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Sample records for metallic glass composite

  1. Metallic glass composition

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, Donald M.; Koch, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    A metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  2. Microwave Absorbing Properties of Metallic Glass/Polymer Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    Technical Report ARWSB-TR-11022 Microwave Absorbing Properties of Metallic Glass/Polymer Composites Stephen Bartolucci...Technical 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microwave Absorbing Properties of Metallic Glass/Polymer Composites 5a. CONTRACT...this study, the microwave absorption characteristics of metallic glass / polymer composites were investigated. Electromagnetic wave absorption

  3. Metallic glass nanostructures of tunable shape and composition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Liu, Jingbei; Sohn, Sungwoo; Li, Yanglin; Cha, Judy J; Schroers, Jan

    2015-04-22

    Metals of hybrid nano-/microstructures are of broad technological and fundamental interests. Manipulation of shape and composition on the nanoscale, however, is challenging, especially for multicomponent alloys such as metallic glasses. Although top-down approaches have demonstrated nanomoulding, they are limited to very few alloy systems. Here we report a facile method to synthesize metallic glass nanoarchitectures that can be applied to a broad range of glass-forming alloys. This strategy, using multitarget carousel oblique angle deposition, offers the opportunity to achieve control over size, shape and composition of complex alloys at the nanoscale. As a consequence, nanostructures of programmable three-dimensional shapes and tunable compositions are realized on wafer scale for metallic glasses including the marginal glass formers. Realizing nanostructures in a wide compositional range allows chemistry optimization for technological usage of metallic glass nanostructures, and also enables the fundamental study on size, composition and fabrication dependences of metallic glass properties.

  4. Economic manufacturing of bulk metallic glass compositions by microalloying

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    2003-05-13

    A method of making a bulk metallic glass composition includes the steps of:a. providing a starting material suitable for making a bulk metallic glass composition, for example, BAM-11; b. adding at least one impurity-mitigating dopant, for example, Pb, Si, B, Sn, P, to the starting material to form a doped starting material; and c. converting the doped starting material to a bulk metallic glass composition so that the impurity-mitigating dopant reacts with impurities in the starting material to neutralize deleterious effects of the impurities on the formation of the bulk metallic glass composition.

  5. Structure and constitution of glass and steel compound in glass-metal composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubimova, Olga N.; Morkovin, Andrey V.; Dryuk, Sergey A.; Nikiforov, Pavel A.

    2014-11-14

    The research using methods of optical and scanning electronic microscopy was conducted and it discovered common factors on structures and diffusing zone forming after welding glass C49-1 and steel Ct3sp in technological process of creating new glass-metal composite. Different technological modes of steel surface preliminary oxidation welded with and without glass were investigated. The time of welding was varied from minimum encountering time to the time of stabilizing width of diffusion zone.

  6. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, P.T.; Fisher, R.W.; Hosking, F.M.; Zanner, F.J.

    1996-08-20

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone. 6 figs.

  7. Methods of making metallic glass foil laminate composites

    DOEpatents

    Vianco, Paul T.; Fisher, Robert W.; Hosking, Floyd M.; Zanner, Frank J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for the fabrication of a rapidly solidified foil laminate composite. An amorphous metallic glass foil is flux treated and coated with solder. Before solidification of the solder the foil is collected on a take-up spool which forms the composite into a solid annular configuration. The resulting composite exhibits high strength, resiliency and favorable magnetic and electrical properties associated with amorphous materials. The composite also exhibits bonding strength between the foil layers which significantly exceeds the bulk strength of the solder alone.

  8. Electrical conductivity of a bulk metallic glass composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Fujita, T.; Chen, M. W.; Nieh, T. G.; Okada, H.; Koyama, K.; Zhang, W.; Inoue, A.

    2007-10-01

    The authors report the electrical conductivity of a bulk metallic glass (BMG) based composite fabricated by warm extrusion of a mixture of gas-atomized glassy powders and ductile α-brass powders. The conductivity of the BMG composite can be well modeled by the percolation theory and the critical percolation threshold volume of the high-conductive brass phase was estimated to be about 10%. It was found that the short irregular brass fibers can dramatically reduce the resistivity of the BMG, leading to an improved material with both high strength and good conductivity for functional applications.

  9. Composition-dependent metallic glass alloys correlate atomic mobility with collective glass surface dynamics.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc; Zhu, Zhi-Guang; Pringle, Brian; Lyding, Joseph; Wang, Wei-Hua; Gruebele, Martin

    2016-06-22

    Glassy metallic alloys are richly tunable model systems for surface glassy dynamics. Here we study the correlation between atomic mobility, and the hopping rate of surface regions (clusters) that rearrange collectively on a minute to hour time scale. Increasing the proportion of low-mobility copper atoms in La-Ni-Al-Cu alloys reduces the cluster hopping rate, thus establishing a microscopic connection between atomic mobility and dynamics of collective rearrangements at a glass surface made from freshly exposed bulk glass. One composition, La60Ni15Al15Cu10, has a surface resistant to re-crystallization after three heating cycles. When thermally cycled, surface clusters grow in size from about 5 glass-forming units to about 8 glass-forming units, evidence of surface aging without crystal formation, although its bulk clearly forms larger crystalline domains. Such kinetically stable glass surfaces may be of use in applications where glassy coatings stable against heating are needed.

  10. Plastic stability of metallic glass composites under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. F.; Li, S. T.; Zhang, G. A.; Wu, X. F.; Lin, P.

    2013-10-01

    The plastic stability of metallic glass composites (MGCs) under tension was investigated. There exists a critical normalized strain-hardening rate determining the plastic stability of MGCs: if the normalized strain-hardening rate is smaller than the critical normalized strain-hardening rate, the plastic instability occurs, thus, leading to localized plastic strain in MGCs; otherwise the plastic stability is in charge of the plastic deformation of the MGCs, so the strain localization or necking is effectively suppressed, which results in homogeneous elongation in MGCs.

  11. Design of Bulk Metallic Glasses and Glass Matrix Composites Near Intermetallic Composition by the Principle of Competitive Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, G. Z.; Chen, D.

    2016-11-01

    A Cu49Zr51 intermetallic is used as a base for synthesizing metallic glasses and composites with glass matrixes [(Cu49Zr51)100 - x Al x , where x = 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 at.%]. The introduction of aluminum raises the microhardness and the ultimate compressive strength. In addition, the suppression of formation of crystalline phase upon the introduction of 8 at.% Al provides a glass-like structure in alloy (Cu49Zr51)92Al8. The formation of the glass-like structure is discussed within the concept of competitive nucleation of different intermetallics.

  12. Metallic glass composition. [That does not embrittle upon annealing

    DOEpatents

    Kroeger, D.M.; Koch, C.C.

    1984-09-14

    This patent pertains to a metallic glass alloy that is either iron-based or nickel-based or based on a mixture of iron and nickel, containing lesser amounts of elements selected from the group boron, silicon, carbon and phosphorous to which is added an amount of a ductility-enhancing element selected from the group cerium, lanthanum, praseodymium and neodymium sufficient to increase ductility of the metallic glass upon annealing.

  13. Dynamic mechanical properties of a Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jinshan Cui, Jing; Bai, Jie; Kou, Hongchao; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Jichao

    2015-04-21

    Dynamic mechanical behavior of a Ti{sub 50}Zr{sub 20}Nb{sub 12}Cu{sub 5}Be{sub 13} bulk metallic glass composite was investigated using mechanical spectroscopy in both temperature and frequency domains. Storage modulus G′ and loss modulus G″ are determined by temperature, and three distinct regions corresponding to different states in the bulk metallic glass composite are characterized. Physical parameters, such as atomic mobility and correlation factor χ, are introduced to analyze dynamic mechanical behavior of the bulk metallic glass composite in the framework of quasi-point defects (QPD) model. The experimental results are in good agreement with the prediction of QPD model.

  14. Flow and Fracture of Bulk Metallic Glass Alloys and their Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, K M; Suh, D; Howell, R; Asoka-Kumar, P; Dauskardt, R H

    2001-06-20

    The fracture and plastic deformation mechanisms of a Zr-Ti-Ni-Cu-Be bulk metallic glass and a composite utilizing a crystalline reinforcement phase are reviewed. The relationship between stress state, free volume and shear band formation are discussed. Positron annihilation techniques were used to confirm the predicted increase in free volume after plastic straining. Strain localization and failure were examined for a wide range of stress states. Finally, methods for toughening metallic glasses are considered. Significant increases in toughness are demonstrated for a composite bulk metallic glass containing a ductile second phase which stabilizes shear band formation and distributes plastic deformation.

  15. Bulk metallic glasses and their composites: Composition optimization, thermal stability, and microstructural tunability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Hesham Ezzat

    A design protocol utilizing common elements for bulk metallic glass formation has been employed to develop novel, low cost Fe-, and Ti- based bulk metallic glasses. A critical obstacle that was successfully overcome in this work is the omission of beryllium in these alloys. Beryllium is of vital importance in many bulk metallic glass forming systems, but it is expensive and poses considerable health risks. Bulk metallic glasses in these novel Fe-, and Ti-based systems exhibit extremely high mechanical strength and excellent thermal stability. Devitrification and cooling rate experiments were used to identify crystalline phase formation and assess activation energy for crystallization, as well as to explore and develop ductile BMG composites. To better control microstructure in these BMG composites, a novel processing technique, called semi-solid forging was developed, wherein the alloy melt is heated to above the melt temperature of the glass, but below the melt temperature of the ductile crystalline phase. Such an approach permits the maintenance of a glassy, or nanocrystalline matrix phase, while simultaneously coarsening and homogenizing the ductile, secondary phase. This processing approach leads to enhanced ductility in the alloys, which, to this point, has not been observed using conventional casting methods. The combination of novel, low-cost, alloy compositions with semi-solid forging has been successfully utilized to develop new high strength structural materials with enhanced ductility and toughness. Microstrutural and mechanical properties of these novel, toughened, BMG composites are presented. A comprehensive analysis of the relationship between deformation mechanisms and microstructure reveals that enhanced ductility is predicated on matching fundamental mechanical and microstructural length scales in a Ti-Ni-Si-Mo BMG composite. Under optimized microstructural conditions, a maximum compressive strength exceeding 2400 MPa with ˜ 30% total strain to

  16. Three-dimensional imaging of shear bands in bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A H; Araullo-Peters, V; Gibbons, M; Restrepo, O D; Niezgoda, S R; Windl, W; Flores, K M; Hofmann, D C; Marquis, E A

    2016-12-01

    The mechanism of the increase in ductility in bulk metallic glass matrix composites over monolithic bulk metallic glasses is to date little understood, primarily because the interplay between dislocations in the crystalline phase and shear bands in the glass could neither be imaged nor modelled in a validated way. To overcome this roadblock, we show that shear bands can be imaged in three dimensions by atom probe tomography from density variations in the reconstructed atomic density, which density-functional theory suggests being a local-work function effect. Imaging of near-interface shear bands in Ti48 Zr20 V12 Cu5 Be15 bulk metallic glass matrix composite permits measurement of their composition, thickness, branching and interactions with the dendrite interface. These results confirm that shear bands here nucleate from stress concentrations in the glass due to intense, localized plastic deformation in the dendrites rather than intrinsic structural inhomogeneities.

  17. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-04-12

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  19. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  20. Compositional landscape for glass formation in metal alloys.

    PubMed

    Na, Jong Hyun; Demetriou, Marios D; Floyd, Michael; Hoff, Andrew; Garrett, Glenn R; Johnson, William L

    2014-06-24

    A high-resolution compositional map of glass-forming ability (GFA) in the Ni-Cr-Nb-P-B system is experimentally determined along various compositional planes. GFA is shown to be a piecewise continuous function formed by intersecting compositional subsurfaces, each associated with a nucleation pathway for a specific crystalline phase. Within each subsurface, GFA varies exponentially with composition, wheres exponential cusps in GFA are observed when crossing from one crystallization pathway to another. The overall GFA is shown to peak at multiple exponential hypercusps that are interconnected by ridges. At these compositions, quenching from the high-temperature melt yields glassy rods with diameters exceeding 1 cm, whereas for compositions far from these cusps the critical rod diameter drops precipitously and levels off to 1 to 2 mm. The compositional landscape of GFA is shown to arise primarily from an interplay between the thermodynamics and kinetics of crystal nucleation, or more precisely, from a competition between driving force for crystallization and liquid fragility.

  1. Soft magnetic composites manufactured by warm co-extrusion of bulk metallic glass and steel powders

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Francis; Raber, Thomas R.; Zabala, Robert J.; Buresh, Steve J.; Tanico, Brian

    2013-05-07

    Soft magnetic composites of Fe-based bulk metallic glass and low-alloy steel have been manufactured by warm co-extrusion of precursor powders at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region of the glass. Composites were manufactured with amorphous volume fractions of 75%, 67%, and 100%. Full consolidation of the constituent powders was observed with the bulk metallic glass remaining substantially amorphous. The composite electrical resistivity was observed to be anisotropic with a resistivity of 79 {mu}{Omega} cm measured transverse to the extrusion axis in a sample with 75% amorphous volume fraction. A 0-3 connectivity pattern with the low-resistivity steel phase embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected high-resistivity bulk metallic glass phase was observed with scanning electron microscopy. This confirms that the flow characteristics of the bulk metallic glass and the steel powders were comparable during extrusion at these temperatures. The saturation magnetization of 1.3 T was consistent with the volume weighted average of the saturation magnetization of the two phases. A relatively high quasistatic coercivity of 8 Oe was measured and is likely due to slight crystallization of the bulk metallic glass as well as domain wall pinning at prior particle boundaries. Careful control of the thermal environment during the extrusion process is required to minimize glass crystallization and achieve the desired balance of magnetic and electrical properties.

  2. Soft magnetic composites manufactured by warm co-extrusion of bulk metallic glass and steel powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Francis; Raber, Thomas R.; Zabala, Robert J.; Buresh, Steve J.; Tanico, Brian

    2013-05-01

    Soft magnetic composites of Fe-based bulk metallic glass and low-alloy steel have been manufactured by warm co-extrusion of precursor powders at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region of the glass. Composites were manufactured with amorphous volume fractions of 75%, 67%, and 100%. Full consolidation of the constituent powders was observed with the bulk metallic glass remaining substantially amorphous. The composite electrical resistivity was observed to be anisotropic with a resistivity of 79 μΩ cm measured transverse to the extrusion axis in a sample with 75% amorphous volume fraction. A 0-3 connectivity pattern with the low-resistivity steel phase embedded in a 3-dimensionally connected high-resistivity bulk metallic glass phase was observed with scanning electron microscopy. This confirms that the flow characteristics of the bulk metallic glass and the steel powders were comparable during extrusion at these temperatures. The saturation magnetization of 1.3 T was consistent with the volume weighted average of the saturation magnetization of the two phases. A relatively high quasistatic coercivity of 8 Oe was measured and is likely due to slight crystallization of the bulk metallic glass as well as domain wall pinning at prior particle boundaries. Careful control of the thermal environment during the extrusion process is required to minimize glass crystallization and achieve the desired balance of magnetic and electrical properties.

  3. Computation assisted design of favored composition for ternary Mg-Cu-Y metallic glass formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Li, J H; Liu, B X

    2015-06-14

    With the aid of ab initio calculations, a realistic interatomic potential was constructed for the Mg-Cu-Y ternary system under the proposed formalism of smoothed and long-range second-moment approximation of tight-binding. Taking the potential as the starting base, an atomistic computation/simulation route was developed for designing favored and optimized compositions for Mg-Cu-Y metallic glass formation. Simulations revealed that the physical origin of metallic glass formation is the collapse of crystalline lattice when solute concentration exceeds a critical value, thus leading to predict a hexagonal region in the Mg-Cu-Y composition triangle, within which metallic glass formation is energetically favored. It is proposed that the hexagonal region can be defined as the intrinsic glass formation region, or quantitative glass formation ability of the system. Inside the hexagonal region, the driving force for formation of each specific glassy alloy was further calculated and correlated with its forming ability in practice. Calculations pinpointed the optimized stoichiometry in the Mg-Cu-Y system to be Mg64Cu16Y20, at which the formation driving force reaches its maximum, suggesting that metallic glasses designed to have compositions around Mg64Cu16Y20 are most stable or easiest to obtain. The predictions derived directly from the atomistic simulations are supported by experimental observations reported so far in the literature. Furthermore, Honeycutt-Anderson analysis indicated that pentagonal bipyramids (although not aggregating to form icosahedra) dominate in the local structure of the Mg-Cu-Y metallic glasses. A microscopic picture of the medium-range packing can then be described as an extended network of the pentagonal bipyramids, entangled with the fourfold and sixfold disclination lines, jointly fulfilling the space of the metallic glasses.

  4. Research of structure, mechanical and operation properties of glass-metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, O. N.; Lyubimov, E. V.; Solonenko, E. P.; Morkovin, A. V.; Dryuk, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The technological bases for the creation of the new structural material—glass-metal composite—are explored in this paper. Properties of the new material: structure and properties of the contact zone of glass and steel, tensile strength under static and dynamic loading, corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance under abrasive wear in the corrosive environment are theoretically and experimentally studied. The limit of thermal stability for experimental composite specimens equals 440°C. Corrosion tests show that the corrosion acceleration is the same for all composite specimens and does not depend on the solution concentration and the initial specimen weight. Steel specimens show significant changes in geometrical characteristics in comparison with composite specimens. Its prospect and ability to compete with steel is proved. The practical application is proposed for glass-metal composite rods.

  5. Low beryllium content Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite with plasticity and work hardenability

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Q. E-mail: dujuan@nimte.ac.cn; Du, J. E-mail: dujuan@nimte.ac.cn

    2014-01-28

    A modified Zr-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite Zr{sub 47.67}Cu{sub 40}Ti{sub 3.66}Ni{sub 2.66}Be{sub 6} has been produced by increasing the contents of elements of Zr and Cu with higher Poisson ratio and reducing the contents of Ti, Ni, and Be elements with lower Poisson ratio based on famous metallic glass former Vitreloy 1. A compressive yielding strength of 1804 MPa, fracture strength of 1938 MPa and 3.5% plastic strain was obtained for obtained metallic glass composite. Also, work-hardening behavior was observed during compressive experiment which was ascribed to the interaction of the in situ precipitated CuZr phase and shear bands.

  6. Fracture Morphology and Local Deformation Characteristics in the Metallic Glass Matrix Composite Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. S.; Sun, X. H.; Hao, G. J.; Guo, Z. X.; Zhang, Y.; Lin, J. P.; Sui, M. L.; Qiao, J. W.

    2017-04-01

    Fracture and deformation characteristics of the Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite have been studied by the tensile test and the in situ TEM tension test. Typically, the composite exhibits the high strength and considerable plasticity. Microscopically, it was found that shear deformation zone formed at the crack tip in glass phase, which can bring about quick propagation of shear bands. However, the plastic deformation zone nearby the crack tip in dendrites will postpone or retard the crack extension by dislocations. The attributions of micro-deformations to mechanical properties of composites were discussed.

  7. Fibre-matrix bond strength studies of glass, ceramic, and metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grande, D. H.; Mandell, J. F.; Hong, K. C. C.

    1988-01-01

    An indentation test technique for compressively loading the ends of individual fibers to produce debonding has been applied to metal, glass, and glass-ceramic matrix composites; bond strength values at debond initiation are calculated using a finite-element model. Results are correlated with composite longitudinal and interlaminar shear behavior for carbon and Nicalon fiber-reinforced glasses and glass-ceramics including the effects of matrix modifications, processing conditions, and high-temperature oxidation embrittlement. The data indicate that significant bonding to improve off-axis and shear properties can be tolerated before the longitudinal behavior becomes brittle. Residual stress and other mechanical bonding effects are important, but improved analyses and multiaxial interfacial failure criteria are needed to adequately interpret bond strength data in terms of composite performance.

  8. Optical properties of dy doped lead and bismuth borate glasses - effect of glass composition, metal and semiconducting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Hio Giap

    The optical properties of Dy3+ ions in lead borate and bismuth borate glasses are studied as a function of glass composition with PbO content (29.5 to 69.5mol%) and Bi2O3 content (29.5 to 59.5 mol%). We also studied the effect of metal and semiconducting nanoparticles on the absorption and fluorescence emission of Dy3+ ions in both lead and bismuth borate glasses. The absorption coefficient at each wavelength is obtained from the optical absorption spectrum of a glass sample, and the number density of rare-earth (RE) ions is calculated from the measurement of the glass density. These two parameters are then used to calculate the oscillator strength of each transition using Judd-Ofelt theory. Using the oscillator strength for each transition, we obtained the intensity parameters which represent changes in the symmetry of the ligand field at the Dy 3+ site (due to structural group changes and changes in Dy-O covalency). Radiative transition probabilities, the radiative lifetime of the excited states and the branching ratios are then obtained from these intensity parameters. The fluorescence spectra, obtained using 355 nm and 458 nm laser excitation, are analyzed by determining the area ratio of yellow/blue (Y/B) peaks and the wavelength of the hypersensitive transition (HST). The compositional dependence and effect of nanoparticles on the stimulated emission cross-section (sigmap), are then evaluated using radiative transition probability, the refractive index of the host glass, effective fluorescence linewidth, and the position of the band. In all of the glass systems, it was found that the optical properties are strongly influenced by structural changes arising from compositional variation and size of nanoparticles. Dy 3+ transitions exhibit large sigmap suggesting the possible utilization of these materials in laser applications.

  9. Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites for Optical and Compliant Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Agnes, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms are used widely in engineering applications due to their ability to translate force and movement. They are found in kinematic pairs, gears, cams, linkages, and in flexure mechanisms (also known as compliant mechanisms). Mechanisms and flexures are used widely in spacecraft design, especially in the area of optics, where precise positioning of telescope mirrors requires elastic flexing of elements. A compliant mechanism is generally defined as a flexible mechanism that uses an elastic body deformation to cause a displacement (such as positing a mirror). The mechanisms are usually constructed as a single monolithic piece of material, and contain thin struts to allow for large elastic bending with low input force. This creates the largest problem with developing precise mechanisms; they must be fabricated from a single piece of metal, but are required to have strict accuracy on their dimensions. They are generally required to have high strength, elasticity, and low coefficient of thermal expansion.

  10. Composition mediated serration dynamics in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Qiao, J. W. E-mail: mwchen@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp; Wang, B. C.; Xu, B. S.; Tian, H.; Sun, B. A.; Chen, M. W. E-mail: mwchen@wpi-aimr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-11-16

    The composition mediated serration dynamics in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated by statistics analyses of the elastic-energy density, and free volumes during shear-banding are beneficial to understand serrated-flow behavior. The amplitude and elastic-energy density display a gradually increasing and then decreasing trend with increasing the content of Zr. It is based on the free-volume theory describing the atomic-level structure of ternary Zr-Cu-Al BMGs. The good agreement between the molecular dynamics simulation and experimental results provides evidence for the variation of free volumes as the elementary mechanism of composition mediated serration dynamics.

  11. Composition mediated serration dynamics in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Qiao, J. W.; Tian, H.; Sun, B. A.; Wang, B. C.; Xu, B. S.; Chen, M. W.

    2015-11-01

    The composition mediated serration dynamics in Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated by statistics analyses of the elastic-energy density, and free volumes during shear-banding are beneficial to understand serrated-flow behavior. The amplitude and elastic-energy density display a gradually increasing and then decreasing trend with increasing the content of Zr. It is based on the free-volume theory describing the atomic-level structure of ternary Zr-Cu-Al BMGs. The good agreement between the molecular dynamics simulation and experimental results provides evidence for the variation of free volumes as the elementary mechanism of composition mediated serration dynamics.

  12. Microyielding of core-shell crystal dendrites in a bulk-metallic-glass matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E. -Wen; Qiao, Junwei; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Lee, Wen -Jay; Scheel, Mario; Chuang, Chih -Pin; Liaw, Peter K.; Lo, Yu -Chieh; Zhang, Yong; Di Michiel, Marco

    2014-03-18

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray experiments have been used to follow the evolution of the diffraction peaks for crystalline dendrites embedded in a bulk metallic glass matrix subjected to a compressive loading-unloading cycle. We observe irreversible diffraction-peak splitting even though the load does not go beyond half of the bulk yield strength. The chemical analysis coupled with the transmission electron microscopy mapping suggests that the observed peak splitting originates from the chemical heterogeneity between the core (major peak) and the stiffer shell (minor peak) of the dendrites. A molecular dynamics model has been developed to compare the hkl-dependent microyielding of the bulk metallic-glass matrix composite. As a result, the complementary diffraction measurements and the simulation results suggest that the interfaces between the amorphous matrix and the (211) crystalline planes relax under prolonged load that causes a delay in the reload curve which ultimately catches up with the original path.

  13. Polyamorphism in metalic glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, H. W.; Liu, H. Z.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Wen, J.; Lee, P.L.; Luo, W.K.; Shastri, S.D.; Ma, E.; X-Ray Science Division; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Chinese Academy of Sciences

    2007-03-01

    A metal, or an alloy, can often exist in more than one crystal structure. The face-centered-cubic and body-centered-cubic forms of iron (or steel) are a familiar example of such polymorphism. When metallic materials are made in the amorphous form, is a parallel 'polyamorphism' possible? So far, polyamorphic phase transitions in the glassy state have been observed only in glasses involving directional and open (such as tetrahedral) coordination environments. Here, we report an in situ X-ray diffraction observation of a pressure-induced transition between two distinct amorphous polymorphs in a Ce{sub 55}Al{sub 45} metallic glass. The large density difference observed between the two polyamorphs is attributed to their different electronic and atomic structures, in particular the bond shortening revealed by ab initio modeling of the effects of f-electron delocalization. This discovery offers a new perspective of the amorphous state of metals, and has implications for understanding the structure, evolution and properties of metallic glasses and related liquids. Our work also opens a new avenue towards technologically useful amorphous alloys that are compositionally identical but with different thermodynamic, functional and rheological properties due to different bonding and structural characteristics.

  14. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  15. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Sun, X H; Qiao, J W; Jiao, Z M; Wang, Z H; Yang, H J; Xu, B S

    2015-09-10

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  16. Effect of chemical composition on the shock response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. D.; Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Eakins, D.; Chapman, D. J.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with nominal compositions of Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38. Velocity interferometry was used to measure the free surface velocity (FSV) histories. These measurements allowed calculation of the Hugoniot elastic limits and onset stresses of fracture (i.e. spall strength) for each alloy. The soft recovered specimens were fully characterized by means of optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, within the BMGs during shock loading. These changes were then correlated to the differences in strength and ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology.

  17. Plasticity-improved Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass matrix composites containing martensite phase

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Y.F.; Wei, B.C.; Wang, Y.R.; Li, W.H.; Cheung, T.L.; Shek, C.H.

    2005-08-01

    Zr{sub 48.5}Cu{sub 46.5}Al{sub 5} bulk metallic glass matrix composites with diameters of 3 and 4 mm were produced through water-cooled copper mold casting. Micrometer-sized bcc based B2 structured CuZr phase containing martensite plate, together with some densely distributed nanocrystalline Zr{sub 2}Cu and plate-like Cu{sub 10}Zr{sub 7} compound, was found embedded in a glassy matrix. The microstructure formation strongly depends on the composition and cooling rate. Room temperature compression tests reveal significant strain hardening and plastic strains of 7.7% and 6.4% before failure are obtained for the 3-mm- and 4-mm-diam samples, respectively. The formation of the martensite phase is proposed to contribute to the strain hardening and plastic deformation of the materials.

  18. Microyielding of core-shell crystal dendrites in a bulk-metallic-glass matrix composite

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, E. -Wen; Qiao, Junwei; Winiarski, Bartlomiej; ...

    2014-03-18

    In-situ synchrotron x-ray experiments have been used to follow the evolution of the diffraction peaks for crystalline dendrites embedded in a bulk metallic glass matrix subjected to a compressive loading-unloading cycle. We observe irreversible diffraction-peak splitting even though the load does not go beyond half of the bulk yield strength. The chemical analysis coupled with the transmission electron microscopy mapping suggests that the observed peak splitting originates from the chemical heterogeneity between the core (major peak) and the stiffer shell (minor peak) of the dendrites. A molecular dynamics model has been developed to compare the hkl-dependent microyielding of the bulkmore » metallic-glass matrix composite. As a result, the complementary diffraction measurements and the simulation results suggest that the interfaces between the amorphous matrix and the (211) crystalline planes relax under prolonged load that causes a delay in the reload curve which ultimately catches up with the original path.« less

  19. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGES

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; ...

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  20. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  1. Ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new zinc-phosphate glass/metal composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaroufi, A.; Oabi, O.; Lucas, B.

    2016-07-01

    The ac-conductivity and dielectric response of new composites based on zinc-phosphate glass with composition 45 mol%ZnO-55 mol%P2O5, filled with metallic powder of nickel (ZP/Ni) were investigated by impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 100 Hz to 1 MHz at room temperature. A high percolating jump of seven times has been observed in the conductivity behavior from low volume fraction of filler to the higher fractions, indicating an insulator - semiconductor phase transition. The measured conductivity at higher filler volume fraction is about 10-1 S/cm and is frequency independent, while, the obtained conductivity for low filler volume fraction is around 10-8 S/cm and is frequency dependent. Moreover, the elaborated composites are characterized by high dielectric constants in the range of 105 for conductive composites at low frequencies (100 Hz). In addition, the distribution of the relaxation processes was also evaluated. The Debye, Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole and Havriliak-Negami models in electric modulus formalism were used to model the observed relaxation phenomena in ZP/Ni composites. The observed relaxation phenomena are fairly simulated by Davidson-Cole model, and an account of the interpretation of results is given.

  2. Revealing homogeneous plastic deformation in dendrite-reinforced Ti-based metallic glass composites under tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, F. F.; Wei, J. S.; Chan, K. C.; Chen, S. H.; Zhao, R. D.; Zhang, G. A.; Wu, X. F.

    2017-02-01

    The tensile plastic deformation of dendrite-reinforced Ti-based metallic glass composites (MGCs) was investigated. It was found that there is a critical normalized strain-hardening rate (NSHR) that determines the plastic stability of MGCs: if the NSHR is larger than the critical value, the plastic deformation of the MGCs will be stable, i.e. the necking and strain localization can be effectively suppressed, resulting in homogeneous plastic elongation. In addition, dendrite-reinforce MGCs are verified as being intrinsically ductile, and can be used as good coatings for improving the surface properties of pure titanium or titanium alloys. These findings are helpful in designing, producing, and using MGCs with improved performance properties.

  3. Dynamic Deformation Behaviors of an In Situ Ti-Based Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Wu, R. F.; Zhang, T. W.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors, fracture characteristics, and microstructural evolution of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti50Zr20V10Cu5Be15 within a wide range of strain rates are investigated. Compared with the quasi-static compression, the yielding stress increases, but the macroscopic plasticity significantly decreases upon dynamic compression. The effects of the strain rate on strain hardening upon quasi-static loading and flow stress upon dynamic loading are evaluated, respectively. The Zerilli-Armstrong (Z-A) model based on dendrite-dominated mechanism is employed to further uncover the dependence of the yielding stress on the strain rate.

  4. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Z. K.; Fu, H. M.; Sha, P. F.; Zhu, Z. W.; Wang, A. M.; Li, H.; Zhang, H. W.; Zhang, H. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2015-03-01

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  5. Atomic interaction mechanism for designing the interface of W/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Z K; Fu, H M; Sha, P F; Zhu, Z W; Wang, A M; Li, H; Zhang, H W; Zhang, H F; Hu, Z Q

    2015-03-11

    The interaction between active element Zr and W damages the W fibers and the interface and decreases the mechanical properties, especially the tensile strength of the W fibers reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs). From the viewpoint of atomic interaction, the W-Zr interaction can be restrained by adding minor elements that have stronger interaction with W into the alloy. The calculation about atomic interaction energy indicates that Ta and Nb preferred to segregate on the W substrate surface. Sessile drop experiment proves the prediction and corresponding in-situ coating appears at the interface. Besides, the atomic interaction mechanism was proven to be effective in many other systems by the sessile drop technique. Considering the interfacial morphology, Nb was added into the alloy to fabricate W/Zr-based BMGCs. As expected, the Nb addition effectively suppressed the W-Zr reaction and damage to W fibers. Both the compressive and tensile properties are improved obviously.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Low-Velocity Repeated Impacts on Glass Fiber Metal Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajkumar, G. R.; Krishna, M.; Narasimha Murthy, H. N.; Sharma, S. C.; Vishnu Mahesh, K. R.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to experimentally investigate the effect of repeated low-velocity impacts on tensile strength of fiber metal laminates (FMLs) using instrumented drop weight impact tester. FMLs were fabricated layer by layer intercalating three layers of aluminum 6061 and two layers of glass fiber-reinforced epoxy. The FMLs were subjected to repeated low-velocity impacts (<10 m/s) at the same location on the FML. The degradation of mechanical property due to impact(s) was studied using Zwick UTM at distances of 0, 20, 40, and 60 mm from the impact point. Results indicate that ultimate tensile strength, failure strain, and ductility of all specimens initially decrease, and then remain constant with increase in number of impacts. A closer examination of impacted FML by scanning electron microscope indicates that thinning and shear fracture in aluminum layers, as well as delamination, and fiber failure in composites plies were present.

