Anil K; Naylor, Jacqueline; Jiang, Shannon; Picton, Helen M; Porter, Karen E; O'Regan, David J; Muraki, Katsuhiko; Fishwick, Colin W G; Beech, David J

    2012-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 3 (TRPM3) is a widely expressed calcium-permeable non-selective cation channel that is stimulated by high concentrations of nifedipine or by physiological steroids that include pregnenolone sulphate. Here we sought to identify steroids that inhibit TRPM3. Channel activity was studied using calcium-measurement and patch-clamp techniques. Progesterone (0.01-10μM) suppressed TRPM3 activity evoked by pregnenolone sulphate. Progesterone metabolites and 17β-oestradiol were also inhibitory but the effects were relatively small. Dihydrotestosterone was an inhibitor at concentrations higher than 1μM. Corticosteroids lacked effect. Overlay assays indicated that pregnenolone sulphate, progesterone and dihydrotestosterone bound to TRPM3. In contrast to dihydrotestosterone, progesterone inhibited nifedipine-evoked TRPM3 activity or activity in the absence of an exogenous activator, suggesting a pregnenolone sulphate-independent mechanism of action. Dihydrotestosterone, like a non-steroid look-alike compound, acted as a competitive antagonist at the pregnenolone sulphate binding site. Progesterone inhibited endogenous TRPM3 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Relevance of TRPM3 or the progesterone effect to ovarian cells, which have been suggested to express TRPM3, was not identified. The data further define a chemical framework for competition with pregnenolone sulphate at TRPM3 and expand knowledge of steroid interactions with TRPM3, suggesting direct steroid binding and pregnenolone sulphate-independent inhibition by progesterone.

  4. Nanocrosses of lead sulphate as the negative active material of lead acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Gao, Pengran; Bu, Xianfu; Kuang, Guizhi; Liu, Wei; Lei, Lixu

    2014-10-01

    Lead sulphate transforms into PbO2 and Pb in the positive and negative electrodes, respectively, when a lead acid battery is charged, thus, it is an active material. It is also generally acknowledged that sulphation results in the failure of lead acid batteries; therefore, it is very interesting to find out how to make lead sulphate more electrochemically active. Here, we demonstrate that nanocrystalline lead sulphate can be used as excellent negative active material in lead acid batteries. The lead sulphate nanocrystals, which are prepared by a facile chemical precipitation of aqueous lead acetate and sodium sulphate in a few minutes, look like crosses with diameter of each arm being 100 nm to 3 μm. The electrode is effectively formed in much shorter time than traditional technique, yet it discharges a capacity of 103 mA h g-1 at the current density of 120 mA g-1, which is 24% higher than that discharged by the electrode made from leady oxide under the same condition. During 100% DOD cycles, more than 80% of that capacity remains in 550 cycles. These results show that lead sulphate can be a nice negative active material in lead acid batteries.

  5. Sulphation of acetaminophen by the human cytosolic sulfotransferases: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Akihiro; Liu, Ming-Yih; Kurogi, Katsuhisa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Saeki, Yuichi; Suiko, Masahito; Liu, Ming-Cheh

    2015-12-01

    Sulphation is known to be critically involved in the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo. This study aimed to systematically identify the major human cytosolic sulfotransferase (SULT) enzyme(s) responsible for the sulphation of acetaminophen. A systematic analysis showed that three of the twelve human SULTs, SULT1A1, SULT1A3 and SULT1C4, displayed the strongest sulphating activity towards acetaminophen. The pH dependence of the sulphation of acetaminophen by each of these three SULTs was examined. Kinetic parameters of these three SULTs in catalysing acetaminophen sulphation were determined. Moreover, sulphation of acetaminophen was shown to occur in HepG2 human hepatoma cells and Caco-2 human intestinal epithelial cells under the metabolic setting. Of the four human organ samples tested, liver and intestine cytosols displayed considerably higher acetaminophen-sulphating activity than those of lung and kidney. Collectively, these results provided useful information concerning the biochemical basis underlying the metabolism of acetaminophen in vivo previously reported.

  6. Carbon isotope equilibration during sulphate-limited anaerobic oxidation of methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshinaga, Marcos Y.; Holler, Thomas; Goldhammer, Tobias; Wegener, Gunter; Pohlman, John W.; Brunner, Benjamin; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe; Elvert, Marcus

    2014-03-01

    Collectively, marine sediments comprise the largest reservoir of methane on Earth. The flux of methane from the sea bed to the overlying water column is mitigated by the sulphate-dependent anaerobic oxidation of methane by marine microbes within a discrete sedimentary horizon termed the sulphate-methane transition zone. According to conventional isotope systematics, the biological consumption of methane leaves a residue of methane enriched in 13C (refs , , ). However, in many instances the methane within sulphate-methane transition zones is depleted in 13C, consistent with the production of methane, and interpreted as evidence for the intertwined anaerobic oxidation and production of methane. Here, we report results from experiments in which we incubated cultures of microbial methane consumers with methane and low levels of sulphate, and monitored the stable isotope composition of the methane and dissolved inorganic carbon pools over time. Residual methane became progressively enriched in 13C at sulphate concentrations above 0.5 mM, and progressively depleted in 13C below this threshold. We attribute the shift to 13C depletion during the anaerobic oxidation of methane at low sulphate concentrations to the microbially mediated carbon isotope equilibration between methane and carbon dioxide. We suggest that this isotopic effect could help to explain the 13C-depletion of methane in subseafloor sulphate-methane transition zones.

  7. Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Huda

    The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1

  8. Formation of secondary carbonates and native sulphur in sulphate-rich Messinian strata, Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegenbalg, S. B.; Brunner, B.; Rouchy, J. M.; Birgel, D.; Pierre, C.; Böttcher, M. E.; Caruso, A.; Immenhauser, A.; Peckmann, J.

    2010-05-01

    Microbially formed authigenic carbonates accompanied by native sulphur are present in the 'Calcare Solfifero' below a thick succession of gypsum deposited during the Messinian salinity crisis in Sicily. We sampled these carbonates and associated sulphur in five former sulphur mines to subject them to a detailed petrographic and geochemical study in order to explore their different modes of formation. Native sulphur formed in conjunction with microbial sulphate reduction, which is reflected in its depletion in 34S ( δ34S values as low as - 2‰ vs. V-CDT) and an enrichment of 34S in the residual sulphate ( δ34S values as high as + 61‰). The oxidation of organic matter by sulphate reduction increased alkalinity, inducing precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals. A set of authigenic limestones lacking sulphate minerals, but characterized by pseudomorphs after gypsum and high δ18O values (as high as + 9‰ vs. V-PDB) reflects syngenetic mineral formation within evaporitic settings. Low δ13C values (as low as - 52‰ vs. V-PDB) reveal that these carbonate phases were formed by microbial sulphate reduction coupled to the oxidation of biogenic methane. Another set of authigenic carbonates that replaced sulphate minerals is typified by low δ18O values (as low as - 4‰). These carbonates formed epigenetically during later diagenesis following compaction. Dissolution of gypsum or anhydrite by meteoric waters delivered the sulphate for microbial sulphate reduction. Low carbon isotope values of these carbonates (- 29 to - 5‰) indicate that carbonate was derived from the oxidation of crude oil and possibly minor methane, partly involving different degrees of admixture of dissolved carbonate from other sources. Although the studied rocks with their vast amounts of secondary carbonate minerals and sulphur seem to indicate a similar genesis at first glance - having formed by biogeochemical transformations of sulphate and hydrocarbons - this study reveals that these

  9. The reversibility of dissimilatory sulphate reduction and the cell-internal multi-step reduction of sulphite to sulphide: insights from the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Benjamin; Einsiedl, Florian; Arnold, Gail L; Müller, Inigo; Templer, Stefanie; Bernasconi, Stefano M

    2012-01-01

    Dissimilatory sulphate reduction (DSR) leads to an overprint of the oxygen isotope composition of sulphate by the oxygen isotope composition of water. This overprint is assumed to occur via cell-internally formed sulphuroxy intermediates in the sulphate reduction pathway. Unlike sulphate, the sulphuroxy intermediates can readily exchange oxygen isotopes with water. Subsequent to the oxygen isotope exchange, these intermediates, e.g. sulphite, are re-oxidised by reversible enzymatic reactions to sulphate, thereby incorporating the oxygen used for the re-oxidation of the sulphur intermediates. Consequently, the rate and expression of DSR-mediated oxygen isotope exchange between sulphate and water depend not only on the oxygen isotope exchange between sulphuroxy intermediates and water, but also on cell-internal forward and backward reactions. The latter are the very same processes that control the extent of sulphur isotope fractionation expressed by DSR. Recently, the measurement of multiple sulphur isotope fractionation has successfully been applied to obtain information on the reversibility of individual enzymatically catalysed steps in DSR. Similarly, the oxygen isotope signature of sulphate has the potential to reveal complementary information on the reversibility of DSR. The aim of this work is to assess this potential. We derived a mathematical model that links sulphur and oxygen isotope effects by DSR, assuming that oxygen isotope effects observed in the oxygen isotopic composition of ambient sulphate are controlled by the oxygen isotope exchange between sulphite and water and the successive cell-internal oxidation of sulphite back to sulphate. Our model predicts rapid DSR-mediated oxygen isotope exchange for cases where the sulphur isotope fractionation is large and slow exchange for cases where the sulphur isotope fractionation is small. Our model also demonstrates that different DSR-mediated oxygen isotope equilibrium values are observed, depending on the

  10. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: Constraints from ODP Leg 204

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trehu, A.M.; Long, P.E.; Torres, M.E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F.R.; Collett, T.S.; Goldberg, D.S.; Milkov, A.V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N.L.; Barr, S.R.; Borowski, W.S.; Claypool, G.E.; Delwiche, M.E.; Dickens, G.R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J.E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M. E.; Weinberger, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ???10 m thick, and may occur in up to ???20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Three-dimensional distribution of gas hydrate beneath southern Hydrate Ridge: constraints from ODP Leg 204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tréhu, A. M.; Long, P. E.; Torres, M. E.; Bohrmann, G.; Rack, F. R.; Collett, T. S.; Goldberg, D. S.; Milkov, A. V.; Riedel, M.; Schultheiss, P.; Bangs, N. L.; Barr, S. R.; Borowski, W. S.; Claypool, G. E.; Delwiche, M. E.; Dickens, G. R.; Gracia, E.; Guerin, G.; Holland, M.; Johnson, J. E.; Lee, Y.-J.; Liu, C.-S.; Su, X.; Teichert, B.; Tomaru, H.; Vanneste, M.; Watanabe, M.; Weinberger, J. L.

    2004-06-01

    Large uncertainties about the energy resource potential and role in global climate change of gas hydrates result from uncertainty about how much hydrate is contained in marine sediments. During Leg 204 of the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) to the accretionary complex of the Cascadia subduction zone, we sampled the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) from the seafloor to its base in contrasting geological settings defined by a 3D seismic survey. By integrating results from different methods, including several new techniques developed for Leg 204, we overcome the problem of spatial under-sampling inherent in robust methods traditionally used for estimating the hydrate content of cores and obtain a high-resolution, quantitative estimate of the total amount and spatial variability of gas hydrate in this structural system. We conclude that high gas hydrate content (30-40% of pore space or 20-26% of total volume) is restricted to the upper tens of meters below the seafloor near the summit of the structure, where vigorous fluid venting occurs. Elsewhere, the average gas hydrate content of the sediments in the gas hydrate stability zone is generally <2% of the pore space, although this estimate may increase by a factor of 2 when patchy zones of locally higher gas hydrate content are included in the calculation. These patchy zones are structurally and stratigraphically controlled, contain up to 20% hydrate in the pore space when averaged over zones ˜10 m thick, and may occur in up to ˜20% of the region imaged by 3D seismic data. This heterogeneous gas hydrate distribution is an important constraint on models of gas hydrate formation in marine sediments and the response of the sediments to tectonic and environmental change.

  12. Acidic conjugate of phenols in insects; glucoside phosphate and glucoside sulphate derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ngah, W Z; Smith, J N

    1983-06-01

    Conjugates of p-nitrophenol in nine species of insects were identified by paper chromatography and ionophoresis as the glucoside, the sulphate, the phosphate and the glucoside phosphate. Metabolites with similar properties to the glucoside phosphates were also formed from 8-hydroxyquinoline, 1-naphthol and 4-methylumbelliferone in Tenebrio larvae. Tenebrio larvae also metabolized p-nitrophenol to a compound believed to be p-nitrophenyl glucoside-6-sulphate. None of the nine species of insect used was able to metabolize [14C]benzoic acid to a glucoside-phosphate or glucoside-sulphate conjugate.

  13. Methane hydrate formation in partially water-saturated Ottawa sand

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waite, W.F.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    Bulk properties of gas hydrate-bearing sediment strongly depend on whether hydrate forms primarily in the pore fluid, becomes a load-bearing member of the sediment matrix, or cements sediment grains. Our compressional wave speed measurements through partially water-saturated, methane hydrate-bearing Ottawa sands suggest hydrate surrounds and cements sediment grains. The three Ottawa sand packs tested in the Gas Hydrate And Sediment Test Laboratory Instrument (GHASTLI) contain 38(1)% porosity, initially with distilled water saturating 58, 31, and 16% of that pore space, respectively. From the volume of methane gas produced during hydrate dissociation, we calculated the hydrate concentration in the pore space to be 70, 37, and 20% respectively. Based on these hydrate concentrations and our measured compressional wave speeds, we used a rock physics model to differentiate between potential pore-space hydrate distributions. Model results suggest methane hydrate cements unconsolidated sediment when forming in systems containing an abundant gas phase.

  14. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  15. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Pellenq, Roland J-M; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J; Buehler, Markus J; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-09-22

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this "liquid stone" gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm(3)) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)(1.65)(SiO2)(H2O)(1.75), also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking.

  16. Free gas in the regional hydrate stability zone: Implications for hydrate distribution and fracturing behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, H.; Dugan, B.

    2010-12-01

    We show that hydrate distribution and fracture genesis in the hydrate stability zone are largely governed by the phase of methane supply. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as free gas, hydrate saturation increases upwards in the hydrate stability zone, and fractures nucleate in the middle of the stability zone where hydrate saturation is highest. In systems where methane is supplied primarily as a dissolved phase in the pore water, hydrate saturation decreases upwards in the stability zone, and fractures nucleate at the base of the stability zone. These interpretations are based on our one-dimensional model that incorporates multiphase flow and free gas within the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). The RHSZ is defined as the interval in which methane hydrate may occur at seawater salinity (3.35% by mass). As hydrate forms and excludes salt from the crystal structure, the porewater salinity increases. Free gas enters the RHSZ when the porewater salinity increases to the value required for three-phase (dissolved methane + gas hydrate + free gas) equilibrium. Our model also incorporates changes to capillary pressure as hydrate forms and occludes the pore system. We model the system until the excess pore pressure exceeds the vertical effective stress in the domain due to capillary effects and pore occlusion, at which point we assume fractures nucleate. We test our model at Hydrate Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the gas phase, and show that hydrate saturation increases upwards and fractures nucleate high within the stability zone, eventually allowing gas to vent to the seafloor. We also model Blake Ridge, where methane supply is dominantly in the dissolved phase, and show that hydrate saturation is greatest at the base of the stability zone; fractures nucleate here and in some cases could propagate through the regional hydrate stability zone, allowing methane-charged water to vent to the seafloor. These two systems represent endmembers of

  17. Understanding effect of structure and stability on transformation of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Yan, Yujie; Liu, Haiying; Xu, Jiafang; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Understanding the transformation process of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate is crucial to develop the CH4sbnd CO2 replacement technique for CH4 production and CO2 sequestration. Ab initio calculations show that the transformation will slightly distort the host lattice and decrease the binding strength of guest molecules, but it is a thermodynamically spontaneous process dominated by the entropic contribution. Moreover, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the dynamics of the host lattice is independent on the guest molecules, while CO2 in hydrate exhibits slower translational and rotational motion than CH4 in hydrate.

  18. Hydration states of AFm cement phases

    SciTech Connect

    Baquerizo, Luis G.; Matschei, Thomas; Scrivener, Karen L.; Saeidpour, Mahsa; Wadsö, Lars

    2015-07-15

    The AFm phase, one of the main products formed during the hydration of Portland and calcium aluminate cement based systems, belongs to the layered double hydrate (LDH) family having positively charged layers and water plus charge-balancing anions in the interlayer. It is known that these phases present different hydration states (i.e. varying water content) depending on the relative humidity (RH), temperature and anion type, which might be linked to volume changes (swelling and shrinkage). Unfortunately the stability conditions of these phases are insufficiently reported. This paper presents novel experimental results on the different hydration states of the most important AFm phases: monocarboaluminate, hemicarboaluminate, strätlingite, hydroxy-AFm and monosulfoaluminate, and the thermodynamic properties associated with changes in their water content during absorption/desorption. This data opens the possibility to model the response of cementitious systems during drying and wetting and to engineer systems more resistant to harsh external conditions.

  19. Hydrate Control for Gas Storage Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Savidge

    2008-10-31

    The overall objective of this project was to identify low cost hydrate control options to help mitigate and solve hydrate problems that occur in moderate and high pressure natural gas storage field operations. The study includes data on a number of flow configurations, fluids and control options that are common in natural gas storage field flow lines. The final phase of this work brings together data and experience from the hydrate flow test facility and multiple field and operator sources. It includes a compilation of basic information on operating conditions as well as candidate field separation options. Lastly the work is integrated with the work with the initial work to provide a comprehensive view of gas storage field hydrate control for field operations and storage field personnel.

  20. Polyethylene oxide hydration in grafted layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Zilu

    Hydration of water soluble polymers is one of the key-factors defining their conformation and properties, similar to biopolymers. Polyethylene oxide (PEO) is one of the most important biomedical-applications polymers and is known for its reverse temperature solubility due to hydrogen bonding with water. As in many practical applications PEO chains are grafted to surfaces, e.g. of nanoparticles or planar surfaces, it is important to understand PEO hydration in such grafted layers. Using atomistic molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the details of molecular conformation and hydration of PEO end-grafted to gold surfaces. We analyze polymer and water density distribution as a function of distance from the surface for different grafting densities. Based on a detailed analysis of hydrogen bonding between polymer and water in grafted PEO layers, we will discuss the extent of PEO hydration and its implication for polymer conformation, mobility and layer properties. This research is supported by NSF (DMR-1410928).

  1. ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrate Production Test

    SciTech Connect

    Schoderbek, David; Farrell, Helen; Howard, James; Raterman, Kevin; Silpngarmlert, Suntichai; Martin, Kenneth; Smith, Bruce; Klein, Perry

    2013-06-30

    Work began on the ConocoPhillips Gas Hydrates Production Test (DOE award number DE-NT0006553) on October 1, 2008. This final report summarizes the entire project from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2013.

  2. Overview: Gas hydrate geology and geography

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, R.D.

    1993-01-01

    Several geological factors which are directly responsible for the presence or absence of gas hydrates have been reviewed and are: tectonic position of the region; sedimentary environments; structural deformation; shale diapirism; hydrocarbon generation and migration; thermal regime in the hydrate formation zone (HFZ); pressure conditions; and hydrocarbon gas supply to the HFZ. Work on gas hydrate formation in the geological environment has made significant advances, but there is still much to be learned. Work is continuing in the deeper offshore areas through the Ocean Drilling Program, Government Agencies, and Industry. The pressure/temperature conditions necessary for formation has been identified for various compositions of natural gas through laboratory investigations and conditions for formation are being advanced through drilling in areas where gas hydrates exist.

