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Sample records for metal-contaminated subsurface soils

  1. Horizontal Gene Transfer of PIB-Type ATPases among Bacteria Isolated from Radionuclide- and Metal-Contaminated Subsurface Soils

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Robert J.; Wang, Yanling; Raimondo, Melanie A.; Coombs, Jonna M.; Barkay, Tamar; Sobecky, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Aerobic heterotrophs were isolated from subsurface soil samples obtained from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Research Center (FRC) located at Oak Ridge, Tenn. The FRC represents a unique, extreme environment consisting of highly acidic soils with cooccurring heavy metals, radionuclides, and high nitrate concentrations. Four hundred isolates obtained from contaminated soil were assayed for heavy metal resistance, and a smaller subset was assayed for tolerance to uranium. The vast majority of the isolates were gram-positive bacteria and belonged to the high-G+C- and low-G+C-content genera Arthrobacter and Bacillus, respectively. Genomic DNA from a randomly chosen subset of 50 Pb-resistant (Pbr) isolates was amplified with PCR primers specific for PIB-type ATPases (i.e., pbrA/cadA/zntA). A total of 10 pbrA/cadA/zntA loci exhibited evidence of acquisition by horizontal gene transfer. A remarkable dissemination of the horizontally acquired PIB-type ATPases was supported by unusual DNA base compositions and phylogenetic incongruence. Numerous Pbr PIB-type ATPase-positive FRC isolates belonging to the genus Arthrobacter tolerated toxic concentrations of soluble U(VI) (UO22+) at pH 4. These unrelated, yet synergistic, physiological traits observed in Arthrobacter isolates residing in the contaminated FRC subsurface may contribute to the survival of the organisms in such an extreme environment. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study to report broad horizontal transfer of PIB-type ATPases in contaminated subsurface soils and is among the first studies to report uranium tolerance of aerobic heterotrophs obtained from the acidic subsurface at the DOE FRC. PMID:16672448

  2. Electrorestoration of metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hicks, R.E.; Tondorf, S. )

    1994-11-01

    The removal of metals from contaminated soils using electric fields has been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory, yet field trials have yielded anomalous results. Poor performance may be attributed to interaction of the metals with naturally occurring electrolytes, humic substances, and co-disposed wastes. Immobilization of contaminants in a narrow band in the soil, analogous to isoelectric focusing, was reproduced experimentally and simulated with a mathematical model. It was shown that the focusing effect can be eliminated by controlling the pH at the cathode using a water rinse. Immobilization resulting from precipitation with carbonates and codisposed wastes may additionally require chelating agents and control of the redox potential to effect removal. Pourbaix diagrams provide a means for rapidly identifying pH and redox conditions suitable for mobilizing metal wastes. Optimum operating conditions can then be determined using a mathematical model that incorporates the appropriate metal speciation chemistry. 32 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Shtangeeva, I.; Laiho, J.V-P.; Kahelin, H.; Gobran, G.R.

    2004-03-31

    Recent concerns regarding environmental contamination have necessitated the development of appropriate technologies to assess the presence and mobility of metals in soil and estimate possible ways to decrease the level of soil metal contamination. Phytoremediation is an emerging technology that may be used to cleanup contaminated soils. Successful application of phytoremediation, however, depends upon various factors that must be carefully investigated and properly considered for specific site conditions. To efficiently affect the metal removal from contaminated soils we used the ability of plants to accumulate different metals and agricultural practices to improve soil quality and enhance plant biomass. Pot experiments were conducted to study metal transport through bulk soil to the rhizosphere and stimulate transfer of the metals to be more available for plants' form. The aim of the experimental study was also to find fertilizers that could enhance uptake of metals and their removal from contaminated soil.

  4. Remediation processes for heavy metals contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, G.A.; Torma, A.E.; Hsu, Pei-Cheng

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides information on selected technologies available for remediation of metal contaminated soils and industrial effluent solutions. Because some of the industrial sites are contaminated with organics (solvents, gasolines and oils), an effort has been made to introduce the most frequently used cost-effective cleanup methods, such as {open_quotes}bioventing{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}composting.{close_quotes} The microorganisms involved in these processes are capable of degrading organic soil contaminants to environmentally harmless compounds: water and carbon dioxide. Heavy metals and radionuclides contaminated mining and industrial sites can be remediated by using adapted heap and dump leaching technologies, which can be chemical in nature or bio-assisted. The importance of volume reduction by physical separation is discussed. A special attention is devoted to the remediation of soils by leaching (soil washing) to remove heavy metal contaminants, such as chromium, lead, nickel and cadmium. Furthermore, the applicability of biosorption technology in the remediation of heavy metals and radionuclides contaminated industrial waste waters and acidic mining effluent solutions was indicated. 60 refs., 9 figs.

  5. THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOAVAILABILITY IN REMEDIATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reduction in exposure to soil metal contamination has typically been accomplished by soil removal and off site disposal, by covering, or by diluting with uncontaminated soil. Cost, logistical concerns, and regulatory requirements associated with excavation and disposal or ex-situ...

  6. THE IMPORTANCE OF BIOAVAILABILITY IN REMEDIATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reduction in exposure to soil metal contamination has typically been accomplished by soil removal and off site disposal, by covering, or by diluting with uncontaminated soil. Cost, logistical concerns, and regulatory requirements associated with excavation and disposal or ex-situ...

  7. Electrokinetic In Situ Treatment of Metal-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Clausen, Christian A., III; Geiger, Cherie; Reinhart, Debra

    2004-01-01

    An electrokinetic technique has been developed as a means of in situ remediation of soils, sludges, and sediments that are contaminated with heavy metals. Examples of common metal contaminants that can be removed by this technique include cadmium, chromium, zinc, lead, mercury, and radionuclides. Some organic contaminants can also be removed by this technique. In the electrokinetic technique, a low-intensity direct current is applied between electrodes that have been implanted in the ground on each side of a contaminated soil mass. The electric current causes electro-osmosis and migration of ions, thereby moving aqueous-phase subsurface contaminants from one electrode to the other. The half reaction at the anode yields H+, thereby generating an acid front that travels from the anode toward the cathode. As this acid front passes through a given location, the local increase in acidity increases the solubility of cations that were previously adsorbed on soil particles. Ions are transported towards one electrode or the other which one depending on their respective electric charges. Upon arrival at the electrodes, the ionic contaminants can be allowed to become deposited on the electrodes or can be extracted to a recovery system. Surfactants and other reagents can be introduced at the electrodes to enhance rates of removal of contaminants. Placements of electrodes and concentrations and rates of pumping of reagents can be adjusted to maximize efficiency. The basic concept of electrokinetic treatment of soil is not new. What is new here are some of the details of application and the utilization of this technique as an alternative to other techniques (e.g., flushing or bioremediation) that are not suitable for treating soils of low hydraulic conductivity. Another novel aspect is the use of this technique as a less expensive alternative to excavation: The cost advantage over excavation is especially large in settings in which contaminated soil lies near and/or under

  8. Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil Treatment: Conceptual Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    circuit without trans- ferring hear from a metallic resistance element. Contaminated soils may be accepted directly with little or (to pretreatment ...with metals has been demon-- strated. No pretreatment for organics destruction would be required. The system can also readily handle liquid wastes and...applications as a pretreatment /recovery step. J 38 0458Bi 3.7.3 Long term stability/performance. The process would remove metals from the soil. Therefore, if

  9. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovely, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    2000-01-01

    Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination.

  10. Phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil by Jatropha curcas.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fang-Chih; Ko, Chun-Han; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Wang, Ya-Nang; Chung, Chin-Yi

    2014-12-01

    This study employed Jatropha curcas (bioenergy crop plant) to assist in the removal of heavy metals from contaminated field soils. Analyses were conducted on the concentrations of the individual metals in the soil and in the plants, and their differences over the growth periods of the plants were determined. The calculation of plant biomass after 2 years yielded the total amount of each metal that was removed from the soil. In terms of the absorption of heavy metal contaminants by the roots and their transfer to aerial plant parts, Cd, Ni, and Zn exhibited the greatest ease of absorption, whereas Cu, Cr, and Pb interacted strongly with the root cells and remained in the roots of the plants. J. curcas showed the best absorption capability for Cd, Cr, Ni, and Zn. This study pioneered the concept of combining both bioremediation and afforestation by J. curcas, demonstrated at a field scale.

  11. Agro-improving method of phytoextracting heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shuhe; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Zhou, Qixing

    2008-02-11

    Phytoextraction of heavy metal contaminated soils is a promising remediation technology. Till now, more than several hundreds of hyperaccumulators or non-hyperaccumulators which can be used to clean polluted soils with heavy metals have been reported. However, phytoextraction is still not extensively applied. Thus, some measurements should be taken to improve phytoremediation. This paper introduced the basic mechanisms of phytoextration, its main restrictive factors, its relationship with agricultural technology and some agricultural improvement methods. We suggested that unavailable heavy metal activation, crop breeding, seed-coating and felicitous utilization of fertilizer and water, as well as the use of two-phase planting may be important and indispensable paths for phytoextraction to be widely applied at a commercial level in the future.

  12. Humus-assisted cleaning of heavy metal contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borggaard, Ole K.; Rasmussen, Signe B.

    2016-04-01

    Contamination of soils with non-degradable heavy metals (HMs) because of human acticities is globally a serious problem threatening human health and ecosystem functioning. To avoid negative effects, HMs must be removed either on-site by plant uptake (phytoremediation) or off-site by extraction (soil washing). In both strategies, HM solubility must be augmented by means of a strong ligand (complexant). Often polycarboxylates such as EDTA and NTA are used but these ligands are toxic, synthetic (non-natural) and may promote HM leaching. Instead naturally occurring soluble humic substances (HS) were tested as means for cleaning HM contaminated soils; HS samples from beech and spruce litter, compost percolate and processed cow slurry were tested. Various long-term HM contaminated soils were extracted with solutions of EDTA, NTA or HS at different pH by single-step and multiple-step extraction mode. The results showed that each of the three complexant types increased HM solubility but the pH-dependent HM extraction efficiency decreased in the order: EDTA ≈ NTA > HS. However, the naturally occurring HS seems suitable for cleaning As, Cd, Cu and Zn contaminated soils both in relation to phytoremediation of moderately contaminated soils and washing of strongly contaminated soils. On the other hand, HS was found unsuited as cleaning agent for Pb polluted calcareous soils. If future field experiments confirm these laboratory results, we have a new cheap and environmentally friendly method for solving a great pollution problem, i.e. cleaning of heavy metal contaminated soils. In addition, humic substances possess additional benefits such as improving soil structure and stimulating microbial activity.

  13. Remediation of metal-contaminated urban soil using flotation technique.

    PubMed

    Dermont, G; Bergeron, M; Richer-Laflèche, M; Mercier, G

    2010-02-01

    A soil washing process using froth flotation technique was evaluated for the removal of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc from a highly contaminated urban soil (brownfield) after crushing of the particle-size fractions >250microm. The metal contaminants were in particulate forms and distributed in all the particle-size fractions. The particle-by-particle study with SEM-EDS showed that Zn was mainly present as sphalerite (ZnS), whereas Cu and Pb were mainly speciated as various oxide/carbonate compounds. The influence of surfactant collector type (non-ionic and anionic), collector dosage, pulp pH, a chemical activation step (sulfidization), particle size, and process time on metal removal efficiency and flotation selectivity was studied. Satisfactory results in metal recovery (42-52%), flotation selectivity (concentration factor>2.5), and volume reduction (>80%) were obtained with anionic collector (potassium amyl xanthate). The transportation mechanisms involved in the separation process (i.e., the true flotation and the mechanical entrainment) were evaluated by the pulp chemistry, the metal speciation, the metal distribution in the particle-size fractions, and the separation selectivity indices of Zn/Ca and Zn/Fe. The investigations showed that a great proportion of metal-containing particles were recovered in the froth layer by entrainment mechanism rather than by true flotation process. The non-selective entrainment mechanism of the fine particles (<20 microm) caused a flotation selectivity drop, especially with a long flotation time (>5 min) and when a high collector dose is used. The intermediate particle-size fraction (20-125 microm) showed the best flotation selectivity.

  14. Chelant soil-washing technology for metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate here, in a pilot-scale experiment, the feasibility of ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)based washing technology for soils contaminated with potentially toxic metals. Acid precipitation coupled to initial alkaline toxic metal removal and an electrochemical advanced oxidation process were used for average recovery of 76 +/- 2% of EDTA per batch and total recycle of water in a closed process loop. No waste water was generated; solid wastes were efficiently bitumen-stabilized before disposal. The technology embodiment, using conventional process equipment, such as a mixer for soil extraction, screen for soil/gravel separation, filter chamber presses for soil/liquid and recycled EDTA separation and soil rinsing, continuous centrifuge separator for removal of precipitated metals and electrolytic cells for process water cleansing, removed up to 72%, 25% and 66% of Pb, Zn and Cd from garden soil contaminated with up to 6960, 3797 and 32.6 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn and Cd, respectively, in nine 60kg soil batches. Concentrations of Pb and Zn remaining in the remediated soil and bioaccessible from the simulated human intestinal phase soil were reduced by 97% and 96% and were brought under the level of determination for Cd. In the most cost-effective operation mode, the material and energy costs of remediation amounted to 50.5 Euros ton(-1) soil and the total cost to 299 Euros ton(-1).

  15. Role of soil rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yan-de; He, Zhen-li; Yang, Xiao-e

    2007-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes, and therefore, have potential to enhance phytoremediation processes. Phytoremediation strategies with appropriate heavy metal-adapted rhizobacteria have received more and more attention. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes.

  16. Role of soil rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils*

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yan-de; He, Zhen-li; Yang, Xiao-e

    2007-01-01

    Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes, and therefore, have potential to enhance phytoremediation processes. Phytoremediation strategies with appropriate heavy metal-adapted rhizobacteria have received more and more attention. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from rhizosphere of plants growing on heavy metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. PMID:17323432

  17. Assessing microbial activities in metal contaminated agricultural volcanic soils--An integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Parelho, C; Rodrigues, A S; Barreto, M C; Ferreira, N G C; Garcia, P

    2016-07-01

    Volcanic soils are unique naturally fertile resources, extensively used for agricultural purposes and with particular physicochemical properties that may result in accumulation of toxic substances, such as trace metals. Trace metal contaminated soils have significant effects on soil microbial activities and hence on soil quality. The aim of this study is to determine the soil microbial responses to metal contamination in volcanic soils under different agricultural land use practices (conventional, traditional and organic), based on a three-tier approach: Tier 1 - assess soil microbial activities, Tier 2 - link the microbial activity to soil trace metal contamination and, Tier 3 - integrate the microbial activity in an effect-based soil index (Integrative Biological Response) to score soil health status in metal contaminated agricultural soils. Our results showed that microbial biomass C levels and soil enzymes activities were decreased in all agricultural soils. Dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities, soil basal respiration and microbial biomass C were the most sensitive responses to trace metal soil contamination. The Integrative Biological Response value indicated that soil health was ranked as: organic>traditional>conventional, highlighting the importance of integrative biomarker-based strategies for the development of the trace metal "footprint" in Andosols.

  18. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal contaminated soils and dusts#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human and ecological risk assessment and often is the "risk-driver" for metal contaminated soil. Site-specific soil physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioavailabilit...

  19. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal contaminated soils and dusts#

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human and ecological risk assessment and often is the "risk-driver" for metal contaminated soil. Site-specific soil physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioavailabilit...

  20. Dynamism of PGPR in bioremediation and plant growth promotion in heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Patel, P R; Shaikh, S S; Sayyed, R Z

    2016-04-01

    Heavy metal contamination, particularly of cultivable lands, is a matter of concern. Bioremediation helps in reversing such contamination to certain extent. Here, we report isolation, polyphasic identification and the role of siderophore producing rhizobacteria Alcaligenes feacalis RZS2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa RZS3 in bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil and plant growth promotion activity in such contaminated soil. Siderophore produced by A. feacalis RZS2 and P. aeruginosa RZS3 strains chelated various heavy metal ions like MnCl₂.4H₂O, NiCl₂.6H₂O, ZnCl₂, CuCl₂ and CoCl₂ other than FeCl₃.6H2O at batch scale. Their bioremediation potential was superior over the chemical ion chelators like EDTA and citric acid. These isolates also promoted growth of wheat and peanut seeds sown in heavy metal contaminated soil. Effective root colonizing ability of these isolates was observed in wheat and peanut plants.

  1. Estimation of heavy metal-contaminated soils' mechanical characteristics using electrical resistivity.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ya; Liu, Songyu; Wang, Fei; Cai, Guojun; Bian, Hanliang

    2017-05-01

    Under the process of urbanization in China, more and more attention has been paid to the reuse of heavy metal-contaminated sites. The shear characteristics of heavy metal-contaminated soils are investigated by electrical detection in this paper. Three metal ions (Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+)) were used, the metal concentrations of which are 50, 166.67, 500, 1666.67, and 5000 mg/kg, respectively. Direct shear tests were used to investigate the influence of heavy metal ions on the shear characters of soil samples. It is found that with the addition of heavy metal ions, the shear strength, cohesion, and friction angle of contaminated soils are higher than the control samples. The higher concentration of heavy metal ions penetrated in soils, the higher these engineering characteristics of contaminated soils observed. In addition, an electrical resistivity detection machine is used to evaluate the shear characteristics of contaminated soils. The electrical resistivity test results show that there is a decreasing tendency of resistivity with the increase of heavy metal ion concentrations in soils. Compared with the electrical resistivity and the shear characteristics of metal-contaminated soils, it is found that, under fixed compactness and saturation, shear strength of metal-contaminated soils decreased with the increase of resistivity. A basic linear relationship between C/log(N + 10) and resistivity can be observed, and there is a basic linear relationship between φ/log(N + 10) and resistivity. Besides, a comparison of the measured and predicted shear characteristics shows a high accuracy, indicating that the resistivity can be used to evaluate the shear characteristics of heavy metal contaminated soils.

  2. Eco-toxicity and metal contamination of paddy soil in an e-wastes recycling area.

    PubMed

    Jun-hui, Zhang; Hang, Min

    2009-06-15

    Paddy soil samples taken from different sites in an old primitive electronic-waste (e-waste) processing region were examined for eco-toxicity and metal contamination. Using the environmental quality standard for soils (China, Grade II) as reference, soil samples of two sites were weakly contaminated with trace metal, but site G was heavily contaminated with Cd (6.37 mg kg(-1)), and weakly contaminated with Cu (256.36 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (209.85 mg kg(-1)). Zn appeared to be strongly bound in the residual fraction (72.24-77.86%), no matter the soil was metal contaminated or not. However, more than 9% Cd and 16% Cu was present in the non-residual fraction in the metal contaminated soils than in the uncontaminated soil, especially for site G and site F. Compared with that of the control soil, the micronucleus rates of site G and site F soil treatments increased by 2.7-fold and 1.7-fold, respectively. Low germination rates were observed in site C (50%) and site G (50%) soil extraction treated rice seeds. The shortest root length (0.2377 cm) was observed in site G soil treated groups, which is only 37.57% of that of the control soil treated groups. All of the micronucleus ratio of Vicia faba root cells, rice germination rate and root length after treatment of soil extraction indicate the eco-toxicity in site F and G soils although the three indexes are different in sensitivity to soil metal contamination.

  3. Growth of Jatropha curcas on heavy metal contaminated soil amended with industrial wastes and Azotobacter. A greenhouse study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, G P; Yadav, S K; Thawale, P R; Singh, S K; Juwarkar, A A

    2008-04-01

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the effect of organic wastes (biosludge and dairy sludge) and biofertilizer (Azotobacter chroococcum) on the planting conditions of Jatropha curcas in metal contaminated soils. Results showed that the plants survival rate in heavy metal contaminated soil increased with addition of amendments. Treatment T6 (heavy metal contaminated soils+dairy sludge+biofertilizer) observed to be the best treatment for growth (height and biomass) as compared with the treatment T5 (heavy metal contaminated soils+biosludge+biofertilizer). In addition, organic amendments provided nutrients such as carbon, N, P and K to support plant growth and reduced the metal toxicity to plant. The present study showed that metal contaminated lands/soils could be suitably remediated by adapting appropriate measures.

  4. Ecological restoration of mine degraded soils, with emphasis on metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Wong, M H

    2003-02-01

    This paper reviews the ecological aspects of mined soil restoration, with special emphasis on maintaining a long-term sustainable vegetation on toxic metal mine sites. The metal mined soils are man-made habitats which are very unstable and will become sources of air and water pollution. Establishment of a vegetation cover is essential to stabilize the bare area and to minimize the pollution problem. In addition to remediate the adverse physical and chemical properties of the sites, the choice of appropriate vegetation will be important. Phytostabilization and phytoextraction are two common phytoremediation techniques in treating metal-contaminated soils, for stabilizing toxic mine spoils, and the removal of toxic metals from the spoils respectively. Soil amendments should be added to aid stabilizing mine spoils, and to enhance metal uptake accordingly.

  5. Recent Developments for In Situ Treatment of Metal Contaminated Soils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report assists the remedy selection process by providing information on four in situ technologies for treating soil contaminated with metals. The four approaches are electrokinetic remediation, phytoremediation, soil flushing, and...

  6. Decrease in the genotoxicity of metal-contaminated soils with biochar amendments.

    PubMed

    Rees, Frédéric; Dhyèvre, Adrien; Morel, Jean Louis; Cotelle, Sylvie

    2017-01-11

    Biochar amendments, i.e., the solid product of biomass pyrolysis, reduce soil metal availability, which may lower the toxicity of metal-contaminated soils. A direct link between the decrease in soil metal availability and improved plant development is however often difficult to establish, as biochar may induce undesirable side effects on plant growth, e.g., a modification to plant nutrition. In order to investigate toxicity processes at a cellular level, roots of Vicia faba were exposed for 7 days to three metal-contaminated substrates and one control soil, amended with a 0 or 5% (w/w) addition of a wood-derived biochar. Exposure to pure biochar was also tested. Root tip cells were then observed to count the number of micronuclei as an estimation of DNA damage and the number of cells at mitosis stage. Results showed that biochar amendments led to a significant decrease in soil metal availability (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and to enhance root development on acidic substrates. The micronucleus frequency in root tip cells was positively correlated and the number of mitotic cells negatively, to the extractability of Zn in soils and to the concentration of Zn in secondary roots. Exposure to pure biochar caused a lower production of roots than most soil substrates, but led to the lowest number of observed micronuclei. In conclusion, biochar amendments can reduce the genotoxicity associated with the presence of metallic contaminants in soils, thereby potentially improving plant growth.

  7. Microbially supported phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils: strategies and applications.

    PubMed

    Phieler, René; Voit, Annekatrin; Kothe, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soil as a result of, for example, mining operations, evokes worldwide concern. The use of selected metal-accumulating plants to clean up heavy metal contaminated sites represents a sustainable and inexpensive method for remediation approaches and, at the same time, avoids destruction of soil function. Within this scenario, phytoremediation is the use of plants (directly or indirectly) to reduce the risks of contaminants in soil to the environment and human health. Microbially assisted bioremediation strategies, such as phytoextraction or phytostabilization, may increase the beneficial aspects and can be viewed as potentially useful methods for application in remediation of low and heterogeneously contaminated soil. The plant-microbe interactions in phytoremediation strategies include mutually beneficial symbiotic associations such as mycorrhiza, plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB), or endophytic bacteria that are discussed with respect to their impact on phytoremediation approaches.

  8. Effects of electrokinetic treatment of a heavy metal contaminated soil on soil enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Cang, Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei; Wang, Quan-Ying; Wu, Dan-Ya

    2009-12-30

    There is a growing concern on the potential application of a direct current (DC) electric field to soil for removing contaminants, but little is known about its impact on soil enzyme activities. This study investigated the change of enzyme activities of a heavy metal contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic (EK) treatments at lab-scale and the mechanisms of EK treatment to affect soil enzyme activities were explored. After treatments with 1-3 V cm(-1) of voltage gradient for 420 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soil heavy metal concentration and enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that the average removal efficiencies of soil copper were about 65% and 83% without and with pH control of catholyte, respectively, and all the removal efficiencies of cadmium were above 90%. The soil invertase and catalase activities increased and the highest invertase activity was as 170 times as the initial one. The activities of soil urease and acidic phosphatase were lower than the initial ones. Bivariate correlation analyses indicated that the soil invertase and acidic phosphatase activities were significantly correlated with soil pH, EC, and DOC at P<0.05, but the soil urease activities had no correlation with the soil properties. On the other hand, the effects of DC electric current on solution invertase and catalase enzyme protein activities indicated that it had negative effect on solution catalase activity and little effect on solution invertase activity. From the change of invertase and catalase activities in soil and solution, the conclusion can be drawn that the dominant effect mechanism is the change of soil properties by EK treatments.

  9. Extraction behavior of metallic contaminants and soil constituents from contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, S; Park, S W; Ulmanu, M

    2005-06-01

    With an aim of developing an effective remediation technology for soils contaminated by heavy metals and metalloids, the extraction behavior of metallic contaminants as well as those of soil constituents was studied on a laboratory scale. Three contaminated soils collected from a former metal recycling plant were examined. These three soils were found to be contaminated by As, Cu, Pb, Sb, Se and Zn as compared to the non-contaminated soil. The pH-dependent extraction behavior of various elements from the soils was measured in a wide pH range and categorized into three groups. Hydrochloric acid (HCl), H2SO4, H3PO4, HNO3, sodium citrate, sodium tartrate, disodium dihydrogen ethylenediaminetetraacetate and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid were evaluated as extractants for removing contaminants from the soils. Extraction behavior of the soil constituents was also studied. The efficiency of the extraction was evaluated by the Japanese content and leaching tests. The stabilization of Pb remaining in the soil after the extraction process was conducted by the addition of iron(III) and calcium chloride.

  10. Remediation of heavy metal contaminated soils by using Solanum nigrum: A review.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Muhammad Zia Ur; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Shafaqat; Ok, Yong Sik; Ishaque, Wajid; Saifullah; Nawaz, Muhammad Farrakh; Akmal, Fatima; Waqar, Maqsooda

    2017-09-01

    Heavy metals are among the major environmental pollutants and the accumulation of these metals in soils is of great concern in agricultural production due to the toxic effects on crop growth and food quality. Phytoremediation is a promising technique which is being considered as an alternative and low-cost technology for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. Solanum nigrum is widely studied for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils owing to its ability for metal uptake and tolerance. S. nigrum can tolerate excess amount of certain metals through different mechanism including enhancing the activities of antioxidant enzymes and metal deposition in non-active parts of the plant. An overview of heavy metal uptake and tolerance in S. nigrum is given. Both endophytic and soil microorganisms can play a role in enhancing metal tolerance in S. nigrum. Additionally, optimization of soil management practices and exogenous application of amendments can also be used to enhance metal uptake and tolerance in this plant. The main objective of the present review is to highlight and discuss the recent progresses in using S. nigrum for remediation of metal contaminated soils. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM; PHOSPHATE STABILIZATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTAMINATED MINE WASTE YARD SOILS, JOPLIN, MISSOURI NPL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Project 22-Phosphate Stabilization of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Mine Waste Yard Soils. Mining, milling, and smelting of ores near Joplin, Missouri, have resulted in heavy metal contamination of the area. The Joplin s...

  12. MINE WASTE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM; PHOSPHATE STABILIZATION OF HEAVY METALS CONTAMINATED MINE WASTE YARD SOILS, JOPLIN, MISSOURI NPL SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Project 22-Phosphate Stabilization of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Mine Waste Yard Soils. Mining, milling, and smelting of ores near Joplin, Missouri, have resulted in heavy metal contamination of the area. The Joplin s...

  13. Metal contamination of vineyard soils in wet subtropics (southern Brazil).

    PubMed

    Mirlean, Nicolai; Roisenberg, Ari; Chies, Jaqueline O

    2007-09-01

    The vine-growing areas in Brazil are the dampest in the world. Copper maximum value registered in this study was as much as 3200 mg kg(-1), which is several times higher than reported for vineyard soils in temperate climates. Other pesticide-derived metals accumulate in the topsoil layer, surpassing in the old vineyards the background value several times for Zn, Pb, Cr and Cd. Copper is transported to deeper soils' horizons and can potentially contaminate groundwater. The soils from basaltic volcanic rocks reveal the highest values of Cu extracted with CaCl(2), demonstrating a high capacity of copper transference into plants. When evaluating the risks of copper's toxic effects in subtropics, the soils from rhyolitic volcanic rocks are more worrisome, as the Cu extracted with ammonium acetate 1M surpasses the toxic threshold as much as 4-6 times.

  14. Pollution Status of Pakistan: A Retrospective Review on Heavy Metal Contamination of Water, Soil, and Vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Arshad, Jahanzaib; Iqbal, Farhat; Sajjad, Ashif; Mehmood, Zahid

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water), soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health. PMID:25276818

  15. Pollution status of Pakistan: a retrospective review on heavy metal contamination of water, soil, and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Waseem, Amir; Arshad, Jahanzaib; Iqbal, Farhat; Sajjad, Ashif; Mehmood, Zahid; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Trace heavy metals, such as arsenic, cadmium, lead, chromium, nickel, and mercury, are important environmental pollutants, particularly in areas with high anthropogenic pressure. In addition to these metals, copper, manganese, iron, and zinc are also important trace micronutrients. The presence of trace heavy metals in the atmosphere, soil, and water can cause serious problems to all organisms, and the ubiquitous bioavailability of these heavy metal can result in bioaccumulation in the food chain which especially can be highly dangerous to human health. This study reviews the heavy metal contamination in several areas of Pakistan over the past few years, particularly to assess the heavy metal contamination in water (ground water, surface water, and waste water), soil, sediments, particulate matter, and vegetables. The listed contaminations affect the drinking water quality, ecological environment, and food chain. Moreover, the toxicity induced by contaminated water, soil, and vegetables poses serious threat to human health.

  16. [Using kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) to reclaim multi-metal contaminated acidic soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Xi; Lu, Huan-Liang; Zhan, Shu-Shun; Deng, Teng-hao-bo; Lin, Qing-Qi; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-03-01

    A five-year field trial was conducted at the surrounding area of Dabao Mountain Mine to explore the feasibility and availability of using kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus) , a fiber crop with strong heavy metals tolerance and potential economic value, to reclaim the multi-metal contaminated acidic farmland soil. Different amendments were applied prior to the kenaf planting to evaluate their effects on the soil properties and kenaf growth. After the amendments application, the kenaf could grow well on the heavy metals contaminated soil with the Pb, Zn, Cu, Cd, and As concentrations being 1600, 440, 640, 7. 6, and 850 mg . kg-1, respectively. Among the amendments, dolomite and fly ash had better effects than limestone and organic fertilizer. With the application of dolomite and fly ash, the aboveground dry mass production of kenaf reached 14-15 t . hm-2, which was similar to that on normal soils, and the heavy metal concentrations in the bast fiber and stem of kenaf decreased significantly, as compared with the control. The mass of the bast fiber accounted for 32% -38% of the shoot production, and the extractable heavy metal concentrations in the bast fiber could meet the standard of 'technical specifications of ecological textiles' in China, suggesting that the bast fiber had potential economic value. It was suggested that planting kenaf combining with dolomite/fly ash application could be an effective measure to reclaim the multi-metal contaminated acidic farmland soil.

  17. Risk of antibiotic resistance from metal contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, Charles

    2013-04-01

    It is known that contaminated soils can lead to increased incidence of illness and disease, but it may also prevent our ability to fight disease. Many antibiotic resistant genes (ARG) acquired by bacteria originate from the environment. It is important to understand factors that influence levels of ARG in the environment, which could affect us clinically and agriculturally. The presence of elevated metal content in soils often promotes antibiotic resistance in exposed microorganisms. Using qPCR, the abundances of ARG to compare levels with geochemical conditions in randomly selected soils from several countries. Many ARG positively correlated with soil metal content, especially copper, chromium, nickel, lead, and iron. Results suggest that geochemical metal conditions influence the potential for antibiotic resistance in soil, which might be used to estimate baseline gene presence on various landscape scales and may translate to epidemiological risk of antibiotic-resistance transmission from the environment. This suggests that we may have to reconsider tolerances of metal pollution in the environment.

  18. Heavy metals contamination of soils surrounding waste deposits in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matache, M.; Rozylowicz, L.; Ropota, M.; Patroescu, C.

    2003-05-01

    Soils contamination with heavy metals is one of the most severe aspects of environmental pollution in Romania, independently of the origin sources (domestic or industrial activities) or type of disposal (organised landfill or hazardous deposits)[l-2]. This fact is the consequence of the poor state of the existing waste deposits in Romania and of the significant costs involved by the establishing of a new landfill according with the international regulations. The present study is trying to emphasise the contamination of soils surrounding different categories of waste deposits (sewage sludge ponds, domestic and industrial waste landfills, hillocks, sterile deposits) from various regions of Romania. Some case studies show a special interest being localise in a protected area (Iron Gates Natural Park). In order to quantify the concentration of metals like Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Zn, Ni, Mo in soil samples, analysis were performed using Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). Romanian standards were used as reference values[3].

  19. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  20. Phytoremediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil for Improving Food Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilev, Stefan; Benlloch, Manuel; Dios-Palomares, R.; Sancho, Enrique D.

    The contamination of the environment is a serious problem which provokes great interest in our society and in the whole scientific community. The input of metals into soils has increased during the last few decades as a consequence of different human activities (storage of industrial and municipal wastes, burning of fuels, mining and wastewater treatments, functioning of non-ferrous-metal-producing smelters, etc.). Nowadays, this type of contamination is one of the most serious concerning the chronic toxic effect which it renders on human health and the environment. As a consequence of all these activities, a huge number of toxic metals and metalloids, such as Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Hg and As, among many others, have been accumulated in soils, reaching toxic values. Unfortunately, much contaminated land is still in use for crop production, despite the danger that the metal content poses.

  1. In-Situ Electrokinetic Remediation for Metal Contaminated Soils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-01

    Press. Riddle, M. J. 1988. Patterns in the distribution of macrofauna! communities in coral reef sediments on the central Great Barrier Reef . Mar...acidified. This acidification results in solubilization of contaminants due to desorption and dissolution of species from soil. Once contaminants are...the north and east, the Pacific Ocean on the south and west, and a Ventura County Game Reserve on the west and northwest (Figure 6). The Navy has

  2. Phytoremediation potential of some agricultural plants on heavy metal contaminated mine waste soils, salem district, tamilnadu.

    PubMed

    Padmapriya, S; Murugan, N; Ragavendran, C; Thangabalu, R; Natarajan, D

    2016-01-01

    The Pot culture experiment performed for phytoextraction potential of selected agricultural plants [millet (Eleusine coracana), mustard (Brassica juncea), jowar (Sorghum bicolor), black gram (Vigna mungo), pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis)] grown in metal contaminated soils around the Salem region, Tamilnadu, India. Physiochemical characterization of soils, reported as low to medium level of N, P, K was found in test soils. The Cr content higher in mine soils than control and the values are 0.176 mg/L in Dalmia soil and 0.049 mg/L in Burn & Co soil. The germination rate low in mine soil than control soils (25 to 85%). The content of chlorophyll, carotenoid, carbohydrate and protein decreased in mine soils than control. The morphological parameters and biomass values decreased in experimental plants due to metal accumulation. Proline content increased in test plants and ranged from 0.113 mg g(-1) to 0.858 mg g(-1) which indicate the stress condition due to toxicity of metals. Sorghum and black gram plants reported as metal tolerant capacity. Among the plants, Sorghum produced good results (both biomass and biochemical parameters) which equal to control plant and suggests Sorghum plant is an ideal for remediation of metal contaminated soils.

  3. Quantitative relations between soil heavy metal contamination and landscape pattern in Wuxi, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ming; Pu, Lijie; Xu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    Land use practices changed landscape pattern and meanwhile, brought forth numerous environmental problems including heavy metal contamination in soil. In this study, we investigated the quantitative relations between soil heavy metal contamination and its surrounding landscape pattern based on topsoil samples and land use map of Wuxi in 2009. The results of vector fitting with Redundancy analysis in R package vegan showed that Percent Coverage of build-up area (PCB) within 2500 m, Perimeter-Area Fractal Dimension (PAFD) within 2500 m, Edge Density (ED) within 2500 m, Patch Density (PD) within 200 m, Percent Coverage of wetland (PCW) within 2000 m and Patch Cohesion (PC) within 200 m significantly affected the contents of heavy metal elements. The results of Stepwise regression suggested that increase of build-up area and fragmentation would increase Cu and Zn, while increase of wetland would decrease the contents of As and Cu. PAFD was negative with Cd, Hg, Pb and Zn.

  4. [Immobilization impact of different fixatives on heavy metals contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lie-shan; Zeng, Dong-mei; Mo, Xiao-rong; Lu, Hong-hong; Su, Cui-cui; Kong, De-chao

    2015-01-01

    Four kinds of amendments including humus, ammonium sulfate, lime, superphosphate and their complex combination were added to rapid immobilize the heavy metals in contaminated soils. The best material was chosen according to the heavy metals' immobilization efficiency and the Capacity Values of the fixative in stabilizing soil heavy metals. The redistributions of heavy metals were determined by the European Communities Bureau of Referent(BCR) fraction distribution experiment before and after treatment. The results were as follows: (1) In the single material treatment, lime worked best with the dosage of 2% compared to the control group. In the compound amendment treatments, 2% humus combined with 2% lime worked best, and the immobilization efficiency of Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn reached 98.49%, 99.40%, 95.86%, 99.21%, respectively. (2) The order of Capacity Values was lime > humus + lime > ammonium sulfate + lime > superphosphate > ammonium sulfate + superphosphate > humus + superphosphate > humus > superphosphate. (3) BCR sequential extraction procedure results indicated that 2% humus combined with 2% lime treatment were very effective in immobilizing heavy metals, better than 2% lime treatment alone. Besides, Cd was activated firstly by 2% humus treatment then it could be easily changed into the organic fraction and residual fraction after the subsequent addition of 2% lime.

  5. Response of soil microbial communities and microbial interactions to long-term heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoqi; Meng, Delong; Li, Juan; Yin, Huaqun; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Xueduan; Cheng, Cheng; Xiao, Yunhua; Liu, Zhenghua; Yan, Mingli

    2017-09-05

    Due to the persistence of metals in the ecosystem and their threat to all living organisms, effects of heavy metal on soil microbial communities were widely studied. However, little was known about the interactions among microorganisms in heavy metal-contaminated soils. In the present study, microbial communities in Non (CON), moderately (CL) and severely (CH) contaminated soils were investigated through high-throughput Illumina sequencing of 16s rRNA gene amplicons, and networks were constructed to show the interactions among microbes. Results showed that the microbial community composition was significantly, while the microbial diversity was not significantly affected by heavy metal contamination. Bacteria showed various response to heavy metals. Bacteria that positively correlated with Cd, e.g. Acidobacteria_Gp and Proteobacteria_thiobacillus, had more links between nodes and more positive interactions among microbes in CL- and CH-networks, while bacteria that negatively correlated with Cd, e.g. Longilinea, Gp2 and Gp4 had fewer network links and more negative interactions in CL and CH-networks. Unlike bacteria, members of the archaeal domain, i.e. phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota, class Thermoprotei and order Thermoplasmatales showed only positive correlation with Cd and had more network interactions in CH-networks. The present study indicated that (i) the microbial community composition, as well as network interactions was shift to strengthen adaptability of microorganisms to heavy metal contamination, (ii) archaea were resistant to heavy metal contamination and may contribute to the adaption to heavy metals. It was proposed that the contribution might be achieved either by improving environment conditions or by cooperative interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of soil type on distribution and bioaccessibility of metal contaminants in shooting range soils.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Peter; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi; Bowman, Mark; McLure, Stuart

    2012-11-01

    Shooting ranges from Department of Defence sites around Australia were investigated for extent of metal contamination. Shooting range soils contained concentrations ranging from 399 to 10,403 mg/kg Pb, 6.57 to 252 mg/kg Sb, 28.7 to 1250 mg/kg Cu, 5.63 to 153 mg/kg Zn, 1.35 to 8.8 mg/kg Ni and 3.08 to 15.8 mg/kg As. Metal(loid)s were primarily concentrated in the stop butt and the surface soil (0-10 cm). The distribution of contamination reflected firing activity, soil properties, climate and management practices. Climatic variations among sites in Australia are significant, with a temperate climate in the south and tropical climate with high rainfall in the north. Up to 8% of total Pb resided in soil fines (<0.075 mm), due to the fragmentation of bullets on impact. Distribution and bioaccessibility varied between each site. Acidic Townsville soil had the highest proportion of water extractable Pb at 10%, compared to the alkaline Murray Bridge with only 2% Pb water extractable. Soil properties such as CEC, pH and dissolved organic carbon influence mobility. This is reflected in the subsoil concentrations of Pb in Townsville and Darwin which are up to 30 and 46% of surface concentration in the subsoil respectively. Similarly bioaccessibility is influenced by soil properties and ranges from 46% in Townsville to 70% in Perth. Acidic pH promotes dissolution of secondary minerals and the downward movement of Pb in the profile. The secondary Pb minerals formed as a result of weathering in these soils were cerussite, hydrocerussite, pyromorphite, galena and anglesite. Copper oxide was also reported on fragments from bullet jackets. These results have implications for range management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Siderophore production by streptomycetes-stability and alteration of ferrihydroxamates in heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Schütze, Eileen; Ahmed, Engy; Voit, Annekatrin; Klose, Michael; Greyer, Matthias; Svatoš, Aleš; Merten, Dirk; Roth, Martin; Holmström, Sara J M; Kothe, Erika

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal-contaminated soil derived from a former uranium mining site in Ronneburg, Germany, was used for sterile mesocosms inoculated with the extremely metal-resistant Streptomyces mirabilis P16B-1 or the sensitive control strain Streptomyces lividans TK24. The production and fate of bacterial hydroxamate siderophores in soil was analyzed, and the presence of ferrioxamines E, B, D, and G was shown. While total ferrioxamine concentrations decreased in water-treated controls after 30 days of incubation, the sustained production by the bacteria was seen. For the individual molecules, alteration between neutral and cationic forms and linearization of hydroxamates was observed for the first time. Mesocosms inoculated with biomass of either strain showed changes of siderophore contents compared with the non-treated control indicating for auto-alteration and consumption, respectively, depending on the vital bacteria present. Heat stability and structural consistency of siderophores obtained from sterile culture filtrate were shown. In addition, low recovery (32 %) from soil was shown, indicating adsorption to soil particles or soil organic matter. Fate and behavior of hydroxamate siderophores in metal-contaminated soils may affect soil properties as well as conditions for its inhabiting (micro)organisms.

  8. Growth and survival of Halimione portulacoides stem cuttings in heavy metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Andrades-Moreno, L; Cambrollé, J; Figueroa, M E; Mateos-Naranjo, E

    2013-10-15

    The halophytic shrub Halimione portulacoides demonstrates a high tolerance to heavy metal contamination and a capacity for accumulating metals within its tissues. On the Iberian Peninsula, this species has colonized habitats with high levels of metal pollution. The aim of this study is to analyze the response of H. portulacoides stem cuttings to this pollution. Growth, photosynthesis and metal uptake were examined in H. portulacoides through an experiment in which stem cuttings were replanted in metal-contaminated soil. This condition decreased growth and lowered both photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance. Reduced photosynthetic performance was largely due to the reduced concentration of photosynthetic pigments. Despite these responses, there was some important evidence suggesting the phytoremediatory potential of Halimione stem cuttings. The results of our study indicate that this salt-marsh shrub may represent a biotool of value in the restoration of polluted areas. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of metal-contaminated forest soils from the Canadian shield to terrestrial organisms.

    PubMed

    Feisthauer, Natalie C; Stephenson, Gladys L; Princz, Juliska I; Scroggins, Richard P

    2006-03-01

    The effects of elevated metal concentrations in forest soils on terrestrial organisms were investigated by determining the toxicity of six site soils from northern Ontario and Quebec, Canada, using a battery of terrestrial toxicity tests. Soils were collected from three sites on each of two transects established downwind of nickel (Sudbury, ON, Canada) and copper (Rouyn-Noranda, PQ, Canada) smelting operations. Site soils were diluted to determine if toxicity estimates for the most-contaminated site soils could be quantified as a percent of site soil. Rouyn-Noranda soils were toxic following acute exposure (14 d) to plants, but not to invertebrates (7 d for collembola and 14 d for earthworms). However, Rouyn-Noranda soils were toxic to all species following chronic exposure (21, 35, and 63 d for plants, collembola, and earthworms, respectively). The toxicity of the Rouyn-Noranda site soils did not correspond to the gradient of metal concentrations in soil. Metal-contaminated Sudbury soils were toxic to plants but not to invertebrates, following acute exposure. Chronic exposure to Sudbury soils caused adverse effects to plant growth and invertebrate survival and reproduction. The toxicity of Sudbury soils corresponded to the metal concentration gradient, with one exception: The reference soil collected in October was toxic to collembola following acute and chronic exposure. This study evaluated the applicability of the new Environment Canada terrestrial toxicity test methods, developed using agricultural soils, to forest soils and also provided useful data to assess the ecological risk associated with mixtures of metals in soil.

  10. Effect of biosludge and biofertilizer amendment on growth of Jatropha curcas in heavy metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Juwarkar, Asha Ashok; Yadav, Santosh Kumar; Kumar, Phani; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2008-10-01

    The pot experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of arsenic, chromium and zinc contaminated soils, amended with biosludge and biofertilizer on the growth of Jatropha curcas which is a biodiesel crop. The results further showed that biosludge alone and in combination with biofertilizer significantly improved the survival rates and enhanced the growth of the plant. With the amendments, the plant was able to grow and survive upto 500, 250 and 4,000 mg kg(-1) of As, Cr and Zn contaminated soils, respectively. The results also showed that zinc enhanced the growth of J. curcas more as compared to other metals contaminated soils. The heavy metal accumulation in plant increased with increasing concentrations of heavy metals in soil, where as a significant reduction in the metal uptake in plant was observed, when amended with biosludge and biofertilizer and biosludge alone. It seems that the organic matter present in the biosludge acted as metal chelator thereby reducing the toxicity of metals to the plant. Findings suggest that plantation of J. curcas may be promoted in metal contaminated soils, degraded soils or wasteland suitably after amending with organic waste.

  11. Sequential extraction evaluation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil: How clean is clean?

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen; Peters, R.W.; Brewster, M.D.; Miller, G.A.

    1995-07-01

    As a result of industrial and military operations, large amounts of land have become contaminated with heavy metals. A growing public awareness of metal toxicity in soils and water has forced increased treatment and improved remediation techniques. To develop an adequate knowledge base to definitively judge the usefulness of the remediation technology requires some basic research in how the contaminants are bound in the soil. In this study, the classic five-step sequential extractions were performed on heavy-metal-contaminated soil from Aberdeen Proving Ground to determine the speciation of the metal forms. This technique speciates the heavy metal distribution into an easily extractable (exchangeable) form, carbonates, reducible oxides, organically-bound forms, and residual forms. In order to compare the results of these fractionations with the amount of heavy metals extracted by chelating agents, multi-stage extractions with EDTA were also performed. The results were used to determine the feasibility of using soil washing and soil flushing techniques for remediating the Aberdeen metals-contaminated soils.

  12. Novel EDTA and process water recycling method after soil washing of multi-metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

    2012-01-30

    The development of EDTA-based soil washing technologies is hampered by the lack of treatment methods of the spent solution, particularly when multi-metal contaminated soils have to be remediated. Extraction of Pb (5329 mg kg(-1)), Zn (3401 mg kg(-1)), Cd (35 mg kg(-1)) and As (279 mg kg(-1)) contaminated soil with 60 mmol EDTA kg(-1) of soil removed 72%, 27%, 71%, and 80% of contaminants, respectively. We demonstrate here, on a laboratory scale experiment, the feasibility of using acid precipitation with HCl and H(2)SO(4), coupled to initial alkaline Fe removal, to recover up to 88% of EDTA from a spent soil washing solution containing 11,578 mg L(-1) of EDTA and 1109, 267, 7.1 and 64 mg L(-1) of Pb, Zn, Cd and As, respectively. An electrochemical advanced oxidation process with a graphite anode was subsequently used to degrade 99.9% of the remaining EDTA in the spent washing solution and remove 99.7% Pb, 100% Zn, 96.6% Cd and 100% of As as (electro)precipitate. The cleansed process water obtained after electrochemical treatment was then used to prepare recycled washing solution by re-dissolving the recovered/recycled part of the EDTA. Washing solutions prepared from recycled EDTA had the same potential to extract Pb, Zn, Cd and As from soil as washing solution prepared from fresh EDTA of the same molarity. The novel recycling method is simple and robust and enables reuse of both EDTA and process water in a closed process loop. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Empirical modeling of heavy metal extraction by EDDS from single-metal and multi-metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Yip, Theo C M; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ng, Kelvin T W; Lo, Irene M C

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of using biodegradable EDDS (S,S-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid) for metal extraction has drawn increasing attention in recent years. In this study, an empirical model, which utilized the initial metal distribution in soils and a set of parameter values independently determined from sequential extraction, was developed for estimating the time-dependent heavy metal extraction by EDDS from single-metal and multi-metal contaminated soils. The model simulation provided a satisfactory description of the experimental results of the 7-d extraction kinetics of Cu, Zn, and Pb in both artificially contaminated and field-contaminated soils. Thus, independent and prior assessment of extraction efficiency would be available to facilitate the engineering applications of EDDS. Furthermore, a simple empirical equation using the initial metal distribution was also proposed to estimate the extraction efficiency at equilibrium. It was found that, for the same type of soils, higher extraction efficiency was achieved in multi-metal contaminated soils than in single-metal contaminated soils. The differences were 4-9%, 9-16%, and 21-31% for Cu, Zn, and Pb, respectively, probably due to the larger proportion of exchangeable and carbonate fractions of sorbed Zn and Pb in multi-metal contaminated soils. EDDS-promoted mineral dissolution, on the other hand, was more significant in multi-metal contaminated soils as a result of the higher EDDS concentration applied to the soils of higher total metal content.

  14. Bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils using Burkholderia sp. Z-90.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhi; Chai, Liyuan; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yi; Xiao, Ruiyang

    2016-01-15

    Bioleaching is an environment-friendly and economical technology to remove heavy metals from contaminated soils. In this study, a biosurfactant-producing strain with capacity of alkaline production was isolated from cafeteria sewer sludge and its capability for removing Zn, Pb, Mn, Cd, Cu, and As was investigated. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rDNA gene sequences confirmed that the strain belonged to Burkholderia sp. and named as Z-90. The biosurfactant was glycolipid confirmed by thin layer chromatography and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy. Z-90 broth was then used for bioleaching remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils. The removal efficiency was 44.0% for Zn, 32.5% for Pb, 52.2% for Mn, 37.7% for Cd, 24.1% for Cu and 31.6% for As, respectively. Mn, Zn and Cd were more easily removed from soil than Cu, Pb and As, which was attributed to the presence of high acid-soluble fraction of Mn, Zn and Cd and high residual fraction of Cu, Pb and As. The heavy metal removal in soils was contributed to the adhesion of heavy metal-contaminated soil minerals with strain Z-90 and the formation of a metal complex with biosurfactant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Utilization of grasses for potential biofuel production and phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Ronald A; Kelly, William J; Satrio, Justinus A; Ruiz-Felix, M Nydia; Fetterman, Marisa; Wynn, Rodd; Hagel, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    This research focuses on investigating the use of common biofuel grasses to assess their potential as agents of long-term remediation of contaminated soils using lead as a model heavy metal ion. We present evidence demonstrating that switch grass and Timothy grass may be potentially useful for long-term phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soils and describe novel techniques to track and remove contaminants from inception to useful product. Enzymatic digestion and thermochemical approaches are being used to convert this lignocellulosic feedstock into useful product (sugars, ethanol, biocrude oil+biochar). Preliminary studies on enzymatic hydrolysis and fast pyrolysis of the Switchgrass materials that were grown in heavy metal contaminated soil and non-contaminated soils show that the presence of lead in the Switchgrass material feedstock does not adversely affect the outcomes of the conversion processes. These results indicate that the modest levels of contaminant uptake allow these grass species to serve as phytoremediation agents as well as feedstocks for biofuel production in areas degraded by industrial pollution.

  16. Metal contamination disturbs biochemical and microbial properties of calcareous agricultural soils of the Mediterranean area.

    PubMed

    de Santiago-Martín, Ana; Cheviron, Natalie; Quintana, Jose R; González, Concepción; Lafuente, Antonio L; Mougin, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Mediterranean climate characteristics and carbonate are key factors governing soil heavy-metal accumulation, and low organic matter (OM) content could limit the ability of microbial populations to cope with resulting stress. We studied the effects of metal contamination on a combination of biological parameters in soils having these characteristics. With this aim, soils were spiked with a mixture of cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc, at the two limit values proposed by current European legislation, and incubated for ≤12 months. Then we measured biochemical (phosphatase, urease, β-galactosidase, arylsulfatase, and dehydrogenase activities) and microbial (fungal and bacterial DNA concentration by quantitative polymerase chain reaction) parameters. All of the enzyme activities were strongly affected by metal contamination and showed the following inhibition sequence: phosphatase (30-64 %) < arylsulfatase (38-97 %) ≤ urease (1-100 %) ≤ β-galactosidase (30-100 %) < dehydrogenase (69-100 %). The high variability among soils was attributed to the different proportion of fine mineral fraction, OM, crystalline iron oxides, and divalent cations in soil solution. The decrease of fungal DNA concentration in metal-spiked soils was negligible, whereas the decrease of bacterial DNA was ~1-54 % at the lowest level and 2-69 % at the highest level of contamination. The lowest bacterial DNA decrease occurred in soils with the highest OM, clay, and carbonate contents. Finally, regarding the strong inhibition of the biological parameters measured and the alteration of the fungal/bacterial DNA ratio, we provide strong evidence that disturbance on the system, even within the limiting values of contamination proposed by the current European Directive, could alter key soil processes. These limiting values should be established according to soil characteristics and/or revised when contamination is produced by a mixture of heavy metals.

  17. Some Case Studies on Metal-Microbe Interactions to Remediate Heavy Metals- Contaminated Soils in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Hyo-Taek

    2015-04-01

    Conventional physicochemical technologies to remediate heavy metals-contaminated soil have many problems such as low efficiency, high cost and occurrence of byproducts. Recently bioremediation technology is getting more and more attention. Bioremediation is defined as the use of biological methods to remediate and/or restore the contaminated land. The objectives of bioremediation are to degrade hazardous organic contaminants and to convert hazardous inorganic contaminants to less toxic compounds of safe levels. The use of bioremediation in the treatment of heavy metals in soils is a relatively new concept. Bioremediation using microbes has been developed to remove toxic heavy metals from contaminated soils in laboratory scale to the contaminated field sites. Recently the application of cost-effective and environment-friendly bioremediation technology to the heavy metals-contaminated sites has been gradually realized in Korea. The merits of bioremediation include low cost, natural process, minimal exposure to the contaminants, and minimum amount of equipment. The limitations of bioremediation are length of remediation, long monitoring time, and, sometimes, toxicity of byproducts for especially organic contaminants. From now on, it is necessary to prove applicability of the technologies to contaminated sites and to establish highly effective, low-cost and easy bioremediation technology. Four categories of metal-microbe interactions are generally biosorption, bioreduction, biomineralization and bioleaching. In this paper, some case studies of the above metal-microbe interactions in author's lab which were published recently in domestic and international journals will be introduced and summarized.

  18. Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project, Resource Recovery Project, and Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Technology Development (EM-50) (OTD) as an element of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November, 1989. OTD has begun to search out, develop, test and demonstrate technologies that can now or in the future be applied to the enormous remediation problem now facing the DOE and the United States public in general. Technology demonstration projects have been designed to attack a separate problem as defined by DOE. The Heavy Metals Contaminated Soil Project was conceived to test and demonstrate off-the-shelf technologies (dominantly from the mining industry) that can be brought to bear on the problem of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination in soils and sediments. The Resource Recovery Project is tasked with identifying, developing, testing, and evaluating new and innovative technologies for the remediation of metal contaminated surface and groundwater. An innovative twist on this project is the stated goal of recovering the metals, formerly disposed of as a waste, for reuse and resale, thereby transforming them into a usable resource. Finally, the Dynamic Underground Stripping Project was developed to demonstrate and remediate underground spills of hydrocarbons from formations that are (1) too deep for excavation, and/or (2) require in-situ remediation efforts of long duration. This project has already been shown effective in reducing the time for remediation by conventional methods from an estimated 200 years at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to less than one year. The savings in time and dollars from this technology alone can be immeasurable.

  19. Ecosystem services and plant physiological status during endophyte-assisted phytoremediation of metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Burges, Aritz; Epelde, Lur; Blanco, Fernando; Becerril, José M; Garbisu, Carlos

    2017-04-15

    Mining sites shelter a characteristic biodiversity with large potential for the phytoremediation of metal contaminated soils. Endophytic plant growth-promoting bacteria were isolated from two metal-(hyper)accumulator plant species growing in a metal contaminated mine soil. After characterizing their plant growth-promoting traits, consortia of putative endophytes were used to carry out an endophyte-assisted phytoextraction experiment using Noccaea caerulescens and Rumex acetosa (singly and in combination) under controlled conditions. We evaluated the influence of endophyte-inoculated plants on soil physicochemical and microbial properties, as well as plant physiological parameters and metal concentrations. Data interpretation through the grouping of soil properties within a set of ecosystem services was also carried out. When grown together, we observed a 41 and 16% increase in the growth of N. caerulescens and R. acetosa plants, respectively, as well as higher values of Zn phytoextraction and soil microbial biomass and functional diversity. Inoculation of the consortia of putative endophytes did not lead to higher values of plant metal uptake, but it improved the plants' physiological status, by increasing the content of chlorophylls and carotenoids by up to 28 and 36%, respectively, indicating a reduction in the stress level of plants. Endophyte-inoculation also stimulated soil microbial communities: higher values of acid phosphatase activity (related to the phosphate solubilising traits of the endophytes), bacterial and fungal abundance, and structural diversity. The positive effects of plant growth and endophyte inoculation on soil properties were reflected in an enhancement of some ecosystem services (biodiversity, nutrient cycling, water flow regulation, water purification and contamination control).

  20. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus populations in heavy-metal-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Del Val, C.; Barea, J.M.; Azcon-Aguilar, C.

    1999-02-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals have been shown to adversely affect the size, diversity, and activity of microbial populations in soil. The aim of this work was to determine how the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is affected by the addition of sewage-amended sludge containing heavy metals in a long-term experiment. Due to the reduced number of indigenous AM fungal (AMF) propagules in the experimental soils, several host plants with different life cycles were used to multiply indigenous fungi. Six AMF ecotypes were found in the experimental soils, showing consistent differences with regard to their tolerance to the presence of heavy metals. AMF ecotypes ranged from very sensitive to the presence of metals to relatively tolerant to high rates of heavy metals in soil. Total AMF spore numbers decreased with increasing amounts of heavy metals in the soil. However, species richness and diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index increased in soils receiving intermediate rates of sludge contamination but decreased in soils receiving the highest rate of heavy-metal-contaminated sludge. Relative densities of most AMF species were also significantly influenced by soil treatments. Host plant species exerted a selective influence on AMF population size and diversity. The authors conclude based on the results of this study that size and diversity of AMF populations were modified in metal-polluted soils, even in those with metal concentrations that were below the upper limits accepted by the European Union for agricultural soils.

  1. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus populations in heavy-metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Del Val, C; Barea, J M; Azcón-Aguilar, C

    1999-02-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals have been shown to adversely affect the size, diversity, and activity of microbial populations in soil. The aim of this work was to determine how the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is affected by the addition of sewage-amended sludge containing heavy metals in a long-term experiment. Due to the reduced number of indigenous AM fungal (AMF) propagules in the experimental soils, several host plants with different life cycles were used to multiply indigenous fungi. Six AMF ecotypes were found in the experimental soils, showing consistent differences with regard to their tolerance to the presence of heavy metals. AMF ecotypes ranged from very sensitive to the presence of metals to relatively tolerant to high rates of heavy metals in soil. Total AMF spore numbers decreased with increasing amounts of heavy metals in the soil. However, species richness and diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index increased in soils receiving intermediate rates of sludge contamination but decreased in soils receiving the highest rate of heavy-metal-contaminated sludge. Relative densities of most AMF species were also significantly influenced by soil treatments. Host plant species exerted a selective influence on AMF population size and diversity. We conclude based on the results of this study that size and diversity of AMF populations were modified in metal-polluted soils, even in those with metal concentrations that were below the upper limits accepted by the European Union for agricultural soils.

  2. Diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Populations in Heavy-Metal-Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Del Val, C.; Barea, J. M.; Azcón-Aguilar, C.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of heavy metals have been shown to adversely affect the size, diversity, and activity of microbial populations in soil. The aim of this work was to determine how the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi is affected by the addition of sewage-amended sludge containing heavy metals in a long-term experiment. Due to the reduced number of indigenous AM fungal (AMF) propagules in the experimental soils, several host plants with different life cycles were used to multiply indigenous fungi. Six AMF ecotypes were found in the experimental soils, showing consistent differences with regard to their tolerance to the presence of heavy metals. AMF ecotypes ranged from very sensitive to the presence of metals to relatively tolerant to high rates of heavy metals in soil. Total AMF spore numbers decreased with increasing amounts of heavy metals in the soil. However, species richness and diversity as measured by the Shannon-Wiener index increased in soils receiving intermediate rates of sludge contamination but decreased in soils receiving the highest rate of heavy-metal-contaminated sludge. Relative densities of most AMF species were also significantly influenced by soil treatments. Host plant species exerted a selective influence on AMF population size and diversity. We conclude based on the results of this study that size and diversity of AMF populations were modified in metal-polluted soils, even in those with metal concentrations that were below the upper limits accepted by the European Union for agricultural soils. PMID:9925606

  3. Challenges and opportunities in the phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils: A review.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Amanullah; Wang, Ping; Ali, Amjad; Awasthi, Mukesh Kumar; Lahori, Altaf Hussain; Wang, Quan; Li, Ronghua; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2016-04-01

    Mining operations, industrial production and domestic and agricultural use of metal and metal containing compound have resulted in the release of toxic metals into the environment. Metal pollution has serious implications for the human health and the environment. Few heavy metals are toxic and lethal in trace concentrations and can be teratogenic, mutagenic, endocrine disruptors while others can cause behavioral and neurological disorders among infants and children. Therefore, remediation of heavy metals contaminated soil could be the only effective option to reduce the negative effects on ecosystem health. Thus, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to review the current status, challenges and opportunities in the phytoremediation for remediating heavy metals from contaminated soils. The prime focus is given to phytoextraction and phytostabilization as the most promising and alternative methods for soil reclamation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Trajectories of Microbial Community Function in Response to Accelerated Remediation of Subsurface Metal Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Mary

    2015-01-14

    Objectives of proposed research were to; Determine if the trajectories of microbial community composition and function following organic carbon amendment can be related to, and predicted by, key environmental determinants; Assess the relative importance of the characteristics of the indigenous microbial community, sediment, groundwater, and concentration of organic carbon amendment as the major determinants of microbial community functional response and bioremediation capacity; and Provide a fundamental understanding of the microbial community ecology underlying subsurface metal remediation requisite to successful application of accelerated remediation and long-term stewardship of DOE-IFC sites.

  5. Immobilizer-assisted management of metal-contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwon-Rae; Kim, Jeong-Gyu; Park, Jeong-Sik; Kim, Min-Suk; Owens, Gary; Youn, Gyu-Hoon; Lee, Jin-Su

    2012-07-15

    Production of food crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils is of concern because consumers are potentially exposed to hazardous metals via dietary intake of such crops or crop derived products. Therefore, the current study was conducted to develop management protocols for crop cultivation to allow safer food production. Metal uptake, as influenced by pH change-induced immobilizing agents (dolomite, steel slag, and agricultural lime) and sorption agents (zeolite and compost), was monitored in three common plants representative of leafy (Chinese cabbage), root (spring onion) and fruit (red pepper) vegetables, in a field experiment. The efficiency of the immobilizing agents was assessed by their ability to decrease the phytoavailability of metals (Cd, Pb, and Zn). The fruit vegetable (red pepper) showed the least accumulation of Cd (0.16-0.29 mgkg(-1) DW) and Pb (0.2-0.9 mgkg(-1) DW) in edible parts regardless of treatment, indicating selection of low metal accumulating crops was a reasonable strategy for safer food production. However, safer food production was more likely to be achievable by combining crop selection with immobilizing agent amendment of soils. Among the immobilizing agents, pH change-induced immobilizers were more effective than sorption agents, showing decreases in Cd and Pb concentrations in each plant well below standard limits. The efficiency of pH change-induced immobilizers was also comparable to reductions obtained by 'clean soil cover' where the total metal concentrations of the plow layer was reduced via capping the surface with uncontaminated soil, implying that pH change-induced immobilizers can be practically applied to metal contaminated agricultural soils for safer food production.

  6. Microbial fuel cell driving electrokinetic remediation of toxic metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Habibul, Nuzahat; Hu, Yi; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-11-15

    An investigation of the feasibility of in-situ electrokinetic remediation for toxic metal contaminated soil driven by microbial fuel cell (MFC) is presented. Results revealed that the weak electricity generated from MFC could power the electrokinetic remediation effectively. The metal removal efficiency and its influence on soil physiological properties were also investigated. With the electricity generated through the oxidation of organics in soils by microorganisms, the metals in the soils would mitigate from the anode to the cathode. The concentrations of Cd and Pb in the soils increased gradually through the anode to the cathode regions after remediation. After about 143days and 108 days' operation, the removal efficiencies of 31.0% and 44.1% for Cd and Pb at the anode region could be achieved, respectively. Soil properties such as pH and soil conductivity were also significantly redistributed from the anode to the cathode regions. The study shows that the MFC driving electrokinetic remediation technology is cost-effective and environmental friendly, with a promising application in soil remediation.