  7. Revealing homogeneous plastic deformation in dendrite-reinforced Ti-based metallic glass composites under tension

    PubMed Central

    Wu, F. F.; Wei, J. S.; Chan, K. C.; Chen, S. H.; Zhao, R. D.; Zhang, G. A.; Wu, X. F.

    2017-01-01

    The tensile plastic deformation of dendrite-reinforced Ti-based metallic glass composites (MGCs) was investigated. It was found that there is a critical normalized strain-hardening rate (NSHR) that determines the plastic stability of MGCs: if the NSHR is larger than the critical value, the plastic deformation of the MGCs will be stable, i.e. the necking and strain localization can be effectively suppressed, resulting in homogeneous plastic elongation. In addition, dendrite-reinforce MGCs are verified as being intrinsically ductile, and can be used as good coatings for improving the surface properties of pure titanium or titanium alloys. These findings are helpful in designing, producing, and using MGCs with improved performance properties. PMID:28195216

  8. Shock Wave Response of Iron-based In Situ Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Khanolkar, Gauri R.; Rauls, Michael B.; Kelly, James P.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Hodge, Andrea M.; Eliasson, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    The response of amorphous steels to shock wave compression has been explored for the first time. Further, the effect of partial devitrification on the shock response of bulk metallic glasses is examined by conducting experiments on two iron-based in situ metallic glass matrix composites, containing varying amounts of crystalline precipitates, both with initial composition Fe49.7Cr17.7Mn1.9Mo7.4W1.6B15.2C3.8Si2.4. The samples, designated SAM2X5-600 and SAM2X5-630, are X-ray amorphous and partially crystalline, respectively, due to differences in sintering parameters during sample preparation. Shock response is determined by making velocity measurements using interferometry techniques at the rear free surface of the samples, which have been subjected to impact from a high-velocity projectile launched from a powder gun. Experiments have yielded results indicating a Hugoniot Elastic Limit (HEL) to be 8.58 ± 0.53 GPa for SAM2X5-600 and 11.76 ± 1.26 GPa for SAM2X5-630. The latter HEL result is higher than elastic limits for any BMG reported in the literature thus far. SAM2X5-600 catastrophically loses post-yield strength whereas SAM2X5-630, while showing some strain-softening, retains strength beyond the HEL. The presence of crystallinity within the amorphous matrix is thus seen to significantly aid in strengthening the material as well as preserving material strength beyond yielding. PMID:26932846

  9. Microstructural Control via Copious Nucleation Manipulated by In Situ Formed Nucleants: Large-Sized and Ductile Metallic Glass Composites.

    PubMed

    Song, Wenli; Wu, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Xiongjun; Chen, Houwen; Guo, Zhenxi; Lu, Zhaoping

    2016-10-01

    A novel strategy to control the precipitation behavior of the austenitic phase, and to obtain large-sized, transformation-induced, plasticity-reinforced bulk metallic glass matrix composites, with good tensile properties, is proposed. By inducing heterogeneous nucleation of the transformable reinforcement via potent nucleants formed in situ, the characteristics of the austenitic phase are well manipulated.

  10. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, Lisha; T, Hysen; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  11. Exchange bias in zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB based metallic glass composite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    R, Lisha; P, Geetha; B, Aravind P.; Anantharaman, M. R.; T, Hysen; Ojha, S.; Avasthi, D. K.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2015-06-24

    The Exchange bias phenomenon and methods to manipulate the bias field in a controlled manner are thrust areas in magnetism due to its sophisticated theoretical concepts as well as advanced technological utility in the field of spintronics. The Exchange bias effect is observed as a result of ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) exchange interaction, usually observed as a loop shift on field cooling below the Neel temperature of AFM. In the present study, we have chosen zinc ferrite which is a well known antiferromagnet, and FeNiMoB based metallic glass as the ferromagnet. The films were prepared by RF sputtering technique. The thickness and composition was obtained by RBS. The magnetic studies using SQUID VSM indicate exchange bias effect in the system. The effect of thermal annealing on exchange bias effect was studied. The observed exchange bias in the zinc ferrite-FeNiMoB system is not due to FM-AFM coupling but due to spin glass-ferromagnetic interaction.

  12. Phase formation and mechanical properties of Cu-Zr-Ti bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Byoung Jin; Yun, Young Su; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the type of the crystalline phase and its volume fraction on the mechanical property of Cu50Zr50-xTix alloys (x = 0-10) bulk metallic glass composites has been investigated in this study. Up to 6 at% of Ti, B19' phase particles distributed in the glassy matrix, while at 8 and 10% of Ti, B2 phase particles are retained in the glass matrix due to suppression of the eutectoid transformation of B2 phase and by avoidance of martensitic transformation of B2 into B19'. The volume fraction of crystalline phase is strongly dependent on the cooling rate. The larger volume fraction of the crystalline phases results in the lower yield stress, the higher plastic strain, and the more pronounced work hardening behavior. At the crystalline volume fraction below 30%, the variation of the yield strength can be described by the rule of mixture model (ROM), while at the crystalline volume fraction higher than 50% by the load-bearing model (LBM). At the crystal fractions between 30 and 50%, there is a yield strength drop and a transition from the ROM to the LBM. This transition is due to the formation of the crystalline structural framework at higher crystal fraction.

  13. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-02-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties.

  14. Local melting to design strong and plastically deformable bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yue-Sheng; Han, Xiao-Liang; Song, Kai-Kai; Tian, Yu-Hao; Peng, Chuan-Xiao; Wang, Li; Sun, Bao-An; Wang, Gang; Kaban, Ivan; Eckert, Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    Recently, CuZr-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composites reinforced by the TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) effect have been explored in attempt to accomplish an optimal of trade-off between strength and ductility. However, the design of such BMG composites with advanced mechanical properties still remains a big challenge for materials engineering. In this work, we proposed a technique of instantaneously and locally arc-melting BMG plate to artificially induce the precipitation of B2 crystals in the glassy matrix and then to tune mechanical properties. Through adjusting local melting process parameters (i.e. input powers, local melting positions, and distances between the electrode and amorphous plate), the size, volume fraction, and distribution of B2 crystals were well tailored and the corresponding formation mechanism was clearly clarified. The resultant BMG composites exhibit large compressive plasticity and high strength together with obvious work-hardening ability. This compelling approach could be of great significance for the steady development of metastable CuZr-based alloys with excellent mechanical properties. PMID:28211890

  15. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Johnson, W.L.

    1998-04-07

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3}K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf){sub a}(Al,Zn){sub b}(Ti,Nb){sub c}(Cu{sub x}Fe{sub y}(Ni,Co){sub z}){sub d} wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d{hor_ellipsis}y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  16. Quinary metallic glass alloys

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Johnson, William L.

    1998-01-01

    At least quinary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise zirconium and/or hafnium in the range of 45 to 65 atomic percent, titanium and/or niobium in the range of 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, and aluminum and/or zinc in the range of 5 to 15 atomic percent. The balance of the alloy compositions comprise copper, iron, and cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is constrained such that the atomic percentage of iron is less than 10 percent. Further, the ratio of copper to nickel and/or cobalt is in the range of from 1:2 to 2:1. The alloy composition formula is: (Zr,Hf).sub.a (Al,Zn).sub.b (Ti,Nb).sub.c (Cu.sub.x Fe.sub.y (Ni,Co).sub.z).sub.d wherein the constraints upon the formula are: a ranges from 45 to 65 atomic percent, b ranges from 5 to 15 atomic percent, c ranges from 4 to 7.5 atomic percent, d comprises the balance, d.multidot.y is less than 10 atomic percent, and x/z ranges from 0.5 to 2.

  17. Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Roberts, Scott; Kozachkov, Henry; Demetriou, Marios D.; Schramm, Joseph P.; Johnson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a class of amorphous metals defined as having a thickness greater than 1 mm, are being broadly investigated by NASA for use in spacecraft hardware. Their unique properties, attained from their non-crystalline structure, motivate several game-changing aerospace applications. BMGs have low melting temperatures so they can be cheaply and repeatedly cast into complex net shapes, such as mirrors or electronic casings. They are extremely strong and wear-resistant, which motivates their use in gears and bearings. Amorphous metal coatings are hard, corrosion-resistant, and have high reflectivity. BMG composites, reinforced with soft second phases, can be fabricated into energy-absorbing cellular panels for orbital debris shielding. One limitation of BMG materials is their inability to be welded, bonded, brazed, or fastened in a convenient method to form larger structures. Cellular structures (which can be classified as trusses, foams, honeycombs, egg boxes, etc.) are useful for many NASA, commercial, and military aerospace applications, including low-density paneling and shields. Although conventional cellular structures exhibit high specific strength, their porous structures make them challenging to fabricate. In particular, metal cellular structures are extremely difficult to fabricate due to their high processing temperatures. Aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels, for example, are used widely as spacecraft shields due to their low density and ease of fabrication, but suffer from low strength. A desirable metal cellular structure is one with high strength, combined with low density and simple fabrication. The thermoplastic joining process described here allows for the fabrication of monolithic BMG truss-like structures that are 90% porous and have no heat-affected zone, weld, bond, or braze. This is accomplished by welding the nodes of stacked BMG composite panels using a localized capacitor discharge, forming a single monolithic structure

  18. A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  19. Effects of chemical composition on the shock response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, J. P.; Chapman, D. J.; Laws, K. J.; Brown, A. D.; Wang, F.; Eakins, D.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.

    2017-01-01

    The effect chemical composition on the shock response of two bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu10Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al8) has been investigated. Plate-impact experiments were conducted at a peak compressive stress of ˜10GPa, above the expected elastic limit of these alloys (˜7GPa). Velocity interferometry was used to measure the particle (up) and free surface velocity (FSV) histories. These measurements allowed calculation of the Hugoniot elastic limits and onset stresses of fracture (i.e. spall strength) for each alloy. The soft recovered specimens were characterized by means of optical and electron microscopy. It was found that the Zr55Cu10Ni5Al30 exhibited a higher HEL and spall strength and a smooth fracture surface morphology consisting of dimple-like features. Conversely, the lower spall strength of the Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38 alloy seems to correlate with rougher fracture surface that shows cup-cone features associated with a predominantly brittle dynamic fracture.

  20. Non-Magnetic, Tough, Corrosion- and Wear-Resistant Knives From Bulk Metallic Glasses and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Douglas C.; Potter, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Quality knives are typically fabricated from high-strength steel alloys. Depending on the application, there are different requirements for mechanical and physical properties that cause problems for steel alloys. For example, diver's knives are generally used in salt water, which causes rust in steel knives. Titanium diver's knives are a popular alternative due to their salt water corrosion resistance, but are too soft to maintain a sharp cutting edge. Steel knives are also magnetic, which is undesirable for military applications where the knives are used as a tactical tool for diffusing magnetic mines. Steel is also significantly denser than titanium (8 g/cu cm vs. 4.5 g/cu cm), which results in heavier knives for the same size. Steel is hard and wear-resistant, compared with titanium, and can keep a sharp edge during service. A major drawback of both steel and titanium knives is that they must be ground or machined into the final knife shape from a billet. Since most knives have a mirrored surface and a complex shape, manufacturing them is complex. It would be more desirable if the knife could be cast into a net or near-net shape in a single step. The solution to the deficiencies of titanium, steel, and ceramic knives is to fabricate them using bulk metallic glasses (or composites). These alloys can be cast into net or near-net shaped knives with a combination of properties that exceed both titanium and steel. A commercially viable BMG (bulk metallic glass) or composite knife is one that exhibits one or all of the following properties: It is based on titanium, has a self-sharpening edge, can retain an edge during service, is hard, is non-magnetic, is corrosion-resistant against a variety of corrosive environments, is tough (to allow for prying), can be cast into a net-shape with a mirror finish and a complex shape, has excellent wear resistance, and is low-density. These properties can be achieved in BMG and composites through alloy chemistry and processing. For

  1. Towards an understanding of tensile deformation in Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites with BCC dendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodziejska, Joanna A.; Kozachkov, Henry; Kranjc, Kelly; Hunter, Allen; Marquis, Emmanuelle; Johnson, William L.; Flores, Katharine M.; Hofmann, Douglas C.

    2016-03-01

    The microstructure and tension ductility of a series of Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite (BMGMC) is investigated by changing content of the β stabilizing element vanadium while holding the volume fraction of dendritic phase constant. The ability to change only one variable in these novel composites has previously been difficult, leading to uninvestigated areas regarding how composition affects properties. It is shown that the tension ductility can range from near zero percent to over ten percent simply by changing the amount of vanadium in the dendritic phase. This approach may prove useful for the future development of these alloys, which have largely been developed experimentally using trial and error.

  2. Development of tough, low-density titanium-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites with tensile ductility

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Douglas C.; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Wiest, Aaron; Lind, Mary-Laura; Demetriou, Marios D.; Johnson, William L.

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical properties of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and their composites have been under intense investigation for many years, owing to their unique combination of high strength and elastic limit. However, because of their highly localized deformation mechanism, BMGs are typically considered to be brittle materials and are not suitable for structural applications. Recently, highly-toughened BMG composites have been created in a Zr–Ti-based system with mechanical properties comparable with high-performance crystalline alloys. In this work, we present a series of low-density, Ti-based BMG composites with combinations of high strength, tensile ductility, and excellent fracture toughness. PMID:19074287

  3. Plasticity in Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass matrix composites containing brass fibers synthesized by warm extrusion of powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, D. H.; Lee, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Sordelet, D. J.

    2003-09-01

    Deformation behavior of centimeter-scale Ni-based metallic glass matrix composites reinforced by brass fibers, synthesized by warm extrusion of gas atomized powders, has been investigated under the uniaxial compression condition at room temperature. Throughout the extrusion process, all blended spherical powders are elongated along the extrusion direction. The brass fibers are well distributed in the metallic glass matrix for the metallic glass matrix composites containing the brass up to 0.4 in volume fraction and no pores are visible. With increasing the brass content, elastic modulus and strength decrease due to the softness of the brass, but enhanced macroscopic plasticity is observed due to the formation of multiple shear bands, initiated from the interface between brass fiber and metallic glass matrix, as well as their confinement between the brass fibers. These behaviors are not observed in the sample synthesized by warm extrusion of only metallic glass powders.

  4. Developing photorefractive glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duignan, Jason P.; Taylor, Lesley L.; Cook, Gary

    2002-01-01

    The production of a transparent photorefractive glass composite would offer a useful alternative to bulk crystal materials. We aim to produce such a material by incorporating single domain photorefractive Fe:LiNbO3 particles into a refractive index matched glass host. This glass host is also required to be chemically compatible with the photorefractive material. This compatibility will ensure that the Fe:LiNbO3 particles added to the host glass will remain in the intended crystalline phase and not simply dissolve in the glass. Due to the high refractive index of the Fe:LiNbO3 (no equals 2.35 532 nm), producing a chemically compatible and refractive index matched glass host is technically challenging. By examining common Tellurite, Bismuthate, and Gallate glasses as a starting point and then developing new and hybrid glasses, we have succeeded in producing a chemically compatible glass host and also a refractive index matched glass host. We have produced preliminary glass composite samples which contain a large amount of Fe:LiNbO3. We are currently able to retain nearly 90% of the incorporated Fe:LiNbO3 in the correct crystalline phase, a substantial improvement over previous work conducted in this area in recent years. In this paper we present our progress and findings in this area.

  5. Compositional origin of unusual β-relaxation properties in La-Ni-Al metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Wang, Z.; Gao, X. Q.; Wen, P.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Ngai, K. L.

    2014-08-28

    The β-relaxation of metallic glasses (MGs) bears nontrivial connections to their microscopic and macroscopic properties. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of the β-relaxation, we studied by dynamical mechanical measurements the change of its properties on varying the composition of La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} in various ways. The properties of the β-relaxation turn out to be very sensitive to the composition. It is found that the isochronal loss peak temperature of β-relaxation, T{sub β,peak}, is effectively determined by the total (La + Ni) content. When Cu is added into the alloy to replace either La, Ni, or Al, the T{sub β,peak} increases with decrease of the (La + Ni) content. The trend is in accordance with data of binary and ternary MGs formed from La, Ni, Al, and Cu. Binary La-Ni MGs have pronounced β-relaxation loss peaks, well separated from the α-relaxation. In contrast, the β-relaxation is not resolved in La-Al and La-Cu MGs, showing up as an excess wing. For the ternary La-Ni-Al MGs, increase of La or Ni content is crucial to lower the T{sub β,peak}. Keeping the Al content fixed, increase of La content lowers the T{sub β,peak} further, indicating the more important role La plays in lowering T{sub β,peak} than Ni. The observed effects on changing the composition of La{sub 60}Ni{sub 15}Al{sub 25} lead to the conclusion that the properties of the β-relaxation are mainly determined by the interaction between the largest solvent element, La, and the smallest element, Ni. From our data, it is further deduced that La and Ni have high mobility in the MGs, and this explains why the β-relaxation in this La-based MGs is prominent and well resolved from the α-relaxation as opposed to Pd- and Zr-based MGs where the solvent and largest atoms, Pd and Zr, are the least mobile.

  6. Compositional origin of unusual β-relaxation properties in La-Ni-Al metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Z G; Li, Y Z; Wang, Z; Gao, X Q; Wen, P; Bai, H Y; Ngai, K L; Wang, W H

    2014-08-28

    The β-relaxation of metallic glasses (MGs) bears nontrivial connections to their microscopic and macroscopic properties. In an effort to elucidate the mechanism of the β-relaxation, we studied by dynamical mechanical measurements the change of its properties on varying the composition of La60Ni15Al25 in various ways. The properties of the β-relaxation turn out to be very sensitive to the composition. It is found that the isochronal loss peak temperature of β-relaxation, Tβ,peak, is effectively determined by the total (La + Ni) content. When Cu is added into the alloy to replace either La, Ni, or Al, the Tβ,peak increases with decrease of the (La + Ni) content. The trend is in accordance with data of binary and ternary MGs formed from La, Ni, Al, and Cu. Binary La-Ni MGs have pronounced β-relaxation loss peaks, well separated from the α-relaxation. In contrast, the β-relaxation is not resolved in La-Al and La-Cu MGs, showing up as an excess wing. For the ternary La-Ni-Al MGs, increase of La or Ni content is crucial to lower the Tβ,peak. Keeping the Al content fixed, increase of La content lowers the Tβ,peak further, indicating the more important role La plays in lowering Tβ,peak than Ni. The observed effects on changing the composition of La60Ni15Al25 lead to the conclusion that the properties of the β-relaxation are mainly determined by the interaction between the largest solvent element, La, and the smallest element, Ni. From our data, it is further deduced that La and Ni have high mobility in the MGs, and this explains why the β-relaxation in this La-based MGs is prominent and well resolved from the α-relaxation as opposed to Pd- and Zr-based MGs where the solvent and largest atoms, Pd and Zr, are the least mobile.

  7. Coating thickness control in continuously fabricating metallic glass-coated composite wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bao-yu; Chen, Xiao-hua; Lu, Zhao-ping; Hui, Xi-dong

    2013-05-01

    A continuous production process was developed for coating bulk metallic glasses on the metallic wire surface. The effects of processing parameters, including the drawing velocity and coating temperature, on the coating thickness were investigated. It is found that the coating thickness increases with the increase in drawing velocity but decreases with the increase in coating temperature. A fluid mechanical model was developed to quantify the coating thickness under various processing conditions. By using this theoretical model, the coating thickness was calculated, and the calculated values are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  8. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods. PMID:26725519

  9. Multi-scale Characterisation of the 3D Microstructure of a Thermally-Shocked Bulk Metallic Glass Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Bodey, Andrew J.; Sui, Tan; Kockelmann, Winfried; Rau, Christoph; Korsunsky, Alexander M.; Mi, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs) are a new class of metal alloys which have significantly increased ductility and impact toughness, resulting from the ductile crystalline phases distributed uniformly within the amorphous matrix. However, the 3D structures and their morphologies of such composite at nano and micrometre scale have never been reported before. We have used high density electric currents to thermally shock a Zr-Ti based BMGMC to different temperatures, and used X-ray microtomography, FIB-SEM nanotomography and neutron diffraction to reveal the morphologies, compositions, volume fractions and thermal stabilities of the nano and microstructures. Understanding of these is essential for optimizing the design of BMGMCs and developing viable manufacturing methods.

  10. Direct Observation on the Evolution of Shear Banding and Buckling in Tungsten Fiber Reinforced Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. H.; Chen, Y.; Jiang, M. Q.; Chen, X. W.; Fu, H. M.; Zhang, H. F.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-11-01

    The evolution of micro-damage and deformation of each phase in the composite plays a pivotal role in the clarification of deformation mechanism of composite. However, limited model and mechanical experiments were conducted to reveal the evolution of the deformation of the two phases in the tungsten fiber reinforced Zr-based bulk metallic glass composite. In this study, quasi-static compressive tests were performed on this composite. For the first time, the evolution of micro-damage and deformation of the two phases in this composite, i.e., shear banding of the metallic glass matrix and buckling deformation of the tungsten fiber, were investigated systematically by controlling the loading process at different degrees of deformation. It is found that under uniaxial compression, buckling of the tungsten fiber occurs first, while the metallic glass matrix deforms homogeneously. Upon further loading, shear bands initiate from the fiber/matrix interface and propagate in the metallic glass matrix. Finally, the composite fractures in a mixed mode, with splitting in the tungsten fiber, along with shear fracture in the metallic glass matrix. Through the analysis on the stress state in the composite and resistance to shear banding of the two phases during compressive deformation, the possible deformation mechanism of the composite is unveiled. The deformation map of the composite, which covers from elastic deformation to final fracture, is obtained as well.

  11. Effect of strain rates on deformation behaviors of an in situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Chu, M. Y.; Wang, Y. S.; Yang, H. J.; Qiao, J. W.

    2016-06-01

    Quasi-static and dynamic deformation behaviors of an in situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composite: Ti56Zr18V10Cu4Be12 were investigated. Upon quasi-static compression, the composite exhibits distinguished work hardening, accompanied by the ultimate strength of 1290 MPa and the plasticity of 20 %. The improved plasticity is attributed to the multiplication of shear bands within the glass matrix and pileups of dislocations within the dendrites. Upon dynamic compression, the stable plastic flow prevails and the yielding stress increases with the strain rate. The macroscopic plasticity decreases considerably, since the shear bands cannot be effectively hindered by dendrites with deteriorated toughness. The dendrite-dominated mechanism results in the positive strain-rate sensitivity, and the Cowper-Symonds model is employed to depict the strain-rate dependency of yielding strength.

  12. The corrosion behavior of in-situ Zr-based metallic glass matrix composites in different corrosive media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, H. F.; Qiao, J. W.; Yang, H. J.; Wang, Y. S.; Liaw, P. K.; Lan, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of Zr58.5Ti14.3Nb5.2Cu6.1Ni4.9Be11.0 metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) in different corrosive media, including 1 M NaCl, 1 M HCl, 0.5 M H2SO4, and 1 M NaOH solutions, was studied. The electrochemical characteristics of the composites were investigated by potentiodynamic-polarization measurements. The results show that the corrosion resistance in NaOH solution is the poorest in terms of the corrosion potential (Ecorr) and corrosion current density (icorr). For comparison, the chemical immersion tests were conducted. The corroded surface morphologies after electrochemical and immersion measurements both show that the amorphous matrix and crystalline dendrites exhibit different corrosion behaviors. The possible interpretation of the observed morphology evolution was proposed. The effect of a very base metallic element of beryllium on the corrosion dynamic process has been emphasized.

  13. Plasmonically enhanced Faraday effect in metal and ferrite nanoparticles composite precipitated inside glass.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Seisuke; Sugioka, Koji; Tanaka, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Masahiro; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Miura, Kiyotaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi; Mukai, Kohki

    2012-12-17

    Using femtosecond laser irradiation and subsequent annealing, nanocomposite structures composed of spinel-type ferrimagnetic nanoparticles (NPs) and plasmonic metallic NPs have been formed space-selectively within glass doped with both α-Fe(2)O(3) and Al. The Faraday rotation spectra exhibit a distinct negative peak at around 400 nm, suggesting that the ferrimagnetic Faraday response is enhanced by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) due to metallic Al NPs. At the interfaces in the nanocomposites, the ferrimagnetism of magnetite NPs is directly coupled with the plasmon in the Al NPs. The control of the resonance wavelength of the magneto-optical peaks, namely, the size of plasmonic NPs has been demonstrated by changing the irradiation or annealing conditions.

  14. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; ...

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motifmore » with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.« less

  15. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Yang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Kramer, M. J.; Napolitano, Ralph E.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motif with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.

  16. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature.

    PubMed

    Bai, J; Li, J S; Qiao, J W; Wang, J; Feng, R; Kou, H C; Liaw, P K

    2016-08-31

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  17. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites. PMID:27576728

  18. Tensile deformation mechanisms of an in-situ Ti-based metallic glass matrix composite at cryogenic temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, J.; Li, J. S.; Qiao, J. W.; Wang, J.; Feng, R.; Kou, H. C.; Liaw, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    Remarkable tensile ductility was first obtained in an in-situ Ti-based bulk metallic glass (BMG) composite at cryogenic temperature (77 K). The novel cryogenic tensile plasticity is related to the effective accommodation of ductile body-centered cubic dendrites at 77 K, characteristic of the prevailing slip bands and dislocations, as well as lattice disorder, which can effectively hinder the propagation of critical shear bands. The greatly increased yield strength of dendrites contributes to the high yield strength of composite at 77 K. A trend of stronger softening is observed at low temperature, and a criterion is proposed to understand the softening behavior. The current research could also provide a guidance to the promising cryogenic application of these new advanced BMG composites.

  19. Towards an understanding of tensile deformation in Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composites with BCC dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziejska, Joanna A; Kozachkov, Henry; Kranjc, Kelly; Hunter, Allen; Marquis, Emmanuelle; Johnson, William L; Flores, Katharine M; Hofmann, Douglas C

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure and tension ductility of a series of Ti-based bulk metallic glass matrix composite (BMGMC) is investigated by changing content of the β stabilizing element vanadium while holding the volume fraction of dendritic phase constant. The ability to change only one variable in these novel composites has previously been difficult, leading to uninvestigated areas regarding how composition affects properties. It is shown that the tension ductility can range from near zero percent to over ten percent simply by changing the amount of vanadium in the dendritic phase. This approach may prove useful for the future development of these alloys, which have largely been developed experimentally using trial and error. PMID:26932509

  20. Alloying Behavior and Properties of Al-Based Composites Reinforced with Al85Fe15 Metallic Glass Particles Fabricated by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Pressing Consolidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lanxiang; Yang, LiKun; Leng, Jinfeng; Wang, Tongyang; Wang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    In this study, Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles with high onset crystallization temperature (1209 K) were synthesized by a mechanical alloying method. High-quality 6061Al-based composites reinforced with Al85Fe15 metallic glass particles were fabricated by a vacuum hot-pressing sintering technique. The glass particles with flake-like shape are distributed uniformly in the Al matrix. The bulk composites possess high relative density, excellent hardness and strength. The microhardness values of the Al-based bulk composites with the additions of 20 vol.% and 30 vol.% Al85Fe15 particles are 204 MPa and 248 MPa, respectively, which are much higher than that of 6061Al (61 MPa). The compressive yield strength of the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite is 478 MPa, which is enhanced by 273% compared with 6061Al. The amorphous characteristic and homogeneous dispersion of glass particles account for the excellent mechanical properties of the Al-based composites. In addition, the corrosion behavior of Al-based composites in a seawater solution has been investigated by electrochemical polarization measurements. Compared to 6061Al, the 30 vol.% glass-reinforced composite shows the lower corrosion/passive current density and larger passive region, indicating the greatly enhanced corrosion resistance.

  1. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Pauly, S; Tang, M Q; Eckert, J; Zhang, H F

    2016-01-12

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated.

  2. Two-phase quasi-equilibrium in β-type Ti-based bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L.; Pauly, S.; Tang, M. Q.; Eckert, J.; Zhang, H. F.

    2016-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of cast Ti/Zr-based bulk metallic glass composites (BMGCs) containing β-Ti still remains ambiguous. This is why to date the strategies and alloys suitable for producing such BMGCs with precisely controllable volume fractions and crystallite sizes are still rather limited. In this work, a Ti-based BMGC containing β-Ti was developed in the Ti-Zr-Cu-Co-Be system. The glassy matrix of this BMGC possesses an exceptional glass-forming ability and as a consequence, the volume fractions as well as the composition of the β-Ti dendrites remain constant over a wide range of cooling rates. This finding can be explained in terms of a two-phase quasi-equilibrium between the supercooled liquid and β-Ti, which the system attains on cooling. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium allows predicting the crystalline and glassy volume fractions by means of the lever rule and we succeeded in reproducing these values by slight variations in the alloy composition at a fixed cooling rate. The two-phase quasi-equilibrium could be of critical importance for understanding and designing the microstructures of BMGCs containing the β-phase. Its implications on the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase are elaborated. PMID:26754315

  3. Metastable metallic hydrogen glass

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W J

    2001-02-06

    The quest for metallic hydrogen has been going on for over one hundred years. Before hydrogen was first condensed into a liquid in 1898, it was commonly thought that condensed hydrogen would be a metal, like the monatomic alkali metals below hydrogen in the first column of the Periodic Table. Instead, condensed hydrogen turned out to be transparent, like the diatomic insulating halogens in the seventh column of the Periodic Table. Wigner and Huntington predicted in 1935 that solid hydrogen at 0 K would undergo a first-order phase transition from a diatomic to a monatomic crystallographically ordered solid at {approx}25 GPa. This first-order transition would be accompanied by an insulator-metal transition. Though searched for extensively, a first-order transition from an ordered diatomic insulator to a monatomic metal is yet to be observed at pressures up to 120 and 340 GPa using x-ray diffraction and visual inspection, respectively. On the other hand, hydrogen reaches the minimum electrical conductivity of a metal at 140 GPa, 0.6 g/cm{sup 3}, and 3000 K. These conditions were achieved using a shock wave reverberating between two stiff sapphire anvils. The shock wave was generated with a two-stage light-gas gun. This temperature exceeds the calculated melting temperature at 140 GPa by a factor of {approx}2, indicating that this metal is in the disordered fluid phase. The disorder permits hydrogen to become metallic via a Mott transition in the liquid at a much smaller pressure than in the solid, which has an electronic bandgap to the highest pressures reached to date. Thus, by using the finite temperature achieved with shock compression to achieve a disordered melt, metallic hydrogen can be achieved at a much lower pressure in a fluid than in a solid. It is not known how, nor even whether, metallic hydrogen can be quenched from a fluid at high pressures to a disordered solid metallic glass at ambient pressure and temperature. Because metallization occurs by simply

  4. Effect of geometrical constraint condition on the formation of nanoscale twins in the Ni-based metallic glass composite

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M H; Kim, B S; Kim, D H; Ott, R T; Sansoz, F; Eckert, J

    2014-04-25

    We investigated the effect of geometrically constrained stress-strain conditions on the formation of nanotwins in alpha-brass phase reinforced Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass (MG) matrix deformed under macroscopic uniaxial compression. The specific geometrically constrained conditions in the samples lead to a deviation from a simple uniaxial state to a multi-axial stress state, for which nanocrystallization in the MG matrix together with nanoscale twinning of the brass reinforcement is observed in localized regions during plastic flow. The nanocrystals in the MG matrix and the appearance of the twinned structure in the reinforcements indicate that the strain energy is highly confined and the local stress reaches a very high level upon yielding. Both the effective distribution of reinforcements on the strain enhancement of composite and the effects of the complicated stress states on the development of nanotwins in the second-phase brass particles are discussed.

  5. Designing tensile ductility in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarac, Baran; Schroers, Jan

    2013-07-01

    Effectiveness of a second phase in metallic glass heterostructures to improve mechanical properties varies widely. Unfortunately, methods to fabricate such heterostructures like foams and composites do not allow controlled variation of structural features. Here we report a novel strategy, which allows us to vary heterostructural features independently, thereby enabling a systematic and quantitative study. Our approach reveals the optimal microstructural architecture for metallic glass heterostructures to achieve tensile ductility. Critical design aspect is a soft second phase, which is most effective when spacing between the second phase assumes the critical crack length of the metallic glass. This spacing should coincide with the second phase’s size, and beyond, the specific second phase morphology of the heterostructure is crucial. These toughening strategies are only effective in samples that are large compared with the spacing of the second phase. The identified design aspects provide guidance in designing tensile ductility into metallic glasses.