  3. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Donn McGuire; Thomas Williams; Bjorn Paulsson; Alexander Goertz

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a drilling hazard by the oil and gas industry for years. Drilling engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous problems, including drilling kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrates as a potential energy source agree that the resource potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained from physical samples taken from actual hydrate-bearing rocks. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The project team drilled and continuously cored the Hot Ice No. 1 well on Anadarko-leased acreage beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and used for determining physical characteristics of hydrates and surrounding rock. After the well was logged, a 3D vertical seismic profile (VSP) was recorded to calibrate the shallow geologic section with seismic data and to investigate techniques to better resolve lateral subsurface variations of potential hydrate-bearing strata. Paulsson Geophysical Services, Inc. deployed their 80 level 3C clamped borehole seismic receiver array in the wellbore to record samples every 25 ft. Seismic vibrators were successively positioned at 1185 different surface positions in a circular pattern around the wellbore. This technique generated a 3D image of the subsurface. Correlations were

  4. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Runyon; Mike Globe; Kent Newsham; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  5. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  6. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Ali Kadaster; Bill Liddell; Tommy Thompson; Thomas Williams; Michael Niedermayr

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project was a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope included drilling and coring a well (Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. During the first drilling season, operations were conducted at the site between January 28, 2003 to April 30, 2003. The well was spudded and drilled to a depth of 1403 ft. Due to the onset of warmer weather, work was then suspended for the season. Operations at the site were continued after the tundra was re-opened the following season. Between January 12, 2004 and March 19, 2004, the well was drilled and cored to a final depth of 2300 ft. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and implemented for determining physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and

  7. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Williams; Keith Millheim; Bill Liddell

    2004-11-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is a cost-shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Anadarko Petroleum, Noble Corporation, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to help identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. As part of the project work scope, team members drilled and cored a well (the Hot Ice No. 1) on Anadarko leases beginning in January 2003 and completed in March 2004. Due to scheduling constraints imposed by the Arctic drilling season, operations at the site were suspended between April 21, 2003 and January 30, 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was constructed and used for determining physical characteristics of frozen core immediately after it was retrieved from the well. The well was drilled from a new and innovative Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a greatly reduced footprint and environmental impact. Final efforts of the project were to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists for future hydrate operations. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in the

  8. Spectroscopic methods in gas hydrate research.

    PubMed

    Rauh, Florian; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2012-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline structures comprising a guest molecule surrounded by a water cage, and are particularly relevant due to their natural occurrence in the deep sea and in permafrost areas. Low molecular weight molecules such as methane and carbon dioxide can be sequestered into that cage at suitable temperatures and pressures, facilitating the transition to the solid phase. While the composition and structure of gas hydrates appear to be well understood, their formation and dissociation mechanisms, along with the dynamics and kinetics associated with those processes, remain ambiguous. In order to take advantage of gas hydrates as an energy resource (e.g., methane hydrate), as a sequestration matrix in (for example) CO(2) storage, or for chemical energy conservation/storage, a more detailed molecular level understanding of their formation and dissociation processes, as well as the chemical, physical, and biological parameters that affect these processes, is required. Spectroscopic techniques appear to be most suitable for analyzing the structures of gas hydrates (sometimes in situ), thus providing access to such information across the electromagnetic spectrum. A variety of spectroscopic methods are currently used in gas hydrate research to determine the composition, structure, cage occupancy, guest molecule position, and binding/formation/dissociation mechanisms of the hydrate. To date, the most commonly applied techniques are Raman spectroscopy and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Diffraction methods such as neutron and X-ray diffraction are used to determine gas hydrate structures, and to study lattice expansions. Furthermore, UV-vis spectroscopic techniques and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) have assisted in structural studies of gas hydrates. Most recently, waveguide-coupled mid-infrared spectroscopy in the 3-20 μm spectral range has demonstrated its value for in situ studies on the formation and dissociation of gas

  9. Physical properties of sediment containing methane gas hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winters, W.J.; Waite, W.F.; Mason, D.H.; Gilbert, L.Y.

    2005-01-01

    A study conducted by the US Geological Survey (USGS) on the formation, behavior, and properties of mixtures of gas hydrate and sediment is presented. The results show that the properties of host material influence the type and quantity of hydrates formed. The presence of hydrate during mechanical shear tests affects the measured sediment pore pressure. Sediment shear strength may be increased more than 500 percent by intact hydrate, but greatly weakened if the hydrate dissociates.

  10. Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.; Riedel, M.; Boswell, R.; Presley, J.; Kumar, P.; Sathe, A.; Sethi, A.; Lall, M.; ,

    2015-01-01

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01 was designed to study the gas-hydrate occurrences off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. During Indian National Gas Hydrate Program Expedition 01, dedicated gas-hydrate coring, drilling, and downhole logging operations were conducted from 28 April 2006 to 19 August 2006.

  11. Exploitation of subsea gas hydrate reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2016-04-01

    Natural gas hydrates are considered to be a potential energy resource in the future. They occur in permafrost areas as well as in subsea sediments and are stable at high pressure and low temperature conditions. According to estimations the amount of carbon bonded in natural gas hydrates worldwide is two times larger than in all known conventional fossil fuels. Besides technical challenges that have to be overcome climate and safety issues have to be considered before a commercial exploitation of such unconventional reservoirs. The potential of producing natural gas from subsea gas hydrate deposits by various means (e.g. depressurization and/or injection of carbon dioxide) is numerically studied in the frame of the German research project »SUGAR«. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into a numerical model. The physics of the process leads to strong non-linear couplings between hydraulic fluid flow, hydrate dissociation and formation, hydraulic properties of the sediment, partial pressures and seawater solution of components and the thermal budget of the system described by the heat equation. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the recent development regarding the production of natural gas from subsea gas hydrate reservoirs. It aims at giving a broad insight into natural gas hydrates and covering relevant aspects of the exploitation process. It is focused on the thermodynamic principles and technological approaches for the exploitation. The effects occurring during natural gas production within hydrate filled sediment layers are identified and discussed by means of numerical simulation results. The behaviour of relevant process parameters such as pressure, temperature and phase saturations is described and compared for different strategies. The simulations are complemented by calculations for different safety relevant problems.

  12. Preservation of methane hydrate at 1 atm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stern, L.A.; Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Durham, W.B.

    2001-01-01

    A "pressure-release" method that enables reproducible bulk preservation of pure, porous, methane hydrate at conditions 50 to 75 K above its equilibrium T (193 K) at 1 atm is refined. The amount of hydrate preserved by this method appears to be greatly in excess of that reported in the previous citations, and is likely the result of a mechanism different from ice shielding.

  13. Measurement of clathrate hydrates via Raman spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sum, A.K.; Burruss, R.C.; Sloan, E.D.

    1997-01-01

    Raman spectra of clathrate hydrate guest molecules are presented for three known structures (I (sI), II (sII), and H (sH)) in the following systems: CH4 (sI), CO2 (sI), C3H8 (sII), CH4 + CO2 (sI), CD4 + C3H8 (sII), CH4 + N2 (sI), CH4 + THF-d8 (sII), and CH4 + C7D14 (sH). Relative occupancy of CH4 in the large and small cavities of sI were determined by deconvoluting the ??1 symmetric bands, resulting in hydration numbers of 6.04 ?? 0.03. The frequency of the ??1 bands for CH4 in structures I, II, and H differ statistically, so that Raman spectroscopy is a potential tool to identify hydrate crystal structure. Hydrate guest compositions were also measured for two vapor compositions of the CH4 + CO2 system, and they compared favorably with predictions. The large cavities were measured to be almost fully occupied by CH4 and CO2, whereas only a small fraction of the small cavities are occupied by CH4. No CO2 was found in the small cavities. Hydration numbers from 7.27 to 7.45 were calculated for the mixed hydrate.

  14. Fe-containing phases in hydrated cements

    SciTech Connect

    Dilnesa, B.Z.; Wieland, E.; Lothenbach, B.; Dähn, R.; Scrivener, K.L.

    2014-04-01

    In this study synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been applied, an element specific technique which allows Fe-containing phases to be identified in the complex mineral mixture of hydrated cements. Several Fe species contributed to the overall Fe K-edge spectra recorded on the cement samples. In the early stage of cement hydration ferrite was the dominant Fe-containing mineral. Ferrihydrite was detected during the first hours of the hydration process. After 1 day the formation of Al- and Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet was observed, while the amount of ferrihydrite decreased. The latter finding agrees with thermodynamic modeling, which predicts the formation of Fe-siliceous hydrogarnet in Portland cement systems. The presence of Al- and Fe-containing siliceous hydrogarnet was further substantiated in the residue of hydrated cement by performing a selective dissolution procedure. - Highlights: • Fe bound to ferrihydrite at early age hydration • Fe found to be stable in siliceous hydrogarnet at longer term age hydration • Fe-containing AFt and AFm phases are less stable than siliceous hydrogarnet. • The study demonstrates EXAFS used to identify amorphous or poorly crystalline phases.

  15. Electrical properties of polycrystalline methane hydrate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Frane, W. L.; Stern, L.A.; Weitemeyer, K.A.; Constable, S.; Pinkston, J.C.; Roberts, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) remote-sensing techniques are demonstrated to be sensitive to gas hydrate concentration and distribution and complement other resource assessment techniques, particularly seismic methods. To fully utilize EM results requires knowledge of the electrical properties of individual phases and mixing relations, yet little is known about the electrical properties of gas hydrates. We developed a pressure cell to synthesize gas hydrate while simultaneously measuring in situ frequency-dependent electrical conductivity (σ). Synthesis of methane (CH4) hydrate was verified by thermal monitoring and by post run cryogenic scanning electron microscope imaging. Impedance spectra (20 Hz to 2 MHz) were collected before and after synthesis of polycrystalline CH4 hydrate from polycrystalline ice and used to calculate σ. We determined the σ of CH4 hydrate to be 5 × 10−5 S/m at 0°C with activation energy (Ea) of 30.6 kJ/mol (−15 to 15°C). After dissociation back into ice, σ measurements of samples increased by a factor of ~4 and Ea increased by ~50%, similar to the starting ice samples.

  16. Hydrate Shell Growth Measured Using NMR.

    PubMed

    Haber, Agnes; Akhfash, Masoumeh; Loh, Charles K; Aman, Zachary M; Fridjonsson, Einar O; May, Eric F; Johns, Michael L

    2015-08-18

    Benchtop nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) pulsed field gradient (PFG) and relaxation measurements were used to monitor the clathrate hydrate shell growth occurring in water droplets dispersed in a continuous cyclopentane phase. These techniques allowed the growth of hydrate inside the opaque exterior shell to be monitored and, hence, information about the evolution of the shell's morphology to be deduced. NMR relaxation measurements were primarily used to monitor the hydrate shell growth kinetics, while PFG NMR diffusion experiments were used to determine the nominal droplet size distribution (DSD) of the unconverted water inside the shell core. A comparison of mean droplet sizes obtained directly via PFG NMR and independently deduced from relaxation measurements showed that the assumption of the shell model-a perfect spherical core of unconverted water-for these hydrate droplet systems is correct, but only after approximately 24 h of shell growth. Initially, hydrate growth is faster and heat-transfer-limited, leading to porous shells with surface areas larger than that of spheres with equivalent volumes. Subsequently, the hydrate growth rate becomes mass-transfer-limited, and the shells become thicker, spherical, and less porous.

  17. Ground movements associated with gas hydrate production

    SciTech Connect

    Siriwardane, H.J.

    1992-10-01

    The mechanics of ground movements during hydrate production can be more closely simulated by considering similarities with ground movements associated with subsidence in permafrost regions than with gob compaction in a longwall mine. The purpose of this research work is to investigate the potential strata movements associated with hydrate production by considering similarities with ground movements in permafrost regions. The work primarily involves numerical modeling of subsidence caused by hydrate dissociation. The investigation is based on the theories of continuum mechanics , thermomechanical behavior of frozen geo-materials, and principles of rock mechanics and geomechanics. It is expected that some phases of the investigation will involve the use of finite element method, which is a powerful computer-based method which has been widely used in many areas of science and engineering. Parametric studies will be performed to predict expected strata movements and surface subsidence for different reservoir conditions and properties of geological materials. The results from this investigation will be useful in predicting the magnitude of the subsidence problem associated with gas hydrate production. The analogy of subsidence in permafrost regions may provide lower bounds for subsidence expected in hydrate reservoirs. Furthermore, it is anticipated that the results will provide insight into planning of hydrate recovery operations.

  18. Proton percolation on hydrated lysozyme powders.

    PubMed

    Careri, G; Giansanti, A; Rupley, J A

    1986-09-01

    The framework of percolation theory is used to analyze the hydration dependence of the capacitance measured for protein samples of pH 3-10, at frequencies from 10 kHz to 4 MHz. For all samples there is a critical value of the hydration at which the capacitance sharply increases with increase in hydration level. The threshold h(c) = 0.15 g of water per g of protein is independent of pH below pH 9 and shows no solvent deuterium isotope effect. The fractional coverage of the surface at h(c) is in close agreement with the prediction of theory for surface percolation. We view the protonic conduction process described here for low hydration and previously for high hydration as percolative proton transfer along threads of hydrogen-bonded water molecules. A principal element of the percolation picture, which explains the invariance of h(c) to change in pH and solvent, is the sudden appearance of long-range connectivity and infinite clusters at the threshold h(c). The relationship of the protonic conduction threshold to other features of protein hydration is described. The importance of percolative processes for enzyme catalysis and membrane transport is discussed.

  19. The hydration properties of carboxybetaine zwitterion brushes.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongbo; Qian, Xianghong

    2016-04-15

    Combined quantum mechanical calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the hydration properties of carboxybetaine zwitterion brushes with varying separation distances between the quaternary ammonium cation and carboxylic anion. The brushes consist of zwitterion trimers and are investigated to mimic interacting zwitterion chains grafted on a substrate as well as polymers with interacting zwitterion side chains. Our results show that the values of both positive and negative charges, their separation distances as well as chain interactions appear to play a critical role in the hydration properties of the zwitterions. The overall hydration property of these zwitterions is dictated by the competition between the strong hydration of the charged groups and the dehydration of the hydrocarbon chains. The strongest hydration occurs when the -CH2- unit in the hydrocarbon chain reaches 6-8 for these trimers. Further increase in the hydrocarbon chain length to 10-14 leads to significant and sudden dehydration of the trimers. The water structure and the water residence time surrounding the zwitterions also demonstrate substantial alteration at this length scale. This hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition is induced by the hydrophobic interactions of the trimer chains. Our hydration results could explain the observed trend of the superiority of the methylated carbohydrates and poly(ethylene glycol) as antifouling materials compared to corresponding hydroxyl-terminated compounds.

  20. Clathrate hydrates in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, S. L.

    1985-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds in which an expanded ice lattice forms cages that contain gas molecules. There are two principal hydrate structures. Structure I, with a 12 A cubic unit cell, contains 46 water molecules and 8 cages of two types, giving an ideal formula (for CH4) of CH4.5.75H2O. The actual formula contains somewhat more water as the cages are not completely filled. Other examples that form Structure I hydrates are C2H6, C2H4, C2H2, CO2, SO2, OCS, Xe, H2S. Structure II, with a 17 A cubic unit cell, contains 136 water molecules, and 8 large and 16 small cages. The ideal formula for CHCl3 is CHCL3.17H2O. Other examples of Structure II hydrates include C3H8, C2H5Cl, acetone, and tetrahydrofuran. Small molecules such as Ar, Kr and probably N2 and O2 also form a Structure II hydrate. The small molecules occupy both the large and small cages, giving an ideal formula of Ar.5.67H2O. The conditions of pressure and temperature for hydrate formation are discussed.

  1. Surfactant effects on SF6 hydrate formation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Lee, Ju Dong; Lee, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Young Bok; Lee, Man Sig; Kim, Young Seok; Englezos, Peter; Kim, Myung Hyun; Kim, Yang Do

    2009-03-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF(6)) has been widely used in a variety of industrial processes, but it is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. For this reason, it is necessary to separate or collect it from waste gas streams. One separation method is through hydrate crystal formation. In this study, SF(6) hydrate was formed in aqueous surfactant solutions of 0.00, 0.01, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.20 wt% to investigate the effects of surfactants on the hydrate formation rates. Three surfactants, Tween 20 (Tween), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LABS), were tested in a semi-batch stirred vessel at the constant temperature and pressures of 276.2 K and 0.78 MPa, respectively. All surfactants showed kinetic promoter behavior for SF(6) hydrate formation. It was also found that SF(6) hydrate formation proceeded in two stages with the second stage being the most rapid. In situ Raman spectroscopy analysis revealed that the increased gas consumption rate with the addition of surfactant was possibly due to the increased gas filling rate in the hydrate cavity.

  2. Structural differences and the presence of unsubstituted amino groups in heparan sulphates from different tissues and species.

    PubMed Central

    Toida, T; Yoshida, H; Toyoda, H; Koshiishi, I; Imanari, T; Hileman, R E; Fromm, J R; Linhardt, R J

    1997-01-01

    This study presents a comparison of heparan sulphate chains isolated from various porcine and bovine tissues. 1H-NMR spectroscopy (500 MHz) was applied for structural and compositional studies on intact heparan sulphate chains. After enzymic digestion of heparan sulphate using heparin lyase I (EC 4.2.2.7) II and III (EC 4.2.2.8), the compositions of unsaturated disaccharides obtained were determined by analytical capillary electrophoresis. Correlations between the N-sulphated glucosamine residues and O-sulphation and between iduronic acid content and total sulphation were discovered using the data obtained by NMR and disaccharide analysis. Heparan sulphate chains could be classified into two groups based on the sulphation degree and the iduronic acid content. Heparan sulphate chains with a high degree of sulphation possessed also a significant number of iduronic acid residues and were isolated exclusively from porcine brain, liver and kidney medulla. The presence and amount of N-unsubstituted glucosamine residues (GlcNp) was established in all of the heparan sulphates examined. The structural context in which this residue occurs was demonstrated to be: high sulphation domain --> 4)-beta-D-GlcAp-(1 --> 4)-alpha-D-GlcNp-(1 --> 4)-beta-D-GlcAp-(1 --> low sulphation domain (where GlcNp is 2-amino-2-deoxyglucopyranose, and GlcAp is glucopyranosyluronic acid), based on the isolation and characterization of a novel, heparin lyase III-derived, GlcNp containing tetrasaccharide and hexasaccharide. The results presented suggest that structural differences may play a role in important biological events controlled by heparan sulphate in different tissues. PMID:9065769

  3. Intelligent hydrated-sulfate template assisted preparation of nanoporous TiO(2) spheres and their visible-light application.

    PubMed

    Lü, Xujie; Huang, Fuqiang; Wu, Jianjun; Ding, Shangjun; Xu, Fangfang

    2011-02-01

    Hydrated metal sulfates (MSO(4)·xH(2)O, M = Zn, Fe, Co, Mg, etc.) were proposed to be intelligent templates to solvothermally synthesize nanoporous TiO(2) spheres with tunable chamber structures from hollow to solid and hybrid compositions. During the reaction, hydrated sulfate serves simultaneously as spherical template, water supplier, and composition controller, and it can be easily removed by washing. The as-prepared anatase TiO(2) spheres were evidenced to contain highly crystallized TiO(2) nanocrystals hybridized with a small amount of metal oxide from the hydrated sulfate. The formation mechanism of the hollow spheres involves the self-conglobation of hydrated sulfate, the hydrolysis of tetrabutyl titanate on the spherical templates, and the subsequent process of solvothermal crystallization. The proposed hydrated-sulfate assisted solvothermal (HAS) strategy was demonstrated to be widely applicable to various systems. When applied to visible-light photocatalysis, the hybrid TiO(2) spheres exhibit excellent photocatalytic performance, benefiting from the reduced charge recombination rate contributed by the heterojunctions of TiO(2) and the hybridized metal oxides.