  7. Proximal spectral sensing to monitor phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Rathod, Paresh H; Rossiter, David G; Noomen, Marleen F; van der Meer, Freek D

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of soil contamination and its long-term monitoring are necessary to evaluate the effectiveness of phytoremediation systems. Spectral sensing-based monitoring methods promise obvious benefits compared to field-based methods: lower cost, faster data acquisition and better spatio-temporal monitoring. This paper reviews the theoretical basis whereby proximal spectral sensing of soil and vegetation could be used to monitor phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soils, and the eventual upscaling to imaging sensing. Both laboratory and field spectroscopy have been applied to sense heavy metals in soils indirectly via their intercorrelations with soil constituents, and also through metal-induced vegetation stress. In soil, most predictions are based on intercorrelations of metals with spectrally-active soil constituents viz., Fe-oxides, organic carbon, and clays. Spectral variations in metal-stressed plants is particularly associated with changes in chlorophyll, other pigments, and cell structure, all of which can be investigated by vegetation indices and red edge position shifts. Key shortcomings in obtaining satisfactory calibration for monitoring the metals in soils or metal-related plant stress include: reduced prediction accuracy compared to chemical methods, complexity of spectra, no unique spectral features associated with metal-related plant stresses, and transfer of calibrations from laboratory to field to regional scale. Nonetheless, spectral sensing promises to be a time saving, non-destructive and cost-effective option for long-term monitoring especially over large phytoremediation areas, and it is well-suited to phytoremediation networks where monitoring is an integral part.

  8. Influence of farmyard manure on retention and availability of nickel, zinc and lead in metal-contaminated calcareous loam soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Continuous irrigation of crops with untreated municipal effluent can result in the accumulation of nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), and lead (Pb) in soils and translocation to the plants. Application of farm yard manure (FYM) to metal-contaminated soils may increase or decrease the availability and retention...

  9. Water-soluble organo-building blocks of aminoclay as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Chul; Kim, Eun Jung; Ko, Dong Ah; Yang, Ji-Won

    2011-11-30

    We demonstrated that water-soluble aminopropyl magnesium functionalized phyllosilicate could be used as a soil-flushing agent for heavy metal contaminated soils. Soil flushing has been an attractive means to remediate heavy metal contamination because it is less disruptive to the soil environment after the treatment was performed. However, development of efficient and non-toxic soil-flushing agents is still required. We have synthesized aminoclays with three different central metal ions such as magnesium, aluminum, and ferric ions and investigated applicability of aminoclays as soil flushing agents. Among them, magnesium (Mg)-centered aminoclay showed the smallest size distribution and superior water solubility, up to 100mg/mL. Mg aminoclay exhibited cadmium and lead binding capacity of 26.50 and 91.31 mg/g of Mg clay, respectively, at near neutral pH, but it showed negligible binding affinity to metals in acidic conditions. For soil flushing with Mg clay at neutral pH showed cadmium and lead were efficiently extracted from soils by Mg clay, suggesting strong binding ability of Mg clay with cadmium and lead. As the organic matter and clay compositions increased in the soil, the removal efficiency by Mg clay decreased and the operation time increased.

  10. Soil heavy metal contamination and risk assessment around the Fenhe Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Liu, Guanglei; Shi, Wei; Li, Jinchang

    2014-08-01

    Heavy metal contamination in the soil around a water source is a particularly serious issue, because these heavy metals can be transferred into the water source and can pose significant human health risks through the contamination of drinking water or farmland irrigation water. In this paper, we collected surface soil samples from the area surrounding the Fenhe Reservoir. The concentrations of As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn were determined and the potential ecological risks posed by the heavy metals were quantitatively evaluated. The primary inputs for As, Ni, and Zn were natural sources, whereas the other elements were derived from mainly anthropogenic sources. Hg displays more serious environmental impacts than the other heavy metals. The upper reaches of the reservoir, located in the northwest, display a higher potential ecological risk.

  11. Effects of mycorrhizae and other soil microbes on revegetation of heavy metal contaminated mine spoil.

    PubMed

    Shetty, K G; Hetrick, B A; Figge, D A; Schwab, A P

    1994-01-01

    The effects of mycorrhizal fungi and other soil microorganisms on growth of two grasses, Andropogon gerardii Vitm. and Festuca arundinacea Schreb., in heavy metal-contaminated soil and mine tailings were investigated. A. gerardii is highly dependent on mycorrhizal fungi in native prairie, while F. arundinacea is a facultative mycotroph and relies on mycorrhizal symbiosis only in extremely infertile soils. Regardless of microbial amendments, neither plant species was able to establish and grow in the mine tailings. Both plant species grew in the moderately contaminated or non-contaminated soils, although A. gerardii grew in these soils only when mycorrhizal. Other soil microbes significantly improved growth of A. gerardii only in uncontaminated soil, but to a lesser extent than mycorrhizae. Although F. arundinacea was more highly colonized by mycorrhizal fungi than A. gerardii, neither microbial amendment affected growth of fescue in any soil. In several treatments mycorrhizal fungi adapted to uncontaminated soil stimulated plant growth more than mycorrhizae adapted to the moderately contaminated soil. However, mycorrhizal fungi adapted to contaminated soil did not increase the productivity of plant growth in contaminated soil more than fungi adapted to uncontaminated soil. A. gerardii plants inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi retained more Zn in roots than in shoots, confirming earlier reports that mycorrhizal fungi alter the translocation pattern of heavy metals in host plants. In contrast, mycorrhizae did not affect translocation patterns in F. arundinaceae, suggesting that the mycorrhizal dependence of a plant species is correlated with the retention of metals in roots. The correlation between mycorrhizal dependence of a plant species and mycorrhizal alteration of translocation pattern may also explain the inconsistent reports of mycorrhizal effects on translocation of heavy metals in plants. Plant response to mycorrhizal symbiosis may therefore provide a useful

  12. Long-term effects of aided phytostabilisation on microbial communities of metal-contaminated mine soil.

    PubMed

    Garaiyurrebaso, Olatz; Garbisu, Carlos; Blanco, Fernando; Lanzén, Anders; Martín, Iker; Epelde, Lur; Becerril, José M; Jechalke, Sven; Smalla, Kornelia; Grohmann, Elisabeth; Alkorta, Itziar

    2017-03-01

    Aided phytostabilisation uses metal-tolerant plants, together with organic or inorganic amendments, to reduce metal bioavailability in soil while improving soil quality. The long-term effects of the following organic amendments were examined as part of an aided phytostabilisation field study in an abandoned Pb/Zn mining area: cow slurry, sheep manure and paper mill sludge mixed with poultry manure. In the mining area, two heavily contaminated vegetated sites, showing different levels of soil metal contamination (LESS and MORE contaminated site), were selected for this study. Five years after amendment application, metal bioavailability (CaCl2 extractability) along with a variety of indicators of soil microbial activity, biomass and diversity were analysed. Paper mill sludge mixed with poultry manure treatment resulted in the highest reduction of Cd, Pb and Zn bioavailability, as well as in stimulation of soil microbial activity and diversity, especially at the LESS contaminated site. In contrast, cow slurry was the least successful treatment. Our results emphasise the importance of the (i) long-term monitoring of soil quality at sites subjected to aided phytostabilisation and (ii) selection of the most efficient amendments and plants in terms of both reduction of metal bioavailability and improvement of soil quality.

  13. Evaluation of small arms range soils for metal contamination and lead bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Bannon, Desmond I; Drexler, John W; Fent, Genevieve M; Casteel, Stan W; Hunter, Penelope J; Brattin, William J; Major, Michael A

    2009-12-15

    Although small arms ranges are known to be contaminated with lead, the full extent of metal contamination has not been described, nor has the oral bioavailability of lead in these soils. In this work, soil samples from ranges with diverse geochemical backgrounds were sieved to <250 microm and analyzed for total metal content. Soils had consistently high levels of lead and copper, ranging from 4549 to 24 484 microg/g and 223 to 2936 microg/g, respectively, while arsenic, antimony, nickel, and zinc concentrations were 100-fold lower. For lead bioavailability measurements, two widely accepted methods were used: an in vivo juvenile swine relative bioavailability method measuring lead absorption from ingested soils relative to equivalent lead acetate concentrations and an in vitro bioaccessibility procedure which measured acid-extractable lead as a percent of total lead in the soil. For eight samples, the mean relative bioavailability and bioaccessibility of lead for the eight soils was about 100% (108 +/- 18% and 95 +/- 6%, respectively) showing good agreement between both methods. Risk assessment and/or remediation of small arms ranges should therefore assume high bioavailability of lead.

  14. Detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils with plant bioassays.

    PubMed

    Knasmüller, S; Gottmann, E; Steinkellner, H; Fomin, A; Pickl, C; Paschke, A; Göd, R; Kundi, M

    1998-12-03

    Aim of the present study was the development of a bioassay which enables the detection of genotoxic effects of heavy metal contaminated soils. In the first part of the present study, the data base on metal effects in plant bioassays was extended. Four metal salts, namely Cr(VI)O3, Cr(III)Cl3, Ni(II)Cl2 and Sb(III)Cl3 were tested comparatively in MN tests with pollen tetrad cells of Tradescantia clone #4430 and in meristematic root tip cells of Vicia faba. With Cr6+ and Ni2+, clear-cut dose-effects were observed in a range between 0.75 and 10.0 mM, whereas this was not the case with Cr3+ (range tested 1.25-10 mM) and Sb3+ (range 0.30-5.25 mM). In Vicia, negative results were obtained with the four metal salts under all conditions of test. To compare the mutagenic potencies of the metals, the increases of the regression curves (k-values) were calculated, they indicate the number of MN induced per mM in 100 tetrad cells. The corresponding values for Cr6+ and Ni2+ are 0.87 and 1.05, respectively. It appears that the Tradescantia system is in particular sensitive towards those metal species which cause DNA damage in animals and man such as Cr6+, Cd2+, Ni2+, and Zn2+, whereas no clear positive results were obtained with less harmful metal ions such as Cu2+, Cr3+ or Sb3+. In the second part of the study, the mutagenic effects of four metal contaminated soils and two types of standardized leachates (pH 4.0 and pH 7.0) of these soils were tested in Tradescantia and in Vicia. In addition, chemical analyses were carried out to determine the metal concentrations in the soils and in the extracts. Two of the samples contained highly elevated levels of a number of metals (Zn, Pb, Cu, Cd, Sb, As), one soil came from the Central Austrian Alps and contained high As levels only. Direct exposure of the Tradescantia plants in the soils resulted in a drastic increase of the MN frequencies over the background. The lowest effect was seen with the Slovakian soil which contained in

  15. Remediation of toxic metal contaminated soil by washing with biodegradable aminopolycarboxylate chelants.

    PubMed

    Begum, Zinnat A; Rahman, Ismail M M; Tate, Yousuke; Sawai, Hikaru; Maki, Teruya; Hasegawa, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    Ex situ soil washing with synthetic extractants such as, aminopolycarboxylate chelants (APCs) is a viable treatment alternative for metal-contaminated site remediation. EDTA and its homologs are widely used among the APCs in the ex situ soil washing processes. These APCs are merely biodegradable and highly persistent in the aquatic environments leading to the post-use toxic effects. Therefore, an increasing interest is focused on the development and use of the eco-friendly APCs having better biodegradability and less environmental toxicity. The paper deals with the results from the lab-scale washing treatments of a real sample of metal-contaminated soil for the removal of the ecotoxic metal ions (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) using five biodegradable APCs, namely [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, imminodisuccinic acid, methylglycinediacetic acid, DL-2-(2-carboxymethyl) nitrilotriacetic acid (GLDA), and 3-hydroxy-2,2'-iminodisuccinic acid. The performance of those biodegradable APCs was evaluated for their interaction with the soil mineral constituents in terms of the solution pH and metal-chelant stability constants, and compared with that of EDTA. Speciation calculations were performed to identify the optimal conditions for the washing process in terms of the metal-chelant interactions as well as to understand the selectivity in the separation ability of the biodegradable chelants towards the metal ions. A linear relationship between the metal extraction capacity of the individual chelants towards each of the metal ions from the soil matrix and metal-chelant conditional stability constants for a solution pH greater than 6 was observed. Additional considerations were derived from the behavior of the major potentially interfering cations (Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, and Mn), and it was hypothesized that use of an excess of chelant may minimize the possible competition effects during the single-step washing treatments. Sequential extraction procedure was used to determine the

  16. Metal contamination of agricultural soils in the copper mining areas of Singhbhum shear zone in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Soma; Singh, Abhay Kumar; Mahato, Mukesh Kumar

    2017-06-01

    The study was intended to investigate the heavy metal contamination in the agricultural soils of the copper mining areas in Singhbhum shear zone, India. The total concentrations of the metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICPMS). Pollution levels were assessed by calculating enrichment factor (EF), geo-accumulation index (I_geo), contamination factors (CF), pollution load index ( PLI), Nemerow index and ecological risk index (RI). The metal concentrations in the soil samples exceeded the average shale values for almost all the metals. Principal component analysis resulted in extraction of three factors explaining 82.6% of the data variability and indicated anthropogenic contribution of Cu, Ni, Co, Cr, Mn and Pb. The EF and I_geo values indicated very high contamination with respect to Cu followed by As and Zn in the agricultural soils. The values of PLI, RI and Nemerow index, which considered the overall effect of all the studied metals on the soils, revealed that 50% of the locations were highly polluted with respect to metals. The pollution levels varied with the proximity to the copper mining and processing units. Consequently, the results advocate the necessity of periodic monitoring of the agricultural soils of the area and development of proper management strategies to reduce the metal pollution.

  17. Phytoremediation potential of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) intercropped with Sedum plumbizincicola in metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Bian, Fangyuan; Zhong, Zheke; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yang, Chuanbao

    2017-09-30

    This study was conducted to investigate the capability of moso bamboo grown alone and in combination with Sedum plumbizincicola to remediate heavy metals. Monoculture of moso bamboo (MM), intercropping of moso bamboo × S. plumbizincicola (IMS), and control (uncultivated, CK) were established in Cu-, Zn-, and Cd-contaminated soil. Soil properties and heavy metal removal capacity were assessed. Results showed that the available and total heavy metal contents in soil (0-20 and 20-40 cm soil layers) were ranked IMS < MM < CK. Available Cu, Zn, and Cd contents were 65.0, 28.7, and 48.4% lower in the IMS and 52.8, 24.8, and 45.5% lower in the MM than those in the CK, respectively. In plants, Cu contents in bamboo rhizomes, branches, and leaves and those of Zn and Cd in all bamboo tissues were significantly higher in the IMS than in the MM. The bioconcentration and translocation factors of bamboo tissues showed an obviously increasing tendency from MM to IMS. Moso bamboo possessed the properties of endurance to heavy metals and high biomass production. Phytoremediation by moso bamboo in association with S. plumbizincicola is an economical strategy to promote heavy metal removal from metal-contaminated soil.

  18. F-RISA fungal clones as potential bioindicators of organic and metal contamination in soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, J W; Fomina, M; Gadd, G M

    2010-08-01

    This work has examined the effects of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and selected toxic metals on fungal populations in a soil microcosm. By using fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (F-RISA) in combination with real-time PCR quantification, four fungi (D63P2-1, D63C2-1, D21Cu1-1 and D63Pb2-2) with specific primer pairs to each were successfully evaluated for their potential as bioindicators in response to pyrene, copper (Cu) and lead (Pb), supplied singly and in combination. F-RISA coupled with real-time PCR is a useful approach for the identification of microorganisms with potential as bioindicators of organic and toxic metal contamination. These bioindicators could be monitored for their population changes that may indicate pollutant-induced perturbations in a given system.

  19. Quantitative assessment on soil enzyme activities of heavy metal contaminated soils with various soil properties.

    PubMed

    Xian, Yu; Wang, Meie; Chen, Weiping

    2015-11-01

    Soil enzyme activities are greatly influenced by soil properties and could be significant indicators of heavy metal toxicity in soil for bioavailability assessment. Two groups of experiments were conducted to determine the joint effects of heavy metals and soil properties on soil enzyme activities. Results showed that arylsulfatase was the most sensitive soil enzyme and could be used as an indicator to study the enzymatic toxicity of heavy metals under various soil properties. Soil organic matter (SOM) was the dominant factor affecting the activity of arylsulfatase in soil. A quantitative model was derived to predict the changes of arylsulfatase activity with SOM content. When the soil organic matter content was less than the critical point A (1.05% in our study), the arylsulfatase activity dropped rapidly. When the soil organic matter content was greater than the critical point A, the arylsulfatase activity gradually rose to higher levels showing that instead of harm the soil microbial activities were enhanced. The SOM content needs to be over the critical point B (2.42% in our study) to protect its microbial community from harm due to the severe Pb pollution (500mgkg(-1) in our study). The quantitative model revealed the pattern of variation of enzymatic toxicity due to heavy metals under various SOM contents. The applicability of the model under wider soil properties need to be tested. The model however may provide a methodological basis for ecological risk assessment of heavy metals in soil.

  20. Characterization of heavy metal contamination in the soil and sediment of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tujin; Pan, Jin; Liu, Xuelian

    2017-02-23

    This paper analyzes the concentration, distribution, bioavailability, and potential heavy metal contamination risk of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cr in the soil and sediment of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR). In this paper, 14 stations that cover the upper reaches to the lower reaches of the TGR were selected. The spatial distribution of heavy metals in the TGR showed that the average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cr were higher in the upper and lower reaches than those in the middle reaches because of industrial and agricultural activities as well as natural processes (e.g., soil erosion, rock weathering). The results also indicated that multiple pollution sources and complex geomorphological, geochemical and biological processes resulted in remarkably higher heavy metal concentrations in the soils of the water-level-fluctuation zone (WLFZ) than in the soils of the banks. The Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, and Cr concentrations in the soils of the TGR did not exceed their respective maximum allowable concentration (MAC) values for agricultural soils in China, indicating that the soil in the TGR was not seriously contaminated with Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, or Cr. However, the mean concentrations of all the studied metals in the sediments were higher than the geochemical background values and much higher than those in the soils, thus indicating the effect of the pollution sources and the altered hydrologic conditions that occurred after the impoundment of the TGR. A geoaccumulation index analysis indicated that the TGR sediments were moderately polluted with Cu and Cd, unpolluted to moderately polluted with Pb and Cr, and unpolluted with Zn. Fractionation studies indicated that Cd was mainly present in the non-residual fractions and exhibited great instability and bioavailability; furthermore, the alternating wetting and drying of the WFLZ soils enhance the mobility and bioavailability of Cd. Thus, greater attention should be paid to Cd pollution in the TGR because of its higher risk

  1. Understanding molecular mechanisms for improving phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Hong-Bo, Shao; Li-Ye, Chu; Cheng-Jiang, Ruan; Hua, Li; Dong-Gang, Guo; Wei-Xiang, Li

    2010-03-01

    Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem with a negative potential impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plants, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes, and therefore, have potential to enhance phytoremediation processes. Phytoremediation strategies with appropriate heavy metal-adapted rhizobacteria or mycorrhizas have received more and more attention. In addition, some plants possess a range of potential mechanisms that may be involved in the detoxification of heavy metals, and they manage to survive under metal stresses. High tolerance to heavy metal toxicity could rely either on reduced uptake or increased plant internal sequestration, which is manifested by an interaction between a genotype and its environment.A coordinated network of molecular processes provides plants with multiple metal-detoxifying mechanisms and repair capabilities. The growing application of molecular genetic technologies has led to an increased understanding of mechanisms of heavy metal tolerance/accumulation in plants and, subsequently, many transgenic plants with increased heavy metal resistance, as well as increased uptake of heavy metals, have been developed for the purpose of phytoremediation. This article reviews advantages, possible mechanisms, current status and future direction of phytoremediation for heavy-metal-contaminated soils.

  2. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site.

    PubMed

    Adama, M; Esena, R; Fosu-Mensah, B; Yirenya-Tawiah, D

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (I geo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites.

  3. Short rotation coppice culture of willows and poplars as energy crops on metal contaminated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Ruttens, Ann; Boulet, Jana; Weyens, Nele; Smeets, Karen; Adriaensen, Kristin; Meers, Erik; Van Slycken, Stijn; Tack, Filip; Meiresonne, Linda; Thewys, Theo; Witters, Nele; Carleer, Robert; Dupae, Joke; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2011-01-01

    Phytoremediation, more precisely phytoextraction, has been placed forward as an environmental friendly remediation technique, that can gradually reduce increased soil metal concentrations, in particular the bioavailable fractions. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibilities of growing willows and poplars under short rotation coppice (SRC) on an acid, poor, sandy metal contaminated soil, to combine in this way soil remediation by phytoextraction on one hand, and production of biomass for energy purposes on the other. Above ground biomass productivities were low for poplars to moderate for willows, which was not surprising, taking into account the soil conditions that are not very favorable for growth of these trees. Calculated phytoextraction efficiency was much longer for poplars than these for willows. We calculated that for phytoextraction in this particular case it would take at least 36 years to reach the legal threshold values for cadmium, but in combination with production of feedstock for bioenergy processes, this type of land use can offer an alternative income for local farmers. Based on the data of the first growing cycle, for this particular case, SRC of willows should be recommended.

  4. Associative diazotrophic bacteria in grass roots and soils from heavy metal contaminated sites.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fátima M S; Lange, Anderson; Klauberg-Filho, Osmar; Siqueira, José O; Nóbrega, Rafaela S A; Lima, Adriana S

    2008-12-01

    This work aimed to evaluate density of associative diazotrophic bacteria populations in soil and grass root samples from heavy metal contaminated sites, and to characterize isolates from these populations, both, phenotypically (Zinc, Cadmium and NaCl tolerance in vitro, and protein profiles) and genotypically (16S rDNA sequencing), as compared to type strains of known diazotrophic species. Densities were evaluated by using NFb, Fam and JNFb media, commonly used for enrichment cultures of diazotrophic bacteria. Bacterial densities found in soil and grass root samples from contaminated sites were similar to those reported for agricultural soils. Azospirillum spp. isolates from contaminated sites and type strains from non-contaminated sites varied substantially in their in vitro tolerance to Zn+2 and Cd+2, being Cd+2 more toxic than Zn+2. Among the most tolerant isolates (UFLA 1S, 1R, S181, S34 and S22), some (1R, S34 and S22) were more tolerant to heavy metals than rhizobia from tropical and temperate soils. The majority of the isolates tolerant to heavy metals were also tolerant to salt stress as indicated by their ability to grow in solid medium supplemented with 30 g L(-1) NaCl. Five isolates exhibited high dissimilarity in protein profiles, and the 16S rDNA sequence analysis of two of them revealed new sequences for Azospirillum.

  5. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soils around a Hospital Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash Dumps Site

    PubMed Central

    Adama, M.; Esena, R.; Fosu-Mensah, B.; Yirenya-Tawiah, D.

    2016-01-01

    Waste incineration is the main waste management strategy used in treating hospital waste in many developing countries. However, the release of dioxins, POPs, and heavy metals in fly and bottom ash poses environmental and public health concerns. To determine heavy metal (Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, and Ag) in levels in incinerator bottom ash and soils 100 m around the incinerator bottom ash dump site, ash samples and surrounding soil samples were collected at 20 m, 40 m, 60 m, 80 m, 100 m, and 1,200 m from incinerator. These were analyzed using the absorption spectrophotometer method. The geoaccumulation (I geo) and pollution load indices (PLI) were used to assess the level of heavy metal contamination of surrounding soils. The study revealed high concentrations in mg/kg for, Zn (16417.69), Pb (143.80), Cr (99.30), and Cd (7.54) in bottom ash and these were above allowable limits for disposal in landfill. The study also found soils within 60 m radius of the incinerator to be polluted with the metals. It is recommended that health care waste managers be educated on the implication of improper management of incinerator bottom ash and regulators monitor hospital waste incinerator sites. PMID:27034685

  6. [Continuous remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil by co-cropping system enhanced with chelator].

    PubMed

    Wei, Ze-Bin; Guo, Xiao-Fang; Wu, Qi-Tang; Long, Xin-Xian

    2014-11-01

    In order to elucidate the continuous effectiveness of co-cropping system coupling with chelator enhancement in remediating heavy metal contaminated soils and its environmental risk towards underground water, soil lysimeter (0.9 m x 0.9 m x 0.9 m) experiments were conducted using a paddy soil affected by Pb and Zn mining in Lechang district of Guangdong Province, 7 successive crops were conducted for about 2.5 years. The treatments included mono-crop of Sedum alfredii Hance (Zn and Cd hyperaccumulator), mono-crop of corn (Zea mays, cv. Yunshi-5, a low-accumulating cultivar), co-crop of S. alfredii and corn, and co-crop + MC (Mixture of Chelators, comprised of citric acid, monosodium glutamate waste liquid, EDTA and KCI with molar ratio of 10: 1:2:3 at the concentration of 5 mmol x kg(-1) soil). The changes of heavy metal concentrations in plants, soil and underground water were monitored. Results showed that the co-cropping system was suitable only in spring-summer seasons and significantly increased Zn and Cd phytoextraction. In autumn-winter seasons, the growth of S. alfredii and its phytoextraction of Zn and Cd were reduced by co-cropping and MC application. In total, the mono-crops of S. alfredii recorded a highest phytoextraction of Zn and Cd. However, the greatest reduction of soil Zn, Cd and Pb was observed with the co-crop + MC treatment, the reduction rates were 28%, 50%, and 22%, respectively, relative to the initial soil metal content. The reduction of this treatment was mainly attributed to the downwards leaching of metals to the subsoil caused by MC application. The continuous monitoring of leachates during 2. 5 year's experiment also revealed that the addition of MC increased heavy metal concentrations in the leaching water, but they did not significantly exceed the III grade limits of the underground water standard of China.

  7. Assessing toxicity of metal contaminated soil from glassworks sites with a battery of biotests.

    PubMed

    Hagner, M; Romantschuk, M; Penttinen, O-P; Egfors, A; Marchand, C; Augustsson, A

    2017-09-10

    The present study addresses toxicological properties of metal contaminated soils, using glassworks sites in south-eastern Sweden as study objects. Soil from five selected glassworks sites as well as from nearby reference areas were analysed for total and water-soluble metal concentrations and general geochemical parameters. A battery of biotests was then applied to assess the toxicity of the glassworks soil environments: a test of phytotoxicity with garden cress (Lepidium sativum); the BioTox™ test for toxicity to bacteria using Vibrio fischeri; and analyses of abundancies and biomass of nematodes and enchytraeids. The glassworks- and reference areas were comparable with respect to pH and the content of organic matter and nutrients (C, N, P), but total metal concentrations (Pb, As, Ba, Cd and Zn) were significantly higher at the former sites. Higher metal concentrations in the water-soluble fraction were also observed, even though these concentrations were low compared to the total ones. Nevertheless, toxicity of the glassworks soils was not detected by the two ex situ tests; inhibition of light emission by V. fischeri could not be seen, nor was an effect seen on the growth of L. sativum. A decrease in enchytraeid and nematode abundance and biomass was, however, observed for the landfill soils as compared to reference soils, implying in situ toxicity to soil-inhabiting organisms. The confirmation of in situ bioavailability and negative effects motivates additional studies of the risk posed to humans of the glassworks villages. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Contrasting Effects of Farmyard Manure (FYM) and Compost for Remediation of Metal Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Sabir, Muhammad; Ali, Amanat; Zia-Ur-rehman, Muhammad; Hakeem, Khalid Rehman

    2015-01-01

    We investigated effect of farm yard manure (FYM) and compost applied to metal contaminated soil at rate of 1% (FYM-1, compost-1), 2% (FYM-2, compost-2), and 3% (FYM-3, compost-3). FYM significantly (P < 0.001) increased dry weights of shoots and roots while compost increased root dry weight compared to control. Amendments significantly increased nickel (Ni) in shoots and roots of maize except compost applied at 1%. FYM-3 and -1 caused maximum Ni in shoots (11.42 mg kg(-1)) and roots (80.92 mg kg(-1)), respectively while compost-2 caused maximum Ni (14.08 mg kg(-1)) and (163.87 mg kg(-1)) in shoots and roots, respectively. Plants grown in pots amended with FYM-2 and compost-1 contained minimum Cu (30.12 and 30.11 mg kg(-1)) in shoots, respectively. FYM-2 and compost-2 caused minimum zinc (Zn) (59.08 and 66.0 mg kg(-1)) in maize shoots, respectively. FYM-2 caused minimum Mn in maize shoots while compost increased Mn in shoots and roots compared to control. FYM and compost increased the ammonium bicarbonate diethylene triamine penta acetic acid (AB-DTPA) extractable Ni and Mn in the soil and decreased Cu and Zn. Lower remediation factors for all metals with compost indicated that compost was effective to stabilize the metals in soil compared to FYM.

  9. The use of plants for remediation of metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Vassilev, Andon; Schwitzguebel, Jean-Paul; Thewys, Theo; Van Der Lelie, Daniel; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2004-01-16

    The use of green plants to remove, contain, inactivate, or degrade harmful environmental contaminants (generally termed phytoremediation) is an emerging technology. In this paper, an overview is given of existing information concerning the use of plants for the remediation of metal-contaminated soils. Both site decontamination (phytoextraction) and stabilization techniques (phytostabilization) are described. In addition to the plant itself, the use of soil amendments for mobilization (in case of phytoextraction) and immobilization (in case of phytostabilization) is discussed. Also, the economical impacts of changed land-use, eventual valorization of biomass, and cost-benefit aspects of phytoremediation are treated. In spite of the growing public and commercial interest and success, more fundamental research is needed still to better exploit the metabolic diversity of the plants themselves, but also to better understand the complex interactions between metals, soil, plant roots, and micro-organisms (bacteria and mycorrhiza) in the rhizosphere. Further, more demonstration experiments are needed to measure the underlying economics, for public acceptance and last but not least, to convince policy makers.

  10. A comparative study of metal contamination in soil using the borehole method.

    PubMed

    Teh, T L; Rahman, Nik Norulaini Nik Ab; Shahadat, Mohammad; Wong, Y S; Syakir, Muhammad I; Omar, A K Mohd

    2016-07-01

    The present study deals with possible contamination of the soil by metal ions which have been affecting the environment. The concentrations of metal ions in 14 borehole samples were studied using the ICP-OES standard method. The degree of contamination was determined on the basis of single element pollution index (SEPI), combined pollution index (CPI), soil enrichment factor (SEF), and geo-accumulation index (Igeo). Geo-accumulation indices and contamination factors indicated moderate to strong contaminations for eight boreholes (BL-1, BL-2, BL-6, BL-8, BL-9, BL-10, BL-12, and BL-13) while the rest were extremely contaminated. Among all the boreholes, BL-3 and BL-11 demonstrated the highest level of Cd(II) and Pb(II) which were found the most polluted sites. The level of metal contamination was also compared with other countries. The development, variation, and limitations regarding the regulations of soil and groundwater contamination can be provided as a helpful guidance for the risk assessment of metal ions in developing countries.

  11. Washing of metal contaminated soil with EDTA and process water recycling.

    PubMed

    Pociecha, Maja; Lestan, Domen

    2012-10-15

    We demonstrate here, in a laboratory scale experiment, the feasibility of using the base/acid pair Ca(OH)(2)/H(2)SO(4) to impose a pH gradient for EDTA recycling and, coupled with an electrochemical advanced oxidation process using a graphite anode, of recycling process water as part of a novel remediation technology for multi-metal contaminated soils. In the first batch, 60 mmol EDTA kg(-1) of soil removed 72, 27, and 71% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, from soil contaminated with 5329±685, 3401±193, and 35±6 mg kg(-1) of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively. In the subsequent four batches, we demonstrated that up to 88% of EDTA was recycled from each batch, with the potential to extract up to 98, 94, and 109% of Pb, Zn, and Cd, respectively, that the fresh EDTA extracted. Accumulation of salts in the process water through multiple remediation batches/recycles was prevented by CaSO(4) precipitation. Recycled process water toxicity testing indicated no significant effect on plant seed germination but some inhibition of root elongation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. [Recent advance in solidification/stabilization technology for the remediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Hao, Han-zhou; Chen, Tong-bin; Jin, Meng-gui; Lei, Mei; Liu, Cheng-wu; Zu, Wen-pu; Huang, Li-mi

    2011-03-01

    Remediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil is still a difficulty and a hotspot of international research projects. At present, the technologies commonly adopted for the remediation of contaminated sites mainly include excavation, solidification/stabilization (S/S), soil washing, soil vapor extraction (SVE), thermal treatment, and bioremediation. Based on the S/S technical guidelines of Unite State Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and United Kingdom Environment Agency (EA) and the domestic and foreign patents, this paper introduced the concepts of S/S and its development status at home and abroad, and discussed its future development directions. Solidification refers to a process that binds contaminated media with a reagent, changing the media's physical properties via increasing its compressive strength, decreasing its permeability, and encapsulating the contaminants to form a solid material. Stabilization refers to the process that involves a chemical reaction which reduces the leachability of a waste, chemically immobilizes the waste and reduces its solubility, making the waste become less harmful or less mobile. S/S technology includes cement solidification, lime pozzolanic solidification, plastic materials stabilization, vitrification, and regent-based stabilization. Stabilization (or immobilization) treatment processes convert contaminants to less mobile forms through chemical or thermal interactions. In stabilization technology, the aim of adding agents is to change the soil physical and chemical properties through pH control technology, redox potential technology, precipitation techniques, adsorption technology, and ion-exchange technology that change the existing forms of heavy metals in soil, and thus, reduce the heavy metals bioavailability and mobility. This review also discussed the S/S evaluation methods, highlighted the need to enhance S/S technology in the molecular bonding, soil polymers, and formulation of China's S/S technical guidelines.

  13. Nature and extent of metal-contaminated soils in urban environments (keynote talk).

    PubMed

    Mielke, Howard W

    2016-08-01

    Research on the nature and extent of metal-contaminated soil began with an urban garden study in Baltimore, MD (USA). Largest quantities of soil metals were clustered in the inner city with lesser amounts scattered throughout metropolitan Baltimore. The probability values of metal clustering varied from P value 10(-15)-10(-23) depending on element. The inner-city clustering of lead (Pb) could not be explained by Pb-based paint alone. A major Pb source was tetraethyl lead (TEL), developed as an anti-knock agent for use in vehicle fuel, thereby making highway traffic flow a toxic substance delivery system in cities. Further study in Minneapolis and St. Paul confirmed the clustering of inner-city soil metals, especially Pb. Based on the evidence, the Minnesota State Legislature petitioned Congress to curtail Pb additives resulting in the rapid phasedown of TEL on January 1, 1986, 10 years ahead of the EPA scheduled ban. Further research in New Orleans, Louisiana (NOLA), verified the link between soil Pb, blood Pb, morbidity, and societal health. Although Pb is a known cause of clinical impairment, there is no known effective medical intervention for reducing children's blood Pb exposure. Ingestion and inhalation are routes of exposure requiring prevention, and soil is a reservoir of Pb. Children's blood Pb exposure observed in pre-Hurricane Katrina (August 29, 2005) NOLA underwent substantial decreases 10 years post-Katrina due to many factors including input of low Pb sediment residues by the storm surge and the introduction of low Pb landscaping materials from outside of the city. Investigation on the topic is ongoing.

  14. Phytoremediation of metal-contaminated soil in temperate humid regions of British Columbia, Canada.

    PubMed

    Padmavathiamma, Prabha K; Li, Loretta Y

    2009-08-01

    The suitability of five plant species was studied for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation in a region with temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada. Pot experiments were conducted using Lolium perenne L (perennial rye grass), Festuca rubra L (creeping red fescue), Helianthus annuus L (sunflower), Poa pratensis L (Kentucky bluegrass) and Brassica napus L (rape) in soils treated with three different metal (Cu, Pb, Mn, and Zn) concentrations. The bio-metric characters of plants in soils with multiple-metal contaminations, their metal accumulation characteristics, translocation properties and metal removal were assessed at different stages of plant growth, 90 and 120 DAS (days after sowing). Lolium was found to be suitable for the phytostabilisation of Cu and Pb, Festuca for Mn and Poa for Zn. Metal removal was higher at 120 than at 90 days after sowing, and metals concentrated more in the underground tissues with less translocation to the aboveground parts. Bioconcentration factors indicate that Festuca had the highest accumulation for Cu, Helianthus for Pb and Zn and Poa for Mn.

  15. Preliminary Evaluation of Animal Bone Char as Potential Metal Stabilization Agent in Metal Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Gruden, Evelin; Bukovec, Peter; Zupančič, Marija

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effect of animal bone char (ABC) addition on metal mobility in mine tailings. The mobility of metals after addition of ABC to tailings at four different application rates (0.6 g, 1.2 g, 1.8 g and 3.6 g ABC per 100 g of tailings) was evaluated by Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) one step extraction. The obtained results indicated that the mobility of Pb, Cr and Cd gradually decreased with increasing quantity of added ABC. According to the TCLP, mobile concentrations of Pb in tailings exceeded threshold values for almost eight times. After ABC addition, Pb TCLP-extractable concentrations decreased from 39 mg L-1 in tailings to lower than the TCLP limit values of 5 mg L-1 at all ABC application rates, except in mixtures with the lowest addition of ABC. We concluded that ABC could be a successful metal stabilization agent for multi-metal contaminated soil, although attention should be paid at highly As contaminated soil.

  16. Risk assessment of heavy metal contaminated soil in the vicinity of a lead/zinc mine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Xie, Zheng-miao; Zhu, Yong-guan; Naidu, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soils through anthropogenic activities is a widespread and serious problem confronting scientists and regulators throughout the world. In this study we investigated the distribution, chemical species and availability of lead, zinc, cadmium and copper in nine surface (0 to 20 cm) soils from near an abandoned lead/zinc mine tailings located in Shaoxing, Zhejiang, China. Total heavy metal contents ranged from 5271 to 16369 mg/kg for Pb, 387 to 1221 mg/kg for Zn, 3.0 to 9.3 mg/kg for Cd and 65 to 206 mg/kg for Cu. In general, all heavy metals exceeded China National Standards for Soil Environmental Quality of Heavy Metals by a factor of 3-65 times. Comparison of the heavy metal concentrations (Pb, Zn, Cd and Cu) with clay content revealed a strongly significant relationship while significant relationship (P < 0.001) was also obtained between Cd + Zn and Pb + Cu. Solid phase speciation of the soils using Tessier procedure showed that the heavy metals were distributed in the order: residual > organically complexed-Fe-Mn oxides occluded > carbonate bound > exchangeable > water soluble. In the organic matter fraction, the ratio of Pb (29.1%) to its total concentration in the soils was higher than those of Zn (4.70%), Cd (3.16%) and Cu (9.50%). The percentages of the water soluble and the exchangeable fractions of Pb (1.80%) and Cd (2.74%) were markedly greater than those of Zn (0.10%) and Cu (0.15%), suggesting that Pb and Cd are relatively more mobile and hence more toxic in the contaminated soils. Strongly significant relationships between H2O-Pb, H2O-Zn and H2O-Cu, strong positive correlations between H2O-Pb, H2O-Zn, H2O-Cu and organic matter in soil were found. The content of H2O-Pb, H2O-Zn, H2O-Cu was negatively correlated with pH values. The similar negative relationships between pH values and exchangeable heavy metals were also recorded. It is suggested that increasing soil pH or liming the soil could decrease bioavailability of heavy

  17. Ancient Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils as a Driver of Tolerant Anthyllis vulneraria Rhizobial Communities.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Roba; Maynaud, Geraldine; Le Quéré, Antoine; Vidal, Céline; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Yashiro, Erika; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude; Brunel, Brigitte

    2017-01-15

    living in symbiosis with rhizobia that can stimulate plant growth naturally through biological nitrogen fixation. We studied microsymbiont partners of a metal-tolerant legume, Anthyllis vulneraria, which is tolerant to very highly metal-polluted soils in mining and nonmining sites. Site-specific rhizobial communities were linked to taxonomic composition and metal tolerance capacity. The rhizobial species Mesorhizobium metallidurans was dominant in all Zn-Pb mines but one. It was not detected in unpolluted sites where other distinct Mesorhizobium species occur. Given the different soil conditions at the respective mining sites, including their heavy-metal contamination, revegetation strategies based on rhizobia adapting to local conditions are more likely to succeed over the long term compared to strategies based on introducing less-well-adapted strains. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Ancient Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils as a Driver of Tolerant Anthyllis vulneraria Rhizobial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Roba; Maynaud, Geraldine; Le Quéré, Antoine; Vidal, Céline; Klonowska, Agnieszka; Yashiro, Erika; Cleyet-Marel, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    cover crop legumes living in symbiosis with rhizobia that can stimulate plant growth naturally through biological nitrogen fixation. We studied microsymbiont partners of a metal-tolerant legume, Anthyllis vulneraria, which is tolerant to very highly metal-polluted soils in mining and nonmining sites. Site-specific rhizobial communities were linked to taxonomic composition and metal tolerance capacity. The rhizobial species Mesorhizobium metallidurans was dominant in all Zn-Pb mines but one. It was not detected in unpolluted sites where other distinct Mesorhizobium species occur. Given the different soil conditions at the respective mining sites, including their heavy-metal contamination, revegetation strategies based on rhizobia adapting to local conditions are more likely to succeed over the long term compared to strategies based on introducing less-well-adapted strains. PMID:27793823

  19. Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils in Riverside Park, Milwaukee, WI: Character, Bioavailability, and Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dansand, J. J.; Knudsen, A. C.

    2007-12-01

    Prior to being breached in 1990, the North Avenue Dam on the Milwaukee River had created a 2.5-mile impoundment for over 150 years. Upstream urban runoff and industrial pollution resulted in the deposition of heavy metal rich sediments in the slow moving waters of the impoundment. After the dam removal, the river returned to a more natural flowpath and as the river narrowed, newly exposed riverbed was annexed as part of Riverside Park, enabling ecological recovery efforts on the river and riparian zones. However, these newly exposed soils are enriched with heavy metal contaminants, most notably, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu, and Ni, concentrated by the impoundment. The current study has analyzed the location and concentrations of these trace metals, as well as their mobility and availability. This study is being conducted in conjunction with the Urban Ecology Center, a nonprofit environmental organization located in Riverside Park that is dedicated to serving the local community and urban youth while restoring and protecting the natural areas along the Milwaukee River. Analyses have included determination of general soil parameters such as particle size, organic content, and point of zero charge analyses. Beyond bulk chemical analysis, we have conducted selective sequential extractions to estimate the chemical speciation of these elements, which showed that approximately 30 percent of contaminants are highly available. Additionally, the soils have been analyzed with an Electron Microprobe to directly observe phase relationships of metals in the soils. Microprobe and other analyses have shown that heavy metals are associated with a variety of phases, including Mn and Fe oxy-hydroxides, and vary in concentration and phase relationships with depth and distance from the river. Finally, a field-portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer (pXRF), coupled with GPS data, is being used to create a geochemical map of heavy metal distributions throughout the park.

  20. Speciation and leaching of trace metal contaminants from e-waste contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jin-Li; Luo, Chun-Ling; Tang, Chloe Wing-Yee; Chan, Ting-Shan; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-05-05

    Primitive electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) recycling activities have caused serious environmental problems. However, little is known about the speciation and leaching behaviors of metal contaminants at e-waste contaminated sites. This study investigated trace metal speciation/mobilization from e-waste polluted soil through column leaching experiments involving irrigation with rainwater for almost 2.5 years. Over the experimental period, Cu and Zn levels in the porewater were 0.14±0.08mg/L, and 0.16±0.08mg/L, respectively, increasing to 0.33±0.16mg/L, and 0.69±0.28mg/L with plant growth. The amounts of Cu, Zn, and Pb released in surface soil (0-2cm) contributed 43.8%, 22.5%, and 13.8%, respectively, to the original levels. The released Cu and Zn were primarily caused by the mobilization of the carbonate species of metals, including Cu(OH)2, CuCO3, and Zn5(CO3)2(OH)6, and amorphous Fe/Mn oxides associated fractions characterized by sequential extraction coupling with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. During the experiments, trace metals were not detected in the effluent, and the re-sequestration of trace metals was mainly attributed to the adsorption on the abundant Fe/Mn oxides in the sub-layer soil. This study quantitatively elucidated the molecular speciation of Cu and Zn in e-waste contaminated soil during the column leaching process.

  1. [Application potential of siderophore-producing rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils: a review].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying-Li; Lin, Qing-Qi; Li, Yu; Yang, Xiu-Hong; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2013-07-01

    Siderophore-producing rhizobacteria (SPR) are a group of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria, being able to play an important role in assisting the phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soils. Based on the comprehensive analysis of related researches at home and abroad, this paper elaborated the functions of SPR in alleviating the heavy metals stress and toxicity to plants and the mechanisms of SPR in improving the heavy metals bioavailability in soil, and indicated that SPR had good application potential in promoting the plant growth in heavy metals-contaminated soils and reinforcing the heavy metals accumulation in plants. The contradictory phenomena of SPR in increasing or decreasing heavy metals accumulation in plants, which existed in current researches, were also analyzed. Aiming at the deficiencies in current researches, it was suggested that in the future researches, the mechanisms of the interactions between SPR and plants, especially hyperaccumulators, should be further studied, the key factors affecting the heavy metals complexation and mobilization in soil by siderophores should also be further clarified, the effects of siderophores on the heavy metals bioavailability and its subsequent influence on the heavy metals uptake by plants should be comprehensively considered, and the measures for improving the colonization of SPR in heavy metals-contaminated soil should be explored.

  2. Spatial-based assessment of metal contamination in agricultural soils near an abandoned copper mine of eastern China.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chun; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Yahua; Shen, Zhenguo

    2012-07-01

    An investigation about metal contamination on agricultural soils was carried out near an abandoned copper mine in eastern China. Results showed the average concentrations of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cd in the 155 soil samples were 147, 53.8, 158, 0.32 mg kg(-1) respectively, which were 4.6-, 2.2-, 2-, 1.7-fold of the corresponding background value. According to the Chinese Farmland Environmental Quality Evaluation Standards for Edible Agricultural Products, it was found 18.4 % of the soils belonged to heavily and moderately contaminated soils.

  3. Sustainability likelihood of remediation options for metal-contaminated soil/sediment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Season S; Taylor, Jessica S; Baek, Kitae; Khan, Eakalak; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-05-01

    Multi-criteria analysis and detailed impact analysis were carried out to assess the sustainability of four remedial alternatives for metal-contaminated soil/sediment at former timber treatment sites and harbour sediment with different scales. The sustainability was evaluated in the aspects of human health and safety, environment, stakeholder concern, and land use, under four different scenarios with varying weighting factors. The Monte Carlo simulation was performed to reveal the likelihood of accomplishing sustainable remediation with different treatment options at different sites. The results showed that in-situ remedial technologies were more sustainable than ex-situ ones, where in-situ containment demonstrated both the most sustainable result and the highest probability to achieve sustainability amongst the four remedial alternatives in this study, reflecting the lesser extent of off-site and on-site impacts. Concerns associated with ex-situ options were adverse impacts tied to all four aspects and caused by excavation, extraction, and off-site disposal. The results of this study suggested the importance of considering the uncertainties resulting from the remedial options (i.e., stochastic analysis) in addition to the overall sustainability scores (i.e., deterministic analysis). The developed framework and model simulation could serve as an assessment for the sustainability likelihood of remedial options to ensure sustainable remediation of contaminated sites.

  4. Spatial distribution of heavy metal contamination in soils near a primitive e-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Quan, Sheng-Xiang; Yan, Bo; Yang, Fan; Li, Ning; Xiao, Xian-Ming; Fu, Jia-Mo

    2015-01-01

    The total concentrations of 12 heavy metals in surface soils (SS, 0-20 cm), middle soils (MS, 30-50 cm) and deep soils (DS, 60-80 cm) from an acid-leaching area, a deserted paddy field and a deserted area of Guiyu were measured. The results showed that the acid-leaching area was heavily contaminated with heavy metals, especially in SS. The mean concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb and Pb in SS from the acid-leaching area were 278.4, 684.1, 572.8, 1.36, 3,472, 1,706 and 222.8 mg/kg, respectively. Heavy metal pollution in the deserted paddy field was mainly concentrated in SS and MS. The average values of Sb in SS and MS from the deserted paddy field were 16.3 and 20.2 mg/kg, respectively. However, heavy metal contamination of the deserted area was principally found in the DS. Extremely high concentrations of heavy metals were also observed at some special research sites, further confirming that the level of heavy metal pollution was very serious. The geoaccumulation index (Igeo) values revealed that the acid-leaching area was severely polluted with heavy metals in the order of Sb > Sn > Cu > Cd > Ni > Zn > Pb, while deserted paddy field was contaminated predominately by metals in the order of Sb > Sn > Cu. It was obvious that the concentrations of some uncommon contaminants, such as Sb and Sn, were higher than principal contaminants, such as Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb, suggesting that particular attention should be directed to Sn and Sb contamination in the future research of heavy metals in soils from e-waste-processing areas. Correlation analysis suggested that Li and Be in soils from the acid-leaching area and its surrounding environment might have originated from other industrial activities and from batteries, whereas Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Sn and Sb contamination was most likely caused by uncontrolled electronic waste (e-waste) processing. These results indicate the significant need for optimisation of e-waste-dismantling technologies and remediation of polluted soil

  5. The EDTA effect on phytoextraction of single and combined metals-contaminated soils using rainbow pink (Dianthus chinensis).

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2005-08-01

    Rainbow pink (Dianthus chinensis), a potential phytoextraction plant, can accumulate high concentrations of Cd from metal-contaminated soils. The soils used in this study were artificially added with different metals including (1) CK: original soil, (2) Cd-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1), (3) Zn-treated soil: 100 mg Zn kg(-1), (4) Pb-treated soil: 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), (5) Cd-Zn-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1) and 100 mg Zn kg(-1), (6) Cd-Pb-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1) and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), (7) Zn-Pb-treated soil: 100 mg Zn kg(-1) and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1), and (8) Cd-Zn-Pb-treated soil: 10 mg Cd kg(-1), 100 mg Zn kg(-1), and 1000 mg Pb kg(-1). Three concentrations of 2Na-EDTA solutions (0 (control), 2, and 5 mmol kg(-1) soil) were added to the different metals-treated soils to study the influence of applied EDTA on single and combined metals-contaminated soils phytoextraction using rainbow pink. The results showed that the Cd, Zn, Pb, Fe, or Mn concentrations in different metals-treated soil solutions significantly increased after applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) (p<0.05). The metal concentrations in different metals-treated soils extracted by deionized water also significantly increased after applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) (p<0.05). Because of the high extraction capacity of both 0.005 M DTPA (pH 5.3) and 0.05 M EDTA (pH 7.0), applying EDTA did not significantly increase the Cd, Zn, or Pb concentration in both extracts for most of the treatments. Applying EDTA solutions can significantly increase the Cd and Pb concentrations in the shoots of rainbow pink (p<0.05). However, this was not statistically significant for Zn because of the low Zn concentration added into the contaminated soils. The results from this study indicate that applying 5 mmol EDTA kg(-1) can significantly increase the Cd, Zn, or Pb concentrations both in the soil solution or extracted using deionized water in single or combined metals-contaminated soils, thus increasing the accumulated metals concentrations in

  6. The study of metal contamination in urban soils of Hong Kong using a GIS-based approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangdong; Lee, Siu-lan; Wong, Sze-chung; Shi, Wenzhong; Thornton, Iain

    2004-05-01

    The study of regional variations and the anthropogenic contamination by metals of soils is very important for environmental planning and monitoring in urban areas. An extensive survey was conducted in the highly urbanized Kowloon area (46.9 km(2)) of Hong Kong, using a systematic sampling strategy with a sampling density of 3-5 composite soil samples (0-15 cm) per km(2). Geochemical maps of 'total' metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) from strong acid extraction in the surface soils were produced based on geographical information system (GIS) technology. A significant spatial relationship was found for Ni, Cu, Pb and Zn in the soils using a GIS-based analysis, suggesting that these metal contaminants in the soils of the Kowloon area had common sources. Several hot-spot areas of metal contamination were identified from the composite metal geochemical map, mainly in the old industrial and residential areas. A further GIS analysis revealed that road junctions, major roads and industrial buildings were possible sources of heavy metals in the urban soils. The Pb isotope composition of the contaminated soils showed clear anthropogenic origins.

  7. Selective recovery of soil-borne metal contaminants through integrated solubilization by biogenic sulfuric acid and precipitation by biogenic sulfide.

    PubMed

    Fang, Di; Zhang, Ruichang; Liu, Xue; Zhou, Lixiang

    2012-06-15

    A hybrid process combining solubilization via sulfuric acid produced by sulfur-oxidizing bacteria with precipitation via sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria was investigated to isolate soil-borne metal contaminants as purified metal-sulfides. The highly efficient two-step acidification process involved bioproduction of sulfuric acid in a culture medium containing 30% (v/v) of sludge filtrate (SF). Soil was added to the culture after maximum acid production. Solubilization efficiencies of 95% for Zn, 76% for Cu and 97% for Cd were achieved after 16 days. At pH 1.9, 3.0 and 4.0, 99% of Cu(2+), 96% of Cd(3+) and 93% of Zn(2+), respectively, were precipitated from the soil leachate by sulfide transported from sulfidogenic bioreactor via N(2) sparging, resulting in final effluent metal contents at the ppb-level. The introduction of SF did not affect the precipitation kinetics and purity of the recovered precipitates. Ultimately, 75% of Cu and 86% of Zn were recovered from the soil as pure CuS and ZnS (confirmed by SEM-EDS and XRD). These results demonstrate the potential of the integrated method for the selective production of valuable metals from metal contamination in soils.

  8. EFFECT OF SOIL MODIFYING FACTORS ON THE BIOAVAILABILITY AND TOXICITY OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metal and organic chemical contamination of soils is a worldwide problem posing a risk to humans and more directly, soil organisms. Metal toxicity is often not directly related to the total concentration of metals present due to a number of modifying factors that depend,...

  9. EFFECT OF SOIL MODIFYING FACTORS ON THE BIOAVAILABILITY AND TOXICITY OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heavy metal and organic chemical contamination of soils is a worldwide problem posing a risk to humans and more directly, soil organisms. Metal toxicity is often not directly related to the total concentration of metals present due to a number of modifying factors that depend,...

  10. Particle morphology and mineral structure of heavy metal-contaminated kaolin soil before and after electrokinetic remediation.

    PubMed

    Roach, Nicole; Reddy, Krishna R; Al-Hamdan, Ashraf Z

    2009-06-15

    This study aims to characterize the physical distribution of heavy metals in kaolin soil and the chemical and structural changes in kaolinite minerals that result from electrokinetic remediation. Three bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were conducted on kaolin that was spiked with Cr(VI) alone, Ni (II) alone, and a combination of Cr(VI), Ni(II) and Cd(II) under a constant electric potential of 1VDC/cm for a total duration of 4 days. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on the soil samples before and after electrokinetic remediation. Results showed that the heavy metal contaminant distribution in the soil samples was not observable using TEM and EDX. EDX detected nickel and chromium on some kaolinite particles and titanium-rich, high-contrast particles, but no separate phases containing the metal contaminants were detected. Small amounts of heavy metal contaminants that were detected by EDX in the absence of a visible phase suggest that ions are adsorbed to kaolinite particle surfaces as a thin coating. There was also no clear correlation between semiquantitative analysis of EDX spectra and measured total metal concentrations, which may be attributed to low heavy metal concentrations and small size of samples used. X-ray diffraction analyses were aimed to detect any structural changes in kaolinite minerals resulting from EK. The diffraction patterns showed a decrease in peak height with decreasing soil pH value, which indicates possible dissolution of kaolinite minerals during electrokinetic remediation. Overall this study showed that the changes in particle morphology were found to be insignificant, but a relationship was found between the crystallinity of kaolin and the pH changes induced by the applied electric potential.

  11. Arsenic and Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils under Different Land Use in an Estuary in Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Van, Thinh; Ozaki, Akinori; Nguyen Tho, Hoang; Nguyen Duc, Anh; Tran Thi, Yen; Kurosawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-05

    Heavy metal contamination of soil and sediment in estuaries warrants study because a healthy estuarine environment, including healthy soil, is important in order to achieve ecological balance and good aquaculture production. The Ba Lat estuary of the Red River is the largest estuary in northern Vietnam and is employed in various land uses. However, the heavy metal contamination of its soil has not yet been reported. The following research was conducted to clarify contamination levels, supply sources, and the effect of land use on heavy metal concentrations in the estuary. Soil samples were collected from the top soil layer of the estuary, and their arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) concentrations were analyzed, as were other soil properties. Most soils in the estuary were loam, silt loam, or sandy loam. The pH was neutral, and the cation exchange capacity ranged from 3.8 to 20 cmol·kg(-1). Manganese and iron concentrations averaged 811 µg·g(-1) and 1.79%, respectively. The magnitude of the soil heavy metal concentrations decreased in the order of Zn > Pb > Cr > Cu > As > Cd. The concentrations were higher in the riverbed and mangrove forest than in other land-use areas. Except for As, the mean heavy metal concentrations were lower than the permissible levels for agricultural soils in Vietnam. The principal component analyses suggested that soil As, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cu were of anthropogenic origin, whereas Cr was of non-anthropogenic origin. The spatial distribution of concentration with land use indicated that mangrove forests play an important role in preventing the spread of heavy metals to other land uses and in maintaining the estuarine environment.

  12. Arsenic and Heavy Metal Contamination in Soils under Different Land Use in an Estuary in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen Van, Thinh; Ozaki, Akinori; Nguyen Tho, Hoang; Nguyen Duc, Anh; Tran Thi, Yen; Kurosawa, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Heavy metal contamination of soil and sediment in estuaries warrants study because a healthy estuarine environment, including healthy soil, is important in order to achieve ecological balance and good aquaculture production. The Ba Lat estuary of the Red River is the largest estuary in northern Vietnam and is employed in various land uses. However, the heavy metal contamination of its soil has not yet been reported. The following research was conducted to clarify contamination levels, supply sources, and the effect of land use on heavy metal concentrations in the estuary. Soil samples were collected from the top soil layer of the estuary, and their arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) concentrations were analyzed, as were other soil properties. Most soils in the estuary were loam, silt loam, or sandy loam. The pH was neutral, and the cation exchange capacity ranged from 3.8 to 20 cmol·kg−1. Manganese and iron concentrations averaged 811 µg·g−1 and 1.79%, respectively. The magnitude of the soil heavy metal concentrations decreased in the order of Zn > Pb > Cr > Cu > As > Cd. The concentrations were higher in the riverbed and mangrove forest than in other land-use areas. Except for As, the mean heavy metal concentrations were lower than the permissible levels for agricultural soils in Vietnam. The principal component analyses suggested that soil As, Pb, Zn, Cd, and Cu were of anthropogenic origin, whereas Cr was of non-anthropogenic origin. The spatial distribution of concentration with land use indicated that mangrove forests play an important role in preventing the spread of heavy metals to other land uses and in maintaining the estuarine environment. PMID:27827965

  13. Human health risk from soil heavy metal contamination under different land uses near Dabaoshan Mine, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huarong; Xia, Beicheng; Fan, Chen; Zhao, Peng; Shen, Shili

    2012-02-15

    Soil heavy metal contamination is a major environmental concern, and the ecological risk associated with heavy metals is increasing. In this paper, we investigated heavy metal contamination near Dabaoshan Mine by: using sequential indicator simulation to delineate the spatial patterns of soil data; fitting multiple linear regression models for heavy metal uptake by crops; interpreting land uses from remote sensing images and integrating the spatial patterns, uptake models and land uses into a dose-response model for human health risks from heavy metals. The areas with elevated soil heavy metal concentrations are mainly located at the Dabaoshan Mine site and in the watershed basins of the Hengshi, Tielong and Chuandu rivers. The average concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in soil in the study area are all above the natural soil background levels, but Cd is the major contributor to human health risk in the area. Areas of low soil pH are also found throughout the watershed basins of the Hengshi, Tielong and Chuandu rivers. Of the different land use types in the study area, agricultural and residential land uses have the highest human health risk because ingestion is the dominant exposure pathway for heavy metals. The spatial patterns of the heavy metal concentrations and soil pH indicate that the areas with the highest human health risk regions do not directly coincide with the areas of highest heavy metal concentrations, but do coincide with the areas of lower soil pH. The contamination with high concentrations of heavy metals provides the risk source, but the combination of high heavy metal concentrations, low pH and agricultural or residential land use is required for human health risks to be present. The spatial pattern of the hazard quotients indicates that Cd is the most important pollutant contributing to the human health risk.

  14. Heavy metal contamination of surface soil in electronic waste dismantling area: site investigation and source-apportionment analysis.

    PubMed

    Jinhui Li; Huabo Duan; Pixing Shi

    2011-07-01

    The dismantling and disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in developing countries is causing increasing concern because of its impacts on the environment and risks to human health. Heavy-metal concentrations in the surface soils of Guiyu (Guangdong Province, China) were monitored to determine the status of heavy-metal contamination on e-waste dismantling area with a more than 20 years history. Two metalloids and nine metals were selected for investigation. This paper also attempts to compare the data among a variety of e-waste dismantling areas, after reviewing a number of heavy-metal contamination-related studies in such areas in China over the past decade. In addition, source apportionment of heavy metal in the surface soil of these areas has been analysed. Both the MSW open-burning sites probably contained invaluable e-waste and abandoned sites formerly involved in informal recycling activities are the new sources of soil-based environmental pollution in Guiyu. Although printed circuit board waste is thought to be the main source of heavy-metal emissions during e-waste processing, requirement is necessary to soundly manage the plastic separated from e-waste, which mostly contains heavy metals and other toxic substances.

  15. Adaptation of soil microbial community structure and function to chronic metal contamination at an abandoned Pb-Zn mine.

    PubMed

    Epelde, Lur; Lanzén, Anders; Blanco, Fernando; Urich, Tim; Garbisu, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Toxicity of metals released from mine tailings may cause severe damage to ecosystems. A diversity of microorganisms, however, have successfully adapted to such sites. In this study, our objective was to advance the understanding of the indigenous microbial communities of mining-impacted soils. To this end, a metatranscriptomic approach was used to study a heavily metal-contaminated site along a metal concentration gradient (up to 3220 000 and 97 000 mg kg(-1) of Cd, Pb and Zn, respectively) resulting from previous mining. Metal concentration, soil pH and amount of clay were the most important factors determining the structure of soil microbial communities. Interestingly, evenness of the microbial communities, but not its richness, increased with contamination level. Taxa with high metabolic plasticity like Ktedonobacteria and Chloroflexi were found with higher relative abundance in more contaminated samples. However, several taxa belonging to the phyla Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria followed opposite trends in relation to metal pollution. Besides, functional transcripts related to transposition or transfer of genetic material and membrane transport, potentially involved in metal resistance mechanisms, had a higher expression in more contaminated samples. Our results provide an insight into microbial communities in long-term metal-contaminated environments and how they contrast to nearby sites with lower contamination.

  16. Ultrasonic and mechanical soil washing processes for the remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seulgi; Lee, Wontae; Son, Younggyu

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonic/mechanical soil washing process was investigated and compared with ultrasonic process and mechanical process using a relatively large lab-scale sonoreactor. It was found that higher removal efficiencies were observed in the combined processes for 0.1 and 0.3 M HCl washing liquids. It was due to the combination effects of macroscale removal for the overall range of slurry by mechanical mixing and microscale removal for the limited zone of slurry by cavitational actions.

  17. Assessment of Ecological and Human Health Risks of Heavy Metal Contamination in Agriculture Soils Disturbed by Pipeline Construction

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Peng; Xiao, Jun; Wang, Yafeng; Chen, Liding

    2014-01-01

    The construction of large-scale infrastructures such as nature gas/oil pipelines involves extensive disturbance to regional ecosystems. Few studies have documented the soil degradation and heavy metal contamination caused by pipeline construction. In this study, chromium (Cr), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) levels were evaluated using Index of Geo-accumulation (Igeo) and Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) values, and human health risk assessments were used to elucidate the level and spatial variation of heavy metal pollution risks. The results showed that the impact zone of pipeline installation on soil heavy metal contamination was restricted to pipeline right-of-way (RoW), which had higher Igeo of Cd, Cu, Ni and Pb than that of 20 m and 50 m. RI showed a declining tendency in different zones as follows: trench > working zone > piling area > 20 m > 50 m. Pipeline RoW resulted in higher human health risks than that of 20 m and 50 m, and children were more susceptible to non-carcinogenic hazard risk. Cluster analysis showed that Cu, Ni, Pb and Cd had similar sources, drawing attention to the anthropogenic activity. The findings in this study should help better understand the type, degree, scope and sources of heavy metal pollution from pipeline construction to reduce pollutant emissions, and are helpful in providing a scientific basis for future risk management. PMID:24590049

  18. [Impacts of landscape patterns on heavy metal contamination of agricultural top soils in the Pearl River Delta, South China].

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Li, Fang-bai; Wu, Zhi-feng; Cheng, Jiong

    2015-04-01

    Landscape patterns are known to influence many ecological processes, but the relationship between landscape patterns and soil pollution processes is not well understood. Based on 300 top soil samples, land use and cover map for the Pearl River Delta (PRD) of 2005, this study explored the characteristics and spatial pattern of heavy metal contamination of agricultural top soils and examined the impacts of landscape patterns on the heavy metal contamination in the buffers of soil samples. Research methods included geostatistical analysis, landscape pattern analysis, single-factor pollution indices, and Pearson correlation analysis. We found that: 1) out of the 235 agricultural soil samples, 3.8%, 0.4%, 17.0% and 9.4% samples exceeded the Grade II national standard for As, Pb, Cd and Ni concentrations respectively. High pollution levels were found in three cities, Guangzhou, Foshan and Zhongshan; 2) soils in the farmland were more polluted than those in the forest and orchard land, and there were no differences among different agricultural land use types in contamination level of each heavy metal (except Cd); and 3) the proportion, mean patch area as well as the degree of landscape fragmentation, landscape-level structural complexity and aggregation/connectivity of water at the buffer zone were significantly positively correlated with the contamination level of each of the four heavy metals in agricultural top soils. Part of the landscape pattern of urban land in the buffer zone also positively correlated with Pb and Cd levels (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the proportion, mean patch area and aggregation degree of forest land negatively correlated with soil Pb and Ni levels (P < 0.05); and 4) the closer to the industry land were the soil samples, the more polluted the soils were for Pb, Cd and Ni. Only landscape diversity was found to be positively correlated with soil Cd contamination. The study results provide new information and scientific basis for heavy metal

  19. Effects of properties of metal-contaminated soils on bacterial bioluminescence activity, seed germination, and root and shoot growth.

    PubMed

    Kang, Il-Mo; Kong, In Chul

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of several factors (metal contents and soil properties) on bacterial bioluminescence activity, seed germination and root/shoot growth of Lactuca in metal-contaminated soils. Each bioassay showed different sensitivities to extractants of soil samples. Average sensitivities of the bioassay were in the following order: root growth > bioluminescence ≥ shoot growth ≥ seed germination. Both total and weak acid-extracted metal contents showed no observable correlations with the activity of any bioassays (r(2) < 0.279). However, reasonable correlations were observed between the bioluminescence activity and organics (r(2) = 0.7198) as well as between root growth and CEC (r(2) = 0.6676). Effects of soils were difficult to generalize since they were dependent on many factors, such as soil properties, metal contents, and the organism used in each test. Nonetheless, these results indicated that a battery of bioassays is an effective strategy for assessment of contaminated soils. Furthermore, specific soil factors were shown to more influence on soil toxicity, depending on the type of bioassay.