  6. Iodine confinement into metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)-low temperature sintering glasses to form novel glass composite material (GCM) alternative waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Garino, Terry J.; Sava, Dorina Florentina

    2010-11-01

    The safe handling of reprocessed fuel addresses several scientific goals, especially when considering the capture and long-term storage of volatile radionuclides that are necessary during this process. Despite not being a major component of the off-gas, radioiodine (I{sub 2}) is particularly challenging, because it is a highly mobile gas and {sup 129}I is a long-lived radionuclide (1.57 x 10{sup 7} years). Therefore, its capture and sequestration is of great interest on a societal level. Herein, we explore novel routes toward the effective capture and storage of iodine. In particular, we report on the novel use of a new class of porous solid-state functional materials (metal-organic frameworks, MOFs), as high-capacity adsorbents of molecular iodine. We further describe the formation of novel glass-composite material (GCM) waste forms from the mixing and sintering of the I{sub 2}-containing MOFs with Bi-Zn-O low-temperature sintering glasses and silver metal flakes. Our findings indicate that, upon sintering, a uniform monolith is formed, with no evidence of iodine loss; iodine is sequestered during the heating process by the in situ formation of AgI. Detailed materials characterization analysis is presented for the GCMs. This includes powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), thermal analysis (thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)), and chemical durability tests including aqueous leach studies (product consistency test (PCT)), with X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) of the PCT leachate.

  7. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts

    PubMed Central

    Ranjkesh, Bahram; Lovschall, Henrik; Erfanparast, Leila; Jafarabadi, Mohammad A; Oskouei, Sina Ghertasi; Isidor, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the survival of composite resin restorations retained by glass fiber posts or reversed-orientated (upside-down) metal posts in severely decayed primary anterior teeth after 6, 12, and 18 months. Materials and methods: A total of forty-four 3- to 5-year-old children with bilateral severely decayed primary maxillary canines were included. Patients were treated under general anesthesia. After pulpectomy, an intracanal post was seated in the primary maxillary canine on each side: either a glass fiber post or a metallic post in reversed orientation and teeth restored with light-cured composite. Survival rate of each technique was evaluated at predetermined follow-ups and data were analyzed with McNemar’s test (α = 0.05). Results: The difference in survival of restorations retained by two types of posts was not statistically significant in clinical and radiographical evaluations after 6, 12, and 18 months. The survival rate of reversed-orientated metal and glass fiber posts after 18 months was 81.1 and 67.6% respectively (p = 0.14). Conclusion: Reversed-orientated metal post did not show lower clinical survival compared with glass fiber posts in 18-month follow-up. Hence, reversed-orientated metal post can be considered as a potential method to obtain retention for composite restorations in severely decayed primary anterior teeth. How to cite this article: Vafaei A, Ranjkesh B, L0vschall H, Erfanparast L, Jafarabadi MA, Oskouei SG, Isidor F. Survival of Composite Resin Restorations of severely Decayed Primary Anterior Teeth retained by Glass Fiber Posts or Reversed-orientated Metal Posts. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2016;9(2):109-113. PMID:27365929

  8. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K. J.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Quadir, M. Z.; Ferry, M.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2015-06-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic glasses (BMG) with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400 ~ 600m/s range and tested at room temperature and 250 °C. The specimens impacted a steel extrusion die which subjected them to high strains at high strain-rates. The extruded samples were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams. The deformed specimens were examined by optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction and hardness measurements. The characterization results aided to assess the effect of chemical composition on the microstructural evolution, i.e. phase changes or crystallization, which might influence the ductility on the nominally brittle amorphous BMGs. The most significant results from this study will be presented. School of Engineering and Information Technology, UNSW Canberra.

  9. Thermoplastic Joining and Assembly of Bulk Metallic Glass Composites Through Capacitive Discharge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Roberts, Scott N. (Inventor); Kozachkov, Henry (Inventor); Demetriou, Marios D. (Inventor); Schramm, Joseph P. (Inventor); Johnson, William L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods for joining BMG Composites are disclosed. Specifically, the joining of BMG Composites is implemented so as to preserve the amorphicity of their matrix phase and the microstructure of their particulate phase. Implementation of the joining method with respect to the construction of modular cellular structures that comprise BMG Composites is also discussed.

  10. Designing novel bulk metallic glass composites with a high aluminum content

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Z. P.; Gao, J. E.; Wu, Y.; Wang, H.; Liu, X. J.; Lu, Z. P.

    2013-01-01

    The long-standing challenge for forming Al-based BMGs and their matrix composites with a critical size larger than 1 mm have not been answered over the past three decades. In this paper, we reported formation of a series of BMG matrix composites which contain a high Al content up to 55 at.%. These composites can be cast at extraordinarily low cooling rates, compatible with maximum rod diameters of over a centimetre in copper mold casting. Our results indicate that proper additions of transition element Fe which have a positive heat of mixing with the main constituents La and Ce can appreciably improve the formability of the BMG matrix composites by suppressing the precipitation of Al(La,Ce) phase resulted from occurrence of the phase separation. However, the optimum content of Fe addition is strongly dependant on the total amount of the Al content in the Al-(CoCu)-(La,Ce) alloys. PMID:24284800

  11. Origin of embrittlement in metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Glenn R.; Demetriou, Marios D.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Owing to their glassy nature, metallic glasses demonstrate a toughness that is extremely sensitive to the frozen-in configurational state. This sensitivity gives rise to “annealing embrittlement,” which is often severe and in many respects limits the technological advancement of these materials. Here, equilibrium configurations (i.e., “inherent states”) of a metallic glass are established around the glass transition, and the configurational properties along with the plane-strain fracture toughness are evaluated to associate the intrinsic glass toughness with the inherent state properties and identify the fundamental origin of embrittlement. The established correlations reveal a one-to-one correspondence between toughness and shear modulus continuous over a broad range of inherent states, suggesting that annealing embrittlement is controlled almost solely by an increasing resistance to shear flow. This annealing embrittlement sensitivity is shown to vary substantially between metallic glass compositions, and appears to correlate well with the fragility of the metallic glass. PMID:27573817

  12. Deformation behavior of metallic glass composites reinforced with shape memory nanowires studied via molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şopu, D.; Stoica, M.; Eckert, J.

    2015-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the deformation behavior and mechanism of Cu64Zr36 composite structures reinforced with B2 CuZr nanowires are strongly influenced by the martensitic phase transformation and distribution of these crystalline precipitates. When nanowires are distributed in the glassy matrix along the deformation direction, a two-steps stress-induced martensitic phase transformation is observed. Since the martensitic transformation is driven by the elastic energy release, the strain localization behavior in the glassy matrix is strongly affected. Therefore, the composite materials reinforced with a crystalline phase, which shows stress-induced martensitic transformation, represent a route for controlling the properties of glassy materials.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS COMPOSITIONS TO IMMOBILIZE ALKALI, ALKALINE EARTH, LANTHANIDE AND TRANSITION METAL FISSION PRODUCTS FROM NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.

    2009-06-24

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) waste management strategy revolves around specific treatment of individual or groups of separated waste streams. A goal for the separations processes is to efficiently manage the waste to be dispositioned as high level radioactive waste. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) baseline technology for immobilization of the lanthanide (Ln) and transition metal fission product (TM) wastes is vitrification into a borosilicate glass. A current interest is to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined waste streams to most cost effectively immobilize the wastes resulting from aqueous fuel reprocessing. Studies showed that high waste loadings are achievable for the Ln only (Option 1) stream. Waste loadings in excess of 60 wt % (on a calcined oxide basis) were demonstrated via a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass. The resulting glasses had excellent relative durability as determined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). For a combined Ln and TM waste stream glass (Option 2), noble metal solubility was found to limit waste loading. However, the measured PCT normalized elemental releases for this glass were at least an order of magnitude below that of Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. Current efforts to evaluate the feasibility of vitrifying combined Ln, TM, alkali (Cs is the primary radionuclide of concern) and alkaline earth (Sr is the primary radionuclide of concern) wastes (Option 3) have shown that these approaches are feasible. However, waste loading limitations with respect to heat load (Cs/Sr loading), molybdenum solubility and/or noble metal solubility will likely be realized and must be considered in determining the cost effectiveness of these approaches.

  14. Elastic heterogeneity in metallic glasses.

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, , W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J. D; Egami, T.; X-Ray Science Division; Univ. of Tennessee; ORNL

    2010-01-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook's law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about 3/4 in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  15. Processing of bulk metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Schroers, Jan

    2010-04-12

    Bulk metallic glass (BMG) formers are multicomponent alloys that vitrify with remarkable ease during solidification. Technological interest in these materials has been generated by their unique properties, which often surpass those of conventional structural materials. The metastable nature of BMGs, however, has imposed a barrier to broad commercial adoption, particularly where the processing requirements of these alloys conflict with conventional metal processing methods. Research on the crystallization of BMG formers has uncovered novel thermoplastic forming (TPF)-based processing opportunities. Unique among metal processing methods, TPF utilizes the dramatic softening exhibited by a BMG as it approaches its glass-transition temperature and decouples the rapid cooling required to form a glass from the forming step. This article reviews crystallization processes in BMG former and summarizes and compares TPF-based processing methods. Finally, an assessment of scientific and technological advancements required for broader commercial utilization of BMGs will be made.

  16. Elastic Heterogeneity in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmowski, W.; Iwashita, T.; Chuang, C.-P.; Almer, J.; Egami, T.

    2010-11-01

    When a stress is applied on a metallic glass it deforms following Hook’s law. Therefore it may appear obvious that a metallic glass deforms elastically. Using x-ray diffraction and anisotropic pair-density function analysis we show that only about (3)/(4) in volume fraction of metallic glasses deforms elastically, whereas the rest of the volume is anelastic and in the experimental time scale deform without resistance. We suggest that this anelastic portion represents residual liquidity in the glassy state. Many theories, such as the free-volume theory, assume the density of defects in the glassy state to be of the order of 1%, but this result shows that it is as much as a quarter.

  17. A High Strain-Rate Investigation of a Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass and an HTPB Polymer Composite

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    or 4.0 mm diameter. The long cylindrical bars were then metallographically polished to a mirror finish first using SiC grit paper (1200 grit and 2400...systems (such as with tungsten in LM-1), but the arrangement may also decrease the amount of energy (such as with silicon carbide in aluminum). In...metallic glass. Scripta Materialia 41, 937-943. 29. Sarva S., Nemat-Nasser S. (2001) Dynamic compressive strength of silicon carbide under uniaxial

  18. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, Gene H.; Roche, Michael F.

    1985-01-01

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na.sub.2 O, ZrO.sub.2, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and SiO.sub.2 in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2.times.10.sup.-3 (ohm-cm).sup.-1 at 300.degree. C. and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500.degree. C.

  19. Glass electrolyte composition

    DOEpatents

    Kucera, G.H.; Roche, M.F.

    1985-01-08

    An ionically conductive glass is disclosed for use as electrolyte in a high temperature electrochemical cell, particularly a cell with sodium anode and sulfur cathode. The glass includes the constituents Na/sub 2/O, ZrO/sub 2/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and SiO/sub 2/ in selected proportions to be a single phase solid solution substantially free of crystalline regions and undissolved constituents. Other advantageous properties are an ionic conductivity in excess of 2 x 10/sup -3/ (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ at 300/sup 0/C and a glass transition temperature in excess of 500/sup 0/C.

  20. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  1. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  2. Magnetic antenna using metallic glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desch, Michael D. (Inventor); Farrell, William M. (Inventor); Houser, Jeffrey G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A lightweight search-coil antenna or sensor assembly for detecting magnetic fields and including a multi-turn electromagnetic induction coil wound on a spool type coil form through which is inserted an elongated coil loading member comprised of metallic glass material wrapped around a dielectric rod. The dielectric rod consists of a plastic or a wooden dowel having a length which is relatively larger than its thickness so as to provide a large length-to-diameter ratio. A tri-axial configuration includes a housing in which is located three substantially identical mutually orthogonal electromagnetic induction coil assemblies of the type described above wherein each of the assemblies include an electromagnetic coil wound on a dielectric spool with an elongated metallic glass coil loading member projecting therethrough.

  3. The dynamic compressive behavior of beryllium bearing bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Bruck, H.A.; Rosakis, A.J.; Johnson, W.L.

    1996-02-01

    In 1993, a new beryllium bearing bulk metallic glass with the nominal composition of Zr{sub 41.25}Ti{sub 13.75}Cu{sub 12.5}Ni{sub 10}Be{sub 22.5} was discovered at Caltech. This metallic glass can be cast as cylindrical rods as large as 16 mm in diameter, which permitted specimens to be fabricated with geometries suitable for dynamic testing. For the first time, the dynamic compressive yield behavior of a metallic glass was characterized at strain rates of 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 4}/s by using the split Hopkinson pressure bar. A high-speed infrared thermal detector was also used to determine if adiabatic heating occurred during dynamic deformation of the metallic glass. From these tests it appears that the yield stress of the metallic glass is insensitive to strain rate and no adiabatic heating occurs before yielding. {copyright} {ital 1996 Materials Research Society.}

  4. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, N.M.; Dye, R.C.; Snow, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1998-04-14

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  5. Composite metal membrane

    DOEpatents

    Peachey, Nathaniel M.; Dye, Robert C.; Snow, Ronny C.; Birdsell, Stephan A.

    1998-01-01

    A composite metal membrane including a first metal layer of Group IVB met or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof is provided together with a process for the recovery of hydrogen from a gaseous mixture including contacting a hydrogen-containing gaseous mixture with a first side of a nonporous composite metal membrane including a first metal of Group IVB metals or Group VB metals, the first metal layer sandwiched between two layers of an oriented metal of palladium, platinum or alloys thereof, and, separating hydrogen from a second side of the nonporous composite metal membrane.

  6. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, M.D.; Kramer, D.P.

    1985-01-04

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  7. Production of glass or glass-ceramic to metal seals with the application of pressure

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Michael D.; Kramer, Daniel P.

    1987-11-10

    In a process for preparing a glass or glass-ceramic to metal seal comprising contacting the glass with the metal and heat-treating the glass and metal under conditions whereby the glass to metal seal is effected and, optionally, the glass is converted to a glass-ceramic, an improvement comprises carrying out the heat-treating step using hot isostatic pressing.

  8. Metallic glass nanostructures: fabrication, properties, and applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianci; Hasan, Molla; Kumar, Golden

    2014-02-21

    Remarkable progress has been made in fabrication and characterization of metal nanostructures because of their crucial role in energy conversion, nanophotonics, nanoelectronics, and biodiagnostics. Less emphasis has been placed on the synthesis of nanostructures from metallic alloys, which are better suited than elemental metals for certain applications such as fuel-cell catalysts. The main challenges in fabrication of alloy nanostructures are controlling their chemical stoichiometry, crystal structures, and shapes because of anisotropic nucleation and growth rates. These limitations can be overcome by using metallic glasses (amorphous metal alloys) which are isotropic and provide additional control handles through their tunable compositions and degree of crystallinity. Here, we review the recent developments in fabrication and characterization of metallic glass (MG) nanostructures. The focus is on sub-micron structures synthesized by unconventional thermoplastic techniques. A concept of self-assembly is introduced for fashioning functional structures using MG nanostructures as building blocks. The article concludes with a brief discussion about unique properties and prospective applications of MG nanostructures.

  9. METAL COMPOSITIONS

    DOEpatents

    Seybolt, A.U.

    1959-02-01

    Alloys of uranium which are strong, hard, and machinable are presented, These alloys of uranium contain bctween 0.1 to 5.0% by weight of at least one noble metal such as rhodium, palladium, and gold. The alloys may be heat treated to obtain a product with iniproved tensile and compression strengths,

  10. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  11. Fractal atomic-level percolation in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, David Z; Shi, Crystal Y; An, Qi; Zeng, Qiaoshi; Mao, Wendy L; Goddard, William A; Greer, Julia R

    2015-09-18

    Metallic glasses are metallic alloys that exhibit exotic material properties. They may have fractal structures at the atomic level, but a physical mechanism for their organization without ordering has not been identified. We demonstrated a crossover between fractal short-range (<2 atomic diameters) and homogeneous long-range structures using in situ x-ray diffraction, tomography, and molecular dynamics simulations. A specific class of fractal, the percolation cluster, explains the structural details for several metallic-glass compositions. We postulate that atoms percolate in the liquid phase and that the percolating cluster becomes rigid at the glass transition temperature.

  12. Ductility and work hardening in nano-sized metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D. Z.; Gu, X. W.; An, Q.; Goddard, W. A.; Greer, J. R.

    2015-02-09

    In-situ nano-tensile experiments on 70 nm-diameter free-standing electroplated NiP metallic glass nanostructures reveal tensile true strains of ∼18%, an amount comparable to compositionally identical 100 nm-diameter focused ion beam samples and ∼3 times greater than 100 nm-diameter electroplated samples. Simultaneous in-situ observations and stress-strain data during post-elastic deformation reveal necking and work hardening, features uncharacteristic for metallic glasses. The evolution of free volume within molecular dynamics-simulated samples suggests a free surface-mediated relaxation mechanism in nano-sized metallic glasses.

  13. Chemical segregation in metallic glass nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Mo; Li, Qi-Kai

    2014-11-21

    Nanowires made of metallic glass have been actively pursued recently due to the superb and unique properties over those of the crystalline materials. The amorphous nanowires are synthesized either at high temperature or via mechanical disruption using focused ion beam. These processes have potential to cause significant changes in structure and chemical concentration, as well as formation of defect or imperfection, but little is known to date about the possibilities and mechanisms. Here, we report chemical segregation to surfaces and its mechanisms in metallic glass nanowires made of binary Cu and Zr elements from molecular dynamics simulation. Strong concentration deviation are found in the nanowires under the conditions similar to these in experiment via focused ion beam processing, hot imprinting, and casting by rapid cooling from liquid state. Our analysis indicates that non-uniform internal stress distribution is a major cause for the chemical segregation, especially at low temperatures. Extension is discussed for this observation to multicomponent metallic glass nanowires as well as the potential applications and side effects of the composition modulation. The finding also points to the possibility of the mechanical-chemical process that may occur in different settings such as fracture, cavitation, and foams where strong internal stress is present in small length scales.

  14. Amorphous metal composites

    DOEpatents

    Byrne, Martin A.; Lupinski, John H.

    1984-01-01

    An improved amorphous metal composite and process of making the composite. The amorphous metal composite comprises amorphous metal (e.g. iron) and a low molecular weight thermosetting polymer binder. The process comprises placing an amorphous metal in particulate form and a thermosetting polymer binder powder into a container, mixing these materials, and applying heat and pressure to convert the mixture into an amorphous metal composite.

  15. Reactive cluster model of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Travis E.; Miorelli, Jonathan; Eberhart, Mark E.

    2014-02-28

    Though discovered more than a half century ago metallic glasses remain a scientific enigma. Unlike crystalline metals, characterized by short, medium, and long-range order, in metallic glasses short and medium-range order persist, though long-range order is absent. This fact has prompted research to develop structural descriptions of metallic glasses. Among these are cluster-based models that attribute amorphous structure to the existence of clusters that are incommensurate with crystalline periodicity. Not addressed, however, are the chemical factors stabilizing these clusters and promoting their interconnections. We have found that glass formers are characterized by a rich cluster chemistry that above the glass transformation temperature promotes exchange as well as static and vibronic sharing of atoms between clusters. The vibronic mechanism induces correlated motions between neighboring clusters and we hypothesize that the distance over which these motions are correlated mediates metallic glass stability and influences critical cooling rates.

  16. Development of high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass metal plus dielectric films optics Au-mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Qu, Shengguan; Li, Xiang-Long

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the development of high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass multilayer films optics Au-mirror with high reflectivity in a wavelength range of 760 to 1000 nm. Multilayer films were fabricated using an radio frequency-magnetron sputtering deposition system. The measured reflectivity of Ta2O5/SiO2/Au/Cr metal plus dielectric films optics Au-mirror could reach up to ≥97%. Then, on the basis of experiments, a Φ75-mm high volume fraction SiCP/Al composite-bismuthate glass multilayer optical Au-mirror for a wavelength range of 760 to 1000 nm was manufactured. The tested results indicate that a peak-to-valley value of 0.854λ (λ=632.8 nm) was achieved on the Au-mirror surface, and the slope deviation error for the flat surface was lower than 0.153λ root mean square. The surface roughness of Ta2O5/SiO2/Au/Cr multilayer thin films was 1.30 nm (Ra).

  17. Bulk metallic glass coating of polymer substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soinila, Erno; Sharma, Parmanand; Heino, Markku; Pischow, Kaj; Inoue, Akihisa; Hänninen, Hannu

    2009-01-01

    Bulk Metallic Glass (BMG) alloy with the composition of Zr55Cu30Al10Ni5 was deposited by sputtering as thin films on several different engineering polymers and polymer composites. Polycarbonate, polymethyl methacrylate, polyamide 12, polyarylamide (50GF=50 % glass fibers), polyphenylene sulfide (30GF) and polybutylene terephthalate (30GF) were used as substrates. The microstructure of the deposited BMG coatings was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of XRD and SEM studies were consistent with amorphous microstructure. Elemental compositions of the coatings were verified by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Mechanical properties of the coatings were compared to copper mould cast BMG using nano- indentation tests with similar results. According to the cross-cut tape tests good adhesion was achieved between the studied BMG alloy and all other polymer substrates except polycarbonate. Nano-indentation results showed similar mechanical properties for coating and cast BMG. The results of this study look promising as they open new opportunities for BMG- polymer composite applications.

  18. Metal etching composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otousa, Joseph E. (Inventor); Thomas, Clark S. (Inventor); Foster, Robert E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a chemical etching composition for etching metals or metallic alloys. The composition includes a solution of hydrochloric acid, phosphoric acid, ethylene glycol, and an oxidizing agent. The etching composition is particularly useful for etching metal surfaces in preparation for subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection.

  19. Combinatorial Strategies for the Development of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Shiyan

    The systematic identification of multi-component alloys out of the vast composition space is still a daunting task, especially in the development of bulk metallic glasses that are typically based on three or more elements. In order to address this challenge, combinatorial approaches have been proposed. However, previous attempts have not successfully coupled the synthesis of combinatorial libraries with high-throughput characterization methods. The goal of my dissertation is to develop efficient high-throughput characterization methods, optimized to identify glass formers systematically. Here, two innovative approaches have been invented. One is to measure the nucleation temperature in parallel for up-to 800 compositions. The composition with the lowest nucleation temperature has a reasonable agreement with the best-known glass forming composition. In addition, the thermoplastic formability of a metallic glass forming system is determined through blow molding a compositional library. Our results reveal that the composition with the largest thermoplastic deformation correlates well with the best-known formability composition. I have demonstrated both methods as powerful tools to develop new bulk metallic glasses.

  20. Prominent β-relaxations in yttrium based metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, P.; Lu, Z.; Zhu, Z. G.; Li, Y. Z.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-01-19

    Most metallic glasses (MGs) exhibit weak slow β-relaxation. We report the prominent β-relaxation in YNiAl metallic glass with a wide composition range. Compared with other MGs, the MGs show a pronounced β-relaxation peak and high β-relaxation peak temperature, and the β-relaxation behavior varies significantly with the changes of the constituent elements, which is attributed to the fluctuations of chemical interactions between the components. We demonstrate the correlation between the β-relaxation and the activation of flow units for mechanical behaviors of the MG and show that the MG is model system for studying some controversial issues in glasses.

  1. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr-Cu-Al bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Dolors Baró, Maria; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-06-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr48Cu48 - x Al4M x (M ≡ Fe or Co, x = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr48Cu48Al4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Co0.5 and 6.2% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Fe0.5) is considerably larger than for Zr48Cu48Al4 or the alloys with x = 1. Slight variations in the Young's modulus (around 5-10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite-martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr-Cu-Al-(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications.

  2. Mechanical failure and glass transition in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    The current majority view on the phenomenon of mechanical failure in metallic glasses appears to be that it is caused by the activity of some structural defects, such as free-volumes or shear transformation zones, and the concentration of such defects is small, only of the order of 1%. However, the recent results compel us to revise this view. Through molecular dynamics simulation it has been shown that mechanical failure is the stress-induced glass transition. According to our theory the concentration of the liquid-like sites (defects) is well over 20% at the glass transition. We suggest that the defect concentration in metallic glasses is actually very high, and percolation of such defects causes atomic avalanche and mechanical failure. In this article we discuss the glass transition, mechanical failure and viscosity from such a point of view.

  3. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  4. Statistical thermodynamics and atomic structure of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lass, Eric Andrew

    -containing binary, ternary, and quaternary Zr-and Fe-based metallic glass forming systems. In binary alloys, strong chemical short-range ordering (CSRO) effects are observed, occurring most prominently at compositions which experimentally show the best glass formability (GFA). Partial coordination numbers calculated using CAM correlate well with those determined by neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Experimentally, Cu-Zr binary glasses exhibit a well-defined glass transition temperature, Tg, while Ni-Zr glasses do not. CAM suggests that the local atomic structure around Cu and Ni atoms is responsible for this difference. Fe-P alloys are shown to have a greater degree of Fe-Fe metallic bonding than Fe-B alloys, possibly elucidating the increased ductility in Fe-based glasses containing P. When BDs are included in CAM, the defect concentration surrounding one particular species in a system is observed to reach a constant value at Tg. Compositional changes in the values of T g predicted by CAM are in excellent agreement with those determined experimentally for both Cu- and Ni-Zr alloys. Using a combination of atomic structural differences and thermodynamic stability of the various phases, an understanding is gained of the difference between glass-forming and non-glass-forming systems. Similarly promising results are observed in ternary metallic glasses. CAM shows the CSRO around Cu atoms in ternary Cu-Zr-Al and Cu-Zr-Ti alloys reaches a maximum near compositions with high GFA. Similar to the binary system, the Zr BD concentration reaches a critical level at experimentally observed Tgs. The use of three-body atomic bonding energies is beneficial in describing ternary interactions in metallic glasses, compared to pair-wise bonding used in other models. Fe-(Mo)-B-P alloys exhibit increased glass stability over their binary counterparts. Replacing 1 at% Fe with Mo in Fe-B-P alloys shows increased stability of the amorphous phase, brought on by the creation of a strong network of Mo

  5. Effects of chemical composition and test conditions on the dynamic tensile response of Zr-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Laws, K.; Martinez, D.; Trujillo, C. P.; Brown, A. D.; Cerreta, E. K.; Hazell, P. J.; Ferry, M.; Quadir, M. Z.; Jiang, J.; Escobedo, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of impact velocity and temperature on the dynamic mechanical behavior of two bulk metallic (BMG) alloys with slightly different elemental compositions (Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 and Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38) have been investigated. Bullet-shaped samples were accelerated by a gas gun to speeds in the 400˜600m/s range and tested at both room temperature and 250°C. The samples impacted steel extrusion dies which subjected the bullets to high strains at relatively high strain-rates. The extruded fragments were subsequently soft recovered by using low density foams and examined by means of optical/scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It was found that shear banding was the dictating mechanism responsible for the fracture of all BMGs. At room temperature, the Zr55Cu30Ni5Al30 alloy exhibited a higher resistance to fragmentation than the Zr46Cu38Ag8Al38 alloy. At 250°C, significant melting was observed in the recovered fragments of both alloys, which indicates that the BMG glassy structure undergoes a melting process and deformation likely occurs homogeneously.

  6. Glass ceramic-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-19

    A glass ceramic composition prepared by subjecting a glass composition comprising, by weight, 65 to 80% SiO/sub 2/, 8 to 16% Li/sub 2/O, 2 to 8% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 1 to 8% K/sub 2/O, 1 to 5% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and 1.5 to 7% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, to the following processing steps of heating the glass composition to a temperature sufficient to crystallize lithium metasilicate therein, holding the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to dissolve the lithium metasilicate therein thereby creating cristobalite nucleii, cooling the glass composition and maintaining the composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to recrystallize lithium metasilicate therein, and thermally treating the glass composition at a temperature and for a time period sufficient to caus growth of cristobalite and further crystallization of lithium metasilicate producing a glass ceramic composition having a specific thermal expansion coefficient and products containing said composition.

  7. 'Work-Hardenable' Ductile Bulk Metallic Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Jayanta; Eckert, Juergen; Tang Meibo; Wang Weihua; Kim, Ki Buem; Baier, Falko; Theissmann, Ralf

    2005-05-27

    Usually, monolithic bulk metallic glasses undergo inhomogeneous plastic deformation and exhibit poor ductility (<1%) at room temperature. We present a new class of bulk metallic glass, which exhibits high strength of up to 2265 MPa together with extensive 'work hardening' and large ductility of 18%. Significant increase in the flow stress was observed during deformation. The 'work-hardening' capability and ductility of this class of metallic glass is attributed to a unique structure correlated with atomic-scale inhomogeneity, leading to an inherent capability of extensive shear band formation, interactions, and multiplication of shear bands.

  8. Large size metallic glass gratings by embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J.; Yi, J.; Zhao, D. Q.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2012-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses have excellent thermoforming ability in their wide supercooled liquid region. We show that large-size metallic glass grating (˜8 × 8 mm2) with fine periodicity and ultra smooth surface feature can be readily fabricated by hot embossing. The method for fabrication of gratings is proved to be much cheaper, and requires low pressure and short time (less than 30 s). The metallic glass gratings exhibit comparable optical properties such as rainbow-like spectrum when shone by fluorescent lamp light.

  9. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  10. Superconducting Metallic Glass Transition-Edge-Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Charles C. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A superconducting metallic glass transition-edge sensor (MGTES) and a method for fabricating the MGTES are provided. A single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is deposited on a substrate. The single-layer superconducting amorphous metal alloy is an absorber for the MGTES and is electrically connected to a circuit configured for readout and biasing to sense electromagnetic radiation.

  11. Cyclic Deformation in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sha, Z D; Qu, S X; Liu, Z S; Wang, T J; Gao, H

    2015-10-14

    Despite the utmost importance and decades of experimental studies on fatigue in metallic glasses (MGs), there has been so far little or no atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved. Here we perform molecular dynamics simulations of tension-compression fatigue in Cu50Zr50 MGs under strain-controlled cyclic loading. It is shown that the shear band (SB) initiation under cyclic loading is distinctly different from that under monotonic loading. Under cyclic loading, SB initiation takes place when aggregates of shear transformation zones (STZs) accumulating at the MG surface reach a critical size comparable to the SB width, and the accumulation of STZs follows a power law with rate depending on the applied strain. It is further shown that almost the entire fatigue life of nanoscale MGs under low cycle fatigue is spent in the SB-initiation stage, similar to that of crystalline materials. Furthermore, a qualitative investigation of the effect of cycling frequency on the fatigue behavior of MGs suggests that higher cycling frequency leads to more cycles to failure. The present study sheds light on the fundamental fatigue mechanisms of MGs that could be useful in developing strategies for their engineering applications.

  12. Glass transition in binary eutectic systems: best glass-forming composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Min; Li, Zijing; Chen, Zeming; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Riping; Tian, Yongjun

    2010-09-23

    The glass transition and glass-forming ability in a binary eutectic system of methyl o-toluate (MOT) versus methyl p-toluate (MPT) are studied across the whole composition range. The phase diagram is constructed to explore the best glass-forming composition as the characteristic temperatures of the glass transition, crystallization, eutectic, and liquidus are determined. The best vitrification region is found to locate between the eutectic and the midpoint compositions of the eutectic line, indicating a remarkable deviation from the eutectic composition. The compilation of various simple binary eutectic systems covering inorganic, metallic, ionic, and molecular glass-forming liquids reproduces the rule. Kinetics and thermodynamics in binary systems are investigated to associate with the rule. The composition dependence of the structural relaxation time and the kinetic fragility are presented with dielectric measurements. It is found that whereas mixing of binary miscible liquids kinetically favors glass formation, thermodynamic contribution to the deviation of the best glass-forming composition from eutectics is implied.

  13. Porosity in metal-organic framework glasses.

    PubMed

    Thornton, A W; Jelfs, K E; Konstas, K; Doherty, C M; Hill, A J; Cheetham, A K; Bennett, T D

    2016-03-07

    The porosity of a glass formed by melt-quenching a metal-organic framework, has been characterized by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. The results reveal porosity intermediate between the related open and dense crystalline frameworks ZIF-4 and ZIF-zni. A structural model for the glass was constructed using an amorphous polymerization algorithm, providing additional insight into the gas-inaccessible nature of porosity and the possible applications of hybrid glasses.