  4. The observation of scintillation in a hydrated inorganic compound: CeCl3 6H2O

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Neal, John S; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported the discovery of a new family of rare-earth metal-organic single-crystal scintillators based on Ce3+ as the activator ion. Starting with the CeCl3(CH3OH)4 prototype, this family of scintillators has recently been extended to include complex metal-organic adducts produced by reacting CeCl3 with heavier organics (e.g., isomers of propanol and butanol). Some of these new rare-earth metal-organic materials incorporated waters of hydration in their structures, and the observation of scintillation in these hydrated compounds was an original finding for any solid scintillator. In the present work, we now report what is apparently the initial observation of gamma-ray-excited scintillation in an inorganic hydrated material, namely single-crystal monoclinic CeCl3 6H2O. This observation shows that the mechanisms of the various scintillation energy-transfer processes are not blocked by the presence of waters of hydration in an inorganic material and that the observation of scintillation in other hydrated inorganic compounds is not precluded.

  5. Hydration during intense exercise training.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J; Meyer, N L

    2013-01-01

    Hydration status has profound effects on both physical and mental performance, and sports performance is thus critically affected. Both overhydration and underhydration - if sufficiently severe - will impair performance and pose a risk to health. Athletes may begin exercise in a hypohydrated state as a result of incomplete recovery from water loss induced in order to achieve a specific body mass target or due to incomplete recovery from a previous competition or training session. Dehydration will also develop in endurance exercise where fluid intake does not match water loss. The focus has generally been on training rather than on competition, but sweat loss and fluid replacement in training may have important implications. Hypohydration may impair training quality and may also increase stress levels. It is unclear whether this will have negative effects (reduced training quality, impaired immunity) or whether it will promote a greater adaptive response. Hypohydration and the consequent hyperthermia, however, can enhance the effectiveness of a heat acclimation program, resulting in improved endurance performance in warm and temperate environments. Drinking in training may be important in enhancing tolerance of the gut when athletes plan to drink in competition. The distribution of water between body water compartments may also be important in the initiation and promotion of cellular adaptations to the training stimulus.

  6. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOEpatents

    Jackovitz, John F.; Pantier, Earl A.

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  7. Carbon Monoxide as an Electron Donor for the Biological Reduction of Sulphate

    PubMed Central

    Parshina, Sofiya N.; Sipma, Jan; Henstra, Anne Meint; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are able to use carbon monoxide (CO) as a carbon source and electron donor for biological sulphate reduction. These strains exhibit variable resistance to CO toxicity. The most resistant SRB can grow and use CO as an electron donor at concentrations up to 100%, whereas others are already severely inhibited at CO concentrations as low as 1-2%. Here, the utilization, inhibition characteristics, and enzymology of CO metabolism as well as the current state of genomics of CO-oxidizing SRB are reviewed. Carboxydotrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria can be applied for biological sulphate reduction with synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide) as an electron donor. PMID:20628586

  8. Indoxyl sulphate and kidney disease: Causes, consequences and interventions.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Robert J; Small, David M; Vesey, David A; Johnson, David W; Francis, Ross; Vitetta, Luis; Gobe, Glenda C; Morais, Christudas

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, chronic kidney disease (CKD), defined as reduced renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR) < 60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) ) and/or evidence of kidney damage (typically manifested as albuminuria) for at least 3 months, has become one of the fastest-growing public health concerns worldwide. CKD is characterized by reduced clearance and increased serum accumulation of metabolic waste products (uremic retention solutes). At least 152 uremic retention solutes have been reported. This review focuses on indoxyl sulphate (IS), a protein-bound, tryptophan-derived metabolite that is generated by intestinal micro-organisms (microbiota). Animal studies have demonstrated an association between IS accumulation and increased fibrosis, and oxidative stress. This has been mirrored by in vitro studies, many of which report cytotoxic effects in kidney proximal tubular cells following IS exposure. Clinical studies have associated IS accumulation with deleterious effects, such as kidney functional decline and adverse cardiovascular events, although causality has not been conclusively established. The aims of this review are to: (i) establish factors associated with increased serum accumulation of IS; (ii) report effects of IS accumulation in clinical studies; (iii) critique the reported effects of IS in the kidney, when administered both in vivo and in vitro; and (iv) summarize both established and hypothetical therapeutic options for reducing serum IS or antagonizing its reported downstream effects in the kidney.

  9. Immunoablation of cells expressing the NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan

    PubMed Central

    Leoni, Giampaolo; Rattray, Marcus; Fulton, Daniel; Rivera, Andrea; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the transmembrane NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) defines a distinct population of NG2-glia. NG2-glia serve as a regenerative pool of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS), which is important for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and are a major component of the glial scar that inhibits axon regeneration after CNS injury. In addition, NG2-glia form unique neuron–glial synapses with unresolved functions. However, to date it has proven difficult to study the importance of NG2-glia in any of these functions using conventional transgenic NG2 ‘knockout' mice. To overcome this, we aimed to determine whether NG2-glia can be targeted using an immunotoxin approach. We demonstrate that incubation in primary anti-NG2 antibody in combination with secondary saporin-conjugated antibody selectively kills NG2-expressing cells in vitro. In addition, we provide evidence that the same protocol induces the loss of NG2-glia without affecting astrocyte or neuronal numbers in cerebellar brain slices from postnatal mice. This study shows that targeting the NG2 CSPG with immunotoxins is an effective and selective means for killing NG2-glia, which has important implications for studying the functions of these enigmatic cells both in the normal CNS, and in demyelination and degeneration. PMID:24252088

  10. Formulation and Evaluation of Fast Dissolving Film for Salbutamol Sulphate.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suneel; Hingawe, Nilesh; Shah, Keyur; Patil, Arun

    2015-01-23

    The present study was aimed to formulate stable, readily dispersible and quick release taste masked fast dis solving film of Salbutamol sulphate by utilizing fast dissolving drug delivery techno logy. This avoids the use of expensive and non-conventional equipments like freeze dryer or spray dryers. It also avoids the time consuming conventional pro cesses like compression and costly polymers. The optimized films were evaluated for film thickness, folding endurance, disintegration time, dissolution time and drug content. The in -vitro dissolution studies were carried out in simulated gastric fluid (pH 1.2) and simulated salivary fluid (pH 6.8). The prepared films were found to be uniform and flexible and more than 90% of the drug was found to be released from the film within 8 min which is a desirable characteristic for fast abso rp tion. FT-IR and DSC studies revealed that there was no interaction between drug and excipients used and the drug was stable in the formulation. The in - vivo disintegration time and taste evaluation studies were carried out in h u man volunteers. These results revealed that there was no bitter taste; no irritation and good mouth feel of o p timized batch.

  11. Copper remediation by Eichhornia spp. and sulphate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dave, Shailesh; Damani, Maitry; Tipre, Devayani

    2010-01-15

    Eichhornia spp. biomass was collected from Chandola Lake, Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Point of zero charge of the biomass was pH 7.3. Flask study showed pH 5 and 2-3h contact time as optimum conditions for copper sorption with 67.25% copper removal. At the end of 24h of contact time, copper removal reached to 85.0%, from 100 ppm copper containing solution. Copper loading capacity of the biomass ranged between 9.9 and 28.5 mg g(-1) of biomass. To understand the interaction among pH, temperature, presence of nickel and zinc in the system, 2(4) factorial experiment was performed. Under the experimental conditions pH and interactions between pH-nickel, temperature-pH and temperature-pH-nickel-zinc were found to be significant with 60-74.7% copper removal. Langmuir isotherm was better fit as compared to Freundlich isotherm and pseudo-second order equation gave R(2) of 0.999 for biosorption kinetic of Eichhornia biomass. Reactor study showed 90% overall copper removal from 24 L of copper containing waste studied and sulphate-reducing bacteria played a significant role. SEMquant element analysis showed increase from 41.66% to 53.93%, 1.02-19.73% and 0.0-12.39% of chloride, aluminium and copper respectively in the loaded biomass as compare to unexposed biomass.

  12. Immunoablation of cells expressing the NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Leoni, Giampaolo; Rattray, Marcus; Fulton, Daniel; Rivera, Andrea; Butt, Arthur M

    2014-02-01

    Expression of the transmembrane NG2 chondroitin sulphate proteoglycan (CSPG) defines a distinct population of NG2-glia. NG2-glia serve as a regenerative pool of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells in the adult central nervous system (CNS), which is important for demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, and are a major component of the glial scar that inhibits axon regeneration after CNS injury. In addition, NG2-glia form unique neuron-glial synapses with unresolved functions. However, to date it has proven difficult to study the importance of NG2-glia in any of these functions using conventional transgenic NG2 'knockout' mice. To overcome this, we aimed to determine whether NG2-glia can be targeted using an immunotoxin approach. We demonstrate that incubation in primary anti-NG2 antibody in combination with secondary saporin-conjugated antibody selectively kills NG2-expressing cells in vitro. In addition, we provide evidence that the same protocol induces the loss of NG2-glia without affecting astrocyte or neuronal numbers in cerebellar brain slices from postnatal mice. This study shows that targeting the NG2 CSPG with immunotoxins is an effective and selective means for killing NG2-glia, which has important implications for studying the functions of these enigmatic cells both in the normal CNS, and in demyelination and degeneration.

  13. Mechanical properties of calcium sulphate/hydroxyapatite cement.

    PubMed

    Lei, Dang; Wardlaw, D; Hukins, D W L

    2006-01-01

    Setting times, volume after setting, injectability and hardness (at 37 degrees C in contact with Ringer's solution) were determined for cements made of mixtures of calcium sulphate hemihydrate (CS) and hydroxyapatite (HA) with a range of compositions. The purpose of these experiments was to determine the behaviour of a mixture that could be used as an injectable cement for orthopaedic applications, including spinal fusion. A suitable mixture consisted of 60% CS and 40% HA by mass; a slurry was made by mixing solid (36 g) with water (15 cm(3)). The slurry had initial and final setting times of 5.7+/-1.3 min and 19.6+/-0.7 min (mean +/- standard deviation), respectively. The hardness of the cement did not systematically increase or decrease in the 72 h following the final setting time. The volume of the cement was 99.8+/-0.4% of the volume of the initial slurry, i.e. there was negligible shrinkage on setting. It was able to withstand a pressure of 7.3+/-1.2 MPa, applied by a hemispherical indenter before the onset of permanent damage, indicating adequate strength for spinal fusion.

  14. Particle engineering using sonocrystallization: salbutamol sulphate for pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Dhumal, Ravindra S; Biradar, Shailesh V; Paradkar, Anant R; York, Peter

    2009-02-23

    The aim of present work was to produce fine elongated crystals of salbutamol sulphate (SS) by sonocrystallization for pulmonary delivery and compare with micronized and spray dried SS (SDSS) for in vitro aerosolization behavior. Application of ultrasound during anti-solvent crystallization resulted in fine elongated crystals (sonocrystallized SS; SCSS) compared to aggregates of large irregular crystals obtained without sonication. Higher sonication amplitude, time, concentration and lower processing temperatures favored formation of smaller crystals with narrow particle size distribution (PSD). SCSS was separated from dispersion by spray drying in the form of loose aggregates (SD-SCSS). The fine particle fraction (FPF) of formulations with coarse lactose carrier in cascade impactor increased from 16.66% for micronized SS to 31.12% for SDSS (obtained by spray drying aqueous SS solution) and 44.21% for SD-SCSS, due to reduced cohesive/adhesive forces and aerodynamic size by virtue of elongated shape of crystals. SD-SCSS was stable without any change in crystallinity and aerodynamic behavior for 3 months at 40 degrees C/75% RH, but amorphous SDSS showed recrystallization with poor aerosolization performance on storage. Sonocrystallization, a rapid and simple technique is reported for production of SS crystals suitable for inhalation delivery.

  15. Interplay between transglutaminases and heparan sulphate in progressive renal scarring

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Izhar; Furini, Giulia; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Atobatele, Adeola G.; Scarpellini, Alessandra; Schroeder, Nina; Atkinson, John; Maamra, Mabrouka; Nutter, Faith H.; Watson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Johnson, Timothy S.; Verderio, Elisabetta A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase-2 (TG2) is a new anti-fibrotic target for chronic kidney disease, for its role in altering the extracellular homeostatic balance leading to excessive build-up of matrix in kidney. However, there is no confirmation that TG2 is the only transglutaminase involved, neither there are strategies to control its action specifically over that of the conserved family-members. In this study, we have profiled transglutaminase isozymes in the rat subtotal nephrectomy (SNx) model of progressive renal scarring. All transglutaminases increased post-SNx peaking at loss of renal function but TG2 was the predominant enzyme. Upon SNx, extracellular TG2 deposited in the tubulointerstitium and peri-glomerulus via binding to heparan sulphate (HS) chains of proteoglycans and co-associated with syndecan-4. Extracellular TG2 was sufficient to activate transforming growth factor-β1 in tubular epithelial cells, and this process occurred in a HS-dependent way, in keeping with TG2-affinity for HS. Analysis of heparin binding of the main transglutaminases revealed that although the interaction between TG1 and HS is strong, the conformational heparin binding site of TG2 is not conserved, suggesting that TG2 has a unique interaction with HS within the family. Our data provides a rationale for a novel anti-fibrotic strategy specifically targeting the conformation-dependent TG2-epitope interacting with HS. PMID:27694984

  16. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of chondroitin sulphate

    PubMed Central

    du Souich, Patrick; García, Antonio G; Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia

    2009-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate (CS) is a natural glycosaminoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is formed by the 1–3 linkage of D-glucuronic acid to N-acetylgalactosamine. In chondrocytes, CS diminishes interleukin-1 p (IL-1p)-induced increases in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation, and decreases nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) nuclear translocation and as a consequence, reduces the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 p and TNF-a, and pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). The mechanism of action of CS explains its beneficial effect on the cartilage, synovial membrane and subchondral bone. On the other hand, in vivo, CS given orally prevents hepatic NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that systemic CS may elicit an anti-inflammatory effect in many tissues besides the articulation. There is preliminary evidence showing that in human beings, CS may be of benefit in other diseases where inflammation is an essential marker, such as psoriasis and atherosclerosis. The review of the literature suggest that CS might also be of interest for the treatment of other diseases with an inflammatory and/or autoimmune character, such as inflammatory bowel disease, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system and stroke, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:19522843

  17. Purification of IgG from serum with caprylic acid and ammonium sulphate precipitation is not superior to ammonium sulphate precipitation alone.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, J G; Elazhary, Y

    1989-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) from bovine serum raised against Aeromonas Salmonicida was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation (ASP) or caprylic acid treatment followed by ammonium sulphate precipitation (CAAS). Purity of IgG samples prepared by both methods were examined by High Performance Gel Permeation Chromatography, electrophoresis and antibody activity assay. Results suggest that IgG prepared by ASP is better than that obtained by CAAS method in terms of the yield of the IgG monomers and the recovery of the antibody activity.

  18. Hydrate pingoes at Nyegga: some characteristic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovland, M.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrate pingoes were observed on the seafloor during two different remotely operated vehicle (ROV)-dives, conducted by Statoil at complex-pockmark G11, at Nyegga, off Mid-Norway. Confirmation that these structures actually represent hydrate ice-cored sediment mounds (pingoes), was done by other investigators (Ivanov et al., 2006). Because it is expected that hydrate pingoes represent relatively dynamic seafloor topographic structures and that their shape and size most probably will change over relatively short time, it is important to know how to recognise them visually. Hovland and Svensen (2006) highlighted five different characteristic aspects that define hydrate pingoes on the sea floor: 1) They are dome- or disc-shaped features, which may attain any size from ~0.5 m in height and upwards. Inside pockmark G11, they were up to 1 m high. 2) They are circular or oval in plan view and may attain lateral sizes on the seafloor ranging upwards from ~0.5 m. Inside G11 they had lengths of several metres and widths of up to 4 m. 3) They have dense communities of organisms growing on their surfaces. At G11, they were overgrown with small pogonophoran tube-worms. 4) They have patches of white or grey bacterial mats growing on their surface, indicating advection (seepage) of reduced pore-waters. 5) They have small pits and patches of fluidized sediments on their surface, indicating pit corrosion of the sub-surface gas hydrate. Because gas hydrates often form in high-porosity, near-surface sediments, where water is readily available, it is thought that they will build up at locations where gases are actively migrating upwards from depth. However, gas hydrates are not stable in the presence of ambient seawater, as seawater is deficient in guest molecule gases (normally methane). Therefore, they tend to build up below surface above conduits for gas flow from depth. But, the near-surface hydrate ice-lenses will continually be corroded by seawater circulating into the sediments

  19. Organic materials retain high proportion of protons, iron and aluminium from acid sulphate soil drainage water with little subsequent release.

    PubMed

    Dang, Tan; Mosley, Luke M; Fitzpatrick, Rob; Marschner, Petra

    2016-12-01

    When previously oxidised acid sulphate soils are leached, they can release large amounts of protons and metals, which threaten the surrounding environment. To minimise the impact of the acidic leachate, protons and metals have to be retained before the drainage water reaches surrounding waterways. One possible amelioration strategy is to pass drainage water through permeable reactive barriers. The suitability of organic materials for such barriers was tested. Eight organic materials including two plant residues, compost and five biochars differing in feedstock and production temperature were finely ground and filled into PVC cores at 3.5 g dry wt/core. Field-collected acidic drainage water (pH 3, Al 22 mg L(-1) and Fe 48 mg L(-1)) was applied in six leaching events followed by six leaching events with reverse osmosis (RO) water (45 mL/event). Compost and biochars increased the leachate pH by up to 4.5 units and had a high retention capacity for metals. The metal and proton release during subsequent leaching with RO water was very small, cumulatively only 0.05-0.8 % of retained metals and protons. Retention was lower in the two plant residues, particularly wheat straw, which raised leachate pH by 2 units only in the first leaching event with drainage water, but had little effect on leachate pH in the following leaching events. It can be concluded that organic materials and particularly biochars and compost have the potential to be used in acid drainage treatment to remove and retain protons and metals.

  20. About transformation of the deep-water methane bubbles into hydrate powder and hydrate foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, A. V.; Nigmatulin, R. I.; Rozhkov, A. N.; Sagalevich, A. M.; Chernyaev, E. S.

    2012-04-01

    During the Russian Academy of Sciences "MIRI na Baikale, 2008-2010" expedition, deep-water experiments with the bubbles of methane seeping from the bottom at depths 405, 860 and 1400 meters were carried out. These depths correspond to gas hydrate stability zone. Bubbles were caught by the trap which was looked like an inverted glass. It was found that the behavior of bubbles in a trap depends on the depth. At depth of 405 meters formation of hydrates was not observed. Having got to a trap at the depth of 860 meters, bubbles became covered by solid hydrate envelope, kept the initial form, and after a time period collapsed in a number of hydrate fragments which showed all properties of a granular matter. No visible changes in the hydrate granular matter were observed in the course of lifting it to a depth of 380 meters. Shallower, the decomposition of the hydrate granular matter into methane gas was observed. In the experiments at depth of 1400 meters the caught bubbles, becoming covered by hydrate envelope formed solid hydrate foam in the trap. At lifting this foam structure was deformed slightly but simultaneously a free gas left the foam and filled the trap. The volume of free gas in the trap at lifting varied according to the Boyle-Mariotte law.