  20. State of the Science Review: Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste By-Products for In-situ Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil and Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal and metalloid contamination of soil and sediment is a widespread problem both in urban and rural areas throughout the United States (U.S. EPA, 2014). Beneficial use of waste by-products as amendments to remediate metal-contaminated soils and sediments can provide major eco...

  1. State of the Science Review: Potential for Beneficial Use of Waste By-Products for In-situ Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soil and Sediment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metal and metalloid contamination of soil and sediment is a widespread problem both in urban and rural areas throughout the United States (U.S. EPA, 2014). Beneficial use of waste by-products as amendments to remediate metal-contaminated soils and sediments can provide major eco...

  2. Assessment of Heavy Metals Contamination in Reclaimed Mine Soil and their Accumulation and Distribution in Eucalyptus Hybrid.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Subodh Kumar; Rana, Vivek

    2017-01-01

    The metal contamination in reclaimed mine soil (RMS) of Jharia coal field, Dhanbad (India) using various contamination indices and their accumulation in tissues of Eucalyptus hybrid were assessed. In RMS, metal concentrations were found higher (202%-533%) than control soil (CS) with major contribution of Co and Mn followed by Zn, Cu and Pb. Principal component analysis (PCA) of metals present in RMS was carried out to assess their origin in RMS. The contamination factor (CF) values in RMS indicated moderate to very high level of pollution (ranged between 2.02 and 5.33). Higher accumulation of Pb in barks (three times), Zn in leaves (4.5 times), Mn in leaves (19 times), and Cu in roots (1.4 times) was found in trees growing on RMS than CS. The study concluded that different tree tissues accumulate varied concentration of heavy metals in RMS and thus for biomonitoring of metals, specific tissues has to be selected.

  3. Phytoextraction and phytostabilisation of metal-contaminated soil in temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmavathiamma, P. K.; Li, L. Y.

    2009-04-01

    This research addressed the phytoremediation of roadside soils subjected to multi-component metal solutions. A typical right of way for roads in Canada is around 30 m, and at least 33% of that land in the right of way is unpaved and can support animal life. Thus, land associated with 12,000 km of roads in the province of British Columbia and millions of kilometres around the world represent a substantial quantity of wildlife habitat where metal contamination needs to be remediated. Phytostabilisation, requires least maintenance among different phytoremediation techniques, and it could be a feasible and practical method of remediating in roadside soils along highways and for improving highway runoff drainage. The suitability of five plant species was studied for phytoextraction and phytostabilisation in a region with temperate maritime climate of coastal British Columbia, Canada. Pot experiments were conducted using Lolium perenne L (perennial rye grass), Festuca rubra L (creeping red fescue), Helianthus annuus L (sunflower), Poa pratensis L (Kentucky bluegrass) and Brassica napus L (rape) in soils treated with three different metal (Cu, Pb, Mn and Zn) concentrations. The bio-metric characters of plants in soils with multiple-metal contaminations, their metal accumulation characteristics, translocation properties and metal removal were assessed at different stages of plant growth, 90 and 120 DAS (days after sowing). Lolium was found to be suitable for the phytostabilisation of Cu and Pb, Festuca for Mn and Poa for Zn. Metal removal was higher at 120 than at 90 days after sowing, and metals concentrated more in the underground tissues with less translocation to the above-ground parts. Bioconcentration factors indicate that Festuca had the highest accumulation for Cu, Helianthus for Pb and Zn and Poa for Mn.

  4. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in surface layers of Roztocze National Park forest soils (SE Poland) by indices of pollution.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Ryszard; Kowalska, Joanna; Gąsiorek, Michał; Zadrożny, Paweł; Józefowska, Agnieszka; Zaleski, Tomasz; Kępka, Wojciech; Tymczuk, Maryla; Orłowska, Kalina

    2017-02-01

    In most cases, in soils exposed to heavy metals accumulation, the highest content of heavy metals was noted in the surface layers of the soil profile. Accumulation of heavy metals may occur both as a result of natural processes as well as anthropogenic activities. The quality of the soil exposed to heavy metal contamination can be evaluated by indices of pollution. On the basis of determined heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Mn, Ni and Cr) in the soils of Roztocze National Park the following indices of pollution were calculated: Enrichment Factor (EF), Geoaccumulation Index (Igeo), Nemerow Pollution Index (PINemerow) and Potential Ecological Risk (RI). Additionally, we introduced and calculated the Biogeochemical Index (BGI), which supports determination of the ability of the organic horizon to accumulate heavy metals. A tens of times higher content of Pb, Zn, Cu and Mn was found in the surface layers compared to their content in the parent material. This distribution of heavy metals in the studied soils was related to the influence of anthropogenic pollution (both local and distant sources of emission), as well as soil properties such as pH, organic carbon and total nitrogen content. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. VegeSafe: A community science program measuring soil-metal contamination, evaluating risk and providing advice for safe gardening.

    PubMed

    Rouillon, Marek; Harvey, Paul J; Kristensen, Louise J; George, Steven G; Taylor, Mark P

    2017-03-01

    The extent of metal contamination in Sydney residential garden soils was evaluated using data collected during a three-year Macquarie University community science program called VegeSafe. Despite knowledge of industrial and urban contamination amongst scientists, the general public remains under-informed about the potential risks of exposure from legacy contaminants in their home garden environment. The community was offered free soil metal screening, allowing access to soil samples for research purposes. Participants followed specific soil sampling instructions and posted samples to the University for analysis with a field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometer. Over the three-year study period, >5200 soil samples, primarily from vegetable gardens, were collected from >1200 Australian homes. As anticipated, the primary soil metal of concern was lead; mean concentrations were 413 mg/kg (front yard), 707 mg/kg (drip line), 226 mg/kg (back yard) and 301 mg/kg (vegetable garden). The Australian soil lead guideline of 300 mg/kg for residential gardens was exceeded at 40% of Sydney homes, while concentrations >1000 mg/kg were identified at 15% of homes. The incidence of highest soil lead contamination was greatest in the inner city area with concentrations declining towards background values of 20-30 mg/kg at 30-40 km distance from the city. Community engagement with VegeSafe participants has resulted in useful outcomes: dissemination of knowledge related to contamination legacies and health risks; owners building raised beds containing uncontaminated soil and in numerous cases, owners replacing all of their contaminated soil.

  6. Amending metal contaminated mine soil with biochars to sequester metals and improve plant growth cover

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous mine spoil sites in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that contain highly acidic, heavy metal-laden soils, which limits establishment of a soil-stabilizing plant cover. Biochars may be a suitable soil amendment to reduce toxic metals, improve soil fertility, soil wa...

  7. Amending metal contaminated mine soil with biochars to sequester metals and improve plant growth cover

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are numerous mine spoil sites in the U.S. Pacific Northwest that contain highly acidic, heavy metal-laden soils, which limits establishment of a soil-stabilizing plant cover. Biochars may be a suitable soil amendment to reduce toxic metals, improve soil fertility, soil wa...

  8. Short-Term Effects of Low-Level Heavy Metal Contamination on Soil Health Analyzed by Nematode Community Structure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byeong-Yong; Lee, Jae-Kook; Ro, Hee-Myong; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-01-01

    The short-term effects of low-level contamination by heavy metals (As, Cd, Cu, and Pb) on the soil health were examined by analyzing soil nematode community in soils planted with tomatoes. For this, the soils were irrigated with five metal concentrations ([1, 1/4, 1/42, 1/43, and 0] × maximum concentrations [MC] detected in irrigation waters near abandoned mine sites) for 18 weeks. Heavy metal concentrations were significantly increased in soils irrigated with MC of heavy metals, among which As and Cu exceeded the maximum heavy metal residue contents of soil approved in Korea. In no heavy metal treatment controls, nematode abundances for all trophic groups (except omnivorous-predatory nematodes [OP]) and colonizer-persister (cp) values (except cp-4–5) were significantly increased, and all maturity indices (except maturity index [MI] of plant-parasitic nematodes) and structure index (SI) were significantly decreased, suggesting the soil environments might have been disturbed during 18 weeks of tomato growth. There were no concentration-dependent significant decreases in richness, abundance, or MI for most heavy metals; however, their significant decreases occurred in abundance and richness of OP and cp-4, MI2–5 (excluding cp-1) and SI, indicating disturbed soil ecosystems, at the higher concentrations (MC and MC/4) of Pb that had the most significant negative correlation coefficients for heavy metal concentrations and nematode community among the heavy metals. Therefore, the short-term effects of low-level heavy metal contamination on soil health can be analyzed by nematode community structures before the appearance of plant damages caused by the abiotic agents, heavy metals. PMID:27493608

  9. Short-Term Effects of Low-Level Heavy Metal Contamination on Soil Health Analyzed by Nematode Community Structure.

    PubMed

    Park, Byeong-Yong; Lee, Jae-Kook; Ro, Hee-Myong; Kim, Young Ho

    2016-08-01

    The short-term effects of low-level contamination by heavy metals (As, Cd, Cu, and Pb) on the soil health were examined by analyzing soil nematode community in soils planted with tomatoes. For this, the soils were irrigated with five metal concentrations ([1, 1/4, 1/4(2), 1/4(3), and 0] × maximum concentrations [MC] detected in irrigation waters near abandoned mine sites) for 18 weeks. Heavy metal concentrations were significantly increased in soils irrigated with MC of heavy metals, among which As and Cu exceeded the maximum heavy metal residue contents of soil approved in Korea. In no heavy metal treatment controls, nematode abundances for all trophic groups (except omnivorous-predatory nematodes [OP]) and colonizer-persister (cp) values (except cp-4-5) were significantly increased, and all maturity indices (except maturity index [MI] of plant-parasitic nematodes) and structure index (SI) were significantly decreased, suggesting the soil environments might have been disturbed during 18 weeks of tomato growth. There were no concentration-dependent significant decreases in richness, abundance, or MI for most heavy metals; however, their significant decreases occurred in abundance and richness of OP and cp-4, MI2-5 (excluding cp-1) and SI, indicating disturbed soil ecosystems, at the higher concentrations (MC and MC/4) of Pb that had the most significant negative correlation coefficients for heavy metal concentrations and nematode community among the heavy metals. Therefore, the short-term effects of low-level heavy metal contamination on soil health can be analyzed by nematode community structures before the appearance of plant damages caused by the abiotic agents, heavy metals.

  10. Metal contamination of soil and translocation in vegetables growing under industrial wastewater irrigated agricultural field of Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, K K; Singh, N K; Patel, M P; Tiwari, M R; Rai, U N

    2011-09-01

    The present investigation was carried out to evaluate metals concentration in ten vegetable crops growing in mixed industrial effluent irrigated agricultural field near Vadodara, Gujarat, India. Differential accumulation and translocation of various metals in selected vegetables plant species was observed. A higher concentration of metals were found in order of Fe>Mn>Zn>Cd>Cu>Pb>Cr>As in soil irrigated with industrial effluent than soil irrigated with tube well water; however, the concentration of As, Cr and Pb found below detection limit in tube well water irrigated soil. Metal accumulation in root and top of vegetables varied significantly both in relations to metal concentration in the soil and the plant genotype. Among ten vegetable species studied five vegetable species, i.e. Spinach, Radish, Tomato, Chili and Cabbage growing in mixed industrial effluent irrigated agricultural field showed high accumulation and translocation of toxic metals (As, Cd, Cr, Pb and Ni) in their edible parts, thus, their cultivation are unsafe with respect to possible transfer in food chain and health hazards. However, it is suggested that vegetable crops restricting toxic metal in non-edible port may be recommended for cultivation in such metal contaminated agricultural field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mitigation effects of silicon rich amendments on heavy metal accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) planted on multi-metal contaminated acidic soil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms of stabilization by silicon-rich amendments of cadmium, zinc, copper and lead in a multi-metal contaminated acidic soil and the mitigation of metal accumulation in rice were investigated in this study. The results from a pot experiment indicated that the application of fly ash (20 and...

  12. Microbial indicators of heavy metal contamination in urban and rural soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuangen; Campbell, C D; Clark, L; Cameron, C M; Paterson, E

    2006-06-01

    Urban soils and especially their microbiology have been a neglected area of study. In this paper, we report on microbial properties of urban soils compared to rural soils of similar lithogenic origin in the vicinity of Aberdeen city. Significant differences in basal respiration rates, microbial biomass and ecophysiological parameters were found in urban soils compared to rural soils. Analysis of community level physiological profiles (CLPP) of micro-organisms showed they consumed C sources faster in urban soils to maintain the same level activity as those in rural soils. Cu, Pb, Zn and Ni were the principal elements that had accumulated in urban soils compared with their rural counterparts with Pb being the most significant metal to distinguish urban soils from rural soils. Sequential extraction showed the final residue after extraction was normally the highest proportion except for Pb, for which the hydroxylamine-hydrochloride extractable Pb was the largest part. Acetic acid extractable fraction of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn were higher in urban soils and aqua regia extractable fraction were lower suggesting an elevated availability of heavy metals in urban soils. Correlation analyses between different microbial indicators (basal respiration, biomass-C, and sole C source tests) and heavy metal fractions indicated that basal respiration was negatively correlated with soil Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn inputs while soil microbial biomass was only significantly correlated with Pb. However, both exchangeable and iron- and manganese-bound Ni fractions were mostly responsible for shift of the soil microbial community level physiological profiles (sole C source tests). These data suggest soil microbial indicators can be useful indicators of pollutant heavy metal stress on the health of urban soils.

  13. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated soils and dusts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contaminat...

  14. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated soils and dusts

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contaminat...

  15. Repeated phytoextraction of four metal-contaminated soils using the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Luo, Yongming; Zhang, Hao; Christie, Peter

    2014-06-01

    A cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator extracted metals from four contaminated soils over three years in a glasshouse experiment. Changes in plant metal uptake and soil total (aqua regia-extractable) and available metals were investigated. Plant Cd concentrations in a high-Cd acid soil and plant Zn concentrations in two acid soils decreased during repeated phytoextraction and were predicted by soil available metal concentrations. However, on repeated phytoextraction, plant Cd concentrations remained constant in lightly Cd-polluted acid soils, as did plant Cd and Zn in alkaline soils, although soil available metal concentrations decreased markedly. After phytoextraction acid soils showed much higher total metal removal efficiencies, indicating possible suitability of phytoextraction for acid soils. However, DGT-testing, which takes soil metal re-supply into consideration, showed substantial removal of available metal and distinct decreases in metal supply capacity in alkaline soils after phytoextraction, suggesting that a strategy based on lowering the bioavailable contaminant might be feasible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of biochars from different stock materials as carriers of bacterial strain for remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Sun, Hongwen; Ren, Xinhao; Li, Bing; Mao, Hongjun

    2017-09-21

    Two kinds of biochars, one derived from corn straw and one from pig manure, were studied as carriers of a mutant genotype from Bacillus subtilis (B38) for heavy metal contaminated soil remediation. After amendment with biochar, the heavy metal bioavailability decreased. Moreover, the heavy metal immobilization ability of the biochar was enhanced by combining it with B38. The simultaneous application of B38 and pig manure-derived biochar exhibited a superior effect on the promotion of plant growth and the immobilization of heavy metals in soil. The plant biomass increased by 37.9% and heavy metal concentrations in the edible part of lettuce decreased by 69.9-96.1%. The polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) profiles revealed that pig manure-derived biochar could enhance the proliferation of both exotic B38 and native microbes. These results suggest that B38 carried by pig manure-derived biochar may be a promising candidate for the remediation of soils contaminated by multiple heavy metals.

  17. The use of chelating agents in the remediation of metal-contaminated soils: a review.

    PubMed

    Lestan, Domen; Luo, Chun-ling; Li, Xiang-dong

    2008-05-01

    This paper reviews current remediation technologies that use chelating agents for the mobilization and removal of potentially toxic metals from contaminated soils. These processes can be done in situ as enhanced phytoextraction, chelant enhanced electrokinetic extraction and soil flushing, or ex situ as the extraction of soil slurry and soil heap/column leaching. Current proposals on how to treat and recycle waste washing solutions after soil is washed are discussed. The major controlling factors in phytoextraction and possible strategies for reducing the leaching of metals associated with the application of chelants are also reviewed. Finally, the possible impact of abiotic and biotic soil factors on the toxicity of metals left after the washing of soil and enhanced phytoextraction are briefly addressed.

  18. Ecotoxicological risk assessment of undisturbed metal contaminated soil at two remote lighthouse sites.

    PubMed

    Chapman, E Emily V; Dave, Göran; Murimboh, John D

    2010-07-01

    Ecotoxicological risk assessments of contaminated soil are commonly completed using guideline values based on total concentrations. However, only certain fractions of contaminants are bioavailable and pose a hazard to the environment. This paper investigates the relationship between measured metal concentrations in soil and soil leachate, and the effects in organisms exposed to intact, undisturbed soil cores (wheat, Tricum aestivum) and soil leachate (lettuce, Lactuca sativa, and water flea, Daphnia magna). Despite the samples containing metal concentrations significantly above guideline values, metals of concern (e.g. Pb and Zn) did not have a significant toxic effect on wheat or D. magna. During weeks with low leachate pH, an effect on lettuce root elongation was observed in the most contaminated samples. This study has shown that bioassays with intact soil cores can indicate metal bioavailability and provide a better estimate of ecological risk than total metal concentrations in the soil. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Phytoremediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils: natural hyperaccumulation versus chemically enhanced phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Lombi, E; Zhao, F J; Dunham, S J; McGrath, S P

    2001-01-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to compare two strategies of phytoremediation: natural phytoextraction using the Zn and Cd hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens J. Presl & C. Presl versus chemically enhanced phytoextraction using maize (Zea mays L.) treated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). The study used an industrially contaminated soil and an agricultural soil contaminated with metals from sewage sludge. Three crops of T. caerulescens grown over 391 d removed more than 8 mg kg(-1) Cd and 200 mg kg(-1) Zn from the industrially contaminated soil, representing 43 and 7% of the two metals in the soil. In contrast, the high concentration of Cu in the agricultural soil severely reduced the growth of T. caerulescens, thus limiting its phytoextraction potential. The EDTA treatment greatly increased the solubility of heavy metals in both soils, but this did not result in a large increase in metal concentrations in the maize shoots. Phytoextraction of Cd and Zn by maize + EDTA was much smaller than that by T. caerulescens from the industrially contaminated soil, and was either smaller (Cd) or similar (Zn) from the agricultural soil. After EDTA treatment, soluble heavy metals in soil pore water occurred mainly as metal-EDTA complexes, which were persistent for several weeks. High concentrations of heavy metals in soil pore water after EDTA treatment could pose an environmental risk in the form of ground water contamination.

  20. Helichrysum italicum growing on metalliferous areas as a potential tool in phytostabilization of metal-contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Claudio; Maleci, Laura; Giuliani, Claudia

    2015-04-01

    Plants that colonize metalliferous soils have developed physiological mechanisms that allow to tolerate high metal concentrations. Generally, metal uptake by these plants is not suppressed, but a detoxification process occurs, as a response to different strategies: some plants (accumulators) concentrate metals in the aerial parts, while others (excluders) present low metal concentrations in the aerial parts, since metals are arrested in their roots. In several regions of Italy (e.g. Veneto, Sardinia, Tuscany), numerous abandoned mine sites are present; On these metal-contaminated soils grow both metalliferous (e.g. Silene paradoxa) and non-metalliferous plants (e.g. Taraxacum officinale). Among them, Helichrysum italicum deserved attention since it is known as essential oil producer and is also used as a medicinal plant for its anti-inflammatory properties; for this reason, it must undergo the Drug Master File certifying the absence of chemical impurities and heavy metals. Samples of the whole plant (roots, leaves and flowers) of H. italicum have been collected at various sites, both mined and not mined, in order to ascertain its ability to uptake and translocate metals from roots to the aerial parts. Fresh and embedded material was examined by Light microscopy and Electron Microscopy (Scanning and Transmission) to ascertain possible damages in plant morphology. Dried samples were crushed, digested with HNO3 and analysed by ICP-OE technique for heavy metal (Cu, Fe, Mn, Zn) concentrations. Preliminary observations on the morphology of the different samples do not show significant differences in the leaf structure. The inorganic chemical composition of H. italicum was characterized by high metal content. Preliminary results of our analyses show that H. italicum accumulate metals (Mn, Zn) in roots, but do not translocate metals to the aerial parts; therefore, it may be considered an excluder plant. On the basis of our results, the aerial parts (leaves, flowers) of

  1. Research Progress of Artificial Forest in the Remediation of Heavy Metal Contaminated Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiafang, MA; Guangtao, MENG; Liping, HE; Guixiang, LI

    2017-01-01

    (1) Remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals has become a hot topic in the world, and phytoremediation technology is the most widely used. (2) In addition to traditional economic benefits, ecological benefits of artificial forest have been more and more important, which are very helpful to soil polluted with heavy metals in the environment. (3) The characteristics of heavy metal pollution of soil and plantations of repair mechanism have been reviewed, and the current mining areas, wetlands, urban plantations on heavy metal elements have enriched the research results. The purpose is to find a new path for governance of heavy metal soil pollution.

  2. Pilot-scale washing of metal contaminated garden soil using EDTA.

    PubMed

    Voglar, David; Lestan, Domen

    2012-05-15

    Ten batches (75kg each) of garden soil with >50% of silt and clay and average 1935mgkg(-1) Pb, 800mgkg(-1) Zn, 10mgkg(-1) Cd and 120mgkg(-1) As were remediated in a pilot-scale chemical extraction plant. Washing with 60mmol ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) per kg of soil on average removed 79, 38, 70, and 80% of Pb, Zn, Cd and As, respectively, and significantly reduced the leachability, phyto-accessibility and oral-availability of residual toxic metals, as assessed using deionised water, toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid extraction (DTPA) and physiologically based extraction test (PBET) tests. The used soil washing solution was treated before discharge using an electrochemical advanced oxidation process with graphite anode: EDTA was removed by degradation and toxic metals were electro-precipitated onto a stainless steel cathode. The novelty of the remediation technique is separation of the soil from the washing solution and soil rinsing (removal of mobilized contaminants) carried out in the same process step. Another novelty is the reuse of the soil rinsing solution from the previous batch for cleansing the soil sand, soil rinsing and for preparation of the washing solution in subsequent batches. The cost of energy and material expenses and disposal of waste products amounted to approximately 75€ton(-1) of soil. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  4. [Research on the effect and technique of remediation for multi-metal contaminated tailing soils].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-xu; Guo, Qing-jun; Yang, Jun-xing; Zhang, Han-zhi; Wei, Rong-fei; Wang, Chun-yu; Marc, Peters

    2013-09-01

    Soil samples were collected from compound polluted tailings to analyze the contents of total heavy metals and their speciation in the soil. Laboratory batch tests were conducted to examine the effects of distilled water and different concentrations of oxalic acid, citric acid, acetic acid, HNO3 and EDTA on the removal of heavy metals from the polluted soils. The suitable eluent and its optimal conditions including liquid to soil ratio, reaction time and washing number were also optimized, and the total toxicity reduction index was proposed to evaluate the effect of the eluent on the remediation of polluted soil. The results showed that Cd and Pb were the most abundant heavy metals in the soil, reaching 52.2 mg x kg(-1) and 4836.5 m x kg(-1), respectively. There was significant difference in the removal efficiency for different heavy metals. Cr had a maximum removal efficiency of 2.7%, while the maximum Cd and Pb removal efficiency was both about 60%. Distilled water had little removal efficiency for heavy metals, with less than 0.1% removal rate; the heavy metal removal efficiency of oxalic acid and acetic acid was also quite low; EDTA in 0.1 mol x L(-1) was selected as the suitable eluent for the polluted soil. Evaluation of the total toxicity reduction index and the cost suggested that EDTA should be used with a liquid to soil ratio of 6:1, a reaction time of 3 h and 2 washings.

  5. Emerging Technology Summary. ACID EXTRACTION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR TREATMENT OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Acid Extraction Treatment System (AETS) is intended to reduce the concentrations and/or teachability of heavy metals in contaminated soils so the soil can be returned to the site from which it originated. The objective of the project was to determine the effectiveness and com...

  6. The holy grail of soil metal contamination site assessment: reducing risk and increasing confidence of decision making using infield portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouillon, M.; Taylor, M. P.; Dong, C.

    2016-12-01

    This research assesses the advantages of integrating field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) technology for reducing the risk and increase confidence of decision making for metal-contaminated site assessments. Metal-contaminated sites are often highly heterogeneous and require a high sampling density to accurately characterize the distribution and concentration of contaminants. The current regulatory assessment approaches rely on a small number of samples processed using standard wet-chemistry methods. In New South Wales (NSW), Australia, the current notification trigger for characterizing metal-contaminated sites require the upper 95% confidence interval of the site mean to equal or exceed the relevant guidelines. The method's low `minimum' sampling requirements can misclassify sites due to the heterogeneous nature of soil contamination, leading to inaccurate decision making. To address this issue, we propose integrating infield pXRF analysis with the established sampling method to overcome sampling limitations. This approach increases the minimum sampling resolution and reduces the 95% CI of the site mean. Infield pXRF analysis at contamination hotspots enhances sample resolution efficiently and without the need to return to the site. In this study, the current and proposed pXRF site assessment methods are compared at five heterogeneous metal-contaminated sites by analysing the spatial distribution of contaminants, 95% confidence intervals of site means, and the sampling and analysis uncertainty associated with each method. Finally, an analysis of costs associated with both the current and proposed methods is presented to demonstrate the advantages of incorporating pXRF into metal-contaminated site assessments. The data shows that pXRF integrated site assessments allows for faster, cost-efficient, characterisation of metal-contaminated sites with greater confidence for decision making.

  7. Heavy metal contamination of agricultural soils affected by mining activities around the Ganxi River in Chenzhou, Southern China.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Sun, Jing; Yang, Zhaoguang; Wang, Lin

    2015-12-01

    Heavy metal contamination attracted a wide spread attention due to their strong toxicity and persistence. The Ganxi River, located in Chenzhou City, Southern China, has been severely polluted by lead/zinc ore mining activities. This work investigated the heavy metal pollution in agricultural soils around the Ganxi River. The total concentrations of heavy metals were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The potential risk associated with the heavy metals in soil was assessed by Nemerow comprehensive index and potential ecological risk index. In both methods, the study area was rated as very high risk. Multivariate statistical methods including Pearson's correlation analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, and principal component analysis were employed to evaluate the relationships between heavy metals, as well as the correlation between heavy metals and pH, to identify the metal sources. Three distinct clusters have been observed by hierarchical cluster analysis. In principal component analysis, a total of two components were extracted to explain over 90% of the total variance, both of which were associated with anthropogenic sources.

  8. Heavy Metal Contamination of Soil, Irrigation Water and Vegetables in Peri-Urban Agricultural Areas and Markets of Delhi.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Arti; Singh, ShivDhar; Kumar, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Dietary exposure to heavy metals, namely cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and copper (Cu), has been identified as a risk to human health through consumption of vegetable crops. The present study investigates heavy metal contamination in irrigation water, soil, and vegetables at four peri-urban and one wholesale site in Delhi, India, and estimates the health risk index. Most of the samples collected from peri-urban areas exceeded the safe limits of lead and cadmium, whereas only lead concentration was found to be higher in vegetable samples collected from the wholesale market. Average uptake of metals by vegetables from soil decreased in the order Cd>Zn>Cu>Pb. The order of metal uptake based on transfer factor was highest in okra, cauliflower, and spinach, from greatest to least. Among the vegetables from peri-urban sites, only okra crossed the safe limit for cadmium; whereas vegetables from the wholesale site exceeded the limit for lead (potato, coriander, chilies, pea, and carrot, in order from greatest to least) with respect to health risk index.

  9. Phytoremediation of Metal Contaminated Soil Using Willow: Exploiting Plant-Associated Bacteria to Improve Biomass Production and Metal Uptake.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Jolien; Weyens, Nele; Croes, Sarah; Beckers, Bram; Meiresonne, Linda; Van Peteghem, Pierre; Carleer, Robert; Vangronsveld, Jaco

    2015-01-01

    Short rotation coppice (SRC) of willow and poplar is proposed for economic valorization and concurrently as remediation strategy for metal contaminated land in northeast-Belgium. However, metal phytoextraction appears insufficient to effectuate rapid reduction of soil metal contents. To increase both biomass production and metal accumulation of SRC, two strategies are proposed: (i) in situ selection of the best performing clones and (ii) bioaugmentation of these clones with beneficial plant-associated bacteria. Based on field data, two experimental willow clones, a Salix viminalis and a Salix alba x alba clone, were selected. Compared to the best performing commercial clones, considerable increases in stem metal extraction were achieved (up to 74% for Cd and 91% for Zn). From the selected clones, plant-associated bacteria were isolated and identified. All strains were subsequently screened for their plant growth-promoting and metal uptake enhancing traits. Five strains were selected for a greenhouse inoculation experiment with the selected clones planted in Cd-Zn-Pb contaminated soil. Extraction potential tended to increase after inoculation of S. viminalis plants with a Rahnella sp. strain due to a significantly increased twig biomass. However, although bacterial strains showing beneficial traits in vitro were used for inoculation, increments in extraction potential were not always observed.

  10. Heavy Metal Contamination in Soil and Brown Rice and Human Health Risk Assessment near Three Mining Areas in Central China

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Metal mining and waste discharge lead to regional heavy metal contamination and attract major concern because of the potential risk to local residents. Methods This research was conducted to determine lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), manganese (Mn), and antimony (Sb) concentrations in soil and brown rice samples from three heavy metal mining areas in Hunan Province, central China, and to assess the potential health risks to local inhabitants. Results Local soil contamination was observed, with mean concentrations of Cd, Pb, Sb, and As of 0.472, 193.133, 36.793, and 89.029 mg/kg, respectively. Mean concentrations of Cd, Pb, Sb, Mn, and As in brown rice were 0.103, 0.131, 5.175, 6.007, and 0.524 mg/kg, respectively. Daily intakes of Cd, As, Sb, Pb, and Mn through brown rice consumption were estimated to be 0.011, 0.0002, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0003 mg/(kg/day), respectively. The combined hazard index for the five heavy metals was 22.5917, and the total cancer risk was 0.1773. Cd contributed most significantly to cancer risk, accounting for approximately 99.77% of this risk. Conclusions The results show that potential noncarcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks exist for local inhabitants and that regular monitoring of pollution to protect human health is urgently required.

  11. ASSOCIATED BACTERIA INCREASE THE PHYTOEXTRACTION OF CADMIUM AND ZINC FROM A METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL BY MYCORRHIZAL WILLOWS.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Dana; Baum, Christel; Leinweber, Peter; Hrynkiewicz, Katarzyna; Meissner, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    In order to enhance phytoremediation efficiency, we investigated the effects of dual inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi and the ectomycorrhiza associated bacteria Micrococcus luteus and Sphingomonas sp. on the growth and metal accumulation of willows (Salix viminalis x caprea) on contaminated soil. The bacterial strains were previously collected from sporocarps of ectomycorrhizal fungi. The bacteria increased plant growth and the mycorrhizal dependency of willows colonized with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Hebeloma crustuliniforme. The total cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation in the shoot biomass was increased after inoculation with the fungal strain Hebeloma crustuliniforme in combination with Micrococcus luteus up to 53% and in combination with Sphingomonas sp. up to 62%, respectively. The dual inoculation in combination with Laccaria laccata did not increase the accumulation of Cd and Zn in the willows. We conclude that associated bacteria can enhance the ectomyorrhiza formation and growth of willows and, thereby, the Cd and Zn accumulation in the plant biomass. The results suggest that bacterial support of root growth promoting ectomycorrhizal fungi may be a promising approach to improve the remediation of metal-contaminated soils by using willows.

  12. Potential of woody plants from a Tonglushan ancient copper spoil heap for phytoremediation of heavy metal contaminated soil(1).

    PubMed

    Kang, Wei; Bao, Jianguo; Zheng, Jin; Xu, Fen; Wang, Liuming

    2016-03-25

    Fast-growing metal-accumulating woody plants are considered potential candidates for phytoremediation of metals. Tonglushan mining, one of the biggest Cu production bases in China, presents an important source of the pollution of environment. The sample was collected at Tonglushan ancient copper spoil heap. The aims were to measure the content of heavy metal in the soil and woody plants and to elucidate the phytoremediation potential of the plants. The result showed the soil Cu, Cd and Pb were the main contamination, the mean contents of which were 3166.73 mg/kg, 3.66 mg/kg and 137.06 mg/kg, respectively, belonged to severe contamination. 14 species from 14 genera of 13 families were collected and investigated, except for Ligutrums lucidum, the other 13 woody plants species were newly recorded in this area. In addition, to assess the ability of metal accumulation of these trees, we proposed enrichment index. Data suggested that Platanus × acerilolia, Broussonetia papyrifera, Ligutrums lucidum, Viburnum awabuk, Firminan simplex, Robina pseudoacacial, Melia azedarach and Osmanthus fragrans exhibited high accumulated capacity and strong tolerance to heavy metals. Therefore, Platanus × acerilolia and Broussonetia papyrifera can be planted in Pb contaminated areas; Viburnum awabuki, Firminan simplex, Robina pseudoacacial and Melia azedarach are the suitable trees for Cd contaminated areas; Viburnum awabuki, Melia azedarach, Ligutrums lucidum, Firminan simplex, Osmanthus fragrans and Robina pseudoacacial are appropriate to Cu, Pb and Cd multi-metal contaminated areas.

  13. Metal contamination of soils and plants associated with the glass industry in North Central India: prospects of phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Varun, Mayank; D'Souza, Rohan; Pratas, João; Paul, Manoj S

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the glass industry on urban soil metal characterization was assessed in the area of Firozabad, India. A comprehensive profile of metal contamination was obtained in five zones each containing five specific sites. Zn, Cd, and As showed a greater accumulation, whereas accumulation of Ni and Cu was high in limited samples. Positive correlation was found for the metal pairs Cu-Zn, Cu-Co, and Cu-Cr at P < 0.01. Moderate positive correlation was also observed between Zn-Co, Mn-Cd, Mn-As, Pb-As, and Ni-Cu at P < 0.05. Integrated contamination indices indicate that 60% of the sites were heavily contaminated while 28% were moderately contaminated. Phytoremedial potential of native flora (twenty herbs, three shrubs, and two grasses) was also assessed by analyzing their metal uptake. Individual elements displayed remarkably different patterns of accumulation in soils as well as in plants. Mn, Zn, Cu, and As were predominantly partitioned in shoots, Co and Cd in roots while Pb, Cr, and Ni almost equally between shoots and roots. Most plants exhibited capabilities in mobilizing Co, Pb, Cr, and Ni in the root zone. Potential phytoextractors include Datura stramonium and Chenopodium murale while phytostabilizers include Calotropis procera and Gnaphalium luteo-album. Poa annua showed potential in both categories. None of the species showed phytoremedial potential for Co and Ni.

  14. Soil heavy metal contamination in an industrial area: analysis of the data collected during a decade.

    PubMed

    D'Emilio, Mariagrazia; Caggiano, Rosa; Macchiato, Maria; Ragosta, Maria; Sabia, Serena

    2013-07-01

    Soil contamination by heavy metals has become a serious problem mainly because, above certain concentrations, all metals have adverse effects on human health. In particular, the accumulation of heavy metals in agricultural soils leads to elevated uptake by crops and affects food quality and safety. In this paper, we present the results of a study carried out over a decade for evaluating the impact of a new industrial settlement in an area geared to agriculture and livestock and far from urban sites. We focus our study on the bioavailable fraction of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in soil samples. Heavy metal concentrations in soil are analysed with both univariate and multivariate statistical procedures. The main goal of this paper is the development of a statistical procedure, based on a mix of multivariate analysis, able to compare field surveys carried out during different years and to characterize spatial and temporal changes in soil heavy metals concentrations.

  15. Improving the phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soil by use of sewage sludge

    PubMed Central

    Placek, Agnieszka; Grobelak, Anna; Kacprzak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sewage sludge, in particular from the food industry, is characterized by fertilizing properties, due to the high content of organic matter and nutrients. The application of sewage sludge causes an improvement of soil parameters as well as increase in cation exchange capacity, and thus stronger binding of cations in the soil environment, which involves the immobilization of nutrients and greater resistance to contamination. In a field experiment sewage sludge has been used as an additive to the soil supporting the phytoremediation process of land contaminated with heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb) using trees species: Scots pine (Pinus silvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), and oak (Quercus robur L.). The aim of the research was to determine how the application of sewage sludge into the soil surface improves the phytoremediation process. The conducted field experiment demonstrated that selected trees like Scots pine and Norway spruce, because of its excellent adaptability, can be used in the remediation of soil. Oak should not be used in the phytoremediation process of soils contaminated with high concentrations of trace elements in the soil, because a significant amount of heavy metals was accumulated in the leaves of oak causing a risk of recontamination. PMID:26368503

  16. Improving the phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soil by use of sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Placek, Agnieszka; Grobelak, Anna; Kacprzak, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Sewage sludge, in particular from the food industry, is characterized by fertilizing properties, due to the high content of organic matter and nutrients. The application of sewage sludge causes an improvement of soil parameters as well as increase in cation exchange capacity, and thus stronger binding of cations in the soil environment, which involves the immobilization of nutrients and greater resistance to contamination. In a field experiment sewage sludge has been used as an additive to the soil supporting the phytoremediation process of land contaminated with heavy metals (Cd, Zn, and Pb) using trees species: Scots pine (Pinus silvestris L.), Norway spruce (Picea abies L.), and oak (Quercus robur L.). The aim of the research was to determine how the application of sewage sludge into the soil surface improves the phytoremediation process. The conducted field experiment demonstrated that selected trees like Scots pine and Norway spruce, because of its excellent adaptability, can be used in the remediation of soil. Oak should not be used in the phytoremediation process of soils contaminated with high concentrations of trace elements in the soil, because a significant amount of heavy metals was accumulated in the leaves of oak causing a risk of recontamination.

  17. Effects of Different Soil Amendments on Mixed Heavy Metals Contamination in Vetiver Grass.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chuck Chuan; Boyce, Amru Nasrulhaq; Rahman, Md Motior; Abas, Mhd Radzi

    2016-11-01

    Three different types of low cost soil amendments, namely, EDTA, elemental S and N-fertilizer, were investigated with Vetiver grass, Vetiveria zizanioides (Linn.) Nash growing under highly mixed Cd-Pb contamination conditions. A significant increase (p < 0.05) in Cd and Pb accumulation were recorded in the shoots of all EDTA and N-fertilizer assisted treatments. The accumulation of Cd in 25 mmol EDTA/kg soil and 300 mmol N/kg soil showed relatively higher translocation factor (1.72 and 2.15) and percentage metal efficacy (63.25 % and 68.22 %), respectively, compared to other treatments. However, it was observed that the increased application of elemental S may inhibit the availability of Pb translocation from soil-to-root and root-to-shoot. The study suggests that viable application of 25 mmol EDTA/kg, 300 mmol N/kg and 20 mmol S/kg soil have the potential to be used for soil amendment with Vetiver grass growing under contaminated mixed Cd-Pb soil conditions.

  18. Characterization of imidacloprid availability in subsurface soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Degradation and sorption/desorption are the most important processes affecting the leaching of pesticides through soil because they control the amount of pesticide available for transport. Once pesticides move past the surface soil layers, variations in subsurface soil physical, chemical, and biolog...

  19. [Heavy Metal Contamination in Farmland Soils at an E-waste Disassembling Site in Qingyuan, Guangdong, South China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-lian; Ding, Jiang-feng; Lu, Gui-ning; Dang, Zhi; Yi, Xiao-yun

    2015-07-01

    Crude e-waste dismantling activities have caused a series of environmental pollution problems, and the pollutants released from the dismantling activities would finally pose high risks to human health by means of the accumulation through food chains. To explore the contamination status of heavy metals to the surrounding farmland soils in Longtang and Shijiao Town, Qingyuan, Guangdong, China, 22 farmland soil samples were collected and analyzed for the contents, spatial distributions and chemical forms of 6 heavy metals (Pb, Cu, Cd, Zn, Cr and Ni). The results showed that the 6 heavy metals exhibited obvious accumulations when compared to the corresponding background values in Guangdong Province. According to farmland environmental quality evaluation standard for edible agricultural products HJ 332-2006, the pollution severity of heavy metals was evaluated by monomial pollution index and Nemerow synthetic pollution index methods, the results indicated that 72. 7% of the soil samples contained one or more kinds of heavy metals with higher concentrations than the corresponding standard values, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn were the main metals in the polluted soils, and for the proportion of contaminated soil samples in all the 22 samples, Cd was the highest, followed by Cu, and finally Pb and Zn. Nemerow synthetic pollution index further revealed that 68. 2% of soil samples were contaminated, and among them 53. 3% of samples were heavily contaminated. Most of the heavy metals were well correlated with each other at the 0. 05 or 0. 01 level, which indicated that primitive e-waste recycling activities were an important source of the heavy metal contamination in Longtang and Shijiao Town. The contents of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn in surface soils were higher than those of other soil layers, and the contents of these 4 metals in deep soils (20- 100 cm) did not show significant decreases with the increasing depths. The contents of Cr and Ni maintained constant, and exhibited no statistical

  20. Heavy metal contamination in water, soil, and vegetables of the industrial areas in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Jasim Uddin; Goni, Md Abdul

    2010-07-01

    Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd, Fe, and Ni have been estimated in soils and vegetables grown in and around an industrial area of Bangladesh. The order of metal contents was found to be Fe > Cu > Zn > Cr > Pb > Ni > Cd in contaminated irrigation water, and a similar pattern Fe > Zn > Ni > Cr > Pb > Cu > Cd was also observed in arable soils. Metal levels observed in different sources were compared with WHO, SEPA, and established permissible levels reported by different authors. Mean concentration of Cu, Fe, and Cd in irrigation water and Cd content in soil were much above the recommended level. Accumulation of the heavy metals in vegetables studied was lower than the recommended maximum tolerable levels proposed by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (1999), with the exception of Cd which exhibited elevated content. Uptake and translocation pattern of metal from soil to edible parts of vegetables were quite distinguished for almost all the elements examined.

  1. Surfactant-facilitated remediation of metal-contaminated soils: efficacy and toxicological consequences to earthworms.

    PubMed

    Slizovskiy, Ilya B; Kelsey, Jason W; Hatzinger, Paul B

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of surfactant formulations to remove aged metals from a field soil and their influence on soil toxicity was investigated. Batch studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of cationic (1-dodecylpyridinium chloride; DPC), nonionic (oleyl dimethyl benzyl ammonium chloride; trade name Ammonyx KP), and anionic (rhamnolipid biosurfactant blend; trade name JBR-425) surfactants for extracting Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd from a soil subjected to more than 80 years of metal deposition. All three surfactants enhanced removal of the target metals. The anionic biosurfactant JBR-425 was most effective, reducing Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd in the soil by 39, 56, 68, and 43%, respectively, compared with less than 6% removal by water alone. Progressive acidification of the surfactants with citric acid buffer or addition of ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid (EDTA) further improved extraction efficiency, with more than 95% extraction of all four metals by surfactants acidified to pH 3.6 and generally greater than 90% removal of all metals with addition of 0.1 M EDTA. In two species of earthworm, Eisenia fetida and Lumbricus terrestris, metal bioaccumulation was reduced by approximately 30 to 80%, total biomass was enhanced by approximately threefold to sixfold, and survival was increased to greater than 75% in surfactant-remediated soil compared with untreated soil. The data indicate that surfactant washing may be a feasible approach to treat surface soils contaminated with a variety of metals, even if those metals have been present for nearly a century, and that the toxicity and potential for metal accumulation in biota from the treated soils may be significantly reduced.

  2. Metal-contaminated soil remediation by means of paper mill sludges addition: chemical and ecotoxicological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Calace, N; Campisi, T; Iacondini, A; Leoni, M; Petronio, B M; Pietroletti, M

    2005-08-01

    Metal pollution of soils is a great environmental problem. The major risks due to metal pollution of soil consist of leaching to groundwater and potential toxicity to plants and/or animals. The objective of this study is to evaluate by means of chemical and ecotoxicological approach the effects of paper mill sludge addition on the mobile metal fraction of polluted metal soils. The study was carried out on acidic soil derived from mining activities and thus polluted with heavy metals, and on two paper mill sludges having different chemical features. The results obtained by leaching experiments showed that the addition of a paper mill sludge, consisting mainly of carbonates, silicates and organic matter, to a heavy-metal polluted soil produces a decrease of available metal forms. The carbonate content seems to play a key role in the chemical stabilisation of metals and consequently in a decrease of toxicity of soil. The leached solutions have a non-toxic effect. The mild remediation by addition of sludge has moreover a lasting effect.

  3. Health Risk-Based Assessment and Management of Heavy Metals-Contaminated Soil Sites in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Chen, Ting-Chien; Chen, Bo-Ching; Guo, Horng-Yuh; Chen, Zueng-Sang

    2010-01-01

    Risk-based assessment is a way to evaluate the potential hazards of contaminated sites and is based on considering linkages between pollution sources, pathways, and receptors. These linkages can be broken by source reduction, pathway management, and modifying exposure of the receptors. In Taiwan, the Soil and Groundwater Pollution Remediation Act (SGWPR Act) uses one target regulation to evaluate the contamination status of soil and groundwater pollution. More than 600 sites contaminated with heavy metals (HMs) have been remediated and the costs of this process are always high. Besides using soil remediation techniques to remove contaminants from these sites, the selection of possible remediation methods to obtain rapid risk reduction is permissible and of increasing interest. This paper discusses previous soil remediation techniques applied to different sites in Taiwan and also clarified the differences of risk assessment before and after soil remediation obtained by applying different risk assessment models. This paper also includes many case studies on: (1) food safety risk assessment for brown rice growing in a HMs-contaminated site; (2) a tiered approach to health risk assessment for a contaminated site; (3) risk assessment for phytoremediation techniques applied in HMs-contaminated sites; and (4) soil remediation cost analysis for contaminated sites in Taiwan. PMID:21139851

  4. Effect of soil metal contamination on glyphosate mineralization: role of zinc in the mineralization rates of two copper-spiked mineral soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bojeong; Kim, Young Sik; Kim, Bo Min; Hay, Anthony G; McBride, Murray B

    2011-03-01

    A systematic investigation into lowered degradation rates of glyphosate in metal-contaminated soils was performed by measuring mineralization of [(14)C]glyphosate to (14)CO(2) in two mineral soils that had been spiked with Cu and/or Zn at various loadings. Cumulative (14)CO(2) release was estimated to be approximately 6% or less of the amount of [(14)C]glyphosate originally added in both soils over an 80-d incubation. For all but the highest Cu treatments (400 mg kg(-1)) in the coarse-textured Arkport soil, mineralization began without a lag phase and declined over time. No inhibition of mineralization was observed for Zn up to 400 mg kg(-1) in either soil, suggesting differential sensitivity of glyphosate mineralization to the types of metal and soil. Interestingly, Zn appeared to alleviate high-Cu inhibition of mineralization in the Arkport soil. The protective role of Zn against Cu toxicity was also observed in the pure culture study with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that increased mineralization rates in high Cu soil with Zn additions might have been due to alleviation of cellular toxicity by Zn rather than a mineralization specific mechanism. Extensive use of glyphosate combined with its reduced degradation in Cu-contaminated, coarse-textured soils may increase glyphosate persistence in soil and consequently facilitate Cu and glyphosate mobilization in the soil environment.

  5. [Promotion effects of microorganisms on phytoremediation of heavy metals-contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuo; Wang, Zhan-Li; Li, Bo-Wen; Zhang, Rui-Fang

    2009-08-01

    Taking Brassica juncea as a hyperaccumulator, a pot experiment was conducted to study the effects of Bacillusme gaterium - Bacillus mucilaginosus mixed agent and Aspergillus niger 30177 fermentation liquor on the phytoremediation of Cd, Pb, and Zn-contaminated soil. The B. gaterium - B. mucilaginosus mixed agent not only promoted the growth of B. juncea, but also increased the soil Cd, Pb, and Zn uptake by the hyperaccumulator, with the phytoremediation efficiency enhanced greatly. The enrichment amount of Cd, Pb and Zn in B. juncea on the soil added with soluble Cd, Pb and Zn increased by 1.18, 1.54 and 0.85 folds, while that on the soil added with Cd, Pb and Zn-contaminated sediment increased by 4.00, 0. 64 and 0. 65 folds, respectively, compared with the control. A. niger 30177 fermentation liquor increased the soil Cd, Pb, and Zn uptake by B. juncea. Comparing with the control, the enrichment amount of Cd, Pb and Zn in aboveground part of B. juncea on the soil added with soluble Cd, Pb and Zn increased by 88.82%, 129.04% and 16.80%, while that on the soil added with Cd, Pb and Zn-contaminated sediment increased by 78.95%, 113.63% and 33.85%, respectively. However, A. niger 30177 fermentation liquor decreased the B. juncea biomass greatly, having less effect in the enhancement of phytoremediation efficiency. The analysis of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography showed that the fermentation liquor of B. gaterium and B. mucilaginosus contained some organic acids such as oxalic acid and citric acid. These acids could dissolve the heavy metals to some degree, and accordingly, enhance the bioavailability of the metals.

  6. Microbial links between sulfate reduction and metal retention in uranium- and heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Jana; Akob, Denise M; Kaufmann, Christian; Finster, Kai; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Burkhardt, Eva-Maria; Kostka, Joel E; Scheinost, Andreas C; Büchel, Georg; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-05-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) can affect metal mobility either directly by reductive transformation of metal ions, e.g., uranium, into their insoluble forms or indirectly by formation of metal sulfides. This study evaluated in situ and biostimulated activity of SRB in groundwater-influenced soils from a creek bank contaminated with heavy metals and radionuclides within the former uranium mining district of Ronneburg, Germany. In situ activity of SRB, measured by the (35)SO(4)(2-) radiotracer method, was restricted to reduced soil horizons with rates of < or =142 +/- 20 nmol cm(-3) day(-1). Concentrations of heavy metals were enriched in the solid phase of the reduced horizons, whereas pore water concentrations were low. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) measurements demonstrated that approximately 80% of uranium was present as reduced uranium but appeared to occur as a sorbed complex. Soil-based dsrAB clone libraries were dominated by sequences affiliated with members of the Desulfobacterales but also the Desulfovibrionales, Syntrophobacteraceae, and Clostridiales. [(13)C]acetate- and [(13)C]lactate-biostimulated soil microcosms were dominated by sulfate and Fe(III) reduction. These processes were associated with enrichment of SRB and Geobacteraceae; enriched SRB were closely related to organisms detected in soils by using the dsrAB marker. Concentrations of soluble nickel, cobalt, and occasionally zinc declined < or =100% during anoxic soil incubations. In contrast to results in other studies, soluble uranium increased in carbon-amended treatments, reaching < or =1,407 nM in solution. Our results suggest that (i) ongoing sulfate reduction in contaminated soil resulted in in situ metal attenuation and (ii) the fate of uranium mobility is not predictable and may lead to downstream contamination of adjacent ecosystems.

  7. Electrokinetic remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils under reducing environments

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, K.R.; Chinthamreddy, S. . Dept. of Civil and Materials Engineering)

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the migration of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), nickel, Ni(II), and cadmium, Cd(II), in clayey soils that contain different reducing agents under an induced electric potential. Bench-scale electrokinetic experiments were conducted using two different clays, kaolin and glacial till, both with and without a reducing agent. The reducing agent used was either humic acid, ferrous iron, or sulfide, in a concentration of 1000 mg/kg. These soils were then spiked with Cr(VI), Ni(II), and Cd(II) in concentrations of 1000, 500 and 250 mg/kg, respectively, and tested under an induced electric potential of 1 VDC/cm for a duration of over 200 h. The reduction of chromium from Cr(VI) to Cr(III) occurred prior to electrokinetic treatment. The extent of this Cr(VI) reduction was found to be dependent on the type and amount of reducing agents present in the soil. The maximum reduction occurred in the presence of sulfides, while the minimum reduction occurred in the presence of humic acid. The concentration profiles in both soils following electrokinetic treatment showed that Cr(VI) migration was retarded significantly in the presence of sulfides due both to the reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) as well as an increase in soil pH. This low migration of chromium is attributed to: (1) migration of Cr(VI) and the reduced Cr(III) fraction in opposite directions, (2) low Cr(III) migration due to adsorption and precipitation in high pH regions near the cathode in kaolin and throughout the glacial till, and (3) low Cr(VI) migration due to adsorption in the pH regions near the anode in both soils. Ni(II) and Cd(II) migrated towards the cathode in kaolin; however, the migration was significantly retarded in the presence of sulfides due to increased pH through most of the soil. Initial high pH conditions within the glacial till resulted in Ni(II) and Cd(II) precipitation, so the effects of reducing agents were inconsequential. Overall, this study demonstrated that the reducing

  8. The effects of heavy metal contamination on the soil arthropod community of a shooting range.

    PubMed

    Migliorini, Massimo; Pigino, Gaia; Bianchi, Nicola; Bernini, Fabio; Leonzio, Claudio

    2004-05-01

    Soils in clay pigeon shooting ranges can be seriously contaminated by heavy metals. The pellets contained in ammunition are composed of Pb, Sb, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu. The total concentrations of these metals in soils, and the effects of their increasing levels on the arthropod community were investigated at seven sampling sites in a clay pigeon shooting range and compared with two controls. Research revealed that the spatial distribution of Pb and Sb contamination in the shot-fall area was strongly correlated with the flight path of the pellets. Ordination obtained through Redundance Analysis showed that Collembola, Protura and Diplura were positively correlated with major detected contaminants (Pb, Sb), while Symphyla showed a negative correlation with these pollutants. Determination of the soluble lead fraction in soil, and of its bioaccumulation in the saprophagous Armadillidium sordidum (Isopoda) and the predator Ocypus olens (Coleoptera), showed that a significant portion of metallic Pb from spent pellets is bioavailable in the soil and can be bioaccumulated by edaphic organisms, entering the soil trophic network, but without biomagnification.

  9. Soil heavy metal contamination and health risks associated with artisanal gold mining in Tongguan, Shaanxi, China.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ran; Wang, Shuang; Li, Ronghua; Wang, Jim J; Zhang, Zengqiang

    2017-07-01

    Soil contamination with heavy metals due to mining activities poses risks to ecological safety and human well-being. Limited studies have investigated heavy metal pollution due to artisanal mining. The present study focused on soil contamination and the health risk in villages in China with historical artisanal mining activities. Heavy metal levels in soils, tailings, cereal and vegetable crops were analyzed and health risk assessed. Additionally, a botany investigation was conducted to identify potential plants for further phytoremediation. The results showed that soils were highly contaminated by residual tailings and previous mining activities. Hg and Cd were the main pollutants in soils. The Hg and Pb concentrations in grains and some vegetables exceeded tolerance limits. Moreover, heavy metal contents in wheat grains were higher than those in maize grains, and leafy vegetables had high concentrations of metals. Ingestion of local grain-based food was the main sources of Hg, Cd, and Pb intake. Local residents had high chronic risks due to the intake of Hg and Pb, while their carcinogenic risk associated with Cd through inhalation was low. Three plants (Erigeron canadensis L., Digitaria ciliaris (Retz.) Koel., and Solanum nigrum L.) were identified as suitable species for phytoremediation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Use of composts in the remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Mark; Jones, Davey L

    2010-03-15

    High levels of heavy metals in soil can ultimately lead to pollution of drinking water and contamination of food. Consequently, sustainable remediation strategies for treating soil are required. The potential ameliorative effect of several composts derived from source-separated and mixed municipal wastes were evaluated in a highly acidic heavily contaminated soil (As, Cu, Pb, Zn) in the presence and absence of lime. Overall, PTE (potentially toxic element) amelioration was enhanced by compost whilst lime had little effect and even exacerbated PTE mobilization (e.g. As). All composts reduced soil solution PTE levels and raised soil pH and nutrient levels and are well suited to revegetation of contaminated sites. However, care must be taken to ensure correct pH management (pH 5-6) to optimize plant growth whilst minimizing PTE solubilization, particularly at high pH. In addition, 'metal excluder' species should be sown to minimize PTE entry into the food chain. (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Remediation of heavy metal-contaminated forest soil using recycled organic matter and native woody plants.

    PubMed

    Helmisaari, H-S; Salemaa, M; Derome, J; Kiikkilä, O; Uhlig, C; Nieminen, T M

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine how the application of a mulch cover (a mixture of household biocompost and woodchips) onto heavy metal-polluted forest soil affects (i) long-term survival and growth of planted dwarf shrubs and tree seedlings and (ii) natural revegetation. Native woody plants (Pinus sylvestris, Betula pubescens, Empetrum nigrum, and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi) were planted in mulch pockets on mulch-covered and uncovered plots in summer 1996 in a highly polluted Scots pine stand in southwest Finland. Spreading a mulch layer on the soil surface was essential for the recolonization of natural vegetation and increased dwarf shrub survival, partly through protection against drought. Despite initial mortality, transplant establishment was relatively successful during the following 10 yr. Tree species had higher survival rates, but the dwarf shrubs covered a larger area of the soil surface during the experiment. Especially E. nigrum and P. sylvestris proved to be suitable for revegetating heavy metal-polluted and degraded forests. Natural recolonization of pioneer species (e.g., Epilobium angustifolium, Taraxacum coll., and grasses) and tree seedlings (P. sylvestris, Betula sp., and Salix sp.) was strongly enhanced on the mulched plots, whereas there was no natural vegetation on the untreated plots. These results indicate that a heavy metal-polluted site can be ecologically remediated without having to remove the soil. Household compost and woodchips are low-cost mulching materials that are suitable for restoring heavy metal-polluted soil.

  12. Bioremediation of multi-metal contaminated soil using biosurfactant - a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Juwarkar, Asha A; Dubey, Kirti V; Nair, Anupa; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2008-03-01

    An unconventional nutrient medium, distillery spent wash (1:3) diluted) was used to produce di-rhamnolipid biosurfactant by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain BS2. This research further assessed the potential of the biosurfactant as a washing agent for metal removal from multimetal contaminated soil (Cr-940 ppm; Pb-900 ppm; Cd-430 ppm; Ni-880 ppm; Cu-480 ppm). Out of the treatments of contaminated soil with tap water and rhamnolipid biosurfactant, the latter was found to be potent in mobilization of metal and decontamination of contaminated soil. Within 36 hours of leaching study, di-rhamnolipid as compared to tap water facilitated 13 folds higher removal of Cr from the heavy metal spiked soil whereas removal of Pb and Cu was 9-10 and 14 folds higher respectively. Leaching of Cd and Ni was 25 folds higher from the spiked soil. This shows that leaching behavior of biosurfactant was different for different metals. The use of wastewater for production of biosurfactant and its efficient use in metal removal make it a strong applicant for bioremediation.

  13. Metal contamination of surface soils of industrial city Sialkot, Pakistan: a multivariate and GIS approach.

    PubMed

    Malik, Riffat Naseem; Jadoon, Waqar Azeem; Husain, Syed Zahoor

    2010-06-01

    In this study concentrations of selected metals viz., Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn in surface soils of Sialkot city known worldwide for tanneries and pharmaceutical industries were measured to assess the status of urban soil pollution and to identify sources of contamination. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HACA) indicated concentrations of Mg and Ca related to parent rock material, Cd, Co, and Pb with traffic related activities, Cr, Cu, Ni and Zn either associated with automobiles activities or industrial pollution and Fe, K and Na related with anthropogenic activities or lithogenous materials. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis based on factor analysis confirmed the results of HACA. Spatial distribution maps exhibited relatively higher concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, Cr and Zn along traffic routes in the city and streams. The results highlighted concentration of Cd, Ni, Cr, Zn, and Pb measured in urban soil exceeded the permissible limit of surface soils and advocated an imperative need for detailed baseline investigations of spatial distribution of heavy metals and other contaminants for the formulation of geochemical database that should be made available to stakeholder involved in monitoring, assessment and conservation of soil contamination for future planning and management of the Sialkot city.

  14. Remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil washing residues with amino polycarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Arwidsson, Zandra; Elgh-Dalgren, Kristin; von Kronhelm, Thomas; Sjöberg, Ragnar; Allard, Bert; van Hees, Patrick

    2010-01-15

    Removal of Cu, Pb, and Zn by the action of the two biodegradable chelating agents [S,S]-ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and methylglycinediacetic acid (MGDA), as well as citric acid, was tested. Three soil samples, which had previously been treated by conventional soil washing (water), were utilized in the leaching tests. Experiments were performed in batches (0.3 kg-scale) and with a WTC-mixer system (Water Treatment Construction, 10 kg-scale). EDDS and MGDA were most often equally efficient in removing Cu, Pb, and Zn after 10-60 min. Nonetheless, after 10d, there were occasionally significant differences in extraction efficiencies. Extraction with citric acid was generally less efficient, however equal for Zn (mainly) after 10d. Metal removal was similar in batch and WTC-mixer systems, which indicates that a dynamic mixer system could be used in full-scale. Use of biodegradable amino polycarboxylic acids for metal removal, as a second step after soil washing, would release most remaining metals (Cu, Pb and Zn) from the present soils, however only after long leaching time. Thus, a full-scale procedure, based on enhanced metal leaching by amino polycarboxylic acids from soil of the present kind, would require a pre-leaching step lasting several days in order to be efficient.

  15. Effects of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on maize grown in multi-metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chang-Cong; Li, Tao; Xiao, Yan-ping; Liu, Mao-Jun; Zhang, Han-Bo; Zhao, Zhi-Wei

    2009-01-01

    Pot culture experiments were established to determine the effects of colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) (Glomus mosseae and G. sp) on maize (Zea mays L.) grown in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils. AMF and non-AMF inoculated maize were grown in sterilized substrates and subjected to different soil heavy metal (Pb, Zn, Cd) concentrations. The root and shoot biomasses of inoculated maize were significantly higher than those of non-inoculated maize. Pb, Zn, and Cd concentrations in roots were significantly higher than those in shoots in both the inoculated and non-inoculated maize, indicating the heavy metals mostly accumulated in the roots of maize. The translocation rates of Pb, Zn, and Cd from roots to shoots were not significantly difference between inoculated and non-inoculated maize. However, at high soil heavy metal concentrations, Pb, Zn, and Cd in the shoots and Pb in the roots of inoculated maize were significantly reduced by about 50% compared to the non-inoculated maize. These results indicated that AMF could promote maize growth and decrease the uptake of these heavy metals at higher soil concentrations, thus protecting their hosts from the toxicity of heavy metals in Pb, Zn, and Cd complex contaminated soils.

  16. Assessment of heavy metals contamination and leaching characteristics in highway side soils, Iran.

    PubMed

    Saeedi, Mohsen; Hosseinzadeh, Majid; Jamshidi, Ahmand; Pajooheshfar, S P

    2009-04-01

    Twenty seven topsoil samples were collected under stable weather conditions from the northern and southern sides of Tehran-Karaj Highway, Iran. Samples were analyzed for heavy metal (Pb, V, Zn, Ni, Co, Cr, Cd, and Mn) contents and leaching characteristics. The results showed that all heavy metal contents except Cr, Mn and Co are higher than acceptable values in natural soils. High contents of these elements could be attributed to anthropogenic effects related to traffic sources. Toxicity characteristics leaching procedure (TCLP) test results reveal that the studied soils may be hazardous. Statistical analysis shows significant positive correlations between heavy metals and organic matter. Also a significant correlation was observed between Cd, Pb and Zn. This affinity and exponentially decreasing concentration with distance from the edge of the road suggest that automobiles are a major source of these metals in the roadside soils. Use of leaded gasoline and tire erosion gives a boost to this claim.

  17. Heavy metal contamination of soils at old mining sites on Thasos Island, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kelepertsis, A E; Bibou, A

    1991-03-01

    Thasos Island has a long history of metalliferous mining, the first mining activities having been initiated by the Phoenicians during the seventh century. The mineralogy of the mineralisation includes primary minerals (galena, sphalerite) and secondary oxidised minerals (smithsonite, cerussite). In the soils studied only secondary minerals were found. Clay minerals (kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, mixed layer clays), plagioclase, calcite and dolomite are also present in the soils. Contamination derived from the old mining sites results in extremely high levels of Pb, Zn, Mn, Fe, As, Sb, Ag, Cd in soils in the vicinity of the old workings. Since many of the Thasos mining sites are in, or adjacent to, areas of agricultural land, plants growing on the polluted sous have increased concentrations of heavy metals. This may well have a possible effect on livestock.

  18. Molecular diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in relation to soil chemical properties and heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mehdi; Hempel, Stefan; Wubet, Tesfaye; Schäfer, Tina; Savaghebi, Gholamreza; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Buscot, François

    2010-08-01

    Abundance and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) associated with dominant plant species were studied along a transect from highly lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) polluted to non-polluted soil at the Anguran open pit mine in Iran. Using an established primer set for AMF in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of rDNA, nine different AMF sequence types were distinguished after phylogenetic analyses, showing remarkable differences in their distribution patterns along the transect. With decreasing Pb and Zn concentration, the number of AMF sequence types increased, however one sequence type was only found in the highly contaminated area. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that further factors than HM soil concentration affect the AMF community at contaminated sites. Specifically, the soils' calcium carbonate equivalent and available P proved to be of importance, which illustrates that field studies on AMF distribution should also consider important environmental factors and their possible interactions.

  19. Enhancement of ecosystem services during endophyte-assisted aided phytostabilization of metal contaminated mine soil.