  14. Composition-dependent structural and electronic properties of Mg(95-x)Zn(x)Ca5 metallic glasses: an ab initio molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Li, S N; Liu, J B; Li, J H; Wang, J; Liu, B X

    2015-02-26

    Recent progress in the synthesis of Mg-based metallic glasses (MGs) has allowed them to be considered as potential candidates for biodegradable and bioabsorbable implant materials. In this work, we use the Mg-Zn-Ca system as a representative to investigate the effect of composition on the atomic-level structure and local chemical environment in Mg-based MGs from ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The results suggest that the short-range order of Mg(95-x)Zn(x)Ca5 (x = 21, 25, 29, and 33) MGs is characterized by Zn-centered icosahedral and icosahedral-like clusters, which show an increasing number and a rising tendency to interpenetrate each other with the enrichment of Zn constituents. A considerable degree of charge transfer between Zn and the surrounding Mg/Ca atoms is observed through electronic structure and bonding character analysis. At Zn-rich compositions, a percolated Zn-Zn network extended throughout the entire sample is formed, upon which the accumulated charges around Zn atoms are associated into a continuous conductivity path. Such results may shed light on the improved corrosion resistance of the Zn-rich Mg-Zn-Ca MGs.

  15. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  16. Room temperature homogeneous flow in a bulk metallic glass with low glass transition temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, K.; Xia, X. X.; Bai, H. Y.; Zhao, D. Q.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-04

    We report a high entropy metallic glass of Zn{sub 20}Ca{sub 20}Sr{sub 20}Yb{sub 20}(Li{sub 0.55}Mg{sub 0.45}){sub 20} via composition design that exhibiting remarkable homogeneous deformation without shear banding under stress at room temperature. The glass also shows properties such as low glass transition temperature (323 K) approaching room temperature, low density and high specific strength, good conductivity, polymerlike thermoplastic manufacturability, and ultralow elastic moduli comparable to that of bones. The alloy is thermally and chemically stable.

  17. Glasses, ceramics, and composites from lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beall, George H.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of useful silicate materials can be synthesized from lunar rocks and soils. The simplest to manufacture are glasses and glass-ceramics. Glass fibers can be drawn from a variety of basaltic glasses. Glass articles formed from titania-rich basalts are capable of fine-grained internal crystallization, with resulting strength and abrasion resistance allowing their wide application in construction. Specialty glass-ceramics and fiber-reinforced composites would rely on chemical separation of magnesium silicates and aluminosilicates as well as oxides titania and alumina. Polycrystalline enstatite with induced lamellar twinning has high fracture toughness, while cordierite glass-ceramics combine excellent thermal shock resistance with high flexural strengths. If sapphire or rutile whiskers can be made, composites of even better mechanical properties are envisioned.

  18. Drastic influence of minor Fe or Co additions on the glass forming ability, martensitic transformations and mechanical properties of shape memory Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glass composites

    PubMed Central

    González, Sergio; Pérez, Pablo; Rossinyol, Emma; Suriñach, Santiago; Dolors Baró, Maria; Pellicer, Eva; Sort, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zr48Cu48 − xAl4Mx (M ≡ Fe or Co, x = 0, 0.5, 1 at.%) metallic glass (MG) composites are highly dependent on the amount of Fe or Co added as microalloying elements in the parent Zr48Cu48Al4 material. Addition of Fe and Co promotes the transformation from austenite to martensite during the course of nanoindentation or compression experiments, resulting in an enhancement of plasticity. However, the presence of Fe or Co also reduces the glass forming ability, ultimately causing a worsening of the mechanical properties. Owing to the interplay between these two effects, the compressive plasticity for alloys with x = 0.5 (5.5% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Co0.5 and 6.2% in Zr48Cu47.5Al4Fe0.5) is considerably larger than for Zr48Cu48Al4 or the alloys with x = 1. Slight variations in the Young’s modulus (around 5–10%) and significant changes in the yield stress (up to 25%) are also observed depending on the composition. The different microstructural factors that have an influence on the mechanical behavior of these composites are investigated in detail: (i) co-existence of amorphous and crystalline phases in the as-cast state, (ii) nature of the crystalline phases (austenite versus martensite content), and (iii) propensity for the austenite to undergo a mechanically-driven martensitic transformation during plastic deformation. Evidence for intragranular nanotwins likely generated in the course of the austenite–martensite transformation is provided by transmission electron microscopy. Our results reveal that fine-tuning of the composition of the Zr–Cu–Al–(Fe,Co) system is crucial in order to optimize the mechanical performance of these bulk MG composites, to make them suitable materials for structural applications. PMID:27877691

  19. Amorphous Metals and Composites as Mirrors and Mirror Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Davis, Gregory L. (Inventor); Agnes, Gregory S. (Inventor); Shapiro, Andrew A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A mirror or mirror assembly fabricated by molding, pressing, assembling, or depositing one or more bulk metal glass (BMG), bulk metal glass composite (BMGMC), or amorphous metal (AM) parts and where the optical surface and backing of the mirror can be fabricated without machining or polishing by utilizing the unique molding capabilities of this class of materials.

  20. Formation of nanostructured metallic glass thin films upon sputtering.

    PubMed

    Ketov, Sergey V; Joksimovic, Rastko; Xie, Guoqiang; Trifonov, Artem; Kurihara, Kazue; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri V

    2017-01-01

    Morphology evolution of the multicomponent metallic glass film obtained by radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was investigated in the present work. Two modes of metallic glass sputtering were distinguished: smooth film mode and clustered film mode. The sputtering parameters, which have the most influence on the sputtering modes, were determined. As a result, amorphous Ni-Nb thin films with a smooth surface and nanoglassy structure were deposited on silica float glass and Si substrates. The phase composition of the target appeared to have a significant influence on the chemical composition of the deposited amorphous thin film. The differences in charge transport and nanomechanical properties between the smooth and nanoglassy Ni-Nb film were also determined.

  1. Major element composition of Luna 20 glasses.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, J.; Reid, A. M.; Ridley, W. I.; Brown, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Ten per cent of the 50 to 150-micron size fraction of Luna 20 soil is glass. A random suite of 270 of these glasses has been analyzed by electron microprobe techniques. The major glass type forms a strong cluster around a mean value corresponding to Highland basalt (anorthositic gabbro) with 70% normative feldspar. Minor glass groups have the compositions of mare basalts and of low-K Fra Mauro type basalts. The glass data indicate that Highland basalt is the major rock type in the highlands north of Mare Fecunditatis.

  2. Structure of glasses containing transition metal ions. Progress report, February 1, 1979-January 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    White, W B; Furukawa, T; Tsong, I S.T.; Fox, K; Herman, J S; Houser, C; Nelson, C

    1980-02-01

    New normal coordinate calculations were used to relate the vibrational frequencies of silicate glasses to Si-O force constants. These appear to account for the observed frequency shifts with degree of silica polymerization. Raman spectroscopy has been used to elucidate the structure of sodium borosilicate glasses and of sodium aluminosilicate glasses. Structures of compositionally complex glasses can be understood if spectra are measured on many glasses spaced at small compositional intervals. Optical absorption spectra were used to investigate the structural setting of iron in alkali silicate glasses. Research on the alkali-hydrogen exchange in alkali silicate glasses was completed and additional work on ternary glasses is under way. A series of appendices present completed work on the structural investigations of alkali borosilicate glasses, on the structural setting of transition metal ions in glasses, and on the diffusion of hydrogen in alkali silicate glasses.

  3. Glass transition temperature of bulk metallic glasses: A linear connection with the mixing enthalpy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuelian; Bian, Xiufang; Hu, Lina; Wu, Yuqin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Junyan

    2007-05-01

    A linear relationship is found between the glass transition temperature Tg and the absolute value of the mixing enthalpy, |ΔHchem|, for bulk metallic glass systems. The increasing (or lowering) of Tg with an admixture of metals or other elements manifests itself in the larger (or smaller) of |ΔHchem| in a given system. The results indicate that the composition dependence of Tg results from the change of excess entropy (Sex) during thermal excitation. The |ΔHchem|, which relates to the strength of interaction among different atoms, corresponds to part of the Sex at Tg [Sex(Tg)]. The glass transition temperatures for Cu-Zr (Hf)-, Zr-Cu-, and La-Al-based glassy alloys are correlated with the interaction intensity between their based binary eutectic compositions, respectively.

  4. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1985-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  5. Metallic glass as a temperature sensor during ion plating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Spalvins, T.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    The temperature of the interface and/or a superficial layer of a substrate during ion plating was investigated using a metallic glass of the composition Fe67Co18B14Si1 as the substrate and as the temperature sensor. Transmission electron microscopy and diffraction studies determined the microstructure of the ion-plated gold film and the substrate. Results indicate that crystallization occurs not only in the film, but also in the substrate. The grain size of crystals formed during ion plating was 6 to 60 nm in the gold film and 8 to 100 nm in the substrate at a depth of 10 to 15 micrometers from the ion-plated interface. The temperature rise of the substrate during ion plating was approximately 500 C. Discontinuous changes in metallurgical microstructure, and physical, chemical, and mechanical properties during the amorphous to crystalline transition in metallic glasses make metallic glasses extremely useful materials for temperature sensor applications in coating processes.

  6. Alloy with metallic glass and quasi-crystalline properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Li-Qian; Hufnagel, Todd C.; Ramesh, Kaliat T.

    2004-02-17

    An alloy is described that is capable of forming a metallic glass at moderate cooling rates and exhibits large plastic flow at ambient temperature. Preferably, the alloy has a composition of (Zr, Hf).sub.a Ta.sub.b Ti.sub.c Cu.sub.d Ni.sub.e Al.sub.f, where the composition ranges (in atomic percent) are 45.ltoreq.a.ltoreq.70, 3.ltoreq.b.ltoreq.7.5, 0.ltoreq.c.ltoreq.4, 3.ltoreq.b+c.ltoreq.10, 10.ltoreq.d.ltoreq.30, 0.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.20, 10.ltoreq.d+e.ltoreq.35, and 5.ltoreq.f.ltoreq.15. The alloy may be cast into a bulk solid with disordered atomic-scale structure, i.e., a metallic glass, by a variety of techniques including copper mold die casting and planar flow casting. The as-cast amorphous solid has good ductility while retaining all of the characteristic features of known metallic glasses, including a distinct glass transition, a supercooled liquid region, and an absence of long-range atomic order. The alloy may be used to form a composite structure including quasi-crystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. Such a composite quasi-crystalline structure has much higher mechanical strength than a crystalline structure.

  7. Wetting of metals and glasses on Mo

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Saiz, Eduardo; Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Benhassine, Mehdi; de Coninck, Joel; Rauch, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred

    2008-01-08

    The wetting of low melting point metals and Si-Ca-Al-Ti-O glasses on molybdenum has been investigated. The selected metals (Au, Cu, Ag) form a simple eutectic with Mo. Metal spreading occurs under nonreactive conditions without interdiffusion or ridge formation. The metals exhibit low (non-zero) contact angles on Mo but this requires temperatures higher than 1100 C in reducing atmospheres in order to eliminate a layer of adsorbed impurities on the molybdenum surface. By controlling the oxygen activity in the furnace, glass spreading can take place under reactive or nonreactive conditions. We have found that in the glass/Mo system the contact angle does not decrease under reactive conditions. In all cases, adsorption from the liquid seems to accelerate the diffusivity on the free molybdenum surface.

  8. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-01-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals. PMID:26853460

  9. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D.; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L.

    2016-02-01

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals.

  10. Shaping metallic glasses by electromagnetic pulsing.

    PubMed

    Kaltenboeck, Georg; Demetriou, Marios D; Roberts, Scott; Johnson, William L

    2016-02-08

    With damage tolerance rivalling advanced engineering alloys and thermoplastic forming capabilities analogous to conventional plastics, metallic glasses are emerging as a modern engineering material. Here, we take advantage of their unique electrical and rheological properties along with the classic Lorentz force concept to demonstrate that electromagnetic coupling of electric current and a magnetic field can thermoplastically shape a metallic glass without conventional heating sources or applied mechanical forces. Specifically, we identify a process window where application of an electric current pulse in the presence of a normally directed magnetic field can ohmically heat a metallic glass to a softened state, while simultaneously inducing a large enough magnetic body force to plastically shape it. The heating and shaping is performed on millisecond timescales, effectively bypassing crystallization producing fully amorphous-shaped parts. This electromagnetic forming approach lays the groundwork for a versatile, time- and energy-efficient manufacturing platform for ultrastrong metals.

  11. Glass matrix composites from coal flyash and waste glass

    SciTech Connect

    Boccaccini, A.R.; Buecker, M.; Bossert, J.; Marszalek, K.

    1997-12-31

    Glass matrix composites have been fabricated from waste materials by means of powder technology. Flyash from coal power stations and waste glass, residue of float glass production, were used. Commercial alumina platelets were employed as the reinforcing component. For flyash contents up to 20% by weight nearly fully dense compacts could be fabricated by using relatively low sintering temperatures (650 C). For higher flyash contents the densification was hindered due to the presence of crystalline particles in the as-received flyash, which jeopardized the viscous flow densification mechanism. The addition of alumina platelets resulted in better mechanical properties of the composites than those of the unreinforced matrix, despite a residual porosity present. Young`s modulus, modulus of rupture, hardness and fracture toughness increase with platelet volume fraction. The low brittleness index of the composites suggests that the materials have good machinability. A qualitative analysis of the wear behavior showed that the composite containing 20% by volume platelet addition has a higher wear resistance than the unreinforced matrix. Overall, the results indicate that the materials may compete with conventional glasses and glass-ceramics in technical applications.

  12. Microstructure, mechanical and bio-corrosion properties of Mn-doped Mg-Zn-Ca bulk metallic glass composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingfeng; Huang, Song; Li, Yang; Wei, Yiyun; Xi, Xingfeng; Cai, Kaiyong

    2013-10-01

    The effects of Mn substitution for Mg on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and corrosion behavior of Mg69-xZn27Ca4Mnx (x=0, 0.5 and 1at.%) alloys were investigated using X-ray diffraction, compressive tests, electrochemical treatments, and immersion tests, respectively. Microstructural observations showed that the Mg69Zn27Ca4 alloy was mainly amorphous. The addition of Mn decreases the glass-forming ability, which results in a decreased strength from 545 MPa to 364 MPa. However, this strength is still suitable for implant application. Polarization and immersion tests in the simulated body fluid at 37 °C revealed that the Mn-doped Mg-Zn-Ca alloys have significantly higher corrosion resistance than traditional ZK60 and pure Mg alloys. Cytotoxicity test showed that cell viabilities of osteoblasts cultured with Mn-doped Mg-Zn-Ca alloys extracts were higher than that of pure Mg. Mg68.5Zn27Ca4Mn0.5 exhibits the highest bio-corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and has desirable mechanical properties, which could suggest to be used as biomedical materials in the future.

  13. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    DOEpatents

    Cline, C.F.

    1983-10-20

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature regime.

  14. Fabrication of metallic glass structures

    DOEpatents

    Cline, Carl F.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metal powders or ribbons are fabricated into solid shapes of appreciable thickness by the application of compaction energy. The temperature regime wherein the amorphous metal deforms by viscous flow is measured. The metal powders or ribbons are compacted within the temperature range.

  15. Bioactive glass coatings for orthopedic metallic implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Esteban, Sonia; Saiz, Eduardo; Fujino, Sigheru; Oku, Takeo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Tomsia, Antoni P.

    2003-06-30

    The objective of this work is to develop bioactive glass coatings for metallic orthopedic implants. A new family of glasses in the SiO2-Na2O-K2O-CaO-MgO-P2O5 system has been synthesized and characterized. The glass properties (thermal expansion, softening and transformation temperatures, density and hardness) are in line with the predictions of established empirical models. The optimized firing conditions to fabricate coatings on Ti-based and Co-Cr alloys have been determined and related to the glass properties and the interfacial reactions. Excellent adhesion to alloys has been achieved through the formation of 100-200 nm thick interfacial layers (Ti5Si3 on Ti-based alloys and CrOx on Co-Cr). Finally, glass coatings, approximately 100 mu m thick, have been fabricated onto commercial Ti alloy-based dental implants.

  16. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  17. Structural rejuvenation in bulk metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Tong, Yang; Iwashita, T.; Dmowski, Wojciech; ...

    2015-01-05

    Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we study structural changes in bulk metallic glasses after uniaxial compressive homogeneous deformation at temperatures slightly below the glass transition. We observe that deformation results in structural disordering corresponding to an increase in the fictive, or effective, temperature. However, the structural disordering saturates after yielding. Lastly, examination of the experimental structure and molecular dynamics simulation suggests that local changes in the atomic connectivity network are the main driving force of the structural rejuvenation.

  18. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  19. Thulium-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, H. B.; Yu, P.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2008-04-07

    We report the formation and properties of a thulium-based bulk metallic glass (BMG). Compared with other known rare-earth (RE) based BMGs, Tm-based BMGs show features of excellent glass formation ability, considerable higher elastic modulus, smaller Poisson's ratio, high mechanical strength, and intrinsic brittleness. The reasons for the different properties between the Tm-based and other RE-based BMGs are discussed. It is expected that the Tm-based glasses with the unique properties are appropriate candidates for studying some important issues in BMGs.

  20. EFFECTS OF TEST TEMPERATURE ON FLOW OF METALLIC GLASSES

    SciTech Connect

    A.S. NOURI; Y. LIU; P. WESSELING; J. LEWANDOWSKI

    2006-04-12

    Micro-hardness experiments were conducted over a range of temperatures using a Nikon QM micro-hardness machine on a number of metallic glass (e.g. Zr-, Fe-, Al-) systems. Although high micro-hardness was exhibited at room temperature, significant hardness reductions were exhibited near the glass transition temperature, T{sub g}. The effects of changes in test temperature on the micro-hardness will be reported. The effects of exposure time on the hardness evolution at a given temperature will also be summarized to illustrate some of the differences in behavior of the systems shown. The extreme softening near T{sub g}, characteristic of bulk metallic glass systems, enables the exploration of novel deformation processing. In order to develop deformation processing windows, the evaluation of bulk metallic glass mechanical properties under quasi-static conditions and the determination of flow properties at different temperatures and strain rates are reported. The use of such information to create layered/composite bulk metallic glasses will be summarized.

  1. Lithium and Sodium Resistance of Alkali Metal Vapor Resistant Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishinevski, Anatoly; Hall, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    A common challenge in atomic physics is that of containing an alkali metal vapor at an elevated temperature and concurrently being able to excite and probe atomic transitions within. Typically glass is used as the material to construct the container, as it is easy to manipulate into any geometry and offers thermal, mechanical, and optical properties that no other material is capable. Unfortunately it has been well established that alkali metal gasses/vapors react readily with silica containing glass and results in a progressive darkening of the material. As the darkening reaction progresses, the optical transmission properties of the glass progressively degrade to an eventual point of uselessness. Alkali metals have been used extensively in frequency standards and magnetometers. The finite life of these alkali metal vapor-containing devices has been accepted despite varying attempts by different teams to solve this problem. As a viable solution, it has been identified there exist a family of glass compositions that contain a marginal amount of silica, may be lampworked using traditional glassblowing techniques, and that offer substantially better alkali vapor resistance. The evaluation of these glasses and their resistance to sodium and lithium vapor at varying pressures and temperatures are discussed.

  2. Key factors affecting mechanical behavior of metallic glass nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Qi-Kai; Li, Mo

    2017-01-01

    Both strengthening and weakening trends with decreasing diameter have been observed for metallic glass nanowires, sometimes even in the samples with the same chemical composition. How to reconcile the results has reminded a puzzle. Since the detailed stress state and microstructure of metallic glass nanowires may differ from each other significantly depending on preparation, to discover the intrinsic size effect it is necessary to study metallic glass nanowires fabricated differently. Here we show the complex size effects from one such class of metallic glass nanowires prepared by casting using molecular dynamics simulations. As compared with the nanowires of the same composition prepared by other methods, the cast nanowires deform nearly homogeneously with much lower strength but better ductility; and also show strengthening in tension but weakening in compression with decreasing wire diameter. The subtle size dependence is shown to be related to the key factors including internal and surface stress state, atomic structure variation, and presence of various gradients. The complex interplay of these factors at decreasing size leads to the different deformation behaviors. PMID:28134292

  3. Key factors affecting mechanical behavior of metallic glass nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Li, Qi-Kai; Li, Mo

    2017-01-01

    Both strengthening and weakening trends with decreasing diameter have been observed for metallic glass nanowires, sometimes even in the samples with the same chemical composition. How to reconcile the results has reminded a puzzle. Since the detailed stress state and microstructure of metallic glass nanowires may differ from each other significantly depending on preparation, to discover the intrinsic size effect it is necessary to study metallic glass nanowires fabricated differently. Here we show the complex size effects from one such class of metallic glass nanowires prepared by casting using molecular dynamics simulations. As compared with the nanowires of the same composition prepared by other methods, the cast nanowires deform nearly homogeneously with much lower strength but better ductility; and also show strengthening in tension but weakening in compression with decreasing wire diameter. The subtle size dependence is shown to be related to the key factors including internal and surface stress state, atomic structure variation, and presence of various gradients. The complex interplay of these factors at decreasing size leads to the different deformation behaviors.

  4. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  5. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The development of structurally efficient, metal-lined, glass-fiber composite pressure vessels. Both the current state-of-the-art and current problems are discussed along with fracture mechanics considerations for the metal liner. The design concepts used for metal-lined, glass-fiber, composite pressure vessels are described and the structural characteristics of the composite designs are compared with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. Results of a current program to evaluate flaw growth and fracture characteristics of the metal liners are reviewed and the impact of these results on composite pressure vessel designs is discussed.

  6. Cooling rates for glass containing lunar compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, C. Y.; Yinnon, H.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling rates required to form glassy or partly-crystalline bodies of 14 lunar compositions have been estimated using a previously introduced, simplified model. The calculated cooling rates are found to be in good agreement with cooling rates measured for the same compositions. Measurements are also reported of the liquidus temperature and glass transition temperature for each composition. Inferred cooling rates are combined with heat flow analyses to obtain insight into the thermal histories of samples 15422, 14162, 15025, 74220, 74241, 10084, 15425, and 15427. The critical cooling rates required to form glasses of 24 lunar compositions, including the 14 compositions of the present study, are suggested to increase systematically with increasing ratio of total network modifiers/total network formers in the compositions. This reflects the importance of melt viscosity in affecting glass formation.

  7. Crystallization of heavy metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Bruce, Allan J.; Doremus, R. H.; Moynihan, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The kinetics of crystallization of a number of fluorozirconate glasses were studied using isothermal and dynamic differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The addition of the fluorides LiF, NaF, AlF3, LaF3 to a base glass composition of ZrF4-BaF2 reduced the tendency to crystallize, probably by modifying the viscosity-temperature relation. ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF glass was the most stable against devitrification and perhaps is the best composition for optical fibers with low scattering loss. Some glasses first crystallize out into metastable beta-BaZr2F10 and beta-BaZrF6 phases, which transform into the most stable alpha-phases when heated to higher temperatures. The size of the crystallites was estimated to be about 600 A from X-ray diffraction.

  8. Bulk metallic glasses deform via slip avalanches.

    PubMed

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R; Hufnagel, Todd C; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T; Dahmen, Karin A

    2014-04-18

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  9. Bulk Metallic Glasses Deform via Slip Avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonaglia, James; Wright, Wendelin J.; Gu, Xiaojun; Byer, Rachel R.; Hufnagel, Todd C.; LeBlanc, Michael; Uhl, Jonathan T.; Dahmen, Karin A.

    2014-04-01

    For the first time in metallic glasses, we extract both the exponents and scaling functions that describe the nature, statistics, and dynamics of slip events during slow deformation, according to a simple mean field model. We model the slips as avalanches of rearrangements of atoms in coupled shear transformation zones (STZs). Using high temporal resolution measurements, we find the predicted, different statistics and dynamics for small and large slips thereby excluding self-organized criticality. The agreement between model and data across numerous independent measures provides evidence for slip avalanches of STZs as the elementary mechanism of inhomogeneous deformation in metallic glasses.

  10. Mechanical properties of bioactive glasses, glass-ceramics and composites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, I D; Hench, L L

    1998-01-01

    The application of bioactive glass and glass-ceramics has been widely documented over the past twenty years but the high modulus and low fracture toughness has made them less applicable for clinical, load bearing, applications. The development of non-resorbable polyethylene and polysulphone matrices for these materials has improved the mechanical properties. However, the primary concern of whether the bioactivity of the composites is reduced is still unresolved. The more recent development of resorbable carrier systems, dextran and collagen, for bioactive glasses does not introduce such problems, hence making this form of composite suitable for novel soft tissue applications. The development of a simple quality index has enabled some of the materials described within this paper to be ranked by their ability to replace bone, thus enabling possible new research directions to be emphasized.

  11. Chemical constraints on fly ash glass compositions

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Brindle; Michael J. McCarthy

    2006-12-15

    The major oxide content and mineralogy of 75 European fly ashes were examined, and the major element composition of the glass phase was obtained for each. Correlation of compositional trends with the glass content of the ash was explored. Alkali content was deduced to have a major influence on glass formation, and this in turn could be related to the probable chemistry of clay minerals in the source coals. Maximal glass content corresponded to high aluminum content in the glass, and this is in accordance with the theoretical mechanism of formation of aluminosilicate glasses, in which network-modifying oxides are required to promote tetrahedral coordination of aluminum in glass chain structures. Iron oxide was found to substitute for alkali oxides where the latter were deficient, and some indications of preferred eutectic compositions were found. The work suggests that the proportion of the glass phase in the ash can be predicted from the coal mineralogy and that the utility of a given ash for processing into geopolymers or zeolites is determined by its source. 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The properties of metal-reinforced glass ionomer materials.

    PubMed

    Chung, K H

    1993-01-01

    The physical properties and bond strengths of two glass ionomer materials reinforced with silver and amalgam alloy powders were compared with those of a conventional material from the same manufacture as well as two commercially available products. The diametral tensile strength, hardness and bonding strength are improved with the addition of either commercial available silver particles or fabricated high-copper amalgam alloy powders to the glass. Simple mixture of the metal or alloy powders with the glass ionomer cement seems to be feasible to improve the properties of the regular cement. However, further studies in formulating an optimal composition of metal or alloy, setting characteristics and long-term clinical evaluation are necessary before proposing uses for this new material.

  13. Predicting Novel Bulk Metallic Glasses via High- Throughput Calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perim, E.; Lee, D.; Liu, Y.; Toher, C.; Gong, P.; Li, Y.; Simmons, W. N.; Levy, O.; Vlassak, J.; Schroers, J.; Curtarolo, S.

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are materials which may combine key properties from crystalline metals, such as high hardness, with others typically presented by plastics, such as easy processability. However, the cost of the known BMGs poses a significant obstacle for the development of applications, which has lead to a long search for novel, economically viable, BMGs. The emergence of high-throughput DFT calculations, such as the library provided by the AFLOWLIB consortium, has provided new tools for materials discovery. We have used this data to develop a new glass forming descriptor combining structural factors with thermodynamics in order to quickly screen through a large number of alloy systems in the AFLOWLIB database, identifying the most promising systems and the optimal compositions for glass formation. National Science Foundation (DMR-1436151, DMR-1435820, DMR-1436268).

  14. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic glass matrix composites for use at 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Minford, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The fabrication and properties of the graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system are described. By reinforcing borosilicate glass with graphite fibers it has been possible to develop a composite whose properties can be compared favorably with resin matrix counterparts. Both high elastic modulus and strength can be obtained and maintained to temperatures of approximately 600 C. In addition, composite dimensional stability is superior to resin or metal matrix systems due to the low thermal expansion behavior of the glass matrix.

  15. Ni- and Be-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high glass-forming ability and unusual plasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengli; Xie, Guoqiang; Qin, Fengxiang; Wang, Xinmin; Inoue, Akihisa

    2012-09-01

    We developed Ni- and Be-free Zr(45+x)Cu(40-x)Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ bulk metallic glasses with large glass-forming ability and unusual plasticity. The alloys have large critical diameters (larger than 10 mm) in a wide composition range (x=0-20). The Zr₅₀Cu₃₅Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ and Zr₅₅Cu₃₀Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ alloys exhibit the largest critical diameter (between 18 and 20 mm). The Zr(45+x)Cu(40-x)Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ bulk metallic glasses also have large plastic elongation in wide composition range (x=10-17). The Zr₆₂Cu₂₃Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ bulk metallic glass exhibits significant plasticity (over 20% of plastic elongation). With increasing Zr content, the compressive strength decreases except for the Zr₆₇Cu₁₈Al₇Pd₅Nb₃ alloy. The fragility parameters were calculated to evaluate the glass-forming ability and plasticity. The fragility exhibits more sensitive correlation with plasticity than glass-forming ability. The ZrCuAlPdNb bulk metallic glasses have high crystallization activation energies of above 300 kJ/mol. The ZrCuAlPdNb bulk metallic glasses are favorable for application to biomaterials.

  16. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, H.

    1983-07-26

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 wt % boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90% tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 and 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  17. Hard metal composition

    DOEpatents

    Sheinberg, Haskell

    1986-01-01

    A composition of matter having a Rockwell A hardness of at least 85 is formed from a precursor mixture comprising between 3 and 10 weight percent boron carbide and the remainder a metal mixture comprising from 70 to 90 percent tungsten or molybdenum, with the remainder of the metal mixture comprising nickel and iron or a mixture thereof. The composition has a relatively low density of between 7 to 14 g/cc. The precursor is preferably hot pressed to yield a composition having greater than 100% of theoretical density.

  18. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  19. Glass-metal objects from archaeological excavation: corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner-Wronowa, Elżbieta; Zabiegaj, Dominika; Piccardo, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    This paper contributes to the investigations on history, technology, and degradation of middle age objects (metallic rings with mounted glass beads) recently excavated under the Main Square in Krakow (Poland). Moreover, they were discovered in soil layers differing by chemical composition and microclimate parameters. Historical material is indeed very limited in terms of quantity and sample size, and the following nondestructive analyses were applied: scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF). The glass and the metal were separately tested. Metallography on cross-sections (by both optical and scanning electron microscopy) was applied only on microfragments sampled from metallic rings. The achieved results pointed out how the local microclimate affected the degradation of the analyzed rings developing locally different corrosion processes. Each tested glass of "ring eye" shows a specific chemical composition. All glass pieces were covered by silica gel, and locally more advanced corrosion has been found.

  20. Characteristics of Johari-Goldstein relaxations in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jichao; Casalini, Riccardo; Pelletier, Jean-Marc; Kato, Hidemi; Yao, Yao; Yao'S Group Team; Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory Team; Pvmh, Mateis, Insa de Lyon Team; Kato'S Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    The dynamics of Pd-based metallic glasses was studied by mechanical spectroscopy and modulated differential scanning calorimetry. The results show the change in composition has a significant effect on the α relaxation dynamics. All Pd-based metallic glasses have similar fragilities, 59 < m <67, and Kohlrausch stretched exponents, 0.59 <βKWW <0.60. The values of m and βKWW correlate well with the general relation proposed by Böhmer et al. for other glassy materials and the substitution of the Ni with Cu induced a large change in the time constant of the β relaxation, τβ. The activation energy, Uβ, of the β relaxation was generally independent of chemical composition. In all cases, 25 glass formers. From the heat capacity and mechanical loss, the number of dynamically correlated units, Ncwere obtained; significantly larger Nc values for these metallic glasses were observed compared with glassy materials.

  1. Metallic Glass Cooling Inside The TEMPUS Furnace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    A sample of advanced metallic glass alloy cools down during an experiment with the TEMPUS furnace on STS-94, July 7, 1997, MET:5/23:35 (approximate). The sequence shows the sample glowing, then fading to black as scientists began the process of preserving the liquid state, but lowering the temperature below the normal solidification temperature of the alloy. This process is known as undercooling. (10 second clip covering approximately 50 seconds.) TEMPUS (stands for Tiegelfreies Elektromagnetisches Prozessiere unter Schwerelosigkeit (containerless electromagnetic processing under weightlessness). It was developed by the German Space Agency (DARA) for flight aboard Spacelab. The DARA project scientist was Igon Egry. The experiment was part of the space research investigations conducted during the Microgravity Science Laboratory-1R mission (STS-94, July 1-17 1997). DARA and NASA are exploring the possibility of flying an advanced version of TEMPUS on the International Space Station. (1.1MB, 9-second MPEG, screen 320 x 240 pixels; downlinked video, higher quality not available) A still JPG composite of this movie is available at http://mix.msfc.nasa.gov/ABSTRACTS/MSFC-0300188.html.