  1. Hydrate-phobic surfaces: fundamental studies in clathrate hydrate adhesion reduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, J David; Meuler, Adam J; Bralower, Harrison L; Venkatesan, Rama; Subramanian, Sivakumar; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2012-05-07

    Clathrate hydrate formation and subsequent plugging of deep-sea oil and gas pipelines represent a significant bottleneck for deep-sea oil and gas operations. Current methods for hydrate mitigation are expensive and energy intensive, comprising chemical, thermal, or flow management techniques. In this paper, we present an alternate approach of using functionalized coatings to reduce hydrate adhesion to surfaces, ideally to a low enough level that hydrodynamic shear stresses can detach deposits and prevent plug formation. Systematic and quantitative studies of hydrate adhesion on smooth substrates with varying solid surface energies reveal a linear trend between hydrate adhesion strength and the practical work of adhesion (γ(total)[1 + cos θ(rec)]) of a suitable probe liquid, that is, one with similar surface energy properties to those of the hydrate. A reduction in hydrate adhesion strength by more than a factor of four when compared to bare steel is achieved on surfaces characterized by low Lewis acid, Lewis base, and van der Waals contributions to surface free energy such that the practical work of adhesion is minimized. These fundamental studies provide a framework for the development of hydrate-phobic surfaces, and could lead to passive enhancement of flow assurance and prevention of blockages in deep-sea oil and gas operations.

  2. Controls on Gas Hydrate Formation and Dissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Miriam Kastner; Ian MacDonald

    2006-03-03

    The main objectives of the project were to monitor, characterize, and quantify in situ the rates of formation and dissociation of methane hydrates at and near the seafloor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, with a focus on the Bush Hill seafloor hydrate mound; to record the linkages between physical and chemical parameters of the deposits over the course of one year, by emphasizing the response of the hydrate mound to temperature and chemical perturbations; and to document the seafloor and water column environmental impacts of hydrate formation and dissociation. For these, monitoring the dynamics of gas hydrate formation and dissociation was required. The objectives were achieved by an integrated field and laboratory scientific study, particularly by monitoring in situ formation and dissociation of the outcropping gas hydrate mound and of the associated gas-rich sediments. In addition to monitoring with the MOSQUITOs, fluid flow rates and temperature, continuously sampling in situ pore fluids for the chemistry, and imaging the hydrate mound, pore fluids from cores, peepers and gas hydrate samples from the mound were as well sampled and analyzed for chemical and isotopic compositions. In order to determine the impact of gas hydrate dissociation and/or methane venting across the seafloor on the ocean and atmosphere, the overlying seawater was sampled and thoroughly analyzed chemically and for methane C isotope ratios. At Bush hill the pore fluid chemistry varies significantly over short distances as well as within some of the specific sites monitored for 440 days, and gas venting is primarily focused. The pore fluid chemistry in the tub-warm and mussel shell fields clearly documented active gas hydrate and authigenic carbonate formation during the monitoring period. The advecting fluid is depleted in sulfate, Ca Mg, and Sr and is rich in methane; at the main vent sites the fluid is methane supersaturated, thus bubble plumes form. The subsurface hydrology exhibits both

  3. Application of sugarcane bagasse for passive anaerobic biotreatment of sulphate rich wastewaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Ali; Qazi, Javed Iqbal

    2016-06-01

    Biological treatment of sulphate-rich wastewaters employing dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria as remedial agents is an attractive technique and has gained importance in the last few years. Industrial effluents enriched with sulphates are generally deficient in electron donors. And thus cannot be treated biologically without supplementation of carbon through an external source. For scalable operations, however, the carbon source must not be expensive. In this context, present study reports the efficiency of biological sulphate reduction using sugarcane bagasse as a cost-effective carbon source. An average 0.00391 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (3.91 mgL-1 day-1) sulphate reduction was observed reaching maximally to 0.00466 ± 0.001 gL-1 day-1 (4.66 mgL-1 day-1) while employing Desulfovibrio fructosovorans-HAQ2 and Desulfovibrio piger-HAQ6 in a 60-day trial of anaerobic incubation using sugarcane bagasse as growth substrate. These findings will be helpful in developing economical bioremediation processes tending to operate for a longer period of time to reduce sulphate contents of contaminated waters.

  4. Isolation and characterisation of putative adhesins from Helicobacter pylori with affinity for heparan sulphate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Bustos, E; Ochoa, J L; Wadström, T; Ascencio, F

    2001-03-01

    A pool of heparan sulphate-binding proteins (HSBPs) from Helicobacter pylori culture supernates was obtained by sequential ammonium sulphate precipitation and affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. The chromatographic procedure yielded one major fraction that contained proteins with heparan sulphate affinity as revealed by inhibition studies of heparan sulphate binding to H. pylori cells. Preparative iso-electric focusing, SDS-PAGE and blotting experiments, with peroxidase(POD)-labelled heparan sulphate as a probe, indicated the presence of two major extracellular proteins with POD-heparan sulphate affinity. One protein had a molecular mass of 66.2 kDa and a pI of 5.4, whilst the second protein had a molecular mass of 71.5 kDa and a pI of 5.0. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 71.5-kDa HSBP did not show homology to any other heparin-binding protein, nor to known proteins of H. pylori, whereas the 66.2-kDa HSBP showed a high homology to an Escherichia coli chaperon protein and equine haemoglobin. A third HSBP was isolated from an outer-membrane protein (OMP) fraction of H. pylori cells with a molecular mass of 47.2 kDa. The amino acid sequence of an internal peptide of the OMP-HSBP did not show homology to the extracellular HSBP of H. pylori, or to another microbial HSBP.

  5. Development of an Inhaled Sustained Release Dry Powder Formulation of Salbutamol Sulphate, an Antiasthmatic Drug.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, C; Sathishkumar, K

    2016-01-01

    The present research was aimed to develop and characterize a sustained release dry powder inhalable formulation of salbutamol sulphate. The salbutamol sulphate microparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation method using biodegradable polymer poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) to produce salbutamol sulphate microparticle mixed with carrier respirable grade lactose for oral inhalation of dry powder. The drug content were estimated to produce 1 mg sustained release salbutamol sulphate per dose. Total four formulations K1, K2, K3 and K4 were prepared with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid). The developed formulations were studied for physicochemical properties, in vitro drug relase and Anderson cascade impaction studies. The prepared formulations effectively releases drug for 12 h in diffusion bag studies. Based on dissolution performance the 1:1 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) produces in vitro release 92.57% at 12 h and having particle size of microparticles (D0.5μm) 5.02±0.6 and the pulmonary deposition of dry powder 34.5±3.21 (respiratory fraction in percentage).

  6. Sulphate production by Paracoccus pantotrophus ATCC 35512 from different sulphur substrates: sodium thiosulphate, sulphite and sulphide.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel Derrossi; Andrino, Felipe Gabriel; Possedente de Lira, Simone; Fornaro, Adalgiza; Corção, Gertrudes; Brandelli, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    One of the problems in waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) is the increase in emissions of hydrogen sulphide (H2S), which can cause damage to the health of human populations and ecosystems. To control emissions of this gas, sulphur-oxidizing bacteria can be used to convert H2S to sulphate. In this work, sulphate detection was performed by spectrophotometry, ion chromatography and atomic absorption spectrometry, using Paracoccus pantotrophus ATCC 35512 as a reference strain growing in an inorganic broth supplemented with sodium thiosulphate (Na2S2O3·5H2O), sodium sulphide (Na2S) or sodium sulphite (Na2SO3), separately. The strain was metabolically competent in sulphate production. However, it was only possible to observe significant differences in sulphate production compared to abiotic control when the inorganic medium was supplemented with sodium thiosulphate. The three methods for sulphate detection showed similar patterns, although the chromatographic method was the most sensitive for this study. This strain can be used as a reference for sulphate production in studies with sulphur-oxidizing bacteria originating from environmental samples of WWTPs.

  7. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans in the developing vertebral column of juvenile Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    Hannesson, Kirsten O; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Takle, Harald; Enersen, Grethe; Bæverfjord, Grete; Pedersen, Mona E

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, the distribution of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the developing vertebral column of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at 700, 900, 1100 and 1400 d° was examined by light microscopy. The mineralization pattern was outlined by Alizarin red S and soft structures by Alcian blue. The temporal and spatial distribution patterns of different types of GAGs: chondroitin-4-sulphate/dermatan sulphate, chondroitin-6-sulphate, chondroitin-0-sulphate and keratan sulphate were addressed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibodies against the different GAGs. The specific pattern obtained with the different antibodies suggests a unique role of the different GAG types in pattern formation and mineralization. In addition, the distribution of the different GAG types in normal and malformed vertebral columns from 15 g salmon was compared. A changed expression pattern of GAGs was found in the malformed vertebrae, indicating the involvement of these molecules during the pathogenesis. The molecular size of proteoglycans (PGs) in the vertebrae carrying GAGs was analysed with western blotting, and mRNA transcription of the PGs aggrecan, decorin, biglycan, fibromodulin and lumican by real-time qPCR. Our study reveals the importance of GAGs in development of vertebral column also in Atlantic salmon and indicates that a more comprehensive approach is necessary to completely understand the processes involved.

  8. Assessment of deterioration in RHA-concrete due to magnesium sulphate attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habeeb, G. A.; Mahmud, H. B.; Hamid, N. B. A. A.

    2010-12-01

    The assessment of magnesium sulphate attack on concretes containing rice husk ash (RHA, 20wt% of the cementitious materials) with various average particle sizes was investigated. The total cementitious materials were 390 kg and the water-to-binder ratio (W/B) was 0.53 for all mixtures. Specimens were initially cured in water for 7 d and then immersed in the 3wt% magnesium sulphate solution for up to 111 d of exposure. The specimens were subjected to drying-wetting cycles to accelerate sulphate attack. In addition to the visual monitoring of the specimens, the concrete specimens were subsequently tested for compressive strength, dynamic modulus of elasticity, and length and mass changes. The results show that the specimens exposed to sulphate attack exhibit higher strength and dynamic modulus than those kept in water. The length change is negligible and can be attributed to the normal swelling of concrete. On the other hand, concretes suffers mass loss and surface spalling and softening; the fine RHA-concrete results in a better resistance. For the accelerated sulphate attack method used in this study, mass change and visual monitoring are recommended for assessing the deterioration degree and the effectiveness of supplementary cementitious materials to resist sulphate attack.

  9. Characteristics and antioxidant of Ulva intestinalis sulphated polysaccharides extracted with different solvents.

    PubMed

    Peasura, Napassorn; Laohakunjit, Natta; Kerdchoechuen, Orapin; Wanlapa, Sorada

    2015-11-01

    Ulva intestinalis, a tubular green seaweed, is a rich source of nutrient, especially sulphated polysaccharides. Sulphated polysaccharides from U. intestinalis were extracted with distilled water, 0.1N HCl, and 0.1N NaOH at 80°C for 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24h to study the effect of the extraction solvent and time on their chemical composition and antioxidant activity. Different types of solvents and extraction time had a significant influence on the chemical characteristics and antioxidant activity (p<0.05). Monosaccharide composition and FT-IR spectra analyses revealed that sulphated polysaccharides from all solvent extractions have a typical sugar backbone (glucose, rhamnose, and sulphate attached at C-2 or C-3 of rhamnose). Sulphated polysaccharides extracted with acid exhibited greater antioxidant activity than did those extracted with distilled water and alkali. The results indicated that solvent extraction could be an efficacious method for enhancing antioxidant activity by distinct molecular weight and chemical characteristic of sulphated polysaccharides.

  10. Development of an Inhaled Sustained Release Dry Powder Formulation of Salbutamol Sulphate, an Antiasthmatic Drug

    PubMed Central

    Kumaresan, C.; Sathishkumar, K.

    2016-01-01

    The present research was aimed to develop and characterize a sustained release dry powder inhalable formulation of salbutamol sulphate. The salbutamol sulphate microparticles were prepared by solvent evaporation method using biodegradable polymer poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) to produce salbutamol sulphate microparticle mixed with carrier respirable grade lactose for oral inhalation of dry powder. The drug content were estimated to produce 1 mg sustained release salbutamol sulphate per dose. Total four formulations K1, K2, K3 and K4 were prepared with 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid). The developed formulations were studied for physicochemical properties, in vitro drug relase and Anderson cascade impaction studies. The prepared formulations effectively releases drug for 12 h in diffusion bag studies. Based on dissolution performance the 1:1 ratio of salbutamol sulphate:poly (D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) produces in vitro release 92.57% at 12 h and having particle size of microparticles (D0.5μm) 5.02±0.6 and the pulmonary deposition of dry powder 34.5±3.21 (respiratory fraction in percentage). PMID:27168692

  11. Determination of steryl sulphates in invertebrate tissue by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Neto, Renato R; Thompson, Anu; Wolff, George A

    2005-11-01

    A method for the identification and quantification of underivatised steryl sulphates in invertebrates by liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (MS) involving a single cleanup step has been developed. Negative electrospray ionisation and positive and negative atmospheric-pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) spectra of steryl sulphate showed pseudomolecular ions ([M+H-H2SO4]+ or [M-H]-). Collision-induced dissociation (CID) was efficient only in positive APCI. LC-MS in negative APCI was least susceptible to interference and possible differences in response factors. The detection limits (signal-to-noise ratio of 3) based on cholest-5-enyl-3-sulphate in positive and negative APCI modes are 3.66 and 0.73 pmol microL(-1), respectively. Calibration plots and response factors for cholest-5-enyl-3-sulphate relative to the internal standard, cholecalciferyl-3-sulphate, in both positive and negative polarities, were linear in the concentration range from 1.22 to 16.4 pmol microL(-1) with good coefficients of determination (R2 > 0.98). It is suggested that the structure elucidation of steryl sulphates is best achieved in CID positive APCI mode, whereas their quantification should be carried out using negative APCI.

  12. Properties of equilibrium carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronov, V. P.; Gorodetskii, E. E.; Podnek, V. E.; Grigoriev, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Specific heat capacity, dissociation heat and hydration number of carbon dioxide hydrate in porous medium are determined by adiabatic calorimetry method. The measurements were carried out in the temperature range 250-290 K and in pressure range 1-5 MPa. The measured specific heat of the hydrate is approximately 2.7 J/(g K), which is significantly larger than the specific heat of methane hydrate. In particular, at heating, larger value of the specific heat of carbon dioxide hydrate is a result of gas emission from the hydrate. The hydration number at the hydrate-gas coexistence changes from 6.2 to 6.9. The dissociation heat of carbon dioxide hydrate varies from the 55 kJ/mol near the upper quadruple point to the 57 kJ/mol near the lower quadruple point.

  13. Origin and evolution of fracture-hosted methane hydrate deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daigle, Hugh; Dugan, Brandon

    2010-11-01

    Fracture-hosted methane hydrate deposits exist at many sites worldwide. These sites often have hydrate present as vein and fracture fill, as well as disseminated through the pore space. We estimate that thousands to millions of years are required to form fracture systems by hydraulic fracturing driven by occlusion of the pore system by hydrate. This time scale is a function of rates of fluid flow and permeability loss. Low-permeability layers in a sedimentary column can reduce this time if the permeability contrast with respect to the surrounding sediments is of order 10 or greater. Additionally, we find that tensile fracturing produced by hydrate heave around hydrate lenses is a viable fracture mechanism over all but the lowermost part of the hydrate stability zone. With our coupled fluid flow-hydrate formation model we assess fracture formation at four well-studied hydrate provinces: Blake Ridge offshore South Carolina, Hydrate Ridge offshore Oregon, Keathley Canyon Block 151 offshore Louisiana, and the Krishna-Godavari Basin offshore India. We conclude that hydraulic fracturing due to pore pressure buildup is reasonable only at Hydrate Ridge and the Krishna-Godavari Basin owing to sediment age constraints, and that hydrate-filled fractures observed at Blake Ridge and Keathley Canyon Block 151 are formed either by hydrate heave or in preexisting fractures. Our findings offer new insight into the processes and time scales associated with fracture-hosted hydrate deposits, which help further our understanding of hydrate systems.

  14. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest

  15. High-Altitude Hydration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parazynski, Scott E.; Orndoff, Evelyne; Bue, Grant C.; Schaefbauer, Mark E.; Urban, Kase

    2010-01-01

    Three methods are being developed for keeping water from freezing during high-altitude climbs so that mountaineers can remain hydrated. Three strategies have been developed. At the time of this reporting two needed to be tested in the field and one was conceptual. The first method is Passive Thermal Control Using Aerogels. This involves mounting the fluid reservoir of the climber s canteen to an inner layer of clothing for better heat retention. For the field test, bottles were mounted to the inner fleece layer of clothing, and then aerogel insulation was placed on the outside of the bottle, and circumferentially around the drink straw. When climbers need to drink, they can pull up the insulated straw from underneath the down suit, take a sip, and then put it back into the relative warmth of the suit. For the field test, a data logger assessed the temperatures of the water reservoir, as well as near the tip of the drink straw. The second method is Passive Thermal Control with Copper-Shielded Drink Straw and Aerogels, also mounted to inner layers of clothing for better heat retention. Braided wire emanates from the inside of the fleece jacket layer, and continues up and around the drink straw in order to use body heat to keep the system-critical drink straw warm enough to keep water in the liquid state. For the field test, a data logger will be used to compare this with the above concept. The third, and still conceptual, method is Active Thermal Control with Microcontroller. If the above methods do not work, microcontrollers and tape heaters have been identified that could keep the drink straw warm even under extremely cold conditions. Power requirements are not yet determined because the thermal environment inside the down suit relative to the external environment has not been established. A data logger will be used to track both the external and internal temperatures of the suit on a summit day.

  16. Biochemical studies on the sulphated glycosaminoglycan fraction of skin fibroblasts cultured from a patient with the Hurler syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Germinario, Ralph J.; Kahlenberg, Arthur; Pinsky, Leonard

    1973-01-01

    1. The metabolism of the sulphated glycosaminoglycan fraction in cultured skin fibroblasts derived from a patient with the Hurler syndrome and from a normal subject was studied. Two labelled precursors, Na235SO4 and d-[2-3H]glucose, were used and their intracellular fates during uptake and `chase' periods were assessed after separation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans from hyaluronic acid. After 4 or 8h of exposure to culture medium containing both labels, [35S]sulphate incorporation into the sulphated glycosaminoglycan fraction was twofold greater in Hurler-syndrome cells than in normal cells. At the same time, the rate of incorporation of [3H]glucose into the sulphated glycosaminoglycan fraction was approximately the same for both cell types. Consequently, an increased 35S/3H ratio (nmol of [35S]sulphate incorporated/nmol of [3H]glucose incorporated) was observed for Hurler-syndrome cells compared with normal cells. 2. The results of `chase' experiments revealed that although the expected loss and relative retention of labelled sulphate occurred in the sulphated glycosaminoglycan fraction of normal and Hurler-syndrome cells, both cell types retained all of their radioactivity derived from [3H]glucose. 3. After 34h exposure to a `corrective-factor' preparation from urine, the sulphated glycosaminoglycan content (as hexosamine and [35S]sulphate) of the Hurler-syndrome cells approached normal values. At the same time, there was an increase in specific radioactivity of `corrected' Hurler-syndrome cells. PMID:4269307

  17. Ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of ion hydration free energies.