    PubMed

    Burges, Aritz; Epelde, Lur; Benito, Garazi; Artetxe, Unai; Becerril, José M; Garbisu, Carlos

    2016-08-15

    Endophytic plant growth-promoting bacteria (endophytes) were isolated from a variety of (pseudo)metallophytes growing in an abandoned Zn/Pb mine and then characterized according to their plant growth-promoting traits (i.e. ACC deaminase activity, IAA production, siderophore production, phosphate solubilising capacity, metal and salt tolerance and phenotypic characterization). Initially, under growth chamber conditions, an endophyte-assisted aided phytostabilization study was carried out with Festuca rubra plants (native vs. commercial variety) inoculated with a Pseudomonas sp. isolate and cow slurry as organic amendment. The effect of treatments on soil physicochemical and microbial indicators of soil quality, as well as plant physiological parameters and metal concentrations, was assessed. We performed a complementary interpretation of our data through their grouping within a set of ecosystem services. Although the application of cow slurry had the most pronounced effects on soil quality indicators and ecosystem services, the growth of native F. rubra plants reduced soil bioavailability of Cd and Zn by 19 and 22%, respectively, and enhanced several soil microbial parameters. On the other hand, endophyte (Pseudomonas sp.) inoculation improved the physiological status of F. rubra plants by increasing the content of carotenoids, chlorophylls and Fv/Fm by 69, 65 and 37%, respectively, while also increasing the values of several soil microbial parameters. Finally, a consortium of five endophyte isolates was used for an endophyte-assisted aided phytostabilization field experiment, where lower metal concentrations in native excluder plants were found. Nonetheless, the field inoculation of the endophyte consortium had no effect on the biomass of native plants.

  20. Effects of remediation train sequence on decontamination of heavy metal-contaminated soil containing mercury.

    PubMed

    Hseu, Zeng-Yei; Huang, Yu-Tuan; Hsi, Hsing-Cheng

    2014-09-01

    When a contaminated site contains pollutants including both nonvolatile metals and Hg, one single remediation technology may not satisfactorily remove all contaminants. Therefore, in this study, chemical extraction and thermal treatment were combined as a remediation train to remove heavy metals, including Hg, from contaminated soil. A 0.2 M solution of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) was shown to be the most effective reagent for extraction of considerable amounts of Cu, Pb, and Zn (> 50%). Hg removal was ineffective using 0.2 M EDTA, but thermogravimetric analysis suggested that heating to 550 degrees C with a heating rate of 5 degrees C/min for a duration of 1 hr appeared to be an effective approach for Hg removal. With the employment of thermal treatment, up to 99% of Hg could be removed. However executing thermal treatment prior to chemical extraction reduced the effectiveness of the subsequent EDTA extraction because nonvolatile heavy metals were immobilized in soil aggregates after the 550 degrees C treatment. The remediation train of chemical extraction followed by thermal treatment appears to remediate soils that have been contaminated by many nonvolatile heavy metals and Hg. Implications: A remediation train conjoining two or more techniques has been initialized to remove multiple metals. Better understandings of the impacts of treatment sequences, namely, which technique should be employed first on the soil properties and the decontamination efficiency, are in high demand. This study provides a strategy to remove multiple heavy metals including Hg from a contaminated soil. The interactions between thermal treatment and chemical extraction on repartitioning of heavy metals was revealed. The obtained results could offer an integrating strategy to remediate the soil contaminated with both heavy metals and volatile contaminants.

  1. Ex-situ remediation of a metal-contaminated Superfund soil using selective extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, M.C.; Pichtel, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act requires the use of remedial technologies that permanently and significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of contaminated materials at affected sites. Extractive processes can accomplish the requirements of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), N-2(acetamido)iminodiacetic acid (ADA), pyridine-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDA), and hydrochloric acid (HCl) were evaluated over a range of concentrations and reaction times in batch studies for their ability to remove lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) from a Superfund soil (Pb{sub total} = 65,200 mg/kg, Cd{sub total} = 52 mg/kg). Lead extraction was limited by a slow overall reaction. The order of Pb removal by extractant was EDTA > ADA > PDA > HCL. The soil was subjected to three repeated 1 h extractions in which a maximum of 86, 84, 70, and 54% of the total soil Pb was removed with EDTA, ADA, PDA, and HCl, respectively. The soil was not treated to below the Pb regulatory limit (1,000 mg/kg), even after five extractions with 0.075 M EDTA; however, the remaining Pb occurred in a residual form. All extractants treated the soil below the proposed Cd regulatory limit (40 mg/kg) within 1 h. With three repeated extractions EDTA, ADA, PDA, and HCl removed a maximum of 96, 100, 98, and 100% Cd, respectively. Lead recovery from spent solution was accomplished by hydroxide precipitation in the presence of excess calcium. Recovery at pH 11 was 70, 98, and 97% from the EDTA, ADA, and PDA complexes, respectively. The results indicate that the remediation of weathered, heavily Pb- and Cd-contaminated soils via extractive processes is possible under the appropriate conditions.

  2. Remediation of metal contaminated soil by EDTA incorporating electrochemical recovery of metal and EDTA

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, H.E.; Chen, P.H. )

    1993-11-01

    Removal of toxic heavy metals from a soil matrix by the addition of ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) is an effective means of remediation. The liquid stream containing the metal and chelating agent is amenable to further treatment by electrolysis in which the metal can be separated from the chelating agent. This provides a separated metal than can be removed for reuse or treated for final disposal by conventional technologies and a reclaimed EDTA stream that can be used again for treatment of contaminated soil. Under the diffusion controlled conditions of polarography or voltammetry, the authors observed reduction of cadmium, copper and lead ions and their protonated EDTA complexes (MHY[sup [minus

  3. IS REMOVAL THE ONLY OPTION: IN SITU REMEDIATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The In-place Inactivation and Natural Ecological Restoration Technologies (IINERT) Soil-Metals Action Team was established in 11/95 as one of several Action Teams under the USEPA Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF). Its primary goal was to examine in situ remediatio...

  4. Metal contaminated biochar and wood ash negatively affect plant growth and soil quality after land application.

    PubMed

    Jones, D L; Quilliam, R S

    2014-07-15

    Pyrolysis or combustion of waste wood can provide a renewable source of energy and produce byproducts which can be recycled back to land. To be sustainable requires that these byproducts pose minimal threat to the environment or human health. Frequently, reclaimed waste wood is contaminated by preservative-treated timber containing high levels of heavy metals. We investigated the effect of feedstock contamination from copper-preservative treated wood on the behaviour of pyrolysis-derived biochar and combustion-derived ash in plant-soil systems. Biochar and wood ash were applied to soil at typical agronomic rates. The presence of preservative treated timber in the feedstock increased available soil Cu; however, critical Cu guidance limits were only exceeded at high rates of feedstock contamination. Negative effects on plant growth and soil quality were only seen at high levels of biochar contamination (>50% derived from preservative-treated wood). Negative effects of wood ash contamination were apparent at lower levels of contamination (>10% derived from preservative treated wood). Complete removal of preservative treated timber from wood recycling facilities is notoriously difficult and low levels of contamination are commonplace. We conclude that low levels of contamination from Cu-treated wood should pose minimal environmental risk to biochar and ash destined for land application.

  5. Cost-benefit calculation of phytoremediation technology for heavy-metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiaoming; Lei, Mei; Chen, Tongbin

    2016-09-01

    Heavy-metal pollution of soil is a serious issue worldwide, particularly in China. Soil remediation is one of the most difficult management issues for municipal and state agencies because of its high cost. A two-year phytoremediation project for soil contaminated with arsenic, cadmium, and lead was implemented to determine the essential parameters for soil remediation. Results showed highly efficient heavy metal removal. Costs and benefits of this project were calculated. The total cost of phytoremediation was US$75,375.2/hm(2) or US$37.7/m(3), with initial capital and operational costs accounting for 46.02% and 53.98%, respectively. The costs of infrastructures (i.e., roads, bridges, and culverts) and fertilizer were the highest, mainly because of slow economic development and serious contamination. The cost of phytoremediation was lower than the reported values of other remediation technologies. Improving the mechanization level of phytoremediation and accurately predicting or preventing unforeseen situations were suggested for further cost reduction. Considering the loss caused by environmental pollution, the benefits of phytoremediation will offset the project costs in less than seven years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Viability of organic wastes and biochars as amendments for the remediation of heavy metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Venegas, A; Rigol, A; Vidal, M

    2015-01-01

    Composts derived from municipal (MOW and MSW) and domestic wastes (DOM), wastes from the olive oil industry (OWH and OP), green waste (GW), and biochars (BF and BS) were investigated to test their viability for remediating metal-contaminated soils. In addition to common analyses, the characterisation included structural analyses (FTIR and (13)C NMR), determination of the acid neutralisation capacity (ANC) and the construction of sorption isotherms for target metals (Pb, Zn, Cd, Ni and Cu). MOW and GW had the highest ANC values (4280 and 7100 meq kg(-1), respectively), and MOW, GW, DOM, BF and BS exhibited the highest solid-liquid distribution coefficients (Kd) with maximum values in the 10(4) L kg(-1) range. Sorption isotherms were fitted using linear and Freundlich models for better comparison of the sorption capacities of the materials. Based on their basic pH, high ANC and high sorption capacity, MOW, GW and biochars are the most promising materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of metals on a siderophore producing bacterial isolate and its implications on microbial assisted bioremediation of metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Gaonkar, Teja; Bhosle, Saroj

    2013-11-01

    A bacterial isolate producing siderophore under iron limiting conditions, was isolated from mangroves of Goa. Based on morphological, biochemical, chemotaxonomical and 16S rDNA studies, the isolate was identified as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NAR38.1. Preliminary characterization of the siderophore indicated it to be catecholate type with dihydroxy benzoate as the core component. Optimum siderophore production was observed at pH 7 in mineral salts medium (MSM) without any added iron with glucose as the carbon source. Addition of NaCl in the growth medium showed considerable decrease in siderophore production above 2% NaCl. Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) below 2 μM and 40 μM concentrations respectively, induced siderophore production, above which the production was repressed. Binding studies of the siderophore with Fe(+2) and Fe(+3) indicated its high affinity towards Fe(+3). The siderophore concentration in the extracellular medium was enhanced when MSM was amended with essential metals Zn, Co, Mo and Mn, however, decreased with Cu, while the concentration was reduced with abiotic metals As, Pb, Al and Cd. Significant increase in extracellular siderophore production was observed with Pb and Al at concentrations of 50 μM and above. The effect of metals on siderophore production was completely mitigated in presence of Fe. The results implicate effect of metals on the efficiency of siderophore production by bacteria for potential application in bioremediation of metal contaminated iron deficient soils especially in the microbial assisted phytoremediation processes.

  8. Bacillus dabaoshanensis sp. nov., a Cr(VI)-tolerant bacterium isolated from heavy-metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaowen; Wang, Yueqiang; Liu, Jing; Chang, Ming; Zhao, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhuang, Li

    2015-05-01

    A Cr(VI)-tolerant, Gram-staining-positive, rod-shaped, endospore-forming and facultative anaerobic bacterium, designated as GSS04(T), was isolated from a heavy-metal-contaminated soil. Strain GSS04(T) was Cr(VI)-tolerant with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 600 mg l(-1) and was capable of reducing Cr(VI) under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Growth occurred with presence of 0-3 % (w/v) NaCl (optimum 1 %), at pH 5.5-10.0 (optimum pH 7.0) and 15-50 °C (optimum 30-37 °C). The main respiratory quinone was MK-7 and the major fatty acids were anteiso-C15:0 and iso-C15:0. The DNA G+C content was 41.1 mol%. The predominant polar lipid was diphosphatidylglycerol. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, the closest phylogenetic relative was Bacillus shackletonii DSM 18868(T) (97.6 %). The DNA-DNA hybridization between GSS04(T) and its closest relatives revealed low relatedness (<70 %). The results of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and genotypic analyses clearly indicated that strain GSS04(T) represents a novel species of the genus Bacillus, for which the name Bacillus dabaoshanensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GSS04(T) (=CCTCC AB 2013260(T) = KCTC 33191(T)).

  9. Perspectives of humic substances application in remediation of highly heavy metals contaminated soils in Kola Subarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tregubova, Polina; Turbaevskaya, Valeria; Zakharenko, Andrey; Kadulin, Maksim; Smirnova, Irina; Stepanov, Andrey; Koptsik, Galina

    2016-04-01

    Northwestern part of Russia, the Kola Peninsula, is one of the most heavy metals (HM) contaminated areas in the northern hemisphere. The main polluters, mining-and-metallurgical integrated works "Pechenganikel" and "Severonikel", are surrounded by heavily damaged barren lands that require remediation. The main contaminating metals are Ni and Cu. Using of exogenous humic substances could be possible effective and cost-efficient solution of HM contamination problem. Rational application of humates (Na-K salts of humic acids) can result in improvement of soil properties, localization of contamination and decreasing bioavailability through binding HM in relatively immobile organic complexes. Our research aim was to evaluate the influence of increasing doses of different origin humates on i) basic properties of contaminated soils; ii) mobility and bioavailability of HMs; iii) vegetation state and chemistry. In summer 2013 a model field experiment was provided in natural conditions of the Kola Peninsula. We investigated the Al-Fe-humus abrazem, soil type that dominates in technogenic barren lands around the "Severonikel" work. These soils are strongly acid: pHH2O was 3.7-4.1; pHKCl was 3.4-4.0. The exchangeable acidity is low (0.8-1.6 cmol(+)/kg) due to the depletion of fine particles and organic matter, being the carriers of exchange positions. The abrazems of barrens had lost organic horizon. 12 sites were created in 1 km from the work. In those sites, except 2 controls, various amendments were added: i) two different by it's origin types of humates: peat-humates and coal-humates, the last were in concentrations 0.5% and 1%; ii) lime; iii) NPK-fertilizer; iv) biomates (organic degradable cover for saving warm and erosion protection). As a test-culture a grass mixture with predominance of Festuca rubra and Festuca ovina was sowed. As a result we concluded that humates of different origin have unequal influence on soil properties and cause decreasing as well as

  10. From conceptual model to remediation: bioavailability, a key to clean up heavy metal contaminated soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruzzelli, Gianniantonio; Pedron, Francesca; Pezzarossa, Beatrice

    2013-04-01

    Processes of metal bioavailability in the soil To know the bioavailability processes at site specific levels is essential to understand in detail the risks associated with pollution, and to support the decision-making process, i.e. description of the conceptual model and choice of clean up technologies. It is particularly important to assess how chemical, physical and biological processes in the soil affect the reactions leading to adsorption, precipitation or release of contaminants. The measurement of bioavailability One of the main difficulties in the practical application of the bioavailability concept in soil remediation is the lack of consensus on the method to be used to measure bioavailability. The best strategy is to apply a series of tests to assess bioavailability, since no applicable method is universally valid under all conditions. As an example, bioavailability tests for phytotechnology application should consider two distinct aspects: a physico-chemical driven solubilization process and a physiologically driven uptake process. Soil and plant characteristics strongly influence bioavailability. Bioavailability as a tool in remediation strategies Bioavailability can be used at all stages in remediation strategies: development of the conceptual model, evaluation of risk assessment, and selection of the best technology, considering different scenarios and including different environmental objectives. Two different strategies can be followed: the reduction and the increase of bioavailability. Procedures that reduce bioavailability aim to prevent the movement of pollutants from the soil to the living organisms, essentially by: i) removal of the labile phase of the contaminant, i.e. the fraction which is intrinsic to the processes of bioavailability (phytostabilization); ii) conversion of the labile fraction into a stable fraction (precipitation or adsorption); iii) increase of the resistance to mass transfer of the contaminants (inertization). Procedures

  11. Feasibility of using hyperaccumulating plants to bioremediate metal-contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.J.; Guerin, T.F.

    1995-12-31

    A feasibility study was carried out to determine whether selected plants were capable of hyperaccumulating anthropogenic sources of metals found in soils from three contaminated sites. A trial was conducted using the previously reported hyperaccumulators, Armeria maritima (thrift), Impatiens balsamina (balsam), Alyssum saxatile (gold dust), and the control species, Brassica oleracea (cabbage). Although none of these plants showed any substantial hyperaccumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb, and Cd, it was established that there is an optimum period in the life-cycle of these plants in which the metal concentration reaches a maximum. This period was dependent on the metal, soil, and plant type. The current paper describes the data obtained for Zn and Cu uptake by thrift.

  12. White clover nodulation index in heavy metal contaminated soils- a potential bioindicator.

    PubMed

    Manier, Nicolas; Deram, Annabelle; Broos, Kris; Denayer, Franck-Olivier; Van Haluwyn, Chantal

    2009-01-01

    The morphological effects of heavy metal stress on the nodulation ability of Rhizobium spp. and growth of white clover (Trifolium repens L.) were studied in the laboratory under controlled conditions. Fourteen topsoils were collected from an area with elevated metal concentrations (Cd, Zn, and Pb). White clover was cultivated using a specialized "rhizotron" method to observe the development of root and nodule characteristics. Results show effects of increasing heavy metal concentrations on nodulation development, especially the nodulation index (i.e., the number of nodules per gram of the total fresh biomass). A significant decrease in nodulation index was observed at about 2.64 mg Cd kg(-1), 300 mg Zn kg(-1), and 130 mg Pb kg(-1) in these soils. The sensitivity of the nodulation index in relation to other morphological characteristics is discussed further. It is proposed that the nodulation index of white clover is a suitable bioindicator of increased heavy metal concentrations in soil.

  13. Performance of bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction applied to metal contaminated soils: a review.

    PubMed

    Lebeau, Thierry; Braud, Armelle; Jézéquel, Karine

    2008-06-01

    Bioaugmentation-assisted phytoextraction is a promising method for the cleaning-up of soils contaminated by metals. Bacteria mainly Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) and fungi mainly Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) associated with hyperaccumulating or non-hyperaccumulating plants were analyzed on the basis of a bioprocess engineering approach (concentration and amount of metals extracted by plants, translocation and bioconcentration factor, and plant biomass). In average bioaugmentation increased metals accumulated by shoots by a factor of about 2 (metal concentration) and 5 (amount) without any obvious differences between bacteria and fungi. To optimize this process, new relevant microorganism-plant associations and field scale experiments are needed along with a common methodology for the comparison of all experiments on the same basis. Recommendations were suggested concerning both the microbial-plant selection and the implementation of bioaugmentation to enhance the microbial survival. The use of microbial consortia associated with plant was discussed notably for multi-contaminated soils.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of metal contamination of soils from the Gulf War activities

    SciTech Connect

    Sadiq, M.; Mian, A.A. ); AlThagafi, K.M. )

    1992-11-01

    Oil burning in Kuwait, atmospheric fallout of particulates from the use of explosives in the Gulf War, and war-related ground activities created serious air pollution problems in the neighboring countries. A large area of Saudi Arabia might have been adversely affected from these activities. In an effort to assess the impact of these problems on air quality, the Research Institute of King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM/RI) initiated an air monitoring program. As a part of the program, soil samples were collected by the Meteorology and Environment Protection Administration (MEPA) and were analyzed for toxic metals. This paper discusses analytical results of these soil samples. It is realized that the paper might have scientific and statistical limitations, but the data reported would be of interest to many environmentalists who care to know the impact of the Gulf War on the terrestrial environment in this region. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. In-Situ Electrokinetic Remediation of Metal Contaminated Soils Technology Status Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    demonstration of electrokinetic remediation at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) Point Mugu. Dr. R. Mark Bricka, David Gent , and Chris Fetter of the...Profile 23 5 I. Introduction Electrokinetic remediation is an in-situ process in which an electrical field is created in a soil matrix by...technology at its current stage of development. 6 II. Technology Description Electrokinetic remediation is an in-situ process in which an

  16. Extent of industrial heavy-metal contamination of soil in East St. Louis, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberger, S.; Kaminski, M.

    1997-12-01

    The city of East St. Louis, Illinois, has an abundant history of economic and industrial activity. The many industrial activities that have operated in and around the area of East St. Louis include ferrous and nonferrous smelters, a coal-fired power plant, organic and inorganic chemical companies, petroleum refineries, fertilizer companies, and rubber reclamation. As a result, heavy-metal accumulation in the residential soils has become a major concern. The extent of the contamination has been investigated in this study.

  17. Estimate of heavy metal contamination in soils after a mining accident using reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kemper, Thomas; Sommer, Stefan

    2002-06-15

    The possibility to adapt chemometrics approaches for the quantitative estimation of heavy metals in soils polluted by a mining accident was explored. In April 1998, the dam of a mine tailings pond in Aznalcóllar (Spain) collapsed and flooded an area of more than 4000 ha with pyritic sludge contaminated with high concentrations of heavy metals. Six months after the end of the first remediation campaign, soil samples were collected for chemical analysis and measurement of visible to near-infrared reflectance (0.35-2.4 microm). Concentrations for As, Cd, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb, S, Sb, and Zn were well above background values. Prediction of heavy metals was achieved by stepwise multiple linear regression analysis (MLR) and an artificial neural network (ANN) approach. It was possible to predict six out of nine elements with high accuracy. Best R2 between predicted and chemically analyzed concentrations were As, 0.84; Fe, 0.72; Hg, 0.96; Pb, 0.95; S, 0.87; and Sb, 0.93. Results for Cd (0.51), Cu (0.43), and Zn (0.24) were not significant. MLR and ANN both achieved similar results. Correlation analysis revealed that most wavelengths important for prediction could be attributed to absorptions features of iron and iron oxides. These results indicate that it is feasible to predict heavy metals in soils contaminated by mining residuals using the rapid and cost-effective reflectance spectroscopy.

  18. [Evaluation of compounding EDTA and citric acid on remediation of heavy metals contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xue; Chen, Jia-Jun; Cai, Wen-Min

    2014-08-01

    As commonly used eluents, Na2EDTA (EDTA) and citric acid (CA) have been widely applied in remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals. In order to evaluate the removal of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead in the contaminated soil collected in a chemical plant by compounding EDTA and CA, a series of stirring experiments were conducted. Furthermore, the changes in speciation distribution of heavy metals before and after washing were studied. The results showed that, adopting the optimal molar ratio of EDTA/CA (1:1), when the pH of the solution was 3, the stirring time was 30 min, the stirring rate was 150 r x min(-1) and the L/S was 5:1, the removal rates of arsenic, cadmium, copper and lead could reach 11.72%, 43.39%, 24.36% and 27.17%, respectively. And it was found that after washing, for arsenic and copper, the content of acid dissolved fraction rose which increased the percentage of available contents. Fe-Mn oxide fraction mainly contributed to the removal of copper. As for cadmium, the percentages of acid dissolved fraction, Fe-Mn oxide fraction and organic fraction also decreased. In practical projects, speciation changes would pose certain environmental risk after soil washing, which should be taken into consideration.

  19. Potential of plant growth promoting traits by bacteria isolated from heavy metal contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Simranjeet; Singh, Joginder; Upadhyay, Niraj

    2015-06-01

    Rhizobacteria can enhance biomass production and heavy metal tolerance of plants under the stress environment. The aim of this study was to collect soil samples from different industrial sites followed by their heavy metal analysis. After performing the ICP-AES analysis of soil samples from seven different sites, bacterial strains were isolated from the soil samples of most polluted (heavy metal) site. Phylogenetic analysis of isolates based on 16S rDNA sequences showed that the isolates belonged to four species: Bacillus thuringiensis, Azotobacter chroococcum, Paenibacillus ehimensis and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. Plant growth promoting activities; siderophore production, indole acetic acid production, HCN production, and phosphate solubilisation were assayed in vitro, and statistically analysis done by using ANOVA analysis and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference test (p ≤ 0.05). Plant growth-promoting characteristics of isolated strains were higher compared to the control Pseudomonas fluorescens (NICM 5096). In vitro study was performed to check resistance against two heavy metals of isolates. It was observed that isolated bacterial strains have higher heavy metal resistance as compared to control E. coli (NICM 2563). These isolates may cause pathogenic effects, so to avoid this risk, their antibacterial susceptibility was checked against eight antibiotics. Among the eight antibiotics, Ciprofloxacin-1 has shown higher inhibition against all the isolated bacterial strains.

  20. Spectroscopic analysis of soil metal contamination around a derelict mine site in the Blue Mountains, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsoddini, A.; Raval, S.; Taplin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Abandoned mine sites pose the potential threat of the heavy metal pollution spread through streams and via runoff leading to contamination of soil and water in their surrounding areas. Regular monitoring of these areas is critical to minimise impacts on water resources, flora and fauna. Conventional ground based monitoring is expensive and sometimes impractical; spectroscopic methods have been emerged as a reliable alternative for this purpose. In this study, the capabilities of the spectroscopy method were examined for modelling soil contamination from around the abandoned silver-zinc mine located at Yerranderie, NSW Australia. The diagnostic characteristics of the original reflectance data were compared with models derived from first and second derivatives of the reflectance data. The results indicate that the models derived from the first derivative of the reflectance data estimate heavy metals significantly more accurately than model derived from the original reflectance. It was also found in this study that there is no need to use second derivative for modelling heavy metal soil contamination. Finally, the results indicate that estimates were of greater accuracy for arsenic and lead compared to other heavy metals, while the estimation for silver was found to be the most erroneous.

  1. Heavy Metal Contamination in Rice-Producing Soils of Hunan Province, China and Potential Health Risks

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fanfu; Wei, Wei; Li, Mansha; Huang, Ruixue; Yang, Fei; Duan, Yanying

    2015-01-01

    We studied Cd, Cr, As, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Hg in three agricultural areas of Hunan province and determined the potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks for residents. Soil and brown rice samples from Shimen, Fenghuang, and Xiangtan counties were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Soil levels of Cd and Hg were greatest, followed by As and Ni. The mean concentrations of heavy metals in brown rice were Cd 0.325, Cr 0.109, As 0.344, Ni 0.610, Mn 9.03, Pb 0.023, and Hg 0.071 mg/kg, respectively. Cd and Hg had greater transfer ability from soil to rice than the other elements. Daily intake of heavy metals through brown rice consumption were estimated to be Cd 2.30, Cr 0.775, As 2.45, Ni 4.32, Pb 0.162, Mn 64.6 and Hg 0.503 µg/(kg·day), respectively. Cd, Hg and As Hazard Quotient values were greater than 1 and Cd, Cr, As and Ni Cancer Risk values were all greater than 10−4. The total non-carcinogenic risk factor was 14.6 and the total carcinogenic risk factor was 0.0423. Long-term exposure to heavy metals through brown rice consumption poses both potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks to the local residents. PMID:26670240

  2. Remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil using chelant extraction: Feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.W.; Miller, G.; Taylor, J.D.; Schneider, J.F.; Zellmer, S.; Edgar, D.E.; Johnson, D.O.

    1993-08-01

    Results are presented of a laboratory investigation conducted to determine the efficacy of using chelating agents to extract heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ba, Cu, and Zn) from soil, the primary focus being on the extraction of lead from the soil. Results from the batch-shaker studies and emphasizes the columnar extraction studies are described. The chelating agents studied included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid, in addition to water. Concentrations of the chelants ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 M; the suspension pH was varied between 3 and 8. Results showed that the removal of lead using citric acid and water was somewhat pH-dependent. For the batch-shaker studies, the results indicated that EDTA was more effective at removing Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn than was citric acid (both present at 0.01 M). EDTA and citric acid were equally effective in mobilizing Cr and Ba from the soil. Heavy metals removal was slightly more effective in the more acidic region (pH {le} 5).

  3. Heavy-metal-contaminated industrial soil: Uptake assessment in native plant species from Brazilian Cerrado.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sylvia Therese; Castro, Samuel Rodrigues; Fernandes, Marcus Manoel; Soares, Aylton Carlos; de Souza Freitas, Guilherme Augusto; Ribeiro, Edvan

    2016-08-02

    Plants of the Cerrado have shown some potential for restoration and/or phytoremediation projects due to their ability to grow in and tolerate acidic soils rich in metals. The aim of this study is to evaluate the tolerance and accumulation of metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in five native tree species of the Brazilian Cerrado (Copaifera langsdorffii, Eugenia dysenterica, Inga laurina, Cedrela fissilis, Handroanthus impetiginosus) subjected to three experiments with contaminated soils obtained from a zinc processing industry (S1, S2, S3) and control soil (S0). The experimental design was completely randomized (factorial 5 × 4 × 3) and conducted in a greenhouse environment during a 90-day experimentation time. The plant species behavior was assessed by visual symptoms of toxicity, tolerance index (TI), translocation factor (TF), and bioaccumulation factor (BF). C. fissilis has performed as a Zn accumulator by the higher BFs obtained in the experiments, equal to 3.72, 0.88, and 0.41 for S1, S2, and S3 respectively. This species had some ability of uptake control as a defense mechanism in high stress conditions with the best behavior for phytoremediation and high tolerance to contamination. With economical and technical benefits, this study may support a preliminary analysis necessary for using native tree species in environmental projects.

  4. Screening and monitoring of metal contamination in soils of environmental disaster areas: available techniques and needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twardowska, Irena; Janta-Koszuta, Krystyna; Stefaniak, Sebastian; Kyziol, Joanna

    2004-12-01

    The monitoring of metals in the environment is well advanced technically and analytically, though the sustainable development requirements induce the need of new methods of metal assessment in the terrestrial and aquatic environment. The current metal monitoring in soil is based on the total content that does not allow for assessment of their environmental mobility and bioavailability. The new techniques should enable metal partitioning with respect to susceptibility to migrate and exert the toxic effect on the target organisms. This statement is exemplified in the screening survey for metals of the area impacted by the catastrophic flood of 1997 in the Odra River valley in Poland. Metals enrichment of soils due to river sediments deposition, as well as their mobility in soils of the affected area were assessed in view of potential risk to the receptors. Sampling cells positioning by GPS and the assessment of the post-flood changes in metal spatial distribution with use of the Geographical Information System (GIS) were most helpful, while the sequential extraction analytical procedure for evaluation of binding strength and major chemical forms of metals was conducted manually and thus was very laborious. Automation of metal partitioning, and bioavailable forms assessment by DGT technique would have given the most valuable information and reduce the time needed for the manual analysis.

  5. Heavy Metal Contamination in Rice-Producing Soils of Hunan Province, China and Potential Health Risks.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Fanfu; Wei, Wei; Li, Mansha; Huang, Ruixue; Yang, Fei; Duan, Yanying

    2015-12-08

    We studied Cd, Cr, As, Ni, Mn, Pb, and Hg in three agricultural areas of Hunan province and determined the potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks for residents. Soil and brown rice samples from Shimen, Fenghuang, and Xiangtan counties were analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Soil levels of Cd and Hg were greatest, followed by As and Ni. The mean concentrations of heavy metals in brown rice were Cd 0.325, Cr 0.109, As 0.344, Ni 0.610, Mn 9.03, Pb 0.023, and Hg 0.071 mg/kg, respectively. Cd and Hg had greater transfer ability from soil to rice than the other elements. Daily intake of heavy metals through brown rice consumption were estimated to be Cd 2.30, Cr 0.775, As 2.45, Ni 4.32, Pb 0.162, Mn 64.6 and Hg 0.503 µg/(kg·day), respectively. Cd, Hg and As Hazard Quotient values were greater than 1 and Cd, Cr, As and Ni Cancer Risk values were all greater than 10(-4). The total non-carcinogenic risk factor was 14.6 and the total carcinogenic risk factor was 0.0423. Long-term exposure to heavy metals through brown rice consumption poses both potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks to the local residents.

  6. Utilization of fly ash for stabilization/solidification of heavy metal contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect

    Dermatas, D.; Meng, X.

    1995-12-01

    Pozzolanic-based stabilization/solidification (S/S) is an effective, yet economic technological alternative to immobilize heavy metals in contaminated soils and sludges. Fly ash waste materials were used along with quicklime (CaO) to immobilize lead, trivalent and hexavalent chromium present in contaminated clayey sand soils. The degree of heavy metal immobilization was evaluated using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) as well as controlled extraction experiments. These leaching test results along with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX) analyses were also implemented to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for immobilization of the heavy metals under study. Finally, the reusability of the stabilized waste forms in construction applications was also investigated by performing unconfined compressive strength and swell tests. Results suggest that the controlling mechanism for both lead and hexavalent chromium immobilization is surface adsorption, whereas for trivalent chromium it is hydroxide precipitation. Addition of fly ash to the contaminated soils effectively reduced heavy metal leachability well below the non-hazardous regulatory limits. However, quicklime addition was necessary in order to attain satisfactory immobilization levels. Overall, fly ash addition increases the immobilization pH region for all heavy metals tested, and significantly improves the stress-strain properties of the treated solids, thus allowing their reuse as readily available construction materials. The only potential problem associated with this quicklime/fly ash treatment is the excessive formation of the pozzolanic product ettringite in the presence of sulfates. Ettringite, when brought in contact with water, may cause significant swelling and subsequent deterioration of the stabilized matrix. Addition of minimum amounts of barium hydroxide was shown to effectively eliminate ettringite formation.

  7. Risk assessment of heavy metal contamination in soil and wild Libyan jird Meriones libycus in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Adham, Khadiga G; Al-Eisa, Nadia A; Farhood, Manal H

    2011-11-01

    This study was undertaken to document the impact of heavy metal pollution on the Libyan jird, Meriones libycus and to contribute to an environmental impact statement for the rapidly growing City of Riyadh. All metal concentrations in surface soil of a polluted site (within Riyadh City) were higherthan those from a reference site (outside the city).Although Pb declined versus earlier reports on Riyadh soil, Cd (0.97 microg g(-1)) and Hg (0.28 microg g(-1)) were above some of the most stringent quality guidelines (0.07-0.62 microg g(-1) for Cd and 0.14-0.18 microg g(-1) for Hg). Metal distribution in M. libycus proved site-related and organ-specific, recognizing a higher affinity of most tested metals towards the kidneys, liver and brain than the lung and heart. The comparatively lower site-specific accumulation of Pb in soft tissues was attributed primarily to its major hypothetical accumulation in bones, whereas, the transition rate of Hg from the liver was suggested to be lower to the brain than to the kidneys. Although a non hazardous status was assumed for Cu (11.27-13.16 microg g(-1)) and Hg (up to 0.207 microg g(-1)) in tissues of M. libycus, a potential risk was imposed by mean tissue concentrations of Cd (up to 3.29 microg g(01)), Ni (up to 1.48 microg g(-1)) and Pb (up to 1.94 microg g(-1)). On the grounds of the significantly higher metal levels in polluted soft tissues versus reference subjects, Libyan jirds possess high exposure potential and can be useful biomonitors of environmental metal contamination.

  8. [Enhanced phytoextraction of heavy metal contaminated soil by chelating agents and auxin indole-3-acetic acid].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-min; Dang, Zhi; Chen, Neng-chang; Xu, Sheng-guang; Xie, Zhi-yi

    2007-09-01

    The environmental risk of chelating agents such as EDTA application to the heavy metals polluted soils and the stress on plant roots due to the abrupt increase metals concentration limit the wide commercial use of chelate-induced phytoextraction. Chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) were used for enhancing heavy metals uptake from soils by Zea mays L. (corn) in pot experiments. The metals content in plant tissues was quantified using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results showed that the combination of IAA and EDTA increased the biomass by about 40.0% and the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in corn shoots by 27.0%, 26.8%, 27.5% and 32.8% respectively, as compared to those in EDTA treatment. While NTA&IAA treatment increased the biomass by about 29.9% and the contents of Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb in corn shoots by 31.8%, 27.6%, 17.0% and 26.9% respectively, as compared to those in NTA treatment. These results indicated that corn growth was promoted, and the biomass and the accumulation of heavy metals in plant shoots were increased significantly with the addition of IAA, which probably helps to change the cell membrane properties and the biomass distribution, resulting in the alleviation of the phytotoxicity of metals and the chelating agents.

  9. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and metal-contaminated soil by successive methyl-β-cyclodextrin-enhanced soil washing-microbial augmentation: a laboratory evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingming; Luo, Yongming; Teng, Ying; Jia, Zhongjun; Li, Zhengao; Deng, Shiping

    2013-02-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and metal-polluted sites caused by abandoned coking plants are receiving wide attention. To address the associated environmental concerns, innovative remediation technologies are urgently needed. This study was initiated to investigate the feasibility of a cleanup strategy that employed an initial phase, using methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) solution to enhance ex situ soil washing for extracting PAHs and metals simultaneously, followed by the addition of PAH-degrading bacteria (Paracoccus sp. strain HPD-2) and supplemental nutrients to treat the residual soil-bound PAHs. Elevated temperature (50 °C) in combination with ultrasonication (35 kHz, 30 min) at 100 g MCD L(-1) was effective in extracting PAHs and metals to assist soil washing; 93 % of total PAHs, 72 % of Cd, 78 % of Ni, 93 % of Zn, 84 % of Cr, and 68 % of Pb were removed from soil after three successive washing cycles. Treating the residual soil-bound PAHs for 20 weeks led to maximum biodegradation rates of 34, 45, 36, and 32 % of the remaining total PAHs, 3-ring PAHs, 4-ring PAHs, and 5(+6)-ring PAHs after washing procedure, respectively. Based on BIOLOG Ecoplate assay, the combined treatment at least partially restored microbiological functions in the contaminated soil. The ex situ cleanup strategy through MCD-enhanced soil washing followed by microbial augmentation can be effective in remediating PAH and metal-contaminated soil.

  10. Electrochemical recovery of EDTA and heavy metals from washing of metal contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.B. Jr.; Dougherty, D.J.; Allen, H.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses the electrodeposition of some heavy metals in ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) in the context of toxic metal removal from soils. Initial experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of an electrochemical cell for electrodepositing lead, cadmium, chromium, and mercury in the absence of EDTA. Current efficiencies were calculated to evaluate the performance of the electrodeposition process. Recovery/current efficiency percents were 99.3/79 for lead, 70.0/79 for cadmium, and 67.9/18 for lead. The same experiment was conducted with a mercury solution, but it was terminated when the mercury precipitated. Next, experiments were performed on the metal-EDTA complexes. Recovery/current efficiency percents were 99.7/62 for lead, 67.9/18 for chromium, and 92.0/60 for mercury. For the Cd-EDTA complex, no plating was observed.

  11. Residual effects of metal contamination on the soil quality: a field survey in central Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Gerardo, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    Agriculture is an important source of income and employment. But depletion and degradation of land challenge to producing safe food and other agricultural products to sustain livelihoods and meet the needs of urban populations. When developing or expanding an agricultural area, it becomes essential to access the soil quality. Even if the present source of contamination is not observed, it is a worth subject to evaluate whether or not any negative effects of the post contamination still last. For this purpose, a field survey (2 ha) was carried: a zinc and lead mining site that was abandoned about 50 years ago was researched at Sanguinheiro (40°18'N and 8°21'W) in Central Portugal. The area is characterized by very steep slopes that are confining with a small stream. The obtained results show that (i) the Pb content in the site (165 mg/kg) is higher than that in the background (67.7 mg/kg); (ii) the Zn content of local vegetation (Eucalyptus globulus) in the post-mining site is 2.1 times that in the control site, and (iii) dead bare ground is observed in some parts of the site. There is a possibility that great amounts of Zn and Pb accumulate in tissues of local vegetation. Although mining activity ended 50 years ago, the contents of Pb and Zn in the sampled soil were comparatively high in the site with about a 75% slope. It is concluded that not only the present contamination but also the post-environmental stress should be assessed to properly develop an agricultural area in terms of securing agricultural products.

  12. Use of Carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) as Flushing Agent for Remediation of Metal Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skold, M. E.; Thyne, G. D.; McCray, J. E.; Drexler, J. W.

    2005-12-01

    One of the major challenges in remediating soil and ground water is the presence of mixed organic and inorganic contaminants. Due to their very different behavior, research has to a large extent focused on remediation of either organic or inorganic contaminants rather than mixed waste. Cyclodextrins (CDs) are a group of non-toxic sugar based molecules that do not sorb to soil particles and do not experience pore size exclusion. Thus, they have good hydraulic properties. CDs enhance the solubility of organic compounds by forming inclusion complexes between organic contaminants and the non-polar cavity at the center of the CD. By substituting functional groups to the cyclodextrin molecule it can form complexes with heavy metals. Previous studies have shown that carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin (CMCD) can simultaneously complex organic and inorganic contaminants. The aim of this study is to compare how strongly CMCD complexes several common heavy metals, radioactive elements and a common divalent cation. Results from batch experiments show that CMCD has the ability to complex a wide array of heavy metals and radioactive elements. The solubility of metal oxalates and metal oxides clearly increased in the presence of CMCD. Logarithmic conditional formation constants ranged from 3.5 to 6 for heavy metals and from 3 to 6 for radioactive elements. Calcium, which may compete for binding sites, has a logarithmic conditional formation constant of 3.1. Batch experiments performed at 10 and 25 degrees C showed little temperature effect on conditional formation constants. Results from batch experiments were compared to results from column experiments where Pb was sorbed onto hydrous ferric oxide coated sand and subsequently removed by a CMCD solution. The results indicate that CMCD is a potential flushing agent for remediation of mixed waste sites.

  13. Modulation of genotoxicity and cytotoxicity by radish grown in metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Villatoro-Pulido, Myriam; Font, Rafael; De Haro-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Romero-Jiménez, Magdalena; Anter, Jaouad; De Haro Bailón, Antonio; Alonso-Moraga, Angeles; Del Río-Celestino, Mercedes

    2009-01-01

    Members of the Brassicaceae family are known for their anticarcinogenic and genetic material protective effects. However, many of the species of this family accumulate high amounts of metals, which is an undesirable feature. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) has shown to accumulate metals in roots to a higher extent than others members of Brassicaceae. The main objectives of this work are (i) to study the distribution of the accumulated As, Pb and Cd in radish plants and (ii) to establish the genotoxic, antigenotoxic and cytotoxic activities of the root and shoot of this vegetable. Results indicate that (i) the shoots of radish accumulate higher concentrations of metal(oid)s than roots; (ii) the shoots were genotoxic at the different concentrations studied, with the root showing such genotoxic effect only at the highest concentration assayed; (iii) the antigenotoxic potential of radish is reduced in plants with high metal content and (iv) the tumouricide activities of the radish plants were negatively correlated to their metal(oid) contents. An interaction between metal(oid)s and the isotyocianates (hydrolysis products of the glucosinolates) contained in the radish is suggested as the main modulator agents of the genotoxic activity of the plants grown in contaminated soils with metal(oid)s.

  14. Lysimeter Study of Plant Water Uptake in a Model Forest Ecosystem on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, M.; Abbaspour, K.; Schulin, R.; Oswald, S.

    2003-04-01

    We have been investigating the impact of heavy metal stress on the water regime of young forest ecosystems grown in 32 open top lysimeters (3 m in diameter and 1 m deep). The factorial treatments of the lysimeters include variations of rainwater acidity (acidic, ambient rain), subsoil type (acidic, calcareous), and soil contamination (with and without copper, zinc and cadmium in the top 20 cm). Each lysimeter was planted in spring of 2000 with the same selection of trees and herbaceous plants. All lysimeters are equipped with tensiometers for monitoring of pressure head and time domain reflectometry for measuring of water content. Irrigation was applied equally to all lysimeters through sprinkler devices. Drainage water was collected by means of canisters installed at the bottom of the lysimeters, and thus evapotranspiration could be calculated through water balancing. We monitored the water regime for two years including an imposed drought period. Significantly more water was extracted from the calcareous than the acidic subsoil. The water potential measurements show that also the heavy metal polluted topsoil had a significant influence on the water regime. Metal stress was particularly evident under reduced irrigation. We suspect that the roots were damaged in the contaminated topsoil. In contrast to the subsoil type, heavy metal pollution did not produce a significant effect on evapotranspiration (ET) though, and neither did acidic rain. Pot experiments confirmed that in presence of clean subsoil plants compensated for metal stress in contaminated topsoil by shifting their root activity from contaminated to uncontaminated zones.

  15. Macroalgal biomonitors of trace metal contamination in acid sulfate soil aquaculture ponds.

    PubMed

    Gosavi, K; Sammut, J; Gifford, S; Jankowski, J

    2004-05-25

    Earthen shrimp aquaculture ponds are often impacted by acid sulfate soils (ASS), typically resulting in increased disease and mortality of cultured organisms. Production losses have been attributed to either low pH or to elevated concentrations of toxic metals, both direct products of pyrite oxidation in ASS. The standard farm management practice to minimise effects of pyrite oxidation is to maintain pH of pond waters above 5, based on the assumption that dissolved metal bioavailability is negligible at this pH. This study aimed to test the validity of this assumption, and therefore elucidate a possible role of toxic heavy metals in observed decreases in farm productivity. Metal bioaccumulation in four genera of macroalgae, Ulva sp., Enteromorpha sp., Cladophora sp. and Chaetomorpha sp., sampled from ASS-affected shrimp aquaculture ponds were measured using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) to assess the relative bioavailability of dissolved metals within the system. Results showed that all four genera of macroalgae accumulated appreciable quantities of Fe, Al, Zn, Cd, Cu, As and Pb. Iron and Al, the most common metals mobilised from ASS, were both accumulated in all algal genera to concentrations three orders of magnitude greater than all other metals analysed. These findings indicate that dissolved heavy metals are indeed bioavailable within the aquaculture pond system. A literature search of heavy metal bioaccumulation by these algal genera revealed concentrations recorded in this study are comparable to highly contaminated environments, such as those exposed to urban, industrial and mining pollution. The results of this study indicate that dissolved metal bioavailability in many earthen shrimp aquaculture ponds may be higher than previously thought.

  16. Heavy metal accumulation by poplar in calcareous soil with various degrees of multi-metal contamination: implications for phytoextraction and phytostabilization.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yahu; Nan, Zhongren; Su, Jieqiong; Wang, Ning

    2013-10-01

    The object of this study was to assess the capacity of Populus alba L. var. pyramidalis Bunge for phytoremediation of heavy metals on calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals. In a pot culture experiment, a multi-metal-contaminated calcareous soil was mixed at different ratios with an uncontaminated, but otherwise similar soil, to establish a gradient of soil metal contamination levels. In a field experiment, poplars with different stand ages (3, 5, and 7 years) were sampled randomly in a wastewater-irrigated field. The concentrations of cadmium (Cd), Cu, lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the poplar tissues and soil were determined. The accumulation of Cd and Zn was greatest in the leaves of P. pyramidalis, while Cu and Pb mainly accumulated in the roots. In the pot experiment, the highest tissue concentrations of Cd (40.76 mg kg(-1)), Cu (8.21 mg kg(-1)), Pb (41.62 mg kg(-1)), and Zn (696 mg kg(-1)) were all noted in the multi-metal-contaminated soil. Although extremely high levels of Cd and Zn accumulated in the leaves, phytoextraction using P. pyramidalis may take at least 24 and 16 years for Cd and Zn, respectively. The foliar concentrations of Cu and Pb were always within the normal ranges and were never higher than 8 and 5 mg kg(-1), respectively. The field experiment also revealed that the concentrations of all four metals in the bark were significantly higher than that in the wood. In addition, the tissue metal concentrations, together with the NH4NO3-extractable concentrations of metals in the root zone, decreased as the stand age increased. P. pyramidalis is suitable for phytostabilization of calcareous soils contaminated with multiple metals, but collection of the litter fall would be necessary due to the relatively high foliar concentrations of Cd and Zn.

  17. A review of metal (Pb and Zn) sensitive and pH tolerant bioassay organisms for risk screening of metal-contaminated acidic soils.

    PubMed

    Chapman, E Emily V; Dave, Göran; Murimboh, John D

    2013-08-01

    To improve risk estimates at the screening stage of Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA), short duration bioassays tailored to undisturbed soil cores from the contaminated site could be useful. However, existing standardized bioassays use disturbed soil samples and often pH sensitive organisms. This is a problem as naturally acidic soils are widespread. Changing soil properties to suit the test organism may change metal bioavailability, leading to erroneous risk estimates. For bioassays in undisturbed soil cores to be effective, species able to withstand natural soil properties must be identified. This review presents a critical examination of bioassay species' tolerance of acidic soils and sensitivity to metal contaminants such as Pb and Zn. Promising organisms include; Dendrobaena octaedra, Folsomia candida, Caenorhabditis elegans, Oppia nitens, Brassica rapa, Trifolium pratense, Allium cepa, Quercus rubra and Acer rubrum. The MetSTICK test and the Bait lamina test were also identified as suitable microorganism tests. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of metal-contaminated soil on the performance of young trees growing in model ecosystems under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Hermle, Sandra; Günthardt-Goerg, Madeleine S; Schulin, Rainer

    2006-11-01

    Young Populus tremula, Salix viminalis, Betula pendula and Picea abies trees were grown together in large open-top chambers. The treatments were: without or with (Cu/Zn/Cd/Pb=640/3000/10/90 mg kg-1) metal contamination in the topsoil, irrigation pH 3.5 or 5.5, and acidic or calcareous subsoil. Growth, metal allocation to foliage and wood, as well as leaf gas exchange were measured. Biomass was reduced in P. tremula and B. pendula by the metal-contaminated topsoil relative to uncontaminated topsoil, whereas in P. tremula photosynthesis and transpiration were decreased. These effects were related to the elevated foliar Zn accumulation in P. tremula. S. viminalis showed a significant reduction in growth and an increased Zn and Cd accumulation on acidic vs. calcareous subsoil. Acidic irrigation produced only a few significant effects. P. abies showed the lowest metal uptake and no growth response to metal contamination.

  19. Phytoremediation: role of terrestrial plants and aquatic macrophytes in the remediation of radionuclides and heavy metal contaminated soil and water.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sunita; Singh, Bikram; Manchanda, V K

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power reactors are operating in 31 countries around the world. Along with reactor operations, activities like mining, fuel fabrication, fuel reprocessing and military operations are the major contributors to the nuclear waste. The presence of a large number of fission products along with multiple oxidation state long-lived radionuclides such as neptunium ((237)Np), plutonium ((239)Pu), americium ((241/243)Am) and curium ((245)Cm) make the waste streams a potential radiological threat to the environment. Commonly high concentrations of cesium ((137)Cs) and strontium ((90)Sr) are found in a nuclear waste. These radionuclides are capable enough to produce potential health threat due to their long half-lives and effortless translocation into the human body. Besides the radionuclides, heavy metal contamination is also a serious issue. Heavy metals occur naturally in the earth crust and in low concentration, are also essential for the metabolism of living beings. Bioaccumulation of these heavy metals causes hazardous effects. These pollutants enter the human body directly via contaminated drinking water or through the food chain. This issue has drawn the attention of scientists throughout the world to device eco-friendly treatments to remediate the soil and water resources. Various physical and chemical treatments are being applied to clean the waste, but these techniques are quite expensive, complicated and comprise various side effects. One of the promising techniques, which has been pursued vigorously to overcome these demerits, is phytoremediation. The process is very effective, eco-friendly, easy and affordable. This technique utilizes the plants and its associated microbes to decontaminate the low and moderately contaminated sites efficiently. Many plant species are successfully used for remediation of contaminated soil and water systems. Remediation of these systems turns into a serious problem due to various anthropogenic activities that have

  20. Variation in whole DNA methylation in red maple (Acer rubrum) populations from a mining region: association with metal contamination and cation exchange capacity (CEC) in podzolic soils.

    PubMed

    Kalubi, K N; Mehes-Smith, M; Spiers, G; Omri, A

    2017-02-15

    Although a number of publications have provided convincing evidence that abiotic stresses such as drought and high salinity are involved in DNA methylation reports on the effects of metal contamination, pH, and cation exchange on DNA modifications are limited. The main objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between metal contamination and Cation exchange capacity (CEC) on whole DNA modifications. Metal analysis confirms that nickel and copper are the main contaminants in sampled sites within the Greater Sudbury Region (Ontario, Canada) and liming has increased soil pH significantly even after 30 years following dolomitic limestone applications. The estimated CEC values varied significantly among sites, ranging between 1.8 and 10.5 cmol(+) kg(-1), with a strong relationship being observed between CEC and pH (r = 0.96**). Cation exchange capacity, significantly lower in highly metal contaminated sites compared to both reference and less contaminated sites, was higher in the higher organic matter limed compared to unlimed sites. There was a significant variation in the level of cytosine methylation among the metal-contaminated sites. Significant and strong negative correlations between [5mdC]/[dG] and bioavailable nickel (r = -0.71**) or copper (r = -0.72**) contents were observed. The analysis of genomic DNA for adenine methylation in this study showed a very low level of [6N-mdA]/dT] in Acer rubrum plants analyzed ranging from 0 to 0.08%. Significant and very strong positive correlation was observed between [6N-mdA]/dT] and soil bioavailable nickel (r = 0.78**) and copper (r = 0.88**) content. This suggests that the increased bioavailable metal levels associated with contamination by nickel and copper particulates are associated with cytosine and adenine methylation.

  1. Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 mediates growth promotion of crack willow (Salix fragilis) saplings in both clean and metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Adams, P; De-Leij, F A A M; Lynch, J M

    2007-08-01

    We investigated if the plant growth promoting fungus Trichoderma harzianum Rifai 1295-22 (also known as "T22") could be used to enhance the establishment and growth of crack willow (Salix fragilis) in a soil containing no organic or metal pollutants and in a metal-contaminated soil by comparing this fungus with noninoculated controls and an ectomycorrhizal formulation commercially used to enhance the establishment of tree saplings. Crack willow saplings were grown in a temperature-controlled growth room over a period of 5 weeks' in a garden center topsoil and over 12 weeks in a soil which had been used for disposal of building materials and sewage sludge containing elevated levels of heavy metals including cadmium (30 mg kg(-1)), lead (350 mg kg(-1)), manganese (210 mg kg(-1)), nickel (210 mg kg(-1)), and zinc (1,100 mg kg(-1)). After 5 weeks' growth in clean soil, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 produced shoots and roots that were 40% longer than those of the controls and shoots that were 20% longer than those of saplings grown with ectomycorrhiza (ECM). T. harzianum T22 saplings produced more than double the dry biomass of controls and more than 50% extra biomass than the ECM-treated saplings. After 12 weeks' growth, saplings grown with T. harzianum T22 in the metal-contaminated soil produced 39% more dry weight biomass and were 16% taller than the noninoculated controls. This is the first report of tree growth stimulation by application of Trichoderma to roots, and is especially important as willow is a major source of wood fuel in the quest for renewable energy. These results also suggest willow trees inoculated with T. harzianum T22 could be used to increase the rate of revegetation and phytostabilization of metal-contaminated sites, a property of the fungus never previously demonstrated.

  2. Sorption of Pahs To Soil Minerals and Subsurface Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, S.; Totsche, K. U.; Koegel-Knabner, I.

    In subsurface soil horizons, the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants may primarily be controlled by the composition and the properties of the soil minerals. Therefore this study aimed to elucidate the sorption and the sorption kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminants to different inorganic soil constituents and subsurface soil horizons. Batch sorption experiments are conducted with three poly- cyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS; phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo(a)pyrene), with the model minerals quartz sand, quartz sand coated with goethite and a quartz sand - mont- morillonite mixture, and with b and c horizons of different soil types developped in the temperate climate. Batch experiments show a considerable sorption of PAHS to all soil minerals and soil horizons except for the sorption of phenanthrene to quartz sand. The sorption process of PAHS to single minerals is rapid and completed after 4 hours of contact time. The sorption to subsurface soil horizons, however, is not in equilibrium after 120h of contact time and shows a considerable sorption kinetic. Sorption capacity is higher for clay minerals and iron oxides than for quartz sand which corresponds with a higher sorption capacity of soil horizons with a high clay content. Sorption isotherms of the soil minerals are best described by a nonlinear isotherm whereas the sorption isotherms of the subsurface soil horizons are more or less linear indicating different sorption mechanisms for mineral sorbents and soil horizons.

  3. Quantifying nonisothermal subsurface soil water evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deol, Pukhraj; Heitman, Josh; Amoozegar, Aziz; Ren, Tusheng; Horton, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Accurate quantification of energy and mass transfer during soil water evaporation is critical for improving understanding of the hydrologic cycle and for many environmental, agricultural, and engineering applications. Drying of soil under radiation boundary conditions results in formation of a dry surface layer (DSL), which is accompanied by a shift in the position of the latent heat sink from the surface to the subsurface. Detailed investigation of evaporative dynamics within this active near-surface zone has mostly been limited to modeling, with few measurements available to test models. Soil column studies were conducted to quantify nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles using a sensible heat balance (SHB) approach. Eleven-needle heat pulse probes were used to measure soil temperature and thermal property distributions at the millimeter scale in the near-surface soil. Depth-integrated SHB evaporation rates were compared with mass balance evaporation estimates under controlled laboratory conditions. The results show that the SHB method effectively measured total subsurface evaporation rates with only 0.01-0.03 mm h-1difference from mass balance estimates. The SHB approach also quantified millimeter-scale nonisothermal subsurface evaporation profiles over a drying event, which has not been previously possible. Thickness of the DSL was also examined using measured soil thermal conductivity distributions near the drying surface. Estimates of the DSL thickness were consistent with observed evaporation profile distributions from SHB. Estimated thickness of the DSL was further used to compute diffusive vapor flux. The diffusive vapor flux also closely matched both mass balance evaporation rates and subsurface evaporation rates estimated from SHB.

  4. Assessing the effects of FBC ash treatments of metal-contaminated soils using life history traits and metal bioaccumulation analysis of the earthworm Eisenia andrei.

    PubMed

    Grumiaux, Fabien; Demuynck, Sylvain; Schikorski, David; Lemière, Sébastien; Leprêtre, Alain

    2010-03-01

    Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were exposed, in controlled conditions, to metal-contaminated soils previously treated in situ with two types of fluidized bed combustion ashes. Effects on this species were determined by life history traits analysis. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was indicated by metal bioaccumulation. Ashes-treated soils reduced worm mortality compared to the untreated soil. However, these ashes reduced both cocoon hatching success and hatchlings numbers compared to the untreated soil. In addition, sulfo-calcical ashes reduced or delayed worm maturity and lowered cocoon production compared to silico-alumineous ones. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was demonstrated for Zn, Cu and to a lesser extent Pb. Only silico-alumineous ashes reduced Cd bioaccumulation, although Cd was still bioconcentrated. Thus, although ash additions to metal-contaminated soils may help in immobilizing metals, their use might result, depending on the chemical nature of ashes, to severe detrimental effects on earthworm reproduction with possible long term consequences to populations. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mitigation effects of silicon rich amendments on heavy metal accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa L.) planted on multi-metal contaminated acidic soil.

    PubMed

    Gu, Hai-Hong; Qiu, Hao; Tian, Tian; Zhan, Shu-Shun; Deng, Teng-Hao-Bo; Chaney, Rufus L; Wang, Shi-Zhong; Tang, Ye-Tao; Morel, Jean-Louis; Qiu, Rong-Liang

    2011-05-01

    The mechanisms of stabilization by silicon-rich amendments of cadmium, zinc, copper and lead in a multi-metal contaminated acidic soil and the mitigation of metal accumulation in rice were investigated in this study. The results from a pot experiment indicated that the application of fly ash (20 and 40gkg(-1)) and steel slag (3 and 6gkg(-1)) increased soil pH from 4.0 to 5.0-6.4, decreased the phytoavailability of heavy metals by at least 60%, and further suppressed metal uptake by rice. Diffusion gradient in thin-film measurement showed the heavy metal diffusion fluxes from soil to solution decreased by greater than 84% after remediation. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the mobile metals were mainly deposited as their silicates, phosphates and hydroxides in amended treatments. Moreover, it was found metal translocation from stem to leaf was dramatically restrained by adding amendments, which might be due to the increase of silicon concentration and co-precipitation with heavy metals in stem. Finally, a field experiment showed the trace element concentrations in polished rice treated with amendments complied with the food safety standards of China. These results demonstrated fly ash and steel slag could be effective in mitigating heavy metal accumulation in rice grown on multi-metal contaminated acidic soils. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal contamination status of the soil-plant system and effects on the soil microbial community near a rare metal recycling smelter.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Ma, Tingting; Yuan, Cheng; Hou, Jinyu; Wang, Qingling; Wu, Longhua; Christie, Peter; Luo, Yongming

    2016-09-01

    Four heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn), two metalloids (As and Sb) and two rare metals (In and Tl) were selected as target elements to ascertain their concentrations and accumulation in the soil-plant system and their effects on the structure of the soil microbial community in a typical area of rare metal smelting in south China. Twenty-seven soil samples 100, 500, 1000, 1500 and 3000 m from the smelter and 42 vegetable samples were collected to determine the concentrations of the target elements. Changes in soil micro-organisms were investigated using the Biolog test and 454 pyrosequencing. The concentrations of the eight target elements (especially As and Cd) were especially high in the topsoil 100 m from the smelter and decreased markedly with increasing distance from the smelter and with increasing soil depth. Cadmium bio-concentration factors in the vegetables were the highest followed by Tl, Cu, Zn, In, Sb, Pb, and then As. The concentrations of As, Cd and Pb in vegetables were 86.7, 100 and 80.0 %, respectively, over the permissible limits and possible contamination by Tl may also be of concern. Changes in soil microbial counts and average well colour development were also significantly different at different sampling distances from the smelter. The degree of tolerance to heavy metals appears to be fungi > bacteria > actinomycetes. The 454 pyrosequencing indicates that long-term metal contamination from the smelting activities has resulted in shifts in the composition of the soil bacterial community.

  7. The selection of plant species-organic amendment combinations aids to restore soil microbial function recovery in a metal-contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Josef; Caravaca, Fuensanta; Azcón, Rosario; Diáz, Gisela; Fuensanta, Garcia-Orenes; Roldan, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    A mesocosm experiment was established to evaluate the effect of two organic wastes: fermented sugar beet residue (SBR) and urban waste compost on the stimulation of plant growth, phytoaccumulation of heavy metals and soil biological quality and their possible use in phytostabilitation tasks with native (Piptatherum miliaceum, Retama sphaerocarpa, Bituminaria bituminosa, Coronilla juncea and Anthyllis cytisoides) and non-native (Lolium perenne) plants in a heavy metal contaminated semiarid soil. Excepting R. sphaerocarpa, SBR increased the contents of shoot N, P and K and shoot biomass of all plants. The percentage of mycorrhizal colonization was not affected by the organic amendments. The highest increase in dehydrogenase and β-glucosidase activities was recorded in SBR-amended P. miliaceum. SBR reduced toxic levels of HM in shoot of P. miliaceum, mainly decreasing Fe and Pb uptake to plants. This study pointed out that the SBR was the most effective amendment for enhancing the plant performance and for improving soil quality. The combination of SBR and P. miliaceum can be regarded the most effective strategy for being employed in phytostabilisation projects of this contaminated site.

  8. Phytostabilization of a metal contaminated sandy soil. II: Influence of compost and/or inorganic metal immobilizing soil amendments on metal leaching.

    PubMed

    Ruttens, A; Colpaert, J V; Mench, M; Boisson, J; Carleer, R; Vangronsveld, J

    2006-11-01

    A lysimeter approach (under natural climatologic conditions) was used to evaluate the effect of four metal immobilizing soil treatments [compost (C), compost+cyclonic ashes (C+CA), compost+cyclonic ashes+steel shots (C+CA+SS)) and cyclonic ashes+steel shots (CA+SS)] on metal leaching through an industrially contaminated soil. All treatments decreased Zn and Cd leaching. Strongest reductions occurred after CA+SS and C+CA+SS treatments (Zn: -99.0% and -99.2% respectively; Cd: -97.2% and -98.3% respectively). Copper and Pb leaching increased after C (17 and >30 times for Cu and Pb respectively) and C+CA treatment (4.4 and >3.7 times for Cu and Pb respectively). C+CA+SS or CA+SS addition did not increase Cu leaching; the effect on Pb leaching was not completely clear. Our results demonstrate that attention should be paid to Cu and Pb leaching when organic matter additions are considered for phytostabilization of metal contaminated soils.

  9. Using poly-glutamic acid as soil-washing agent to remediate heavy metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zong-Han; Dong, Cheng-Di; Chen, Chiu-Wen; Sheu, Yih-Terng; Kao, Chih-Ming

    2017-05-20

    The extraction efficiency of heavy metals from soils using three forms of gamma poly-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) as the washing agents was investigated. Controlling factors including agent concentrations, extraction time, pH, and liquid to soil ratio were evaluated to determine the optimum operational conditions. The distribution of heavy metal species in soils before and after extraction processes was analyzed. Up to 46 and 74% of heavy metal removal efficiencies were achieved with one round and a sequential extraction process using H-bonding form of γ-PGA (200 mM) with washing time of 40 min, liquid to solid ratio of 10 to 1, and pH of 6. Major heavy metal removal mechanisms were (1) γ-PGA-promoted dissolution and (2) complexation of heavy metal with free carboxyl groups in γ-PGA, which resulted in heavy metal desorption from soils. Metal species on soils were redistributed after washing, and soils were remediated without destruction of soil structures and productivity.

  10. Effects of selected soil properties on phytoremediation applicability for heavy-metal-contaminated soils in the Apulia region, Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Farrag, K; Senesi, N; Rovira, P Soler; Brunetti, G

    2012-11-01

    Phytoremediation is a well-known promising alternative to conventional approaches used for the remediation of diffused and moderated contaminated soils. The evaluation of the accumulation, availability, and interactions of heavy metals in soil is a priority objective for the possible use of phytoremediation techniques such as phytoextraction and phytostabilization. The soils used in this work were collected from a number of sites inside a protected area in the Apulia region (Southern Italy), which were contaminated by various heavy metals originated from the disposal of wastes of different sources of origin. Soils examined contained Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in amounts exceeding the critical limits imposed by EU and Italian laws. However, the alkaline conditions, high organic matter content, and silty to silty loamy texture of soils examined would suggest a reduced availability of heavy metals to plants. Due to the high total content but the low available fraction of heavy metals analyzed, especially Cr, phytoextraction appears not to be a promising remediation approach in the sites examined, whereas phytostabilization appears to be the best technique for metal decontamination in the studied areas.

  11. Effects of long-term radionuclide and heavy metal contamination on the activity of microbial communities, inhabiting uranium mining impacted soils.

    PubMed

    Boteva, Silvena; Radeva, Galina; Traykov, Ivan; Kenarova, Anelia

    2016-03-01

    Ore mining and processing have greatly altered ecosystems, often limiting their capacity to provide ecosystem services critical to our survival. The soil environments of two abandoned uranium mines were chosen to analyze the effects of long-term uranium and heavy metal contamination on soil microbial communities using dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities as indicators of metal stress. The levels of soil contamination were low, ranging from 'precaution' to 'moderate', calculated as Nemerow index. Multivariate analyses of enzyme activities revealed the following: (i) spatial pattern of microbial endpoints where the more contaminated soils had higher dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities, (ii) biological grouping of soils depended on both the level of soil contamination and management practice, (iii) significant correlations between both dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities and soil organic matter and metals (Cd, Co, Cr, and Zn, but not U), and (iv) multiple relationships between the alkaline than the acid phosphatase and the environmental factors. The results showed an evidence of microbial tolerance and adaptation to the soil contamination established during the long-term metal exposure and the key role of soil organic matter in maintaining high microbial enzyme activities and mitigating the metal toxicity. Additionally, the results suggested that the soil microbial communities are able to reduce the metal stress by intensive phosphatase synthesis, benefiting a passive environmental remediation and provision of vital ecosystem services.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the extent of heavy-metal contamination in soils near Picher, Oklahoma, within the Tar Creek Superfund Site.