  2. Atomic structure of biodegradable Mg-based bulk metallic glass.

    PubMed

    Christie, J K

    2015-05-21

    We have used highly accurate first-principles molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the structure of Mg60Zn35Ca5 and Mg72Zn23Ca5 bulk metallic glasses, which are candidate materials for biomedical implants; these two compositions exhibit different behaviours when implanted. The environments of each species are different, and average coordination numbers are ∼13 for Mg, ∼11 for Zn and ∼18-19 for Ca. A wide range of local environments were found and icosahedral motifs, often seen in bulk metallic glasses, were among the most common for both Mg and Zn. Through the computation of a chemical short-range order parameter, a moderate avoidance of Zn-Zn bonding over Zn-Mg or Zn-Ca was observed. No statistically significant difference in structure was observed between the two compositions.

  3. Dimensionally Stable Graphite-Fiber/Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Robert; Bergen, George J.; Studer, Philip A.

    1992-01-01

    Method of making composites of glass matrices reinforced by graphite fibers provides for control of proportions, orientations, and distributions of fibers in matrices and for fused bonds between fibers and matrices. Enables fabrication of composites of high specific strength and dimensional stability. Method particularly suitable for making low-thermal-expansion platforms for optical instruments.

  4. Influence of temperature and glass composition on aluminum nitride contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarnovskiy, R.; Ditts, A.

    2016-11-01

    Results of research of different glass compositions for possibility of their application in metallization pastes intended for ceramics based on aluminum nitride are presented in this article. It includes research of contact angle of aluminum nitride with glasses of different compositions at different temperatures and different roughness of ceramics.

  5. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, B.R.; McBranch, D.W.; Robinson, J.M.; Koskelo, A.C.; Love, S.P.

    1995-05-30

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites is described. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C{sub 60} in silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these ``guests`` in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C{sub 60}. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C{sub 60} dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C{sub 60} in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  6. Preparation of fullerene/glass composites

    DOEpatents

    Mattes, Benjamin R.; McBranch, Duncan W.; Robinson, Jeanne M.; Koskelo, Aaron C.; Love, Steven P.

    1995-01-01

    Synthesis of fullerene/glass composites. A direct method for preparing solid solutions of C.sub.60 in silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2) glass matrices by means of sol-gel chemistry is described. In order to produce highly concentrated fullerene-sol-gel-composites it is necessary to increase the solubility of these "guests" in a delivery solvent which is compatible with the starter sol (receiving solvent). Sonication results in aggregate disruption by treatment with high frequency sound waves, thereby accelerating the rate of hydrolysis of the alkoxide precursor, and the solution process for the C.sub.60. Depending upon the preparative procedure, C.sub.60 dispersed within the glass matrix as microcrystalline domains, or dispersed as true molecular solutions of C.sub.60 in a solid glass matrix, is generated by the present method.

  7. Plasma-sprayed metal-glass fluoride coatings for lubrication to 1170 K (1650 F)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma spray of Nichrome matrix composite contains dispersed glass for oxidation protection and calcium fluoride for lubrication. Coatings can be applied to bearing journals and bearing bores. Coating was easily machinable and had excellent bond strength on substrate metal.

  8. Stability of Glass Fiber-Plastic Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-11-01

    differs between the two main sources ( Owens - Corning and Ferro Corporation) from which samples were obtained for this research program. However...according to published work by Humphrey (8) of Owens - Corning , the approximate composition of S-glass (994) is 65% S1Ü2, 25% A1203 and 10% MgO. From the...fibers. S-glass fibers furnished by both Owens - Corning and Ferro Cor- poration were utilized and the results analyzed using scanning electron 34

  9. Glass/polymer composites and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Samuels, W.D.; Exarhos, G.J.

    1995-06-06

    The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

  10. Glass/polymer composites and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Samuels, W. D.; Exarhos, Gregory J.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention relates to new glass/polymer composites and methods for making them. More specifically, the invention is glass/polymer composites having phases that are at the molecular level and thereby practicably indistinguishable. The invention further discloses making molecular phase glass/polymer composites by mixing a glass and a polymer in a compatible solvent.

  11. Glass Stability and Kinetic Analysis of Iron-Metalloid Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhaweesuk, Charuayporn

    Multicomponent Fe-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with a combination of excellent properties such as good soft magnetic properties, high strength, high hardness, and high corrosion resistance have attracted increasing attention both from a basic science research standpoint and due to their industrial application potential. However, many of the elemental additions which lead to the easiest glass formation are expensive. The identification of alloys composed of abundant and inexpensive elements that still retain excellent properties would promote applications for engineering and industry. In short, the development of the Fe-based BMG without any glass-forming metal elements and with high glass forming ability is desired. This study shows that the thermal stability of the Fe-based alloys can be improved beyond a simple rule of mixtures prediction by utilizing a well-balance multi-metalloid approach. The kinetics aspect of glass-forming ability is studied experimentally for Fe-B-Si-P alloys. The systematic variation in alloy composition gives access to differences in phase selection and the final dimensions of glass formation. Two alloys, representing the best glass-forming composition and the poorest glass-forming composition, were studied in terms of their stability to crystallization, solidification microstructure evolution and thermal history. The utility of the wedge-casting technique is developed to examine bulk glass-forming alloys by combining multiple temperature profiles of the quenching melt with a measurement-based kinetic analysis of the phase selection competition and critical cooling rate conditions. Based upon direct thermal measurement, microstructural analysis and kinetic modeling, it was found that both representative alloys show a board spectrum of solidification microstructures which include a critical cooling rate range. The kinetic competition in the formation of certain phases can enhance or detract from the final dimension of bulk glass

  12. GLASS COMPOSITION AND PROCESS OF MAKING

    DOEpatents

    Bishay, A.M.

    1962-09-01

    Glass compositions are described which are suitable for scintillators of thermal-neutron counters. The glass consists of from 70 to 75 mole% of B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, from 7 to 9 mole% of Ce/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and from 23 to 16 mole% of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ plus Na/sub 2 /O in a mole ratio of 1 to 1.5. The process of making the glass from cerous oxalate, ammonium pentaborate, sodium carbonate, and hydrated alumina in a nonoxidizing atmosphere at 1400-1500 deg C is given. (AEC)

  13. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, G.G.; Livingston, R.R.; Baylor, L.C.; Whitaker, M.J.; O`Rourke, P.E.

    1997-06-10

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications is described. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagent strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping. 12 figs.

  14. Tetraethyl orthosilicate-based glass composition and method

    DOEpatents

    Wicks, George G.; Livingston, Ronald R.; Baylor, Lewis C.; Whitaker, Michael J.; O'Rourke, Patrick E.

    1997-01-01

    A tetraethyl orthosilicate-based, sol-gel glass composition with additives selected for various applications. The composition is made by mixing ethanol, water, and tetraethyl orthosilicate, adjusting the pH into the acid range, and aging the mixture at room temperature. The additives, such as an optical indicator, filler, or catalyst, are then added to the mixture to form the composition which can be applied to a substrate before curing. If the additive is an indicator, the light-absorbing characteristics of which vary upon contact with a particular analyte, the indicator can be applied to a lens, optical fiber, reagant strip, or flow cell for use in chemical analysis. Alternatively, an additive such as alumina particles is blended into the mixture to form a filler composition for patching cracks in metal, glass, or ceramic piping.

  15. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  16. Atomic Transport in Metallic Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    creep, amorphous metals, canpositionally modulated films, structural relaxation, iso-configurational flow, bimolecular kinetics, Stokes-Einstein relation ...34 731471 60 rcoe F I iov s isasso Einstain relation from the viscosity. - S/N8CUN@4* 40 CLASSIPICATIOOW OF T04lS PAGEL(010 fON41 EW PREFACE This report...12- tion, B is related to the macroscopic interdiffusion coefficient, B, by r 2 K 13 I+ -.1 (2) where f; is the second derivative, with respect to

  17. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1985-08-26

    Disclosed is a method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  18. Method for forming glass-to-metal seals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, Daniel P.; Massey, Richard T.

    1986-01-01

    A method for forming a glass-to-metal seal in which the glass has a higher melting point than the metal. The molten glass is vacuum injection molded onto the metal, thus melting a very thin layer of the surface of the metal long enough to form a seal, but not long enough to cause a distortion in the shape of the metal component.

  19. Structural aspects of elastic deformation of a metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, T. C.; Ott, R. T.; Almer, J.

    2006-02-01

    We report the use of high-energy x-ray scattering to measure strain in a Zr{sub 57}Ti{sub 5}Cu{sub 20}Ni{sub 8}Al{sub 10} bulk metallic glass in situ during uniaxial compression in the elastic regime up to stresses of approximately 60% of the yield stress. The strains extracted in two ways--directly from the normalized scattering data and from the pair correlation functions--are in good agreement with each other for length scales greater than 4 A. The elastic modulus calculated on the basis of this strain is in good agreement with that reported for closely related amorphous alloys based on macroscopic measurements. The strain measured for atoms in the nearest-neighbor shell, however, is smaller than that for more distant shells, and the effective elastic modulus calculated from the strain on this scale is therefore larger, comparable to crystalline alloys of similar composition. These observations are in agreement with previously proposed models in which the nominally elastic deformation of a metallic glass has a significant anelastic component due to atomic rearrangements in topologically unstable regions of the structure. We also observe that the distribution of the atomic-level stresses in the glass becomes more uniform during loading. This implies that the stiffness of metallic glasses may have an entropic contribution, analogous to the entropic contribution in rubber elasticity.

  20. Spinodal Decomposition of Ni-Nb-Y metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mattern, Norbert; G, Goerigk; Vainio, U; Miller, Michael K; Gemming, T; Eckert, J

    2009-01-01

    Phase-separated Ni-Nb-Y metallic glasses were prepared by rapid quenching from the melt. The early stages of decomposition were characterized in Ni-Nb-Y alloys with Ni contents of more than 60 at.%. Strongly correlated chemical fluctuations with a nanometer length scale were found to exist in the as-quenched state. The observed fluctuation lengths range from 5 to 12 nm, depending on the actual composition of the glass. The 'frozen-in' early stages of decomposition occur in the deeply undercooled melt due to the reduction in the critical temperature of liquid-liquid phase separation with Ni content. Annealing of the phase-separated Ni{sub 70}Nb{sub 15}Y{sub 15} glass below the crystallization temperature leads to an increase in the amplitude of the fluctuations. However, the wavelength was unchanged, which provides evidence for the spinodal character of the decomposition.

  1. Research on Graphite Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    This report contains the results obtained in the first twelve months of research under NASA Langley Contract NAS1-14346 for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites. Included in the report is a summary of the research by other investigators in this area. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a C.G.W. 7740 (Pyrex) glass matrix. The graphite fibers used included Hercules HMS, Hercules HTS, Thornel 300S, and Celanese DG-102 and, of these, the Hercules HMS and Celanese DG-102 graphite fibers in C.G.W. 7740 gave the most interesting but widely different results. Hercules HMS fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) showed an average four-point flexural strength of 848 MPa or 127,300 psi. As the test temperature was raised from room temperature to 560 C in argon or vacuum, the strength was higher by 50 percent. However, in air, similar tests at 560 C gave a severe loss in strength. These composites also have good thermal cycle properties in argon or vacuum, greatly increased toughness compared to glass, and no loss in strength in a 100 cycle fatigue test. Celanese DG-102 fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) had a much lower flexural strength but did not suffer any loss in this strength when samples were heated to 560 C in air for 4 hrs.

  2. Advances in photo-thermo-refractive glass composition modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, S. A.; Ignatiev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The novel photo-thermo-refractive (PTR) glass developed in ITMO University is a very promising optical material for photonic and plasmonic applications. In this paper authors represent study of tin influence on photo thermo inducted crystallization process and make a comparison of the optical and holographic properties of the new and classic composition of glass. Also during this work was made overall optimization of chemical composition namely was optimized concentration of halides, fluorides, bromides which are responsible for crystalline phase properties. Ions of antimony, which playing key role in catching and transferring electrons emitted during the UV exposure and subsequent heating. Also was lowered the concentration of stray impurity ions which a capable to catch photo-electrons. Optical spectra show that new composition of PTR glass has no absorption band in visible range caused by metal nano particles of silver. That allows recording of pure phase holograms in wide spectral range. Furthermore new PTR glass allows receiving refractive index modulation up to 1500 ppm. And the UV exposures needed to achieve maximum changes in refraction index are 6-7 times lower than in classic glass.

  3. Phonon dispersion relation of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Daniel; Bruna, Pere; Valles, Araceli; Pineda, Eloi

    2016-10-01

    Experimental data on the phase sound speed of metallic glasses show anomalies in the terahertz range, reflecting an underlying complex behavior of their phonon dispersion spectrum not yet explained. We determine the phonon dispersion curve of metallic glasses by means of massive molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to obtain the low-q region behavior with unprecedented detail. Results confirm that the sound speed is constant below the THz range, down to the macroscopic limit. On the contrary, a hardening of the sound speed, more notable in the transverse case, is found in the THz range. This behavior is modeled in terms of a relaxation model. The model gives quantitative agreement and allows us to determine a new threshold frequency ωh, at the end of the boson-peak region. Above ωh the shear modulus increases dramatically, reflecting the end of the amorphous-like acoustic propagation region characterized by the excess density of vibrational states.

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell having a glass composite seal

    DOEpatents

    De Rose, Anthony J.; Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl Jacob

    2013-04-16

    A solid oxide fuel cell stack having a plurality of cassettes and a glass composite seal disposed between the sealing surfaces of adjacent cassettes, thereby joining the cassettes and providing a hermetic seal therebetween. The glass composite seal includes an alkaline earth aluminosilicate (AEAS) glass disposed about a viscous glass such that the AEAS glass retains the viscous glass in a predetermined position between the first and second sealing surfaces. The AEAS glass provides geometric stability to the glass composite seal to maintain the proper distance between the adjacent cassettes while the viscous glass provides for a compliant and self-healing seal. The glass composite seal may include fibers, powders, and/or beads of zirconium oxide, aluminum oxide, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), or mixtures thereof, to enhance the desirable properties of the glass composite seal.

  5. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-03-18

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation.

  6. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-01-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation. PMID:26988265

  7. Structural considerations in design of lightweight glass-fiber composite pressure vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The design concepts used for metal-lined glass-fiber composite pressure vessels are described, comparing the structural characteristics of the composite designs with each other and with homogeneous metal pressure vessels. Specific design techniques and available design data are identified. The discussion centers around two distinctly different design concepts, which provide the basis for defining metal lined composite vessels as either (1) thin-metal lined, or (2) glass fiber reinforced (GFR). Both concepts are described and associated development problems are identified and discussed. Relevant fabrication and testing experience from a series of NASA-Lewis Research Center development efforts is presented.

  8. Crystallization of Beryllium-Boron Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A F; Wall, M A; Nieh, T G

    2002-02-14

    Prior studies of evaporation and sputter deposition show that the grain size of pure beryllium can be dramatically refined through the incorporation of metal impurities. Recently, the addition of boron at a concentration greater than 11% is shown to serve as a glassy phase former in sputter deposited beryllium. Presently, thermally induced crystallization of the beryllium-boron metallic glass is reported. The samples are characterized during an in-situ anneal treatment with bright field imaging and electron diffraction using transmission electron microscopy. A nanocrystalline structure evolves from the annealed amorphous phase and the crystallization temperature is affected by the boron concentration.

  9. Flash Joule heating for ductilization of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Okulov, I V; Soldatov, I V; Sarmanova, M F; Kaban, I; Gemming, T; Edström, K; Eckert, J

    2015-07-29

    Metallic glasses (MGs) inherit their amorphous structure from the liquid state, which predetermines their ability to withstand high loads approaching the theoretical limit. However, the absence of slip systems makes them very sensitive to the type of loading and extremely brittle in tension. The latter can be improved by precipitation of ductile crystals, which suppress a catastrophic propagation of shear bands in a glassy matrix. Here we report a novel approach to obtain MG-matrix composites with tensile ductility by flash Joule heating applied to Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 (at.%) metallic glass. This homogeneous, volumetric and controllable rapid heat treatment allows achieving uniformly distributed metastable B2 CuZr crystals in the glassy matrix. It results in a significant tensile strain of 6.8±0.5%. Moreover, optimized adjustment of the heat-treatment conditions enables tuning of microstructure to achieve desired mechanical properties.

  10. Plastic Deformation in Zirconium Based Metallic Glasses via Nanoindentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melgarejo-Pinto, Zenon Humberto

    Since the discovery in 1960 of Au-Si amorphous alloy by rapidly quenching with cooling rates up to 106 K/s metallic glasses became as an important research topic in the materials science community because of their intriguing processing routes, structure and properties. Recently, new multicomponent glassy- alloy systems, bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), appeared with lower critical cooling rates (103 to 1 K/s) and superlative properties, such as corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, and high strength/modulus ratio. Nevertheless, low temperature brittleness remains a concern. This brittleness comes from the tendency of plastic deformation to concentrate into extremely narrow shear bands. The present research pursues a better understanding of plastic deformation in metallic glasses (MGs) by studying, via nanoindentation, the effect of thermal history, composition, and loading paths on the mechanical behavior of Zr-based MGs. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis helps to assess structural relaxation near glass transition temperature (T g). Broadband nanoindentation creep (BNC) and load transient nanoindentation experiments contribute to characterize the hardness-strain rate behavior and indentation size effects, respectively. As-cast Zr 50Cu45Al5 (at. %) metallic glasses evidenced hardness-strain rate loading path dependence, which gradually disappears by effect of the annealing treatments. Back-stresses effect is theorized as the cause of load path dependence behavior. Relaxation effect at low and high strain rates in BNC traces and load ramps "overshoots" in transient experiments enabled to confirm structural changes during mechanical deformation, which is not considered by thermal activation models of deformation. Most of the Zr-based metallic glasses exhibited measurable overshoot indentation size effect. Nonetheless, creep fraction size effect was observed just in as-cast Zr50Cu45Al5 alloys. Rheological mechanical model helps to both characterize the

  11. Polymeric, Metallic, and Other Glasses in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Stephen J.

    2008-01-01

    Non-ceramic glasses are not adequately discussed in introductory chemistry. Such glasses include polycarbonate, which many corrective lenses are made of, amber, enamel, gelatin, hard candy, coal, refrigerated glycerol, and metallic glasses that have been marketed in recent decades. What is usually discussed in elementary texts is siliceous glass,…

  12. Molybdenum sealing glass-ceramic composition

    DOEpatents

    Eagan, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having low hydrogen and helium permeability properties, along with high fracture strength, a thermal coefficient of expansion similar to that of molybdenum, and adaptable for hermetically sealing to molybdenum at temperatures of between about 900.degree. and about 950.degree.C. to form a hermatically sealed insulator body.

  13. A Process for Making Bulk Heavy Metal Fluoride Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This invention relates to the preparation of glasses, and, in particular, relates to the preparation of heavy metal fluoride glasses with...reproducible high optical qualities. Considerable effort has been expended to develop heavy metal fluoride glasses ( HMFG ) as a viable family of infrared

  14. Bulk formation of metallic glasses and amorphous silicon from the melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures and compositions for producing metallic glasses in bulk at slow cooling rates were investigated. An attempt was made to form the amorphous phase of the tetrahedrally coordinated elements (Si or Ge) by undercooling the melt. The crystal nucleation behavior of pure liquids and glass formers were examined.

  15. Fracture and deformation of a zirconium based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Katharine Marie

    the design of metallic glass matrix composites. A ductile particle reinforcement phase blocks the propagation of shear bands and distributes plastic deformation over a larger volume, giving rise to extensive stable crack growth at stress intensities double the intrinsic toughness of the unreinforced bulk metallic glass.

  16. Thermo-mechanical relaxation of stresses in a glass-metal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubimova, O. N.; Solonenko, E. P.

    2016-10-01

    This work deals with the evaluation of the stress-strain state in an infinite layered cylindrical junction of glass with steel. Structural changes in the glass behavior are described by the Tool-Narayanaswamy-Mazurin-Moynihan model. The relaxation processes in the glass have been presented by the temperature regime depending of the fictive temperature Tf, the relaxation time τ' or the viscosity η and the thermal expansion coefficient α(1). The calculations of the stress components in the glass have been made by using the viscoelastic model. The presented model allows to find the optimal annealing conditions for the creation of the glass- metal composite material.

  17. Spectral descriptors for bulk metallic glasses based on the thermodynamics of competing crystalline phases

    PubMed Central

    Perim, Eric; Lee, Dongwoo; Liu, Yanhui; Toher, Cormac; Gong, Pan; Li, Yanglin; Simmons, W. Neal; Levy, Ohad; Vlassak, Joost J.; Schroers, Jan; Curtarolo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses attract considerable interest due to their unique combination of superb properties and processability. Predicting their formation from known alloy parameters remains the major hindrance to the discovery of new systems. Here, we propose a descriptor based on the heuristics that structural and energetic ‘confusion' obstructs crystalline growth, and demonstrate its validity by experiments on two well-known glass-forming alloy systems. We then develop a robust model for predicting glass formation ability based on the geometrical and energetic features of crystalline phases calculated ab initio in the AFLOW framework. Our findings indicate that the formation of metallic glass phases could be much more common than currently thought, with more than 17% of binary alloy systems potential glass formers. Our approach pinpoints favourable compositions and demonstrates that smart descriptors, based solely on alloy properties available in online repositories, offer the sought-after key for accelerated discovery of metallic glasses. PMID:27480126

  18. Nanostructured metal-polyaniline composites

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Hsing-Lin; Li, Wenguang; Bailey, James A.; Gao, Yuan

    2010-08-31

    Metal-polyaniline (PANI) composites are provided together with a process of preparing such composites by an electrodeless process. The metal of the composite can have nanoscale structural features and the composites can be used in applications such as catalysis for hydrogenation reactions and for analytical detection methods employing SERS.

  19. Glass-ceramic hermetic seals to high thermal expansion metals

    DOEpatents

    Kramer, D.P.; Massey, R.T.

    1987-04-28

    A process for forming glass-ceramic materials from an alkaline silica-lithia glass composition comprising 60-72 mole-% SiO/sub 2/, 18-27 mole-% Li/sub 2/O, 0-5 mole-% Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, 0-6 mole-% K/sub 2/O, 0-3 mole-% B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, and 0.5-2.5 mole-% P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, which comprises heating said glass composition at a first temperature within the 950-1050/degree/C range for 5-60 minutes, and then at a devitrification temperature within the 700-900/degree/C range for about 5-300 minutes to obtain a glass-ceramic having a thermal expansion coefficient of up to 210 x 10/sup /minus/7///degree/C. These ceramics form strong, hermetic seals with high expansion metals such as stainless steel alloys. An intermediate nucleation heating step conducted at a temperature within the range of 675-750/degree/C for 10-120 minutes may be employed between the first stage and the devitrification stage. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Fatigue evaluation of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumesnil, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of composite-reinforced, integrally stiffened metal panels was investigated in combined metal and composite materials subjected to fatigue loading. The systems investigated were aluminum-graphite/epoxy, and aluminum-S glass/epoxy. It was found that the composite material would support the total load at limit stress after the metal had completely failed, and the weight of the composite-metal system would be equal to that of an all metal system which would carry the same total load at limit stress.

  1. NATURAL FIBER OR GLASS REINFORCED POLYPROPYLENE COMPOSITES?

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzi, W.; Di Landro, L.; Casiraghi, A.; Pagano, M. R.

    2008-08-28

    Problems related to the recycle of conventional composite materials are becoming always more relevant for many industrial fields. Natural fiber composites (NFC) have recently gained much attention due to their low cost, environmental gains (eco-compatibility), easy disposal, reduction in volatile organic emissions, and their potential to compete with glass fiber composites (GFC). Interest in natural fibers is not only based over ecological aspects. NFC have good mechanical performances in relation to their low specific weight and low price. A characterization of mechanical properties, dynamic behavior, and moisture absorption is presented.

  2. Dynamic mechanical behavior and high pressure phase stability of a zirconium-based bulk metallic glass and its composite with tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Morgana

    2008-10-01

    The research involved performing controlled impact experiments on BMG composites consisting of amorphous Zr57Nb5Cu 15:4Ni12:6Al10 (LM106 or Vitreloy106) with crystalline tungsten reinforcement particles. Monolithic LM106 was also examined to aid in the understanding of the composite. The mechanical behavior of the composite was investigated over a range of strain rates (10-3 s -1 to 106 s-1), stress states (compression, compression-shear, tension), and temperatures (RT to 600°C) to determine the dependence of mechanical properties and deformation and failure modes (i.e., homogeneous deformation vs. inhomogeneous shear banding) on these parameters. Mechanical testing in the quasi-static to intermediate strain-rate regimes was performed using an Instron, Drop Weight Tower, and Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar, respectively. High-strain-rate mechanical properties of the BMG-matrix composite and monolithic BMG were investigated using dynamic compression (reverse Taylor) and dynamic tension (spall) impact experiments performed using a gas gun instrumented with velocity interferometry and high-speed digital photography. These experiments provided information about dynamic strength and deformation modes, and allowed for validation of constitutive models via comparison of experimental and simulated transient deformation profiles and free surface velocity traces. Hugoniot equation of state measurements were performed on the monolithic BMG to investigate the high pressure phase stability of the glass and the possible implications of a high pressure phase transformation on mechanical properties. Specimens were recovered for post-impact microstructural and thermal analysis to gain information about the mechanisms of dynamic deformation and fracture, and to examine for possible shock-induced phase transformations of the amorphous phase. For the composite, mechanical testing revealed positive strain-rate sensitivity of its yield stress and negative strain-rate sensitivity of its

  3. A predictive structural model for bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Laws, K J; Miracle, D B; Ferry, M

    2015-09-15

    Great progress has been made in understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses, but there is still no clear connection between atomic structure and glass-forming ability. Here we give new insights into perhaps the most important question in the field of amorphous metals: how can glass-forming ability be predicted from atomic structure? We give a new approach to modelling metallic glass atomic structures by solving three long-standing problems: we discover a new family of structural defects that discourage glass formation; we impose efficient local packing around all atoms simultaneously; and we enforce structural self-consistency. Fewer than a dozen binary structures satisfy these constraints, but extra degrees of freedom in structures with three or more different atom sizes significantly expand the number of relatively stable, 'bulk' metallic glasses. The present work gives a new approach towards achieving the long-sought goal of a predictive capability for bulk metallic glasses.

  4. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOEpatents

    Lin, Xianghong; Peker, Atakan; Johnson, William L.

    1997-01-01

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

  5. Hard and fragile holmium-based bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Q.; Zhao, D.Q.; Pan, M.X.; Wang, R.J.; Wang, W.H.

    2006-05-01

    A family of holmium-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with high glass-forming ability is obtained. The Ho-based BMGs exhibit much larger elastic moduli and high thermal stability in contrast to other known rare-earth (RE)-based BMGs. In particular, the BMGs show a large value of fragility. It is expected that the hard RE-based glasses with high glass-forming ability and fragile behaviors make them the appropriate candidate for glass transition study.

  6. Stability of bulk metallic glass structure

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, H.; Williams, D.B.

    2003-06-18

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub (80-x)}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  7. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  8. DWPF waste glass Product Composition Control System

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.G.; Postles, R.L.

    1992-07-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will be used to blend aqueous radwaste (PHA) with solid radwaste (Sludge) in a waste receipt vessel (the SRAT). The resulting SRAT material is transferred to the SME an there blended with ground glass (Frit) to produce a batch of melter feed slurry. The SME material is passed to a hold tank (the MFT) which is used to continuously feed the DWPF melter. The melter. The melter produces a molten glass wasteform which is poured into stainless steel canisters for cooling and, ultimately, shipment to and storage in a geologic repository. The Product Composition Control System (PCCS) is the system intended to ensure that the melt will be processible and that the glass wasteform will be acceptable. This document provides a description of this system.

  9. Thermomechanical Behavior of Molded Metallic Glass Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Magagnosc, Daniel J.; Chen, Wen; Kumar, Golden; Schroers, Jan; Gianola, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glasses are disordered materials that offer the unique ability to perform thermoplastic forming operations at low thermal budget while preserving excellent mechanical properties such as high strength, large elastic strain limits, and wear resistance owing to the metallic nature of bonding and lack of internal defects. Interest in molding micro- and nanoscale metallic glass objects is driven by the promise of robust and high performance micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems and miniature energy conversion devices. Yet accurate and efficient processing of these materials hinges on a robust understanding of their thermomechanical behavior. Here, we combine large-scale thermoplastic tensile deformation of collections of Pt-based amorphous nanowires with quantitative thermomechanical studies of individual nanowires in creep-like conditions to demonstrate that superplastic-like flow persists to small length scales. Systematic studies as a function of temperature, strain-rate, and applied stress reveal the transition from Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow to be ubiquitous across the investigated length scales. However, we provide evidence that nanoscale specimens sustain greater free volume generation at elevated temperatures resulting in a flow transition at higher strain-rates than their bulk counterparts. Our results provide guidance for the design of thermoplastic processing methods and methods for verifying the flow response at the nanoscale. PMID:26787400

  10. Thermomechanical Behavior of Molded Metallic Glass Nanowires.

    PubMed

    Magagnosc, Daniel J; Chen, Wen; Kumar, Golden; Schroers, Jan; Gianola, Daniel S

    2016-01-20

    Metallic glasses are disordered materials that offer the unique ability to perform thermoplastic forming operations at low thermal budget while preserving excellent mechanical properties such as high strength, large elastic strain limits, and wear resistance owing to the metallic nature of bonding and lack of internal defects. Interest in molding micro- and nanoscale metallic glass objects is driven by the promise of robust and high performance micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems and miniature energy conversion devices. Yet accurate and efficient processing of these materials hinges on a robust understanding of their thermomechanical behavior. Here, we combine large-scale thermoplastic tensile deformation of collections of Pt-based amorphous nanowires with quantitative thermomechanical studies of individual nanowires in creep-like conditions to demonstrate that superplastic-like flow persists to small length scales. Systematic studies as a function of temperature, strain-rate, and applied stress reveal the transition from Newtonian to non-Newtonian flow to be ubiquitous across the investigated length scales. However, we provide evidence that nanoscale specimens sustain greater free volume generation at elevated temperatures resulting in a flow transition at higher strain-rates than their bulk counterparts. Our results provide guidance for the design of thermoplastic processing methods and methods for verifying the flow response at the nanoscale.

  11. High temperature glass coatings for superalloys and refractory metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, J. W.; Grekila, R. B.; Hirayama, C.; Mattox, D. M.

    1970-01-01

    New glasses are used as protective coatings on metals and alloys susceptible to oxidation at high temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. Glasses are stable and solid at temperatures up to 1000 deg C, adhere well to metal surfaces, and are usable for metals with broad range of expansion coefficients.

  12. Dynamic Pressure Induced Transformation Toughening and Strengthening in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    subject materials to uniaxial-stress loading up to 30 GPa and nano -to-micro-second duration, allowing studies of the influence of stress-states and... zirconium -based bulk metallic glass, MS&T Conference, Pittsburg, October 2009. Mechanical Behavior of bulk metallic glass and tungsten composite over...we are able to subject materials to uniaxial-stress loading up to 30 GPa and nano -to-micro-second duration, allowing studies of the influence of

  13. Glass former composition and method for immobilizing nuclear waste using the same

    DOEpatents

    Cadoff, Laurence H.; Smith-Magowan, David B.

    1988-01-01

    An alkoxide glass former composition has silica-containing constituents present as solid particulates of a particle size of 0.1 to 0.7 micrometers in diameter in a liquid carrier phase substantially free of dissolved silica. The glass former slurry is resistant to coagulation and may contain other glass former metal constituents. The immobilization of nuclear waste employs the described glass former by heating the same to reduce the volume, mixing the same with the waste, and melting the resultant mixture to encapsulate the waste in the resultant glass.

  14. SCOPING MELTING STUDIES OF HIGH ALUMINA WASTE GLASS COMPOSITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Jared O.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Vienna, John D.

    2015-09-04

    Glass property models will be used at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant to formulate durable high-level waste glasses for disposal. A major effort is focused on expanding glass property models to cover a broader range of wastes and higher waste-loaded glasses. As a part of this effort, a statistically designed matrix of high-alumina glass compositions was developed. Forty five compositions were selected from the matrix to evaluate glass properties. Of these compositions, thirty three produced homogeneous glasses. The other twelve compositions contained segregated phases and high crystallinity; these were iteratively modified in an attempt to produce homogeneous glass samples while altering the original composition as little as possible. This paper focuses on the characterization of the twelve inhomogeneous compositions and their modifications using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

  15. Stochastic metallic-glass cellular structures exhibiting benchmark strength.

    PubMed

    Demetriou, Marios D; Veazey, Chris; Harmon, John S; Schramm, Joseph P; Johnson, William L

    2008-10-03

    By identifying the key characteristic "structural scales" that dictate the resistance of a porous metallic glass against buckling and fracture, stochastic highly porous metallic-glass structures are designed capable of yielding plastically and inheriting the high plastic yield strength of the amorphous metal. The strengths attainable by the present foams appear to equal or exceed those by highly engineered metal foams such as Ti-6Al-4V or ferrous-metal foams at comparable levels of porosity, placing the present metallic-glass foams among the strongest foams known to date.