    PubMed

    Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2009-05-28

    We apply ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) methods in conjunction with the thermodynamic integration or "lambda-path" technique to compute the intrinsic hydration free energies of Li(+), Cl(-), and Ag(+) ions. Using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional, adapting methods developed for classical force field applications, and with consistent assumptions about surface potential (phi) contributions, we obtain absolute AIMD hydration free energies (DeltaG(hyd)) within a few kcal/mol, or better than 4%, of Tissandier et al.'s [J. Phys. Chem. A 102, 7787 (1998)] experimental values augmented with the SPC/E water model phi predictions. The sums of Li(+)/Cl(-) and Ag(+)/Cl(-) AIMD DeltaG(hyd), which are not affected by surface potentials, are within 2.6% and 1.2 % of experimental values, respectively. We also report the free energy changes associated with the transition metal ion redox reaction Ag(+)+Ni(+)-->Ag+Ni(2+) in water. The predictions for this reaction suggest that existing estimates of DeltaG(hyd) for unstable radiolysis intermediates such as Ni(+) may need to be extensively revised.

  18. Selective O-alkylation of phenol with methanol over sulphates supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Samolada, M.C.; Grigoriadou, E.; Kiparissides, Z.; Vasalos, I.A.

    1995-03-01

    The reaction of phenol with methanol was studied in a fixed-bed reactor system as a potential source for the production of methyl aryl ethers. For this reason, the performance of alumina-supported catalysts impregnated with sulphate salts of metals of the groups VIIB and IIB was studied. The effects of reaction temperature, reaction time, type of metal, metal content, and potassium content on the selectivity of methyl aryl ethers (MAE), as well as the phenol conversion and the yield of MAE, were established. The reaction temperature and the potassium content were found mainly to affect the selectivity of the catalyst, the phenol conversion, and the yield of MAE. Empirical equations were drived which proved to be useful for predicting the performance of a catalyst over a broad range of reaction conditions. A catalyst (K{sub 3}{sup S}) containing only potassium (3 wt%) in the form of potassium sulphate supported on {gamma}-alumina was found to have the most promising performance compared to those reported in the literature in terms of MAE selectivity and phenol conversion at atmospheric pressure (selectivity of MAE = 98%, phenol conversion = 65 wt%). The catalyst remains stable over a broad range of temperatures (290-330{degrees}C). K{sub 3}{sup S} is an inexpensive catalyst, showing major selectivity advantages and product composition (anisole, 92 wt%; o-cresol, 8 wt%) and a low coke production (7 wt%). The presence of potassium sulphate in the catalyst proved to be the controlling factor for the production of MAE and it was found to be the active phase of the catalyst. The MAE selectivity of potassium sulphate catalysts in determined by the potassium content of the catalyst, while its optimum value is achieved, when acid sites of medium strength (+ 1.5 < H{sub 0} {le} + 4.8) with low acidity values 22 x 10{sup {minus}4} mmol/m{sup 2} exist on their surface. 35 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom

  20. Gas hydrates: past and future geohazard?

    PubMed

    Maslin, Mark; Owen, Matthew; Betts, Richard; Day, Simon; Dunkley Jones, Tom; Ridgwell, Andrew

    2010-05-28

    Gas hydrates are ice-like deposits containing a mixture of water and gas; the most common gas is methane. Gas hydrates are stable under high pressures and relatively low temperatures and are found underneath the oceans and in permafrost regions. Estimates range from 500 to 10,000 giga tonnes of carbon (best current estimate 1600-2000 GtC) stored in ocean sediments and 400 GtC in Arctic permafrost. Gas hydrates may pose a serious geohazard in the near future owing to the adverse effects of global warming on the stability of gas hydrate deposits both in ocean sediments and in permafrost. It is still unknown whether future ocean warming could lead to significant methane release, as thermal penetration of marine sediments to the clathrate-gas interface could be slow enough to allow a new equilibrium to occur without any gas escaping. Even if methane gas does escape, it is still unclear how much of this could be oxidized in the overlying ocean. Models of the global inventory of hydrates and trapped methane bubbles suggest that a global 3( degrees )C warming could release between 35 and 940 GtC, which could add up to an additional 0.5( degrees )C to global warming. The destabilization of gas hydrate reserves in permafrost areas is more certain as climate models predict that high-latitude regions will be disproportionately affected by global warming with temperature increases of over 12( degrees )C predicted for much of North America and Northern Asia. Our current estimates of gas hydrate storage in the Arctic region are, however, extremely poor and non-existent for Antarctica. The shrinking of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets in response to regional warming may also lead to destabilization of gas hydrates. As ice sheets shrink, the weight removed allows the coastal region and adjacent continental slope to rise through isostacy. This removal of hydrostatic pressure could destabilize gas hydrates, leading to massive slope failure, and may increase the risk of

  1. Marine electromagnetic methods for gas hydrate characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitemeyer, Karen Andrea

    Gas hydrate is a type of clathrate consisting of a gas molecule (usually methane) encased in a water lattice, and is found worldwide in marine and permafrost regions. Hydrate is important because it is a geo-hazard, has potential as an energy resource, and is a possible contributor to climate change. There are large uncertainties about the global amount of hydrate present, partly because the characterization of hydrate with seismic methods is unreliable. Marine electromagnetic (EM) methods can be used to image the bulk resistivity structure of the subsurface and are able to augment seismic data to provide valuable information about gas hydrate distribution in the marine environment. Marine controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) sounding data from a pilot survey at Hydrate Ridge, located on the Cascadia subduction zone, show that regions with higher concentrations of hydrate are resistive. The apparent resistivities computed from the CSEM data are consistent for both apparent resistivity pseudosections and two-dimensional regularized inversion results. The 2D inversion results provide evidence of a strong resistor near the seismic bottom simulating reflector (BSR), and geologic structures are imaged to about a kilometer depth. Comparisons with electrical resistivity logging while drilling (LWD) data from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 204 show a general agreement except for one of three sites where the CSEM inversion shows a large resistor at depth as compared to the LWD. An overlay of the CSEM inversion with a collocated seismic line 230 from Trehu et al. (2001) exhibits remarkable similarities with the sedimentary layering, geologic structures, and the seismic BSR. Magnetotelluric (MT) sounding data collected simultaneously during the CSEM survey provide an electrical image of the oceanic crust and mantle (50 km depth) and the folding associated with the accretionary complex (top 2 km depth). In addition, the MT model provides a complementary low-resolution image of

  2. Study on propane-butane gas storage by hydrate technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamidi, Nurkholis; Wijayanti, Widya; Widhiyanuriyawan, Denny

    2016-03-01

    Different technology has been applied to store and transport gas fuel. In this work the storage of gas mixture of propane-butane by hydrate technology was studied. The investigation was done on the effect of crystallizer rotation speed on the formation of propane-butane hydrate. The hydrates were formed using crystallizer with rotation speed of 100, 200, and 300 rpm. The formation of gas hydrates was done at initial pressure of 3 bar and temperature of 274K. The results indicated that the higher rotation speed was found to increase the formation rate of propane-butane hydrate and improve the hydrates stability.

  3. Hydrate problems in pipelines: A study from Norwegian continental waters

    SciTech Connect

    Lysne, D.; Larsen, R.; Lund, A.; Thomsen, A.K.

    1995-12-31

    This study was undertaken by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate and SINTEF to identify hydrate problems occurring in pipelines on the Norwegian continental shelf. A brief review of hydrate dissociation theory is given. Three major techniques for hydrate removal are discussed, as well as hazards related to hydrate plug removal. Questionnaire answers from 15 companies operating in Norwegian waters show three specific occurrences of hydrate plugs in the North Sea. Problems from other geographical areas are also discussed. Hydrate problems are reported for a wide variety of pipe lengths, diameters, profiles, insulations characteristics and fluids. Most problems occur during normal operation.

  4. Development of hydrate risk quantification in oil and gas production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhari, Piyush N.

    Subsea flowlines that transport hydrocarbons from wellhead to the processing facility face issues from solid deposits such as hydrates, waxes, asphaltenes, etc. The solid deposits not only affect the production but also pose a safety concern; thus, flow assurance is significantly important in designing and operating subsea oil and gas production. In most subsea oil and gas operations, gas hydrates form at high pressure and low temperature conditions, causing the risk of plugging flowlines, with a undesirable impact on production. Over the years, the oil and gas industry has shifted their perspective from hydrate avoidance to hydrate management given several parameters such as production facility, production chemistry, economic and environmental concerns. Thus, understanding the level of hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines is an important in developing efficient hydrate management techniques. In the past, hydrate formation models were developed for various flow-systems (e.g., oil dominated, water dominated, and gas dominated) present in the oil and gas production. The objective of this research is to extend the application of the present hydrate prediction models for assessing the hydrate risk associated with subsea flowlines that are prone to hydrate formation. It involves a novel approach for developing quantitative hydrate risk models based on the conceptual models built from the qualitative knowledge obtained from experimental studies. A comprehensive hydrate risk model, that ranks the hydrate risk associated with the subsea production system as a function of time, hydrates, and several other parameters, which account for inertial, viscous, interfacial forces acting on the flow-system, is developed for oil dominated and condensate systems. The hydrate plugging risk for water dominated systems is successfully modeled using The Colorado School of Mines Hydrate Flow Assurance Tool (CSMHyFAST). It is found that CSMHyFAST can be used as a screening tool in

  5. Nucleation and Growth of Gas Hydrate in Natural Seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holman, S. A.; Osegovic, J. P.; Young, J. C.; Max, M. D.; Ames, A. L.

    2003-12-01

    Large-scale nucleation of gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas and seawater are brought together under suitable pressure-temperature conditions or where dissolved hydrate-forming gas in saturated or near-saturated seawater is chilled or brought to higher pressures. Profuse formation of hydrate shells on gas bubbles and nucleation of at least five different forms of gas hydrate have been achieved in fresh natural seawater. Growth of masses of solid gas hydrate takes place when hydrate-forming gas reactant dissolved in seawater is brought into the vicinity of the hydrate. The gas concentration of the enriched water in the vicinity of hydrate is higher than the hydrate equilibrium gas concentration. Hydrate growth under these conditions is accelerated due to the chemical potential difference between the enriched water and the hydrate crystals, which induces mass flux of dissolved hydrate forming gas into new hydrate crystals. As long as water enriched in the hydrate-forming gas is circulated into the vicinity of the hydrate, growth proceeds into the water space. Experimental approaches for growth of examples of solid masses of hydrate are presented. Results of these experiments provide an insight into the growth of gas hydrate under natural conditions where interstitial water in marine sediments is captured by burial from open seawater, and where solid gas hydrate forms on the seafloor. By using fresh natural seawater, which is a chemically and materially complex fluid, our experiments in pressurized, refrigerated reactors should closely track the growth history of solid hydrate in the natural environment. In our model for hydrate growth in sediments, nearly complete pore fill by diagenetic hydrate can best be accomplished by nucleation of hydrate at a point source within the pore water or at a particular point on sediment particulate, with growth outward into the water space that is refreshed with ground water having high concentrations of hydrate

  6. Complex admixtures of clathrate hydrates in a water desalination method

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Blake A.; Bradshaw, Robert W.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Anderson, David W.

    2009-07-14

    Disclosed is a method that achieves water desalination by utilizing and optimizing clathrate hydrate phenomena. Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds of gas and water that desalinate water by excluding salt molecules during crystallization. Contacting a hydrate forming gaseous species with water will spontaneously form hydrates at specific temperatures and pressures through the extraction of water molecules from the bulk phase followed by crystallite nucleation. Subsequent dissociation of pure hydrates yields fresh water and, if operated correctly, allows the hydrate-forming gas to be efficiently recycled into the process stream.

  7. Characterization of Gas-Hydrate Sediment: In Situ Evaluation of Hydrate Saturation in Pores of Pressured Sedimental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Kida, M.; Nagao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Hydrate saturation of gas-hydrate bearing sediment is a key of gas production from natural gas-hydrate reservoir. Developable natural gas-hydrates by conventional gas/oil production apparatus almost exist in unconsolidated sedimental layer. Generally, hydrate saturations of sedimental samples are directly estimated by volume of gas generated from dissociation of gas hydrates in pore spaces, porosity data and volume of the sediments. Furthermore, hydrate saturation can be also assessed using velocity of P-wave through sedimental samples. Nevertheless, hydrate saturation would be changed by morphological variations (grain-coating, cementing and pore-filling model) of gas hydrates in pore spaces. Jin et al.[1,2] recently observed the O-H stretching bands of H2O molecules of methane hydrate in porous media using an attenuated total reflection IR (ATR-IR) spectra. They observed in situ hydrate formation/dissociation process in sandy samples (Tohoku Keisya number 8, grain size of ca. 110 μm). In this presentation, we present IR spectroscopy approach to in situ evaluation of hydrate saturation of pressured gas-hydrate sediments. This work was supported by funding from the Research Consortium for Methane Hydrate Resources in Japan (MH21 Research Consortium) planned by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI), Japan. [1] Jin, Y.; Konno, Y.; Nagao, J. Energy Fules, 2012, 26, 2242-2247. [2] Jin, Y.; Oyama, H.; Nagao, J. Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 48, No. 108001.

  8. Hydraulic and Mechanical Effects from Gas Hydrate Conversion and Secondary Gas Hydrate Formation during Injection of CO2 into CH4-Hydrate-Bearing Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigalke, N.; Deusner, C.; Kossel, E.; Schicks, J. M.; Spangenberg, E.; Priegnitz, M.; Heeschen, K. U.; Abendroth, S.; Thaler, J.; Haeckel, M.

    2014-12-01

    The injection of CO2 into CH4-hydrate-bearing sediments has the potential to drive natural gas production and simultaneously sequester CO2 by hydrate conversion. The process aims at maintaining the in situ hydrate saturation and structure and causing limited impact on soil hydraulic properties and geomechanical stability. However, to increase hydrate conversion yields and rates it must potentially be assisted by thermal stimulation or depressurization. Further, secondary formation of CO2-rich hydrates from pore water and injected CO2 enhances hydrate conversion and CH4 production yields [1]. Technical stimulation and secondary hydrate formation add significant complexity to the bulk conversion process resulting in spatial and temporal effects on hydraulic and geomechanical properties that cannot be predicted by current reservoir simulation codes. In a combined experimental and numerical approach, it is our objective to elucidate both hydraulic and mechanical effects of CO2 injection and CH4-CO2-hydrate conversion in CH4-hydrate bearing soils. For the experimental approach we used various high-pressure flow-through systems equipped with different online and in situ monitoring tools (e.g. Raman microscopy, MRI and ERT). One particular focus was the design of triaxial cell experimental systems, which enable us to study sample behavior even during large deformations and particle flow. We present results from various flow-through high-pressure experimental studies on different scales, which indicate that hydraulic and geomechanical properties of hydrate-bearing sediments are drastically altered during and after injection of CO2. We discuss the results in light of the competing processes of hydrate dissociation, hydrate conversion and secondary hydrate formation. Our results will also contribute to the understanding of effects of temperature and pressure changes leading to dissociation of gas hydrates in ocean and permafrost systems. [1] Deusner C, Bigalke N, Kossel E

  9. Rust in the Apollo 16 rocks. [hydration and oxidation processes in lunar environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, L. A.; Mao, H. K.; Bell, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Apollo 16 samples of all four rock types and from all stations contain evidence for hydration and oxidation - i.e., the presence of hydrated iron oxide, probably goethite. Rock 66095 contains native FeNi grains with a characteristic intergrowth of schreibersite and, to lesser extents, of cohenite. Troilite also contains sphalerite. The goethite contains 1.5-4.6 wt.% chlorine and occurs mainly on the edges of FeNi metal, causing a rust color in the cracks and space around the native metal grains, which also contain abundant chlorine. This observation suggests the presence of lawrencite (FeCl2), a phase that deliquesces and oxidizes very rapidly upon exposure to water or to a moist atmosphere.

  10. Microphysics and chemistry of sulphate aerosols at warm stratospheric temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drdla, K.; Pueschel, R. F.; Strawa, A. W.; Cohen, R. C.; Hanisco, T. F.

    1999-11-01

    Observations of high NOx/NOy ratios (overall 40% larger than modelled values) during the Polar Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer campaign have led us to re-examine the heterogeneous chemistry of stratospheric aerosol particles during the polar summer period, using the Integrated MicroPhysics and Aerosol Chemistry on Trajectories model. The warm summer temperatures (up to 235 K) imply very concentrated sulphuric acid solutions (80 wt %). On the one hand, these solutions are more likely to freeze, into sulphuric acid monohydrate (SAM), reducing the efficiency of the N2O5 hydrolysis reaction. Including this freezing process increases NOx/NOy ratios but does not improve model/measurement agreement: in polar spring, SAM formation causes the NOx/NOy ratio to be overpredicted whereas freezing has a much smaller effect on nitrogen chemistry during the continuous solar exposure of polar summer. On the other hand, if sulphate aerosols remain liquid, the high acidity may promote acid-catalysed reactions. The most important reaction is CH2O + HNO3, which effectively increases NOx/NOy ratios across a wide range of conditions, improving agreement with measurements. Furthermore, the production of HONO can either enhance gas-phase OH concentrations or promote secondary liquid reactions, including HONO + HNO3 and HONO + HCl. Primary uncertainties include the uptake coefficient of CH2O relevant to reaction with HNO3, the amount of HONO available for secondary reaction, and the relative rates of HONO reaction with HNO3 and HCl. The fate of the formic acid product, whose presence in the stratosphere may be an indicator for the CH2O reaction, and the impact on the stratospheric hydrogen budget are also discussed.

  11. Copper sulphate use in South African traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Street, Renée A; Kabera, Gaëtan M; Connolly, Catherine

    2016-04-08

    Copper (Cu) is an essential element to humans; however, exposure to elevated concentrations through occupational hazard and/or environmental means may be detrimental. This paper provides results of a cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of copper sulphate (CuSO4) use in South African traditional medicine by traditional health practitioners (THPs) and details the use thereof. A total of 201 THPs were enrolled from two main municipal areas of KwaZulu-Natal (South Africa). Information on demographic characteristics of THPs, reasons for using or not using CuSO4 as well as administration methods and age groups of recipients were collected. Of the 201 THPs interviewed, 145 (72 %) use CuSO4 for healing purposes. The use of CuSO4 was strongly associated with gender (p = 0.009) where the proportion of CuSO4 users was higher for female than male THPs. CuSO4 was reportedly administered to individuals of all ages, including infants and children. The main routes of administration were enema (n = 110; 76 %), oral (n = 40; 28 %) and use in bath (n = 40; 28 %). The reasons cited for use are diverse and included skin rashes (n = 43; 30 %), aches, pains and swelling (n = 38; 28 %) as well as sexually transmitted diseases (n = 28; 19 %). This study identified a high prevalence of THPs using CuSO4 for healing purposes. These findings support the need to regulate South African traditional medicine to safeguard the user.

  12. Sulphated glycosaminoglycans support an assortment of planarian rhabdite structures.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Matthew J

    2017-03-16

    Planaria are soft-bodied, bilateral flatworms of the phylum Playhelminthes. They are covered in cilia and use ciliary-gliding to traverse the substratum while hunting. Their body surface is covered in a layer of viscous slime primarily derived from specialised secretory granules known as rhabdites. The slime must somehow stay associated with the surface of the animal in aqueous environments whilst also lubricating the interface of the animal and the surfaces over which the animal moves. The slime prevents damage to the animal's soft body and also contributes to adhesion to the substratum. In order to gain insight into how it might achieve these diverse functions, we performed electron microscopic examination of the slime's structure. Analysis of two freshwater flatworms from the UK Schmidtea polychroa (Schmidt, 1861) and Polycelis tenuis (Ijima, 1884) revealed a high level of organisation of the slime layer and a variety of ejected slime structures. We show that these structures are rich in sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). Most of these (269 of 285 examined) appear to be topologically-closed spheroids that we name ball-GAGs Another class appears to burst to release flower- and star-like clusters which adhere to motile cilia. We also observe fibrous nets that are associated with entrapped bacteria. Examination of the structure of rhabdites ejected onto a porous surface suggests a mechanism by which their structure allows them to both bind to the porous surface and provide a smooth layer over which the animal could glide. Such sGAG-based structures might provide models for the design of artificial biomimetic replacements for tears, saliva, bio-compatible lubricants or drug-delivery vehicles.