    PubMed

    Beattie, Rachelle E; Henke, Wyatt; Davis, Conor; Mottaleb, M Abdul; Campbell, James H; McAliley, L Rex

    2017-04-01

    The Tri-State Mining District of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma was the site of large-scale mining operations primarily for lead and zinc until the mid-1950s. Although mining across the area has ceased, high concentrations of heavy metals remain in the region's soil and water systems. The town of Picher, Ottawa County, OK, lies within this district and was included in the Tar Creek Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in 1980 due to extensive contamination. To elucidate the extent of heavy-metal contamination, a soil-chemistry survey of the town of Picher was conducted. Samples (n = 111) were collected from mine tailings, locally known as chat, in Picher and along cardinal-direction transects within an 8.05-km radius of the town in August 2015. Samples were analyzed for soil pH, moisture, and metal content. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) analyses of 20 metals showed high concentrations of lead (>1000 ppm), cadmium (>40 ppm) and zinc (>4000 ppm) throughout the sampled region. Soil moisture content ranged from 0.30 to 35.9%, and pH values ranged from 5.14 to 7.42. MANOVA of metal profiles determined that soils collected from the north transect and chat were significantly different (p < 0.01) than other sampled directions. Lead, cadmium and zinc were correlated with one another. These data show an unequal distribution of contamination surrounding the Picher mining site. Mapping heavy-metal contamination in these soils represents the first step in understanding the distribution of these contaminants at the Picher mining site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell-type specificity of lung cancer associated with low-dose soil heavy metal contamination in Taiwan: An ecological study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have examined the association between heavy metal contamination (including arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], mercury [Hg], nickel [Ni], lead [Pb], and zinc [Zn]) and lung cancer. However, data from previous studies on pathological cell types are limited, particularly regarding exposure to low-dose soil heavy metal contamination. The purpose of this study was to explore the association between soil heavy metal contamination and lung cancer incidence by specific cell type in Taiwan. Methods We conducted an ecological study and calculated the annual averages of eight soil heavy metals (i.e., As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) by using data from the Taiwan Environmental Protection Administration from1982 to 1986. The age-standardized incidence rates of lung cancer according to two major pathological types (adenocarcinoma [AC] and squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]) were obtained from the National Cancer Registry Program conducted in Taiwan from 2001 to 2005. A geographical information system was used to plot the maps of soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer incidence rates. Poisson regression models were used to obtain the adjusted relative ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the lung cancer incidence associated with soil heavy metals. Results For males, the trend test for lung SCC incidence caused by exposure to Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, and Zn showed a statistically significant dose–response relationship. However, for lung AC, only Cu and Ni had a significant dose–response relationship. As for females, those achieving a statistically significant dose–response relationship for the trend test were Cr (P = 0.02), Ni (P = 0.02), and Zn (P= 0.02) for lung SCC, and Cu (P < 0.01) and Zn (P = 0.02) for lung AC. Conclusion The current study suggests that a dose–response relationship exists between low-dose soil heavy metal concentration and lung cancer occurrence by specific cell-type; however, the relevant

  14. The hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola harbors metal-resistant endophytic bacteria that improve its phytoextraction capacity in multi-metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Oliveira, Rui S; Nai, Fengjiao; Rajkumar, Mani; Luo, Yongming; Rocha, Inês; Freitas, Helena

    2015-06-01

    Endophyte-assisted phytoremediation has recently been suggested as a successful approach for ecological restoration of metal contaminated soils, however little information is available on the influence of endophytic bacteria on the phytoextraction capacity of metal hyperaccumulating plants in multi-metal polluted soils. The aims of our study were to isolate and characterize metal-resistant and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) utilizing endophytic bacteria from tissues of the newly discovered Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola and to examine if these endophytic bacterial strains could improve the efficiency of phytoextraction of multi-metal contaminated soils. Among a collection of 42 metal resistant bacterial strains isolated from the tissues of S. plumbizincicola grown on Pb/Zn mine tailings, five plant growth promoting endophytic bacterial strains (PGPE) were selected due to their ability to promote plant growth and to utilize ACC as the sole nitrogen source. The five isolates were identified as Bacillus pumilus E2S2, Bacillus sp. E1S2, Bacillus sp. E4S1, Achromobacter sp. E4L5 and Stenotrophomonas sp. E1L and subsequent testing revealed that they all exhibited traits associated with plant growth promotion, such as production of indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores and solubilization of phosphorus. These five strains showed high resistance to heavy metals (Cd, Zn and Pb) and various antibiotics. Further, inoculation of these ACC utilizing strains significantly increased the concentrations of water extractable Cd and Zn in soil. Moreover, a pot experiment was conducted to elucidate the effects of inoculating metal-resistant ACC utilizing strains on the growth of S. plumbizincicola and its uptake of Cd, Zn and Pb in multi-metal contaminated soils. Out of the five strains, B. pumilus E2S2 significantly increased root (146%) and shoot (17%) length, fresh (37%) and dry biomass (32%) of S. plumbizincicola as well as plant Cd uptake (43%), whereas

  15. Phytoextraction and phytostabilization potential of plants grown in the vicinity of heavy metal-contaminated soils: a case study at an industrial town site.

    PubMed

    Lorestani, B; Yousefi, N; Cheraghi, M; Farmany, A

    2013-12-01

    With the development of urbanization and industrialization, soils have become increasingly polluted by heavy metals. Phytoremediation, an emerging cost-effective, nonintrusive, and aesthetically pleasing technology that uses the remarkable ability of plants to concentrate elements, can be potentially used to remediate metal-contaminated sites. In this research, two processes of phytoremediation (phytoextraction and phytostabilization) were surveyed in some plant species around an industrial town in the Hamedan Province in the central-western part of Iran. To this purpose, shoots and roots of the seven plant species and the associated soil samples were collected and analyzed by measuring Pb, Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn concentrations using ICP-AES and then calculating the biological absorption coefficient, bioconcentration factor, and translocation factor parameters for each element. The obtained results showed that among the collected plants, Salsola soda is the most effective species for phytoextraction and phytostabilization and Cirsium arvense has the potential for phytostabilization of the measured heavy metals.

  16. The role of regolith and soil development with respect to assessing heavy metal contamination in urban soils with particular reference to iron.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Graaff, R.

    2012-04-01

    The role of regolith and soil development with respect to assessing heavy metal contamination in urban soils with particular reference to iron. Robert H.M. van de Graaff, PhD Van de Graaff & Associates Pty Ltd, 14 Linlithgow Street, Mitcham, Victoria, 3132, Australia Environmental assessors investigating brown and green development areas in inner and peripheral urban land in Australia routinely collect soil samples at prescribed depths, e.g. 0.1 - 0.5 - 1.0 - etc., in the soil profile. These sampling depths take no notice of the natural horizonation of a soil profile and hence are blind to geomorphological and weathering history of the site. In a continent like Australia, which largely has been spared the wholesale removal and re-deposition of soil and rock materials by Pleistocene glaciers, the vertical and lateral movement of heavy metals, including iron, nearly always explains the occurrence of elevated concentrations of As, Cu, Pb, V, Co, Cr, Zn and Ni in certain strata of the soil profile. The localised accumulation of these metals is normally controlled by changing redox potentials, which in turn are affected by translocation of clay and differences in soil hydraulic conductivity between A, B and C soil horizons. In other cases, the soil profile has operated like a chromatogram over many thousands of years. In Australian cities many urban soils do not have anthropogenic origins. This paper will give some examples of misinterpreted contamination scares in relation to As, Ba, Cr and V that sometimes caused large financial budget overruns at developments in Melbourne. These examples are all based on practical consulting experience but elucidated by reference to the scientific literature. Because of its huge spread, the greater Melbourne Metropolitan region extends from its western extremity with 450 mm annual rainfall to its eastern extremity with 900 mm, a distance of 70 km. A similar rainfall gradient may well have operated during much of the Quaternary

  17. Isolation and characterization of a heavy metal-resistant Burkholderia sp. from heavy metal-contaminated paddy field soil and its potential in promoting plant growth and heavy metal accumulation in metal-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chun-yu; Sheng, Xia-fang; Qian, Meng; Wang, Qing-ya

    2008-05-01

    A heavy metal-resistant bacterial strain was isolated from heavy metal-contaminated soils and identified as Burkholderia sp. J62 based on the 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The heavy metal- and antibiotic resistance, heavy metal solubilization of the isolate were investigated. The isolate was also evaluated for promoting plant growth and Pb and Cd uptakes of the plants from heavy metal-contaminated soils in pot experiments. The isolate was found to exhibit different multiple heavy metal and antibiotic resistance characteristics. Atomic absorption spectrometer analysis showed increased bacterial solubilization of lead and cadmium in solution culture and in soils. The isolate produced indole acetic acid, siderophore and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase. The isolate also solubilized inorganic phosphate. Inoculation with the isolate was found to significantly (p<0.05) increase the biomass of maize and tomato plants. Increase in tissue Pb and Cd contents varied from 38% to 192% and from 5% to 191% in inoculated plants growing in heavy metal-contaminated soils compared to the uninoculated control, respectively. These results show that heavy metal-solubilizing and plant growth promoting bacteria are important for plant growth and heavy metal uptake which may provide a new microbial enhanced-phytoremediation of metal-polluted soils.

  18. Health risk assessment of heavy metals contamination in tomato and green pepper plants grown in soils amended with phosphogypsum waste materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Hwaiti, Mohammad; Al-Khashman, Omar

    2015-04-01

    Phosphogypsum (PG) is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry that has relatively high concentrations of some heavy metals (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, V, and Zn). The present study was conducted to investigate heavy metal contamination in soils and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) and to evaluate the possible health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables grown in PG-amended soils. The enrichment factor values indicated that Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, and V were depleted to minimally enriched, and Cd was moderately enriched. The pollution load index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were strongly polluted with Cd, moderately polluted with Cr and Ni, and slightly polluted with Pb, Cu, Zn and V. The geo-accumulation index values indicated that the PG-amended soils were uncontaminated with Pb, Cr, Cu, Ni, Zn, V, and moderately contaminated with Cd. The trace metal transfer for Cd, Cr, Pb, and Zn concentrations was below what are considered as acceptable limits (<1) for food production in soil and vegetables (tomatoes and green peppers) at each site area. Soil-to-plant transfer factor values decreased in order of Zn > Pb > Cd > Cr. The biological absorption coefficients in plants are, in order of highest to lowest, Pb > Zn > Cd > Cr, which suggests that Pb is more bioavailable to plants than Cd, Cr, and Zn. Furthermore, this study highlights that both adults and children consuming vegetables (e.g., tomatoes and green peppers) grown in PG-amended soils ingest significant amounts of the metals studied. However, the daily intake of metals (DIM) and the health risk index (HRI) values are <1, indicating a relative absence of health risks associated with the consumption of vegetables/fruits grown in PG-amended soils. However, while DIM and HRI values suggest that the consumption of plants grown in PG-amended soils is nearly free of risks, there are other sources of metal exposures such as dust inhalation, dermal contact, and ingestion (for

  19. Using the VegeSafe community science program to measure, evaluate risk and advise on soil-metal contamination in Sydney backyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M. P.; Rouillon, M.; Harvey, P.; Kristensen, L. J.; Steven, G. G.

    2016-12-01

    The extent of metal contamination in Sydney residential garden soils was evaluated using data collated from a 3-year university community science program called VegeSafe. Despite knowledge of industrial and urban contamination amongst scientists, the general public remains under informed about the potential risks of exposure from legacy contaminants in their home environments. The Australian community was offered free soil metal screening allowing access to soil samples for research purposes. Participants followed specific soil sampling instructions and posted samples to the University for analysis with a field portable X-ray Fluorescence (pXRF) spectrometer. Over the 3-year period >5000 soil samples were collected and analysed from >1000 households across Australia, primarly from vegetable gardens. As anticipated, the primary soil metal of concern was lead: mean concentrations were 413 mg/kg (front garden), 707 mg/kg (drip line), 226 mg/kg (back yard) and 301 mg/kg (vegetable garden). The Australian soil lead guideline of 300 mg/kg for residential yards was exceeded at 40% of domestic properties. Soil lead concentrations >1000 mg/kg were identified in 15% of Sydney backyards. The incidence of highest soil lead contamination was greatest in the inner city area with concentrations declining towards background values of 20-30 mg/kg at 30-40 km distance from the city. Community engagement with VegeSafe participants has resulted in useful outcomes: dissemination of knowledge related to contamination legacies and health risks, owners building raised beds containing clean soil, and, in numerous cases owners replacing their contaminated soil. This study demonstrates the potential for similar community science programs for expediting mass sample collection of soils and dusts for analysis of traditional and emerging contaminants within the home environment.

  20. Heavy metal contamination of soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site: implications for dissemination of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qihang; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Geng, Xinhua; Chen, Shejun; Huang, Xuexia; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Zhuying; Zhu, Libin; Chen, Jiahao; Lu, Yayin

    2015-02-15

    Illegal e-waste recycling activity has caused heavy metal pollution in many developing countries, including China. In recent years, the Chinese government has strengthened enforcement to impede such activity; however, the heavy metals remaining in the abandoned e-waste recycling site can still pose ecological risk. The present study aimed to investigate the concentrations of heavy metals in soil and water in the vicinity of an abandoned e-waste recycling site in Longtang, South China. Results showed that the surface soil of the former burning and acid-leaching sites was still heavily contaminated with Cd (>0.39 mg kg(-1)) and Cu (>1981 mg kg(-1)), which exceeded their respective guideline levels. The concentration of heavy metals generally decreased with depth in both burning site and paddy field, which is related to the elevated pH and reduced TOM along the depth gradient. The pond water was seriously acidified and contaminated with heavy metals, while the well water was slightly contaminated since heavy metals were mostly retained in the surface soil. The use of pond water for irrigation resulted in considerable heavy metal contamination in the paddy soil. Compared with previous studies, the reduced heavy metal concentrations in the surface soil imply that heavy metals were transported to the other areas, such as pond. Therefore, immediate remediation of the contaminated soil and water is necessary to prevent dissemination of heavy metals and potential ecological disaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Phytoremediation and microbial community structure of soil from a metal-contaminated military shooting range: comparisons of field and pot experiments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunghyun; Baek, Kyunghwa; Lee, Insook

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the heavy metal uptake ability of two plant species, barnyard grass and Indian mallow, and the effects of associated micro-communities on the rhizosphere of these plants were investigated in metal-contaminated sites. In addition, the effectiveness of phytoremediation using these plants was compared under field and pot conditions. To accomplish this analysis, phytoremediation of general military shooting range soil was conducted for 8 weeks under the two conditions. The results showed that metal uptake by plants and reductions in soil metal concentration were lower in the field than in pots. However, soil dehydrogenase activities and microbial diversity increased in response to phytoremediation in the field. Specifically, the soil dehydrogenase activities of barnyard grass in field soils were 3-fold higher than those of potted soils. Moreover, the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis patterns revealed that groups formed according to plant species. Finally, the Shannon-Weaver diversity index and Simpson dominance index were higher in the rhizosphere of barnyard grass than in the rhizosphere of Indian mallow under field conditions. These results indicate that it is difficult to apply the results obtained from pot experiments to field conditions. These findings can be used to inform future studies conducted to determine if field sites are suitable for phytoremediation based on the results of pot studies.

  2. Simulation of changes in heavy metal contamination in farmland soils of a typical manufacturing center through logistic-based cellular automata modeling.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Menglong; Wang, Qi; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Junjian; Yang, Guoyi; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    A customized logistic-based cellular automata (CA) model was developed to simulate changes in heavy metal contamination (HMC) in farmland soils of Dongguan, a manufacturing center in Southern China, and to discover the relationship between HMC and related explanatory variables (continuous and categorical). The model was calibrated through the simulation and validation of HMC in 2012. Thereafter, the model was implemented for the scenario simulation of development alternatives for HMC in 2022. The HMC in 2002 and 2012 was determined through soil tests and cokriging. Continuous variables were divided into two groups by odds ratios. Positive variables (odds ratios >1) included the Nemerow synthetic pollution index in 2002, linear drainage density, distance from the city center, distance from the railway, slope, and secondary industrial output per unit of land. Negative variables (odds ratios <1) included elevation, distance from the road, distance from the key polluting enterprises, distance from the town center, soil pH, and distance from bodies of water. Categorical variables, including soil type, parent material type, organic content grade, and land use type, also significantly influenced HMC according to Wald statistics. The relative operating characteristic and kappa coefficients were 0.91 and 0.64, respectively, which proved the validity and accuracy of the model. The scenario simulation shows that the government should not only implement stricter environmental regulation but also strengthen the remediation of the current polluted area to effectively mitigate HMC.

  3. The effectiveness of spent coffee grounds and its biochar on the amelioration of heavy metals-contaminated water and soil using chemical and biological assessments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Suk; Min, Hyun-Gi; Koo, Namin; Park, Jeongsik; Lee, Sang-Hwan; Bak, Gwan-In; Kim, Jeong-Gyu

    2014-12-15

    Spent coffee grounds (SCG) and charred spent coffee grounds (SCG-char) have been widely used to adsorb or to amend heavy metals that contaminate water or soil and their success is usually assessed by chemical analysis. In this work, the effects of SCG and SCG-char on metal-contaminated water and soil were evaluated using chemical and biological assessments; a phytotoxicity test using bok choy (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Jusl.) was conducted for the biological assessment. When SCG and SCG-char were applied to acid mine drainage, the heavy metal concentrations were decreased and the pH was increased. However, for SCG, the phytotoxicity increased because a massive amount of dissolved organic carbon was released from SCG. In contrast, SCG-char did not exhibit this phenomenon because any easily released organic matter was removed during pyrolysis. While the bioavailable heavy metal content decreased in soils treated with SCG or SCG-char, the phytotoxicity only rose after SCG treatment. According to our statistical methodology, bioavailable Pb, Cu and As, as well as the electrical conductivity representing an increase in organic content, affected the phytotoxicity of soil. Therefore, applying SCG during environment remediation requires careful biological assessments and evaluations of the efficiency of this remediation technology.

  4. Prospective modeling with Hydrus-2D of 50 years Zn and Pb movements in low and moderately metal-contaminated agricultural soils.

    PubMed

    Rheinheimer dos Santos, Danilo; Cambier, Philippe; Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; Labanowski, Jérôme; Lamy, Isabelle; Tessier, Daniel; van Oort, Folkert

    2013-02-01

    Results of detailed modeling of in situ redistribution of heavy metals in pedological horizons of low and moderately metal contaminated soils, considering distinctly different long-term land use, are scarcely reported in literature. We used Hydrus-2D software parameterized with abundant available local soil data to simulate future Zn and Pb movements in soils contaminated by metallurgical fallout in the 20th century. In recent work on comparing different modeling hypotheses, we validated a two-site reactive model set with adjusted chemical kinetic constant values by fitting the 2005 Zn and Pb concentration profiles in soils, with estimated 1901-1963 airborne Zn and Pb loads (Mallmann et al., 2012a). In the present work, we used the same approach to simulate 2005-2055 changes in Zn and Pb depth-distribution and soil-solution concentrations, comparing two hypotheses of chemical equilibrium: i) the validated two-site model (one site at equilibrium and the other involved in kinetic reactions with pore water) set with adjusted kinetic EDTA extraction constants, and ii) a non-linear one-surface site adsorption equilibrium model. Simulated transfers were found generally lower and more realistic when using the two-site model. Simulations showed that consistent Zn redistribution and loss occurred in the moderately contaminated soil until 2055, i.e., more than one century after the main metal deposition, but negligible in low contaminated soils. Transfer of Pb was small in the three soils and under both hypotheses. In 2055, simulated Zn outflow concentrations remained under threshold values for drinking water.

  5. Prospective modeling with Hydrus-2D of 50 years Zn and Pb movements in low and moderately metal-contaminated agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinheimer dos Santos, Danilo; Cambier, Philippe; Mallmann, Fábio Joel Kochem; Labanowski, Jérôme; Lamy, Isabelle; Tessier, Daniel; van Oort, Folkert

    2013-02-01

    Results of detailed modeling of in situ redistribution of heavy metals in pedological horizons of low and moderately metal contaminated soils, considering distinctly different long-term land use, are scarcely reported in literature. We used Hydrus-2D software parameterized with abundant available local soil data to simulate future Zn and Pb movements in soils contaminated by metallurgical fallout in the 20th century. In recent work on comparing different modeling hypotheses, we validated a two-site reactive model set with adjusted chemical kinetic constant values by fitting the 2005 Zn and Pb concentration profiles in soils, with estimated 1901-1963 airborne Zn and Pb loads (Mallmann et al., 2012a). In the present work, we used the same approach to simulate 2005-2055 changes in Zn and Pb depth-distribution and soil-solution concentrations, comparing two hypotheses of chemical equilibrium: i) the validated two-site model (one site at equilibrium and the other involved in kinetic reactions with pore water) set with adjusted kinetic EDTA extraction constants, and ii) a non-linear one-surface site adsorption equilibrium model. Simulated transfers were found generally lower and more realistic when using the two-site model. Simulations showed that consistent Zn redistribution and loss occurred in the moderately contaminated soil until 2055, i.e., more than one century after the main metal deposition, but negligible in low contaminated soils. Transfer of Pb was small in the three soils and under both hypotheses. In 2055, simulated Zn outflow concentrations remained under threshold values for drinking water.

  6. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  7. SUBSURFACE SOIL CONDITIONS BENEATH AND NEAR BUILDINGS AND THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS ON SOIL VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion. Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and enter indoor air spaces of overlying buildings. T...

  8. Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analyses of contaminated soils by XRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucke, D.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy-metal contamination of soils in Saxony/Germany by foundry fumes and low-cost rapid analysis of contaminated soils by XRF Dieter Mucke, Rolf Kumann, Sebastian Baldauf GEOMONTAN Gesellschaft für Geologie und Bergbau mbH&Co.KG, Muldentalstrasse 56, 09603 Rothenfurth, Saxony/Germany For hundreds of years in the Ore Mountains between Bohemia and Saxony silver and other ores are produced and smelted. Sulphide- and sulpharsenide-ores needed to be roasted first. In doing so the sulphide sulphur was oxidised under formation of sulphur dioxide SO2 and arsenide conversed into elemental arsenic and arsenide trioxide As2O3 respectively. Also the metals lead, cadmium and zinc are components of hut smokes, in the field of nickel foundries also nickel. The contents of soils basically reflect the geogenic conditions, which are caused by decomposition- and relocation-effects of the mineralisations, in the area of foundries also with influences by with the hut smokes anthropogenic mobilised elements. The Saxonian Agency for Environment and Geology drafted in 1992 a Soil Investigation Program with the aim of investigation of the contamination of Saxonian soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. In order of this Agency GEOMONTAN investigated 1164 measuring points in the grid 4 * 4 km.soil profiles and extracted soil samples for analysis. In the result of the laboratory examinations the Agency edited the "Soil atlas of the Free State of Saxony". 27 elements, pH and PAK are shown in detailed maps and allow in whole Saxony the first assessment of the contamination of soils with arsenic and toxic heavy metals. Each of the investigated soil profiles represent an area of 16 km2. Already by the different use of the districts (agricultural, industrial, urban) restricts representative values. GEOMONTAN in the meantime used at the exploration of a copper deposit in Brandenburg/Germany with approx. 50,000 single tests at drill cores a very fast low-cost method: the X Ray fluorescence

  9. Shifts in the relative abundance of bacteria after wine-lees-derived biochar intervention in multi metal-contaminated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Xu, Min; Xia, Hongxia; Wu, Jun; Yang, Gang; Zhang, Xiaohong; Peng, Hong; Yu, Xiaoyu; Li, Li; Xiao, Hong; Qi, Hui

    2017-12-01

    The impact of biochar application on soil ecological functions depends on the diversity of soil conditions and of the feedstocks from which biochar is obtained. Moreover, little information is available on the effect of biochar on dynamic changes in microorganisms with the development of rice plants in multi-metal-contaminated paddy soil amended with wine-lees-derived biochar. In this paper, biochar obtained from the pyrolysis of wine lees at 600°C was used to investigate the potential role of biochar in maintaining soil ecological functions, with consideration of the alteration of the microbial population over periods of rice growth. Biochar increased the soil nutrient availability, suppressed the toxicity of heavy metals and benefited the rice growth. Enzymic activities initially increased and then decreased with increasing biochar addition as well as with the growth stage. High-throughput sequencing results indicated that biochar application shifted the soil microbial community, increased the bacterial diversity and reduced the bacterial richness. The relative abundances of Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes and Cyanobacteria increased with increasing biochar addition, whereas the abundance of Gemmatimonadetes decreased at higher biochar applications. With increasing biochar application, Nitrospirae, which were lowest in the 1% biochar addition treatment, first decreased and then increased. The results from this study indicated that biochar addition increased N2 fixation and improved C cycling. Redundancy analysis (RDA) indicated that RI (potential ecological risk index), AN (available nitrogen) and AP (available phosphorus) were the most important factors for bacteria and accounted for 68.7%, 58.3% and 52.4% of the variation, respectively. Therefore, the reduction of metal toxicity and the improvement of soil fertility are important mechanisms for higher bacterial abundances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of heavy metal contaminated shooting range soils on mycorrhizal colonization of roots and metal uptake by leek.

    PubMed

    Mozafar, A; Ruh, R; Klingel, P; Gamper, H; Egli, S; Frossard, E

    2002-10-01

    We grew leek (Allium porrum) in soils of two shooting ranges heavily contaminated with heavy metals in the towns of Zuchwil and Oberuzwil in Switzerland as a bioassay to test the activity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in these soils. Soil samples were taken from (1) front of the shooting house (HOUSE), (2) the area between house and target (FIELD) and (3) the berm (BACKSTOP). Samples of Ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) growing naturally within the shooting ranges were also collected and the colonization of its roots by mycorrhizal fungi was measured. The number of AM spores in the soils was significantly reduced concomitant with the increase in the degree of soil contamination with metals. In Zuchwil, mycorrhizal fungi equally colonized roots of Ribwort plantain sampled from BACKSTOP and HOUSE. In Oberuzwil, however, plants from BACKSTOP had lower colonization when compared with those sampled from HOUSE. Colonization of leek was strongly reduced in the BACKSTOP soil of Zuchwil and slightly reduced in the BACKSTOP soil of Oberuzwil when compared with plants grown in respective HOUSE soil. Concentrations of Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in the leaves of leek grown in the BACKSTOP soil was within the range considered toxic for human consumption. This points to the high degree of bioavailability of these metal in these soils. Significant decrease in the number of mycorrhizal spores in the BACKSTOP soils in Zuchwil and the low colonization of leek roots grown in these soils point to possible changes in the species diversity of mycorrhizal fungi in these soils.

  11. Assessing Metal Contamination in Lead Arsenate Contaminated Orchard Soils Using Near and Mid-Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Historic use of lead-arsenate as pesticide in apple orchards left many soils contaminated with arsenic (As) and lead (Pb). Notorious health effects and their severe soil contamination are of primary concerns for major regulatory agencies, and community at large. Wet chemistry methods for soil anal...

  12. Endophytic and rhizospheric bacteria associated with Silene paradoxa grown on metal-contaminated soils are selected and transferred to the next generation of plants as seed endophytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mocali, Stefano; Fabiani, Arturo; Chiellini, Carolina; Gori, Giulia; Gonnelli, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that bacteria are commonly associated to the plants, either on the outer surfaces (epiphytes) that inside the plant tissues (endophytes). These bacteria mainly derived from soil and reach the various organs of the plant throughout the root system. Despite recent works have shown that endophytic bacteria can have an important role in the physiology of the plant, little is known of their possible involvement in the resistance and tolerance mechanisms of plants to heavy metals. Furthermore, until now only limited research has been conducted to unravel the exact role and possible applications of seed endophytes. The aim of this work was to characterize the plant-associated bacterial communities present at both the rhizosphere and inside the seeds, roots and aerial parts of plants of Silene paradoxa, a plant highly well-adapted to extreme environments, such as metal-contaminated soils. Thus, soil samples and plants of S. paradoxa were collected from i) the landfill of a Cu mine at Fenice Capanne (Grosseto, Italy); ii) a serpentine soil (with a high Ni content) at Pieve Santo Stefano (Arezzo, Italy); iii) a limestone uncontaminated soil in Colle Val d'Elsa (Siena, Italy). Bacterial communities associated with the three different plant organs have been then characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes (microbiota). Bacteria were also isolated from seeds and soil and the colony forming units (CFU) was determined on plates containing different concentrations of Ni and Cu (5, 10 and 15 mM). The results showed a greater bacterial diversity among the three soils compared to plants. In particular, even though some phyla occurred in all the three soils (Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chlorflexi and Acidobacteria), in general the bacterial community structure of the three soils was quite different from each other. Interestingly, the endophytic composition within each plant compartment was observed to be strongly affected by the soil of

  13. Root development of non-accumulating and hyperaccumulating plants in metal-contaminated soils amended with biochar.

    PubMed

    Rees, Frédéric; Sterckeman, Thibault; Morel, Jean Louis

    2016-01-01

    Biochar may be used as an amendment in contaminated soils in phytoremediation processes. The mechanisms controlling plant metal uptake in biochar-amended soils remain however unclear. This work aimed at evaluating the influence of biochar on root development and its consequence on plant metal uptake, for two non-hyperaccumulating plants (Zea mays and Lolium perenne) and one hyperaccumulator of Cd and Zn (Noccaea caerulescens). We conducted rhizobox experiments using one acidic and one alkaline soil contaminated with Cd, Pb and Zn. Biochar was present either homogeneously in the whole soil profile or localized in specific zones. A phenomenon of root proliferation specific to biochar-amended zones was seen on the heterogeneous profiles of the acidic soil and interpreted by a decrease of soil phytotoxicity in these zones. Biochar amendments also favored root growth in the alkaline soil as a result of the lower availability of certain nutrients in the amended soil. This increase of root surface led to a higher accumulation of metals in roots of Z.mays in the acidic soil and in shoots of N. caerulescens in the alkaline soil. In conclusion, biochar can have antagonist effects on plant metal uptake by decreasing metal availability, on one hand, and by increasing root surface and inducing root proliferation, on the other hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metal-resistant rhizobacteria isolates improve Mucuna deeringiana phytoextraction capacity in multi-metal contaminated soils from a gold mining area.

    PubMed

    Boechat, Cácio Luiz; Giovanella, Patricia; Amorim, Magno Batista; de Sá, Enilson Luiz Saccol; de Oliveira Camargo, Flávio Anastácio

    2017-01-01

    Phytoremediation consists of biological techniques for heavy metal remediation, which include exploring the genetic package of vegetable species to remove heavy metals from the environment. The goals of this study were to investigate heavy metal and bioaugmentation effects on growth and nutrient uptake by Mucuna deeringiana; to determine the metal translocation factor and bioconcentration factor and provide insight for using native bacteria to enhance heavy metal accumulation. The experiment was conducted under greenhouse conditions using a 2 × 4 factorial scheme with highly and slightly contaminated soil samples and inoculating M. deeringiana with three highly lead (Pb(+2))-resistant bacteria Kluyvera intermedia (Ki), Klebsiella oxytoca (Ko), and Citrobacter murliniae (Cm) isolated from the rhizosphere of native plants identified as Senecio brasiliensis (Spreng.) Less., Senecio leptolobus DC., and Baccharis trimera (Less) DC., respectively. The increased heavy metal concentrations in soil samples do not decrease the root dry mass of M. deeringiana, concerning the number and dry weight of nodules. The shoot dry mass is reduced by the increasing concentration of heavy metals in soil associated with Kluyvera intermedia and Klebsiella oxytoca bacteria. The number of nodules is affected by heavy metals associated with Citrobacter murliniae bacteria. The bacteria K. intermedia, C. murliniae, and K. oxytoca increase the lead and cadmium available in the soil and enhanced metal uptake by Mucuna deeringiana. The M. deeringiana specie has characteristics that make it hyperaccumulate copper and zinc. The translocation and bioconcentration factors for M. deeringiana characterize it as a promising candidate to phytostabilize multi-metal contaminated soils.

  15. Role of extrinsic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in heavy metal-contaminated wetlands with various soil moisture levels.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S; Wang, C; Shen, Z; Quan, Y; Liu, X

    2015-01-01

    This study presents an efficient heavy metal (HM) control method in HM-contaminated wetlands with varied soil moisture levels through the introduction of extrinsic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) into natural wetland soil containing indigenous AMF species. A pot culture experiment was designed to determine the effect of two soil water contents (5-8% and 25-30%), five extrinsic AMF inoculants (Glomus mosseae, G. clarum, G. claroideum, G. etunicatum, and G. intraradices), and HM contamination on root colonization, plant growth, and element uptake of common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel) plantlets in wetland soils. This study showed the prevalence of mycorrhizae in the roots of all P. australis plantlets, regardless of extrinsic AMF inoculations, varied soil moisture or HM levels. It seems that different extrinsic AMF inoculations effectively lowered HM concentrations in the aboveground tissues of P. australis at two soil moisture levels. However, metal species, metal concentrations, and soil moisture should also be very important factors influencing the elemental uptake performance of plants in wetland ecosystems. Besides, the soil moisture level significantly influenced plant growth (including height, and shoot and root dry weight (DW)), and extrinsic AMF inoculations differently affected shoot DW.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility variation of MSW compost-amended soils: in-situ method for monitoring heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mitsuo; Jedidi, Naceur; Hamdi, Helmi; Ayari, Fethia; Hassen, Abdennaceur; M'Hiri, Ali

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic susceptibility was measured for agricultural soils in Mornag area, Tunisia, where the soils were partly amended by manure or compost obtained from municipal solid waste stabilisation ('MSW compost'). Our study indicates that natural non-treated soils and manure-amended soils are always low in magnetic susceptibility, but MSW compost-amended soils show higher values of this parameter. Actually, the increase of magnetic susceptibility shows a direct correspondence with the increasing of the amount of MSW compost added to the soil. According to the magnetic mineralogical investigation carried out by isothermal remanent magnetisation acquisition technique, higher magnetic susceptibility values are depending on an increase in ferromagnetic components such as either magnetite (beta-Fe3O4) or maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) particles. The growth in content of these ferromagnetic components corresponds to an increase of the concentration of heavy metals in soils, which means that magnetic susceptibility indirectly indicates the concentration of heavy metals in MSW compost-amended soils.

  17. Effects of carbon nanotube and biochar on bioavailability of Pb, Cu and Sb in multi-metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Vithanage, Meththika; Herath, Indika; Almaroai, Yaser A; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Huang, Longbin; Sung, Jwa-Kyung; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2017-03-22

    This study examined the effects of carbon nanotube and biochar on the bioavailability of Pb, Cu and Sb in the shooting range soils for developing low-cost remediation technology. Commercially available multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) and biochar pyrolyzed from soybean stover at 300 °C (BC) at 0.5, 1 and 2.5% (w w(-1)) were used to remediate the contaminated soil in an incubation experiment. Both DTPA (bioavailable) and TCLP (leaching) extraction procedures were used to compare the metal/loid availability and leaching by the amendments in soil. The addition of BC was more effective in immobilizing mobile Pb and Cu in the soil than that in MWCNT. The BC reduced the concentrations of Pb and Cu in the soil by 17.6 and 16.2%, respectively. However, both MWCNTs and BC increased Sb bioavailability by 1.4-fold and 1.6-fold, respectively, in DTPA extraction, compared to the control. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) test showed that the leachability of Pb in the soil amended with 2.5% MWCNT was 1.3-fold higher than that the unamended soil, whereas the BC at 2.5% decreased the TCLP-extractable Pb by 19.2%. Precipitation and adsorption via electrostatic and π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions were postulated to be involved in the interactions of Pb and Cu with surfaces of the BC in the amended soils, whereas ion exchange mechanisms might be involved in the immobilization of Cu in the MWCNT-amended soils. The application of BC derived from soybean stover can be a low-cost technology for simultaneously immobilizing bioavailable Pb and Cu in the shooting range soils; however, neither of amendments was effective in Sb immobilization.

  18. [Lead uptake by plants inoculated with plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria in heavy metal-contaminated soil].

    PubMed

    Shabaev, V P

    2014-01-01

    The effects of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria of the genus Pseudomonas on the growth and elemental composition of barley plants were examined in pot experiments under artificial contamination of soil with water-soluble Pb compounds. Bacterial inoculation reduced Pb uptake by plants at the beginning and in the first half of the growing season due to the binding of the heavy metal in organic compounds and stable complexes in the rhizosphere soil without changes in the soil medium reaction. The bacterium P. fluorescens 21 had a maximum capacity for Pb immobilization and contributed to the minimum metal uptake into plants. Application of bacterium P. fluorescens 21 eliminated Pb toxicity and increased the plant weight to the level characteristic of the uncontaminated soil.

  19. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  20. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  1. Comparison of EDTA-enhanced phytoextraction and phytostabilisation strategies with Lolium perenne on a heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Thomas; Gustot, Quentin; Couder, Eléonore; Houben, David; Iserentant, Anne; Lutts, Stanley

    2011-11-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising and cost-effective strategy to manage heavy metal polluted sites. In this experiment, we compared simultaneously phytoextraction and phytostabilisation techniques on a Cd and Zn contaminated soil, through monitoring of plant accumulation and leaching. Lolium perenne plants were cultivated for 2 months under controlled environmental conditions in a 27.6 dm(3)-pot experiment allowing the collect of leachates. The heavy metal phytoextraction was promoted by adding Na-EDTA (0.5 g kg(-1) of soil) in watering solution. Phytostabilisation was assessed by mixing soil with steel shots (1%) before L. perenne sowing. Presence of plants exacerbated heavy metal leaching, by improving soil hydraulic conductivity. Use of EDTA for phytoextraction led to higher concentration of heavy metal in shoots. However, this higher heavy metal extraction was insufficient to satisfactory reduce the heavy metal content in soil, and led to important heavy metal leaching induced by EDTA. On the other hand, addition of steel shots efficiently decreased both Cd and Zn mobility, according to 0.01 M CaCl(2) extraction, and leaching. However, improvement of growth conditions by steel shots led to higher heavy metal mass in shoot tissues. Therefore, soil heavy metal mobility and plant metal uptake are not systematically positively correlated.

  2. Heavy metal contamination in soils around the Tunçbilek Thermal Power Plant (Kütahya, Turkey).

    PubMed

    Özkul, Cafer

    2016-05-01

    Tunçbilek, one of the major thermal power plants (TTPP) in Turkey running on coal, has capacity to generate 365 MW (per year) electricity. Fifty top soil samples were collected from a depth about 0-20 cm in the close vicinity of the TTPP from random points and at different distances. The samples were analyzed using ICP-MS for heavy metals. Heavy metal contents in soils around TTPP varied from 4.4 to 317.5 mg/kg for As, 0.03 to 0.26 mg/kg for Cd, 20.3 to 1028 mg/kg for Cr, 4.8 to 76.8 mg/kg for Cu, 0.09 to 9.3 mg/kg for Hg, 16.6 to 2385 mg/kg for Ni, 4.8 to 58.6 mg/kg for Pb, and 14.5 to 249.5 mg/kg for Zn. Geoaccumulation index (I geo) and enrichment factor (EF) have been calculated in order to evaluate heavy metal pollution in the soils. According to the I geo calculations, the surface soils around TTPP are contaminated by As, Hg, and Ni from uncontaminated to extremely contaminated. I geo values for Cr show practically uncontaminated to be heavily contaminated. The contamination of soil samples changes from practically uncontaminated to moderately contaminated degree for Pb and Zn. The soil samples were uncontaminated for Cd and Cu metals. The enrichment factors of As, Cr, Hg, and Ni in most of the sampling locations indicate significant to extremely high enrichment. The EF for Pb is also high and indicates moderate to very high enrichment of chromium in the soils. The average EF values for Cd, Cu, and Zn are showing moderate enrichment.

  3. Phytoremediation potential of weeds in heavy metal contaminated soils of the Bassa Industrial Zone of Douala, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Lum, A Fontem; Ngwa, E S A; Chikoye, D; Suh, C E

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a promising option for reclaiming soils contaminated with toxic metals, using plants with high potentials for extraction, stabilization and hyperaccumulation. This study was conducted in Cameroon, at the Bassa Industrial Zone of Douala in 2011, to assess the total content of 19 heavy metals and 5 other elements in soils and phytoremediation potential of 12 weeds. Partial extraction was carried out in soil, plant root and shoot samples. Phytoremediation potential was evaluated in terms of the Biological Concentration Factor, Translocation Factor and Biological Accumulation Coefficient. The detectable content of the heavy metals in soils was Cu:70-179, Pb:8-130, Zn:200-971, Ni:74-296, Co:31-90, Mn:1983-4139, V:165-383, Cr:42-1054, Ba:26-239, Sc:21-56, Al:6.11-9.84, Th:7-22, Sr:30-190, La:52-115, Zr:111-341, Y:10-49, Nb:90-172 in mg kg(-1), and Ti:2.73-4.09 and Fe:12-16.24 in wt%. The contamination index revealed that the soils were slightly to heavily contaminated while the geoaccumulation index showed that the soils ranged from unpolluted to highly polluted. The concentration of heavy metals was ranked as Zn > Ni > Cu > V > Mn > Sc > Co > Pb and Cr in the roots and Mn > Zn > Ni > Cu > Sc > Co > V > Pb > Cr > Fe in the shoots. Dissotis rotundifolia and Kyllinga erecta had phytoextraction potentials for Pb and Paspalum orbicularefor Fe. Eleusine indica and K. erecta had phytostabilisation potential for soils contaminated with Cu and Pb, respectively.

  4. Fingerprinting sedimentary and soil units by their natural metal contents: a new approach to assess metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Amorosi, Alessandro; Guermandi, Marina; Marchi, Nazaria; Sammartino, Irene

    2014-12-01

    One of the major issues when assessing soil contamination by inorganic substances is reliable determination of natural metal concentrations. Through integrated sedimentological, pedological and geochemical analyses of 1414 (topsoil/subsoil) samples from 707 sampling stations in the southern Po Plain (Italy), we document that the natural distribution of five potentially toxic metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb) can be spatially predicted as a function of three major factors: source-rock composition, grain size variability and degree of soil weathering. Thirteen genetic and functional soil units (GFUs), each reflecting a unique combination of these three variables, are fingerprinted by distinctive geochemical signatures. Where sediment is supplied by ultramafic (ophiolite-rich) sources, the natural contents of Cr and Ni in soils almost invariably exceed the Italian threshold limits designated for contaminated lands (150 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively), with median values around twice the maximum permissible levels (345 mg/kg for Cr and 207 mg/kg for Ni in GFU B5). The original provenance signal is commonly confounded by soil texture, with general tendency toward higher metal concentrations in the finest-grained fractions. Once reliable natural metal concentrations in soils are established, the anthropogenic contribution can be promptly assessed by calculating metal enrichments in topsoil samples. The use of combined sedimentological and pedological criteria to fingerprint GFU geochemical composition is presented here as a new approach to enhance predictability of natural metal contents, with obvious positive feedbacks for legislative purposes and environmental protection. Particularly, natural metal concentrations inferred directly from a new type of pedogeochemical map, built according to the international guideline ISO 19258, are proposed as an efficient alternative to the pre-determined threshold values for soil contamination commonly established by the national

  5. Heavy metal contamination of arable soil and corn plant in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory and stabilization by liming.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Gutierrez, Jessie; Yun, Sung Wook; Lee, Yong Bok; Yu, Chan; Kim, Pil Joo

    2009-02-01

    The heavy metal contamination in soils and cultivated corn plants affected by zinc smelting activities in the vicinity of a zinc smelting factory in Korea was studied. Soils and corn plants were sampled at the harvesting stage and analyzed for cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) concentration, as well as Cd and Zn fraction and other chemical properties of soils. Cd and Zn were highly accumulated in the surface soils (0-20 cm), at levels higher than the Korean warning criteria (Cd, 1.5; Zn, 300 mg kg(-1)), with corresponding mean values of 1.7 and 407 mg kg(-1), respectively, but these metals decreased significantly with increasing soil depth and distance from the factory, implying that contaminants may come from the factory through aerosol dynamics (Hong et al., Kor J Environ Agr 26(3):204-209, 2007a; Environ Contam Toxicol 52:496-502, 2007b) and not from geological sources. The leaf part had higher Cd and Zn concentrations, with values of 9.5 and 1733 mg kg(-1), compared to the stem (1.6 and 547 mg kg(-1)) and grain (0.18 and 61 mg kg(-1)) parts, respectively. Cd and Zn were higher in the oxidizable fraction, at 38.5% and 46.9% of the total Cd (2.6 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (407 mg kg(-1)), but the exchangeable + acidic fraction of Cd and Zn as the bioavailable phases was low, 0.2 and 50 mg kg(-1), respectively. To study the reduction of plant Cd and Zn uptake by liming, radish (Raphanus sativa L.) was cultivated in one representative field among the sites investigated, and Ca(OH)(2) was applied at rates of 0, 2, 4, and 8 mg ha(-1). Plant Cd and Zn concentrations and NH(4)OAc extractable Cd and Zn concentrations of soil decreased significantly with increasing Ca(OH)(2) rate, since it markedly increases the cation exchange capacity of soil induced by increased pH. As a result, liming in this kind of soil could be an effective countermeasure in reducing the phytoextractability of Cd and Zn.

  6. Soil Carbon Dioxide Production and Surface Fluxes: Subsurface Physical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, D.; Kellman, L.; Beltrami, H.

    Soil respiration is a critical determinant of landscape carbon balance. Variations in soil temperature and moisture patterns are important physical processes controlling soil respiration which need to be better understood. Relationships between soil respi- ration and physical controls are typically addressed using only surface flux data but other methods also exist which permit more rigorous interpretation of soil respira- tion processes. Here we use a combination of subsurface CO_{2} concentrations, surface CO_{2} fluxes and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface envi- ronment to examine physical controls on soil CO_{2} production at four climate observatories in Eastern Canada. Results indicate that subsurface CO_{2} produc- tion is more strongly correlated to the subsurface thermal environment than the surface CO_{2} flux. Soil moisture was also found to have an important influence on sub- surface CO_{2} production, particularly in relation to the soil moisture - soil profile diffusivity relationship. Non-diffusive profile CO_{2} transport appears to be im- portant at these sites, resulting in a de-coupling of summertime surface fluxes from subsurface processes and violating assumptions that surface CO_{2} emissions are the result solely of diffusion. These results have implications for the study of soil respiration across a broad range of terrestrial environments.

  7. EXTRACTION, RECOVERY, AND BIOSTABILITY OF EDTA FOR REMEDIATION OF HEAVY METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825549C052)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chelation removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil is seen as a viable remediation technique. A useful chelating agent should be strong, reusable, and biostable during metal extraction and recovery operations. This work tested the extraction, recovery, and biostability o...

  8. Adaptation to metal-contaminated soils in populations of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus: Vegetative growth and reproductive expression

    SciTech Connect

    Jules, E.S.; Shaw, A.J. )

    1994-06-01

    Many observations suggest that morphological evolution occurs slowly in bryophytes, and this has been suggested to reflect low genetic diversity within species. Isozyme studies, however, stand in apparent contrast and have shown that bryophytes can contain high levels of genetic variability within and among populations. In light of this conflict, we tested the potential of the moss, Ceratodon purpureus, to undergo adaptive change (i.e., ecotypic differentiation) in response to soils that have been contaminated with high levels of metals for 90 years by measuring gametophytic growth and reproductive expression under experimental conditions. Variation in protonemal growth in sterile culture indicates that plants from one population growing on contaminated soil near a smelter are significantly more tolerant of zinc, cadmium, and lead than plants from uncontaminated sites. Results from a common garden experiment, in which plants were grown on soil from the smelter site, indicate that plants from near the smelter are significantly more tolerant of contaminated soils than plants from uncontaminated sites for vegetative growth. The same experiment suggests that plants from the smelter site are also more tolerant in terms of gametangial production (although we could not test this statistically). Our results demonstrate that C. purpureus has been able to undergo relatively rapid evolution in response to strong selective pressures. 29 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Hyperaccumulator oilcake manure as an alternative for chelate-induced phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated alluvial soils.

    PubMed

    Mani, Dinesh; Kumar, Chitranjan; Patel, Niraj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The ability of hyperaccumulator oilcake manure as compared to chelates was investigated by growing Calendula officinalis L for phytoremediation of cadmium and lead contaminated alluvial soil. The combinatorial treatment T6 [2.5 g kg(-1) oilcake manure+5 mmol kg(-1) EDDS] caused maximum cadmium accumulation in root, shoot and flower up to 5.46, 4.74 and 1.37 mg kg(-1) and lead accumulation up to 16.11, 13.44 and 3.17 mg kg(-1), respectively at Naini dump site, Allahabad (S3). The treatment showed maximum remediation efficiency for Cd (RR=0.676%) and Pb (RR=0.202%) at Mumfordganj contaminated site (S2). However, the above parameters were also observed at par with the treatment T5 [2.5 g kg(-1) oilcake manure +2 g kg(-1) humic acid]. Applied EDDS altered chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, and carotene contents of plants while application of oilcake manure enhanced their contents in plant by 3.73-8.65%, 5.81-17.65%, and 7.04-17.19%, respectively. The authors conclude that Calendula officinalis L has potential to be safely grown in moderately Cd and Pb-contaminated soils and application of hyperaccumulator oilcake manure boosts the photosynthetic pigments of the plant, leading to enhanced clean-up of the cadmium and lead-contaminated soils. Hence, the hyperaccumulator oilcake manure should be preferred over chelates for sustainable phytoremediation through soil-plant rhizospheric process.

  10. Kinetic extractions to assess mobilization of Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd in a metal-contaminated soil: EDTA vs. citrate.

    PubMed

    Labanowski, Jérôme; Monna, Fabrice; Bermond, Alain; Cambier, Philippe; Fernandez, Christelle; Lamy, Isabelle; van Oort, Folkert

    2008-04-01

    Kinetic EDTA and citrate extractions were used to mimic metal mobilization in a soil contaminated by metallurgical fallout. Modeling of metal removal rates vs. time distinguished two metal pools: readily labile (QM1) and less labile (QM2). In citrate extractions, total extractability (QM1+QM2) of Zn and Cd was proportionally higher than for Pb and Cu. Proportions of Pb and Cu extracted with EDTA were three times higher than when using citrate. We observed similar QM1/QM2 ratios for Zn and Cu regardless of the extractant, suggesting comparable binding energies to soil constituents. However, for Pb and Cd, more heterogeneous binding energies were hypothesized to explain different kinetic extraction behaviors. Proportions of citrate-labile metals were found consistent with their short-term, in-situ mobility assessed in the studied soil, i.e., metal amount released in the soil solution or extracted by cultivated plants. Kinetic EDTA extractions were hypothesized to be more predictive for long-term metal migration with depth.

  11. Influence of [S, S]-EDDS on phytoextraction of copper and zinc by Elsholtzia splendens from metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Wu, L H; Sun, X F; Luo, Y M; Xing, X R; Christie, P

    2007-01-01

    Two pot experiments were conducted to investigate the time course effects of the (S, S)-N, N'-ethylenediamine disuccinic acid (EDDS) addition to contaminated soil on the uptake of Cu and Zn by the Cu accumulator Elsholtzia splendens and on plant Cu and Zn concentrations at different growth stages. EDDS increased the amounts of Cu and Zn soluble in the soil, taken up by plants, concentrated in the xylem sap, and translocated from roots to stems and leaves. The increase in soil-soluble metals, especially Cu, resulted in a corresponding increase in metal concentrations in the xylem sap and leaves. The addition of EDDS to the soil increased plant Cu and Zn concentrations, especially in the leaves, and changed the proportions of Cu and Zn taken up by different plant parts. The proportions of Cu and Zn taken up by the roots were higher than by the leaves of control plants, but EDDS-treated plants showed the opposite trend. EDDS exerted greater effects at the end of the vegetative growth stage than at the start of the flowering or reproductive stages.

  12. Impact of poplar-based phytomanagement on soil properties and microbial communities in a metal-contaminated site.

    PubMed

    Foulon, Julie; Zappelini, Cyril; Durand, Alexis; Valot, Benoit; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2016-10-01

    Despite a long history of use in phytomanagement strategies, the impacts of poplar trees on the structure and function of microbial communities that live in the soil remain largely unknown. The current study combined fungal and bacterial community analyses from different management regimes using Illumina-based sequencing with soil analysis. The poplar phytomanagement regimes led to a significant increase in soil fertility and a decreased bioavailability of Zn and Cd, in concert with changes in the microbial communities. The most notable changes in the relative abundance of taxa and operational taxonomic units unsurprisingly indicated that root and soil constitute distinct ecological microbial habitats, as exemplified by the dominance of Laccaria in root samples. The poplar cultivar was also an important driver, explaining 12% and 6% of the variance in the fungal and bacterial data sets, respectively. The overall dominance of saprophytic fungi, e.g. Penicillium canescens, might be related to the decomposition activities needed at the experimental site. Our data further highlighted that the mycorrhizal colonization of poplar cultivars varies greatly between the species and genotypes, which is exemplified by the dominance of Scleroderma under Vesten samples. Further interactions between fungal and bacterial functional groups stressed the potential of high-throughput sequencing technologies in uncovering the microbial ecology of disturbed environments. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. EXTRACTION, RECOVERY, AND BIOSTABILITY OF EDTA FOR REMEDIATION OF HEAVY METAL-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825549C052)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chelation removal of heavy metals from contaminated soil is seen as a viable remediation technique. A useful chelating agent should be strong, reusable, and biostable during metal extraction and recovery operations. This work tested the extraction, recovery, and biostability o...

  14. Advances in microbe-assisted reclamation of heavy metal contaminated soils over the last decade: A review.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Muhammad Arslan; Hussain, Iqbal; Rasheed, Rizwan; Iqbal, Muhammad; Riaz, Muhammad; Arif, Muhammad Saleem

    2017-08-01

    Contamination of agricultural soils with trace metals present lethal consequences in terms of diverse ecological and environmental problems that entail entry of metal in food chain, soil deterioration, plant growth suppression, yield reduction and alteration in microbial community. Metal polluted soils have become a major concern for scientists around the globe. Phytoremediation involves the hyperaccumulation of metals in different plant parts. Phytoremediation of metals from polluted soils could be enhanced through inoculation with metal resistant plant growth promoting (PGP) bacteria. These PGP bacteria not only promote plant growth but also enhance metal uptake by plants. There are a number of reports in the literature where PGP bacterial inoculation improves metal accumulation in different plant parts without influencing plant growth. Therefore, there is a need to select PGP bacterial strains which possess the potential to improve plant growth as well as expedite the phytoremediation of metals. In this review, we have discussed the mechanisms possessed by PGP bacteria to promote plant growth and phytoremediation of metals. The central part of this review deals with the recent advances in microbial assisted-phytoremediation of metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in soil profiles of roadside Suaeda salsa wetlands in a Chinese delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiaojun; Wang, Qinggai; Zhang, Guangliang; Bai, Junhong; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Shuai

    2017-02-01

    Five sampling sites (Sites A, B, C, D and E) were selected along a 250 m sampling zone covered by Suaeda salsa, which is perpendicular to a road, in the Yellow River Delta of China. Soil samples were collected to a depth of 40cm in these five sampling sites to investigate the profile distributions and toxic risks of heavy metals. Concentrations of heavy metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) were determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic absorption spectrometry (ICP-AAS). The results showed that in each sampling site, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn have approximately constant concentrations along soil profiles and did not show high contamination compared with the values of probable effect levels (PELs). All soils exhibited As and Ni contamination at all sampling sites compared with other heavy metals. The index of geo-accumulation (Igeo) values for As in the 20-30 cm soil layer at Site B was grouped into Class Ⅳ(2 < Igeo ≤ 3), indicating that the soil was moderately to strongly contaminated. Forty percent of Igeo values of Cd for all soil samples were grouped into Class Ⅳ(2 < Igeo ≤ 3) and 75% samples of Site C showed moderately to strongly contaminated level. The Enrichment factor (EF) values of As at Sites B, C, D and E reached significant enrichment level and EF values of Cd at five sampling sites all reached significant enrichment level. The sum of toxic units (∑TUs) values for surface soils of Sites B and C beyond 4 indicated that Sites B and C have severer toxicity compared with other three sampling sites. As and Ni should be paid more attention to avoid potential ecotoxicity due to their high contribution ratios to the ∑TUs in Suaeda salsa wetlands. Correlation analysis (CA) and principal components analysis (PCA) revealed that Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn might derive from the common sources, Cd might originate from another, while As might have more complex sources in this study area.

  16. Varying effect of biochar on Cd, Pb and As mobility in a multi-metal contaminated paddy soil.

    PubMed

    Yin, Daixia; Wang, Xin; Chen, Can; Peng, Bo; Tan, Changyin; Li, Hailong

    2016-06-01

    Cd, Pb and As stand as the most prominent contaminants prevailing in Chinese soils. In the present study, biochars derived from water hyacinth (BCW) and rice straw (BCR) were investigated regarding their applicability and durability in soil Cd, Pb, and As immobilization under acid precipitation. Total Cd, Pb, and As in both BCs were below the maximum allowed threshold according to biochar toxicity standard recommended by International Biochar Initiative. To evaluate BCs effect on Cd, Pb, As bioavailability and mobility, CaCl2, KH2PO4 and SPLP extractions were firstly carried out. In neutral extraction with CaCl2 and KH2PO4, significantly reduced Cd/Pb concentrations in CaCl2 extract along with elevated KH2PO4-extractable As were recorded with either BC at 2% or 5%. In SPLP with simulated acid rainwater as extractant, comparable Cd, Pb and As levels were determined in SPLP extract with 2% BCW, while slight to significant increase in SPLP-Cd, Pb or As was recorded with other treatments. Longer-term leaching column test further confirmed the high durability of 2% BCW in Cd immobilization under continuous acid exposure. In parallel, little increase in As concentrations in eluate was determined with 2% BCW compared to no-biochar control, indicating a lowered risk of As mobilization with acid input. However, remarkably higher Pb in leachate from both BCW-only control and 2% BCW-amended soils were noticed at the initial stage of acid leaching, indicating a higher acid-solubility of Pb minerals in BCW (most probably PbO) than in tested soil (PbO2, PbAs2O6). Taken together, BCW exhibited important potential for soil Cd sequestration with little effect on As mobilization under acid precipitation. But it may simultaneously load highly acid-soluble Pb minerals into soils, resulting in elevated Pb mobility upon acid exposure. Therefore, more stringent threshold for Pb content in biochar need to be put forward to secure biochar application in soils subject to anthropogenic

  17. Metal contamination of soils and crops affected by the Chenzhou lead/zinc mine spill (Hunan, China).

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyu; Probst, Anne; Liao, Bohan

    2005-03-01

    In 1985, the collapse of the tailing dam in Chenzhou lead/zinc mine (Hunan, southern China) led to the spread of mining waste spills on the farmland along the Dong River. After the accident, an urgent soil cleaning up was carried out in some places. Seventeen years later, cereal (rice, maize, and sorghum), pulses (soybean, Adzuki bean, mung bean and peanut), vegetables (ipomoea, capsicum, taro and string bean) and the rooted soils were sampled at four sites: (1) the mining area (SZY), (2) the area still covered with the mining tailing spills (GYB), (3) the cleaned area from mining tailing spills (JTC), and (4) a background site (REF). Metal concentrations in the crops and soils were analyzed to evaluate the long-term effects of the spilled waste on the soil and the potential human exposure through food chains. The results showed that the physical-chemical properties of the soils obviously changed due to the different farming styles used by each individual farmer. Leaching effects and plant extraction of metals from some soils were quite weak. Certain soils were still heavily polluted with As, Cd, Zn, Pb and Cu. The contamination levels were in the order of GYB>SZY>JTC showing that the clean-up treatment was effective. The maximum allowable concentration (MAC) levels for Chinese agricultural soils were still highly exceeded, particularly for As and Cd (followed by Zn, Pb and Cu), with mean concentrations of 709 and 7.6 mg kg(-1), respectively. These concentrations exceed the MAC levels by 24 times for As and 13 times for Cd at GYB. Generally, the edible leaves or stems of crops were more heavily contaminated than seeds or fruits. Ipomoea was the most severely contaminated crop. The concentrations of Cd and Pb were 3.30 and 76.9 mg kg(-1) in ipomoea leaves at GYB, which exceeded the maximum permit levels (0.5 mg kg(-1) for Cd and 9 mg kg(-1) for Pb) by 6.6 and 8.5 times, respectively. Taro (+skin) could accumulate high concentrations of Zn and Cd in the edible stem

  18. Combined and Relative Effect Levels of Perceived Risk, Knowledge, Optimism, Pessimism, and Social Trust on Anxiety among Inhabitants Concerning Living on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhongjun; Guo, Zengli; Zhou, Li; Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Qinfeng; Zhu, Huike

    2016-11-02

    This research aims at combined and relative effect levels on anxiety of: (1) perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust; and (2) four sub-variables of social trust among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. On the basis of survey data from 499 Chinese respondents, results suggest that perceived risk, pessimism, optimism, and social trust have individual, significant, and direct effects on anxiety, while knowledge does not. Knowledge has significant, combined, and interactive effects on anxiety together with social trust and pessimism, respectively, but does not with perceived risk and optimism. Social trust, perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism have significantly combined effects on anxiety; the five variables as a whole have stronger predictive values than each one individually. Anxiety is influenced firstly by social trust and secondly by perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism. Each of four sub-variables of social trust has an individual, significant, and negative effect on anxiety. When introducing four sub-variables into one model, trust in social organizations and in the government have significantly combined effects on anxiety, while trust in experts and in friends and relatives do not; anxiety is influenced firstly by trust in social organization, and secondly by trust in the government.

  19. Combined and Relative Effect Levels of Perceived Risk, Knowledge, Optimism, Pessimism, and Social Trust on Anxiety among Inhabitants Concerning Living on Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhongjun; Guo, Zengli; Zhou, Li; Xue, Shengguo; Zhu, Qinfeng; Zhu, Huike

    2016-01-01

    This research aims at combined and relative effect levels on anxiety of: (1) perceived risk, knowledge, optimism, pessimism, and social trust; and (2) four sub-variables of social trust among inhabitants concerning living on heavy metal contaminated soil. On the basis of survey data from 499 Chinese respondents, results suggest that perceived risk, pessimism, optimism, and social trust have individual, significant, and direct effects on anxiety, while knowledge does not. Knowledge has significant, combined, and interactive effects on anxiety together with social trust and pessimism, respectively, but does not with perceived risk and optimism. Social trust, perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism have significantly combined effects on anxiety; the five variables as a whole have stronger predictive values than each one individually. Anxiety is influenced firstly by social trust and secondly by perceived risk, pessimism, knowledge, and optimism. Each of four sub-variables of social trust has an individual, significant, and negative effect on anxiety. When introducing four sub-variables into one model, trust in social organizations and in the government have significantly combined effects on anxiety, while trust in experts and in friends and relatives do not; anxiety is influenced firstly by trust in social organization, and secondly by trust in the government. PMID:27827866

  20. Metal contamination of home gardens soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: Implications for human exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ferri, Roberta; Hashim, Dana; Smith, Donald R.; Guazzetti, Stefano; Donna, Filippo; Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina; Beone, Gian Maria; Lucchini, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    Background For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Methods Home gardens (n=63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity duration in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-ray fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Results Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Conclusions Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1+F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references. We

  1. Possibility for using of two Paulownia lines as a tool for remediation of heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Tzvetkova, Nikolina; Miladinova, Kamelya; Ivanova, Katya; Georgieva, Teodora; Geneva, Marya; Markovska, Yuliana

    2015-01-01

    One-year-old two Paulownia lines (Ptomentosa x fortunei--TF 01 and R elongata x fortunei--EF 02) were grown, as pot experiment, in soil collected from the field of waste depository of Kremikovtzi ferrous metallurgical industry near Sofia. The soil was heavily polluted with Cd. Metals content (Ca, Mg, K, Na, Cd, Cu, Pb, Zn and Fe) in soil and its distribution in roots, stems and leaves of both lines was studied. The results showed that Ca and K accumulated more in stem, Mg, Na, Fe and Cd in root, while Pb, Cu and Zn in the leaves of both lines. The bloaccumulation factor (BF) and translocation factor (TF) were evaluated in order to determine the potential of plants in removing metals from contaminated soil. The BF for Fe, Pb, Cu and Zn in TF 01 line exceeded that of EF 02 line--5.6; 1.03; 1.20; 1.14 times, respectively. TF was higher in TF 01 line for Fe, Pb and Cd (6.0; 1.92 and 1.03, respectively), but not for Cu and Zn. The success of phytoremediation depends on plant growth and restricted distribution of heavy metals in shoots. Our results showed that stem length and total leaf area of Paulownia elongata x fortunei were higher than Paulownia tomentosa x fortuneibut BF for Cu and Zn and TF for Pb was less. BF for Cd was 1.7 times higher and TF for Zn was 1.03 times higher in Paulownia elongata x fortunei. Selected two lines (P. tomentosa x fortunei--TF 01 and P elongataxfortunei--EF02) were accumulators of Cu, Zn and Cd. Paulownia tomentosax fortunei accumulated more Pb and Zn in aboveground parts, while Paulownia elongata x fortunei--accumulated Zn only. These lines proved to be a promising species for phytoremediation of heavy metal polluted soils due to high biomass productivity.