  16. Effect of Zr on microstructure of metallic glass coatings prepared by gas tunnel type plasma spraying.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, A; Kuroda, T; Kimura, H; Inoue, A

    2012-06-01

    Metallic glass is one of the most attractive advanced materials, and many researchers have conducted various developmental research works. Metallic glass is expected to be used as a functional material because of its excellent physical and chemical functions such as high strength and high corrosion resistance. However, the application for small size parts has been carried out only in some industrial fields. In order to widen the industrial application fields, a composite material is preferred for the cost performance. In the coating processes of metallic glass with the conventional deposition techniques, there is a difficulty to form thick coatings due to their low deposition rate. Thermal spraying method is one of the potential candidates to produce metallic glass composites. Metallic glass coatings can be applied to the longer parts and therefore the application field can be widened. The gas tunnel plasma spraying is one of the most important technologies for high quality ceramic coating and synthesizing functional materials. As the gas tunnel type plasma jet is superior to the properties of other conventional type plasma jets, this plasma has great possibilities for various applications in thermal processing. In this study, the gas tunnel type plasma spraying was used to form the metallic glass coatings on the stainless-steel substrate. The microstructure and surface morphology of the metallic glass coatings were examined using Fe-based metallic glass powder and Zr-based metallic glass powder as coating material. For the mechanical properties the Vickers hardness was measured on the cross section of both the coatings and the difference between the powders was compared.

  17. Spin-exchange interaction between transition metals and metalloids in soft-ferromagnetic metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santanu; Choudhary, Kamal; Chernatynskiy, Aleksandr; Choi Yim, Haein; Bandyopadhyay, Asis K.; Mukherjee, Sundeep

    2016-06-01

    High-performance magnetic materials have immense industrial and scientific importance in wide-ranging electronic, electromechanical, and medical device technologies. Metallic glasses with a fully amorphous structure are particularly suited for advanced soft-magnetic applications. However, fundamental scientific understanding is lacking for the spin-exchange interaction between metal and metalloid atoms, which typically constitute a metallic glass. Using an integrated experimental and molecular dynamics approach, we demonstrate the mechanism of electron interaction between transition metals and metalloids. Spin-exchange interactions were investigated for a Fe-Co metallic glass system of composition [(Co1-x Fe x )0.75B0.2Si0.05]96Cr4. The saturation magnetization increased with higher Fe concentration, but the trend significantly deviated from simple rule of mixtures. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation was used to identify the ferromagnetic/anti-ferromagnetic interaction between the transition metals and metalloids. The overlapping band-structure and density of states represent ‘Stoner type’ magnetization for the amorphous alloys in contrast to ‘Heisenberg type’ in crystalline iron. The enhancement of magnetization by increasing iron was attributed to the interaction between Fe 3d and B 2p bands, which was further validated by valence-band study.

  18. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; ...

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences.more » For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.« less

  19. Sink property of metallic glass free surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Lin; Fu, Engang; Price, Lloyd; Chen, Di; Chen, Tianyi; Wang, Yongqiang; Xie, Guoqiang; Lucca, Don A.

    2015-03-16

    When heated to a temperature close to glass transition temperature, metallic glasses (MGs) begin to crystallize. Under deformation or particle irradiation, crystallization occurs at even lower temperatures. Hence, phase instability represents an application limit for MGs. Here, we report that MG membranes of a few nanometers thickness exhibit properties different from their bulk MG counterparts. The study uses in situ transmission electron microscopy with concurrent heavy ion irradiation and annealing to observe crystallization behaviors of MGs. For relatively thick membranes, ion irradiations introduce excessive free volumes and thus induce nanocrystal formation at a temperature linearly decreasing with increasing ion fluences. For ultra-thin membranes, however, the critical temperature to initiate crystallization is about 100 K higher than the bulk glass transition temperature. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this effect is due to the sink property of the surfaces which can effectively remove excessive free volumes. These findings suggest that nanostructured MGs having a higher surface to volume ratio are expected to have higher crystallization resistance, which could pave new paths for materials applications in harsh environments requiring higher stabilities.

  20. Second virial coefficient and mechanical moduli of metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wan Qiang

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between the bulk, shear moduli and second virial coefficient of amorphous materials is derived according to their dependences with the radial distribution function. Lennard-Jones-Gaussian potential is used to investigate the relationship between second virial coefficient and temperature, where Lennard-Jones potential represents interactions with the nearest neighbor atoms, and Gaussian potential is responsible for the multi-atom interactions including the next nearest neighbor atoms and heterogeneous structures for a metallic glass. The results show that deep potential well formed by Gaussian potential causes a large second virial coefficient at low temperatures, which is very obvious for the larger fragility glasses. The quadratic form relationship of shear modulus and compositions is proposed, and confirmed by the experimental results of PdxNi100-x-20P20 alloy.

  1. DWPF (Defense Waste Processing Facility) glass composition control based on glass properties

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, J T; Brown, K G; Bickford, D F

    1988-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will immobilize Savannah River Plant (SRP) High Level Waste as a durable borosilicate glass for permanent disposal in a civilian repository. The DWPF will be controlled based on glass composition. The waste glass physical and chemical properties, such as viscosity, liquidus temperature, and durability are functions of glass chemistry. Preliminary models have been developed to evaluate the effects of feed composition variability on the glass properties. These properties are presently being related to the waste glass composition in order to develop process control paradigms that include batching algorithms, hold points, and transfer limits. 3 refs., 6 tabs.

  2. Glass formation, chemical properties and surface analysis of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chunling; Zhao, Weimin; Inoue, Akihisa

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the influence of alloying elements Mo, Nb, Ta and Ni on glass formation and corrosion resistance of Cu-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). In order to obtain basic knowledge for application to the industry, corrosion resistance of the Cu-Hf-Ti-(Mo, Nb, Ta, Ni) and Cu-Zr-Ag-Al-(Nb) bulk glassy alloy systems in various solutions are reported in this work. Moreover, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis is performed to clarify the surface-related chemical characteristics of the alloy before and after immersion in the solutions; this has lead to a better understanding of the correlation between the surface composition and the corrosion resistance.

  3. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  4. Bulk Formation of Metallic Glasses and Amorphous Silicon from the Melt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaepen, F.

    1985-01-01

    By using metallic glass compositions with a high relative glass transition temperature, such as Pd40Ni40P20, homogeneous nucleation also becomes negligible. Large (5g) masses of this alloys were obtained using a molten B2O3 flux. Presently, bulk glass formation in iron based glasses is being investigated. It is expected that if an undercooling of about 250K can be achieved in a Ge or Si melt, formation of the amorphous semiconductor phase (rather than the crystal) may be kinetically favored. The volumetric behavior of undercooled liquid Ga droplet dispersion is investigated by dilatometry. A theoretical model (both analytical and numerical) was developed for transient nucleation in glass forming melts. The model, originally designed for isothermal conditions, was extended to continuous quenching. It is being applied to glass formation in various metallic and oxide systems. A further refinement will be the inclusion of diffusion controlled interfacial rearrangements governing the growth of the crystal embryos.

  5. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  6. Nanoscale size effects in crystallization of metallic glass nanorods.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sungwoo; Jung, Yeonwoong; Xie, Yujun; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan; Cha, Judy J

    2015-09-01

    Atomistic understanding of crystallization in solids is incomplete due to the lack of appropriate materials and direct experimental tools. Metallic glasses possess simple metallic bonds and slow crystallization kinetics, making them suitable to study crystallization. Here, we investigate crystallization of metallic glass-forming liquids by in-situ heating metallic glass nanorods inside a transmission electron microscope. We unveil that the crystallization kinetics is affected by the nanorod diameter. With decreasing diameters, crystallization temperature decreases initially, exhibiting a minimum at a certain diameter, and then rapidly increases below that. This unusual crystallization kinetics is a consequence of multiple competing factors: increase in apparent viscosity, reduced nucleation probability and enhanced heterogeneous nucleation. The first two are verified by slowed grain growth and scatter in crystallization temperature with decreasing diameters. Our findings provide insight into relevant length scales in crystallization of supercooled metallic glasses, thus offering accurate processing conditions for predictable metallic glass nanomolding.

  7. Passive Impact Damage Detection of Fiber Glass Composite Panels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-19

    PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS. By BRUNO ZAMORANO-SENDEROS A dissertation...COVERED 04-11-2012 to 10-12-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE PASSIVE IMPACT DAMAGE DETECTION OF FIBER GLASS COMPOSITE PANELS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...process. .................................... 31 Figure 3-8 Sensor attached to the fiber glass fabric

  8. Application of the model of delocalized atoms to metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanditov, D. S.; Darmaev, M. V.; Sanditov, B. D.

    2017-01-01

    The parameters of the model of delocalized atoms applied to metallic glasses have been calculated using the data on empirical constants of the Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann equation (for the temperature dependence of viscosity). It has been shown that these materials obey the same glass-formation criterion as amorphous organic polymers and inorganic glasses. This fact qualitatively confirms the universality of the main regularities of the liquid-glass transition process for all amorphous materials regardless of their origin. The energy of the delocalization of an atom in metallic glasses, Δɛ e ≈ 20-25 kJ/mol, coincides with the results obtained for oxide inorganic glasses. It is substantially lower than the activation energies for a viscous flow and for ion diffusion. The delocalization of an atom (its displacement from the equilibrium position) for amorphous metallic alloys is a low-energy small-scale process similar to that for other glass-like systems.

  9. Responses of bone-forming cells on pre-immersed Zr-based bulk metallic glasses: Effects of composition and roughness.

    PubMed

    Huang, L; Cao, Z; Meyer, H M; Liaw, P K; Garlea, E; Dunlap, J R; Zhang, T; He, W

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) demonstrate attractive properties for potential biomedical applications, owing to their amorphous structure. The present work has investigated the biocompatibility of Zr-based BMGs by studying the cellular behavior of bone-forming mouse MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast cells. A Ti-6Al-4V alloy was used as a reference material. Pre-immersion treatment was performed on BMG samples in phosphate-buffered saline prior to cell experiments. The effects of 1at.% yttrium alloying and surface roughness on cellular behavior were examined. The general biosafety of Zr-based BMGs for MC3T3-E1 cells was revealed as normal cell responses. Pre-immersion treatment was found to effectively reduce the surface concentrations of alloying elements. Micro-alloying with 1 at.% yttrium did not significantly affect cell adhesion and proliferation, but slightly decreased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity on rough surfaces. Lower cell adhesion and proliferation were found on smooth surfaces of Zr-based BMGs compared to their rougher counterparts. Higher ALP activity was detected on rougher surfaces. To obtain a mechanistic understanding surface free energy was correlated with cell adhesion.

  10. Biocompatible Ni-free Zr-based bulk metallic glasses with high-Zr-content: compositional optimization for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nengbin; Huang, Lu; Chen, Wenzhe; He, Wei; Zhang, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The present study designs and prepares Ni-free Zr60+xTi2.5Al10Fe12.5-xCu10Ag5 (at.%, x=0, 2.5, 5) bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) by copper mold casting for potential biomedical application. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility of the Zr-based BMGs are evaluated by investigating mechanical properties, bio-corrosion behavior, and cellular responses. It is found that increasing the content of Zr is favorable for the mechanical compatibility with a combination of low Young's modulus, large plasticity, and high notch toughness. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the Zr-based BMGs are corrosion resistant in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The bio-corrosion resistance of BMGs is improved with the increase in Zr content, which is attributed to the enrichment in Zr and decrease in Al concentration in the surface passive film of alloys. Regular cell responses of mouse MC3T3-E1 cells, including cell adhesion and proliferation, are observed on the Zr-Ti-Al-Fe-Cu-Ag BMGs, which reveals their general biosafety. The high-Zr-based BMGs exhibit a higher cell proliferation activity in comparison with that of pure Zr and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The effects of Zr content on the in vitro biocompatibility can be used to guide the future design of biocompatible Zr-based BMGs.

  11. Modified glass fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumei

    A high ratio of strength to density and relatively low-cost are some of the significant features of glass fibre reinforced polymer composites (GFRPCs) that made them one of the most rapidly developed materials in recent years. They are widely used as the material of construction in the areas of aerospace, marine and everyday life, such as airplane, helicopter, boat, canoe, fishing rod, racket, etc. Traditionally, researchers tried to raise the mechanical properties and keep a high strength/weight ratio using all or some of the following methods: increasing the volume fraction of the fibre; using different polymeric matrix material; or changing the curing conditions. In recent years, some new techniques and processing methods were developed to further improve the mechanical properties of glass fibre (GF) reinforced polymer composite. For example, by modifying the surface condition of the GF, both the interface strength between the GF and the polymer matrix and the shear strength of the final composite can be significantly increased. Also, by prestressing the fibre during the curing process of the composite, the tensile, flexural and the impact properties of the composite can be greatly improved. In this research project, a new method of preparing GFRPCs, which combined several traditional and modern techniques together, was developed. This new method includes modification of the surface of the GF with silica particles, application of different levels of prestressing on the GF during the curing process, and the change of the fibre volume fraction and curing conditions in different sets of experiments. The results of the new processing were tested by the three-point bend test, the short beam shear test and the impact test to determine the new set of properties so formed in the composite material. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface of the new materials after the mechanical tests were performed. By taking advantages of the

  12. Lunar glass compositions - Apollo 16 core sections 60002 and 60004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. O. A.; Tsai, H.-M.

    1975-01-01

    Approximately 500 glasses between 1 mm and 125 microns in size have been analyzed from fourteen samples from the Apollo 16 core sections 60002 and 60004. The majority of glasses have compositions comparable to those found in previous studies of lunar surface soils; however, two new and distinct glass compositions that are probably derived in part from mare material occur in the core samples. The major glass composition in all samples is that of Highland Basalt glass, but it also appears that high-K Fra Mauro Basalt (KREEP) glass is more common at the Apollo 16 site than was previously thought. The relative abundance of glasses within the core samples is random in distribution: each sample is characterized by a particular assemblage and distribution of the constituent glass compositions.

  13. Quantifying the origin of metallic glass formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Na, J. H.; Demetriou, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    The waiting time to form a crystal in a unit volume of homogeneous undercooled liquid exhibits a pronounced minimum τX* at a `nose temperature' T* located between the glass transition temperature Tg, and the crystal melting temperature, TL. Turnbull argued that τX* should increase rapidly with the dimensionless ratio trg=Tg/TL. Angell introduced a dimensionless `fragility parameter', m, to characterize the fall of atomic mobility with temperature above Tg. Both trg and m are widely thought to play a significant role in determining τX*. Here we survey and assess reported data for TL, Tg, trg, m and τX* for a broad range of metallic glasses with widely varying τX*. By analysing this database, we derive a simple empirical expression for τX*(trg, m) that depends exponentially on trg and m, and two fitting parameters. A statistical analysis shows that knowledge of trg and m alone is therefore sufficient to predict τX* within estimated experimental errors. Surprisingly, the liquid/crystal interfacial free energy does not appear in this expression for τX*.

  14. Glass Fiber Reinforced Metal Pressure Vessel Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landes, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The Engineering Guide presents curves and general equations for safelife design of lightweight glass fiber reinforced (GFR) metal pressure vessels operating under anticipated Space Shuttle service conditions. The high composite vessel weight efficiency is shown to be relatively insensitive to shape, providing increased flexibility to designers establishing spacecraft configurations. Spheres, oblate speroids, and cylinders constructed of GFR Inconel X-750, 2219-T62 aluminum, and cryoformed 301 stainless steel are covered; design parameters and performance efficiencies for each configuration are compared at ambient and cryogenic temperature for an operating pressure range of 690 to 2760 N/sq cm (1000 to 4000 psi). Design variables are presented as a function of metal shell operating to sizing (proof) stress ratios for use with fracture mechanics data generated under a separate task of this program.

  15. Cavitation instability in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, L. H.; Huang, X.; Ling, Z.

    2015-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that fracture surfaces of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) usually exhibit an intriguing nanoscale corrugation like fractographic feature mediated by nanoscale void formation. We attribute the onset of this nanoscale corrugation to TTZs (tension transformation zones) mediated cavitation. In our recent study, the spall experiments of Zr-based BMG using a single-stage light gas gun were performed. To uncover the mechanisms of the spallation damage nucleation and evolution, the samples were designed to be subjected to dynamic tensile loadings of identical amplitude but with different durations by making use of the multi-stress pulse and the double-flyer techniques. It is clearly revealed that the macroscopic spall fracture in BMGs originates from the nucleation, growth and coalescence of micro-voids. Then, a microvoid nucleation model of BMGs based on free volume theory is proposed, which indicates that the nucleation of microvoids at the early stage of spallation in BMGs is resulted from diffusion and coalescence of free volume. Furthermore, a theoretical model of void growth in BMGs undergoing remote dynamic hydrostatic tension is developed. The critical condition of cavitation instability is obtained. It is found that dynamic void growth in BMGs can be well controlled by a dimensionless inertial number characterizing the competition between intrinsic and extrinsic time scales. To unveil the atomic-level mechanism of cavitation, a systematic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of spallation behaviour of a binary metallic glass with different impact velocities was performed. It is found that micro-void nucleation is determined TTZs while the growth is controlled by shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale.

  16. Polaronic Transport in Phosphate Glasses Containing Transition Metal Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Mark

    such glasses because the two network formers will tend to separate into different phases, making it difficult to obtain homogenous samples. The PSF system proved easier to study than other systems. The hopping in this system seems to be dominated by the Greaves mid-range mechanism. In addition, in samples containing the same proportion of iron, conductivities were found to not depend noticeably on composition, supporting the use of models focusing on the transition metal ions in calculating conductivity. Despite ostensibly changing the structural and metrical properties of the network, the ratio of the concentration of the network formers only appears to have an effect on the conductivity through changing the inter-atomic distance of iron. The numerical model adds to the evidence for the dominating contribution on the nearest-neighbor ordering of TI ions on the electrical properties of a glass; especially interesting is the reproducibility of the mixed-transition ion effect (MTE) in a numerical model where ensemble averages are taken over possible arrangements. It was also determined that the disorder arising from the spread between two types of traps can lead to a MIT as function of population. Finally, an outline of the notion of invariance in TI glasses is extended from work done by other authors, creating an opportunity for further research.

  17. EXAFS studies of the local atomic environment in metal-metal glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.; Lytle, F. W.; Liebermann, H. H.; Tanner, L. E.

    1980-01-01

    The interatomic distances and nearest neighbor coordinations of constituent atoms in a series of metal-metal glasses: M'/sub 100-x/M''/sub x/ where M' = Zr, Nb, M'' = Fe, Ni, Cu and x varies from 30 to 60 at %, have been determined using the EXAFS technique in conjunction with the x-ray synchrotron source at Stanford. Fourier transforms of the EXAFS signals clearly indicate there are like as well as unlike atom pairs in the first coordination shell about both the M' and M'' atoms. The ratio of like and unlike pairs scales linearly with composition and is indicative of random mixing in these binary glasses. The M'-M'' separation are shorter than sum of the Goldschmidt radii and implies chemical interaction between the M' and M'' atoms.

  18. The formation of silver metal nanoparticles by ion implantation in silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytykacova, S.; Svecova, B.; Nekvindova, P.; Spirkova, J.; Mackova, A.; Miksova, R.; Böttger, R.

    2016-03-01

    It has been shown that glasses containing silver metal nanoparticles are promising photonics materials for the fabrication of all-optical components. The resulting optical properties of the nanocomposite glasses depend on the composition and structure of the glass, as well as on the type of metal ion implanted and the experimental procedures involved. The main aim of this article was to study the influence of the conditions of the ion implantation and the composition of the glass on the formation of metal nanoparticles in such glasses. Four various types of silicate glasses were implanted with Ag+ ions with different energy (330 keV, 1.2 MeV and 1.7 MeV), with the fluence being kept constant (1 × 1016 ions cm-2). The as-implanted samples were annealed at 600 °C for 1 h. The samples were characterised in terms of: the nucleation of metal nanoparticles (linear optical absorption), the migration of silver through the glass matrix during the implantation and post-implantation annealing (Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy), and the oxidation state of silver (photoluminescence in the visible region).

  19. PIXE characterization of tissues surrounding metallic prostheses coated with biological glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbotteau, Y.; Irigaray, J. L.; Moretto, Ph.

    2004-01-01

    Biological glasses can be used as coatings for metallic prostheses in order to prevent corrosion. According to their composition, these glasses have different properties. We studied, in vivo, two glasses referred to as BVA and BVH. They are used as coatings of Ti6Al4V metallic implant. BVA glass disappears after 3 months of implantation and is replaced by bone. Prostheses initially coated by this glass have a larger osseous contact perimeter compared to the uncoated prostheses. This ensures a better anchoring of the implant and limits the micro-motions which cause wear debris. BVH glass keeps a constant composition during implantation and it is used like a layer which isolates metal implant from biological environment. In order to characterize the bony environment surrounding implants, we have used PIXE and RBS methods. This paper shows results of the behavior of bony tissue under micro-beam, the quality tests of new bone which replaces the BVA glass coating and the evaluation of corrosion effects. Titanium release in bony tissues begins when the metal surface of the prosthesis is exposed to biological fluids. After a few months of implantation, the titanium contamination is stabilized and remains localized within the first tens of micrometers of surrounding bone.

  20. Vitrification and waste glass compositional limits

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, C.C.; Whittington, K.F.; Peters, R.D.

    1994-08-01

    The most important issue when evaluating the suitability of a waste stream for vitrification is the composition of the waste. Appropriate analytical data are required to ensure that adequate information is available for evaluating and implementing the technology. Although vitrification can be used to immobilize almost any waste stream through dilution of the waste with glass formers, it may be too costly for certain limiting conditions. This report provides guidelines of these limit sand the consequent analytical requirements that are necessary for appropriate qualitative cost estimates.

  1. Filled glass composites for sealing of solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Tandon, Rajan; Widgeon, Scarlett Joyce; Garino, Terry J.; Brochu, Mathieu; Gauntt, Bryan D.; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.

    2009-04-01

    Glasses filled with ceramic or metallic powders have been developed for use as seals for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC's) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Program. The composites of glass (alkaline earth-alumina-borate) and powders ({approx}20 vol% of yttria-stabilized zirconia or silver) were shown to form seals with SOFC materials at or below 900 C. The type and amount of powder were adjusted to optimize thermal expansion to match the SOFC materials and viscosity. Wetting studies indicated good wetting was achieved on the micro-scale and reaction studies indicated that the degree of reaction between the filled glasses and SOFC materials, including spinel-coated 441 stainless steel, at 750 C is acceptable. A test rig was developed for measuring strengths of seals cycled between room temperature and typical SOFC operating temperatures. Our measurements showed that many of the 410 SS to 410 SS seals, made using silver-filled glass composites, were hermetic at 0.2 MPa (2 atm.) of pressure and that seals that leaked could be resealed by briefly heating them to 900 C. Seal strength measurements at elevated temperature (up to 950 C), measured using a second apparatus that we developed, indicated that seals maintained 0.02 MPa (0.2 atm.) overpressures for 30 min at 750 C with no leakage. Finally, the volatility of the borate component of sealing glasses under SOFC operational conditions was studied using weight loss measurements and found by extrapolation to be less than 5% for the projected SOFC lifetime.

  2. Predicting the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses from their molecular chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert G; Brauer, Delia S

    2011-10-01

    A recently published paper (M.D. O'Donnell, Acta Biomaterialia 7 (2011) 2264-2269) suggests that it is possible to correlate the glass transition temperature (T(g)) of bioactive glasses with their molar composition, based on iterative least-squares fitting of published T(g) data. However, we show that the glass structure is an important parameter in determining T(g). Phase separation, local structural effects and components (intermediate oxides) which can switch their structural role in the glass network need to be taken into consideration, as they are likely to influence the glass transition temperature of bioactive glasses. Although the model suggested by O'Donnell works reasonably well for glasses within the composition range presented, it is oversimplified and fails for glasses outside certain compositional boundaries.

  3. Developing and Characterizing Bulk Metallic Glasses for Extreme Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Scott Nolan

    Metallic glasses have typically been treated as a "one size fits all" type of material. Every alloy is considered to have high strength, high hardness, large elastic limits, corrosion resistance, etc. However, similar to traditional crystalline materials, properties are strongly dependent upon the constituent elements, how it was processed, and the conditions under which it will be used. An important distinction which can be made is between metallic glasses and their composites. Charpy impact toughness measurements are performed to determine the effect processing and microstructure have on bulk metallic glass matrix composites (BMGMCs). Samples are suction cast, machined from commercial plates, and semi-solidly forged (SSF). The SSF specimens have been found to have the highest impact toughness due to the coarsening of the dendrites, which occurs during the semi-solid processing stages. Ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) temperatures are measured for a BMGMC. While at room temperature the BMGMC is highly toughened compared to a fully glassy alloy, it undergoes a DTBT by 250 K. At this point, its impact toughness mirrors that of the constituent glassy matrix. In the following chapter, BMGMCs are shown to have the capability of being capacitively welded to form single, monolithic structures. Shear measurements are performed across welded samples, and, at sufficient weld energies, are found to retain the strength of the parent alloy. Cross-sections are inspected via SEM and no visible crystallization of the matrix occurs. Next, metallic glasses and BMGMCs are formed into sheets and eggbox structures are tested in hypervelocity impacts. Metallic glasses are ideal candidates for protection against micrometeorite orbital debris due to their high hardness and relatively low density. A flat single layer, flat BMG is compared to a BMGMC eggbox and the latter creates a more diffuse projectile cloud after penetration. A three tiered eggbox structure is also tested by firing

  4. Metal particle manipulation by laser irradiation in borosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Yamazaki, Takato; Itoh, Sho; Hiromatsu, Kuniaki; Tokura, Hitoshi

    2010-09-13

    We propose a new technique of manipulating a metal particle in borosilicate glass. A metal particle that is heated by laser illumination heats the surrounding glass by radiation and conduction. A softened glass enabled metal particle migration. A 1-µm-thick platinum film was deposited on the back surface of a glass plate and irradiated with a green CW laser beam through the glass. As a result, the platinum film was melted and implanted into the glass as a particle. Platinum particles with diameters of 3 to 50 μm migrated at speeds up to 10 mm/s. In addition to platinum particles, nickel and austenitic stainless steel (SUS304) particles can be implanted.

  5. Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni

    DOEpatents

    Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

    1997-04-08

    At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

  6. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-09-23

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste uranium oxides The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  7. Electromagnetic vibration process for producing bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Takuya; Amiya, Kenji; Rachmat, Rudi S; Mizutani, Yoshiki; Miwa, Kenji

    2005-04-01

    It is known that the cooling rate from the liquid state is an important factor in the production of bulk metallic glasses. However, the effects of other factors such as electric and magnetic fields have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we present a new method for producing bulk metallic glasses by using electromagnetic vibrations with simultaneous imposition of an alternating electric current and a magnetic field. This method was found to be effective in enhancing apparent glass-forming ability in Mg65-Cu25-Y10 (atomic percent) alloys. Indeed, larger bulk metallic glasses could be obtained by the electromagnetic vibration process under the same cooling conditions. We presume that disappearance or decrement of clusters by the electromagnetic vibrations applied to the liquid state cause suppression of crystal nucleation. This electromagnetic vibration process should be effective in other bulk metallic glass systems if the clusters in the liquid state cause the crystal nucleation.

  8. Stress Concentration in Glass-Epoxy Composite Plates.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES, * GLASS REINFORCED PLASTICS, *STRESS CONCENTRATION, STRESS STRAIN RELATIONS, LOAD DISTRIBUTION, FIBERGLASS , MANUFACTURING, THESES, HOLES(OPENINGS), STRAIN GAGES, EPOXY COMPOUNDS, WEAR RESISTANCE.

  9. Preparation of high density heavy metal fluoride glasses with extended ultraviolet and infra red ranges, and such high density heavy metal fluoride glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Steven W. (Inventor); Huebsch, Jesse (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) consisting essentially of: (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24)InF.sub.3 or GaF.sub.3.(4-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-22)ZnF.sub.2. In an alternative embodiment, a heavy metal fluoride glass composition range (in mol percent) comprises (16-30)BaF.sub.2.(8-26)HfF.sub.4.(6-24) of (0-24)InF.sub.3, (0-24)GaF.sub.3 and (0-19)AlF.sub.3.(1-16)CdF.sub.2.(6-24)YbF.sub.3.(4-26)ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass produced in accordance with the present invention comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.7InF.sub.3.5GaF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3. 16ZnF.sub.2. A preferred heavy metal fluoride glass has maximum thickness of most preferably about 3 mm. Another preferred heavy metal fluoride glass comprises a composition (in mol %) and comprises about 26BaF.sub.2.18HfF.sub.4.12AlF.sub.3.10CdF.sub.2.18YbF.sub.3.16ZnF.sub.2.

  10. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples of these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.

  11. Compositional Models of Glass/Melt Properties and their Use for Glass Formulation

    DOE PAGES

    Vienna, John D.; USA, Richland Washington

    2014-12-18

    Nuclear waste glasses must simultaneously meet a number of criteria related to their processability, product quality, and cost factors. The properties that must be controlled in glass formulation and waste vitrification plant operation tend to vary smoothly with composition allowing for glass property-composition models to be developed and used. Models have been fit to the key glass properties. The properties are transformed so that simple functions of composition (e.g., linear, polynomial, or component ratios) can be used as model forms. The model forms are fit to experimental data designed statistically to efficiently cover the composition space of interest. Examples ofmore » these models are found in literature. The glass property-composition models, their uncertainty definitions, property constraints, and optimality criteria are combined to formulate optimal glass compositions, control composition in vitrification plants, and to qualify waste glasses for disposal. An overview of current glass property-composition modeling techniques is summarized in this paper along with an example of how those models are applied to glass formulation and product qualification at the planned Hanford high-level waste vitrification plant.« less

  12. The correlation between shear elastic modulus and glass transition temperature of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Zhibin; Li Jiangong; Shao Hang; Ni Xia; Gleiter, H.

    2009-03-02

    Based on Varshni equation, the shear elastic modulus at the glass transition temperature [G(T{sub g})] and the shear elastic modulus at 0 K [G(0)] were calculated from the elastic modulus measured at room temperature for various bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). The G(T{sub g})/G(0) ratios for various BMGs are almost the same and have a value around 0.85. This unique correlation implies that the glass transition occurs when the shear modulus of a BMG decreases to about 85% of G(0). This correlation between shear modulus and glass transition is of significance in understanding the glass transition of BMGs.

  13. Process for direct conversion of reactive metals to glass

    DOEpatents

    Rajan, John B.; Kumar, Romesh; Vissers, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive alkali metal is introduced into a cyclone reactor in droplet form by an aspirating gas. In the cyclone metal reactor the aspirated alkali metal is contacted with silica powder introduced in an air stream to form in one step a glass. The sides of the cyclone reactor are preheated to ensure that the initial glass formed coats the side of the reactor forming a protective coating against the reactants which are maintained in excess of 1000.degree. C. to ensure the formation of glass in a single step.

  14. Clustered field evaporation of metallic glasses in atom probe tomography.

    PubMed

    Zemp, J; Gerstl, S S A; Löffler, J F; Schönfeld, B

    2016-03-01

    Field evaporation of metallic glasses is a stochastic process combined with spatially and temporally correlated events, which are referred to as clustered evaporation (CE). This phenomenon is investigated by studying the distance between consecutive detector hits. CE is found to be a strongly localized phenomenon (up to 3nm in range) which also depends on the type of evaporating ions. While a similar effect in crystals is attributed to the evaporation of crystalline layers, CE of metallic glasses presumably has a different - as yet unknown - physical origin. The present work provides new perspectives on quantification methods for atom probe tomography of metallic glasses.

  15. The shells of atomic structure in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, S. P.; Feng, S. D.; Qiao, J. W.; Dong, B. S.; Qin, J. Y.

    2016-02-01

    We proposed a scheme to describe the spatial correlation between two atoms in metallic glasses. Pair distribution function in a model iron was fully decomposed into several shells and can be presented as the spread of nearest neighbor correlation via distance. Moreover, angle distribution function can also be decomposed into groups. We demonstrate that there is close correlation between pair distribution function and angle distribution function for metallic glasses. We think that our results are very helpful understanding the atomic structure of metallic glasses.