  13. Correlations between stream sulphate and regional SO2 emissions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, R.A.; Alexander, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between atmospheric SO2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. Precipitation sulphate (SO4) records are mostly <5 yr in length and do not account for dry sulphur deposition. Moreover, a variable fraction of wet- and dry-deposited sulphur is retained in soils and vegetation and does not contribute to the acidity of aquatic systems. We have compared annual SO2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1976 to 1980 with stream SO4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. We find that the two forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States (SE) receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States (NE). In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that there are significant regional differences in the fraction of deposited sulphur retained in basin soils and vegetation.The relationship between atmospheric SO//2 emissions and stream and lake acidification has been difficult to quantify, largely because of the limitations of sulphur deposition measurements. The authors have compared annual SO//2 emissions for the eastern United States from 1967 to 1980 with stream SO//4 measurements from fifteen predominantly undeveloped watersheds. They found that both the wet - and dry-deposited forms of sulphur are strongly correlated on a regional basis and that streams in the southeastern United States receive a smaller fraction (on average, 16%, compared with 24%) of regional sulphur emissions than do streams in the northeastern United States. In addition to providing direct empirical evidence of a relationship between sulphur emissions and aquatic chemistry, these results suggest that

  14. Hydrate melting in soil around hot conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Briaud, J.L.; Chaouch, A.

    1997-07-01

    There is ice in the Gulf of Mexico, and this type of ice called gas hydrates burns when ignited. Gas hydrates form slowly within the soil mass when the gas seeping up from offshore oil reservoirs mixes with water under high pressures (>500 m of water) and low temperatures (a few degrees Celsius). The oil travels from the well to the platform through a conductor pipe. The oil and therefore the conductor are very hot and melt the existing hydrates that are within the depth of the foundation piles. The melting process generates a large amount of gas that can endanger the stability of the foundation. The rate at which the temperature rises around the hot conductor in the hydrate rich soil is studied using the finite-element method (FEM). A detailed thermodynamic analysis is performed. It includes a laboratory experiment to help validate FEM, a study of the mesh size, the thermodynamic analysis results, a study of the conductor size, and of the latent heat influence. The results can be used to evaluate the temperature rise around a hot pipe buried in soil and therefore the propagation of the hydrate melting front around the conductor and toward the piles.

  15. Dynamic hydration numbers for biologically important ions.

    PubMed

    Kiriukhin, Michael Y; Collins, Kim D

    2002-10-16

    The role of ionized groups in biological systems is determined by their affinity for water [Biophys. J. 72 (1997) 65-76]. The tightly bound water associated with biologically important ions increases their apparent size. We define the apparent dynamic hydration number of an ion here as the number of tightly bound water molecules that must be assigned to the ion to explain its apparent molecular weight on a Sephadex G-10 size exclusion column, and report the first accurate determination of tightly bound water for 23 ions of biological significance, including H(+) and HO(-). We also calculate the radius of the equivalent hydrated sphere (r(h)) for each ion. We find that the ratio of the hydrated volumes of two ions approximates the ratio of the square of the charges of the same two ions. Since the 'ionic strength' of the solution also depends upon the square of the charges on the ions, our results suggest that ionic strength effects may largely arise from local effects related to the hydrated volume of the ion--that is, from space filling, osmotic, water activity, surface tension and hydration shell overlap effects rather than from long-range electric field effects.

  16. Blue LED irradiation to hydration of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Requena, Michelle B.; Lizarelli, Rosane F., Z.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.

    2015-06-01

    Blue LED system irradiation shows many important properties on skin as: bacterial decontamination, degradation of endogenous skin chromophores and biostimulation. In this clinical study we prove that the blue light improves the skin hydration. In the literature none authors reports this biological property on skin. Then this study aims to discuss the role of blue light in the skin hydration. Twenty patients were selected to this study with age between 25-35 years old and phototype I, II and III. A defined area from forearm was pre determined (A = 4.0 cm2). The study was randomized in two treatment groups using one blue light device (power of 5.3mW and irradiance of 10.8mW/cm2). The first treatment group was irradiated with 3J/cm2 (277seconds) and the second with 6J/cm2 (555 seconds). The skin hydration evaluations were done using a corneometer. The measurements were collected in 7, 14, 21 and 30 days, during the treatment. Statistical test of ANOVA, Tukey and T-Student were applied considering 5% of significance. In conclusion, both doses were able to improve the skin hydration; however, 6J/cm2 has kept this hydration for 30 days.

  17. Interfacial phenomena in gas hydrate systems.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Koh, Carolyn A

    2016-03-21

    Gas hydrates are crystalline inclusion compounds, where molecular cages of water trap lighter species under specific thermodynamic conditions. Hydrates play an essential role in global energy systems, as both a hinderance when formed in traditional fuel production and a substantial resource when formed by nature. In both traditional and unconventional fuel production, hydrates share interfaces with a tremendous diversity of materials, including hydrocarbons, aqueous solutions, and inorganic solids. This article presents a state-of-the-art understanding of hydrate interfacial thermodynamics and growth kinetics, and the physiochemical controls that may be exerted on both. Specific attention is paid to the molecular structure and interactions of water, guest molecules, and hetero-molecules (e.g., surfactants) near the interface. Gas hydrate nucleation and growth mechanics are also presented, based on studies using a combination of molecular modeling, vibrational spectroscopy, and X-ray and neutron diffraction. The fundamental physical and chemical knowledge and methods presented in this review may be of value in probing parallel systems of crystal growth in solid inclusion compounds, crystal growth modifiers, emulsion stabilization, and reactive particle flow in solid slurries.

  18. Fragmentation and hydration of tektites and microtektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glass, B.P.; Muenow, D.W.; Bohor, B.F.; Meeker, G.P.

    1997-01-01

    An examination of data collected over the last 30 years indicates that the percent of glass fragments vs. whole splash forms in the Cenozoic microtektite strewn fields increases towards the source crater (or source region). We propose that this is due to thermal stress produced when tektites and larger microtektites fall into water near the source crater while still relatively hot (>1150 ??C). We also find evidence (low major oxide totals, frothing when melted) for hydration of most of the North American tektite fragments and microtektites found in marine sediments. High-temperature mass spectrometry indicates that these tektite fragments and microtektites contain up to 3.8 wt% H2O. The H2O-release behavior during the high-temperature mass-spectrometric analysis, plus high Cl abundances (???0.05 wt%), indicate that the North. American tektite fragments and microtektites were hydrated in the marine environment (i.e., the H2O was not trapped solely on quenching from a melt). The younger Ivory Coast and Australasian microtektites do not exhibit much evidence of hydration (at least not in excess of 0.5 wt% H2O); this suggests that the degree of hydration increases with age. In addition, we find that some glass spherules (with 65 wt% SiO2 can undergo simple hydration in the marine environment, while impact glasses (with <65 wt% SiO2) can also undergo palagonitization.

  19. The geology of aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite group minerals: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2001-03-01

    Aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite supergroup (APS minerals) occur in a wide range of environments of formation covering the metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary realms. Supergene processes, including mineral dressing and dumping when sulphide ores are mined, as well as hypogene alteration are also responsible for the precipitation of APS minerals. In these environments, complex solid solution series (s.s.s.) can form. The general formula of these alunite minerals is AB 3 (XO 4) 2(OH) 6, where A is a large cation (Na, U, K, Ag, NH 4, Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr, REE). B sites are occupied by cations of the elements Al, Fe, Cu and Zn. In nature, the anion (XO 4) x- is dominated by P and S. Mineral dressing and identification of APS minerals often needs a combination of highly sophisticated measures including Atterberg settling methods, XRD, DTA, TGA, TEM-EDX, SEM, EMPA and XRF. In sedimentary rocks APS minerals occur in various rocks and environments of deposition: calcareous, phosphorite-bearing, argillaceous-carbonaceous, arenaceous, coal-bearing environments, in soils and paleosols, in saprolite (bauxites, laterites) and in calcareous-argillaceous sequences hosting Carlin-type SHDG deposits. In igneous rocks, APS minerals may be encountered mainly in acidic through intermediate pyroclastic, volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They occur in barren volcanic rocks and porphyry-type intrusions that have sparked epithermal Au-Ag-base metal deposits, Au-Sb mineralization, APS-bearing argillite and alunite deposits in their immediate surroundings. Granitic and pegmatitic rocks are rarely host of supergene APS mineralization. During low-grade stage regional metamorphism, peraluminous parent rocks originating from a sedimentary or igneous protolith may also give rise to APS mineralization. Peraluminous parent rocks enriched in S and/or P are a prerequisite for the formation of APS minerals that are stable up to a temperature of 400°C at moderately high fluid pressure of up

  20. Impairment of skin barrier function via cholinergic signal transduction in a dextran sulphate sodium-induced colitis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoshi; Hiramoto, Keiichi; Koyama, Mayu; Ooi, Kazuya

    2015-10-01

    Dry skin has been clinically associated with visceral diseases, including liver disease, as well as for our previously reported small intestinal injury mouse model, which have abnormalities in skin barrier function. To clarify this disease-induced skin disruption, we used a dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis mouse model. Following treatment with DSS, damage to the colon and skin was monitored using histological and protein analysis methods as well as the detection of inflammatory mediators in the plasma. Notably, transepidermal water loss was higher, and skin hydration was lower in DSS-treated mice compared to controls. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 and NO2-/NO3- levels were also upregulated in the plasma, and a decrease in body weight and colon length was observed in DSS-treated mice. However, when administered TNF-α antibody or an iNOS inhibitor, no change in skin condition was observed, indicating that another signalling mechanism is utilized. Interestingly, the number of tryptase-expressing mast cells, known for their role in immune function via cholinergic signal transduction, was elevated. To evaluate the function of cholinergic signalling in this context, atropine (a muscarinic cholinoceptor antagonist) or hexamethonium (a nicotinic cholinergic ganglion-blocking agent) was administered to DSS-treated mice. Our data indicate that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are the primary receptors functioning in colon-to-skin signal transduction, as DSS-induced skin disruption was suppressed by atropine. Thus, skin disruption is likely associated with DSS-induced colitis, and the activation of mast cells via mAChRs is critical to this association.

  1. Aluminium-phosphate-sulphate minerals as markers of sustained acidic conditions during the Permian-Triassic transition in E Iberia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borruel-Abadía, Violeta; Belén Galán-Abellán, Ana; Barrenechea, José F.; De la Horra, Raúl; Luque, Francisco Javier; Alonso-Azcárate, Jacinto; López-Gómez, José

    2016-04-01

    Strontium-rich hydrated Aluminium phosphate-sulphate (APS) minerals are markers of an acidic formation environment due to their precipitation at low pH conditions. However, their small size (0.5-6 μm), low concentrations, and optical properties represent the main problems to quantify these minerals. This study provides quantitative data on APS mineral concentrations for the Late Permian and Early-Middle Triassic in different continental sections of East Iberia. By quantifying APS minerals useful insight can be obtained into the environmental conditions that prevailed during the biotic crisis of the PTB and during the later recovery of life at the end of the Early Triassic. For that, a quantification method based on element mapping of randomly selected areas of thin sections on the electron microprobe is proposed, with relative errors ranging from 5.6% to 11.7%. The results are considered on a detailed petrographic, sedimentological, and palaeontological framework, and compared with other geochemical. Thus, in the first sedimentary record after the Permian-Triassic boundary (Olenekian), it has been possible to correlate relatively high concentration levels of APS minerals with the lack of signs of living organisms. Our findings suggest a long period of sustained acidic conditions followed by an environmental change that permitted the recovery of life, as reflected by lower APS mineral contents detected at the end of the Spathian and the first presence of bioturbation, paleosols, footprints, and plant remains. Early Anisian acidic episodes were much more sporadic than those during the Olenekian deposition, in which APS mineral concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. This fact would indicate punctual acidic conditions still during the beginning of the Anisian. Based on these results, this method is proposed as a tool for addressing environmental changes that took place during the Permian-Triassic transition in continental environments.

  2. Stability evaluation of hydrate-bearing sediments during thermally-driven hydrate dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, T.; Cho, G.; Santamarina, J.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrate-bearing sediments may destabilize spontaneously as part of geological processes, unavoidably during petroleum drilling/production operations, or intentionally as part of gas extraction from the hydrate itself. In all cases, high pore fluid pressure generation is anticipated during hydrate dissociation. This study examined how thermal changes destabilize gas hydrate-bearing sediments. First, an analytical formulation was derived for predicting fluid pressure evolution in hydrate-bearing sediments subjected to thermal stimulation without mass transfer. The formulation captures the self-preservation behavior, calculates the hydrate and free gas quantities during dissociation, considering effective stress-controlled sediment compressibility and gas solubility in aqueous phase. Pore fluid pressure generation is proportional to the initial hydrate fraction and the sediment bulk stiffness; is inversely proportional to the initial gas fraction and gas solubility; and is limited by changes in effective stress that cause the failure of the sediment. Second, the analytical formulation for hydrate dissociation was incorporated as a user-defined function into a verified finite difference code (FLAC2D). The underlying physical processes of hydrate-bearing sediments, including hydrate dissociation, self-preservation, pore pressure evolution, gas dissolution, and sediment volume expansion, were coupled with the thermal conduction, pore fluid flow, and mechanical response of sediments. We conducted the simulations for a duration of 20 years, assuming a constant-temperature wellbore transferred heat to the surrounding hydrate-bearing sediments, resulting in dissociation of methane hydrate in the well vicinity. The model predicted dissociation-induced excess pore fluid pressures which resulted in a large volume expansion and plastic deformation of the sediments. Furthermore, when the critical stress was reached, localized shear failure of the sediment around the borehole was

  3. Mineral content of urban plants as an indicator of air sulphate pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Ufimtseva, M.D.; Zaickina, L.I.

    1996-08-01

    Phytogeochemical indication constitutes one of the promising methods of urban environment monitoring. Usually the phytogeochemical assessment includes the estimation of heavy metal content in urban plants in reference to the regional background level. The indication, based on the diversity of the biological response reactions to the industrial contamination, allows us to use the other parameters for the characterization of current condition of the urban environment (and particularly the atmospheric contamination) as well. As it is well known, mineral phytolites which may constitute up to 85% of dry weight are formed in plant tissues. The mineral composition of plants does not seem to be studied well enough as yet, and the data on mineral complexes in urban plants are absent completely. The authors` attempt was to study the peculiarities of urban plant mineral content and to reveal the value of the quantitative proportion of different mineral compounds for the air pollution indication. Urban plant mineral composition was tested in the samples of ashes by means of the infrared (IR) spectroscopy method which is usually used for the estimation of mineral compounds in rock. The IR absorption spectra were taken for the samples of bark or leaf ashes, taken from the tree, shrub, and herbaceous species that were most common and widely distributed both throughout the industrial areas and in the areas without noticeable pollution. These spectra look like curves with a lot of peales with different range which evidently correspond not to clear substances but to the mixtures of different minerals. The variation of absorbtion intensities in the observed lands makes it possible to estimate the quantitative contribution of different minerals (carbonates, sulphates, phosphates, quartz, feldspar, etc.) to the general IR spectrum.

  4. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh; Woodward, Jonathan

    2011-06-07

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  5. Metallization of bacterial cellulose for electrical and electronic device manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Barbara R [Oak Ridge, TN; O'Neill, Hugh M [Knoxville, TN; Jansen, Valerie Malyvanh [Memphis, TN; Woodward, Jonathan [Knoxville, TN

    2010-09-28

    A method for the deposition of metals in bacterial cellulose and for the employment of the metallized bacterial cellulose in the construction of fuel cells and other electronic devices is disclosed. The method for impregnating bacterial cellulose with a metal comprises placing a bacterial cellulose matrix in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal salt is reduced to metallic form and the metal precipitates in or on the matrix. The method for the construction of a fuel cell comprises placing a hydrated bacterial cellulose support structure in a solution of a metal salt such that the metal precipitates in or on the support structure, inserting contact wires into two pieces of the metal impregnated support structure, placing the two pieces of metal impregnated support structure on opposite sides of a layer of hydrated bacterial cellulose, and dehydrating the three layer structure to create a fuel cell.

  6. Weight-of-evidence approach in assessment of ecotoxicological risks of acid sulphate soils in the Baltic Sea river estuaries.

    PubMed

    Wallin, Jaana; Karjalainen, Anna K; Schultz, Eija; Järvistö, Johanna; Leppänen, Matti; Vuori, Kari-Matti

    2015-03-01

    Acidity and leaching of metals from acid sulphate soils (ASSs) impair the water quality of receiving surface waters. The largest ASS areas in Europe are found in the coasts of the northern Baltic Sea. We used weight-of-evidence (WoE) approach to assess potential risks in 14 estuary sites affected by ASS in the Gulf of Finland, northern Baltic Sea. The assessment was based on exposure and effect profiles utilizing sediment and water metal concentrations and concurrent pH variation, sediment toxicity tests using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the midge Chironomus riparius, and the ecological status of benthic macroinvertebrate communities. Sediment metal concentrations were compared to national sediment quality criteria/guidelines, and water metal concentrations to environmental quality standards (EQSs). Hazard quotients (HQs) were established for maximum aluminium, cadmium and zinc concentrations at low pH based on applicable US EPA toxicity database. Sediment metal concentrations were clearly elevated in most of the studied estuaries. The EQS of cadmium (0.1 μg/l) was exceeded in 3 estuaries out of 14. The pH-minima were below the national threshold value (5.5) between good and satisfactory water quality in 10 estuaries. V. fischeri bioluminescence indicated toxicity of the sediments but toxic response was not observed in the C. riparius emergence test. Benthic invertebrate communities were deteriorated in 6 out of 14 sites based on the benthic invertebrate quality index. The overall ecotoxicological risk was assessed as low in five, moderate in three and high in five of the estuary sites. The risk assessment utilizing the WoE approach indicated that harmful effects of ASSs are likely to occur in the Baltic Sea river estuaries located at the ASS hotspot area.

  7. Hydration and leaching characteristics of cement pastes made from electroplating sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Liang; Ko, Ming-Sheng; Lai, Yi-Chieh; Chang, Juu-En

    2011-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the hydration and leaching characteristics of the pastes of belite-rich cements made from electroplating sludge. The compressive strength of the pastes cured for 1, 3, 7, 28, and 90 days was determined, and the condensation of silicate anions in hydrates was examined with the {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technology. The leachabilities of the electroplating sludge and the hardened pastes were studied with the multiple toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (MTCLP) and the tank leaching test (NEN 7345), respectively. The results showed that the electroplating sludge continued to leach heavy metals, including nickel, copper, and zinc, and posed a serious threat to the environment. The belite-rich cement made from the electroplating sludge was abundant in hydraulic {beta}-dicalcium silicate, and it performed well with regard to compressive-strength development when properly blended with ordinary Portland cements. The blended cement containing up to 40% the belite-rich cement can still satisfy the compressive-strength requirements of ASTM standards, and the pastes cured for 90 days had comparable compressive strength to an ordinary Portland cement paste. It was also found that the later hydration reaction of the blended cements was relatively more active, and high fractions of belite-rich cement increased the chain length of silicate hydrates. In addition, by converting the sludge into belite-rich cements, the heavy metals became stable in the hardened cement pastes. This study thus indicates a viable alternative approach to dealing with heavy metal bearing wastes, and the resulting products show good compressive strength and heavy-metal stability.