  2. Metal contamination of home garden soils and cultivated vegetables in the province of Brescia, Italy: implications for human exposure.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Roberta; Hashim, Dana; Smith, Donald R; Guazzetti, Stefano; Donna, Filippo; Ferretti, Enrica; Curatolo, Michele; Moneta, Caterina; Beone, Gian Maria; Lucchini, Roberto G

    2015-06-15

    For the past century, ferroalloy industries in Brescia province, Italy produced particulate emissions enriched in manganese (Mn), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), iron (Fe), and aluminum (Al). This study assessed metal concentrations in soil and vegetables of regions with varying ferroalloy industrial activity levels. Home gardens (n=63) were selected in three regions of varying ferroalloy plant activity durations in Brescia province. Total soil metal concentration and extractability were measured by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), aqua regia extraction, and modified Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) sequential extraction. Unwashed and washed spinach and turnips cultivated in the same gardens were analyzed for metal concentrations by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Median soil Al, Cd, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn concentrations were significantly higher in home gardens near ferroalloy plants compared to reference home gardens. The BCR method yielded the most mobile soil fraction (the sum of extractable metals in Fractions 1 and 2) and all metal concentrations were higher in ferroalloy plant areas. Unwashed spinach showed higher metal concentrations compared to washed spinach. However, some metals in washed spinach were higher in the reference area likely due to history of agricultural product use. Over 60% of spinach samples exceeded the 2- to 4-fold Commission of European Communities and Codex Alimentarius Commission maximum Pb concentrations, and 10% of the same spinach samples exceeded 2- to 3-fold maximum Cd concentrations set by both organizations. Turnip metal concentrations were below maximum standard reference values. Prolonged industrial emissions increase median metal concentrations and most soluble fractions (BCR F1+F2) in home garden soils near ferroalloy plants. Areas near ferroalloy plant sites had spinach Cd and Pb metal concentrations several-fold above maximum standard references. We recommend thorough washing of vegetables

  3. Rhizosphere concentrations of zinc and cadmium in a metal contaminated soil after repeated phytoextraction by Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ling; Wu, Longhua; Li, Na; Luo, Yongming; Li, Siliang; Li, Zhu; Han, Cunliang; Jiang, Yugen; Christie, Peter

    2011-09-01

    A growth chamber pot experiment and a field plot experiment were conducted with the installation of rhizobags to study the effects of repeated phytoextraction by Sedum plumbizincicola on the bioavailability of Cd and Zn in the rhizosphere and bulk soil Repeated phytoextraction gave significantly lower Cd and Zn concentrations in both rhizosphere and bulk soil solutions compared with soil without repeated phytoextraction. The depletion rates of NH40Ac-extractable Zn in rhizosphere soil in each treatment (L-PS, L-NPS, H-PS, and H-NPS) were 59.7, 18.0, 16.3, and 18.6%, respectively. For NH40Ac-extractable Cd, the depletion rates in treatments L-PS, L-NPS, H-PS, and H-NPS were 6.67, 29.4, 40.3, and 41.4%, respectively. Plant shoot biomass decreased in the order H-PS > H-NPS > L-PS > L-NPS, with dry weights of 0.56, 0.42, 1.43, and 1.21 g pot(-1), respectively. Plant Cd uptake increased with increasing aqua-regia extractable metal concentrations. The NH4OAc extraction procedure was satisfactory to predict the bioavailability of Cd and Zn in rhizosphere soil in terms of shoot uptake by S. plumbizincicola with positive correlation coefficients of 0.545 (p < 0.05) and 0.452 (p < 0.05), respectively. The field study results show a slight decrease in water soluble and NH4OAc-extractable metals, a trend similar to that found in the pot experiment.

  4. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs on the Fate of Metal Contaminants in an Overlaying Groundwater Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, H.; Qafoku, N. P.; Lawter, A.; Bowden, M. E.; Brown, C. F.

    2014-12-01

    The leakage of CO2 and the concomitant upward transport of brine solutions and contaminants from deep storage reservoirs to overlaying groundwater aquifers is considered one of the major risks associated with geologic carbon sequestration (GCS). A systematic understanding of how such leakage would impact the geochemistry of potable aquifers is crucial to the maintenance of environmental quality and the widespread acceptance of GCS. A series of batch and column experiments studies were conducted to understand the fate (mobilization and immobilization) of trace metals, such as Cd and As in the groundwater aquifer after the intrusion of CO2 gas and CO2-saturated fluids containing leached metals from deep subsurface storage reservoirs. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US DOE. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. The experiments were conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The results demonstrated that Cd and As that intrude into groundwater aquifers with the leaking CO2 at initial concentrations of 40 and 114 mg/L, respectively, will be adsorbed on the sediments, in spite of the acidic pH (between 5 and 6) due to CO2 dissolution in the groundwater. Cd concentrations were well below its MCL in both the aqueous solution of the batch study and the effluent of the column study, even for one of the sediment samples which had undetectable amount of carbonate minerals to buffer the pH. Arsenic concentrations were also significantly lower than that in the influent, suggesting that natural sediments have the capacity to mitigate the adverse effects of the CO2 leakage. However, the mitigation capacity of sediments is influenced by its geochemical properties. When there are anions

  5. SOLID OXYGEN SOURCE FOR BIOREMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sodium percarbonate was encapsulated in poly(vinylidene chloride) to determine its potential as a slow-release oxygen source for biodegradation of contaminan ts in subsurface soils. In laboratory studies under aqueous conditions, the encapsulated sodium percarbonate was estimate...

  6. SOLID OXYGEN SOURCE FOR BIOREMEDIATION IN SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sodium percarbonate was encapsulated in poly(vinylidene chloride) to determine its potential as a slow-release oxygen source for biodegradation of contaminan ts in subsurface soils. In laboratory studies under aqueous conditions, the encapsulated sodium percarbonate was estimate...

  7. Field evaluation of in situ remediation of a heavy metal contaminated soil using lime and red-mud.

    PubMed

    Gray, C W; Dunham, S J; Dennis, P G; Zhao, F J; McGrath, S P

    2006-08-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of lime and red mud (by-product of aluminium manufacturing) to reduce metal availability to Festuca rubra and to allow re-vegetation on a highly contaminated brown-field site. Application of both lime and red mud (at 3 or 5%) increased soil pH and decreased metal availability. Festuca rubra failed to establish in the control plots, but grew to a near complete vegetative cover on the amended plots. The most effective treatment in decreasing grass metal concentrations in the first year was 5% red mud, but by year two all amendments were equally effective. In an additional pot experiment, P application in combination with red mud or lime decreased the Pb concentration, but not total uptake of Pb in Festuca rubra compared to red mud alone. The results show that both red mud and lime can be used to remediate a heavily contaminated acid soil to allow re-vegetation.

  8. Leguminous plants nodulated by selected strains of Cupriavidus necator grow in heavy metal contaminated soils amended with calcium silicate.

    PubMed

    Avelar Ferreira, Paulo Ademar; Lopes, Guilherme; Bomfeti, Cleide Aparecida; de Oliveira Longatti, Silvia Maria; de Sousa Soares, Cláudio Roberto Fonseca; Guimarães Guilherme, Luiz Roberto; de Souza Moreira, Fatima Maria

    2013-11-01

    Increasing concern regarding mining area environmental contamination with heavy metals has resulted in an emphasis of current research on phytoremediation. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of symbiotic Cupriavidus necator strains on different leguminous plants in soil contaminated with heavy metals following the application of inorganic materials. The application of limestone and calcium silicate induced a significant increase in soil pH, with reductions in zinc and cadmium availability of 99 and 94 %, respectively. In addition, improved nodulation of Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia, Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica in soil with different levels of contamination was observed. Significant increases in the nitrogen content of the aerial parts of the plant were observed upon nodulation of the root system of Leucaena leucocephala and Mimosa pudica by strain UFLA01-659 (36 and 40 g kg(-1)) and by strain UFLA02-71 in Mimosa caesalpiniaefolia (39 g kg(-1)). The alleviating effect of calcium silicate resulted in higher production of dry matter from the aerial part of the plant, an increase in nodule number and an increase in the nitrogen fixation rate. The results of the present study demonstrate that the combination of rhizobia, leguminous plants and calcium silicate may represent a key factor in the remediation of areas contaminated by heavy metals.

  9. Comparison of three types of oil crop rotation systems for effective use and remediation of heavy metal contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhou, Xihong; Tie, Boqing; Peng, Liang; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Kelin; Zeng, Qingru

    2017-12-01

    Selecting suitable plants tolerant to heavy metals and producing products of economic value may be a key factor in promoting the practical application of phytoremediation polluted soils. The aim of this study is to further understand the utilization and remediation of seriously contaminated agricultural soil. In a one-year field experiment, we grew oilseed rape over the winter and then subsequently sunflowers, peanuts and sesame after the first harvest. This three rotation system produced high yields of dry biomass; the oilseed rape-sunflower, oilseed rape-peanut and oilseed rape-sesame rotation allowed us to extract 458.6, 285.7, and 134.5 g ha(-1) of cadmium, and 1264.7, 1006.1, and 831.1 g ha(-1) of lead from soil, respectively. The oilseed rape-sunflower rotation showed the highest phytoextraction efficiency (1.98%) for cadmium. Lead and cadmium in oils are consistent with standards after extraction with n-hexane. Following successive extractions with potassium tartrate, concentrations of lead and cadmium in oilseed rape and peanut seed meals were lower than levels currently permissible for feeds. Thus, this rotation system could be useful for local farmers as it would enable the generation of income during otherwise sparse phytoremediation periods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Polyaspartate, a biodegradable chelant that improves the phytoremediation potential of poplar in a highly metal-contaminated agricultural soil.

    PubMed

    Lingua, Guido; Todeschini, Valeria; Grimaldi, Michele; Baldantoni, Daniela; Proto, Antonio; Cicatelli, Angela; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective and environment friendly in situ technique for the reclamation of heavy metal-polluted soils. The efficacy of this technique, which relies on tolerant plant species, can be improved by the use of chelating agents. A pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the phytoextraction and phytostabilisation capacities of a white poplar (Populus alba L.) clone named AL35 previously selected for its marked tolerance to copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn). Cuttings were grown on agricultural soil highly contaminated with Cu and Zn, in the presence or not (controls) of a chelant mixture (EDTA/EDDS) known to enhance metal bioavailability and, hence, uptake by plant roots, or the not yet investigated synthetic, highly biodegradable polyaspartic acid (PASP). Both chelant treatments improved the phytostabilisation of Cu and Zn in AL35 plants, whilst the phytoextraction capacity was enhanced only in the case of Cu. Considering that the effectiveness of PASP as phytostabilizer was comparable or better than that of EDTA/EDDS, the low cost of its large-scale chemical synthesis and its biodegradability makes it a good candidate for chelant-enhanced metal phytoextraction from soil while avoiding the toxic side-effects previously described for both EDTA and EDDS.

  11. Effect of heavy metal-solubilizing microorganisms on zinc and cadmium extractions from heavy metal contaminated soil with Tricholoma lobynsis.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ling-yun; Zhang, Wei-wei; Yu, Dong; Cao, Yan-ru; Xu, Heng

    2012-01-01

    The macrofungus, Tricholoma lobynsis, was chosen to remedy Zn-Cd-Pb contaminated soil. To enhance its metal-extracting efficiency, two heavy metal resistant microbes M6 and K1 were applied owing to their excellent abilities to solubilize heavy metal salts. The two isolated microbial strains could also produce indole acetic acid (IAA), siderophore and solubilize inorganic phosphate, but neither of them showed 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity. The strains M6 and K1 were identified as Serratia marcescens and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa based on 16S rDNA and ITS sequence analysis respectively. Pot experiment showed that spraying to T. lobynsis-inoculated soil with M6 and K1 respectively could increase total Cd accumulations of this mushroom by 216 and 61%, and Zn by 153 and 49% compared to the uninoculated control. Pb accumulation however, was too low (<1 mg kg(-1)) to be determined. The results illustrated that special microbes and macrofungi can work together to remedy polluted soil as plant and plant growth promoting microbes do, probably because of excellent metal-accumulating abilities of macrofungi and IAA-siderophore production, phosphate solubilization abilities of the assisted-microbes. This kind of macrofungi-microbe interaction can be developed into a novel bioremediation strategy.

  12. Transcriptome Response to Heavy Metals in Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 Reveals New Metal Resistance Determinants That Also Promote Bioremediation by Medicago lupulina in Metal-Contaminated Soil.

    PubMed

    Lu, Mingmei; Jiao, Shuo; Gao, Enting; Song, Xiuyong; Li, Zhefei; Hao, Xiuli; Rensing, Christopher; Wei, Gehong

    2017-10-15

    The symbiosis of the highly metal-resistant Sinorhizobium meliloti CCNWSX0020 and Medicago lupulina has been considered an efficient tool for bioremediation of heavy metal-polluted soils. However, the metal resistance mechanisms of S. meliloti CCNWSX00200 have not been elucidated in detail. Here we employed a comparative transcriptome approach to analyze the defense mechanisms of S. meliloti CCNWSX00200 against Cu or Zn exposure. Six highly upregulated transcripts involved in Cu and Zn resistance were identified through deletion mutagenesis, including genes encoding a multicopper oxidase (CueO), an outer membrane protein (Omp), sulfite oxidoreductases (YedYZ), and three hypothetical proteins (a CusA-like protein, a FixH-like protein, and an unknown protein), and the corresponding mutant strains showed various degrees of sensitivity to multiple metals. The Cu-sensitive mutant (ΔcueO) and three mutants that were both Cu and Zn sensitive (ΔyedYZ, ΔcusA-like, and ΔfixH-like) were selected for further study of the effects of these metal resistance determinants on bioremediation. The results showed that inoculation with the ΔcueO mutant severely inhibited infection establishment and nodulation of M. lupulina under Cu stress, while inoculation with the ΔyedYZ and ΔfixH-like mutants decreased just the early infection frequency and nodulation under Cu and Zn stresses. In contrast, inoculation with the ΔcusA-like mutant almost led to loss of the symbiotic capacity of M. lupulina to even grow in uncontaminated soil. Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme activity and metal accumulation in roots of M. lupulina inoculated with all mutants were lower than those with the wild-type strain. These results suggest that heavy metal resistance determinants may promote bioremediation by directly or indirectly influencing formation of the rhizobium-legume symbiosis.IMPORTANCE Rhizobium-legume symbiosis has been promoted as an appropriate tool for bioremediation of heavy metal-contaminated

  13. Heavy metal contamination of water, soil and produce within riverine communities of the Río Pilcomayo basin, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Miller, J R; Hudson-Edwards, K A; Lechler, P J; Preston, D; Macklin, M G

    2004-03-29

    The Río Pilcomayo heads on the Cerro Rico de Potosí precious metal-polymetallic tin deposits of Southern Bolivia. Mining of the Potosí deposits began in 1545 and has led to the severe contamination of the Pilcomayo's water and sediments for at least 200 km downstream of the mines. This investigation addresses the potential human health affects of metal and As contamination on four communities located along the upper Río Pilcomayo by examining the potential significance of human exposure pathways associated with soils, crops and water (including river, irrigation and drinking water supplies). The most significantly contaminated agricultural soils occur upstream at Mondragón where Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations exceed recommended guideline values for agricultural use. Further downstream the degree of contamination decreases, and metal concentrations are below Dutch, German and Canadian guideline values. Metal and As concentrations in agricultural products from the four communities were generally below existing guidelines for heavy metal content in commercially-sold vegetables. Thus, the consumption of contaminated produce does not appear to represent a significant exposure pathway. A possible exception is Pb in carrots, lettuce and beetroots from Sotomayor and Tuero Chico; 37% and 55% of the samples, respectively, exceeded recommended guidelines. Most communities obtain drinking water from sources other than the Río Pilcomayo. In general, dissolved concentrations of metals and As in drinking water from the four studied communities are below the WHO guideline values with the exception of Sb, which was high at Tasapampa. The inadvertent ingestion of contaminated water from irrigation canals and the Río Pilcomayo represents a potential exposure pathway, but its significance is thought to be minimal. Given the degree of soil contamination in the area, perhaps the most significant exposure pathway is the ingestion of contaminated soil particles, particularly

  14. Bacteria associated with yellow lupine grown on a metal-contaminated soil: in vitro screening and in vivo evaluation for their potential to enhance Cd phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Weyens, N; Gielen, M; Beckers, B; Boulet, J; van der Lelie, D; Taghavi, S; Carleer, R; Vangronsveld, J

    2014-09-01

    In order to stimulate selection for plant-associated bacteria with the potential to improve Cd phytoextraction, yellow lupine plants were grown on a metal-contaminated field soil. It was hypothesised that growing these plants on this contaminated soil, which is a source of bacteria possessing different traits to cope with Cd, could enhance colonisation of lupine with potential plant-associated bacteria that could then be inoculated in Cd-exposed plants to reduce Cd phytotoxicity and enhance Cd uptake. All cultivable bacteria from rhizosphere, root and stem were isolated and genotypically and phenotypically characterised. Many of the rhizobacteria and root endophytes produce siderophores, organic acids, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase, as well as being resistant to Cd and Zn. Most of the stem endophytes could produce organic acids (73.8%) and IAA (74.3%), however, only a minor fraction (up to 0.7%) were Cd or Zn resistant or could produce siderophores or ACC deaminase. A siderophore- and ACC deaminase-producing, highly Cd-resistant Rhizobium sp. from the rhizosphere, a siderophore-, organic acid-, IAA- and ACC deaminase-producing highly Cd-resistant Pseudomonas sp. colonising the roots, a highly Cd- and Zn-resistant organic acid and IAA-producing Clavibacter sp. present in the stem, and a consortium composed of these three strains were inoculated into non-exposed and Cd-exposed yellow lupine plants. Although all selected strains possessed promising in vitro characteristics to improve Cd phytoextraction, inoculation of none of the strains (i) reduced Cd phytotoxicity nor (ii) strongly affected plant Cd uptake. This work highlights that in vitro characterisation of bacteria is not sufficient to predict the in vivo behaviour of bacteria in interaction with their host plants.

  15. Risk assessment and interpretation of heavy metal contaminated soils on an urban brownfield site in New York metropolitan area.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu; Gallagher, Frank; Deng, Yang; Wu, Meiyin; Feng, Huan

    2017-08-29

    In this study, soil samples were collected at 22 sites in Liberty State Park, New Jersey, in 2005, for metal enrichment and potential ecological risk assessment. The geoaccumulation index (I geo) showed that enrichment levels of trace metals followed an order of Cu > Pb > Zn > As > Cr > Hg while the potential ecological risk factor ([Formula: see text]) indicated that the potential ecological risk of the metals was in the order of Cu > Pb > As > Hg > Zn > Cr. Among these 22 sites, this investigation identified 9 sites at moderate ecological risk, 3 sites at considerable ecological risk, and 4 sites at high ecological risk according to the potential ecological risk index (RI). Hierarchical cluster analysis (CA) of soil metal concentrations separated the study sites into four groups, which are supported by the significant difference in RI values. Geographically, three regions in the Liberty State Park brownfield site were determined based on the CA results and RI values. Subarea 1 had low ecological risk while subareas 2 and 3 had a greater potential for ecological risk. Significant correlations of Pb with Cr and Zn were observed in subareas 2 and 3, respectively. This study shows that statistical approaches coupled with a risk assessment index provide a more comprehensive interpretation of land contamination than a single approach in support of planning land redevelopment.

  16. Plant growth promotion and root colonization by EPS producing Enterobacter sp. RZS5 under heavy metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Sayyed, R Z; Patel, P R; Shaikh, S S

    2015-02-01

    The heavy metal resistant bacterium isolated from field soil and identified as Enterobacter sp. RZS5 tolerates a high concentration (100-2000 μM) of various heavy metal ions such as Mn2+, Ni2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, CO2+ and Fe2+ when grown in such environment and produces exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we have demonstrated EPS production by Enterobacter sp. RZS5 during 60 h of growth in yeast extract mannitol broth (YEMB). The yield increased by two fold after the addition of 60 μM of Ca2+; 50 μM of Fe2+ and 60 μM of Mg2+ ions in YEMB, and the optimization of physico-chemical parameters. EPS was extracted with 30% (v/v) of isopropanol as against the commonly used 50% (v/v) isopropanol method. EPS-rich broth promoted seed germination, shoot height, root length, number of leaves and chlorophyll content of wheat (Triticum aestivum) seed and peanut (Arachis hypogaea) seed. The higher colony-forming unit of Enterobacter sp. in soil inoculated with EPS rich broth of Enterobacter sp. indicated the root colonizing potential and rhizosphere competence of the isolate. The FTIR spectra of the EPS extract confirmed the presence of the functional group characteristics of EPS known to exhibit a high binding affinity towards certain metal ions. This overall growth and vigour in plants along with the effective root colonization, reflected the potential of the isolate as an efficient bio-inoculant in bioremediation.

  17. Assessment of heavy metal contamination in the surrounding soils and surface sediments in Xiawangang River, Qingshuitang District.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Min; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Chang; Ma, Xiaoying; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jiachao; Lu, Lunhui; Yu, Qian; Hu, Langping; Liu, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    Xiawanggang River region is considered to be one of the most polluted areas in China due to its huge amount discharge of pollutants and accumulation for years. As it is one branch of Xiang River and the area downstream is Changsha city, the capital of Hunan Province, the ecological niche of Xiawangang River is very important. The pollution treatment in this area was emphasized in the Twelfth Five-Year Plan of Chinese government for Xiang River Water Environmental Pollution Control. In order to assess the heavy metal pollution and provide the base information in this region for The Twelfth Five-Year Plan, contents and fractions of four heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) covering both sediments and soils were analyzed to study their contamination state. Three different indexes were applied to assess the pollution extent. The results showed this area was severely polluted by the four heavy metals, and the total concentrations exceeded the Chinese environmental quality standard for soil, grade III, especially for Cd. Moreover, Cd, rated as being in high risk, had a high mobility as its great contents of exchangeable and carbonates fractions in spite of its relative low content. Regression analysis revealed clay could well explain the regression equation for Cd, Cu and Zn while pH and sand could significantly interpret the regression equation for Pb. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between Non-residual fraction and I(geo) for all the four metals. Correlation analysis showed four metals maybe had similar pollution sources.

  18. Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in the Surrounding Soils and Surface Sediments in Xiawangang River, Qingshuitang District

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Min; Zeng, Guangming; Zhang, Chang; Ma, Xiaoying; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Jiachao; Lu, Lunhui; Yu, Qian; Hu, Langping; Liu, Lifeng

    2013-01-01

    Xiawanggang River region is considered to be one of the most polluted areas in China due to its huge amount discharge of pollutants and accumulation for years. As it is one branch of Xiang River and the area downstream is Changsha city, the capital of Hunan Province, the ecological niche of Xiawangang River is very important. The pollution treatment in this area was emphasized in the Twelfth Five-Year Plan of Chinese government for Xiang River Water Environmental Pollution Control. In order to assess the heavy metal pollution and provide the base information in this region for The Twelfth Five-Year Plan, contents and fractions of four heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) covering both sediments and soils were analyzed to study their contamination state. Three different indexes were applied to assess the pollution extent. The results showed this area was severely polluted by the four heavy metals, and the total concentrations exceeded the Chinese environmental quality standard for soil, grade III, especially for Cd. Moreover, Cd, rated as being in high risk, had a high mobility as its great contents of exchangeable and carbonates fractions in spite of its relative low content. Regression analysis revealed clay could well explain the regression equation for Cd, Cu and Zn while pH and sand could significantly interpret the regression equation for Pb. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between Non-residual fraction and Igeo for all the four metals. Correlation analysis showed four metals maybe had similar pollution sources. PMID:23951103

  19. An integrated approach to safer plant production on metal contaminated soils using species selection and chemical immobilization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyuck Soo; Seo, Byoung-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Sik; Kim, Won-Il; Owens, Gary; Kim, Kwon-Rae

    2016-09-01

    In order to examine the species specific accumulation of heavy metals in medicinal crops, seven different common medicinal plants were cultivated on a Cd (55mgkg(-1)) and Pb (1283mgkg(-1)) contaminated soil. Subsequently, the effect of various immobilizing agents, applied in isolation and in combination, on Cd and Pb uptake by two medicinal plant species was examined. Cadmium and Pb root concentrations in medicinal plants grown in the control soil varied between 0.5 and 2.6mgkg(-1) for Cd and 3.2 and 36.4mgkg(-1) for Pb. The highest accumulation occurred in Osterici Radix (Ostericum koreanum) and Ginger (Zingiber officinale) and the lowest in Yam (Dioscorea batatas). Application of immobilizing agents significantly reduced both Cd and Pb concentrations in all medicinal plants examined, where the most effective single immobilizing agent was lime fertilizer (LF). Application of combination treatments involving sorption agents such as compost together with lime further decreased Cd and Pb concentrations from 1.3 and 25.3mgkg(-1) to 0.2 and 4.3mgkg(-1), respectively, which was well below the corresponding WHO guidelines. Thus appropriate immobilizing agents in combination with species selection can be practically used for safer medicinal plant production.

  20. Non-destructive soil amendment application techniques on heavy metal-contaminated grassland: Success and long-term immobilising efficiency.

    PubMed

    Friesl-Hanl, Wolfgang; Platzer, Klaus; Riesing, Johann; Horak, Othmar; Waldner, Georg; Watzinger, Andrea; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2017-01-15

    Extensive contamination of grassland with cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) is a typical problem close to Pb/Zn smelter sites. The entry of Cd or Pb into the food chain is very likely, as are toxicity effects of Zn in plants. Previous promising results from pot and field experiments showed the high potential of using amendments for immobilisation to reduce metal input into the food chain via crops grown on smelter-contaminated soils at Arnoldstein (Austria) (Friesl et al., 2006). The aim of this study was to find a practical solution for large-scale contaminations in hilly regions that avoids erosion. Field application of amendments without destroying the vegetation cover (grassland) involved two approaches: (a) slurrying (Slu) the amendments into cut gaps in the vegetation cover and (b) injecting (Inj) the amendments through the vegetation cover. Here, we investigate the immobilising and long-term efficiency of treatments [gravel sludge (2.5%) + red mud (0.5%) (GS + RM)]. Risk assessment was based on soil, plant and water samples taken over a period of 10 years. Ammonium-nitrate-extractable Cd was reduced up to 50%, Pb up to 90%, and Zn over 90%. Plant uptake into the grass mixture and narrow leaf plantain was significantly reduced for Cd, Pb, and Zn. Harvesting early in vegetation period can further reduce uptake and meet the threshold for fodder crops. The reduction of these elements in the seepage water in 24 samplings within these 10 years reached 40%, 45% and 50%, respectively. Immobilisation increased microbial biomass and decreased human bioaccessibility for Pb. Our investigation of the long-term efficiency of GS + RM in all treatments shows that the Slu and Inj amendment application techniques have promising potential as a realistic and practical method for extensively contaminated hilly land. Slurrying performed best. We conclude that grassland remediation methods involving tillage are counterproductive from the viewpoint of bioaccessibility

  1. Human and animal health risk assessment of metal contamination in soil and plants from Ait Ammar abandoned iron mine, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mohamed; Haddioui, Abdelmajid

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate metal pollution in food chain and assess the resulting health risks to native citizens in Ait Ammar village. The results showed that cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and copper (Cu) concentrations in animal organs were above the metal concentration safety limit. Nevertheless, soils and plants from mining area were contaminated with iron (Fe), chromium (Cr), zinc (Zn), and Cr, Cu, Zn respectively. Cd concentrations in almost animal organs were higher than the acceptable daily upper limit, suggesting human consumption of this livestock meat and offal may pose a health risk. The estimated intake of Pb and Cd for Ait Ammar population could be a cause of concern because it exceeded the Provisional Tolerable Weekly Intake (PTWI) proposed by Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) in this area. Thus, conducting regular periodic studies to assess the dietary intake of mentioned elements are recommended.

  2. Selenite reduction by the obligate aerobic bacterium Comamonas testosteroni S44 isolated from a metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shixue; Su, Jing; Wang, Liang; Yao, Rong; Wang, Dan; Deng, Yujia; Wang, Rui; Wang, Gejiao; Rensing, Christopher

    2014-08-07

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element in most organisms but has to be carefully handled since there is a thin line between beneficial and toxic concentrations. Many bacteria have the ability to reduce selenite (Se(IV)) and (or) selenate (Se(VI)) to red elemental selenium that is less toxic. A strictly aerobic bacterium, Comamonas testosteroni S44, previously isolated from metal(loid)-contaminated soil in southern China, reduced Se(IV) to red selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with sizes ranging from 100 to 200 nm. Both energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX or EDS) and EDS Elemental Mapping showed no element Se and SeNPs were produced inside cells whereas Se(IV) was reduced to red-colored selenium in the cytoplasmic fraction in presence of NADPH. Tungstate inhibited Se(VI) but not Se(IV) reduction, indicating the Se(IV)-reducing determinant does not contain molybdenum as co-factor. Strain S44 was resistant to multiple heavy and transition metal(loid)s such as Se(IV), As(III), Cu(II), and Cd(II) with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 100 mM, 20 mM, 4 mM, and 0.5 mM, respectively. Disruption of iscR encoding a transcriptional regulator negatively impacted cellular growth and subsequent resistance to multiple heavy metal(loid)s. C. testosteroni S44 could be very useful for bioremediation in heavy metal(loid) polluted soils due to the ability to both reduce toxic Se(VI) and Se(IV) to non-toxic Se (0) under aerobic conditions and to tolerate multiple heavy and transition metals. IscR appears to be an activator to regulate genes involved in resistance to heavy or transition metal(loid)s but not for genes responsible for Se(IV) reduction.

  3. Effects of nickel hyperaccumulation on physiological characteristics of Alyssum murale grown on metal contaminated waste amended soil.

    PubMed

    Sellami, Rim; Gharbi, Fatma; Rejeb, Saloua; Rejeb, Mohamed Néjib; Henchi, Belgacem; Echevarria, Guillaume; Morel, Jean-Louis

    2012-07-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of nickel concentration on physiological characteristics of Alyssum murale when grown in a soil mixed with sewage sludge (at the rate of 2.8%). Two types of sludge were used: agricultural sewage sludge (S1) and industrial sewage sludge with an increasing nickel concentration (S2, S3, and S4). Results showed that Ni in shoots was higher than Ni in roots. A. murale is able to concentrate up to 12730 mg/kg Ni in leaves. The highest dry matter yield was observed with plants grown with agricultural sewage sludge. An addition of S2 and S3 increased shoot biomass. However, application of S4 reduced 40% shoot dry weight as compared to the control Ni treatment did not affect all chlorophyll fluorescence parameters. The F(v)/F(m) ratio was stable between Ni treatments. Photosynthesis rate (A) increased with agricultural sewage sludge, but remained stable with variable Ni rates from the industrial sludge. The chlorophyll content increased with S1, S2 and S3 but it remains constant with S4 when compared to the control Therefore, high nickel concentration did not affect the function of the photosynthetic machine of A. murale.

  4. Field application of electrokinetic remediation for multi-metal contaminated paddy soil using two-dimensional electrode configuration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo-Seung; Jeon, Eun-Ki; Jung, Ji-Min; Jung, Hong-Bae; Ko, Sung-Hwan; Seo, Chang-Il; Baek, Kitae

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of in situ electrokinetic remediation for arsenic (As)-, copper (Cu)-, and lead (Pb)-contaminated soil, in a pilot-scale field application with two-dimensional electrode configurations. Square and hexagonal configurations with different electrode spacing, 1 m and 2 m, were investigated under a constant 100 V. A square configuration with electrode spacing of 2 m removed 61.5 % of As, 11.4 % of Cu, and 0.9 % of Pb, respectively, and a hexagonal configuration with the same spacing showed a higher removal efficiency in top (59 % of As, 0-0.5 m) and middle (53 % of As, 0.5-1.0 m) layers, but much lower removal efficiency in the bottom layer (1-1.5 m), which was thought to be due to groundwater flow through periodic rise and fall of tides. Fractionation analysis showed that As bound to Fe-Mn oxyhydroxide was the main form of As removed by the electrokinetic process. The two-dimensional configuration wasted less electrical energy by Joule heating, and required fewer electrode installations, compared to the one-dimensional electrode configuration.

  5. Effects of Cd- and Pb-resistant endophytic fungi on growth and phytoextraction of Brassica napus in metal-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yanan; Xie, Huarong; Cao, Lixiang; Zhang, Renduo; Xu, Zaichao; Wang, Zhuoya; Deng, Zujun

    2017-01-01

    Metal-resistant endophytic fungi from roots improved phytoremediation efficacy of host plants; however, the effects of endophytic fungi from plant aerial parts on host plants are unknown. The aim of this study was to develop a feasible method to screen fungal endophytes from stems and roots of Brassica napus and to investigate effects of the endophytic fungi on growth and phytoremediation efficiency of the plant. Endophytic Fusarium sp. CBRF44, Penicillium sp. CBRF65, and Alternaria sp. CBSF68 with different traits were isolated from roots and stems of rapes grown in a metal-contaminated soil. Fusarium sp. CBRF44 (resistant to 5 mM Cd and 15 mM Pb, isolated from roots) and Alternaria sp. CBSF68 (resistant to 1 mM Cd and 10 mM Pb, isolated from stems) could produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and siderophore; Penicillium sp. CBRF65 (tolerate 2 mM Cd and 20 mM Pb, isolated from roots) could not produce IAA and siderophore but showed the highest phosphate-solubilizing activities. Fusarium sp. CBRF44 and Penicillium sp. CBRF65 significantly increased the rape biomass and promoted the extraction efficacy of Pb and Cd, while Alternaria sp. CBSF68 did not show similar results. Penicillium sp. CBRF65 and Fusarium sp. CBRF44 could be frequently recovered from inoculated rape roots, while Alternaria sp. CBSF68 was scarcely recovered. The results indicate that the colonizing capacity of endophytic fungi in roots is important to improve phytoremediation efficacy of host plants.

  6. ENGINEERING ISSUE: IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED UNSATURATED SUBSURFACE SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology for the remediation of unsaturated subsurface soils involves the use of microorganisms to degrade contaminants which are present in such soils. Understanding the processes which drive in situ bioremediation, as well as the effectiveness and efficiency of th...

  7. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol affects the photosynthetic apparatus and improves the performance of transgenic poplars on heavy metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, L A; Ronzhina, D A; Ivanov, L A; Stroukova, L V; Peuke, A D; Rennenberg, H

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies of transgenic poplars over-expressing the genes gsh1 and gsh2 encoding γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS) and glutathione synthetase, respectively, provided detailed information on regulation of GSH synthesis, enzymes activities and mRNA expression. In this experiment, we studied quantitative parameters of leaves, assimilating tissues, cells and chloroplasts, mesophyll resistance for CO(2) diffusion, chlorophyll and carbohydrate content in wild-type poplar and transgenic plants over-expressing gsh1 in the cytosol after 3 years of growth in relatively clean (control) or heavy metal-contaminated soil in the field. Over-expression of gsh1 in the cytosol led to a twofold increase of intrafoliar GSH concentration and influenced the photosynthetic apparatus at different levels of organisation, i.e., leaves, photosynthetic cells and chloroplasts. At the control site, transgenic poplars had a twofold smaller total leaf area per plant and a 1.6-fold leaf area per leaf compared to wild-type controls. Annual aboveground biomass gain was reduced by 50% in the transgenic plants. The reduction of leaf area of the transformants was accompanied by a significant decline in total cell number per leaf, indicating suppression of cell division. Over-expression of γ-ECS in the cytosol also caused changes in mesophyll structure, i.e., a 20% decrease in cell and chloroplast number per leaf area, but also an enhanced volume share of chloroplasts and intercellular airspaces in the leaves. Transgenic and wild poplars did not exhibit differences in chlorophyll and carotenoid content of leaves, but transformants had 1.3-fold fewer soluble carbohydrates. Cultivation on contaminated soil caused a reduction of palisade cell volume and chloroplast number, both per cell and leaf area, in wild-type plants but not in transformants. Biomass accumulation of wild-type poplars decreased in contaminated soil by more than 30-fold, whereas transformants showed a twofold decrease

  8. Deep Soil: Quantifying and Modeling Subsurface Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, J. N.; Devine, W.; Harrison, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Some soil carbon datasets that are spatially rich, such as the USDA Forest Service Inventory and Analysis National Program dataset, sample soil to only 20 cm (8 inches), despite evidence that substantial stores of soil C can be found deeper in the soil profile. The maximum extent of tree rooting is typically many meters deep and provides: direct exchange with the soil solution; redistribution of water from deep horizons toward the surface during times of drought; resources for active microbial communities in deep soil around root channels; and direct carbon inputs through exudates and root turnover. This study examined soil carbon to a depth of 2.5 meters across 22 soils in Pacific Northwest Douglas-fir forests. Excavations at 20 additional sites took place in summer 2014, greatly expanding the spatial coverage and extent of the data set. Forest floor and mineral soil bulk density samples were collected at depths of 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 meters. Pool estimates from systematic sampling depths shallower than 1.5 m yielded significantly smaller estimates than the total soil stock to 2.5 meters (P<0.01). On average, only 5% of soil C was found in the litter layer, 35% was found below 0.5 meter, and 21% was found below 1.0 meter. Due to the difficulty of excavating and measuring deep soil carbon, a series of nonlinear mixed effect models were fit to the data to predict deep soil carbon stocks given sampling to 1.0 meter. A model using an inverse polynomial function predicted soil carbon to 2.5 meters with -5.6% mean error. The largest errors occurred in Andisols with non-crystalline minerals, which can adsorb large quantities of carbon on mineral surfaces and preserve it from decomposition. An accurate spatial dataset of soil depth to bedrock would be extremely useful to constrain models of the vertical distribution of soil carbon. Efforts to represent carbon in spatial models would benefit from considering the vertical distribution of carbon in soil. Sampling

  9. In Situ Evaluation of Crop Productivity and Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Paddy Soils after Remediation of Metal-Contaminated Soils.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin Woong; Chae, Yooeun; Moon, Jongmin; Kim, Dokyung; Cui, Rongxue; An, Gyeonghyeon; Jeong, Seung-Woo; An, Youn-Joo

    2017-02-15

    Soils contaminated with heavy metals have been reused for agricultural, building, and industrial uses following remediation. This study assesses plant growth and bioaccumulation of heavy metals following remediation of industrially contaminated soil. The soil was collected from a field site near a nonferrous smelter and was subjected to laboratory- and field-scale studies. Soil from the contaminated site was remediated by washing with acid or mixed with soil taken from a distant uncontaminated site. The activities of various soil exoenzymes, the rate of plant growth, and the bioaccumulations of six heavy metals were measured to assess the efficacy of these bioremediation techniques. Growth of rice (Oryza sativa) was unaffected in acid-washed soil or the amended soil compared to untreated soil from the contaminated site. The levels of heavy metals in the rice kernels remained within safe limits in treated and untreated soils. Rice, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and wheat (Triticum aestivum) cultivated in the same soils in the laboratory showed similar growth rates. Soil exoenzyme activities and crop productivity were not affected by soil treatment in field experiments. In conclusion, treatment of industrially contaminated soil by acid washing or amendment did not adversely affect plant productivity or lead to increased bioaccumulation of heavy metals in rice.

  10. Subsurface Weathering of Rocks and Soils at Gusev Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, A. S.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Clark, B. C.; Morris, R. V.; Rodionov, D.; Schroeder, C.

    2005-01-01

    Data collected by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit at Gusev Crater suggest that enhanced weathering of rocks and soils occurs beneath the immediate surface. We suggest that this alteration occurs over geological timescales under present climatic conditions and is a result of diurnal condensation of thin-films of water on subsurface materials. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  11. Estimating Hydrologic Processes from Subsurface Soil Displacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, C. E.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L.; MIller, S.

    2012-12-01

    Soil moisture and the processes that control it are important components of the hydrologic cycle, but measuring these processes remains challenging. We have developed a new measurement method that offers flexibility compared to existing technology. The approach is to measure small vertical displacements in the soil which responds proportionally to distributed surface load changes such as variation in the near-surface water content. The instrument may be installed at a depth of several meters to hundreds of meters below the surface. Because the measurement averaging region scales with the depth of the displacement measurements, this approach provides the means for estimating the soil moisture time series over tens of square meters to tens of thousands of square meters. The instrument developed for this application is called a Sand-X, which is short for Sand Extensometer. It is designed for applications in unconsolidated material, ranging from clay to sand. The instrument is simple and relatively inexpensive, and it can be installed in a boring made with a hand auger or with a small drill rig. Studies at the field scale are ongoing at a field site near Clemson, SC. The site is underlain by saprolite weathered primarily from biotite gneiss. Several Sand-X devices are installed at a field site that is instrumented for validating soil moisture, precipitation, and evapotranspiration estimates. These instruments are emplaced at a depth of 6 m and respond to the weight of a vehicle out to 18 m from the well. Calibration is performed by comparing precipitation measurements to the soil displacement response. For example, the coefficient for one installation is roughly 185 nm soil displacement/mm water content change. The resolution of the instrument is approximately 10 nm, so the Sand-X is capable of detecting changes of soil moisture on the order of tenths of one mm in compliant soils like saprolite. A typical soil displacement time series shows alternating periods of

  12. Microbial Diversity and Heterogeneity in Sandy Subsurface Soils

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jizhong; Xia, Beicheng; Huang, Heshu; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tiedje, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Microbial community diversity and heterogeneity in saturated and unsaturated subsurface soils from Abbott's Pit in Virginia (1.57, 3.25, and 4.05 m below surface) and Dover Air Force Base in Delaware (6.00 and 7.50 m below surface) were analyzed using a culture-independent small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (rDNA)-based cloning approach. Four to six dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were identified in 33 to 100 unique SSU rDNA clones (constituting about 40 to 50% of the total number of SSU rDNA clones in the clone library) from the saturated subsurface samples, whereas no dominant OTUs were observed in the unsaturated subsurface sample. Less than 10% of the clones among samples from different depths at the same location were identical, and the proportion of overlapping OTUs was lower for the samples that were vertically far apart than for adjacent samples. In addition, no OTUs were shared between the Abbott's Pit and Dover samples. The majority of the clones (80%) had sequences that were less than 5% different from those in the current databases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that most of the bacterial clones were affiliated with members of the Proteobacteria family (90%), gram-positive bacteria (3%), and members of the Acidobacteria family (3%). Principal component analysis revealed that samples from different geographic locations were well separated and that samples from the same location were closely grouped together. In addition, the nonsaturated subsurface samples from Abbott's Pit clustered together and were well separated from the saturated subsurface soil sample. Finally, the overall diversity of the subsurface samples was much lower than that of the corresponding surface soil samples. PMID:15006798

  13. Heavy metal contaminations in a soil-rice system: identification of spatial dependence in relation to soil properties of paddy fields.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Keli; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Selim, H M

    2010-09-15

    In order to identify spatial relationship of heavy metals in soil-rice system at a regional scale, 96 pairs of rice and soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang province, China, which is one of the well-known electronic and electric waste recycling centers. The results indicated some studied areas had potential contaminations by heavy metals, especially by Cd. The spatial distribution of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn illustrated that the highest concentrations were located in the northwest areas and the accumulation of these metals may be due to the industrialization, agricultural chemicals and other human activities. In contrast, the concentration of Ni decreased from east to west and the mean concentration was below the background value, indicating the distribution of Ni may be naturally controlled. Enrichment index (EI) was used to describe the availability of soil heavy metals to rice. The spatial distribution of EIs for Cd, Ni and Zn exhibited a west-east structure, which was similar with the spatial structures of pH, OM, sand and clay. Cross-correlograms further quantitatively illustrated the EIs were significantly correlated with most soil properties, among which; soil pH and OM had the strongest correlations with EIs. However, EI of Cu showed relative weak correlations with soil properties, especially soil pH and OM had no correlations with EI of Cu, indicating the availability of Cu may be influenced by other factors.

  14. Subsurface Salts in Antarctic Dry Valley Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, P.; Bishop, J. L.; Gibson, E. K.; Koeberl, C.

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of water-soluble ions, major and minor elements, and other parameters were examined to determine the extent and effects of chemical weathering on cold desert soils. Patterns at the study sites support theories of multiple salt forming processes, including marine aerosols and chemical weathering of mafic minerals. Periodic solar-mediated ionization of atmospheric nitrogen might also produce high nitrate concentrations found in older sediments. Chemical weathering, however, was the major contributor of salts in Antarctic Dry Valleys. The Antarctic Dry Valleys represent a unique analog for Mars, as they are extremely cold and dry desert environments. Similarities in the climate, surface geology, and chemical properties of the Dry Valleys to that of Mars imply the possible presence of these soil formation mechanisms on Mars, other planets and icy satellites.

  15. The effects of Pantoea sp. strain Y4-4 on alfalfa in the remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil, and auxiliary impacts of plant residues on the remediation of saline-alkali soils.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhuan; Wang, Jie; Gao, Nanxiong; Liu, Lizhu; Chen, Yahua

    2017-04-01

    The plant-growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Y4-4 was isolated from plant rhizosphere soil and identified as Pantoea sp. by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The effects of strain Y4-4 on alfalfa grown in heavy-metals-contaminated soil was investigated using a pot experiment. In a Cu-rich environment, the shoot dry mass and total dry mass of plants inoculated with strain Y4-4 increased by 22.6% and 21%, and Cu accumulation increased by 15%. In a Pb-Zn-rich environment, the shoot dry mass and total dry mass of plants inoculated with strain Y4-4 increased by 23.4% and 22%, and Zn accumulation increased by 30.3%. In addition, the salt tolerance and biomass of wheat seedlings could be improved by applying strain Y4-4 mixed with plant residue as a result of the Cu-rich plant residues providing copper nutrition to wheat. This study offers an efficient PGPR with strong salt tolerance and a safe strategy for the post-treatment of plant residue.

  16. Does soil water saturation mobilize metals from riparian soils to adjacent surface water? A field monitoring study in a metal contaminated region.

    PubMed

    Van Laer, Liesbeth; Smolders, Erik

    2013-06-01

    In the Noorderkempen (NW Belgium), a large area (about 280 km(2)) is contaminated with cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) due to historical pollution by the Zn smelters. Direct aquatic emissions of metals have diminished over time, however the surface water metal concentration largely exceeds quality standards, mainly during winter periods. Monitoring data were analyzed to reveal whether these fluctuations are related to seasonal redox reactions in associated contaminated riparian soils that drain into the rivers. A field survey was set up with soil pore-water and groundwater monitored for three years in transects of soil monitoring points perpendicular to rivers at contaminated and non-contaminated sites. Site averaged surface water concentrations of a 15 year dataset exceeded local quality standards 4 to 200-fold. Winter averaged metal concentrations significantly exceeded the corresponding summer values 1.3-1.8 (Zn) and 1.5-2.4 fold (Cd). Zinc and Cd concentrations in water were positively related to Fe and Mn but not to Ca, K or Na suggesting that redox reactions and not dilution processes are involved. In ground- and pore-water of the associated riparian soils, the concentrations of Zn fluctuate by the same order of magnitude as in surface water but were generally smaller than in the corresponding contaminated rivers. In addition, correlations of dissolved Zn with Fe and Mn were lacking. This analysis suggests that redox reactions in streams, and not in riparian soils, explain the seasonal trends of Zn and Cd in surface water. Hence, river sediments and not riparian soils may be the cause of the winter peaks of Zn and Cd in these rivers.

  17. Dynamics of decadally cycling carbon in subsurface soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Hockaday, William C.; Masiello, Caroline A.; Trumbore, Susan E.

    2012-09-01

    Subsurface horizons contain more than half of the global soil carbon (C), yet the dynamics of this C remains poorly understood. We estimated the amount of decadally cycling subsurface C (˜20 to 60 cm depth) from the incorporation of `bomb' radiocarbon (14C) using samples taken over 50 years from grassland and forest soils in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California. The radiocarbon content of all organic matter fractions (roots, low-density (LF), high-density (HF), and non-oxidizable HF) increased from the pre- to post-bomb samples, indicating ˜1-6 kgC m-2, or about half of the subsoil C, consists of C fixed since 1963. Low-density (LF-C) represented <24% (grassland) to 40-55% (forest) of the subsurface C and represented a mixture of post-bomb C and varying amounts of pre-1950 charcoal, identified using13C-NMR spectroscopy. The14C content of HF-C increased rapidly from 1992 to 2009, indicating a significant time lag (>20 years) for the arrival of `bomb'14C to this fraction. A two-pool (fast-cycling and passive) model including >20 year time lag showed that 28-73% of the subsoil mineral-associated C had turnover times of 10-95 years. Microbially respired C was enriched in bomb14C compared to both LF and HF fractions in 2009. Overall, we estimate that C fluxes through decadally cycling pools in the subsurface are equivalent to 1-9% (grassland) to 10-54% (forest) of the surface litterfall at these sites. Our results demonstrate the importance of decadally cycling C for ecosystem C balance, and that a lagged response of the large subsurface C stores to changes in environmental conditions is possible.

  18. Effects of soil type upon metolachlor losses in subsurface drainage.

    PubMed

    Novak, S M; Portal, J M; Schiavon, M

    2001-01-01

    A field experiment at La Bouzule (Lorraine, France) investigated metolachlor movement to subsurface drains in two soil types, a silt loam and a heavy clay soil, under identical agricultural management practices and climatic conditions. Drainage volumes and concentrations of metolachlor in the soil plough layer and drainwater were monitored after herbicide application from May 1996 to February 1997, and from May to August 1998. Total losses in drainwater were 0.08% and 0.18% of the amount applied to the silt loam compared with 0.59% and 0.41% for the clay soil, in 1996/97 and 1998, respectively. In 1996/97, 32% of total metolachlor loss from the silt loam and 91% from the clay soil occurred during the spring/summer period following treatment. Peak concentrations were 18.5 and 171.6 microg l(-1) for the silt loam and 130.6 and 395.3 microg l(-1) for the clay soil during the spring/summer periods of 1996/97 and 1998, respectively. During the autumn/winter period, concentrations did not exceed 2.2 microg l(-1) for the silt loam and 2.6 microg l(-1) for the clay soil. The experimental results indicate that metolachlor losses in drainwater were primarily caused by preferential flow (macropore flow) which was greater in the clay soil than in the silt loam, and occurring mainly during the spring/summer periods.

  19. Degradation and Sorption of Imidacloprid in Dissimilar Surface and Subsurface Soils

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Degradation and sorption/desorption are important processes affecting the leaching of pesticides through soil. Once pesticides move past the surface soil layers, subsurface soil physical, chemical, and biological properties significantly affect pesticide fate and the potential for groundwater contam...

  20. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contamination may arise from multiple sources of toxic elements that may exist as different forms (species) which impact bioavailability. In turn, the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants has a direct impact on human health risk assessment and risk management practices. Novel research efforts focusing on development and application of in vitro and in vivo methods to measure the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metal contaminated soils have advanced in the past few years. The objective of this workshop was to focus on recent developments in assessing the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of arsenic contaminated soils, metal contamination in urban residences in Canada and potential children’s exposures to toxic elements in house dust, a community-based study known as the West Oakland Residential Lead Assessment , studies of the bioavailability of soil cadmium, chromium, nickel and mercury and human exposures to contaminated Brownfield soils. These presentations covered issues related to human health and bioavailability along with the most recent studies on community participation in assessing metal contamination, studies of exposures to residential contamination, and

  1. Assessing the bioavailability and risk from metal-contaminated ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Exposure to contaminated soil and dust is an important pathway in human health risk assessment. Physical and chemical characteristics, as well as biological factors, determine the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants. Within a single sample, contamination may arise from multiple sources of toxic elements that may exist as different forms (species) which impact bioavailability. In turn, the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of soil and dust contaminants has a direct impact on human health risk assessment and risk management practices. Novel research efforts focusing on development and application of in vitro and in vivo methods to measure the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of metal contaminated soils have advanced in the past few years. The objective of this workshop was to focus on recent developments in assessing the bioaccessibility/bioavailability of arsenic contaminated soils, metal contamination in urban residences in Canada and potential children’s exposures to toxic elements in house dust, a community-based study known as the West Oakland Residential Lead Assessment , studies of the bioavailability of soil cadmium, chromium, nickel and mercury and human exposures to contaminated Brownfield soils. These presentations covered issues related to human health and bioavailability along with the most recent studies on community participation in assessing metal contamination, studies of exposures to residential contamination, and

  2. Metal contamination in environmental media in residential ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hard-rock mining for metals, such as gold, silver, copper, zinc, iron and others, is recognized to have a significant impact on the environmental media, soil and water, in particular. Toxic contaminants released from mine waste to surface water and groundwater is the primary concern, but human exposure to soil contaminants either directly, via inhalation of airborne dust particles, or indirectly, via food chain (ingestion of animal products and/or vegetables grown in contaminated areas), is also, significant. In this research, we analyzed data collected in 2007, as part of a larger environmental study performed in the Rosia Montana area in Transylvania, to provide the Romanian governmental authorities with data on the levels of metal contamination in environmental media from this historical mining area. The data were also considered in policy decision to address mining-related environmental concerns in the area. We examined soil and water data collected from residential areas near the mining sites to determine relationships among metals analyzed in these different environmental media, using the correlation procedure in SAS statistical software. Results for residential soil and water analysis indicate that the average values for arsenic (As) (85 mg/kg), cadmium (Cd) (3.2 mg/kg), mercury (Hg) (2.3 mg/kg) and lead (Pb) (92 mg/kg) exceeded the Romanian regulatory exposure levels [the intervention thresholds for residential soil in case of As (25 mg/kg) and Hg

  3. Metal contamination in environmental media in residential ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Hard-rock mining for metals, such as gold, silver, copper, zinc, iron and others, is recognized to have a significant impact on the environmental media, soil and water, in particular. Toxic contaminants released from mine waste to surface water and groundwater is the primary concern, but human exposure to soil contaminants either directly, via inhalation of airborne dust particles, or indirectly, via food chain (ingestion of animal products and/or vegetables grown in contaminated areas), is also, significant. In this research, we analyzed data collected in 2007, as part of a larger environmental study performed in the Rosia Montana area in Transylvania, to provide the Romanian governmental authorities with data on the levels of metal contamination in environmental media from this historical mining area. The data were also considered in policy decision to address mining-related environmental concerns in the area. We examined soil and water data collected from residential areas near the mining sites to determine relationships among metals analyzed in these different environmental media, using the correlation procedure in SAS statistical software. Results for residential soil and water analysis indicate that the average values for arsenic (As) (85 mg/kg), cadmium (Cd) (3.2 mg/kg), mercury (Hg) (2.3 mg/kg) and lead (Pb) (92 mg/kg) exceeded the Romanian regulatory exposure levels [the intervention thresholds for residential soil in case of As (25 mg/kg) and Hg

  4. Solidification/stabilisation of metals contaminated industrial soil from former Zn smelter in Celje, Slovenia, using cement as a hydraulic binder.

    PubMed

    Voglar, Grega E; Lestan, Domen

    2010-06-15

    In a laboratory study, Portland cement (15%, w/w) was used for solidification/stabilisation (S/S) of Cd, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni and As contaminated soils from the former industrial site. Soils formed solid monoliths with cement. S/S effectiveness was assessed by measuring the mechanical strength of the monoliths, concentrations of metals in deionised water and TCLP (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure) soil extracts, and mass transfer of metals. Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn and Ni in water extracts from S/S soils generally decreased, concentrations of As remained unchanged, while concentrations of Cu increased. Concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn and Ni in the TCLP extracts from S/S soils were lower than from original soils. Cu extractability was lower in most soil samples, while the extractability of As from S/S soils increased. Overall, the concentration of metals in deionised water and TCLP solution, obtained after extraction of the S/S soils, was below the regulatory limits. S/S greatly reduced the mass transfer of Cd (up to 83-times), Pb (up to 13.7-times) and Zn (up to 294-times). Mass transfer of Ni and As was generally also reduced, while that of Cu increased in some S/S soils. Based on the findings of mass-transfer mechanism analysis the predominant mechanism of release was surface wash-off of metals otherwise physically encapsulated within the cementous soil matrix. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Heavy metal contamination characteristic of soil in WEEE (waste electrical and electronic equipment) dismantling community: a case study of Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Damrongsiri, Seelawut; Vassanadumrongdee, Sujitra; Tanwattana, Puntita

    2016-09-01

    Sue Yai Utit is an old community located in Bangkok, Thailand which dismantles waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). The surface soil samples at the dismantling site were contaminated with copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn), and nickel (Ni) higher than Dutch Standards, especially around the WEEE dumps. Residual fractions of Cu, Pb, Zn, and Ni in coarse soil particles were greater than in finer soil. However, those metals bonded to Fe-Mn oxides were considerably greater in fine soil particles. The distribution of Zn in the mobile fraction and a higher concentration in finer soil particles indicated its readily leachable character. The concentration of Cu, Pb, and Ni in both fine and coarse soil particles was mostly not significantly different. The fractionation of heavy metals at this dismantling site was comparable to the background. The contamination characteristics differed from pollution by other sources, which generally demonstrated the magnification of the non-residual fraction. A distribution pathway was proposed whereby contamination began by the deposition of WEEE scrap directly onto the soil surface as a source of heavy metal. This then accumulated, corroded, and was released via natural processes, becoming redistributed among the soil material. Therefore, the concentrations of both the residual and non-residual fractions of heavy metals in WEEE-contaminated soil increased.

  6. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacing effects on soil water redistribution, corn yield, and water productivity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Emitter spacings of 0.3 to 0.6 m are commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) of corn on the deep, silt loam soils of the United States Great Plains. Subsurface drip irrigation emitter spacings of 0.3, 0.6, 0.9 and 1.2 m were examined for the resulting differences in soil water redistribut...

  7. Addition of microbially-treated sugar beet residue and a native bacterium increases structural stability in heavy metal-contaminated Mediterranean soils.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Caravaca, F; Azcón, R; Kohler, J; Roldán, A

    2009-10-15

    A mesocosm experiment was conducted to investigate the effect of the addition of Aspergillus niger-treated sugar beet waste, in the presence of rock phosphate, and inoculation with a native, metal-tolerant bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis, on the stabilisation of soil aggregates of two mine tailings, with differing pH values, from a semiarid Mediterranean area and on the stimulation of growth of Piptatherum miliaceum. Bacterium combined with organic amendment enhanced structural stability (38% in acidic soil and 106% in neutral soil compared with their corresponding controls). Only the organic amendment increased pH, electrical conductivity, water-soluble C, water-soluble carbohydrates and plant growth, in both soils. While in neutral soil both organic amendment and bacterium increased dehydrogenase activity, only organic amendment had a significant effect in acidic soil. This study demonstrates that the use of P. miliaceum in combination with organic amendment and bacterium is a suitable tool for the stabilisation of the soil structure of degraded mine tailings, although its effectiveness is dependent on soil pH.

  8. Biological reduction of uranium in groundwater and subsurface soil.

    PubMed

    Abdelouas, A; Lutze, W; Gong, W; Nuttall, E H; Strietelmeier, B A; Travis, B J

    2000-04-24

    Biological reduction of uranium is one of the techniques currently studied for in situ remediation of groundwater and subsurface soil. We investigated U(VI) reduction in groundwaters and soils of different origin to verify the presence of bacteria capable of U(VI) reduction. The groundwaters originated from mill tailings sites with U concentrations as high as 50 mg/l, and from other sites where uranium is not a contaminant, but was added in the laboratory to reach concentrations up to 11 mg/l. All waters contained nitrate and sulfate. After oxygen and nitrate reduction, U(VI) was reduced by sulfate-reducing bacteria, whose growth was stimulated by ethanol and trimetaphosphate. Uranium precipitated as hydrated uraninite (UO2 x xH2O). In the course of reduction of U(VI), Mn(IV) and Fe(III) from the soil were reduced as well. During uraninite precipitation a comparatively large mass of iron sulfides formed and served as a redox buffer. If the excess of iron sulfide is large enough, uraninite will not be oxidized by oxygenated groundwater. We show that bacteria capable of reducing U(VI) to U(IV) are ubiquitous in nature. The uranium reducers are primarily sulfate reducers and are stimulated by adding nutrients to the groundwater.

  9. A Rapid, Accurate, and Efficient Method to Map Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soils of Abandoned Mine Sites Using Converted Portable XRF Data and GIS.

    PubMed

    Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon

    2016-12-01

    The use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) increases the rapidity and accuracy of soil contamination mapping, respectively. In practice, it is often necessary to repeat the soil contamination assessment and mapping procedure several times during soil management within a limited budget. In this study, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate soil contamination mapping method using a PXRF data and geostatistical spatial interpolation. To obtain a large quantity of high quality data for interpolation, in situ PXRF data analyzed at 40 points were transformed to converted PXRF data using the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. The method was applied to an abandoned mine site in Korea to generate a soil contamination map for copper and was validated for investigation speed and prediction accuracy. As a result, regions that required soil remediation were identified. Our method significantly shortened the time required for mapping compared to the conventional mapping method and provided copper concentration estimates with high accuracy similar to those measured by ICP-AES. Therefore, our method is an effective way of mapping soil contamination if we consistently construct a database based on the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data.

  10. Toxicity assessment of diesel- and metal-contaminated soils through elutriate and solid phase assays with the slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Ruiz, Amaia; Dondero, Francesco; Viarengo, Aldo; Marigómez, Ionan

    2016-06-01

    A suite of organisms from different taxonomical and ecological positions is needed to assess environmentally relevant soil toxicity. A new bioassay based on Dictyostelium is presented that is aimed at integrating slime molds into such a testing framework. Toxicity tests on elutriates and the solid phase developmental cycle assay were successfully applied to a soil spiked with a mixture of Zn, Cd, and diesel fuel freshly prepared (recently contaminated) and after 2 yr of aging. The elutriates of both soils provoked toxic effects, but toxicity was markedly lower in the aged soil. In the D. discoideum developmental cycle assay, both soils affected amoeba viability and aggregation, with fewer multicellular units, smaller fruiting bodies and, overall, inhibition of fruiting body formation. This assay is quick and requires small amounts of test soil, which might facilitate its incorporation into a multispecies multiple-endpoint toxicity bioassay battery suitable for environmental risk assessment in soils. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1413-1421. © 2015 SETAC. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. A Rapid, Accurate, and Efficient Method to Map Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soils of Abandoned Mine Sites Using Converted Portable XRF Data and GIS

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jangwon; Lee, Hyeongyu; Choi, Yosoon

    2016-01-01

    The use of portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) increases the rapidity and accuracy of soil contamination mapping, respectively. In practice, it is often necessary to repeat the soil contamination assessment and mapping procedure several times during soil management within a limited budget. In this study, we have developed a rapid, inexpensive, and accurate soil contamination mapping method using a PXRF data and geostatistical spatial interpolation. To obtain a large quantity of high quality data for interpolation, in situ PXRF data analyzed at 40 points were transformed to converted PXRF data using the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. The method was applied to an abandoned mine site in Korea to generate a soil contamination map for copper and was validated for investigation speed and prediction accuracy. As a result, regions that required soil remediation were identified. Our method significantly shortened the time required for mapping compared to the conventional mapping method and provided copper concentration estimates with high accuracy similar to those measured by ICP-AES. Therefore, our method is an effective way of mapping soil contamination if we consistently construct a database based on the correlation between PXRF and ICP-AES data. PMID:27916970

  12. Comparison of the ability of organic acids and EDTA to enhance the phytoextraction of metals from a multi-metal contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hyun; Lee, In-Sook

    2010-02-01

    Chelates have been shown to enhance the phytoextraction of metal from contaminated soil. In this study, we evaluated the ability of chelates to enhance the phytoextraction of metals by barnyard grass (Echinochloa crus-galli) from soils contaminated with multiple metals. The results revealed that EDTA increased the ability of barnyard grass to take up Cd, Cu and Pb, but that it resulted in increased soil leaching. Conversely, citric acid induced the removal of Cd, Cu and Pb from soil without increasing the risk of leaching. Furthermore, E.crus-galli showed no signs of phytotoxicity in response to treatment with citric acid, whereas its shoot growth decreased in response to treatment with EDTA (p < 0.05). Taken together, these results demonstrate that citric acid is a good agent for the enhancement of the phytoextraction of metals.

  13. Effects of long term raw pig slurry inputs on nutrient and metal contamination of tropical volcanogenic soils, Uvéa Island (South Pacific).

    PubMed

    Gunkel-Grillon, P; Roth, E; Laporte-Magoni, C; Le Mestre, M

    2015-11-15

    In small Polynesian islands, family pig breeding is usually conducted without recovery of pig slurry. Raw pig slurry is spread onto the soil without any treatment. So far, most of the studies were carried out in temperate climate and for industrial digested pig slurry applications on agricultural lands. In the present case study, conducted in Uvéa Island, the aim is to determine if long term application of raw pig slurry on tropical soils, naturally rich in heavy metals has a significant influence on elements concentrations and mobility. Two types of tropical soils and two pig breeding systems, pig enclosure on small concrete pens or pig enclosure in large land pens, were investigated. Here we demonstrate that raw pig slurry inputs on soils can lead to an increase of total nitrogen and phosphorus content with high Contamination Factors. The Pollution Load Index values (1.3; 5.3; 2.5; 2.3) were indicative of multi-heavy metals pollution (Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni) in mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area and they are exchangeable while they are immobilized or less mobile in inland pure ferralitic soils. For mixed calcareous soils of the coastal area, family pig breeding represents a drainage risk of soluble species (phosphorus, inorganic nitrogen, Fe, Mn, Al, Cu, Zn, Cr and Ni). For inland ferralitic soils, family pig breeding is more compatible with a sustainable management of the environment in Uvéa Island and by extension in volcanic tropical islands with respect to the investigated chemical elements. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Integrating EDDS-enhanced washing with low-cost stabilization of metal-contaminated soil from an e-waste recycling site.

    PubMed

    Beiyuan, Jingzi; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Zhang, Weihua; Yang, Xin; Baek, Kitae; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    While chelant-enhanced soil washing has been widely studied for metal extraction from contaminated soils, there are concerns about destabilization and leaching of residual metals after remediation. This study integrated 2-h soil washing enhanced by biodegradable ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid (EDDS) and 2-month stabilization using agricultural waste product (soybean stover biochar pyrolyzed at 300 and 700 °C), industrial by-product (coal fly ash (CFA)), and their mixture. After integration with 2-month stabilization, the leachability and mobility of residual metals (Cu, Zn, and Pb) in the field-contaminated soil were significantly reduced, especially for Cu, in comparison with 2-h EDDS washing alone. This suggested that the metals destabilized by EDDS-washing could be immobilized by subsequent stabilization with biochar and CFA. Moreover, when the remediation performance was evaluated for phytoavailability and bioaccessibility, prior EDDS washing helped to achieve a greater reduction in the bioavailable fraction of metals than sole stabilization treatment. This was probably because the weakly-bound metals were first removed by EDDS washing before stabilization. Both individual and combined applications of biochar and CFA showed comparable effectiveness regardless of the difference in material properties, possibly due to the high level of amendments (150 ton ha(-1)). Based on the mobility and bioaccessibility results, the estimated human health risk (primarily resulting from Pb) could be mitigated to an acceptable level in water consumption pathway or reduced by half in soil ingestion pathway. These results suggest that an integration of EDDS washing with soil stabilization can alleviate post-remediation impacts of residual metals in the treated soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing geochemical influence of traffic and other vehicle-related activities on heavy metal contamination in urban soils of Kerman city, using a GIS-based approach.