  16. The plastic yield and flow behavior in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamburaja, Prakash; Klusemann, Benjamin; Adibi, Sara; Bargmann, Swantje

    2015-02-01

    Metallic glasses have vast potential applications as components in microelectronics- and nanoelectronics-type devices. The design of such components through computer simulations requires the input of a faithful set of continuum-based constitutive equations. However, one long-standing controversial issue in modeling the plastic behavior of metallic glasses at the continuum level is the use of the most appropriate plastic yield criterion and flow rule. Guided by a series of molecular dynamics simulations conducted at low-homologous temperatures under homogeneous deformations, we quantitatively prove that the continuum plastic behavior in metallic glasses is most accurately described by a von Mises-type plastic yield criterion and flow rule.

  17. Exploring Mg-Zn-Ca-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses for Biomedical Applications Based on Thermodynamic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramya, M.; Sarwat, Syed Ghazi; Udhayabanu, V.; Raj, Baldev; Ravi, K. R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg)-based metallic glasses are considered as possible candidates in orthopedic implant applications. This paper aims to theoretically predict the glass-forming ability (GFA) in Mg-Zn-Ca alloy using a newly proposed thermodynamic model ( P HHS), and the consistency of this model is verified through experimental analysis. P HHS is based on thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy of chemical mixing, elastic enthalpy, and configurational entropy, thus incorporating the pivotal effects, i.e., electron transfer effects, effect of atomic size mismatch, and effect of randomness, which aid to high GFA. In essence, P HHS can be visualized as the energy barrier that exists between the transformations of random atomic structure of glass to ordered crystalline structure. When the P HHS value is more negative, the energy barrier will be high, supporting easy glass formation. Various Mg-Zn-Ca metallic glass compositions displayed almost an expected and supporting trend, where the critical diameter of the metallic glass rod increased with a more negative P HHS value. Among the predicted Mg-Zn-Ca systems, the Mg60Zn35Ca5 composition shows deviation from the expected trend. This discrepancy has been clearly elucidated using a eutectic phase diagram. In addition to the consistency of the P HHS parameter to verifying the GFA of various compositions, the unique ability of this model is to predict unexplored Mg-Zn-Ca glass-forming compositions using contour development. Thus, proving P HHS parameter to be used as an efficient tool in predicting new glass-forming compositions.

  18. General nanomoulding with bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ze; Schroers, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are ideal for nanomoulding as they possess desirable strength for molds as well as for moldable materials and furthermore lack intrinsic size limitations. Despite their attractiveness, only recently Pt-based BMGs have been successfully molded into pores ranging 10-100 nm (Kumar et al 2009 Nature 457 868-72). Here, we introduce a quantitative theory, which reveals previous challenges in filling nanosized pores. This theory considers, in addition to a viscous and a capillary term, also oxidation, which becomes increasingly more important on smaller length scales. Based on this theory we construct a nanomoulding processing map for BMG, which reveals the limiting factors for BMG nanomoulding. Based on the quantitative prediction of the processing map, we introduce a strategy to reduce the capillary effect through a wetting layer, which allows us to mold non-noble BMGs below 1 μm in air. An additional benefit of this strategy is that it drastically facilitates demoulding, one of the main challenges of nanomoulding in general.

  19. Isomechanical groups in bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, J. D.; Todd, I.

    2012-08-01

    Isomechanical groups are, as defined by Frost and Ashby [H.J. Frost and M.F. Ashby, Deformation-Mechanism Maps, Pergamon Press, Oxford, 1982], separate classes of materials that exhibit similar deformation and transport properties when normalised by an appropriate parameter. Fundamentally, this separation results from significant differences in material structure and bonding. Here, such an analysis is applied to 40 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) grouped into three classes according to their Poisson's ratio, which is known to be an indicator of intrinsic toughness. Through rigorous statistical analysis, it is found that isomechanical groups are present and that they may result from (1) variation in the tendency for directional bonding, and (2) how liquid-like the structure is, which may be characterised by a quantification of local volumetric strain. These results suggest that, although experimentally observed properties from BMGs in different isomechanical groups are all typically considered within the same framework, differences in atomic packing and inter-atomic bonding mean that they should in fact be treated separately. These fundamental differences in bonding and structure may explain the known large variation in the tendency for toughness and plasticity in BMGs.

  20. Status of Gr/glass composites technology at UTOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayor, Ramon A.

    1988-01-01

    The TSC (Thermally Stable Composite) refers to a family of graphite reinforced glass matrix composite materials developed by UTOS. This fiber matrix combination exhibits low coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), exceptional dimensional stability, high specific strength and stiffness, adequate fracture toughness, and space environment compatibility. The dimensional stability of a TSC mirror structure was experimentally characterized at the Steward Observatory. Preliminary results indicate that TSC is significantly more thermally stable than most current structural composite materials. In addition, the use of lower CTE glass matrix materials, such as 96 percent silica glass, have the potential for producing graphite/glass panels with expansion rates and stability comparable to that of fused silica.

  1. Research of glass fibre used in the electromagnetic wave shielding and absorption composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Jia, F.; Bao, H. Q.; Cui, K.; Zhang, F.

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic shielding and absorption composite material plays an important role in the defence and economic field. Comparing with other filler, Glass fibre and its processed product—metal-coated glass fibre can greatly reduce the material's weight and costs, while it still remains the high strength and the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. In this paper, the electromagnetic absorption mechanism and the reflection mechanism have been investigated as a whole, and the shielding effectiveness of the double-layer glass fibre composite material is mainly focused. The relationship between the shielding effectiveness and the filled glass fibre as well as its metal-coated product's parameters has also been studied. From the subsequent coaxial flange and anechoic chamber analysis, it can be confirmed that the peak electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of this double-layer material can reach -78dB while the bandwidth is from 2GHz to 18GHz.

  2. Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Day, D.E.

    1991-09-03

    A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

  3. Glass-ceramic composition for hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Jr., Clifford P.

    1979-01-01

    The invention relates to a glass-ceramic composition having a high fracture strength adaptable for hermetically sealing to chromium bearing iron or nickel base alloys at temperatures of between about 950.degree. C to about 1100.degree. C to form a hermetically sealed insulator body, comprising from about 55 to about 65 weight percent SiO.sub.2, from about 0 to about 5 weight percent Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, from about 6 to about 11 weight % Li.sub.2 O, from about 25 to about 32 weight percent BaO, from about 0.5 to about 1.0 weight percent CoO and from about 1.5 to about 3.5 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5.

  4. Replacement of oxide glass with metallic glass for Ag screen printing metallization on Si emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Yun; Jee, Sang Soo; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang; Lee, Eun-Sung; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Sang Mock; Lee, Jun Ho; Eckert, Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Cu-Zr-based metallic glass (MG) has been applied as a binding agent of Ag paste for front contact formation in Si solar cell by screen printing process. Use of electroconductive MG binder significantly improves the quality of the contact by the formation of highly dense 10-50 nm size Ag crystallites and the noncorrugation of the emitter surface with a very shallow Ag crystallite penetration depth of 10-30 nm. Nanoscale Ag crystallites form on the emitter surface by local Si-Cu-Ag eutectic melting, leading to the formation of pyramidal pits on the Si emitter surface, followed by precipitation of Ag crystallites during cooling.

  5. High expansion coefficient glasses can be sealed to common metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camp, F. E.; Champman, J. W.; Hirayama, C.

    1970-01-01

    New series of high expansion coefficient glasses can be sealed by fusion onto hot surfaces of metals and alloys. Glasses have relatively low working temperatures, good chemical durability, and can be used in electrical insulators and feedthroughs to fluid or vacuum systems.

  6. Localized crystallization in shear bands of a metallic glass

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhijie; Song, Kaikai; Hu, Yong; Dai, Fuping; Chu, Zhibing; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Stress-induced viscous flow is the characteristic of atomic movements during plastic deformation of metallic glasses in the absence of substantial temperature increase, which suggests that stress state plays an important role in mechanically induced crystallization in a metallic glass. However, it is poorly understood. Here, we report on the stress-induced localized crystallization in individual shear bands of Zr60Al15Ni25 metallic glass subjected to cold rolling. We find that crystallization in individual shear bands preferentially occurs in the regions neighboring the amorphous matrix, where the materials are subjected to compressive stresses demonstrated by our finite element simulations. Our results provide direct evidence that the mechanically induced crystallization kinetics is closely related with the stress state. The crystallization kinetics under compressive and tensile stresses are interpreted within the frameworks of potential energy landscape and classical nucleation theory, which reduces the role of stress state in mechanically induced crystallization in a metallic glass. PMID:26758530

  7. LIQUID METAL COMPOSITIONS CONTAINING URANIUM

    DOEpatents

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-04-21

    Liquid metal compositions containing a solid uranium compound dispersed therein is described. Uranium combines with tin to form the intermetallic compound USn/sub 3/. It has been found that this compound may be incorporated into a liquid bath containing bismuth and lead-bismuth components, if a relatively small percentage of tin is also included in the bath. The composition has a low thermal neutron cross section which makes it suitable for use in a liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor.

  8. Elasticity dominates strength and failure in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2015-01-07

    Two distinct deformation mechanisms of shearing and volume dilatation are quantitatively analyzed in metallic glasses (MGs) from the fundamental thermodynamics. Their competition is deduced to intrinsically dominate the strength and failure behaviors of MGs. Both the intrinsic shear and normal strengths give rise to the critical mechanical energies to activate destabilization of amorphous structures, under pure shearing and volume dilatation, respectively, and can be determined in terms of elastic constants. By adopting an ellipse failure criterion, the strength and failure behaviors of MGs can be precisely described just according to their shear modulus and Poisson's ratio without mechanical testing. Quantitative relations are established systematically and verified by experimental results. Accordingly, the real-sense non-destructive failure prediction can be achieved in various MGs. By highlighting the broad key significance of elasticity, a “composition-elasticity-property” scheme is further outlined for better understanding and controlling the mechanical properties of MGs and other glassy materials from the elastic perspectives.

  9. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.; Ma, Evan

    2016-12-01

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce `flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales.

  10. Universal structural parameter to quantitatively predict metallic glass properties

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Sheng, Howard; Asta, Mark; Ritchie, Robert O.; Ma, Evan

    2016-01-01

    Quantitatively correlating the amorphous structure in metallic glasses (MGs) with their physical properties has been a long-sought goal. Here we introduce ‘flexibility volume' as a universal indicator, to bridge the structural state the MG is in with its properties, on both atomic and macroscopic levels. The flexibility volume combines static atomic volume with dynamics information via atomic vibrations that probe local configurational space and interaction between neighbouring atoms. We demonstrate that flexibility volume is a physically appropriate parameter that can quantitatively predict the shear modulus, which is at the heart of many key properties of MGs. Moreover, the new parameter correlates strongly with atomic packing topology, and also with the activation energy for thermally activated relaxation and the propensity for stress-driven shear transformations. These correlations are expected to be robust across a very wide range of MG compositions, processing conditions and length scales. PMID:27941922

  11. General 2.5 power law of metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qiaoshi; Lin, Yu; Liu, Yijin; Zeng, Zhidan; Shi, Crystal Y.; Zhang, Bo; Lou, Hongbo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Park, Changyong; Yang, Wenge; Wang, Weihua; Sheng, Hongwei; Mao, Ho-kwang; Mao, Wendy L.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass (MG) is an important new category of materials, but very few rigorous laws are currently known for defining its “disordered” structure. Recently we found that under compression, the volume (V) of an MG changes precisely to the 2.5 power of its principal diffraction peak position (1/q1). In the present study, we find that this 2.5 power law holds even through the first-order polyamorphic transition of a Ce68Al10Cu20Co2 MG. This transition is, in effect, the equivalent of a continuous “composition” change of 4f-localized “big Ce” to 4f-itinerant “small Ce,” indicating the 2.5 power law is general for tuning with composition. The exactness and universality imply that the 2.5 power law may be a general rule defining the structure of MGs. PMID:26831105

  12. Compressive behavior of bulk metallic glass under different conditions --- Coupled effect of temperature and strain rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Weihua

    Metallic glass was first reported in 1960 by rapid quenching of Au-Si alloys. But, due to the size limitation, this material did not attract remarkable interest until the development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with specimen sizes in excess of 1 mm. BMGs are considered to be promising engineering materials because of their ultrahigh strength, high elastic limit and wear resistance. However, they usually suer from a strong tendency for localized plastic deformation with catastrophic failure. Many basic questions, such as the origin of shear softening and the strain rate eect remain unclear. In this thesis, the mechanical behavior of the Zr55Al 10Ni5Cu30 bulk metallic glass and a metallic glass composite is investigated. The stress-strain relationship for Zr55Al10Ni 5Cu30 over a wide range of strain rate (5x10 --5 to 2x103 s--1) was investigated in uniaxial compression loading using both MTS servo-hydraulic system (quasi-static) and compression Kolsky bar system (dynamic). The effect of the strain rate on the fracture stress at room temperature was discussed. Based on the experimental results, the strain rate sensitivity of the bulk metallic glass changes from a positive value to a negative value at high strain rate, which is a consequence of the significant adiabatic temperature rise during the dynamic testing. In order to characterize the temperature eect on the mechanical behavior of the metallic glass, a synchronically assembled heating unit was designed to be attached onto the Kolsky bar system to perform high temperature and high strain rate mechanical testing. A transition from inhomogeneous deformation to homogeneous deformation has been observed during the quasi-static compressive experiments at testing temperatures close to the glass transition temperature. However, no transition has been observed at high strain rates at all the testing temperatures. A free volume based model is applied to analyze the stress-strain behavior of the homogeneous

  13. Quantitative NDE applied to composites and metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Winfree, William P.; Parker, F. Raymond; Heath, D. Michele; Welch, Christopher S.

    1989-01-01

    Research at the NASA/Langley Research Center concerning quantitative NDE of composites and metals is reviewed. The relationship between ultrasonics and polymer cure is outlined. NDE models are presented, which can be used to develop measurement technologies for characterizing the curing of a polymer system for composite materials. The models can be used to determine the glass transition temperature, the degree of cure, and the cure rate. The application of the model to control autoclave processing of composite materials is noted. Consideration is given to the use of thermal diffusion models combined with controlled thermal input measurements to determine the thermal diffusivity of materials. Also, a two-dimensional physical model is described that permits delaminations in samples of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors to be detected in thermograms in the presence of cooling effects and uneven heating.

  14. Predicting the Glass-Forming-Ability of Alloys by Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A Working Example of Ti-Co Bulk Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Su-Wen; Yang, Ke-Chin; Wang, Shuo-Hong; Hwang, Chi-Chuan; Lee, Pee-Yew; Huang, Rong-Tan; Chin, Tsung-Shune

    2009-06-01

    Predicting the glass-forming-ability (GFA) of alloys before experimental trials has long been a pursuit in the exploration of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs). Researchers can determine GFA criteria, such as reduced glass-transition temperature (Trg) and gamma factor concluded only from experimental data in prepared amorphous metals, but not beforehand. This study predicts the GFA of binary TixCo100-x system, where x = 60, 70, 77 and 84 (hyper-eutectic, eutectic to hypo-eutectic compositions) by calculating their Trg using molecular dynamics simulation with modified tight-binding potentials. The same compositions were also melted and injection-cast into 1 mm rods. Experiment tests confirm that the compositions Ti60Co40 and Ti70Co30, having calculated Trg> 0.5, were able to produce BMGs. Both calculation and differential thermal analysis indicate that Ti-Co BMGs have exceptionally high glass-transition temperatures.

  15. Guided evolution of bulk metallic glass nanostructures: A platform for designing three-dimensional electrocatalytic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Doubek, Gustavo; Sekol, Ryan C.; Li, Jinyang; Ryu, Won -Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S.; Nejati, Siamak; Moy, Eric; Reid, Candy; Carmo, Marcelo; Linardi, Marcelo; Bordeenithikasem, Punnathat; Kinser, Emily; Liu, Yanhui; Tong, Xiao; Osuji, Chinedum; Schroers, Jan; Mukherjee, Sundeep; Taylor, Andre D.

    2015-12-22

    Precise control over catalyst surface composition and structure is necessary to improve the function of electrochemical systems. To that end, bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys with atomically dispersed elements provide a highly processable, nanoscale platform for electrocatalysis and surface modification. Here we report on nanostructures of Pt-based BMGs that are modified with various subtractive and additive processes to improve their electrochemical performance.

  16. Plasticity in the Supercooled Liquid Region of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Nieh, T G; Wadsworth, J; Liu, C T; Ice, G E

    2000-10-30

    Intensive efforts have been carried out over the past decade to develop means to slow down the phase transformation kinetics during the forming of metallic glasses. As a result of these efforts, some metallic glasses can now be fabricated in bulk forms (BMG) from the liquid state at cooling rates on the order of 1-10 K/s, which is close to that of conventional casting. This enables the production of bulk amorphous alloys with a thickness of {approx}10 mm. While advances in amorphous metallic alloy development have been impressive, they have been made largely through experience [1]. Three main conclusions drawn from this study are: (1) Bulk metallic glasses generally have excellent mechanical formability in the supercooled liquid region. (2) Bulk metallic glasses may not be necessarily behave like a Newtonian fluid (i.e. m=1). The non-Newtonian behavior is associated with glass instability during deformation. (3) Multi-component Bulk metallic glasses can be used as the precursor of a nanocrystalline solid. However, the nanocrystalline solid is not necessarily superplastic. The non-superplastic behavior is caused by the difficult strain accommodation at grain triple junctions.

  17. Relationship between topological order and glass forming ability in densely packed enstatite and forsterite composition glasses.

    PubMed

    Kohara, S; Akola, J; Morita, H; Suzuya, K; Weber, J K R; Wilding, M C; Benmore, C J

    2011-09-06

    The atomic structures of magnesium silicate melts are key to understanding processes related to the evolution of the Earth's mantle and represent precursors to the formation of most igneous rocks. Magnesium silicate compositions also represent a major component of many glass ceramics, and depending on their composition can span the entire fragility range of glass formation. The silica rich enstatite (MgSiO(3)) composition is a good glass former, whereas the forsterite (Mg(2)SiO(4)) composition is at the limit of glass formation. Here, the structure of MgSiO(3) and Mg(2)SiO(4) composition glasses obtained from levitated liquids have been modeled using Reverse Monte Carlo fits to diffraction data and by density functional theory. A ring statistics analysis suggests that the lower glass forming ability of the Mg(2)SiO(4) glass is associated with a topologically ordered and very narrow ring distribution. The MgO(x) polyhedra have a variety of irregular shapes in MgSiO(3) and Mg(2)SiO(4) glasses and a cavity analysis demonstrates that both glasses have almost no free volume due to a large contribution from edge sharing of MgO(x)-MgO(x) polyhedra. It is found that while the atomic volume of Mg cations in the glasses increases compared to that of the crystalline phases, the number of Mg-O contacts is reduced, although the effective chemical interaction of Mg(2+) remains similar. This unusual structure-property relation of Mg(2)SiO(4) glass demonstrates that by using containerless processing it may be possible to synthesize new families of dense glasses and glass ceramics with zero porosity.

  18. Methods of Fabricating a Layer of Metallic Glass-Based Material Using Immersion and Pouring Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofmann, Douglas (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement layers of metallic glass-based materials. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a layer of metallic glass includes: applying a coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to an object, the coating layer being applied in a sufficient quantity such that the surface tension of the liquid phase metallic glass causes the coating layer to have a smooth surface; where the metallic glass has a critical cooling rate less than 1000 K/s; and cooling the coating layer of liquid phase metallic glass to form a layer of solid phase metallic glass.

  19. Fast Surface Dynamics of Metallic Glass Enable Superlatticelike Nanostructure Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, L.; Cao, C. R.; Shi, J. A.; Lu, Z.; Sun, Y. T.; Luo, P.; Gu, L.; Bai, H. Y.; Pan, M. X.; Wang, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Contrary to the formation of complicated polycrystals induced by general crystallization, a modulated superlatticelike nanostructure, which grows layer by layer from the surface to the interior of a Pd40Ni10Cu30P20 metallic glass, is observed via isothermal annealing below the glass transition temperature. The generation of the modulated nanostructure can be solely controlled by the annealing temperature, and it can be understood based on the fast dynamic and liquidlike behavior of the glass surface. The observations have implications for understanding the glassy surface dynamics and pave a way for the controllable fabrication of a unique and sophisticated nanostructure on a glass surface to realize the properties' modification.

  20. Ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1985-01-01

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwaving mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic and metal workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are then insulated and microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  1. Ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwave heating

    DOEpatents

    Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1983-10-04

    A method for producing a ceramic-glass-metal seal by microwaving, mixes a slurry of glass sealing material and coupling agent and applies same to ceramic and metal workpieces. The slurry and workpieces are then insulated and microwaved at a power, time and frequency sufficient to cause a liquid-phase reaction in the slurry. The reaction of the glass sealing material forms a chemically different seal than that which would be formed by conventional heating because it is formed by diffusion rather than by wetting of the reactants.

  2. Prediction of glass durability as a function of glass composition and test conditions: Thermodynamics and kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    The long-term durability of nuclear waste glasses can be predicted by comparing their performance to natural and ancient glasses. Glass durability is a function of the kinetic and thermodynamic stability of glass in solution. The relationship between the kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of glass durability can be understood when the relative contributions of glass composition and imposed test conditions are delineated. Glass durability has been shown to be a function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy which can be calculated from the glass composition. Hydration thermodynamics also furnishes a quantitative frame of reference to understand how various test parameters affect glass durability. Linear relationships have been determined between the logarithmic extent of hydration and the calculated hydration free energy for several different test geometries. Different test conditions result in different kinetic reactivity parameters such as the exposed glass surface area (SA), the leachant solution volume (V), and the length of time that the glass is in the leachant (t). Leachate concentrations are known to be a function of the kinetic test parameter (SAV)t. The relative durabilities of glasses, including pure silica, obsidians, nuclear waste glasses, medieval window glasses, and frit glasses define a plane in three dimensional ..delta..G/sub hyd/-concentration-(SAV)t space. At constant kinetic conditions, e.g., test geometry and test duration, the three dimensional plane is intersected at constant (SAV)t and the ..delta..G/sub hyd/-concentration plots have similar slopes. The slope represents the natural logarithm of the theoretical slope, (12.303 RT), for the rate of glass dissolution. 53 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Atomic-scale heterogeneity of a multicomponent bulk metallic glass with excellent glass forming ability.

    PubMed

    Fujita, T; Konno, K; Zhang, W; Kumar, V; Matsuura, M; Inoue, A; Sakurai, T; Chen, M W

    2009-08-14

    We report the atomic structure of a multicomponent Cu45Zr45Ag10 bulk metallic glass investigated by state-of-the-art experimental and computational techniques. In comparison with a binary Cu50Zr50 metallic glass, Zr-rich interpenetrating clusters centered by paired and stringed Ag atoms and Cu-rich icosahedra are widely observed in the ternary Cu45Zr45Ag10 alloy. The atomic-scale heterogeneity caused by chemical short- and medium-range order is found to play a key role in stabilizing the liquid phase and in improving the glass forming ability of the multicomponent alloy.

  4. Mechanical behaviour of degradable phosphate glass fibres and composites-a review.

    PubMed

    Colquhoun, R; Tanner, K E

    2015-12-23

    Biodegradable materials are potentially an advantageous alternative to the traditional metallic fracture fixation devices used in the reconstruction of bone tissue defects. This is due to the occurrence of stress shielding in the surrounding bone tissue that arises from the absence of mechanical stimulus to the regenerating bone due to the mismatch between the elastic modulus of bone and the metal implant. However although degradable polymers may alleviate such issues, these inert materials possess insufficient mechanical properties to be considered as a suitable alternative to current metallic devices at sites of sufficient mechanical loading. Phosphate based glasses are an advantageous group of materials for tissue regenerative applications due to their ability to completely degrade in vivo at highly controllable rates based on the specific glass composition. Furthermore the release of the glass's constituent ions can evoke a therapeutic stimulus in vivo (i.e. osteoinduction) whilst also generating a bioactive response. The processing of these materials into fibres subsequently allows them to act as reinforcing agents in degradable polymers to simultaneously increase its mechanical properties and enhance its in vivo response. However despite the various review articles relating to the compositional influences of different phosphate glass systems, there has been limited work summarising the mechanical properties of different phosphate based glass fibres and their subsequent incorporation as a reinforcing agent in degradable composite materials. As a result, this review article examines the compositional influences behind the development of different phosphate based glass fibre compositions intended as composite reinforcing agents along with an analysis of different potential composite configurations. This includes variations in the fibre content, matrix material and fibre architecture as well as other novel composites designs.

  5. Thermoplastic Micro-Forming of Bulk Metallic Glasses: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Chen, Wen; Liu, Lin

    2016-04-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are a fascinating class of metallic alloys with an isotropic amorphous structure that is rapidly quenched from liquid melts. The absence of a crystalline micro-structure endows them with a portfolio of properties such as high strength, high elasticity, and excellent corrosion resistance. Whereas the limited plasticity and hence poor workability at ambient temperature impede the structural application of bulk metallic glasses, the unique superplasticity within the supercooled liquid region opens an alternative window of so-called thermoplastic forming, which allows precise and versatile net-shaping of complex geometries on length scales ranging from nanometers to centimeters that were previously unachievable with conventional crystalline metal processing. Thermoplastic forming not only breaks through the bottleneck of the manufacture of bulk metallic glasses at ambient temperature but also offers an alluring prospect in micro-engineering applications. This paper comprehensively reviews some pivotal aspects of bulk metallic glasses during thermoplastic micro-forming, including an in-depth understanding of the crystallization kinetics of bulk metallic glasses and the thermoplastic processing time window, the thermoplastic forming map that clarifies the relationship between the flow characteristics and the formability, the interfacial friction in micro-forming and novel forming methods to improve the formability, and the potential applications of the hot-embossed micro-patterns/components.

  6. Design and Fabrication of E-Glass /carbon/graphite epoxy hybrid composite leaf spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, T.; Raja, M.; Jothi Prakash, V. M.; Gnanavel, C.

    2017-03-01

    The Automobile Industry has shown increase interest for replacement of steel leaf spring with that of composite leaf spring. Substituting composite materials for conventional metallic materials has many advantages because of higher specific stiffness, strength and fatigue resistance etc. This work deals with the replacement of conventional steel leaf spring with a hybrid Composite leaf spring using E -Glass/Carbon/Graphite/Epoxy. The hybrid composite is obtained by introducing more than one fiber in the reinforcement phase. The hybrid composite is fabricated by the vacuum bag technique. The result shows that introduction of carbon and graphite fiber in the reinforcement phase increases the stiffness of the composite.

  7. Composite materials based on wastes of flat glass processing.

    PubMed

    Gorokhovsky, A V; Escalante-Garcia, J I; Gashnikova, G Yu; Nikulina, L P; Artemenko, S E

    2005-01-01

    Glass mirrors scrap and poly (vinyl) butiral waste (PVB) obtained from flat glass processing plants were investigated as raw materials to produce composites. The emphasis was on studying the influence of milled glass mirror waste contents on properties of composites produced with PVB. The characterization involved: elongation under rupture, water absorption, tensile strength and elastic modulus tests. The results showed that the composite containing 10 wt% of filler powder had the best properties among the compositions studied. The influence of the time of exposure in humid atmosphere on the composite properties was investigated. It was found that the admixture of PVB iso-propanol solution to the scrap of glass mirrors during milling provided stabilization of the properties of the composites produced.

  8. Surface modification of bioactive glasses and preparation of PDLLA/bioactive glass composite films.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Chang, Jiang

    2009-08-01

    In order to improve the homogeneous dispersion of particles in the polymeric matrix, 45S5, mesoporous 58S, and 58S bioactive glasses were surface modified by esterification reactions with dodecyl alcohol at reflux temperature of 260 degrees C (named as m-45S5, m-mesoporous 58S, and m-58S, respectively). The modified particles showed better hydrophobicity and longer time of suspension in organic matrix. The PDLLA/bioactive glass composite films were fabricated using surface modified bioactive glass particles through solvent casting-evaporation method. Surface morphology, mechanical property, and bioactivity were investigated. The results revealed that the inorganic particle distribution and tensile strength of the composite films with modified bioactive glass particles were significantly improved while great bioactive properties were maintained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation illustrated that the modified bioactive glass particles were homogeneously dispersed in the PDLLA matrix. The maximum tensile strengths of composite films with modified bioactive glass particles were higher than that of composite films with unmodified bioactive glass particles. The bioactivity of the composite films were evaluated by being soaked in the simulated body fluid (SBF) and the SEM observation of the films suggested that the modified composite films were still bioactive in that they could induce the formation of HAp on its surface and the distribution of HAp was even more homogeneous on the film. The results mentioned above indicated that the surface modification of bioactive glasses with dodecyl alcohol was an effective method to prepare PDLLA/bioactive glass composites with enhanced properties. By studying the comparisons of modification effects among the three types of bioactive glasses, we could get the conclusion that the size and morphology of the inorganic particles would greatly affect the modification effects and the properties of composites.

  9. Some developments on ceramic-to-metal and glass-ceramics-to-metal seals and related studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kothiyal, G. P.; Goswami, M.; Shrikhande, V. K.

    2008-05-01

    Seals and coatings based on ceramics and glass-ceramics find numerous applications in different disciplines of science and technology including space, accelerators, nuclear energy, chemical industry. Ceramic-to-metal (CM) seals based on conventional design (using brazing alloys) and glass-ceramics have been prepared. While Ag-Cu brazing alloy has been used in conventional CM seal, we have employed lithium zinc silicate (LZS) and lithium aluminum silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics for glass-ceramics-to-metal (GCM) seals. LZS glass-ceramics based on two different compositions; (a) LZSL composition (wt.%)- Li2O: 12.65, ZnO: 1.85, SiO2: 74.4, Al2O3: 3.8, K2O: 2.95, P2O5: 3.15, and B2O3: 1.2 (low ZnO) and (b) LZSH composition (wt.%)- Li2O: 8.9, ZnO: 24.03, SiO2: 53.7, Na2O: 5.42, P2O5: 2.95, and B2O3: 5.0 (high ZnO) were prepared with desired sealing characteristics for matched type seals. In addition, (wt.%) 12.6Li2O-71.7SiO2-5.1Al2O3-4.9K2O-3.2B2O3-2.5P2O5 (LAS-GC) was investigated for compressive type of seal. LZS glass-ceramics-to-Cu as well as SS-321 seals were found to withstand a vacuum of 10-6 Torr with leak rate 10-9 Torr. 1/s and LAS GC-to-SS304 seal showed high pressure endurance of 12000psi. In order to understand the mechanism of sealing, glass-ceramics-to-metal interface study has also been carried out.

  10. Impact of ion irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, S.G.

    2005-04-01

    The impact of ion-beam irradiation on the thermal, structural, and mechanical properties of metallic glasses is investigated using the model glass, CuTi, in molecular dynamics computer simulations. It is found that ion-beam bombardment successively modifies the compositional and structural order toward a universal steady state, which proves to be independent of the initial relaxation state and thermal history of the unirradiated sample. This is reflected by key materials properties, including enthalpy, structural and compositional short-range order, as well as Young's modulus and fracture behavior. The results are interpreted within the framework of competing dynamics, where radiation-induced plastic relaxation counteracts ion-beam disordering.

  11. Calcium and Zinc Containing Bactericidal Glass Coatings for Biomedical Metallic Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Díaz, Luis A.; Prado, Catuxa; Cabal, Belén; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The present work presents new bactericidal coatings, based on two families of non-toxic, antimicrobial glasses belonging to B2O3–SiO2–Na2O–ZnO and SiO2–Na2O–Al2O3–CaO–B2O3 systems. Free of cracking, single layer direct coatings on different biomedical metallic substrates (titanium alloy, Nb, Ta, and stainless steel) have been developed. Thermal expansion mismatch was adjusted by changing glass composition of the glass type, as well as the firing atmosphere (air or Ar) according to the biomedical metallic substrates. Formation of bubbles in some of the glassy coatings has been rationalized considering the reactions that take place at the different metal/coating interfaces. All the obtained coatings were proven to be strongly antibacterial versus Escherichia coli (>4 log). PMID:25056542

  12. High strength glass-ceramic to metal seals

    SciTech Connect

    Haws, L D; Kramer, D P; Moddeman, W E; Wooten, G W

    1986-12-01

    In many applications, ceramics are joined to other materials, especially metals. In such cases, interfacial strength is as important as the strength of each constituent material. Examples are presented for tailoring materials and processes to optimize the glass-ceramic-to-metal seal. Means for detecting defects, nondestructively, are also identified.