  8. Surfactant adsorption and interfacial tension investigations on cyclopentane hydrate.

    PubMed

    Aman, Zachary M; Olcott, Kyle; Pfeiffer, Kristopher; Sloan, E Dendy; Sum, Amadeu K; Koh, Carolyn A

    2013-02-26

    Gas hydrates represent an unconventional methane resource and a production/safety risk to traditional oil and gas flowlines. In both systems, hydrate may share interfaces with both aqueous and hydrocarbon fluids. To accurately model macroscopic properties, such as relative permeability in unconventional systems or dispersion viscosity in traditional systems, knowledge of hydrate interfacial properties is required. This work presents hydrate cohesive force results measured on a micromechanical force apparatus, and complementary water-hydrocarbon interfacial tension data. By combining a revised cohesive force model with experimental data, two interfacial properties of cyclopentane hydrate were estimated: hydrate-water and hydrate-cyclopentane interfacial tension values at 0.32 ± 0.05 mN/m and 47 ± 5 mN/m, respectively. These fundamental physiochemical properties have not been estimated or measured for cyclopentane hydrate to date. The addition of surfactants in the cyclopentane phase significantly reduced the cyclopentane hydrate cohesive force; we hypothesize this behavior to be the result of surfactant adsorption on the hydrate-oil interface. Surface excess quantities were estimated for hydrate-oil and water-oil interfaces using four carboxylic and sulfonic acids. The results suggest the density of adsorbed surfactant may be 2× larger for the hydrate-oil interface than the water-oil interface. Additionally, hydrate-oil interfacial tension was observed to begin decreasing from the baseline value at significantly lower surfactant concentrations (1-3 orders of magnitude) than those for the water-oil interfacial tension.

  9. Gas origin of hydrate in the Qilian Mountain permafrost, Qinghai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, Z.

    2012-12-01

    Gas origin of hydrate is not clear yet in the Muli of Qilian mountain permafrost, which will obviously affect its further exploration direction. A case is illustrated in the hole of DK-2 during gas hydrate drilling; gas composition and isotopes of gas hydrate and its associated gases are analyzed; organic geochemistry on mudstone, oily shale, coal, oil & gas indications are correlated within the interval of gas hydrate occurrences; the aim is to discuss the source of gases from gas hydrate and its implication to gas hydrate exploration in the study area. Results from gas composition and isotopes of gas hydrate and its associated gases reveal that the origin of gases from gas hydrate is mainly concomitant with deep oil or crude oil in the study area. Parameters for the abundance, type and thermal evolution of organic matter in mudstone, oil shale, coal in the same interval of gas hydrate occurrence suggest that these strata, especially within gas hydrate stability zone, play little role in gas sources for gas hydrate. Reservoir pyrolysis results for oil & gas indication-bearing cores reveal that oil & gas indications are closely associated with gas hydrate within its interval, indicating that they may serve as a sign of gas hydrate in the study area.

  10. Methane hydrates in nature - Current knowledge and challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collett, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of methane hydrate research and the need for a coordinated effort, the United States Congress enacted the Methane Hydrate Research and Development Act of 2000. At the same time, the Ministry of International Trade and Industry in Japan launched a research program to develop plans for a methane hydrate exploratory drilling project in the Nankai Trough. India, China, the Republic of Korea, and other nations also have established large methane hydrate research and development programs. Government-funded scientific research drilling expeditions and production test studies have provided a wealth of information on the occurrence of methane hydrates in nature. Numerous studies have shown that the amount of gas stored as methane hydrates in the world may exceed the volume of known organic carbon sources. However, methane hydrates represent both a scientific and technical challenge, and much remains to be learned about their characteristics and occurrence in nature. Methane hydrate research in recent years has mostly focused on: (1) documenting the geologic parameters that control the occurrence and stability of methane hydrates in nature, (2) assessing the volume of natural gas stored within various methane hydrate accumulations, (3) analyzing the production response and characteristics of methane hydrates, (4) identifying and predicting natural and induced environmental and climate impacts of natural methane hydrates, (5) analyzing the methane hydrate role as a geohazard, (6) establishing the means to detect and characterize methane hydrate accumulations using geologic and geophysical data, and (7) establishing the thermodynamic phase equilibrium properties of methane hydrates as a function of temperature, pressure, and gas composition. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership (COL) combined their efforts in 2012 to assess the contributions that scientific drilling has made and could continue to make to advance

  11. Expulsion of ions from hydrophobic hydration shells.

    PubMed

    Rankin, Blake M; Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2013-06-19

    Raman spectroscopy is combined with multivariate curve resolution to quantify interactions between ions and molecular hydrophobic groups in water. The molecular solutes in this study all have similar structures, with a trimethyl hydrophobic domain and a polar or charged headgroup. Our results imply that aqueous sodium and fluoride ions are strongly expelled from the first hydration shells of the hydrophobic (methyl) groups, while iodide ions are found to enter the hydrophobic hydration shell, to an extent that depends on the methyl group partial charge. However, our quantitative estimates of the corresponding ion binding equilibrium constants indicate that the iodide concentration in the first hydrophobic hydration shell is generally lower than that in the surrounding bulk water, and so an iodide ion cannot be viewed as having a true affinity for the molecular hydrophobic interface, but rather is less strongly expelled from such an interface than fluoride.

  12. Gas hydrate single-crystal structure analyses.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Michael T; Boese, Roland; Billups, W Edward; Norman, Lewis R

    2004-08-04

    The first single-crystal diffraction studies on methane, propane, methane/propane, and adamantane gas hydrates SI, SII, and SH have been performed. To circumvent the problem of very slow crystal growth, a novel technique of in situ cocrystallization of gases and liquids resulting in oligocrystalline material in a capillary has been developed. With special data treatment, termed oligo diffractometry, structural data of the gas hydrates of methane, acetylene, propane, a propane/ethanol/methane-mixture and an adamantane/methane-mixture were obtained. Cell parameters are in accord with reported values. Host network and guest are subject to extensive disorder, reducing the reliability of structural information. It was found that most cages are fully occupied by a guest molecule with the exception of the dodecahedral cage in the acetylene hydrate which is only filled to 60%. For adamantane in the icosahedral cage a disordered model is proposed.

  13. Apparatus investigates geological aspects of gas hydrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Dillon, William P.

    1999-01-01

    The US Geological Survey has developed a laboratory research system which allows the study of the creation and dissociation of gas hydrates under deepwater conditions and with different sediment types and pore fluids. The system called GHASTLI (gas hydrate and sediment test laboratory instrument) comprises a pressure chamber which holds a sediment specimen, and which can simulate water depths to 2,500m and different sediment overburden. Seawater and gas flow through a sediment specimen can be precisely controlled and monitored. It can simulate a wide range of geology and processes and help to improve understanding of gas hydrate processes and aid prediction of geohazards, their control and potential use as an energy source. This article describes GHASTLI and how it is able to simulate natural conditions, focusing on fluid volume, acoustic velocity-compressional and shear wave, electric resistance, temperature, pore pressure, shear strength, and permeability.

  14. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    2003-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  15. Fuel cell membrane hydration and fluid metering

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Daniel O.; Walsh, Michael M.

    1999-01-01

    A hydration system includes fuel cell fluid flow plate(s) and injection port(s). Each plate has flow channel(s) with respective inlet(s) for receiving respective portion(s) of a given stream of reactant fluid for a fuel cell. Each injection port injects a portion of liquid water directly into its respective flow channel in order to mix its respective portion of liquid water with the corresponding portion of the stream. This serves to hydrate at least corresponding part(s) of a given membrane of the corresponding fuel cell(s). The hydration system may be augmented by a metering system including flow regulator(s). Each flow regulator meters an injecting at inlet(s) of each plate of respective portions of liquid into respective portion(s) of a given stream of fluid by corresponding injection port(s).

  16. Method for production of hydrocarbons from hydrates

    DOEpatents

    McGuire, Patrick L.

    1984-01-01

    A method of recovering natural gas entrapped in frozen subsurface gas hydrate formations in arctic regions. A hot supersaturated solution of CaCl.sub.2 or CaBr.sub.2, or a mixture thereof, is pumped under pressure down a wellbore and into a subsurface hydrate formation so as to hydrostatically fracture the formation. The CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 solution dissolves the solid hydrates and thereby releases the gas entrapped therein. Additionally, the solution contains a polymeric viscosifier, which operates to maintain in suspension finely divided crystalline CaCl.sub.2 /CaBr.sub.2 that precipitates from the supersaturated solution as it is cooled during injection into the formation.

  17. Hydration for recreational sport and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Kenefick, Robert W; Cheuvront, Samuel N

    2012-11-01

    This review presents recommendations for fluid needs and hydration assessment for recreational activity. Fluid needs are based on sweat losses, dependent on intensity and duration of the activity, and will vary among individuals. Prolonged aerobic activity is adversely influenced by dehydration, and heat exposure will magnify this effect. Fluid needs predicted for running 5-42 km at recreational paces show that fluid losses are <2% body mass; thus, aggressive fluid replacement may not be necessary. Competitive paces result in greater fluid losses and greater fluid needs. Fluid needs for recreational activity may be low; however, carbohydrate consumption (sport drinks, gels, bars) can benefit high-intensity (≤ 1 h) and less-intense, long-duration activity (≥ 1 h). Spot measures of urine color or urine-specific gravity to assess hydration status have limitations. First morning urine concentration and body mass with gross thirst perception can be simple ways to assess hydration status.

  18. Amorphization of sugar hydrates upon milling.

    PubMed

    Willart, J F; Dujardin, N; Dudognon, E; Danède, F; Descamps, M

    2010-07-19

    The possibility to amorphize anhydrous crystalline sugars, like lactose, trehalose and glucose, by mechanical milling was previously reported. We test here the possibility to amorphize the corresponding crystalline hydrates: lactose monohydrate, trehalose dihydrate and glucose monohydrate using fully identical milling procedures. The results show that only the first hydrate amorphizes while the other two remain structurally invariant. These different behaviours are attributed to the plasticizing effect of the structural water molecules which can decrease the glass transition temperature below the milling temperature. The results reveal clearly the fundamental role of the glass transition in the solid-state amorphization process induced by milling, and they also explain why crystalline hydrates are systematically more difficult to amorphize by milling than their anhydrous counterpart. The investigations have been performed by differential scanning calorimetry and powder X-ray diffraction.

  19. Piezoelectric and related properties of hydrated collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Fukada, E; Ueda, H; Rinaldi, R

    1976-01-01

    Two piezoelectric constants (polarization per unit stress, d=d'-id'', and polarization per unit strain, e=e'-ie''), the elastic constant, and dielectric constant are determined for oriented collagen at different hydration levels at 10 Hz from -150 to 50 degrees C. With no hydration (approximately 0% H2O), d' increases slightly with higher temperatures, while e' decreases slightly. Near 11 wt% H2O, both d' and e' increase then decrease around 0 degrees C, and is probably caused by an increase of the dielectric constant and the ionic conductivity in the nonpiezoelectric phase. Hydration greater than 25 wt%, d' and e' decrease above -50 degrees C which is considered to be due to a greater ionic conductivity surrounding the piezoelectric phase. PMID:938730

  20. Acute irritant threshold correlates with barrier function, skin hydration and contact hypersensitivity in atopic dermatitis and rosacea.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Kazandjieva, Jana; Tsankov, Nikolai; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the study was to disclose interactions between epidermal barrier, skin irritation and sensitization in healthy and diseased skin. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum hydration (SCH) were assessed in adult patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), rosacea and healthy controls. A 4-h patch test with seven concentrations of sodium lauryl sulphate was performed to determine the irritant threshold (IT). Contact sensitization pattern was revealed by patch testing with European baseline series. Subjects with a lower IT had higher TEWL values and lower SCH. Subjects with positive allergic reactions had significantly lower IT. In AD, epidermal barrier deterioration was detected on both volar forearm and nasolabial fold, while in rosacea, impeded skin physiology parameters were observed on the facial skin only, suggesting that barrier impediment is restricted to the face in rosacea, in contrast with AD where the abnormal skin physiology is generalized.

  1. Cage occupancy and structural changes during hydrate formation from initial stages to resulting hydrate phase.

    PubMed

    Schicks, Judith M; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2013-11-01

    Hydrate formation processes and kinetics are still not sufficiently understood on a molecular level based on experimental data. In particular, the cavity formation and occupancy during the initial formation and growth processes of mixed gas hydrates are rarely investigated. In this study, we present the results of our time-depending Raman spectroscopic measurements during the formation of hydrates from ice and gases or gas mixtures such as CH4, CH4-CO2, CH4-H2S, CH4-C3H8, CH4-iso-C4H10, and CH4-neo-C5H12 at constant pressure and temperature conditions and constant composition of the feed gas phase. All investigated systems in this study show the incorporation of CH4 into the 5(12) cavities as first step in the initial stages of hydrate formation. Furthermore, the results imply that the initial hydrate phases differ from the resulting hydrate phase having reached a steady state regarding the occupancy and ratio of the small and large cavities of the hydrate.

  2. The microbial communities and potential greenhouse gas production in boreal acid sulphate, non-acid sulphate, and reedy sulphidic soils.

    PubMed

    Šimek, Miloslav; Virtanen, Seija; Simojoki, Asko; Chroňáková, Alica; Elhottová, Dana; Krištůfek, Václav; Yli-Halla, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Acid sulphate (AS) soils along the Baltic coasts contain significant amounts of organic carbon and nitrogen in their subsoils. The abundance, composition, and activity of microbial communities throughout the AS soil profile were analysed. The data from a drained AS soil were compared with those from a drained non-AS soil and a pristine wetland soil from the same region. Moreover, the potential production of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrous oxide from the soils was determined under laboratory conditions. Direct microscopic counting, glucose-induced respiration (GIR), whole cell hybridisation, and extended phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis confirmed the presence of abundant microbial communities in the topsoil and also in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil. The patterns of microbial counts, biomass and activity in the profile of the AS soil and partly also in the non-AS soil therefore differed from the general tendency of gradual decreases in soil profiles. High respiration in the deepest Cg2 horizon of the AS soil (5.66 μg Cg(-1)h(-1), as compared to 2.71 μg Cg(-1)h(-1) in a top Ap horizon) is unusual but reasonable given the large amount of organic carbon in this horizon. Nitrous oxide production peaked in the BCgc horizon of the AS and in the BC horizon of the non-AS soil, but the peak value was ten-fold higher in the AS soil than in the non-AS soil (82.3 vs. 8.6 ng Ng(-1)d(-1)). The data suggest that boreal AS soils on the Baltic coast contain high microbial abundance and activity. This, together with the abundant carbon and total and mineral nitrogen in the deep layers of AS soils, may result in substantial gas production. Consequently, high GHG emissions could occur, for example, when the generally high water table is lowered because of arable farming.

  3. Simulation of subsea gas hydrate exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Georg; Schlüter, Stefan; Hennig, Torsten; Deerberg, Görge

    2014-05-01

    The recovery of methane from gas hydrate layers that have been detected in several subsea sediments and permafrost regions around the world is a promising perspective to overcome future shortages in natural gas supply. Being aware that conventional natural gas resources are limited, research is going on to develop technologies for the production of natural gas from such new sources. Thus various research programs have started since the early 1990s in Japan, USA, Canada, India, and Germany to investigate hydrate deposits and develop required technologies. In recent years, intensive research has focussed on the capture and storage of CO2 from combustion processes to reduce climate impact. While different natural or man-made reservoirs like deep aquifers, exhausted oil and gas deposits or other geological formations are considered to store gaseous or liquid CO2, the storage of CO2 as hydrate in former methane hydrate fields is another promising alternative. Due to beneficial stability conditions, methane recovery may be well combined with CO2 storage in the form of hydrates. Regarding technological implementation many problems have to be overcome. Especially mixing, heat and mass transfer in the reservoir are limiting factors causing very long process times. Within the scope of the German research project »SUGAR« different technological approaches for the optimized exploitation of gas hydrate deposits are evaluated and compared by means of dynamic system simulations and analysis. Detailed mathematical models for the most relevant chemical and physical processes are developed. The basic mechanisms of gas hydrate formation/dissociation and heat and mass transport in porous media are considered and implemented into simulation programs. Simulations based on geological field data have been carried out. The studies focus on the potential of gas production from turbidites and their fitness for CO2 storage. The effects occurring during gas production and CO2 storage within

  4. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  5. Arctic Gas hydrate, Environment and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienert, Jurgen; Andreassen, Karin; Bünz, Stefan; Carroll, JoLynn; Ferre, Benedicte; Knies, Jochen; Panieri, Giuliana; Rasmussen, Tine; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    Arctic methane hydrate exists on land beneath permafrost regions and offshore in shelf and continental margins sediments. Methane or gas hydrate, an ice-like substrate, consists mainly of light hydrocarbons (mostly methane from biogenic sources but also ethane and propane from thermogenic sources) entrapped by a rigid cage of water molecules. The pressure created by the overlying water and sediments offshore stabilizes the CH4 in continental margins at a temperature range well above freezing point; consequently CH4 exists as methane ice beneath the seabed. Though the accurate volume of Arctic methane hydrate and thus the methane stored in hydrates throughout the Quaternary is still unknown it must be enormous if one considers the vast regions of Arctic continental shelves and margins as well as permafrost areas offshore and on land. Today's subseabed methane hydrate reservoirs are the remnants from the last ice age and remain elusive targets for both unconventional energy and as a natural methane emitter influencing ocean environments and ecosystems. It is still contentious at what rate Arctic warming may govern hydrate melting, and whether the methane ascending from the ocean floor through the hydrosphere reaches the atmosphere. As indicated by Greenland ice core records, the atmospheric methane concentration rose rapidly from ca. 500 ppb to ca. 750 ppb over a short time period of just 150 years at the termination of the younger Dryas period ca. 11600 years ago, but the dissociation of large quantities of methane hydrates on the ocean floor have not been documented yet (Brook et al., 2014 and references within). But with the major projected warming and sea ice melting trend (Knies et al., 2014) one may ask, for how long will CH4 stay trapped in methane hydrates if surface and deep-ocean water masses will warm and permafrost continuous to melt (Portnov et al. 2014). How much of the Arctic methane will be consumed by the micro- and macrofauna, how much will

  6. Assessing the Thermodynamic Feasibility of the Conversion of Methane Hydrate into Carbon Dioxide Hydrate in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Duane H.; Seshadri, Kal; Wilder, Joseph W.

    2001-05-31

    Concerns about the potential effects of rising carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere have stimulated interest in a number of carbon dioxide sequestration studies. One suggestion is the sequestration of carbon dioxide as clathrate hydrates by injection of carbon dioxide into methane hydrate. Energy-supply research estimates indicate that natural gas hydrates in arctic and sub-seafloor formations contain more energy than all other fossil fuel deposits combined. The simultaneous sequestration of carbon dioxide and the production of methane by injection of carbon dioxide into deposits of natural gas hydrates, if possible, represents a potentially efficient and cost effective option for the sequestration of carbon dioxide. Data in the literature show that the conversion of bulk methane hydrate into carbon dioxide hydrate is thermodynamically favored. These results are not directly applicable to naturally occurring hydrates, because the hydrates in these locations are embedded in sediments. The thermodynamics of any potential conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate will therefore be affected by the size of the pores in which the conversion of CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate would take place. We have developed a model that is able to explain and predict equilibria in porous media for any pore size distribution. This model can be used to calculate the heats of dissociation for these hydrates in porous media as a function of pore size and temperature. These results allow for an assessment of the thermodynamic feasibility of converting CH4 hydrate to CO2 hydrate in porous media involving various size pores. We have used this model to derive a simple, explicit relation for the hydrate formation conditions in porous media, as well as the enthalpy of dissociation for these hydrates.