    PubMed

    Hamzeh, Mohammad Ali; Aftabi, Alijan; Mirzaee, Mohammad

    2011-12-01

    Heavy metal pollution caused by traffic activities is increasingly becoming a great threat to urban environmental quality and human health. In this paper, soils of Kerman urban and suburban areas were collected to assess the potential effects of traffic and other vehicle-related pollution by heavy metal accumulation in soils. Eighty-six samples were collected along streets and from residential and rural sectors, as well as vehicle-related workshops from depth of 0-5 and 15-20 cm and analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) for heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Sn and Zn), as well as major elements (Al, Ca, Fe and Mn). Several hot-spot areas were identified in the composite geochemical maps produced based on Geographical Information System (GIS) technology. The majority of the hot-spot areas were identified to be vehicle-related workshops, fuel stations and road junctions. The most polluted hot-spot in the study area was located in soils close to a car battery processing workshop in the southwestern part of Kerman city, with concentrations of Cd (0.32 mg/kg), Cr (169 mg/kg), Cu (250 mg/kg), Pb (5,780 mg/kg), Sn (27.2 mg/kg) and Zn (178 mg/kg) of 1, 8.5, 8.3, 230, 13.5 and 3 times more than the relevant mean concentrations in natural soils, respectively. Traffic pollution has resulted in significant accumulation of heavy metals in soils and sediments, and that level of accumulation varied remarkably among elements. Based on X-ray diffraction analysis, most parts of soils and sediments of the Kerman basement consist of calcite and clay minerals. Abundance of clay minerals and medium to alkaline pH causes low mobility of heavy metals in soils of Kerman.

  16. [Risk Assessment of Heavy Metal Contamination in Farmland Soil in Du'an Autonomous County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Yang, Jun; Zhou, Xiao-yong; Lei, Mei; Gao, Ding; Qiao, Peng-wei; Du, Guo-dong

    2015-08-01

    For a comprehensive understanding of the pollution characteristics and ecological risk of heavy metals of farmland soil in Du'an Autonomous County of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China, this study evaluated the cadmium (Cd), arsenic (As), nickel (Ni), zinc (Zn), chromium (Cr), antimony (Sb), copper (Cu) and lead ( Pb) pollution situation using the single factor index, the Nemerow pollution index and the Hakanson ecological risk index. The results showed that heavy-metal pollution of farmland soil in Du'an County was serious. 74.6% of the soil samples had heavy metals concentrations higher than the Grade II of National Soil Environmental Quality Standard (GB 15618-1995). The over standard rates of Cd, As, Ni, Zn, Cr, Sb, Cu, Pb were 70.6%, 42.9%, 34.9%, 19.8%, 19.6%, 2.94%, 1.59%, 0.79%, respectively. Cd and As were the main contaminants in Du'an County, the pollution was far more serious than those of the national and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. In terms of the ecological risk, heavy metals of farmland soil in Du'an County showed a "middle" ecological risk, with Cd accounting for 88% of the total ecological risk. The north-west of Jiudu Town and the zone between Bao'an Town and Dongmiao Town were two areas with high ecological risk in Du'an County. The contamination of farmland soils in Du'an County was caused by two main sources, whereas the pollution of As and Sb of farmland soils near Diaojiang River was mainly caused by the upstream mining industry.

  17. Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals Contamination in Paddy Soil, Plants, and Grains (Oryza sativa L.) at the East Coast of India

    PubMed Central

    Satpathy, Deepmala; Reddy, M. Vikram; Dhal, Soumya Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals known to be accumulated in plants adversely affect human health. This study aims to assess the effects of agrochemicals especially chemical fertilizers applied in paddy fields, which release potential toxic heavy metals into soil. Those heavy metals get accumulated in different parts of paddy plant (Oryza sativa L.) including the grains. Concentrations of nonessential toxic heavy metals (Cd, Cr, and Pb) and the micronutrients (Cu, Mn, and Zn) were measured in the paddy field soil and plant parts. Mn and Cd are found to be accumulated more in shoot than in root. The metal transfer factors from soil to rice plant were significant for Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Zn. The ranking order of bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for heavy metals was Zn > Mn > Cd > Cu > Cr > Pb indicating that the accumulation of micronutrients was more than that of nonessential toxic heavy metals. The concentrations of heavy metals were found to be higher in paddy field soils than that of the nearby control soil but below permissible limits. The higher Health Index (HI) values of rice consuming adults (1.561) and children (1.360) suggest their adverse health effects in the near future. PMID:24995308

  18. Risk assessment of heavy metals contamination in paddy soil, plants, and grains (Oryza sativa L.) at the East Coast of India.

    PubMed

    Satpathy, Deepmala; Reddy, M Vikram; Dhal, Soumya Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals known to be accumulated in plants adversely affect human health. This study aims to assess the effects of agrochemicals especially chemical fertilizers applied in paddy fields, which release potential toxic heavy metals into soil. Those heavy metals get accumulated in different parts of paddy plant (Oryza sativa L.) including the grains. Concentrations of nonessential toxic heavy metals (Cd, Cr, and Pb) and the micronutrients (Cu, Mn, and Zn) were measured in the paddy field soil and plant parts. Mn and Cd are found to be accumulated more in shoot than in root. The metal transfer factors from soil to rice plant were significant for Pb, Cd, Cu, Cr, Mn, and Zn. The ranking order of bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for heavy metals was Zn > Mn > Cd > Cu > Cr > Pb indicating that the accumulation of micronutrients was more than that of nonessential toxic heavy metals. The concentrations of heavy metals were found to be higher in paddy field soils than that of the nearby control soil but below permissible limits. The higher Health Index (HI) values of rice consuming adults (1.561) and children (1.360) suggest their adverse health effects in the near future.

  19. In situ stabilization of heavy metals in multiple-metal contaminated paddy soil using different steel slag-based silicon fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Ning, Dongfeng; Liang, Yongchao; Song, Alin; Duan, Aiwang; Liu, Zhandong

    2016-12-01

    Steel slag has been widely used as amendment and silicon fertilizer to alleviate the mobility and bioavailability of heavy metals in soil. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of particle size, composition, and application rate of slag on metal immobilization in acidic soil, metals uptake by rice and rice growth. The results indicated that application of slag increased soil pH, plant-available silicon concentrations in soil, and decreased the bioavailability of metals compared with control treatment, whereas pulverous slag (S1) was more effective than granular slag (S2 and S3). The acid-extractable fraction of Cd in the spiked soil was significantly decreased with application of S1 at rates of 1 and 3 %, acid-extractable fractions of Cu and Zn were decreased when treated at 3 %. Use of S1 at both rates resulted in significantly lower Cd, Cu, and Zn concentrations in rice tissues than in controls by 82.6-92.9, 88.4-95.6, and 67.4-81.4 %, respectively. However, use of pulverous slag at 1 % significantly promotes rice growth, restricted rice growth when treated at 3 %. Thus, the results explained that reduced particle size and suitable application rate of slag could be beneficial to rice growth and metals stabilization.

  20. Metal contamination at recreational boatyards linked to the use of antifouling paints-investigation of soil and sediment with a field portable XRF.

    PubMed

    Lagerström, Maria; Norling, Matz; Eklund, Britta

    2016-05-01

    The application of a field portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (FPXRF) to measure Cu, Zn, and Pb in soil and sediments at recreational boatyards by Lake Mälaren in Sweden was investigated. Confirmatory chemical analysis on freeze-dried samples shows that, ex situ, the FPXRF produces definitive level data for Cu and Zn and quantitative screening data for Pb, according to USEPA criteria for data quality. Good agreement was also found between the ex situ measurements and the in situ screening. At each of the two studied boatyards, >40 in situ soil measurements were carried out. Statistical differences in soil concentration based on land use were consequently found: the areas used for boat storage and maintenance were significantly higher in Cu and Zn than the areas used for car parking and transportation. The metal pollution in the boat storage areas is therefore shown to be directly linked to hull maintenance activities during which metal-containing antifouling paint particles are shed, end up on the ground, and consequently pollute the soil. In the boat storage areas, the Cu and Zn concentrations often exceeded the national guideline values for soil. In this study, they were also shown to increase with increasing age of the boatyard operation. Pb soil concentrations were only elevated at a few measurement points, reflecting the phasing out of Pb compounds from antifouling products over the past 2 decades. In the surface sediments, concentrations of Cu and Zn were 2-3 times higher compared to deeper levels. No decrease in metal concentration with time was found in the sediments, indicating that boat owners are not complying with the ban of biocide-containing paints in freshwater introduced over 20 years ago.

  1. Uptake of Al, As, Cr, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn in native wheatgrasses, wildryes, and bluegrass on three metal-contaminated soils from Montana

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One of the biggest challenges to successfully phytoremediate contaminated mineland soils is the identification of native plants that possess a broad adaptation to ecological sites and either exclude or uptake heavy metals of interest. This study evaluated forage concentrations of aluminum (Al), ars...

  2. Effect of Miscanthus cultivation on metal fractionation and human bioaccessibility in metal-contaminated soils: comparison between greenhouse and field experiments.

    PubMed

    Pelfrêne, Aurélie; Kleckerová, Andrea; Pourrut, Bertrand; Nsanganwimana, Florien; Douay, Francis; Waterlot, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    The in situ stabilization of metals in soils using plants with great biomass value is a promising, cost-effective, and ecologically friendly alternative to manage metal-polluted sites. The goal of phytostabilization is to reduce the bioavailable concentrations of metals in polluted soil and thus reduce the risk to the environment and human health. In this context, this study aimed at evaluating Miscanthus × giganteus efficiency in phytostabilizing metals on three contaminated agricultural sites after short-term exposure under greenhouse conditions and after long-term exposure under field conditions. Particular attention was paid to the influence of Miscanthus cultivation on (i) Cd, Pb, and Zn fractionation using sequential extractions and (ii) metal bioaccessibility using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion test. Data gave evidence of (i) different behaviors between the greenhouse and the field; (ii) metal redistribution in soils induced by Miscanthus culture, more specifically under field conditions; (iii) higher environmental availability for Cd than for Pb and Zn was found in both conditions; and (iv) overall, a higher bioaccessible fraction for Pb (about 80 %) and Cd (65-77 %) than for Zn (36-52 %) was recorded in the gastric phase, with a sharp decrease in the intestinal phase (18-35 % for Cd, 5-30 % for Pb, and 36-52 % for Zn). Compared to soils without culture, the results showed that phytostabilization using Miscanthus culture provided evidence for substantial effects on oral bioaccessibility of Cd, Pb, and Zn.

  3. Short-term usage of sewage sludge as organic fertilizer to sugarcane in a tropical soil bears little threat of heavy metal contamination.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Thiago Assis Rodrigues; Franco, Ademir; He, Zhenli; Braga, Vivian Santoro; Firme, Lucia Pittol; Abreu, Cassio Hamilton

    2013-01-15

    A field experiment was carried out to study the effect of application rates of sewage sludge and mineral nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers on As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn concentration in soil, cane plant, and first ratoon (residual effect) in a Typic Hapludult soil. To allow an analysis by means of response surface modeling, four rates of sewage sludge (0, 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 t ha(-1), dry base), of N (0, 30, 60 and 90 kg ha(-1)) and of P(2)O(5) (0, 60, 120 and 180 kg ha(-1)) were applied in randomized block design, in a 4 × 4 × 4 factorial scheme, with confounded degrees of freedom for triple interaction, with two replications. To evaluate the residual effect of the sludge applied to cane plant on the cane ratoon growth, mineral NK fertilizers were applied at the rates of 120 kg ha(-1) N and 140 kg ha(-1) of K(2)O, on all treatments. The application rates of mineral nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers did not affect statistically the heavy metal concentration in the soil and in the sugarcane plants. Sewage sludge application increased As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn concentrations in soil, but values did not exceed the quality standard established by legislation for agricultural soils. Although the concentrations of metals in the plants were very low, the uptake of heavy metal by sugarcane plants was generally increased by sewage sludge doses. The use of sewage sludge based on N criteria introduces a small amount of heavy metal into the agricultural system, however it poses no hazard to the environment.

  4. Spatial characterization and prioritization of heavy metal contaminated soil-water resources in peri-urban areas of National Capital Territory (NCT), Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Rani, Rupa

    2006-12-01

    Due to rapid industrialization and urbanization during last two decades, contamination of soils by heavy metals is on an increase globally. Lands under peri-urban agriculture are the worst affected. In NCT, Delhi about 14.4% of land area is chemically degraded. In order to take care of this problem, recently the Supreme Court of India ordered to shift various non-confirming (about 39,000 units) industries to regions outside NCT, Delhi. However in spite of this, there have been several reports and parliamentary debates on the phyto-toxicity and extensive accumulation of heavy metals in the region. Literature review revealed that the basis of these debates is a few studies on some point locations in/around Delhi. It was further observed that information on the distribution and extent of heavy metal pollution problem in the region was completely missing. The present study was thus basically aimed at assessing the spatial distribution/extent and type of heavy metal pollution in the study area, for enabling future designing of appropriate site-specific management measures by the decision makers. For this, detailed spatial information on bio-available heavy metal concentrations in the soils and surface/sub-surface waters of NCT (Delhi) was generated through actual soil/water surveys, standard laboratory methods and GIS techniques. The study showed that concentration of all micronutrients (viz. Zn: 0.05-0.18 ppm; Cu: in traces; Fe: 0-0.5 ppm; and Mn: 0-1.2 ppm) and most heavy metals (viz. Ni: 0-0.7 ppm; Pb: 0-0.15 ppm and Cd: in traces) in the surface/sub-surface irrigation waters were well within permissible limits. However Cr concentrations in irrigation waters of Alipur and Shahdara blocks were far above their maximum permissible limit of 1 ppm. It was further observed that Ni and Cr concentrations in the drinking waters of almost entire test area were far above maximum permissible levels of 0.02 and 0.01 ppm, respectively. Bio-available concentrations of several heavy

  5. An assessment of high-energy explosives and metal contamination in soil at TA-67 (12), L-Site, and TA-14, Q-Site

    SciTech Connect

    Haywood, W.; McRae, D.; Powell, J.; Harris, B.W.

    1995-01-01

    The results of the field investigation to determine the kind and concentration of explosives found in the soil and on articles at sites known to be contaminated with energetic materials are given in this report. We are concerned about safety and health hazards associated with some explosives, nitro-organics and organic nitrates. Results from the use of the old and new field spot-test kits to detect the presence of energetic materials are given. Also included are data from the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses of acetonitrile extracts from Q-Site soil samples, and data from the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) analyses for hazardous metals on the same samples.

  6. [Impact of compounded chelants on removal of heavy metals and characteristics of morphologic change in soil from heavy metals contaminated sites].

    PubMed

    Yin, Xue; Chen, Jia-Jun; Lü, Ce

    2014-02-01

    Na2 EDTA (EDTA) has been extensively applied in remediation of soil contaminated by heavy metals (HMs). However, it poses a threat to the environment due to its difficulty of degradation. In addition, it is of great importance to clarify the morphological distribution of these metals in soil, as it is related to the environmental risk of contaminated sites. Thus, in order to cut back the use of EDTA, a series of batch washing experiments were conducted to evaluate the removal of arsenic, cadmium, copper, and lead from the contaminated soil collected in a chemical plant. Furthermore, adopting the optimal ratio of EDTA/EDDS, the change of morphological distribution of HMs before and after washing was studied. The results indicated that the removal of arsenic, cadmium and lead reached the maximum when the ratio of EDTA/EDDS was 7:3 and the optimal value was 12.67%, 38.71% and 31.09%, respectively. The removal of copper reached 16.91% at an EDTA/EDDS ratio of 9:1. After washing, the absolute Fe-Mn oxide fraction concentration of arsenic was higher, which would increase the environmental risk; the morphological fraction distribution of cadmium was similar to the original soil; the removal of copper and lead was mainly derived from the Fe-Mn oxide fraction; as to lead, the absolute concentration of Fe-Mn oxide fraction decreased dramatically, was and the same was observed for the percentage in the organic fraction. Employing the compounded system, the removal of HMs could be improved, and meanwhile the amounts of bioavailable HMs declined. Hence, it is beneficial for providing theoretical support for HMs remediation.

  7. High potential of symbiotic interactions between native mycorrhizal fungi and the exotic tree Eucalyptus camaldulensis for phytostabilization of metal-contaminated arid soils.

    PubMed

    Ouaryi, A; Boularbah, A; Sanguin, H; Hafidi, M; Baudoin, E; Ouahmane, L; Le Roux, C; Galiana, A; Prin, Y; Duponnois, R

    2016-01-01

    Waste dumps generated by mining activities contain heavy metals that are dispersed into areas leading to significant environmental contamination. The objectives of this study were (i) to survey native plants and their associated AM fungal communities from waste soils in a Moroccan mine site and (ii) to follow Eucalyptus growth in soil collected from the waste-mine. AM spores from native plant species were collected from the mining site and the surrounding uncontaminated areas were multiplied and inoculated onto Eucalyptus camaldulensis. The results showed that (i) the native plant species recorded in the waste did not show an active metal uptake, (ii) the selected native plant species are associated with AM mycorrhizal fungi and (iii) the use of AM fungi adapted to these drastic conditions can improve the growth of the fast-growing tree, E. camaldulensis and its tolerance to high soil Cu content. In conclusion, it is suggested that in order to define efficient low-cost phytostabilization processes, the use of native resources (i.e., mixtures of native mycorrhizal fungi) in combination with fast-growing tree species such as Eucalyptus, could be used to optimize the establishment of a permanent cover plant in contaminated areas.

  8. Potential health risk assessment of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) grown on metal contaminated soils in the central zone of Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zafar Iqbal; Ahmad, Kafeel; Yasmeen, Sumaira; Akram, Nudrat Aisha; Ashraf, Muhammad; Mehmood, Naunain

    2017-01-01

    Metal buildup was estimated in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), grown in central Punjab, Pakistan. This crop was irrigated with multiple water sources like ground, sewage and canal water. Concentrations of different metals like zinc (Zn), arsenic (As), lead (Pb), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), copper (Cu), and selenium (Se) were assessed in the potato crop irrigated with different types of waters. Sewage water treated crop and soil had higher metal concentrations than those treated with other two treatments. All metals had positive and significant correlation except for Mo which was non-significantly correlated between the vegetable and soil. Highest daily intake was observed for Fe (0.267), whereas the lowest was seen for Se (0.003). The enrichment factor and health index varied between 0.135-15.08 and 0.285-83.77, respectively. This study concludes that vegetables cultivated on soil treated with sewage water is a potent threat for human health as the metals manifest toxicity after entering the food chain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of metal-contaminated soils on the accumulation of heavy metals in gotu kola (Centella asiatica) and the potential health risks: a study in Peninsular Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Ghim Hock; Wong, Ling Shing; Tan, Ai Li; Yap, Chee Kong

    2016-01-01

    Centella asiatica is a commonly used medicinal plant in Malaysia. As heavy metal accumulation in medicinal plants which are highly consumed by human is a serious issue, thus the assessment of heavy metals in C. asiatica is important for the safety of consumers. In this study, the heavy metal accumulation in C. asiatica and the potential health risks were investigated. Samples of C. asiatica and surface soils were collected from nine different sites around Peninsular Malaysia. The concentration of six heavy metals namely Cd, Cu, Ni, Fe, Pb and Zn were determined by air-acetylene flame atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS). The degree of anthropogenic influence was assessed by calculating the enrichment factor (EF) and index of geoaccumulation (Igeo). The heavy metal uptake into the plant was estimated through the calculation of translocation factor (TF), bioconcentration factor (BCF) and correlation study. Estimated daily intakes (EDI) and target hazard quotients (THQ) were used to determine the potential health risk of consuming C. asiatica. The results showed that the overall surface soil was polluted by Cd, Cu and Pb, while the uptake of Zn and Ni by the plants was high. The value of EDI and THQ showed that the potential of Pb toxicity in C. asiatica was high as well. As heavy metal accumulation was confirmed in C. asiatica, daily consumption of the plant derived from polluted sites in Malaysia was not recommended.

  10. Bait-lamina assay as a tool to assess the effects of metal contamination in the feeding activity of soil invertebrates within a uranium mine area.

    PubMed

    André, A; Antunes, S C; Gonçalves, F; Pereira, R

    2009-01-01

    As part of the tier 2 of a site-specific risk assessment, this study was the first reporting an intensive in situ application of the bait-lamina assay; two exposure periods (7 and 14 days) were tested during four seasons in ten different sites, within a uranium mine area and at two different depths. The most contaminated sites (by deposition of sludge from the effluent treatment pond) were discriminated after 14 days of exposure because extremely low percentages of feeding activity were recorded. Previous sub-lethal ecotoxicological assays, already had demonstrated that the habitat function of these soils is compromised. Nevertheless, seasonality has proved to have a significant influence on responses. Thus to strength conclusions about the impact of contaminants, the in situ bait-lamina assay should be performed on different annual seasons, at least for temperate regions. It was also found that some environmental parameters (e.g. soil moisture and litter) can act as confounding factors in the bait-lamina assay.

  11. Fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 mediate growth of Lolium mutiforum and Phytolacca americana, metal uptake, and metal bioavailability in metal-contaminated soil: evidence from DGT measurement.

    PubMed

    Song, Ningning; Wang, Fangli; Zhang, Changbo; Tang, Shirong; Guo, Junkang; Ju, Xuehai; Smith, Donald L

    2013-01-01

    Fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 may mediate plant growth and uptake of heavy metals, but little evidence from Diffusive Gradients in Thin-films (DGT) measurement has been obtained to characterize the process. Lolium mutiforum and Phytolacca americana were grown at ambient and elevated CO2 on naturally Cd and Pb contaminated soils inoculated with and without Trichoderma asperellum strain C3 or Penicillium chrysogenum strain D4, to investigate plant growth, metal uptake, and metal bioavailability responses. Fungal inoculation increased plant biomass and shoot/root Cd and Pb concentrations. Elevated CO2 significantly increased plants biomass, but decreased Cd and Pb concentrations in shoot/root to various extents, leading to a metal dilution phenomenon. Total Cd and Pb uptake by plants, and DGT-measured Cd and Pb concentrations in rhizosphere soils, were higher in all fungal inoculation and elevated CO2 treatments than control treatments, with the combined treatments having more influence than either treatment alone. Metal dilution phenomenon occurred because the increase in DGT-measured bioavailable metal pools in plant rhizosphere due to elevated CO2 was unable to match the increase in requirement for plant uptake of metals due to plant biomass increase.

  12. Heavy metal contaminations in soil-rice system: source identification in relation to a sulfur-rich coal burning power plant in Northern Guangdong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangqin; Zeng, Xiaoduo; Chuanping, Liu; Li, Fangbai; Xu, Xianghua; Lv, Yahui

    2016-08-01

    Heavy metal contents (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) in 99 pairs of soil-rice plant samples were evaluated from the downwind directions of a large thermal power plant in Shaoguan City, Guangdong Province, China. Results indicate that there is a substantial buildup of As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in the predominant wind direction of the power plant. The significant correlations between S and heavy metals in paddy soil suggest that the power plant represents a source of topsoil heavy metals in Shaoguan City due to sulfur-rich coal burning emissions. Elevated Cd concentrations were also found in rice plant tissues. Average Cd (0.69 mg kg(-1)) and Pb (0.39 mg kg(-1)) contents in rice grain had exceeded their maximum permissible limits (both were 0.2 mg kg(-1)) in foods of China (GB2762-2005). The enrichment of Cd and Pb in rice grain might pose a potential health risk to the local residents.

  13. [Prediction of Cadmium Content in the Leaves of Navel Orange in Heavy Metal Contaminated Soil Using VIS-NIR Reflectance Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Shi, Rong-jie; Pan, Xian-zhang; Wang, Chang-kun; Liu, Ya; Li, Yan-li; Li, Zhi-ting

    2015-11-01

    Visual and Near-infrared (VIS-NIR) reflectance spectroscopy had been used widely in monitoring agricultural pollution in recent years, however, it was rarely applied in monitoring the contamination of heavy metal in orchards. In the present paper, Newhall navel orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] Osbeck cv. Newhall) were cultivated in the potted soil contaminated with cadmium (Cd) at different levels, and the spectral reflectance and Cd content in the leaves were measured simultaneously at different growing seasons, which then were used to establish the prediction model by partial least squares regression (PLSR) based on spectral reflectance and by linear regression based on spectral index. The results showed that Cd was more easily transferred to and cumulated in the new leaves, and this phenomenon was more obvious in heavily contaminated soils with Cd. Blue shift in red edge was found in the band of 700-730 nm in the new leaves, however, no such phenomenon was found in the old leaves. The coefficient of determination (R²) of linear regression model based on spectral index was nearly 0. 8, while the PLSR model had a better result in predicting Cd content in the new leaves than the linear regression with R²CV of approximately 0.9. Furthermore, the standard normal variate transformation(SNV) in spectral preprocessing can improve the precision significantly in PLSR model. These results suggest that the VIS-NIR method has a great potential in monitoring heavy metal pollution in the navel orange.

  14. Comparative effects of native filamentous and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the establishment of an autochthonous, leguminous shrub growing in a metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, L; Azcón, R; Kohler, J; Roldán, A; Caravaca, F

    2011-02-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of inoculation with a native arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus mosseae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerd. and Trappe, or a filamentous fungus, Penicillium aurantiogriseum Dierckx 1901, on the establishment of Coronilla juncea L. seedlings grown in a polluted, semiarid soil. For that, root and shoot biomass, nutrient uptake, mycorrhizal colonisation and nitrate reductase (NR) and phosphatase activities were analysed. Six months after planting, the shoot biomass of C. juncea was increased only by the inoculation with G. mosseae (by about 62% compared with non-mycorrhizal plants). The shoot NR and root acid phosphatase activities were increased more by inoculation with G. mosseae than with P. aurantiogriseum inoculation. The root NR activity and foliar nutrient contents were increased only by the inoculation with the AM fungus. The root Zn and Cu decreased with the AM fungus. In conclusion, the autochthonous AM fungus was an effective inoculant with regard to stimulating growth and alleviating heavy metal toxicity for plants growing on a soil contaminated by multiple heavy metals. Inoculation with an autochthonous, filamentous fungus does not seem to be a good strategy for phytoremediation of such problematic sites.

  15. Effects of phosphorus amendments and plant growth on the mobility of Pb, Cu, and Zn in a multi-metal-contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yueying; Cao, Xinde; Zhao, Ling

    2012-06-01

    Phosphorus amendments have been widely and successfully used in immobilization of one single metal (e.g., Pb) in contaminated soils. However, application of P amendments in the immobilization of multiple metals and particularly investigations about the effects of planting on the stability of the initially P-induced immobilized metals in the contaminated soils are far limited. This study was conducted to determine the effects of phosphate rock tailing (PR), triple superphosphate fertilizer (TSP), and their combination (P+T) on mobility of Pb, Cu, and Zn in a multimetal-contaminated soil. Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. chinensis) (metal-sensitive) and Chinese kale (Brassica alboglabra Bailey) (metal-resistant) were introduced to examine the effects of planting on leaching of Pb, Cu, and Zn in the P-amended soils. All three P treatments greatly reduced CaCl(2)-extractable Pb and Zn by 55.2-73.1% and 14.3-33.6%, respectively. The PR treatment decreased CaCl(2)-extractable Cu by 27.8%, while the TSP and P+T treatments increased it by 47.2% and 44.4%, respectively. All three P treatments were effective in reducing simulated rainwater leachable Pb, with dissolved and total leachable Pb decrease by 15.6-81.9% and 16.3-64.5%, respectively. The PR treatment reduced the total leachable Zn by 16.8%, while TSP and P+T treatments increased Zn leaching by 92.7% and 78.9%, respectively. However, total Cu leaching were elevated by 17.8-178% in all P treatments. Planting promoted the leaching of Pb and Cu by 98.7-127% and 23.5-170%, respectively, especially in the colloid fraction, whereas the leachable Zn was reduced by 95.3-96.5% due to planting. The P treatments reduced the uptake of Pb, Cu, and Zn in the aboveground parts of Chinese cabbage by up to 65.1%, 34.3%, and 9.59%, respectively. Though P treatments were effective in reducing Zn concentrations in the aboveground parts of the metal-resistant Chinese kale by 22.4-28.9%, they had little effect on Pb and Cu uptake

  16. Soil chip convey of lunar subsurface auger drill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Deming; Tang, Dewei; Hou, Xuyan; Jiang, Shengyuan; Deng, Zongquan

    2016-05-01

    Celestial body subsurface drilling and sampling is a key aspect of near-earth exploration projects. In these sample return missions, the auger drill system is universally used due to the environment and detector load limits. The common failure that the auger faces is chip chocking, which can raise the torque and cause the drill to stick. This paper builds auger drill models describing chip flow in the auger groove to balance geometric parameters, functional capability, and reliability. The features of chip flow are summarized and verified by a series of discrete element method simulations. In contrast to previous auger design, a convey capability factor is defined to indicate the auger's chip removal capacity, and the role of pitch angle and other parameters is assessed through motion analysis of the lunar soil flow process. The theory is verified by testing the drill penetrating speed limit, which combines drill geometry and motion parameters. This work provides a new method for design and optimization of low speed auger drill systems and research on particle flow with small scale mechanical constraints.

  17. Stabilization and reuse of heavy metal contaminated soils by means of quicklime sulfate salt treatment. Final report, September 1992--February 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Dermatas, D.

    1995-08-01

    Capillary and hydraulic flows of water in porous media contaminated by heavy metal species often result in severe aquifer contamination. In the present study a chemical admixture stabilization approach is proposed, where heavy metal stabilization/immobilization is achieved by means of quicklime-based treatment. Both in-situ treatment by injection and on-site stabilization by excavation, mixing, and compaction will be investigated. In addition, the potential to reuse the resulting stabilized material as readily available construction material will also be investigated. The heavy metals under study include: arsenic, chromium, lead, and mercury. The proposed technical approach consists of three separate phases. During phase A, both artificial and naturally occurring contaminated soil mixes were treated, and then tested for stress-strain properties, leachability, micromorphology, mineralogical composition, permeability, setting time, and durability. In such a way, the effectiveness of the proposed remediation technology was verified, the treatment approach was optimized, and the underlying mechanisms responsible for stabilization were established. During phase B, the proposed technology will be tested for two DOE-site subscale systems, involving naturally occurring contaminated soil, using the same testing methodology as the one outlined for phase A. Provided that the proposed technology is proven effective for the subscale systems, a field application will be demonstrated. Again process quality monitoring will be performed by testing undisturbed samples collected from the treated sites, in the same fashion as for the previous phases. Following completion of the proposed study, a set of comprehensive guidelines for field applications will be developed. 42 refs., 196 figs., 26 tabs.

  18. An assessment of heavy metal contamination in soils of fresh water aquifer system and evaluation of eco-toxicity by lithogenic implications.

    PubMed

    Harichandan, R; Routroy, S; Mohanty, J K; Panda, C R

    2013-04-01

    The chemistry of heavy metals in sediments with respect to bio-availability and chemical reactivity is regulated by pH, texture, and organic matter contents of the sediments and specific binding form and coupled reactivity of the metals within. To focus on the metal distribution (Fe, Mn, Pb, Cd, Zn, Co, Cu, and Cr) and behavior in a fresh water aquifer system along with the ecological toxicity parameters, a four-step sequential extraction method was applied on 18 Eastern Ghats' type sediments from fluorosis-hit Nayagarh district, India. Geo-accumulation index of metals in the sediments indicates that they are practically uncontaminated and/or less contaminated with and Fe, Mn, and Cu; contaminated to moderately contaminated with Pb, Zn, and Cr; and strongly contaminated with Cd. Rather, more than 80 % recovered Cd metal concentration in sediments constitute the labile fractions. Temporal clustering of metal fractions indicates transition metal fraction distribution claiming the sediment pH regulation. Similarly, base metal distribution accounts for organic carbon and soil conductivity due to their greater availability in exchangeable and sulfide fractions. Correlation analysis and factor analysis scores demonstrate lack of inter-relationship between transition group and base metal fractions. High fluoride concentration in ground water is associated with high sodium-bicarbonate-iron affinity with elevated pH values (i.e., >7.0) and high positive factor score with the total iron concentration in ground water.

  19. Soil ventilation: Effects on microbial populations in gasoline-contaminated subsurface soils

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, W.J.

    1995-07-01

    Short- and long-term effects of vapor extraction (VE) in an unsaturated subsurface soil and in situ biodegradation of gasoline were evaluated in a field study. Subsurface temperature, moisture, solid- and gas-phase contaminant levels, atmospheric gases, nutrient levels, and microbial population densities were measured during and after soil VE for 462 d. Microbial activity, based on in situ O{sub 2} consumption rates, measured 7 d after VE started averaged 3.8% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}; by Day 62 these rates dropped to 0.2% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}. Soil VE was stopped on Day 180 and about 70 d elapsed before renewed, low-level (0.05% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}) activity was detectable. Following a second round of VE, average O{sub 2} consumption rates increased to 0.11% O{sub 2} d{sup -1}. Microbial population densities did not consistently reflect activity changes measured by O{sub 2} consumption. Activity increases in the latter part of the study were not adequately accounted for by changes in subsurface moisture levels, temperature, or contaminant vapor concentrations. At the study`s completion, 400 kg of gasoline was volatilized from the soil and another 139 kg estimated to be biodegraded in situ. A two-phase process is proposed to account for the effects of VE on microbial activity. The initial phase is characterized by declining microbial activity levels in response to substrate reduction. Microbial activity slowly increases as a result of interactions between gasoline vapor concentrations and possibly changes in degradative activities of the microbial population. More work is needed to identify the gasoline constituents serving as substrates for microbial populations before and after ventilation. 31 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Soil Samplers: New Techniques for Subsurface Sampling for Volatile Organic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Susan Sorini; John Schabron; Joseph Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2009-03-31

    Soil sampling techniques for volatile organic analysis must be designed to minimize loss of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the soil that is being sampled. Preventing VOC loss from soil cores that are collected from the subsurface and brought to the surface for subsampling is often difficult. Subsurface bulk sample retrieval systems are designed to obtain intact cylindrical cores of soil ranging anywhere from one to four inches in diameter, and one to several feet in length. The current technique that is used to subsample these soil cores for VOC analysis is to expose a horizontal section of the soil core to the atmosphere; screen the exposed soil using a photoionization detector (PID) or other appropriate device to locate contamination in the soil core; and use a hand-operated coring tool to collect samples from the exposed soil for analysis. Because the soil core can be exposed to the atmosphere for a considerable length of time during screening and sample collection, the current sub-sampling technique provides opportunity for VOCs to be lost from the soil. This report describes three alternative techniques from the current technique for screening and collecting soil samples from subsurface soil cores for VOC analysis and field testing that has been done to evaluate the techniques. Based on the results of the field testing, ASTM D4547, Standard Guide for Sampling Waste and Soils for Volatile Organic Compounds, was revised to include information about the new techniques.

  1. Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.

    PubMed

    Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

    2005-01-01

    Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns.

  2. Residues of endosulfan in surface and subsurface agricultural soil and its bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Odukkathil, Greeshma; Vasudevan, Namasivayam

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of many hydrophobic pesticides has been reported by various workers in various soil environments and its bioremediation is a major concern due to less bioavailability. In the present study, the pesticide residues in the surface and subsurface soil in an area of intense agricultural activity in Pakkam Village of Thiruvallur District, Tamilnadu, India, and its bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium was investigated. Surface (0-15 cm) and subsurface soils (15-30 cm and 30-40 cm) were sampled, and pesticides in different layers of the soil were analyzed. Alpha endosulfan and beta endosulfan concentrations ranged from 1.42 to 3.4 mg/g and 1.28-3.1 mg/g in the surface soil, 0.6-1.4 mg/g and 0.3-0.6 mg/g in the subsurface soil (15-30 cm), and 0.9-1.5 mg/g and 0.34-1.3 mg/g in the subsurface soil (30-40 cm) respectively. Residues of other persistent pesticides were also detected in minor concentrations. These soil layers were subjected to bioremediation using a novel bacterial consortium under a simulated soil profile condition in a soil reactor. The complete removal of alpha and beta endosulfan was observed over 25 days. Residues of endosulfate were also detected during bioremediation, which was subsequently degraded on the 30th day. This study revealed the existence of endosulfan in the surface and subsurface soils and also proved that the removal of such a ubiquitous pesticide in the surface and subsurface environment can be achieved in the field by bioaugumenting a biosurfactant-producing bacterial consortium that degrades pesticides.

  3. Final Technical Report: Optimization and Directed, Natural Evolution of Biologically-Mediated Chromate Reduction in Subsurface Soil Microcosms

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Dorothea K; Wickham, Gene S; Layton, Alice C

    2012-07-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is faced with the complex challenge of remediating or containing the various mixed wastes present in the subsurface environments of numerous DOE sites. The development of scientifically grounded strategies for the effective management and reclamation of these contaminated sites requires fundamental knowledge on the composition, dynamics, and metabolic potential of indigenous microbial communities, which are of primary importance in the fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface environments. To date, the complex effect of environmental (both geochemical and biological) parameters on the bioremediative potential of subsurface microbial populations is only partially understood; this is primarily because the majority of microbial ecological studies have focused only on a qualitative analysis of subsurface microbial diversity, while the impact of quantitative changes in microbial communities as a function of environmental factors has been ignored. The project described here directly addresses the need for a more comprehensive, molecular understanding of how microbial growth and activity quantitatively relate to mineral and contaminant biotransformation (Science Element: Subsurface Microbial Ecology and Community, Notice DE-FG02-06ER06-12). The proposed study uses a truly novel combination of standard molecular phylogenetic analyses, rRNA-targeted fluorescence in situ hybridization, and mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to investigate the biological response to experimentally controlled conditions and the concomitant effect on chromate reduction in situ. This response will be characterized in terms of microbial community structure (principally, population number and spatial distribution) and community proteome dynamics. Towards this overarching goal, we will (1) set up aerobic and anaerobic laboratory microcosms derived from subsurface soil collected from a chromate [Cr(VI)]-contaminated DOE site, and

  4. Influence of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekele, Dawit N.; Naidu, Ravi; Chadalavada, Sreenivasulu

    2014-05-01

    A comprehensive field study was conducted at a site contaminated with chlorinated solvents, mainly trichloroethylene (TCE), to investigate the influence of subsurface soil moisture and temperature on vapour intrusion (VI) into built structures. Existing approaches to predict the risk of VI intrusion into buildings assume homogeneous or discrete layers in the vadose zone through which TCE migrates from an underlying source zone. In reality, the subsurface of the majority of contaminated sites will be subject to significant variations in moisture and temperature. Detailed site-specific data were measured contemporaneously to evaluate the impact of spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil properties on VI exposure assessment. The results revealed that indoor air vapour concentrations would be affected by spatial and temporal variability of subsurface soil moisture and temperature. The monthly monitoring of soil-gas concentrations over a period of one year at a depth of 3 m across the study site demonstrated significant variation in TCE vapour concentrations, which ranged from 480 to 629,308 μg/m3. Soil-gas wells at 1 m depth exhibited high seasonal variability in TCE vapour concentrations with a coefficient of variation 1.02 in comparison with values of 0.88 and 0.74 in 2 m and 3 m wells, respectively. Contour plots of the soil-gas TCE plume during wet and dry seasons showed that the plume moved across the site, hence locations of soil-gas monitoring wells for human risk assessment is a site specific decision. Subsurface soil-gas vapour plume characterisation at the study site demonstrates that assessment for VI is greatly influenced by subsurface soil properties such as temperature and moisture that fluctuate with the seasons of the year.

  5. RESTORATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS USING BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids in combination with different types of limestone have been applied to metal mine tailings in Bunker Hill, ID, Leadville, Co, Joplin, MO and Tar Creek, OK. For each of these sites, tailings were unable to support a vegetative cover prior to amendment addition. Elevated...

  6. RESTORATION OF METAL CONTAMINATED SOILS USING BIOSOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biosolids in combination with different types of limestone have been applied to metal mine tailings in Bunker Hill, ID, Leadville, Co, Joplin, MO and Tar Creek, OK. For each of these sites, tailings were unable to support a vegetative cover prior to amendment addition. Elevated...

  7. Catalyst regeneration process including metal contaminants removal

    DOEpatents

    Ganguli, Partha S.

    1984-01-01

    Spent catalysts removed from a catalytic hydrogenation process for hydrocarbon feedstocks, and containing undesired metals contaminants deposits, are regenerated. Following solvent washing to remove process oils, the catalyst is treated either with chemicals which form sulfate or oxysulfate compounds with the metals contaminants, or with acids which remove the metal contaminants, such as 5-50 W % sulfuric acid in aqueous solution and 0-10 W % ammonium ion solutions to substantially remove the metals deposits. The acid treating occurs within the temperature range of 60.degree.-250.degree. F. for 5-120 minutes at substantially atmospheric pressure. Carbon deposits are removed from the treated catalyst by carbon burnoff at 800.degree.-900.degree. F. temperature, using 1-6 V % oxygen in an inert gas mixture, after which the regenerated catalyst can be effectively reused in the catalytic process.

  8. Application of in situ vitrification in the soil subsurface: Engineering-scale testing

    SciTech Connect

    Luey, J.; Seiler, D.K.

    1995-03-01

    Engineering-scale testing to evaluate the initiation and propagation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process in the soil subsurface has been completed. Application of ISV in the soil subsurface both increases the applicable treatment depth (beyond a demonstrated 5 m) and allows treatment of local contamination, such as liquid seepage trenches (found on many US Department of Energy sites) that were designed to remove contamination at the bottom of the trench. The following observations and conclusions resulted from the test data: the ISV process can be initiated in the soil subsurface and propagated in both vertical directions, with the downward direction providing greater ease of operation; energy efficiency to process a kilogram of soil was 20% better than for an ISV melt initiated at the soil surface, increased efficiency was attributed to insulation from the soil overburden; the feasibility of initiating the process with a planar starter path was confirmed, thus increasing the number of options for initiating the process in the field; soil subsidence was pronounced and requires attention before field demonstration of subsurface ISV. Further field work at pilot-scale is recommended for this new ISV application. The key step will be the placement of starter material at depth to initiate the process.

  9. Changes in enzymatic activities in metal contaminated and reclaimed lands in Northern Ontario (Canada).

    PubMed

    Narendrula-Kotha, Ramya; Nkongolo, Kabwe K

    2017-06-01

    Metal and sulfur dioxide (SO2) contaminations in Northern Ontario (Canada), especially in the Greater Sudbury Region (GSR) caused by mining activities have resulted in severe environmental degradations. A long term restoration program has led to significant landscape changes and healthy ecosystems. The objective of this study was to assess variation in enzymatic activities and soil respiration in metal contaminated and reclaimed ecosystems. Soil analysis revealed that respiration rates were higher in metal contaminated limed soils (65ppm) compared to adjacent unlimed areas (35ppm). The respiration rates in metal contaminated sites (55ppm) were significantly lower compared to reference (metal-uncontaminated) areas (90ppm). β-glucosidase (BG), cellobiohydrolase (CBH), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGase), aryl sulfatase (AS), acid phosphatase (AP), alkaline phosphatase (AlP), glycine aminopeptidase (GAP), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP) activities were significantly higher in limed compared to unlimed sites. Metal contamination significantly reduced the activities of these enzymes with the exception of LAP. An opposite trend was observed for peroxidase (PER) activity that was lower in limed compared to corresponding unlimed areas. Likewise, PER activity values were significantly lower in metal contaminated than in uncontaminated reference sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phosphorus runoff losses from subsurface-applied poultry litter on coastal plain soils.

    PubMed

    Kibet, Leonard C; Allen, Arthur L; Kleinman, Peter J A; Feyereisen, Gary W; Church, Clinton; Saporito, Lou S; Way, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    The application of poultry litter to soils is a water quality concern on the Delmarva Peninsula, as runoff contributes P to the eutrophic Chesapeake Bay. This study compared a new subsurface applicator for poultry litter with conventional surface application and tillage incorporation of litter on a Coastal Plain soil under no-till management. Monolith lysimeters (61 cm by 61 cm by 61 cm) were collected immediately after litter application and subjected to rainfall simulation (61 mm h(-1) 1 h) 15 and 42 d later. In the first rainfall event, subsurface application of litter significantly lowered total P losses in runoff (1.90 kg ha(-1)) compared with surface application (4.78 kg ha(-1)). Losses of P with subsurface application were not significantly different from disked litter or an unamended control. By the second event, total P losses did not differ significantly between surface and subsurface litter treatments but were at least twofold greater than losses from the disked and control treatments. A rising water table in the second event likely mobilized dissolved forms of P in subsurface-applied litter to the soil surface, enriching runoff water with P. Across both events, subsurface application of litter did not significantly decrease cumulative losses of P relative to surface-applied litter, whereas disking the litter into the soil did. Results confirm the short-term reduction of runoff P losses with subsurface litter application observed elsewhere but highlight the modifying effect of soil hydrology on this technology's ability to minimize P loss in runoff.

  11. Methane emissions from MSW landfill with sandy soil covers under leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Houhu; He, Pinjing; Shao, Liming

    CH 4 emissions and leachate disposal are recognized as the two major concerns in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Recently, leachate recirculation was attempted to accelerate land-filled waste biodegradation and thus enhanced landfill gas generation. Leachate irrigation was also conducted for volume reduction effectively. Nevertheless, the impacts of leachate recirculation and irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions have not been previously reported. A field investigation of landfill CH 4 emissions was conducted on selected sandy soil cover with leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation based on whole year around measurement. The average CH 4 fluxes were 311±903, 207±516, and 565±1460 CH 4 m -2 h -1 from site A without leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, lift B2 with leachate subsurface irrigation, and lift B1 with both leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation, respectively. Both gas recovery and cover soil oxidation minimized CH 4 emissions efficiently, while the later might be more pronounced when the location was more than 5 m away from gas recovery well. After covered by additional clay soil layer, CH 4 fluxes dropped by approximately 35 times in the following three seasons compared to the previous three seasons in lift B2. The diurnal peaks of CH 4 fluxes occurred mostly followed with air or soil temperature in the daytimes. The measured CH 4 fluxes were much lower than those of documented data from the landfills, indicating that the influences of leachate recirculation and subsurface irrigation on landfill CH 4 emissions might be minimized with the help of a well-designed sandy soil cover. Landfill cover composed of two soil layers (clay soil underneath and sandy soil above) is suggested as a low-cost and effective alternative to minimize CH 4 emissions.

  12. Role of Subsurface Physics in the Assimilation of Surface Soil Moisture Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Root zone soil moisture controls the land-atmosphere exchange of water and energy and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly scales. Assimilation of satellite-based surface soil moisture observations into a land surface model is an effective way to estimate large-scale root zone soil moisture. The propagation of surface information into deeper soil layers depends on the model-specific representation of subsurface physics that is used in the assimilation system. In a suite of experiments we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture observations into four different models (Catchment, Mosaic, Noah and CLM) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter. We demonstrate that identical twin experiments significantly overestimate the information that can be obtained from the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations. The second key result indicates that the potential of surface soil moisture assimilation to improve root zone information is higher when the surface to root zone coupling is stronger. Our experiments also suggest that (faced with unknown true subsurface physics) overestimating surface to root zone coupling in the assimilation system provides more robust skill improvements in the root zone compared with underestimating the coupling. When CLM is excluded from the analysis, the skill improvements from using models with different vertical coupling strengths are comparable for different subsurface truths. Finally, the skill improvements through assimilation were found to be sensitive to the regional climate and soil types.

  13. Role of Subsurface Physics in the Assimilation of Surface Soil Moisture Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichle, R. H.

    2010-01-01

    Root zone soil moisture controls the land-atmosphere exchange of water and energy and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly scales. Assimilation of satellite-based surface soil moisture observations into a land surface model is an effective way to estimate large-scale root zone soil moisture. The propagation of surface information into deeper soil layers depends on the model-specific representation of subsurface physics that is used in the assimilation system. In a suite of experiments we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture observations into four different models (Catchment, Mosaic, Noah and CLM) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter. We demonstrate that identical twin experiments significantly overestimate the information that can be obtained from the assimilation of surface soil moisture observations. The second key result indicates that the potential of surface soil moisture assimilation to improve root zone information is higher when the surface to root zone coupling is stronger. Our experiments also suggest that (faced with unknown true subsurface physics) overestimating surface to root zone coupling in the assimilation system provides more robust skill improvements in the root zone compared with underestimating the coupling. When CLM is excluded from the analysis, the skill improvements from using models with different vertical coupling strengths are comparable for different subsurface truths. Finally, the skill improvements through assimilation were found to be sensitive to the regional climate and soil types.

  14. Potential impact of soil microbial heterogeneity on the persistence of hydrocarbons in contaminated subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Aleer, Sam; Adetutu, Eric M; Weber, John; Ball, Andrew S; Juhasz, Albert L

    2014-04-01

    In situ bioremediation is potentially a cost effective treatment strategy for subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons, however, limited information is available regarding the impact of soil spatial heterogeneity on bioremediation efficacy. In this study, we assessed issues associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation and soil spatial heterogeneity (samples designated as FTF 1, 5 and 8) from a site in which in situ bioremediation was proposed for hydrocarbon removal. Test pit activities showed similarities in FTF soil profiles with elevated hydrocarbon concentrations detected in all soils at 2 m below ground surface. However, PCR-DGGE-based cluster analysis showed that the bacterial community in FTF 5 (at 2 m) was substantially different (53% dissimilar) and 2-3 fold more diverse than communities in FTF 1 and 8 (with 80% similarity). When hydrocarbon degrading potential was assessed, differences were observed in the extent of (14)C-benzene mineralisation under aerobic conditions with FTF 5 exhibiting the highest hydrocarbon removal potential compared to FTF 1 and 8. Further analysis indicated that the FTF 5 microbial community was substantially different from other FTF samples and dominated by putative hydrocarbon degraders belonging to Pseudomonads, Xanthomonads and Enterobacteria. However, hydrocarbon removal in FTF 5 under anaerobic conditions with nitrate and sulphate electron acceptors was limited suggesting that aerobic conditions were crucial for hydrocarbon removal. This study highlights the importance of assessing available microbial capacity prior to bioremediation and shows that the site's spatial heterogeneity can adversely affect the success of in situ bioremediation unless area-specific optimizations are performed.

  15. Chemical and Mineralogical Characterization of Arsenic, Lead, Chromium, and Cadmium in a Metal-contaminated Histosol

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Schulze, D

    2010-01-01

    The chemical and mineralogical forms of As, Pb, Cr, and Cd were studied in a metal-contaminated organic soil (Histosol) that received runoff and seepage water from a site that was once occupied by a lead smelter. Soil samples were collected from different depth intervals during both wet and dry seasons and analyzed using bulk powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron-based micro X-ray diffraction ({mu}-XRD), and micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-SXRF) spectroscopy. There was a clear pattern of mineral distribution with depth that indicated the presence of an intense redox gradient. The oxidized reddish brown surface layer (0-10 cm) was dominated by goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and poorly crystalline akaganeite ({beta}-FeOOH). Lead and arsenic were highly associated with these Fe oxides, possibly by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. Gypsum (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O) was abundant in the layer as well, particularly for samples collected during dry periods. Fe(II)-containing minerals, such as magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), were identified in the intermediate layers (10-30 cm) where the reductive dissolution of Fe(III) oxides occurred. A number of high-temperature minerals, such as mullite (3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 2Si{sub 2}O), corundum ({alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and wustite (FeO) were identified in the subsurface and they probably formed as a result of a burning event. Several sulfide minerals were identified in the most reduced layers at depths > 30 cm. They included realgar (AsS), alacranite (As{sub 4}S{sub 4}), galena (PbS), and sphalerite (Zn, Fe{sup 2+})S, and a series of Fe sulfides, including greigite (Fe{sup 2+}Fe{sub 2}{sup 3+} S{sub 4}), pyrrhotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S), mackinawite (FeS), marcasite (FeS{sub 2}), and pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Most of these minerals occurred as almost pure phases in sub-millimeter aggregates and appeared to be secondary phases that had precipitated from

  16. Soil-soil solution distribution coefficient of soil organic matter is a key factor for that of radioiodide in surface and subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Unno, Yusuke; Tsukada, Hirofumi; Takeda, Akira; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the vertical distribution of the soil-soil-solution distribution coefficients (Kd) of (125)I, (137)Cs, and (85)Sr in organic-rich surface soil and organic-poor subsurface soil of a pasture and an urban forest near a spent-nuclear-fuel reprocessing plant in Rokkasho, Japan. Kd of (137)Cs was highly correlated with water-extractable K(+). Kd of (85)Sr was highly correlated with water-extractable Ca(2+) and SOC. Kd of (125)I(-) was low in organic-rich surface soil, high slightly below the surface, and lowest in the deepest soil. This kinked distribution pattern differed from the gradual decrease of the other radionuclides. The thickness of the high-(125)I(-)Kd middle layer (i.e., with high radioiodide retention ability) differed between sites. Kd of (125)I(-) was significantly correlated with Kd of soil organic carbon. Our results also showed that the layer thickness is controlled by the ratio of Kd-OC between surface and subsurface soils. This finding suggests that the addition of SOC might prevent further radioiodide migration down the soil profile. As far as we know, this is the first report to show a strong correlation of a soil characteristic with Kd of (125)I(-). Further study is needed to clarify how radioiodide is retained and migrates in soil.

  17. Biomonitoring heavy metal contaminations by moss visible parameters.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang-Er; Cui, Jun-Mei; Yang, Jin-Chuan; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Yuan, Ming; Song, Chun; Yang, Hui; Liu, Han-Mei; Wang, Chang-Quan; Zhang, Huai-Yu; Zeng, Xian-Yin; Yuan, Shu

    2015-10-15

    Traditional sampling for heavy metal monitoring is a time-consuming and inconvenient method, which also does not indicate contaminants non-invasively and instantaneously. Moss is sensitive to heavy metals and is therefore considered a pollution indicator. However, it is unknown what kind physiological parameters can indicate metal contaminations quickly and non-invasively. Here, we systematically examined the effects of six heavy metals on physiological parameters and photosynthetic activities of two moss species grown in aquatic media or moist soil surface. We suggest that a phenotype with anthocyanin accumulation pattern and chlorosis pattern and two chlorophyll fluorescence parameters with their images can roughly reflect metal species groups, concentrations and differences between the two moss species. In other words, metal contaminations could be roughly estimated visually using the naked eye. Enzymatic and non-enzymatic anti-oxidative abilities and photosynthetic protein contents of Eurhynchium eustegium were higher than those of Taxiphyllum taxirameum, indicating their differential metal tolerance. Neither anti-oxidative abilities nor photosynthetic proteins were found to be ideal indicators. This study provides new ideas to monitor heavy metals rapidly and non-invasively in water or on wetland and moist soil surface.

  18. Effects of soil depth and subsurface flow along the subsurface topography on shallow landslide predictions at the site of a small granitic hillslope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Seok; Onda, Yuichi; Uchida, Taro; Kim, Jin Kwan

    2016-10-01

    Shallow landslides are affected by various conditions, including soil depth and subsurface flow via an increase in the pore water pressure. In this study, we evaluate the effect of soil depth and subsurface flow on shallow landslide prediction using the shallow landslide stability (SHALSTAB) model. Three detailed soil depth data-the average soil depth, weathered soil depth, and bedrock soil depth-were collected using a knocking pole test at a small hillslope site composed of granite in the Republic of Korea. The SHALSTAB model was applied to a ground surface topographic digital elevation model (DEM) using the three soil depths and upslope contributing area (SCA) assuming subsurface flow calculated from four DEMs: a ground surface topography (GSTO) DEM, weathered soil topography (WSTO) DEM, bedrock topography (BSTO) DEM, and low-level bedrock topography (EBSTO) DEM. The model performance was measured using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. While evaluating the effect of the soil depth with SCA using GSTO DEM, it was found that the bedrock soil depth had higher prediction accuracy compared to that of the average soil depth or weathered soil depth. To evaluate the saturated subsurface flow between the soil and bedrock, SCAs calculated using WSTO and BSTO DEMs were applied. From these simulations, we found that SCA from BSTO DEM and the bedrock soil depth affect the shallow landslide prediction; however, these prediction effects are not significantly increased by large differences in the elevation (between the lowest and highest elevation values). Therefore, we considered the influence of the bedrock depression and SCA from EBSTO DEM. In applying SCA from EBSTO, the prediction accuracy was significantly increased compared to the other predictions. Our results demonstrate that the influence of the bedrock topography on the prediction of shallow landslides may be particularly significant at the scale of a hillslope.

  19. Subsurface approaches for measuring soil CO2 isotopologue flux: Theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nickerson, Nick; Egan, Jocelyn; Risk, David

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of the stable isotope composition of soil flux have many uses, from separating autotrophic and heterotrophic components of respiration to teasing apart information about gas transport physics. While soil flux chambers are typically used for these measurements, subsurface approaches are becoming more accessible with the introduction of field-deployable isotope analyzers. These subsurface measurements have the unique benefit of offering depth-resolved isotopologue flux data, which can help to disentangle the many soil respiration processes that occur throughout the soil profile. These methods are likely to grow in popularity in the coming years and a solid methodological basis needs to be formed in order for data collected in these subsurface studies to be interpreted properly. Here we explore the range of possible techniques that could be used for subsurface isotopologue gas interpretation and rigorously test the assumptions and application of each approach using a combination of numerical modeling, laboratory experiments, and field studies. Our results suggest that methodological uncertainties arise due to poor assumptions and mathematical instabilities but certain methods, particularly those based on diffusion physics, are able to cope with these uncertainties well and produce excellent depth-resolved isotopologue flux data.

  20. Antibiotic resistance genes persist longer in soils with subsurface banded poultry litter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to determine the concentration of AR genes for sulfonamide (sulI), tetracycline (tetW), streptomycin (strpB) and for the class one integrase (intI1) gene in soils with subsurface banded PL. Field scale plots were established with triplicate treatments of either no fer...

  1. WAVELENGTH IDENTIFICATION FOR REFLECTANCE ESTIMATION OF SURFACE AND SUBSURFACE SOIL PROPERTIES

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Optical diffuse reflectance sensing is a potential approach for rapid and reliable on-site estimation of soil properties. In this study, reflectance sensing in visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths was combined with partial least squares (PLS) regression to estimate surface and subsurfac...

  2. Monitoring Changes in Soil Water Content Using Subsurface Displacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrash, C. J.; Miller, S.; Murdoch, L. C.; Germanovich, L. N.; Gates, J. B.; Volkmer, A.; Weinburg, A.

    2013-12-01

    Closing the water balance is important in many research and water resource applications, but it can be difficult to accomplish due to a variety of factors. A new technique that measures vertical displacement of soil in order to estimate the change in mass of water stored in overlying material is being developed. The measurement technique uses an extensometer that functions as a lysimeter, and we refer to the technique as Displacement Extensometry for Lysimetric Terrain Analysis (DELTA). DELTA extensometers are 2-m-long devices deployed by creating a friction fit with intact soil below a cased borehole. The instrument measures small displacements (better than 10 nm resolution) in response to changes of mass in the overlying soil, or other factors. The instrument averages over a region that scales with the depth of installation (the radius of influence is approximately 2x the depth). The spatial averaging of this instrument extends over regions representative of agricultural fields, hydrologic model grid blocks, and small watersheds. Five DELTA extensometers have been deployed at a field site near Clemson, SC at depths of 3, 6, and 9 m within saprolite derived from biotite gneiss. Barometric pressure, precipitation, and soil moisture are being measured along with displacement. Signals from the co-located extensometers are remarkably similar, demonstrating reproducibility of the technique. Rainfall causes soil compression, and at 6 m depth there is approximately 200 nm of compression per 1 mm of rainfall. There is gradual expansion, which ranges from 0.15 to 1.75 μm/day, following rainfall. The gradual unloading of the soil is interpreted as water loss due to evapotranspiration. Superimposed on the signal are diurnal fluctuations of 0.5 to 1 μm, which correlate to changes in barometric pressure. Four DELTA extensometers were recently deployed in hard, clayey sediments at two field locations south of Amarillo, TX. The instruments will compliment current research on

  3. The role of fragipan soils properties for hillslope subsurface flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlke, Helen; Easton, Zachary; Brown, Larry; Steenhuis, Tammo

    2010-05-01

    In watersheds characterized by fragipan, soils runoff generation is traditionally assumed to be dominated by shallow subsurface flow perched by a nearly impenetrable, low-conductive, subsurface soil horizon. However, several irrigation studies have indicated that fragipan soils can conduct subsurface flow vertically in considerable amounts resulting from differences in fragipan properties (e.g., prism diameter, interprism cracks, etc). These fragipan properties remain difficult to measure at the hillslope and watershed scales and consequently are inadequately accounted for in hydrological models. In the present study, a geophysical survey using ground penetrating radar of a 0.5 ha hillslope in central New York, USA has shown that spatial variability of the continuity and depth of fragipan soils is more influential on subsurface flow pathways than the physical characteristics of the fragipan itself. The geophysical survey revealed that the depth to fragipan varied between 0.3 and 0.8 m, resulting in water table and subsurface flow dynamics similar to the ‘fill and spill hypothesis'. The survey also indicated that the fragipan is interrupted by a higher conductive glacial sand lens that facilitates percolation of subsurface flow beneath the fragipan. The effect of the spatial variability of fragipan soils on subsurface flow pathways and flux was examined in further detail by installation of a 1.5 m wide, 1.5 m deep and 12.5 m long trench at the base of the 125 m long hillslope. The trench was installed in a variable source area (VSA) that forms at the base of the hillslope. The trench was instrumented with a surface flow collector measuring runoff from the upper 5 cm of the soil, and two collector drains installed at the soil-fragipan interface in 0.4 m depth and at the base of the trench (1.5 m depth). In addition, water levels were recorded at 5-min intervals in a 10 m x 10 m grid at the upslope contributing area of the trench. Soils in the study site are

  4. Influence of surface and subsurface tillage on soil physical properties and soil/plant relationships of planted loblolly pine

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Kelting; H. L. Allen

    2000-05-01

    Soil tillage can improve tree survival and growth by reducing competing vegetation, increasing nutrient availability, improving planting quality, and improving soil physical properties. The authors conducted a tillage study with competition control and nutrient amendments to isolate the physical effects of tillage on tree growth. The objectives of this study were to understand: (1) how tillage affects soil physical properties; (2) the relationships between these properties and root growth; (3) linkages between root growth response and aboveground growth; and (4) tillage effects on aboveground growth. Four replicates of a 2x2 factorial combination of surface (disking) and subsurface (subsoiling) were installed on a well-drained, clay-textured subsoil, soil located on the Piedmont of North Carolina. Disking improved soil physical properties (reduced bulk density and increased aeration porosity) in the surface 20-cm of soil. Subsoiling improved soil physical properties at all depths in the planting row, with improvements still noted at 60-cm from the planting row in the surface 10-cm of soil. Rooting patterns followed the changes in soil physical properties. Despite improvements in soil physical properties and changes in rooting patterns, aboveground tree growth was not affected by tillage. The results of this study point to the need for better diagnostics for identifying sites were tillage is appropriate in situations where fertilization and vegetation control are planned. Potential factors to consider are presence and abundance of old root channels, soil shrink/swell capacity, soil structure, presence and depth to root restricting layers, and historical precipitation records.

  5. Subsurface drip irrigation with micro-encapsulated trifluralin. Trifluralin residues in soils and cultivations.

    PubMed

    Spera, G; Rosati, S; Rossi, E; Scicchitano, S

    2006-01-01

    In full field and greenhouse agriculture, the subsurface water distribution with underground driplines--subsurface drip irrigation--is advantageous to obtain a better production and a simplification of cultivation practices. This technique can have a major applicative interest on condition that the roots' intrusion inside the driplines irrigators is eliminated or reduced. To reach this goal, a study has been made on vegetable greenhouse cultivations, and on subsurface drip irrigation with underground driplines protected against roots' intrusion with a product containing micro-encapsulated polyethylene Trifuralin (trifluralin). Underground pipes with driplines (without trifluralin) have constituted the confrontation thesis. The trifluralin residues have been determined through GC-ECD, according to different cultivation phases for two entire production cycles: with 30% of leaf covering, at the moment of flowering and maturation, during production and at the harvest ending, on soil, leaves and maturation, during the production and, at the harvest ending, on fruits.

  6. Subsurface soil characterization using geoelectrical and geotechnical investigations at a bridge site in Uttarakhand Himalayan region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Anita; Israil, M.; Anbalagan, R.; Gupta, Pravin K.

    2017-09-01

    Geoelectrical characterization of subsurface soil has been done at a bridge foundation site on the banks of Bhagirathi River at Tehri reservoir site, Uttarakhand, India. For this purpose, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and the Standard Penetration Test (SPT) data, recorded at both banks of Bhagirathi River are analyzed. A total of six ERT profiles, recorded on both the West and East banks, were interpreted to determine an electrical resistivity image showing the resistivity variations with depth. The borehole data and geological inputs were used for lithological correlation and calibration of the resistivity values to the subsurface formation. Subsequently the electrical parameter (resistivity) for different subsurface lithological units has been inferred. Further, at selected points, the electrical resistivity sounding data, derived from the ERT, have been correlated with the Standard Penetration Test (SPT) data. This correlation results from the fact that in the subsurface soil both the electrical resistivity variations and the soil strength measured by SPT are controlled by the soil properties: grain size distribution, compactness, porosity and water saturation. It has been observed that the N-values smaller than 16 are unreliable and inconsistent. In the River Borne Material (RBM) on the West Bank it is due to the presence of coarse gravels while on the East Bank it is due to the boulders. The N-values greater than 16 mainly correspond to the weathered rock formation. For these values, there exists a linear relationship between N-values and resistivity with a correlation coefficient greater than 0.80. The coefficients of linear relationship at the two banks vary due to varying amount of clay content. Such a relationship is important for any site in tough Himalayan terrain because it can be used as an alternative to the SPT for determining soil strength parameters from ERT.

  7. Quantification of the effect of temperature gradients in soils on subsurface radon signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haquin, Gustavo; Ilzycer, Danielle; Kamai, Tamir; Zafrir, Hovav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Temperature gradients that develop in soils due to atmospheric temperature cycles are factors of primary importance in determining the rates and directions of subsurface gas flow. Models including mechanisms of thermal convection and thermal diffusion partially explain the impact of temperature gradients on subsurface radon transport. However, the overall impact of temperature gradients on subsurface radon transport is still not well understood. A laboratory setup was designed and built to experimentally investigate the influence of temperature gradients on radon transport under well controlled conditions. A 60 cm diameter and 120 cm tall column was thermally insulated except from the atmosphere-soil interface, such that it was constructed to simulate field conditions where temperature gradients in soils are developed following atmospheric temperature cycles. The column was filled with fine grinded phosphate rock which provided the porous media with radon source. Radon in soil-air was continuously monitored using NaI gamma detectors positioned at different heights along the column. Soil temperature, differential pressure, and relative humidity were monitored along the column. Experiments based on steep and gradual stepwise changes in ambient temperature were conducted. Absolute changes on radon levels in the order of 10-30% were measured at temperature gradients of up to ±20oC/m. Results showed a non-linear correlation between the temperature gradient and the subsurface radon concentration. An asymmetric relationship between the radon concentration and the temperature gradients for ΔT>0 and ΔT<0 was also observed. Laboratory simulations of the time- and depth-dependent temperature wave functions with frequencies ranged from a daily cycle to few days were performed. In response to the harmonic temperature behaviour radon oscillations at similar frequencies were detected correspondingly. In this work a quantitative relationship between radon and temperature

  8. Nocturnal soil CO2 uptake and its relationship to sub-surface soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a Chihuahuan Desert shrubland

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite their prevalence, little attention has been given to quantifying aridland soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes over prolonged, annually occurring dry periods. We measured surface soil respiration (Rsoil), volumetric soil moisture and temperature in inter- and under-canopy soils, sub-surface soi...

  9. Evaluation of wetting area and water distribution on different soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, B.; Sohrabi, T.; Mirzaei, F.; Rodríguez-Sinobas, L.

    2012-04-01

    Growing pressure on the world's available water resources has led to an increase in the efficiency and productivity of water-use of irrigation systems in arid and semi-arid regions with water scarcity. In this context, sub-surface drip irrigation, where emitters discharge water underneath the soil surface, might help by saving water since soil evaporation, surface runoff, and deep percolation are greatly reduced or eliminated. In this paper, the wetting area and water distribution on light, medium and heavy texture homogeneous soils in subsurface drip irrigation emitters were evaluated. Experimental tests were carried out in a plexiglass lysimeter container with transparent walls. Emitters were buried at 15, 30 and 45 cm depths and discharge rates of 2 and 4 L/h were applied. Observations of wetting bulbs dimensions showed that water moved more laterally than downwards for higher emitter discharges. However, small emitter discharges enhanced water to move downwards. Likewise, higher emitter discharges also favored water to move upwards toward the soil surface. Water redistribution was affected by emitter depth. For the same emitter discharge, the deepest depth showed less water redistributed in the down vertical and horizontal directions but the contrary was observed for shallow depths. This could be explained considering the dry soil area above the emitter that is larger in the deepest emitters. Observations on wetting bulb dimensions and water distributions could aim at the selection of proper design variables (emitter depth), and/or operation variables (inlet head and irrigation time) in the studied soils under different scenarios of cropping patterns. Key Words: subsurface drip irrigation, wetting bulb, soil water distribution, water redistribution, optimum management

  10. Subsurface application of poultry litter in pasture and no-till soils.

    PubMed

    Pote, D H; Way, T R; Kleinman, P J A; Moore, P A; Meisinger, J J; Sistani, K R; Saporito, L S; Allen, A L; Feyereisen, G W

    2011-01-01

    Poultry litter provides a rich nutrient source for crops, but the usual practice of surface-applying litter can degrade water quality by allowing nutrients to be transported from fields in surface runoff while much of the ammonia (NH3)-N escapes into the atmosphere. Our goal was to improve on conventional titter application methods to decrease associated nutrient losses to air and water while increasing soil productivity. We developed and tested a knifing technique to directly apply dry poultry litter beneath the surface of pastures. Results showed that subsurface litter application decreased NH3-N volatilization and nutrient losses in runoff more than 90% (compared with surface-applied litter) to levels statistically as low as those from control (no litter) plots. Given this success, two advanced tractor-drawn prototypes were developed to subsurface apply poultry litter in field research. The two prototypes have been tested in pasture and no-till experiments and are both effective in improving nutrient-use efficiency compared with surface-applied litter, increasing crop yields (possibly by retaining more nitrogen in the soil), and decreasing nutrient losses, often to near background (control plot) levels. A paired-watershed study showed that cumulative phosphorus losses in runoff from continuously grazed perennial pastures were decreased by 55% over a 3-yr period if the annual poultry litter applications were subsurface applied rather than surface broadcast. Results highlight opportunities and challenges for commercial adoption of subsurface poultry litter application in pasture and no-till systems.

  11. Small Particles - Big Change? Engineered Nanomaterial Effects on Soil Subsurface Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dror, I.; Yaron, B.; Berkowitz, B.

    2014-12-01

    A large number of research papers on the fate of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil-water system have appeared in recent years, focusing on ENM transport, persistence and toxicological impact. However, very few studies have examined the impact of ENMs on the natural soil-subsurface matrix and its properties. Potential irreversible changes to natural soil-subsurface systems that originate from contact with other chemical contaminants of anthropogenic origin have been noted previously. Such changes are considered to have a substantial impact on the liquid phase and solid matrix properties. ENMs reach the land surface through many pathways during and after their beneficial use. Once in the soil, ENMs move as suspended particles in aqueous solution. Dissolution, aggregation and deposition are the primary processes governing their interaction with the soil solid phase and their redistribution from the land surface to the groundwater. We argue that irreversible deposition of ENMs occurring under specific conditions (e.g., in arid and semi-arid environments) may lead to irreversible changes in soil matrix structure and properties. Results from our research on metal and metal oxides ENMs (e.g., CuO, Ag) and from literature on carbon based nanomaterials will be presented in support of our hypothesis.

  12. Moment Analysis Characterizing Water Flow in Repellent Soils from On- and Sub-Surface Point Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Yunwu; Furman, Alex; Wallach, Rony

    2010-05-01

    Water repellency has a significant impact on water flow patterns in the soil profile. Flow tends to become unstable in such soils, which affects the water availability to plants and subsurface hydrology. In this paper, water flow in repellent soils was experimentally studied using the light reflection method. The transient 2D moisture profiles were monitored by CCD camera for tested soils packed in a transparent flow chamber. Water infiltration experiments and subsequent redistribution from on-surface and subsurface point sources with different flow rates were conducted for two soils of different repellency degrees as well as for wettable soil. We used spatio-statistical analysis (moments) to characterize the flow patterns. The zeroth moment is related to the total volume of water inside the moisture plume, and the first and second moments are affinitive to the center of mass and spatial variances of the moisture plume, respectively. The experimental results demonstrate that both the general shape and size of the wetting plume and the moisture distribution within the plume for the repellent soils are significantly different from that for the wettable soil. The wetting plume of the repellent soils is smaller, narrower, and longer (finger-like) than that of the wettable soil compared with that for the wettable soil that tended to roundness. Compared to the wettable soil, where the soil water content decreases radially from the source, moisture content for the water-repellent soils is higher, relatively uniform horizontally and gradually increases with depth (saturation overshoot), indicating that flow tends to become unstable. Ellipses, defined around the mass center and whose semi-axes represented a particular number of spatial variances, were successfully used to simulate the spatial and temporal variation of the moisture distribution in the soil profiles. Cumulative probability functions were defined for the water enclosed in these ellipses. Practically identical

  13. Microbial colonisation in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2014-09-01

    Colonisation of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focusing on settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associate vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soils types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with plate count at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soils samples and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The deep subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 182 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between N deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soils samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significant higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 m and 172 m depth at 80 °C and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  14. Microbial colonization in diverse surface soil types in Surtsey and diversity analysis of its subsurface microbiota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marteinsson, V.; Klonowski, A.; Reynisson, E.; Vannier, P.; Sigurdsson, B. D.; Ólafsson, M.

    2015-02-01

    Colonization of life on Surtsey has been observed systematically since the formation of the island 50 years ago. Although the first colonisers were prokaryotes, such as bacteria and blue-green algae, most studies have been focused on the settlement of plants and animals but less on microbial succession. To explore microbial colonization in diverse soils and the influence of associated vegetation and birds on numbers of environmental bacteria, we collected 45 samples from different soil types on the surface of the island. Total viable bacterial counts were performed with the plate count method at 22, 30 and 37 °C for all soil samples, and the amount of organic matter and nitrogen (N) was measured. Selected samples were also tested for coliforms, faecal coliforms and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria. The subsurface biosphere was investigated by collecting liquid subsurface samples from a 181 m borehole with a special sampler. Diversity analysis of uncultivated biota in samples was performed by 16S rRNA gene sequences analysis and cultivation. Correlation was observed between nutrient deficits and the number of microorganisms in surface soil samples. The lowest number of bacteria (1 × 104-1 × 105 cells g-1) was detected in almost pure pumice but the count was significantly higher (1 × 106-1 × 109 cells g-1) in vegetated soil or pumice with bird droppings. The number of faecal bacteria correlated also to the total number of bacteria and type of soil. Bacteria belonging to Enterobacteriaceae were only detected in vegetated samples and samples containing bird droppings. The human pathogens Salmonella, Campylobacter and Listeria were not in any sample. Both thermophilic bacteria and archaea 16S rDNA sequences were found in the subsurface samples collected at 145 and 172 m depth at 80 and 54 °C, respectively, but no growth was observed in enrichments. The microbiota sequences generally showed low affiliation to any known 16S rRNA gene sequences.

  15. Sorption of acetochlor, S-metolachlor, and atrazine in surface and subsurface soil horizons of Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bedmar, Francisco; Daniel, Peter E; Costa, José L; Giménez, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Understanding herbicide sorption within soil profiles is the first step to predicting their behavior and leaching potential. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine the influence of surface and subsurface soil properties on acetochlor, atrazine, and S-metolachlor sorption. Soil samples were taken from horizons A, B, and C of two loamy soils of the humid pampas of Argentina under no-till management; horizon A was divided into two layers, A(0) (0-5 cm) and A(1) (5 cm to the full thickness of an A horizon). Sorption isotherms were determined from each sampled horizon using the batch equilibrium method and seven concentrations (0, 0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 mg L(-1)). Sorption affinity of herbicides was approximated by the Freundlich equation. The sorption strength K(f) (mg(1 - 1/n) kg(-1) L(1/n) ) over the soils and horizons studied followed the order S-metolachlor (16.51-29.19) > atrazine (4.85-12.34) ≥ acetochlor (5.17-11.97), which was closely related to the hydrophobicity of herbicides expressed as octanol-water partition coefficient (K(OW) ). The K(f) values of the three herbicides were positively correlated with soil organic carbon, with a significance of p < 0.01. Values of K(f) for the three herbicides decreased with depth in the two soils, indicating greater sorption onto surficial soil horizons and possibly a delayed transport toward subsurface soils and subsequent pollution of groundwater.

  16. Nocturnal soil CO2 uptake and its relationship to subsurface soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a Chihuahuan Desert shrubland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamerlynck, Erik P.; Scott, Russell L.; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Barron-Gafford, Greg A.

    2013-12-01

    their prevalence, little attention has been given to quantifying arid land soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes over prolonged, annually occurring dry periods. We measured soil [CO2] profiles and fluxes (Fs) along with volumetric soil moisture and temperature in bare interplant canopy soils and in soils under plant canopies over a three-month hot and dry period in a Chihuahuan Desert shrubland. Nocturnal Fs was frequently negative (from the atmosphere into the soil), a form of inorganic carbon exchange infrequently observed in other deserts. Negative Fs depended on air-soil temperature gradients and were more frequent and stronger in intercanopy soils. Daily integrated ecosystem-level Fs was always positive despite lower daily Fs in intercanopy soils due to nocturnal uptake and more limited positive response to isolated rains. Subsurface [CO2] profiles associated with negative Fs indicated that sustained carbonate dissolution lowered shallow-soil [CO2] below atmospheric levels. In the morning, positive surface Fs started earlier and increased faster than shallow-soil Fs, which was bidirectional, with upward flux toward the surface and downward flux into deeper soils. These dynamics are consistent with carbonate precipitation in conjunction with convection-assisted CO2 outgassing from warming air and soil temperatures and produced a pronounced diurnal Fs temperature hysteresis. We concluded that abiotic nocturnal soil CO2 uptake, through a small carbon sink, modulates dry season ecosystem-level carbon dynamics. Moreover, these abiotic carbon dynamics may be affected by future higher atmospheric carbon dioxide levels and predictions of more prolonged and regular hot and dry periods.

  17. Frozen Soil Barrier. Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area. OST Reference No. 51

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    Problem: Hazardous and radioactive materials have historically been disposed of at the surface during operations at Department of Energy facilities. These contaminants have entered the subsurface, contaminating soils and groundwater resources. Remediation of these groundwater plumes using the baseline technology of pump and treat is expensive and takes a long time to complete. Containment of these groundwater plumes can be alternative or an addition to the remediation activities. Standard containment technologies include slurry walls, sheet piling, and grouting. These are permanent structures that once installed are difficult to remove. How It Works: Frozen Soil Barrier technology provides a containment alternative, with the key difference being that the barrier can be easily removed after a period of time, such as after the remediation or removal of the source is completed. Frozen Soil Barrier technology can be used to isolate and control the migration of underground radioactive or other hazardous contaminants subject to transport by groundwater flow. Frozen Soil Barrier technology consists of a series of subsurface heat transfer devices, known as thermoprobes, which are installed around a contaminant source and function to freeze the soil pore water. The barrier can easily be maintained in place until remediation or removal of the contaminants is complete, at which time the barrier is allowed to thaw.

  18. Variability of soil potential for biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in a heterogeneous subsurface.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Andreas H; Poulsen, Tjalfe G; Mortensen, Lars; Moldrup, Per

    2010-07-15

    Quantifying the spatial variability of factors affecting natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in the unsaturated zone is important to (i) performing a reliable risk assessment and (ii) evaluating the possibility for bioremediation of petroleum-polluted sites. Most studies to date have focused on the shallow unsaturated zone. Based on a data set comprising analysis of about 100 soil samples taken in a 16 m-deep unsaturated zone polluted with volatile petroleum compounds, we statistically and geostatistically analysed values of essential soil properties. The subsurface of the site was highly layered, resulting in an accumulation of pollution within coarse sandy lenses. Air-filled porosity, readily available phosphorous, and the first-order rate constant (k(1)) of benzene obtained from slurry biodegradation experiments were found to depend on geologic sample characterization (P<0.05), while inorganic nitrogen was homogenously distributed across the soil stratigraphy. Semivariogram analysis showed a spatial continuity of 4-8.6 m in the vertical direction, while it was 2-5 times greater in the horizontal direction. Values of k(1) displayed strong spatial autocorrelation. Even so, the soil potential for biodegradation was highly variable, which from autoregressive state-space modeling was partly explained by changes in soil air-filled porosity and gravimetric water content. The results suggest considering biological heterogeneity when evaluating the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.

  19. The impact of subsurface physics on soil moisture estimates derived from the assimilation of surface observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichle, R. H.; Kumar, S. V.; Koster, R. D.; Crow, W. T.; Peters-Lidard, C.

    2008-05-01

    Soil moisture controls the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere and exhibits memory that may be useful for climate prediction at monthly time scales. Large-scale observations of root zone soil moisture, however, are not routinely available. Assimilation of surface soil moisture observations (for example from satellites) into a land surface model (LSM) can yield improved estimates in the root zone. Land surface models, however, differ significantly in their representation of subsurface soil moisture processes. Therefore, the propagation of surface information into deeper soil layers depends on the LSM that is used in the assimilation system. Here, we use the Land Information System (LIS) data assimilation testbed, an interoperable framework for sequential data assimilation that enables the integrated use of multiple LSMs, observations types, and data assimilation algorithms. In a suite of experiments we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture observations into four different LSMs (Catchment, Mosaic, Noah and CLM) using the Ensemble Kalman Filter and investigate the impact of subsurface physics on the skill of soil moisture assimilation products. Our results suggest that assimilation of surface soil moisture generally provides improvements in the root zone estimates. The magnitude of improvements in the root zone is highest if the true subsurface physics has a strong correlation between the surface and root zone, such as in the case of Catchment LSM, regardless of which LSM is used in the assimilation system. For northern-hemisphere summer conditions, we also find that the average skill improvements through data assimilation across different "truth" scenarios are comparable regardless of which model is used in the assimilation system. When evaluating year-round improvements, the use of CLM in the assimilation system yields more limited improvements than use of Catchment, Mosaic, or Noah. This suggests that a simpler LSM is a

  20. Subsurface and terrain controls on runoff generation in deep soil landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, John; McGlynn, Brian; Richter, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Our understanding of runoff generation in regions characterized by deep, highly weathered soils is incomplete despite the prevalence of this setting worldwide. To address this, we instrumented a first-order watershed in the Piedmont of South Carolina, USA. The Piedmont region of the United States extends east of the Appalachians from Maryland to Alabama, and is home to some of the most rapid population growth in the country. Regional and local relief is modest, although the landscape is highly dissected and local slope can be quite variable. The region's soils are ancient, deeply weathered, and characterized by sharp changes in hydrologic properties due to concentration of clay in the Bt horizon. Despite a mild climate and consistent precipitation, seasonally variable energy availability and deciduous tree cover create a strong evapotranspiration mediated seasonal hydrologic dynamic: while moist soils and extended stream networks are typical of the late fall through spring, relatively dry soils and contracting stream networks emerge in the summer and early fall. To elucidate the control of the complex vertical and planform structure of this region, as well as the strongly seasonal subsurface hydrology, on runoff generation, we installed a network of nested, shallow groundwater wells across an ephemeral to first-order watershed to continuously measure internal water levels. We also recorded local precipitation and discharge at the outlet of this watershed, a similar adjacent watershed, and in the second to third order downstream watershed. Subsurface water dynamics varied spatially, vertically, and seasonally. Shallow depths and landscape positions with minimal contributing area exhibited flashier dynamics comparable to the stream hydrographs while positions with more contributing area exhibited relatively muted dynamics. Most well positions showed minimal response to precipitation throughout the summer, and even occasionally observed response rarely co

  1. Subsurface and terrain controls on runoff generation in deep soil landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallard, J. M.; McGlynn, B. L.; Richter, D., Jr.

    2016-12-01

    Our understanding of runoff generation in regions characterized by deep, highly weathered soils is incomplete despite the prevalence of this setting worldwide. To address this, we instrumented a first-order watershed in the Piedmont of South Carolina, USA. The Piedmont region of the United States extends east of the Appalachians from Maryland to Alabama, and is home to some of the most rapid population growth in the country. Regional and local relief is modest, although the landscape is highly dissected and local slope can be quite variable. The region's soils are ancient, deeply weathered, and characterized by sharp changes in hydrologic properties due to concentration of clay in the Bt horizon. Despite a mild climate and consistent precipitation, seasonally variable energy availability and deciduous tree cover create a strong evapotranspiration mediated seasonal hydrologic dynamic: while moist soils and extended stream networks are typical of the late fall through spring, relatively dry soils and contracting stream networks emerge in the summer and early fall. To elucidate the control of the complex vertical and planform structure of this region, as well as the strongly seasonal subsurface hydrology, on runoff generation, we installed a network of nested, shallow groundwater wells across an ephemeral to first-order watershed to continuously measure internal water levels. We also recorded local precipitation and discharge at the outlet of this watershed, a similar adjacent watershed, and in the second to third order downstream watershed. Subsurface water dynamics varied spatially, vertically, and seasonally. Shallow depths and landscape positions with minimal contributing area exhibited flashier dynamics comparable to the stream hydrographs while positions with more contributing area exhibited relatively muted dynamics. Most well positions showed minimal response to precipitation throughout the summer, and even occasionally observed response rarely co

  2. Soil gas 222Rn concentration in northern Germany and its relationship with geological subsurface structures.

    PubMed

    Künze, N; Koroleva, M; Reuther, C-D

    2013-01-01

    (222)Rn in soil gas activity was measured across the margins of two active salt diapirs in Schleswig-Holstein, northern Germany, in order to reveal the impact of halokinetic processes on the soil gas signal. Soil gas and soil sampling were carried out in springtime and summer 2011. The occurrence of elevated (222)Rn in soil gas concentrations in Schleswig-Holstein has been ascribed to radionuclide rich moraine boulder material deposits, but the contribution of subsurface structures has not been investigated so far. Reference samples were taken from a region known for its granitic moraine boulder deposits, resulting in (222)Rn in soil gas activity of 40 kBq/m(3). The values resulting from profile sampling across salt dome margins are of the order of twice the moraine boulder material reference values and exceed 100 kBq/m(3). The zones of elevated concentrations are consistent throughout time despite variations in magnitude. One soil gas profile recorded in this work expands parallel to a seismic profile and reveals multiple zones of elevated (222)Rn activities above a rising salt intrusion. The physical and chemical properties of salt have an impact on the processes influencing gas migration and surface near radionuclide accumulations. The rise of salt supports the breakup of rock components thus leading to enhanced emanation. This work provides a first approach regarding the halokinetic contribution to the (222)Rn in soil gas occurrence and a possible theoretical model which summarizes the relevant processes was developed.

  3. Microbial community structures in anoxic freshwater lake sediment along a metal contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Gough, Heidi L; Stahl, David A

    2011-03-01

    Contamination, such as by heavy metals, has frequently been implicated in altering microbial community structure. However, this association has not been extensively studied for anaerobic communities, or in freshwater lake sediments. We investigated microbial community structure in the metal-contaminated anoxic sediments of a eutrophic lake that were impacted over the course of 80 years by nearby zinc-smelting activities. Microbial community structure was inferred for bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic populations by evaluating terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) patterns in near-surface sediments collected in triplicate from five areas of the lake that had differing levels of metal contamination. The majority of the fragments in the bacterial and eukaryotic profiles showed no evidence of variation in association with metal contamination levels, and diversity revealed by these profiles remained consistent even as metal concentrations varied from 3000 to 27,000 mg kg(-1) total Zn, 0.125 to 11.2 μ pore water Zn and 0.023 to 5.40 μM pore water As. Although most archaeal fragments also showed no evidence of variation, the prevalence of a fragment associated with mesophilic Crenarchaeota showed significant positive correlation with total Zn concentrations. This Crenarchaeota fragment dominated the archaeal TRFLP profiles, representing between 35% and 79% of the total measured peak areas. Lake DePue 16S rRNA gene sequences corresponding to this TRFLP fragment clustered with anaerobic and soil mesophilic Crenarchaeota sequences. Although Crenarchaeota have been associated with metal-contaminated groundwater and soils, this is a first report (to our knowledge) documenting potential increased prevalence of Crenarchaeota associated with elevated levels of metal contamination.

  4. Microbial community structures in anoxic freshwater lake sediment along a metal contamination gradient

    PubMed Central

    Gough, Heidi L; Stahl, David A

    2011-01-01

    Contamination, such as by heavy metals, has frequently been implicated in altering microbial community structure. However, this association has not been extensively studied for anaerobic communities, or in freshwater lake sediments. We investigated microbial community structure in the metal-contaminated anoxic sediments of a eutrophic lake that were impacted over the course of 80 years by nearby zinc-smelting activities. Microbial community structure was inferred for bacterial, archaeal and eukaryotic populations by evaluating terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) patterns in near-surface sediments collected in triplicate from five areas of the lake that had differing levels of metal contamination. The majority of the fragments in the bacterial and eukaryotic profiles showed no evidence of variation in association with metal contamination levels, and diversity revealed by these profiles remained consistent even as metal concentrations varied from 3000 to 27 000 mg kg−1 total Zn, 0.125 to 11.2 μ pore water Zn and 0.023 to 5.40 μ pore water As. Although most archaeal fragments also showed no evidence of variation, the prevalence of a fragment associated with mesophilic Crenarchaeota showed significant positive correlation with total Zn concentrations. This Crenarchaeota fragment dominated the archaeal TRFLP profiles, representing between 35% and 79% of the total measured peak areas. Lake DePue 16S rRNA gene sequences corresponding to this TRFLP fragment clustered with anaerobic and soil mesophilic Crenarchaeota sequences. Although Crenarchaeota have been associated with metal-contaminated groundwater and soils, this is a first report (to our knowledge) documenting potential increased prevalence of Crenarchaeota associated with elevated levels of metal contamination. PMID:20811473

  5. Influence of soil spatial variability on surface and subsurface flow at a vegetative buffer strip scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatel, Laura; Lauvernet, Claire; Carluer, Nadia; Paniconi, Claudio; Leblois, Etienne

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the influence of soil hydrodynamic characteristics variability on surface and subsurface flow at a vegetative buffer strip scale, using mecanistic modeling. Cathy (CATchment HYdrology, Camporese et al. 2010) is a research physically based model able to simulate coupled surface/subsurface flow. The evaluation of soil hydrodynamic characteristics variability is based essentially on saturated hydraulic conductivity because of its large spatial variability in the 3 dimensions and its important influence on flow pathways, as well as its high influence on the model output variables. After testing the model sensitivity to some input variables, to the boundary conditions and to the mesh definition, the work focuses on hydraulic conductivity parametrization. The study was first conducted with uniform (by horizons) conductivity domains based on field measurements. In a second step, heterogeneous fields were generated by a statistical tool which allows the user to choose the statistical law (in this case, lognormal or Gauss), the hydraulic conductivity auto-correlation length and the possibility to condition the fields with measured points. With all these different ways to represent spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity, model simulated surface and subsurface fluxes consistent with datasets from artificial run-off experiments on an French wineyard hillslope (Morcille catchment, Beaujolais, France). Model simulations are evaluated and compared to observations on several criteria : consistency, stability, interaction with water table, etc...

  6. Numerical Analysis of Mass and Energy Transport in Subsurface and at Soil-atmosphere Interface using HYDRUS: Effect of Soil Heterogeneity and Surface Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, H.; Simunek, J.

    2016-12-01

    It is broadly accepted that mass and energy fluxes in the subsurface in general, and in arid and semi-arid regions in particular, are closely coupled and cannot be evaluated without considering their mutual interactions. However, only a few numerical models (if any) consider coupled water, vapor and energy transport in both the subsurface and at the soil-atmosphere interface. While the subsurface is commonly implemented in existing models, which often consider both isothermal and thermally induced water and vapor flow, the effects of slope inclination, slope azimuth, variable surface albedo and plant shading on incoming radiation and spatially variable surface mass and energy balance, and consequently soil moisture distribution, is rarely considered. Such elements have been recently implemented into the HYDRUS model. In this presentation, the effect of soil heterogeneity and surface roughness on mass and energy fluxes in the subsurface and at the soil-atmosphere interface is evaluated numerically with the HYDRUS model.

  7. Presence of Actinobacterial and Fungal Communities in Clean and Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Subsurface Soil

    PubMed Central

    Björklöf, Katarina; Karlsson, Sanja; Frostegård, Åsa; Jørgensen, Kirsten S

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the microbial communities adapted to soil environments contaminated with aged complex hydrocarbon mixtures, especially in the subsurface soil layers. In this work we studied the microbial communities in two different soil profiles down to the depth of 7 m which originated from a 30-year-old site contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) and from a clean site next to the contaminated site. The concentration of oxygen in the contaminated soil profile was strongly reduced in soil layers below 1 m depth but not in the clean soil profile. Total microbial biomass and community composition was analyzed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) measurements. The diversity of fungi and actinobacteria was investigated more in detail by construction of rDNA-based clone libraries. The results revealed that there was a significant and diverse microbial community in subsoils at depth below 2 m, also in conditions where oxygen was limiting. The diversity of actinobacteria was different in the two soil profiles; the contaminated soil profile was dominated by Mycobacterium -related sequences whereas sequences from the clean soil samples were related to other, generally uncultured organisms, some of which may represent two new subclasses of actinobacteria. One dominating fungal sequence which matched with the ascomycotes Acremonium sp. and Paecilomyces sp. was identified both in clean and in contaminated soil profiles. Thus, although the relative amounts of fungi and actinobacteria in these microbial communities were highest in the upper soil layers, many representatives from these groups were found in hydrocarbon contaminated subsoils even under oxygen limited conditions. PMID:19543551

  8. Effects of subsurface aeration and trinexapac-ethyl application on soil microbial communities in a creeping bentgrass putting green

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Feng, Y.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Van Santen, E.; Walker, R.H.

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of creeping bentgrass (Agrostis palustris Huds.) to the extreme heat found in the southeastern United States has led to the development of new greens-management methods. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of subsurface aeration and growth regulator applications on soil microbial communities and mycorrhizal colonization rates in a creeping bentgrass putting green. Two cultivars (Crenshaw and Penncross), a growth regulator (trinexapacethyl), and subsurface aeration were evaluated in cool and warm seasons. Total bacterial counts were higher in whole (unsieved) soils than in sieved soils, indicating a richer rhizosphere soil environment. Mycorrhizal infection rates were higher in trinexapac-ethyl (TE) treated plants. High levels of hyphal colonization and relatively low arbuscule and vesicle occurrence were observed. Principal components analysis of whole-soil fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles indicated that warm-season microbial populations in whole and sieved soils had similar constituents, but the populations differed in the cool season. FAME profiles did not indicate that subsurface aeration and TE application affected soil microbial community structure. This is the first reported study investigating the influences of subsurface aeration and TE application on soil microorganisms in a turfgrass putting green soil.

  9. Isotopic mixing model for quantifying contributions of soil water and groundwater in subsurface ('tile') drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, C. D.; Gall, H.; Jafvert, C. T.; Bowen, G. J.

    2010-12-01

    Subsurface (‘tile’) drainage, consisting of buried grids of perforated pipe, has provided a means of converting millions of acres of poorly drained soils in the Midwestern U.S. into fertile cropland. However, by altering pathways and rates of soil water and groundwater movement through agricultural lands, this practice may accelerate the loss of nitrate and other agrochemicals. To better understand the hydrological controls on nitrogen dynamics in artificially drained agricultural watersheds, a field sampling program has been established at the Animal Science Research and Education Center (ASREC) at Purdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana) to (1) measure precipitation amount, tile flow, and water-table elevation, and (2) collect water samples for analysis of nitrate, major ions, and oxygen isotope ratios in precipitation, tile drainage, shallow (1 m) and deep (3 m) groundwater, and soil water during storm events. Preliminary physical, chemical, and isotopic data collected at the ASREC show a coincident timing of peak storm ‘event water’ and peak nitrate flux in tile drainage, suggesting significant routing of infiltrating event water. In this work, we aim to refine our understanding of tile drainage at the ASREC by developing a mixing model for partitioning contributions of soil water and groundwater in tile drainage during several storm runoff events ranging in precipitation intensity and coinciding with varying antecedent soil moisture conditions. The results of our model will describe tile drainage in terms of its hydrological components, soil water and groundwater, which in turn will provide a means of incorporating the effects of tile drainage in surface/subsurface hydrological transport models.

  10. 3-D modeling useful tool for planning. [mapping groundwater and soil pollution and subsurface features

    SciTech Connect

    Calmbacher, C.W. )

    1992-12-01

    Visualizing and delineating subsurface geological features, groundwater contaminant plumes, soil contamination, geological faults, shears and other features can prove invaluable to environmental consultants, engineers, geologists and hydrogeologists. Three-dimensional modeling is useful for a variety of applications from planning remediation to site planning design. The problem often is figuring out how to convert drilling logs, map lists or contaminant levels from soil and groundwater into a 3-D model. Three-dimensional subsurface modeling is not a new requirement, but a flexible, easily applied method of developing such models has not always been readily available. LYNX Geosystems Inc. has developed the Geoscience Modeling System (GMS) in answer to the needs of those regularly having to do three-dimensional geostatistical modeling. The GMS program has been designed to allow analysis, interpretation and visualization of complex geological features and soil and groundwater contamination. This is a powerful program driven by a 30 volume modeling technology engine. Data can be entered, stored, manipulated and analyzed in ways that will present very few limitations to the user. The program has selections for Geoscience Data Management, Geoscience Data Analysis, Geological Modeling (interpretation and analysis), Geostatistical Modeling and an optional engineering component.

  11. Heavy metal contamination in the Tanat Valley, North Wales.

    PubMed

    Fuge, R; Paveley, C F; Holdham, M T

    1989-12-01

    The Tanat Valley area of North Powys, Wales, has a long history of metalliferous mining, the most active period of extraction being during the 18th century, while the largest mine, Llangynog, was in production until 1899. Ore minerals found in the area include galena (PbS), sphalerite (ZnS) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS2). Below the Llangynog mine the valley is heavily contaminated with elevated levels of Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd in soils and river sediments. On the valley floor subsoil metal levels frequently greatly exceed those of topsoils which probably reflects contamination of the floodplain during the peak period of mining. High levels of base metals in the stream sediments some 2 km downstream of the mine area are thought to be due to river erosion of the contaminated bank material. Contamination derived from the old mine tips results in extremely high levels of heavy metals in soils and stream sediments in the immediate vicinty of the old workings. Some metal contamination is also thought to derive from previously undetected mineralisation.

  12. Soil Physical Constraints on Intrinsic Biodegradation of Petroleum Vapors in a Layered Subsurface

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Andreas H.; Henriksen, Kaj; Mortensen, Lars; Scow, Kate M.; Moldrup, Per

    2011-01-01

    Naturally occurring biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in the vadose zone depends on the physical soil environment influencing field-scale gas exchange and pore-scale microbial metabolism. In this study, we evaluated the effect of soil physical heterogeneity on biodegradation of petroleum vapors in a 16-m-deep, layered vadose zone. Soil slurry experiments (soil/water ratio 10:30 w/w, 25°C) on benzene biodegradation under aerobic and well-mixed conditions indicated that the biodegradation potential in different textured soil samples was related to soil type rather than depth, in the order: sandy loam > fine sand > limestone. Similarly, O2 consumption rates during in situ respiration tests performed at the site were higher in the sandy loam than in the fine sand, although the difference was less significant than in the slurries. Laboratory and field data generally agreed well and suggested a significant potential for aerobic biodegradation, even with nutrient-poor and deep subsurface conditions. In slurries of the sandy loam, the biodegradation potential declined with increasing in situ water saturation (i.e., decreasing air-filled porosity in the field). This showed a relation between antecedent undisturbed field conditions and the slurry biodegradation potential, and suggested airfilled porosity to be a key factor for the intrinsic biodegradation potential in the field. PMID:21617737

  13. Subsurface cadmium loss from a stony soil-effect of cow urine application.

    PubMed

    Gray, Colin William; Chrystal, Jane Marie; Monaghan, Ross Martin; Cavanagh, Jo-Anne

    2017-05-01

    Cadmium (Cd) losses in subsurface flow from stony soils that have received cow urine are potentially important, but poorly understood. This study investigated Cd loss from a soil under a winter dairy-grazed forage crop that was grazed either conventionally (24 h) or with restricted grazing (6 h). This provided an opportunity to test the hypothesis that urine inputs could increase Cd concentrations in drainage. It was thought this would be a result of cow urine either (i) enhancing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations via an increase in soil pH, resulting in the formation of soluble Cd-organic carbon complexes and, or (ii) greater inputs of chloride (Cl) via cow urine, promoting the formation of soluble Cd-Cl complexes. Cadmium concentrations in subsurface flow were generally low, with a spike above the water quality guidelines for a month after the 24-h grazing. Cadmium fluxes were on average 0.30 g Cd ha(-1) year(-1) (0.27-0.32 g Cd ha(-1) year(-1)), in line with previous estimates for agricultural soils. The mean Cd concentration in drainage from the 24-h grazed plots was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than 6-h plots. No increase in DOC concentrations between the treatments was found. However, Cl concentrations in drainage were significantly higher (P < 0.001) from the 24-h than the 6-h grazed treatment plots, and positively correlated with Cd concentrations, and therefore, a possible mechanism increasing Cd mobility in soil. Further study is warranted to confirm the mechanisms involved and quantities of Cd lost from other systems.

  14. Improving irrigation efficiency of sandy soils by subsurface water retaining membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andrey; Smucker, Alvin; Berhanu, Samrawi

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production in sandy soils is challenging due to low soil water holding capacity and high water permeability. The subsurface water retention technology (SWRT) is a relatively new long-term approach that offers precision control of water and nutrients in the root zone. However, multiple design of SWRT membrane configurations and spatial distributions require more modeling for best application in arid regions with relevant irrigation methods. The objective of this study was to define optimal geometric parameters of the SWRT membranes and the most accurate irrigation rates for corn production in sandy soils. HYDRUS-2D model, that describes two-dimensional water flow in unsaturated soil, was calibrated and validated on data in a large sand-filled lysimeter with SWRT membranes installed at different depths with different aspect ratios. The model adequately reproduced soil water content dynamics measured at 12 locations inside the sand profile. Then HYDRUS-2D simulations were repeated with different SWRT installation depths and aspect ratios. The installation depths in these simulations were 20 cm, 40 cm, and 60 cm, while the aspect ratios were 2:1, 3:1, 5:1 and 10:1. The results of simulations confirmed water holding capacity of the soil can be differentially controlled by aspect ratios of SWRT membranes. SWRT membranes with an aspect ratio of 2:1 substantially increased soil water content at 20-cm soil layer above the membrane, and this effect diminished with increasing aspect ratio of the membrane. Installation depth within the soil profile had no significant effect on water loss. The HYDRUS-2D simulations were repeated with SWRT installed at depth of 20 cm for sprinkle, surface drip and subsurface drip irrigation. Corn irrigation was triggered at pressure head of -30cm at a depth of 15 cm for all irrigation techniques. Simulated water losses by deep infiltration in sands without SWRT membranes approached 60% with approximately 15% losses when SWRT

  15. Investigation of (de)coupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture using a Distributed Lag Non-linear Model (DNLM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, Coleen; van der Ploeg, Martine

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimates of water content in the soil profile are essential for environmental and climate modeling studies. Current trends for estimating profile soil moisture incorporate remote sensing methods for mapping soil moisture at greater spatial coverage but is limited to the upper soil layers (e.g. 5cm for radar satellites). Data assimilation methods offer promising computational techniques to translate mapped surface soil moisture to estimates of profile soil moisture, in conjunction with physical models. However, a variety of factors, such as differences in the drying rates, can lead to "decoupling" (Capehart and Carlson, 1997) of surface and subsurface soil moisture. In other words, surface soil moisture conditions no longer reflect or represent subsurface conditions. In this study, we investigated the relation and observed decoupling between surface and subsurface soil moisture from 15-minute interval time series datasets in four selected Dutch agricultural fields (SM_05, SM_09, SM_13, SM_20) from the soil moisture network in Twente region. The idea is that surface soil moisture conditions will be reflected in the subsurface after a certain time lag because of its movement or flow from the surface. These lagged associations were analysed using distributed lag non-linear model (DLNM). This statistical technique provides a framework to simultaneously represent non-linear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects. DNLM was applied to elucidate which surface soil moisture conditions resulted in a high association to subsurface values, indicating good correlation between the two zones. For example, initial results for this ongoing study from SM_13 show an overall low but increasing association from dry to intermediate soil moisture values (0 to 25%). At this range of values, we say that the two zones are decoupled. Above these values towards near saturated conditions ( 40%), associations between the two zones remain high. For predictor

  16. Modelling and interpreting biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structure using automated micropenetrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoon, Stephen R.; Felde, Vincent J. M. N. L.; Drahorad, Sylvie L.; Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Soil penetrometers are used routinely to determine the shear strength of soils and deformable sediments both at the surface and throughout a depth profile in disciplines as diverse as soil science, agriculture, geoengineering and alpine avalanche-safety (e.g. Grunwald et al. 2001, Van Herwijnen et al. 2009). Generically, penetrometers comprise two principal components: An advancing probe, and a transducer; the latter to measure the pressure or force required to cause the probe to penetrate or advance through the soil or sediment. The force transducer employed to determine the pressure can range, for example, from a simple mechanical spring gauge to an automatically data-logged electronic transducer. Automated computer control of the penetrometer step size and probe advance rate enables precise measurements to be made down to a resolution of 10's of microns, (e.g. the automated electronic micropenetrometer (EMP) described by Drahorad 2012). Here we discuss the determination, modelling and interpretation of biologically crusted dryland soil sub-surface structures using automated micropenetrometry. We outline a model enabling the interpretation of depth dependent penetration resistance (PR) profiles and their spatial differentials using the model equations, σ {}(z) ={}σ c0{}+Σ 1n[σ n{}(z){}+anz + bnz2] and dσ /dz = Σ 1n[dσ n(z) /dz{} {}+{}Frn(z)] where σ c0 and σ n are the plastic deformation stresses for the surface and nth soil structure (e.g. soil crust, layer, horizon or void) respectively, and Frn(z)dz is the frictional work done per unit volume by sliding the penetrometer rod an incremental distance, dz, through the nth layer. Both σ n(z) and Frn(z) are related to soil structure. They determine the form of σ {}(z){} measured by the EMP transducer. The model enables pores (regions of zero deformation stress) to be distinguished from changes in layer structure or probe friction. We have applied this method to both artificial calibration soils in the

  17. [Simulation of soil water dynamics in triploid Populus tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Xi, Ben-Ye; Jia, Li-Ming; Wang, Ye; Li, Guang-De

    2011-01-01

    Based on the observed data of triploid Populus tomentosa root distribution, a one-dimensional root water uptake model was proposed. Taking the root water uptake into account, the soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under subsurface drip irrigation was simulated by using HYDRUS model, and the results were validated with field experiment. Besides, the HYDRUS model was used to study the effects of various irrigation technique parameters on soil wetting patterns. The RMAE for the simulated soil water content by the end of irrigation and approximately 24 h later was 7.8% and 6.0%, and the RMSE was 0.036 and 0.026 cm3 x cm(-3), respectively, illustrating that the HYDRUS model performed well in simulating the short-term soil water dynamics in triploid P. tomentosa root zone under drip irrigation, and the root water uptake model was reasonable. Comparing with 2 and 4 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and continuous irrigation, both the 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and the pulsed irrigation with water applied intermittently in 30 min periods could increase the volume of wetted soil and reduce deep percolation. It was concluded that the combination of 1 L x h(-1) of drip discharge and pulsed irrigation should be the first choice when applying drip irrigation to triploid P. tomentosa root zone at the experiment site.

  18. Response of subsurface soils covered by sand clay liners to temperature variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafalla, Muawia

    2017-04-01

    The use of sand clay liners as a cover for near surface material works as a heat insulator as well as a hydraulic barrier. The soil temperature profile below grade level is normally a function of soil type, dampness and state of compaction. The temperature rise and fall is closely related to the moisture content conditions within the strata. This study is aimed at investigating the effect of a sand clay liner placed on ground surface on the temperature moisture profile. A section of clay sand liners was constructed on site on top of a silty sand formation with some clay. The field section was observed for variable temperature and weather conditions over six month's period. 5TE Decagon sensors capable of recording moisture content, temperature and electrical conductivity connected to Em50 data loggers were employed. A weather station equipped with rainfall, temperature, humidity and wind sensors was installed on site throughout the period of the investigation. The measurements of electrical conductivity were found extremely sensitive to wetting and drying and to temperature changes. Profiles for dry soil being wetted and wet soil being dried out are presented and compared in this study. Mineralogy and chemical composition of the subsurface soil in addition to the chemistry of water do have a remarkable influence on shaping these profiles.

  19. Biogeochemical controls on the corrosion of depleted uranium alloy in subsurface soils.

    PubMed

    Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Worsfold, Paul J; Livens, Francis R; Vaughan, David J; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Boothman, Christopher; Sajih, Mustafa; Alvarez, Rebeca; Keith-Roach, Miranda J

    2009-08-15

    Military activities have left a legacy of depleted uranium (DU) penetrator waste in the near-surface terrestrial environment. To understand the fate of this DU alloy, the mechanisms and controlling factors of corrosion need to be determined. In this study, field-moist and waterlogged microcosms were used to investigate the effect of redox conditions and soil water content on the corrosion and fate of DU in subsurface soil, and the impact of corroding DU on the soil microbial population. The mechanism of corrosion and the corrosion products formed were highly dependent on the water status of the soil. Under field-moist conditions, DU corroded at a rate of 0.49 +/- 0.06 g cm(-2) y(-1) and the main U input to surrounding soil was large metaschoepite [(UO2)8O2(OH)12 x (H2O)10] particles. However, underwaterlogged conditions the rate of corrosion was significantly slower at 0.01-0.02 g cm(-2) y(-1) and occurred with the release of dissolved species to the surrounding environment. Corrosion ceases under reducing conditions, thus redox conditions are important in determining the persistence of penetrators in the environment. Corroding DU alters the redox conditions in the surrounding environment and both mechanisms of corrosion impact the microbial community.

  20. A Subsurface Soil Composition and Physical Properties Experiment to Address Mars Regolith Stratigraphy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richter, L.; Sims, M.; Economou, T.; Stoker, C.; Wright, I.; Tokano, T.

    2004-01-01

    Previous in-situ measurements of soil-like materials on the surface of Mars, in particular during the on-going Mars Exploration Rover missions, have shown complex relationships between composition, exposure to the surface environment, texture, and local rocks. In particular, a diversity in both compositional and physical properties could be established that is interpreted to be diagnostic of the complex geologic history of the martian surface layer. Physical and chemical properties vary laterally and vertically, providing insight into the composition of rocks from which soils derive, and environmental conditions that led to soil formation. They are central to understanding whether habitable environments existed on Mars in the distant past. An instrument the Mole for Soil Compositional Studies and Sampling (MOCSS) - is proposed to allow repeated access to subsurface regolith on Mars to depths of up to 1.5 meters for in-situ measurements of elemental composition and of physical and thermophysical properties, as well as for subsurface sample acquisition. MOCSS is based on the compact PLUTO (PLanetary Underground TOol) Mole system developed for the Beagle 2 lander and incorporates a small X-ray fluorescence spectrometer within the Mole which is a new development. Overall MOCSS mass is approximately 1.4 kilograms. Taken together, the MOCSS science data support to decipher the geologic history at the landing site as compositional and textural stratigraphy if they exist - can be detected at a number of places if the MOCSS were accommodated on a rover such as MSL. Based on uncovered stratigraphy, the regional sequence of depositional and erosional styles can be constrained which has an impact on understanding the ancient history of the Martian near-surface layer, considering estimates of Mars soil production rates of 0.5... 1.0 meters per billion years on the one hand and Mole subsurface access capability of approximately 1.5 meters. An overview of the MOCSS, XRS

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi restore normal growth in a white poplar clone grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil, and this is associated with upregulation of foliar metallothionein and polyamine biosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Cicatelli, Angela; Lingua, Guido; Todeschini, Valeria; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2010-11-01

    It is increasingly evident that plant tolerance to stress is improved by mycorrhiza. Thus, suitable plant-fungus combinations may also contribute to the success of phytoremediation of heavy metal (HM)-polluted soil. Metallothioneins (MTs) and polyamines (PAs) are implicated in the response to HM stress in several plant species, but whether the response is modulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to check whether colonization by AMF could modify growth, metal uptake/translocation, and MT and PA gene expression levels in white poplar cuttings grown on HM-contaminated soil, and to compare this with plants grown on non-contaminated soil. In this greenhouse study, plants of a Populus alba clone were pre-inoculated, or not, with either Glomus mosseae or G. intraradices and then grown in pots containing either soil collected from a multimetal- (Cu and Zn) polluted site or non-polluted soil. The expression of MT and PA biosynthetic genes was analysed in leaves using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Free and conjugated foliar PA concentrations were determined in parallel. On polluted soil, AMF restored plant biomass despite higher Cu and Zn accumulation in plant organs, especially roots. Inoculation with the AMF caused an overall induction of PaMT1, PaMT2, PaMT3, PaSPDS1, PaSPDS2 and PaADC gene expression, together with increased free and conjugated PA levels, in plants grown on polluted soil, but not in those grown on non-polluted soil. Mycorrhizal plants of P. alba clone AL35 exhibit increased capacity for stabilization of soil HMs, together with improved growth. Their enhanced stress tolerance may derive from the transcriptional upregulation of several stress-related genes, and the protective role of PAs.

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi restore normal growth in a white poplar clone grown on heavy metal-contaminated soil, and this is associated with upregulation of foliar metallothionein and polyamine biosynthetic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Cicatelli, Angela; Lingua, Guido; Todeschini, Valeria; Biondi, Stefania; Torrigiani, Patrizia; Castiglione, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims It is increasingly evident that plant tolerance to stress is improved by mycorrhiza. Thus, suitable plant–fungus combinations may also contribute to the success of phytoremediation of heavy metal (HM)-polluted soil. Metallothioneins (MTs) and polyamines (PAs) are implicated in the response to HM stress in several plant species, but whether the response is modulated by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) remains to be clarified. The aim of the present study was to check whether colonization by AMF could modify growth, metal uptake/translocation, and MT and PA gene expression levels in white poplar cuttings grown on HM-contaminated soil, and to compare this with plants grown on non-contaminated soil. Methods In this greenhouse study, plants of a Populus alba clone were pre-inoculated, or not, with either Glomus mosseae or G. intraradices and then grown in pots containing either soil collected from a multimetal- (Cu and Zn) polluted site or non-polluted soil. The expression of MT and PA biosynthetic genes was analysed in leaves using quantitative reverse transcription–PCR. Free and conjugated foliar PA concentrations were determined in parallel. Results On polluted soil, AMF restored plant biomass despite higher Cu and Zn accumulation in plant organs, especially roots. Inoculation with the AMF caused an overall induction of PaMT1, PaMT2, PaMT3, PaSPDS1, PaSPDS2 and PaADC gene expression, together with increased free and conjugated PA levels, in plants grown on polluted soil, but not in those grown on non-polluted soil. Conclusions Mycorrhizal plants of P. alba clone AL35 exhibit increased capacity for stabilization of soil HMs, together with improved growth. Their enhanced stress tolerance may derive from the transcriptional upregulation of several stress-related genes, and the protective role of PAs. PMID:20810743

  3. Predicting the Fate and Effects of Resuspended Metal Contaminated Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-23

    metal contaminant speciation, partitioning and transport and the resulting exposures linked to biological effects in these dynamic ecosystems . It...transport and the resulting exposures linked to biological effects in these dynamic ecosystems . Technical Approach A wide range of sediment

  4. Evaluation of Natural Radioactivity in Subsurface Air, Water and Soil in Western Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Masami

    2008-08-07

    Surveys of radon concentrations in western Japan were carried out to estimate the contents not only of waters in the environment but also in soil gas. The maximum concentration measured for drinking water as public supply exceeded the 1991 United States Environmental Protection Agency-recommended limit for drinking water (11 Bq L{sup -1}) but did not exceed that of several European countries (100 Bq L{sup -1}). Overall, the concentrations of radon in subsurface water ranged from 1 to 100 Bq L{sup -1} and those in surface water were below 1 Bq L{sup -1} in a residential area. Fifty nine samples in soil gas at 4 Prefectures of the Kinki district were analyzed together with 19 samples of interest due to karst and uranium mining sites from another two Prefectures to compare with the above samples. The cumulative frequency of the {sup 222}Rn-concentrations both in environmental water and soil gas showed a log-normal distribution. Surveys of natural radioactivity in soils were also carried out with a Ge(Li) detector to determine the concentrations.

  5. Spatial variation in herbicide leaching from a marine clay soil via subsurface drains

    PubMed Central

    Ulén, Barbro M; Larsbo, Mats; Kreuger, Jenny K; Svanbäck, Annika

    2013-01-01

    Background Subsurface transport via tile drains can significantly contribute to pesticide contamination of surface waters. The spatial variation in subsurface leaching of normally applied herbicides was examined together with phosphorus losses in 24 experimental plots with water sampled flow-proportionally. The study site was a flat, tile-drained area with 60% marine clay in the topsoil in southeast Sweden. The objectives were to quantify the leaching of frequently used herbicides from a tile drained cracking clay soil and to evaluate the variation in leaching within the experimental area and relate this to topsoil management practices (tillage method and structure liming). Results In summer 2009, 0.14, 0.22 and 1.62%, respectively, of simultaneously applied amounts of MCPA, fluroxypyr and clopyralid were leached by heavy rain five days after spraying. In summer 2011, on average 0.70% of applied bentazone was leached by short bursts of intensive rain 12 days after application. Peak flow concentrations for 50% of the treated area for MCPA and 33% for bentazone exceeded the Swedish no-effect guideline values for aquatic ecosystems. Approximately 0.08% of the glyphosate applied was leached in dissolved form in the winters of 2008/2009 and 2010/2011. Based on measurements of glyphosate in particulate form, total glyphosate losses were twice as high (0.16%) in the second winter. The spatial inter-plot variation was large (72–115%) for all five herbicides studied, despite small variations (25%) in water discharge. Conclusions The study shows the importance of local scale soil transport properties for herbicide leaching in cracking clay soils. © 2013 The Authors. Pest Management Science published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:23658148

  6. Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadamma, Sindhu; Mayes, Melanie; Zinn, Yuri; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Ann, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

  7. Cone penetrometer deployed in situ video microscope for characterizing sub-surface soil properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, S.H.; Knowles, D.S.; Kertesz, J.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper we report on the development and field testing of an in situ video microscope that has been integrated with a cone penetrometer probe in order to provide a real-time method for characterizing subsurface soil properties. The video microscope system consists of a miniature CCD color camera system coupled with an appropriate magnification and focusing optics to provide a field of view with a coverage of approximately 20 mm. The camera/optic system is mounted in a cone penetrometer probe so that the camera views the soil that is in contact with a sapphire window mounted on the side of the probe. The soil outside the window is illuminated by diffuse light provided through the window by an optical fiber illumination system connected to a white light source at the surface. The video signal from the camera is returned to the surface where it can be displayed in real-time on a video monitor, recorded on a video cassette recorder (VCR), and/or captured digitally with a frame grabber installed in a microcomputer system. In its highest resolution configuration, the in situ camera system has demonstrated a capability to resolve particle sizes as small as 10 {mu}m. By using other lens systems to increase the magnification factor, smaller particles could be resolved, however, the field of view would be reduced. Initial field tests have demonstrated the ability of the camera system to provide real-time qualitative characterization of soil particle sizes. In situ video images also reveal information on porosity of the soil matrix and the presence of water in the saturated zone. Current efforts are focused on the development of automated imaging processing techniques as a means of extracting quantitative information on soil particle size distributions. Data will be presented that compares data derived from digital images with conventional sieve/hydrometer analyses.

  8. The Effects of Subsurface Bioremediation on Soil Structure, Colloid Formation, and Contaminant Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Liang, X.; Zhuang, J.; Radosevich, M.

    2016-12-01

    Anaerobic bioremediation is widely applied to create anaerobic subsurface conditions designed to stimulate microorganisms that degrade organic contaminants and immobilize toxic metals in situ. Anaerobic conditions that accompany such techniques also promotes microbially mediated Fe(III)-oxide mineral reduction. The reduction of Fe(III) could potentially cause soil structure breakdown, formation of clay colloids, and alternation of soil surface chemical properties. These processes could then affect bioremediation and the migration of contaminants. Column experiments were conducted to investigate the impact of anaerobic bioreduction on soil structure, hydraulic properties, colloid formation, and transport of three tracers (bromide, DFBA, and silica shelled silver nanoparticles). Columns packed with inoculated water stable soil aggregates were placed in anaerobic glovebox, and artificial groundwater media was pumped into the columns to simulate anaerobic bioreduction process for four weeks. Decent amount of soluble Fe(II) accompanied by colloids were detected in the effluent from bioreduction columns a week after initiation of bioreduction treatment, which demonstrated bioreduction of Fe(III) and formation of colloids. Transport experiments were performed in the columns before and after bioreduction process to assess the changes of hydraulic and surface chemical properties through bioreduction treatment. Earlier breakthrough of bromide and DFBA after treatment indicated alterations in flow paths (formation of preferential flow paths). Less dispersion of bromide and DFBA, and less tailing of DFBA after treatment implied breakdown of soil aggregates. Dramatically enhanced transport and early breakthrough of silica shelled silver nanoparticles after treatment supported the above conclusion of alterations in flow paths, and indicated changes of soil surface chemical properties.

  9. Transport of contaminants from energy-process-waste leachates through subsurface soils and soil components: laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wangen, L.E.; Stallings, E.A.; Walker, R.D.

    1982-08-01

    The subsurface transport and attenuation of inorganic contaminants common to a variety of energy process waste leachates are being studied using laboratory column methods. Anionic species currently being emphasized are As, B, Mo, and Se. Transport of the cations Cd and Ni is also being studied. The solid adsorbents consist of three soil mineral components (silica sand, kaolinite, and goethite), and four subsurface soils (a dunal sand, an oxidic sandy clay loam, an acidic clay loam, and an alkaline clay loam). Breakthrough patterns of these species from packed soil columns are followed by monitoring eluent concentrations vs time under carefully controlled laboratory conditions. This report describes the experimental methods being used, the results of preliminary batch adsorption studies, and the results of column experiments completed through calendar year 1981. Using column influent concentrations of about 10 mg/l, adsorption (mmoles/100 g) has been determined from the eluent volume corresponding to 50% breakthrough. On silica sand, kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, these are 2.0 x 10/sup -4/, 0.020, 0.013, and 0.31 for cadmium, 4.4 x 10/sup -4/, 0.039, 0.020, and 0.98 for nickel. On kaolinite, dunal sand, and goethite, respectively, adsorption values (mmoles/100 g) are As (0.24, 0.019, and 20.5), B (0.041, 0.0019, and 1.77), Mo (0.048, 0.0010, and 5.93), and Se (0.029, 0.00048, and 1.30). Arsenic is the most highly adsorbed contaminant species and goethite has the largest adsorption capacity of the adsorbents.

  10. Numerical modeling of shallow subsurface runoff on cultivated soil with temporary variable structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Klípa, Vladimír; Dušek, Jaromír; Dostál, Tomáš

    2014-05-01

    Temporary variable properties of periodically cultivated soils are one of the crucial factors that must be taken into account to understand flow processes on agriculture catchments. Soil structure is a property that is often considered as a static rather than dynamic. This could be a reasonable assumption for compacted subsoil, but not for the plough layer. The man-made and natural processes such as an overuse of heavy machinery, tillage, plowing, harvest, quick vegetation and root growth, edaphon activity, raindrops kinetic energy, freezing, thawing etc. cause recurrent cycles of the topsoil loosening, compaction and surface sealing. Deformation of the structure causes reduction of volume and connectivity of inter-aggregate voids and eroded fine particles clog the macropores and preferential pathways, the infiltration capacity decreases. Originally connected large pores normally serve as a quick bypass for infiltrating water, therefore, based on the state of the topsoil structure one can expect different runoff mechanisms ranging from hypodermic to surface flow. The aim of the contribution is to examine the runoff dynamics along the inclined slope under different structural properties of the topsoil. We will present a numerical analysis of the effect of variable preferential domain ratio on subsurface runoff, the simulation results will be qualitatively compared to measured hydrographs at the catchment. We used a combination of physically based macroscopic models S1D and HYPO. In the S1D the dual permeability approach with two coupled Richards equations is used, the simultaneously operating HYPO code is based on a diffusion wave (Boussinesq eq.). The study is based on monitoring of water regime of the cultivated soils on experimental catchment Nucice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic). The soil is classified as Cambisol, texture ranges from loam to clay loam classes. Soil is conservatively tilled till depth of approximately 17 cm, below that a compacted subsoil was

  11. Subsurface flow velocities through selected forest soils, South Island, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosley, M. P.

    1982-02-01

    Subsurface flow through soils in Tawhai, Big Bush and Craigieburn State Forests has been studied by applying water at a line source 1 m upslope from a pit, in the base of which an intercepting trough is located. By measuring lag times between the centres of mass of input and outflow and between the start of input and start of outflow, minimum estimates of mean and maximum flow velocity, V¯ and Vmax, at 51 locations were obtained. Mean values for the Tawhai sites were for V¯ 0.3 cm/s and for Vmax 0.42 cm/s, but a considerable degree of variability was present, with coefficients of variation up to 90%. A number of different pathways through the soil are followed by flowing water; macropore networks (root channels, etc.) are effective transmitters of water and at some sites conveyed up to 40% of the input rapidly to the interception trough. Variability in flow velocity and the proportion of the input appearing as rapid outflow is a function of antecedent moisture conditions and of the relative importance of the various pathways at a given site, which is in turn a function of the characteristics of the soil, the macropore network and the parent material at the base of the soil. At sites where the soil had an open structure and the parent material was shattered or permeable, the macropore network was a less important control upon soil hydrological behavior than where the subsoil had a less open structure and was underlain by impermeable bedrock. Measurements of flow velocities on undisturbed, logged, and logged/burned/planted sites were made at Tawhai SF, but the spatial and temporal variability was such that no statistically significant differences could be discerned. The time lapse since logging may be insufficient for changes in the root systems to be having a hydrological impact, but the high variability would require a sample size of over 1000 to show a significant difference in velocity of even 10%. For rapid flow through macropores to have a significant

  12. Metal contamination in wildlife living near two zinc smelters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.; Pattee, O.H.; Sileo, L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1985-01-01

    Wildlife in an oak forest on Blue Mountain was studied 10 km upwind (Bake Oven Knob site) and 2 km downwind (Palmerton site) of two zinc smelters in eastern Pennsylvania, USA. Previous studies at sites near these smelters had shown changes in populations of soil microflora, lichens, green plants and litter-inhabiting arthropods. The 02 soil litter horizon at Palmerton was heavily contaminated with Pb (2700 mg kg-1), Zn (24000 mg kg-1), and Cd (710 mg kg-1), and to a lesser extent with Cu (440 mg kg-1). Various kinds of invertebrates (earthworms, slugs and millipedes) that feed on soil litter or soil organic matter were rare at, or absent from, the Palmerton site. Those collected at Bake Oven Knob tended to have much higher concentrations of metals than did other invertebrates. Frogs, toads and salamanders were very rare at, or absent from, the Palmerton site, but were present at Bake Oven Knob and at other sites on Blue Mountain farther from the smelters. Metal concentrations (dry wt) in different organisms from Palmerton were compared. Concentrations of Pb were highest in shrews (110 mg kg-1), followed by songbirds (56 mg kg-1), leaves (21 mg kg-1), mice (17 mg kg-1), carrion insects (14 mg kg-1), berries (4.0 mg kg-1), moths (4,3 mg kg-1) and fungi (3.7 mg kg-1). Concentrations of Cd, in contrast, were highest in carrion insects (25 mg kg-1 ),followed by fungi (9.8 mg kg-1), leaves (8.1 mg kg-1), shrews (7.3 mg kg-I), moths (4.9 mg kg-1), mice (2.6 mg kg -1), songbirds (2.5 mg kg -1) and berries (1.2 mg kg-1). Concentrations of Zn and Cu tended to be highest in the same organisms that had the highest concentrations of Cd. Only a small proportion of the metals in the soil became incorporated into plant foliage, and much of the metal contamination detected in the biota probably came from aerial deposition. The mice from both sites seemed to be healthy. Shrews had higher concentrations of metals than did mice, and one shrew showed evidence of Pb poisoning; its red

  13. Kinetics of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine in surface and subsurface agricultural soils in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Tuovinen, Olli H; Deshmukh, Vaidehi; Özkaya, Bestamin; Radosevich, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess atrazine mineralization in surface and subsurface samples retrieved from vertical cores of agricultural soils from two farm sites in Ohio. The Defiance site (NW-Ohio) was on soybean-corn rotation and Piketon (S-Ohio) was on continuous corn cultivation. Both sites had a history of atrazine application for at least a couple of decades. The clay fraction increased at the Defiance site and the organic matter and total N content decreased with depth at both sites. Mineralization of atrazine was assessed by measurement of (14)CO2 during incubation of soil samples with [U-ring-(14)C]-atrazine. Abiotic mineralization was negligible in all soil samples. Aerobic mineralization rate constants declined and the corresponding half-lives increased with depth at the Defiance site. Anaerobic mineralization (supplemented with nitrate) was mostly below the detection at the Defiance site. In Piketon samples, the kinetic parameters of aerobic and anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine displayed considerable scatter among replicate cores and duplicate biometers. In general, this study concludes that data especially for anaerobic biomineralization of atrazine can be more variable as compared to aerobic conditions and cannot be extrapolated from one agricultural site to another.

  14. Effects of soil layering and interfacial tension on DNAPL migration in subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect

    Singletary, M.A.; Pennell, K.D.; Ramsburg, A.

    1999-07-01

    A series of tetrachloroethene (PCE) infiltration experiments was conducted in 2-dimensional aquifer cells to investigate the effects of soil layering and interfacial tension on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) infiltration and entrapment in saturated environments. The aquifer cells were packed with a background medium, 20--30 mesh Ottawa sand, and a single low-permeability layer, consisting of either F-70 Ottawa sand or Wurtsmith aquifer material, located near the center of the cell. PCE was introduced approximately 5 cm below the water table at a constant flow rate of 0.05 ml/min. The results of these experiments demonstrate the dramatic effects that interfacial tension reduction can have on DNAPL flow and entrapment in layered subsurface systems. These findings also have implications during field implementation of surfactant enhanced aquifer remediation (SEAR), in which low interfacial tension surfactant formulations may lead to DNAPL migration into fine layers or previously uncontaminated regions of an aquifer.

  15. Field Validation of the NUFT Code for Subsurface Remediation by Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Nitao, J.J.

    2000-09-23

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is a widely-used method for remediation of contaminants in the unsaturated, or vadose, zone. SVE removes volatile contaminants by extracting gases from the subsurface. The pressure gradients necessary to drive gas flow are limited by at most one atmosphere of vacuum. Therefore, a common adjunct to SVE is the injection of fresh air into the subsurface at a distance from the extraction wells in order to increase overall gas pressure gradients, and, hence, flow rates. SVE has also been used for saturated zone remediation by first pumping the water table down to expose free phase contaminants. The selection of a vadose zone remediation method depends on a variety of site parameters. The type of contaminant is a major factor. Obviously, the selection of SVE as a method makes sense only for volatile contaminants since, otherwise, gas phase transport would be impossible. Bioventing is often a cost-effective candidate for contaminants that biodegrade easily in an aerobic environment, such as petroleum hydrocarbons. Bioventing shares some similarity to SVE, except that the flow rates are usually much lower. Whereas, the main goal of bioventing is to provide oxygen to the micro-organisms that break-down the contaminant; the main goal of SVE is physical removal. Biodegradation may be, for some contaminants, an important side benefit of SVE. However, bioventing and other forms of bioremediation are not considered to be effective for chlorinated vadose zone contaminants, such as trichloroethylene (TCE), which does not biodegrade readily in an aerobic environment. Soil excavation is a viable remediation method for the shallow spills where there are no existing important man-made structures. Otherwise, SVE is often the most appropriate and widely used remediation method for VOC's in the vadose zone.

  16. Application of manure to no-till soils: Phosphorus losses by sub-surface and surface pathways

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Concern over the acceleration of eutrophication by agricultural runoff has focused attention on manure management in no-till. We evaluated losses of phosphorus (P) in sub-surface and surface flow as a function of dairy manure application to no-till soils on a dairy farm in north-central Pennsylvania...