  7. Conditions for Fromation of Oceanic Natural Gas Hydrate Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Max, M. M.

    2005-12-01

    Despite the widespread nature of oceanic natural gas hydrate and associated gas concentrations on continental margins, natural gas hydrate has yet to be proven to be an economically viable unconventional gas resource. In part, this is because unequivocal models for the formation of economic hydrate deposits do not yet exist and there is no exploration methodology for identifying the high-grade hydrate sweet spots that will constitute economic hydrate deposits. At this time, it appears that the most commercially viable high-grade hydrate deposits consist of naturally permeable strata that hosts a high proportion of solid hydrate filling of original porosity. The different means by which hydrate grows and the optimum conditions for the maintenance of a strong growth dynamic provide a key to predicting the location of potential hydrate deposits. Hydrate has been produced from natural seawater, which is a close approximation of connate water in marine sediments, and a variety of Hydrate Forming Gases (HFG) using several different types of crystallizers in laboratory experiments. The crystallizers have been developed to test a broad range of hydrate growth conditions by controlling pressure, temperature (or temperature gradients), and HFG saturation levels. Growth has been achieved in both aqueous and gaseous media. These results provide insight into formation of natural gas hydrate and may constrain the search for economic hydrate deposits Natural gas hydrate forms in one of three main growth modes in aqueous media; mineralizing solutions, diffusion in aqueous media, and solid diffusion. When the relative potential for growth of these modes are assessed along with geological and ground (pore) water provincing, the most likely locations within the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) for recoverable hydrate natural gas deposits may be identified. The most rapid mode for growth of solid hydrate takes place on the seafloor in the presence of venting. Natural gas-rich fluids

  8. Mechanical instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jianyang; Ning, Fulong; Trinh, Thuat T.; Kjelstrup, Signe; Vlugt, Thijs J. H.; He, Jianying; Skallerud, Bjørn H.; Zhang, Zhiliang

    2015-01-01

    Despite observations of massive methane release and geohazards associated with gas hydrate instability in nature, as well as ductile flow accompanying hydrate dissociation in artificial polycrystalline methane hydrates in the laboratory, the destabilising mechanisms of gas hydrates under deformation and their grain-boundary structures have not yet been elucidated at the molecular level. Here we report direct molecular dynamics simulations of the material instability of monocrystalline and polycrystalline methane hydrates under mechanical loading. The results show dislocation-free brittle failure in monocrystalline hydrates and an unexpected crossover from strengthening to weakening in polycrystals. Upon uniaxial depressurisation, strain-induced hydrate dissociation accompanied by grain-boundary decohesion and sliding destabilises the polycrystals. In contrast, upon compression, appreciable solid-state structural transformation dominates the response. These findings provide molecular insight not only into the metastable structures of grain boundaries, but also into unusual ductile flow with hydrate dissociation as observed during macroscopic compression experiments. PMID:26522051

  9. Unraveling Mixed Hydrate Formation: Microscopic Insights into Early Stage Behavior.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kyle Wm; Zhang, Zhengcai; Kusalik, Peter G

    2016-12-29

    The molecular-level details of mixed hydrate nucleation remain unclear despite the broad implications of this process for a variety of scientific domains. Through analysis of mixed hydrate nucleation in a prototypical CH4/H2S/H2O system, we demonstrate that high-level kinetic similarities between mixed hydrate systems and corresponding pure hydrate systems are not a reliable basis for estimating the composition of early stage mixed hydrate nuclei. Moreover, we show that solution compositions prior to and during nucleation are not necessarily effective proxies for the composition of early stage mixed hydrate nuclei. Rather, microscopic details, (e.g., guest-host interactions and previously neglected cage types) apparently play key roles in determining early stage behavior of mixed hydrates. This work thus provides key foundational concepts and insights for understanding mixed hydrate nucleation.

  10. Identification of an extended N-acetylated sequence adjacent to the protein-linkage region of fibroblast heparan sulphate.

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, M; Steward, W P; Hampson, I N; Gallagher, J T

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of N-sulphate groups within fibroblast heparan sulphate chains was investigated. The detergent-extractable heparan sulphate proteoglycan from adult human skin fibroblasts, radiolabelled with [3H]glucosamine and [35S]sulphate, was coupled to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. After partial depolymerization of the heparan sulphate with nitrous acid, the remaining Sepharose-bound fragments were removed by treatment with alkali. These fragments, of various sizes, but all containing an intact reducing xylose residue, were fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 and the distribution of the 3H and 35S radiolabels was analysed. A decreased degree of sulphation was observed towards the reducing termini of the chains. After complete nitrous acid hydrolysis of the Sepharose-bound proteoglycan, analysis of the proximity of N-sulphation to the reducing end revealed the existence of an extended N-acetylated sequence directly adjacent to the protein-linkage sequence. The size of this N-acetylated domain was estimated by gel filtration to be approximately eight disaccharide units. This domain appears to be highly conserved, being present in virtually all the chains derived from this proteoglycan, implying the existence of a mechanism capable of generating such a non-random sequence during the post-polymeric modification of heparan sulphate. Comparison with the corresponding situation in heparin suggests that different mechanisms regulate polymer N-sulphation in the vicinity of the protein-linkage region of these chemically related glycosaminoglycans. PMID:2954540

  11. Transport of oestrone sulphate by the mammary gland in the goat.

    PubMed

    Heap, R B; Hamon, M; Fleet, I R

    1984-05-01

    During pregnancy in goats the concentration of endogenous oestrone sulphate in milk increased more than twofold, and that in arterial and mammary venous plasma 10- and 20-fold respectively. The concentration in milk was higher than that in arterial plasma, particularly in lactating goats during mid-gestation. This was partly related to mammary production of oestrone sulphate (or of a closely related steroid which cross-reacted in the radioimmunoassay) since in tracer infusion studies the specific activity of oestrone sulphate in milk was significantly lower than that in arterial or mammary venous plasma. It was also related to the existence of a mechanism within the gland which concentrates oestrone sulphate in milk since when infused close-arterially into the mammary gland of a non-pregnant goat with undetectable levels of the endogenous compound in the circulation, a concentration ratio of 7.4:1.0 was reached for oestrone sulphate in milk:arterial plasma. Tracer kinetic studies showed that mammary extraction of [3H]oestrone sulphate was variable (up to 41.3 +/- 30.6%, mean +/- S.E.M.). During intravenous or close-arterial infusion, radioactivity in arterial and mammary venous plasma at steady state was mainly in the form of [3H]oestrone sulphate (range, 64 +/- 10.6 to 80.2 +/- 5.9% of total radioactivity in plasma). The remainder was in the form of compounds chromatographically similar to oestradiol-17 beta-3-monosulphate, oestradiol-17 alpha-3-monosulphate and unconjugated oestrogens. The distribution of radioactivity between these different steriods was similar in arterial mammary venous plasma indicating a low level of selective mammary metabolism or extraction. The amount of labelled oestrone sulphate transferred into milk was low, and it was significantly less in pregnant (range, 0.11 +/- 0.07 to 0.27 +/- 0.16% of total infusate) than in non-pregnant animals (3.23 +/- 0.50%). Studies of the rate of transfer of [3H]oestrone sulphate from blood to milk

  12. Timescales for migration of atmospherically derived sulphate through an alpine/subalpine watershed, Loch Vale, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michel, R.L.; Campbell, D.; Clow, D.; Turk, J.T.

    2000-01-01

    Sulphur 35, a cosmogenically produced radioisotope with a short half-life (87 days), was measured in snowpack during 1993-1997 and at four locations within the Loch Vale watershed during 1995-1997. The four sites include the two main drainages in the watershed, Andrews Creek and Icy Brook, a small south facing catchment flowing into Andrews Creek (Andrews Spring 1), and a similar north facing catchment flowing out of a scree field into Icy Brook (Spring 19). Concentrations ranged from a high of almost 50 mBq/L for a sample from Spring 19 in June 1996 to a concentration near the detection limit for a sample from Andrews Creek in April 1997. Sulphur 35 concentrations were normalized to sulphate (as mBq/mg SO4/-2) and were decay-corrected to a Julian day of 90 (April 1) for each year. Snowpack had the highest 35S concentration with an average concentration of 53 mBq/mg SO4-2. Concentrations in the streams were much lower, even when corrected for decay relative to JD 90. The large 35S concentrations found in Spring 19 were the result of increases in concentration due to sublimation and/or evapotranspiration and were lower than snowpack when normalized to sulphate. Using 35S concentrations found in snowpack as of JD 90 as a beginning concentration, the fraction of sulphate in streamflow that was derived from atmospheric deposition within the prior water year was estimated. For Icy Brook and Andrews Creek the fraction of the sulphate in streamflow derived from that year's snowpack and precipitation was low prior to the beginning of the main spring melt, reached a maximum during the period of maximum flow, and decreased as the summer progressed. A calculation of the seasonal flux indicated that about 40% of the sulphate that flowed out of the watershed was derived from atmospheric sulphate deposited during the previous year. This suggests that more than half of the sulphate deposited in the watershed by atmospheric processes during the previous year was removed during the

  13. The Zechstein sulphates: The state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbein, Rolf

    The origin and preservation of the features observed in the Zechstein sulphates exclusively depend on their diagenesis. The main factor of the diagenetic feature overprint is the cementation. It is controlled by the stability relations at the bottom of the basin. Different compensation-depth lines can be distinguished. The primary lithofeatures are preserved by the halite or anhydrite cementation. Thereby sedimentites may be recognised as inorganogenic or organogenic sedentites. By means of the gypsum cementation rocks are formed which are deformed during the diagenetic phase change from gypsum to anhydrite. The plastic deformation ranges from enterolites up to large folded blocks. Cementation which has been partial or which has not taken place favours total or differential compaction. During this process partial compactites (stratolites) and compactites (stratobolites) are produced. The breccia structures frequently occurring in the Zechstein anhydrites must be assigned to different processes. During the resedimentation they formed as intraclastites, during the progressive diagenesis as residual or collapse breccias. Completely new feature elements can be produced by retrograde gypsification. Compactites and cementites differ in their thickness in the ratio 1:4 to 1:5. The cementites are formed in shallow water at the margin of the basin and form there anhydrite platforms. Thin compactites are widely distributed in the basin facies. Because of the differential compaction between thick pletholites and thin stratolites in the Werra series, the facies distribution of the Stassfurt carbonate and the thickness of the halite are influenced as well. The giant breccias in the Upper Werra Anhydrite are interpreted as compaction or collapse breccias. Olisthostromes and, therefore, deep-water facies cannot be found in the Zechstein 1. Temporary drainage and differential compaction continue to take place in younger series and influence sedimentation there. Thus, the

  14. Strategies for gas hydrate exploration in the gulf of mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A.; Dillon, W.; Max, M.

    2003-04-01

    Drilling results from Japan and the Canadian Arctic have demonstrated the potential for commercial production of natural gas from gas hydrate. Commercial gas hydrate methane production is likely within less than 10 years on a limited basis. A number of factors make the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) a significant area of interest for gas hydrate exploration. First, gas hydrate reaches its maximum concentrations in coarse clastics, and deposition in the GOM has provided for substantial amounts of sandy beds within the zone of hydrate stability. Second, the GOM has a high gas flux rate and an extensive system of migration paths, resulting in a high probability of multiple reservoirs with gas hydrate in the hydrate stability zone and gas deposits immediately below. Third, the existing infrastructure of platforms and pipelines improves the economics of hydrate development through the leveraging of existing facilities. Fourth, the GOM lies in a region of favorable political climate for exploitation of hydrocarbon deposits. Fifth, technology required for exploitation of gas hydrate is now emerging. Exploring for gas hydrates in the GOM requires the establishment of models for hydrate development and natural gas extraction. Ideally, such models integrate seismic, well log, and core data from throughout the subsurface hydrate stability zone. Unfortunately, few wells have been adequately logged in the hydrate stability zone interval in the Gulf and models are incomplete. Moreover, standard processing approaches for seismic data do not allow satisfactory assessment of hydrate occurrences. As a result, published models are presently derived mainly from piston core data and observations from submersibles. This near-seafloor information may be strongly misleading with respect to more deeply buried hydrate concentrations. The integration of a more stratigraphic approach to the Gulf's subsurface models and recognition of the importance of the hydrate cap could yield substantial new

  15. Hydrates: Significance for design and operation of multiphase pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Fadnes, F.H.; Schei, R.S.; Majeed, A.I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the hydrate prevention concept for an actual North Sea subsea development, and how this concept was established. Based on the outline of the development, an extensive program of hydrate characterization tests was performed. These tests consist of semi-static experiments in visual high pressure PVT-cells and dynamic studies in pressurized flow loops and flow simulators. Special emphasis has been put on the investigation of the potential of hydrate blockage and the future use of unconventional hydrate inhibitors.

  16. Immune-driven alterations in mucin sulphation is an important mediator of Trichuris muris helminth expulsion

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Paul A.; Lourie, Rohan; Hutson, Peter; Tong, Hui; Grencis, Richard K.

    2017-01-01

    Mucins are heavily glycosylated proteins that give mucus its gel-like properties. Moreover, the glycans decorating the mucin protein core can alter the protective properties of the mucus barrier. To investigate whether these alterations could be parasite-induced we utilized the Trichuris muris (T. muris) infection model, using different infection doses and strains of mice that are resistant (high dose infection in BALB/c and C57BL6 mice) or susceptible (high dose infection in AKR and low dose infection in BALB/c mice) to chronic infection by T. muris. During chronicity, within the immediate vicinity of the T. muris helminth the goblet cell thecae contained mainly sialylated mucins. In contrast, the goblet cells within the epithelial crypts in the resistant models contained mainly sulphated mucins. Maintained mucin sulphation was promoted by TH2-immune responses, in particular IL-13, and contributed to the protective properties of the mucus layer, making it less vulnerable to degradation by T. muris excretory secretory products. Mucin sulphation was markedly reduced in the caecal goblet cells in the sulphate anion transporter-1 (Sat-1) deficient mice. We found that Sat-1 deficient mice were susceptible to chronic infection despite a strong TH2-immune response. Lower sulphation levels lead to decreased efficiency of establishment of T. muris infection, independent of egg hatching. This study highlights the complex process by which immune-regulated alterations in mucin glycosylation occur following T. muris infection, which contributes to clearance of parasitic infection. PMID:28192541

  17. Resistance of class C fly ash belite cement to simulated sodium sulphate radioactive liquid waste attack.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, A; Goñi, S; Allegro, V R

    2009-01-30

    The resistance of class C fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) to concentrated sodium sulphate salts associated with low level wastes (LLW) and medium level wastes (MLW) is discussed. This study was carried out according to the Koch and Steinegger methodology by testing the flexural strength of mortars immersed in simulated radioactive liquid waste rich in sulphate (48,000 ppm) and demineralised water (used as a reference), at 20 degrees C and 40 degrees C over a period of 180 days. The reaction mechanisms of sulphate ion with the mortar was carried out through a microstructure study, which included the use of Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), porosity and pore-size distribution and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the FABC mortar was stable against simulated sulphate radioactive liquid waste (SSRLW) attack at the two chosen temperatures. The enhancement of mechanical properties was a result of the formation of non-expansive ettringite inside the pores and an alkaline activation of the hydraulic activity of cement promoted by the ingress of sulphate. Accordingly, the microstructure was strongly refined.

  18. Chromate reduction at low sulphate concentration in hydrogen-fed bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Battaglia-Brunet, F; Foucher, S; Denamur, A; Marggraff, M; Morin, D; Ignatiadis, I

    2004-01-01

    Aimed at developing a bioremediation process to treat Cr(VI)-bearing water at low sulphate concentration in order to reduce excess sulphide production, the highly toxic, mutagenic, and soluble Cr(VI) was reduced to the less toxic and insoluble Cr(III) in 2-litre fixed-bed reactors inoculated with the sulphate-reducing bacterium (SRB) Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, capable of performing direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction. H2 was used as the electron source. The fixed-films were developed on three different supports: a PVC cross-flow material, a pozzolana, and a ceramic granulate. The phased experiments began with a progressive increase of the Cr(VI) concentration in the feed to the column reactors, followed by a progressive decrease of the sulphate concentration. Inhibition by Cr(VI) was less pronounced with pozzolana than with the other supports; when the pozzolana column was fed with a medium containing 100 mg l(-1) Cr(VI) and only 250 mg l(-1) sulphate, the lowest residence time that could be applied for complete Cr(VI) reduction was 16 h. The molar ratio between the sulphate and Cr(VI) reduction rates was decreased down to 1.5, suggesting that indirect reaction with HS was not the sole mechanism of Cr(VI) reduction.

  19. A new sulphate metabolite as a long-term marker of metandienone misuse.

    PubMed

    Gómez, C; Pozo, O J; Garrostas, L; Segura, J; Ventura, R

    2013-12-11

    Metandienone is one of the most frequently detected anabolic androgenic steroids in sports drug testing. Metandienone misuse is commonly detected by monitoring different metabolites excreted free or conjugated with glucuronic acid using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase and liquid-liquid extraction. It is known that several metabolites are the result of the formation of sulphate conjugates in C17, which are converted to their 17-epimers in urine. Therefore, sulphation is an important phase II metabolic pathway of metandienone that has not been comprehensively studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulphate fraction of metandienone metabolism by LC-MS/MS. Seven sulphate metabolites were detected after the analysis of excretion study samples by applying different neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and SRM methods. One of the metabolites (M1) was identified and characterised by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS as 18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one sulphate. M1 could be detected up to 26 days after the administration of a single dose of metandienone (5 mg), thus improving the period in which the misuse can be reported with respect to the last long-term metandienone metabolite described (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one excreted in the glucuronide fraction).

  20. Effect of folic acid and zinc sulphate on endocrine parameters and seminal antioxidant level after varicocelectomy.

    PubMed

    Nematollahi-Mahani, S N; Azizollahi, G H; Baneshi, M R; Safari, Z; Azizollahi, S

    2014-04-01

    Varicocele is among the most common problems which may lead to male infertility. Spermatogenesis is impaired as a consequence of this vascular defect, through mechanisms that are not well described. This study aimed to evaluate serum hormonal level (inhibin B, FSH and testosterone) and seminal plasma antioxidant defence levels after folic acid and zinc sulphate administration in varicocelectomised patients. Participants were randomly allocated to four experimental groups. Our randomisation schedule was as follows: zinc sulphate/folic acid, folic acid, zinc sulphate and placebo. The patients underwent varicocelectomy, before which a blood and semen sample were obtained and also three and six months after varicocelectomy for evaluation of blood hormonal level (FSH, testosterone, inhibin B) and seminal oxidative stress status (nitric oxide, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity). Patients in different groups took orally one capsule per day after dinner following varicocelectomy for 6 months. A significant rise in peripheral blood inhibin B and seminal plasma activity was detected in the zinc sulphate/folic acid group after 6 months. The present clinical trial indicates a change in the hormonal status of varicocelectomised patients following long-term administration of zinc sulphate and folic acid.