  13. Glass/Ceramic Composites for Sealing Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.

    2007-01-01

    A family of glass/ceramic composite materials has been investigated for use as sealants in planar solid oxide fuel cells. These materials are modified versions of a barium calcium aluminosilicate glass developed previously for the same purpose. The composition of the glass in mole percentages is 35BaO + 15CaO + 5Al2O3 + 10B2O3 + 35SiO2. The glass seal was found to be susceptible to cracking during thermal cycling of the fuel cells. The goal in formulating the glass/ ceramic composite materials was to (1) retain the physical and chemical advantages that led to the prior selection of the barium calcium aluminosilicate glass as the sealant while (2) increasing strength and fracture toughness so as to reduce the tendency toward cracking. Each of the composite formulations consists of the glass plus either of two ceramic reinforcements in a proportion between 0 and 30 mole percent. One of the ceramic reinforcements consists of alumina platelets; the other one consists of particles of yttria-stabilized zirconia wherein the yttria content is 3 mole percent (3YSZ). In preparation for experiments, panels of the glass/ceramic composites were hot-pressed and machined into test bars.

  14. Metal coated glasses by sputtering and their microfouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kougo, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Wada, N.; Hihara, T.; Minekawa, M.; Fujita, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Some elements as contaminant tend to be concentrated in biofilm. In order to prevent the fogging of glass, it is very important to control biofilm formation by metal dissolution. In this study, Metals were deposited on glass substrate by Helicon-wave-excited-plasma sputtering process. Sample was very thin metals layer like as half mirror, it could transmit light. The results of biofilm formation test, biofilm formation were inhibited on Cu, Sn and Cr, and light transmission of these samples was not degradation. It could be said that inhibition of biofilm formation was effective to suppressing cloudiness.

  15. High-throughput drawing and testing of metallic glass nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Molla; Kumar, Golden

    2017-03-02

    Thermoplastic embossing of metallic glasses promises direct imprinting of metal nanostructures using templates. However, embossing high-aspect-ratio nanostructures faces unworkable flow resistance due to friction and non-wetting conditions at the template interface. Herein, we show that these inherent challenges of embossing can be reversed by thermoplastic drawing using templates. The flow resistance not only remains independent of wetting but also decreases with increasing feature aspect-ratio. Arrays of assembled nanotips, nanowires, and nanotubes with aspect-ratios exceeding 1000 can be produced through controlled elongation and fracture of metallic glass structures. In contrast to embossing, the drawing approach generates two sets of nanostructures upon final fracture; one set remains anchored to the metallic glass substrate while the second set is assembled on the template. This method can be readily adapted for high-throughput fabrication and testing of nanoscale tensile specimens, enabling rapid screening of size-effects in mechanical behavior.

  16. A comparative study of the mechanical performance of Glass and Glass/Carbon hybrid polymer composites at different temperature environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, M. J.; Kumar, D. S.; Mahato, K. K.; Rathore, D. K.; Prusty, R. K.; Ray, B. C.

    2015-02-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) composites have been widely accepted as high strength, low weight structural material as compared to their metallic counterparts. Some specific advanced high performance applications such as aerospace components still require superior specific strength and specific modulus. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) composites exhibit superior specific strength and modulus but have a lower failure strain and high cost. Hence, the combination of both glass and carbon fiber in polymer composite may yield optimized mechanical properties. Further the in-service environment has a significant role on the mechanical performance of this class of materials. Present study aims to investigate the mechanical property of GFRP and Glass/Carbon (G/C hybrid) composites at room temperature, in-situ and ex-situ temperature conditions. In-situ testing at +70°C and +100°C results in significant loss in inter-laminar shear strength (ILSS) for both the composites as compared to room temperature. The ILSS was nearly equal for both the composite systems tested in-situ at +100°C and effect of fiber hybridisation was completely diminished there. At low temperature ex-situ conditioning significant reduction in ILSS was observed for both the systems. Further at -60°C G/C hybrid exhibited 32.4 % higher ILSS than GFRP. Hence this makes G/C hybrid a better choice of material in low temperature environmental applications.

  17. Relating Dynamic Properties to Atomic Structure in Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, H.W.; Ma, E.; Kramer, Matthew J.

    2012-07-18

    Atomic packing in metallic glasses is not completely random but displays various degrees of structural ordering. While it is believed that local structures profoundly affect the properties of glasses, a fundamental understanding of the structure–property relationship has been lacking. In this article, we provide a microscopic picture to uncover the intricate interplay between structural defects and dynamic properties of metallic glasses, from the perspective of computational modeling. Computational methodologies for such realistic modeling are introduced. Exploiting the concept of quasi-equivalent cluster packing, we quantify the structural ordering of a prototype metallic glass during its formation process, with a new focus on geometric measures of subatomic “voids.” Atomic sites connected with the voids are found to be crucial in terms of understanding the dynamic, including vibrational and atomic transport, properties. Normal mode analysis is performed to reveal the structural origin of the anomalous boson peak (BP) in the vibration spectrum of the glass, and its correlation with atomic packing cavities. Through transition-state search on the energy landscape of the system, such structural disorder is found to be a facilitating factor for atomic diffusion, with diffusion energy barriers and diffusion pathways significantly varying with the degree of structural relaxation/ordering. The implications of structural defects for the mechanical properties of metallic glasses are also discussed.

  18. Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Minglei; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D.; O'Hern, Corey S.

    2013-09-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate Rc below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing Rc, and thus good glass-formers possess small values of Rc. We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change Rc significantly. These results are tempered by the fact that the slowest cooling rates achieved in our simulations correspond to ˜1011 K/s, which is several orders of magnitude higher than Rc for typical BMGs. Despite this, our studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

  19. Computational studies of the glass-forming ability of model bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Minglei; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Liu, Yanhui; Schroers, Jan; Shattuck, Mark D; O'Hern, Corey S

    2013-09-28

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are produced by rapidly thermally quenching supercooled liquid metal alloys below the glass transition temperature at rates much faster than the critical cooling rate R(c) below which crystallization occurs. The glass-forming ability of BMGs increases with decreasing R(c), and thus good glass-formers possess small values of R(c). We perform molecular dynamics simulations of binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) mixtures to quantify how key parameters, such as the stoichiometry, particle size difference, attraction strength, and heat of mixing, influence the glass-formability of model BMGs. For binary LJ mixtures, we find that the best glass-forming mixtures possess atomic size ratios (small to large) less than 0.92 and stoichiometries near 50:50 by number. In addition, weaker attractive interactions between the smaller atoms facilitate glass formation, whereas negative heats of mixing (in the experimentally relevant regime) do not change R(c) significantly. These results are tempered by the fact that the slowest cooling rates achieved in our simulations correspond to ~10(11) K/s, which is several orders of magnitude higher than R(c) for typical BMGs. Despite this, our studies represent a first step in the development of computational methods for quantitatively predicting glass-formability.

  20. Innovative Technologies to Manufacture Hybrid Metal Foam/Composite Components

    SciTech Connect

    Carrino, L.; Durante, M.; Franchitti, S.; Sorrentino, L.; Tersigni, L.

    2011-01-17

    The aim of this paper is to verify the technological feasibility to realize hybrid metal-foam/composite component and the mechanical performances of the final structure. The hybrid component is composed by a cylindrical core in aluminum foam, the most used between those commercially available, and an outer layer in epoxy/S2-glass, manufactured by filament winding technology.A set of experimental tests have been carried out, to the aim to estimate the improvement of the hybrid component characteristics, compared to the sum of the single components (metal foam cylinder and epoxy/S2-glass tube).

  1. Ultra-Short Pulsed Laser Engineered Metal-Glass Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalmashonak, Andrei; Seifert, Gerhard; Abdolvand, Amin

    Glasses and other dielectrics containing metallic nanoparticles are very promising materials for applications in optoelectronics due to their unique linear and non-linear optical properties. These properties are dominated by the strong surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the metal nanoparticles. The SPR occurs when the electron and light waves couple with each other at a metal-dielectric interface. These are regarded as the collective oscillation of the nanoparticle (NP) electrons.

  2. Multifunctional methacrylate-based coatings for glass and metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pospiech, Doris; Jehnichen, Dieter; Starke, Sandra; Müller, Felix; Bünker, Tobias; Wollenberg, Anne; Häußler, Liane; Simon, Frank; Grundke, Karina; Oertel, Ulrich; Opitz, Michael; Kruspe, Rainer

    2017-03-01

    In order to prevent freshwater biofouling glass and metal surfaces were coated with novel transparent methacrylate-based copolymers. The multifunctionality of the copolymers, such as adhesion to the substrate, surface polarity, mechanical long-term stability in water, and ability to form metal complexes was inserted by the choice of suitable comonomers. The monomer 2-acetoacetoxy ethyl methacrylate (AAMA) was used as complexing unit to produce copper(II) complexes in the coating's upper surface layer. The semifluorinated monomer 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyl methacrylate was employed to adjust the surface polarity and wettability. Comprehensive surface characterization techniques, such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurements showed that surface compositions and properties can be easily adjusted by varying the concentrations of the comonomers. The formation of copper(II) complexes along the copolymer chains and their stability against washing out with plenty of water was proven by XPS. Copolymers containing semifluorinated comonomers significantly inhibited the growth of Achnanthidium species. Copolymers with copper-loaded AAMA-sequences were able to reduce both the growth of Achnanthidium spec. and Staphylococcus aureus.

  3. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    Nardone , "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications", Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-85-C-0332, Report R86... Nardone and K M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass", J. Mater. Sci. accepted for publication, 1987. 27. R. F. Cooper and K

  4. Glass fiber addition strengthens low-density ablative compositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandler, H. H.

    1974-01-01

    Approximately 15% of E-glass fibers was added to compositions under test and greatly improved char stability. Use of these fibers also reduced thermal strains which, in turn, minimized char shrinkage and associated cracks, subsurface voids, and disbonds. Increased strength allows honeycomb core reinforcement to be replaced by equivalent amount of glass fibers.

  5. Formation and atomic configuration of binary metallic glasses studied by ion beam mixing and molecular dynamics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, K. P.; Gao, N.; Dai, X. D.; Li, J. H.; Liu, B. X.

    2007-06-15

    Metallic glasses are obtained in an immiscible Ag-Nb system with overall composition ranging from 25 to 90 at. % of Nb by ion beam mixing. Interestingly, the diffraction analysis shows that the formed Nb-rich metallic glass features are two distinct atomic configurations. In atomistic modeling, an n-body Ag-Nb potential is derived, under the assistance of ab initio calculation, and then applied in molecular dynamics simulations. An atomic configuration is discovered, i.e., an icositetrahedral ordering, and as well as an icosahedral ordering observed in the Ag-Nb metallic glasses and in some previously reported systems. Simulations confirm that the two dominate local atomic packing units are formed through a structural phase transition from the Nb-based bcc and fcc solid solutions, respectively, suggesting a concept of structural heredity that the crystalline structure of the constituent metals play a decisive role in determining the atomic structure of the resultant metallic glasses.

  6. Correlation Between Local Structure and Boson Peak in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Azkar Saeed; Zhao, Xiangnan; Xu, Mingxiang; Zhang, Dongxian; Hu, Junwen; Fecht, Hans J.; Wang, Xiaodong; Cao, Qingping; Jiang, J. Z.

    2017-01-01

    We made a systematic study of the boson peak for six different Zr-based metallic glasses and found a universal correlation between average local atomic structure and boson peak. It is found that the boson peak can be decomposed into six characteristic vibratory modes, i.e., Debye's vibratory mode and five Einstein's vibratory modes. By using the Ioffe-Regel condition over all studied Zr-based metallic glasses, we reveal that atomic pair correlation function exactly maps on the low-temperature dynamics and the origin of the boson peak, which is the sum of vibrations of local density fluctuation domains in the glasses. In addition, it is found that the Debye's type oscillators are the major contributors to the low-temperature specific heat capacities. This study opens a new way of understanding the relationship of the physical properties with the atomic arrangements in glasses.

  7. Monitoring Damage Propagation in Glass Fiber Composites Using Carbon Nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabagh, Ahmed; Taha, Eman; Kandil, Usama; Nasr, Gamal-Abdelnaser; Reda Taha, Mahmoud

    2016-09-10

    In this work, we report the potential use of novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs), dispersed during fabrication of glass fiber composites to monitor damage propagation under static loading. The use of CNFs enables a transformation of the typically non-conductive glass fiber composites into new fiber composites with appreciable electrical conductivity. The percolation limit of CNFs/epoxy nanocomposites was first quantified. The electromechanical responses of glass fiber composites fabricated using CNFs/epoxy nanocomposite were examined under static tension loads. The experimental observations showed a nonlinear change of electrical conductivity of glass fiber composites incorporating CNFs versus the stress level under static load. Microstructural investigations proved the ability of CNFs to alter the polymer matrix and to produce a new polymer nanocomposite with a connected nanofiber network with improved electrical properties and different mechanical properties compared with the neat epoxy. It is concluded that incorporating CNFs during fabrication of glass fiber composites can provide an innovative means of self-sensing that will allow damage propagation to be monitored in glass fiber composites.

  8. Monitoring Damage Propagation in Glass Fiber Composites Using Carbon Nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sabagh, Ahmed; Taha, Eman; Kandil, Usama; Nasr, Gamal-Abdelnaser; Reda Taha, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we report the potential use of novel carbon nanofibers (CNFs), dispersed during fabrication of glass fiber composites to monitor damage propagation under static loading. The use of CNFs enables a transformation of the typically non-conductive glass fiber composites into new fiber composites with appreciable electrical conductivity. The percolation limit of CNFs/epoxy nanocomposites was first quantified. The electromechanical responses of glass fiber composites fabricated using CNFs/epoxy nanocomposite were examined under static tension loads. The experimental observations showed a nonlinear change of electrical conductivity of glass fiber composites incorporating CNFs versus the stress level under static load. Microstructural investigations proved the ability of CNFs to alter the polymer matrix and to produce a new polymer nanocomposite with a connected nanofiber network with improved electrical properties and different mechanical properties compared with the neat epoxy. It is concluded that incorporating CNFs during fabrication of glass fiber composites can provide an innovative means of self-sensing that will allow damage propagation to be monitored in glass fiber composites. PMID:28335298

  9. Composite material based on fluoroplast and low melting oxyfluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatieva, L. N.; Savchenko, N. N.; Lalayan, V. M.; Zverev, G. A.; Goncharuk, V. K.; Ustinov, A. Yu.; Shaulov, A. Yu.; Berlin, A. A.; Bouznik, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    The present work summarizes the results of studies of the samples fabricated through extrusion blending of mixtures composed of the perfluorocarbon polymer (polyvinylidene fluoride, PVDF), which presently undergoes intensive studies, and the inorganic glass (BF-glass) of the composition 3B2O3-97(40SnF2-30SnO-30P2O5). It is revealed as a result of application of the suggested technique the composite material whose structure depends on the component ratio in the mixture (from individual areas formed by each component to homogeneously distributed composite particles) has been fabricated. The peculiarities of formation of composites were studied on the basis of the results of studying their morphology, molecular structure and phase composition. It was revealed the preservation of the polymer molecular structure and the absence of interaction with the glass in the fabricated samples. We found that in the process of sample fabrication there occur melting of the mixture, mixing of particles and changing of the phase compositions. The polymer partially and the glass almost completely crystallize in the process of composite fabrication. Glass crystals fill polymer cavities forming agglomerates. Along with the increase of the amount of inorganic component crystals, the polymer monolithic nature is disrupted and an inversion occurs at a certain component ratio: polymer particles are located between crystals of the inorganic component, mixing with them and covering them. The glass crystallization is facilitated through pre-crushing in extruder mill.

  10. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Slavin, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  11. Redox systematics in model glass compositions from West Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, H.D.; Schreiber, C.W.; Ward, C.C.

    1993-12-31

    At a processing temperature of 1150{degrees}C for model West Valley glass composition, the prescribed range of oxygen fugacities needed to achieve an [Fe{sup 2+}]/[Fe{sup 3+}] of 0.1 to 0.5 is 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -7} atm. Establishment of the Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 0} equilibrium, resulting in metal precipitation from the melt, occurs at oxygen fugacities lower than 10{sup -11} atm at this temperature. The target processing range as defined by the iron redox ratio is equally valid at both lower and higher temperatures ({+-}100{degrees}C). Elevations of the concentrations of redox-active components to 1 wt% Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 1 wt% NiO, 1 wt% CeO{sub 2}, and 4 wt% Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the waste glass will not affect the redox limits as established by the iron redox ratio of 0.1 to 0.5; these limits provide sufficiently large margins of safety to assure no stabilization of reduced or oxidized forms of these elements.

  12. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, Ray F.

    1994-01-01

    A device and method for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method uses the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality.

  13. Monitoring and analyzing waste glass compositions

    DOEpatents

    Schumacher, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    A device and method are described for determining the viscosity of a fluid, preferably molten glass. The apparatus and method use the velocity of rising bubbles, preferably helium bubbles, within the molten glass to determine the viscosity of the molten glass. The bubbles are released from a tube positioned below the surface of the molten glass so that the bubbles pass successively between two sets of electrodes, one above the other, that are continuously monitoring the conductivity of the molten glass. The measured conductivity will change as a bubble passes between the electrodes enabling an accurate determination of when a bubble has passed between the electrodes. The velocity of rising bubbles can be determined from the time interval between a change in conductivity of the first electrode pair and the second, upper electrode pair. The velocity of the rise of the bubbles in the glass melt is used in conjunction with other physical characteristics, obtained by known methods, to determine the viscosity of the glass melt fluid and, hence, glass quality. 2 figures.

  14. Polyimide fiber-glass composite resists high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilwee, W. J.; Rosser, R. W.; Parker, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Composites synthesized from bismaleimide have superior strength and oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures when compared with similar composites prepared with epoxy or silicon polymers of similar cost. Polyimide synthesis technique and processing method yield essentially void-free fiber-glass reinforced composites.

  15. Rejuvenation of metallic glasses by non-affine thermal strain.

    PubMed

    Ketov, S V; Sun, Y H; Nachum, S; Lu, Z; Checchi, A; Beraldin, A R; Bai, H Y; Wang, W H; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Carpenter, M A; Greer, A L

    2015-08-13

    When a spatially uniform temperature change is imposed on a solid with more than one phase, or on a polycrystal of a single, non-cubic phase (showing anisotropic expansion-contraction), the resulting thermal strain is inhomogeneous (non-affine). Thermal cycling induces internal stresses, leading to structural and property changes that are usually deleterious. Glasses are the solids that form on cooling a liquid if crystallization is avoided--they might be considered the ultimate, uniform solids, without the microstructural features and defects associated with polycrystals. Here we explore the effects of cryogenic thermal cycling on glasses, specifically metallic glasses. We show that, contrary to the null effect expected from uniformity, thermal cycling induces rejuvenation, reaching less relaxed states of higher energy. We interpret these findings in the context that the dynamics in liquids become heterogeneous on cooling towards the glass transition, and that there may be consequent heterogeneities in the resulting glasses. For example, the vibrational dynamics of glassy silica at long wavelengths are those of an elastic continuum, but at wavelengths less than approximately three nanometres the vibrational dynamics are similar to those of a polycrystal with anisotropic grains. Thermal cycling of metallic glasses is easily applied, and gives improvements in compressive plasticity. The fact that such effects can be achieved is attributed to intrinsic non-uniformity of the glass structure, giving a non-uniform coefficient of thermal expansion. While metallic glasses may be particularly suitable for thermal cycling, the non-affine nature of strains in glasses in general deserves further study, whether they are induced by applied stresses or by temperature change.

  16. Relaxation Behavior of Ca-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-03

    DD-MM-YY) 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) April 2014 Interim 19 March 2014 – 31 March 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE RELAXATION...liquids.[2 4] Almost all bulk metallic glasses show intermediate fragile behavior.[ 5 ] Slow kinet- ics of crystallization due to high viscosity/high...on u is used to calculate the activation enthalpy of structural relax- ation, DHg, at the glass transition: [17] DHg ¼ R d lnu d 1 . Tcalg ½ 5

  17. Glass-to-Metal Seal Against Liquid Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, John L.; Gatewood, John R.

    1987-01-01

    Simple compression joint with indium gasket forms demountable seal for superfluids. Seal developed for metal lid on glass jar used in experiments on liquid helium. Glass container allows contents to be viewed for such purposes as calibration of liquid-level detectors and adjustments of displacement plungers. Seal contains liquid helium even when temperature drops below 2.19K. Made from inexpensive, commercially available materials and parts.

  18. Investigation of waterborne epoxies for E-glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Robert Eric

    Research is presented which encompasses a study of epoxies based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) cured with 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (EMI-24) in the presence of the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100. Interest in this epoxy system is due partially to the potential application as a waterborne replacement for solvent cast epoxies in E-glass laminated printed circuit boards. This research has revealed that the viscoelastic behavior of the cured epoxy is altered when serving as the matrix in a glass composite. The additional constraining and coupling of the E-glass fibers to the segmental motion of the epoxy matrix results in an increased level of viscoelastic cooperativity. Current research has determined that the cooperativity of an epoxy/E-glass composite is also sensitive to the surface chemistry of the glass fibers. Model single-ply epoxy/E-glass laminates were constructed in which the glass was pretreated with either 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) or 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPS) coupling agents. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was then used to create master curves of the storage modulus (E') in the frequency domain. The frequency range of the master curves and resulting cooperativity plots clearly varied depending on the surface treatment of the glass fibers. It was determined that the surfactant has surprisingly little effect in the observed trends in cooperativity of the composites. However, the changes in cooperativity due to the surface pretreatment of the glass were lessened by the aqueous phase of the waterborne resin. Moisture uptake experiments were also performed on epoxy samples that were filled with spherical glass beads as well as multi-ply laminated composites. No increases in the diffusion constant could be attributed to the surfactant. However, the surfactant did enhance the final equilibrium moisture uptake levels. These equilibrium moisture uptake levels were also sensitive to the surface pretreatment of the E-glass.

  19. Relaxation Behavior of Ca-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Almost all bulk metallic glasses show intermediate fragile behavior [ 5 The fragile behavior of supercooled glass forming liquids can generally be...transition [17 ( )calgg Td dRH 1 lnϕ −=∆ ]: ( 5 ) where R is the gas constant. The calorimetric fragility index mc is then often calculated as: mc...temperatures of the start and the end of the glass transition, respectively, and τg = 1000 s. Equation (6) is equivalent to Equation 4 5 (2) only if ∆Tg

  20. Ordering and dimensional crossovers in metallic glasses and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, David Z.; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Greer, Julia R.

    2017-01-01

    The atomic-level structures of liquids and glasses are amorphous, lacking long-range order. We characterize the atomic structures by integrating radial distribution functions (RDF) from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for several metallic liquids and glasses: C u46Z r54 , N i80A l20 , N i33.3Z r66.7 , and P d82S i18 . Resulting cumulative coordination numbers (CN) show that metallic liquids have a dimension of d =2.55 ±0.06 from the center atom to the first coordination shell and metallic glasses have d =2.71 ±0.04 , both less than 3. Between the first and second coordination shells, both phases crossover to a dimension of d =3 , as for a crystal. Observations from discrete atom center-of-mass position counting are corroborated by continuously counting Cu glass- and liquid-phase atoms on an artificial grid, which accounts for the occupied atomic volume. Results from Cu grid analysis show short-range d =2.65 for Cu liquid and d =2.76 for Cu glass. Cu grid structures crossover to d =3 at ξ ˜8 Å (˜3 atomic diameters). We study the evolution of local structural dimensions during quenching and discuss its correlation with the glass transition phenomenon.

  1. Major element compositions of Luna 20 glass particles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, B. P.

    1973-01-01

    Major element analyses of nineteen Luna 20 glass particles indicate that most of the Luna 20 glasses have Al2O3 contents greater than 21 wt % and compositions similar to Apollo 16 and Luna 20 rocks and soils. Three of the glass particles have low Al2O3 (less than 13 wt %) and high FeO (greater than 18 wt %) contents and were probably derived from one of the adjacent maria. The low glass content of the Luna 20 soil indicates that it is relatively young or less mature than most mare soils that have been studied.

  2. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  3. Structural origins of the boson peak in metals: From high-entropy alloys to metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brink, Tobias; Koch, Leonie; Albe, Karsten

    2016-12-01

    The boson peak appears in all amorphous solids and is an excess of vibrational states at low frequencies compared to the phonon spectrum of the corresponding crystal. Until recently, the consensus was that it originated from "defects" in the glass. The nature of these defects is still under discussion, but the picture of regions with locally disturbed short-range order and/or decreased elastic constants has gained some traction. Recently, a different theory was proposed: The boson peak was attributed to the first van Hove singularity of crystal lattices which is only smeared out by the disorder. This new viewpoint assumes that the van Hove singularity is simply shifted by the decreased density of the amorphous state and is therefore not a glass-specific anomaly. In order to resolve this issue, we use computer models of a four-component alloy, alternatively with chemical disorder (high-entropy alloy), structural disorder, and reduced density. Comparison to a reference glass of the same composition reveals that the boson peak consists of additional vibrational modes which can be induced solely by structural disorder. While chemical disorder introduces fluctuations of the elastic constants, we find that those do not lead to sufficient local softening to induce these modes. A boson peak due to a reduction of density could be excluded for the present metallic system.

  4. Effect of mixed transition metal ions on DC conductivity in lithium bismuth borate glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Khasa, S.; Yadav, Arti Dahiya, M. S.; Seema,; Ashima; Agarwal, A.

    2015-06-24

    The DC conductivities of glasses having composition x(2NiO·V{sub 2}O{sub 5})·(30-x)Li{sub 2}O·20Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}·50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (with x=0, 2, 5, 7 and 10, i.e. NVLBB glasses) and glass samples having composition 7NiO·23 Li{sub 2}O·20Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}·50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 7V{sub 2}O{sub 5}·23Li{sub 2}O·20Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}·50B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NLBB and VLBB respectively) are investigated as a function of temperature. Conductivity for glasses containing higher percentage of lithium ions is predominantly ionic and in glasses containing higher percentage of transition metal (TM) ions is predominantly electronic. The observed increase in conductivity with x and peak-like behavior at x=7 in NVLBB glasses due to competitive transport of small polaron contributing to a significant structural change in NVLBB glasses. Variation of molar volume and density was also observed with x. In NVLBB glasses, as x increases density increases except a slight decrease at x=7. Also density increases in NLBB whereas in case of VLBB it decreases in comparison to NVLBB1 glass composition. Mott’s small polaron hopping (SPH) model has been applied to analyze the high temperature conductivity data and activation energy.

  5. Innovative approach to the design of low-cost Zr-based BMG composites with good glass formation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jia-Lin; Chen, Guang; Liu, Chain-Tsuan; Li, Yi

    2013-01-01

    The high manufacturing cost for metallic glasses hampers actual commercial applications of this class of fascinating materials. In this letter, the effect of oxygen impurity on the glass forming ability and tensile properties of Zr-BMG composites were studied. Our results have demonstrated that oxygen was absorbed and concentrated only in the precipitated β-Zr phase, leading that the remainder molten metal retains good glass forming ability. The high oxygen concentration in the β-Zr phase induces a significant solid-solution strengthening effect, this resulting in an enhanced strength of the BMG composites without sacrificing their overall ductility. Based on this alloying strategy, we have successfully developed the low-cost Zr-based BMG composites with excellent tensile properties and good glass forming ability, using the low grade industrial raw materials processed under industrial vacuum systems. This finding is expected to greatly cut down the manufacturing cost and greatly promote the commercial applications of the BMG composites.

  6. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, R.C.

    1985-02-11

    Disclosed are: amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M/sub 1/)/sub a/(M/sub 2/)/sub b/ wherein M/sub 1/ is at least one transition metal, M/sub 2/ is at least one main group metal and the integers ''a'' and ''b'' provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  7. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  8. Synthesis of new amorphous metallic spin glasses

    DOEpatents

    Haushalter, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Amorphous metallic precipitates having the formula (M.sub.1).sub.a (M.sub.2).sub.b wherein M.sub.1 is at least one transition metal, M.sub.2 is at least one main group metal and the integers "a" and "b" provide stoichiometric balance; the precipitates having a degree of local order characteristic of chemical compounds from the precipitation process and useful electrical and mechanical properties.

  9. Atomistic mechanisms of cyclic hardening in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Chuang; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2012-06-01

    Molecular dynamics with an embedded-atom method potential is used to simulate the nanoindentation of Cu63.5Zr36.5 metallic glasses. In particular, the effects of cyclic loading within the nominal elastic range on the overall strength and plasticity of metallic glass are studied. The simulated results are in line with the characteristics of experimentally observed hardening effects. In addition, analysis based on local von Mises strain suggests that the hardening is induced by confined microplasticity and stiffening in regions of the originally preferred yielding path, requiring a higher applied load to trigger a secondary one.

  10. Structural features of plastic deformation in bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Scudino, S. Shakur Shahabi, H.; Stoica, M.; Kühn, U.; Kaban, I.; Escher, B.; Eckert, J.; Vaughan, G. B. M.

    2015-01-19

    Spatially resolved strain maps of a plastically deformed bulk metallic glass (BMG) have been created by using high-energy X-ray diffraction. The results reveal that plastic deformation creates a spatially heterogeneous atomic arrangement, consisting of strong compressive and tensile strain fields. In addition, significant shear strain is introduced in the samples. The analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the strain tensor indicates that considerable structural anisotropy occurs in both the magnitude and direction of the strain. These features are in contrast to the behavior observed in elastically deformed BMGs and represent a distinctive structural sign of plastic deformation in metallic glasses.

  11. Formation of alkali-metal nanoparticles in alkali-silicate glasses under electron irradiation and thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochkareva, E. S.; Sidorov, A. I.; Ignat'ev, A. I.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Podsvirov, O. A.

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulation show that the irradiation of alkali-containing glasses using electrons at an energy of 35 keV and the subsequent thermal processing at a temperature above the vitrification point lead to the formation of spherical metal (lithium, sodium, and potassium) nanoparticles with oxide sheaths that exhibit plasmon resonances in the visible spectral range. Glasses containing two alkali metals exhibit mutual effect of metals on the formation of nanoparticles with two compositions due to the difference of ion radii and mobilities of metal ions.

  12. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  13. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2004-11-02

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  14. Low melting high lithia glass compositions and methods

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol M.; Pickett, John B.; Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Marra, James C.

    2003-10-07

    The invention relates to methods of vitrifying waste and for lowering the melting point of glass forming systems by including lithia formers in the glass forming composition in significant amounts, typically from about 0.16 wt % to about 11 wt %, based on the total glass forming oxides. The lithia is typically included as a replacement for alkali oxide glass formers that would normally be present in a particular glass forming system. Replacement can occur on a mole percent or weight percent basis, and typically results in a composition wherein lithia forms about 10 wt % to about 100 wt % of the alkali oxide glass formers present in the composition. The present invention also relates to the high lithia glass compositions formed by these methods. The invention is useful for stabilization of numerous types of waste materials, including aqueous waste streams, sludge solids, mixtures of aqueous supernate and sludge solids, combinations of spent filter aids from waste water treatment and waste sludges, supernate alone, incinerator ash, incinerator offgas blowdown, or combinations thereof, geological mine tailings and sludges, asbestos, inorganic filter media, cement waste forms in need of remediation, spent or partially spent ion exchange resins or zeolites, contaminated soils, lead paint, etc. The decrease in melting point achieved by the present invention desirably prevents volatilization of hazardous or radioactive species during vitrification.

  15. Mechanical evaluation of SiC particle reinforced oxynitride glass and glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Lavelle, C. . Lab. de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface); Garnier, C.; Verdier, P.; Laurent, Y. . Lab. de Chimie des Materiaux)

    1994-07-01

    In silicon oxynitride glasses, the nitrogen occupies anion sites and is bonded to three silicons. Hence, replacement of divalent oxygen ions by trivalent nitrogen ones results in a considerable improvement of the mechanical resistance. In this exploratory work, the authors investigate some basic mechanical properties at room temperature of composite materials prepared by adding some SiC particles to a highly refractory Y-Mg-Si-Al-O-N oxynitride glass. Taking advantage of both constituents, the brittle particulate composites exhibit much better fracture strength and toughness and higher elastic moduli than the glassy matrix. Due to the easy crystallization of the selected glass, a further improvement is attainable through a crystallization treatment of the matrix. Fracture toughness and Young's modulus as high as 5.4 MPa.m[sup 0.5] and 215 GPa respectively have been measured on the glass-ceramic composite containing 50 vol.% SiC.

  16. Relationship between structure, dynamics, and mechanical properties in metallic glass-forming alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y. Q.; Sheng, H. W.; Ma, E.

    2008-07-01

    Using Cu-Zr models, we demonstrate icosahedral ordering as a microscopic origin of the non-Arrhenius dynamical slowing down in metallic supercooled liquids. This correlation between the structural and dynamical heterogeneities underlies the evolution of the energy barrier for relaxation upon undercooling, as well as the eventual glass transition that leads to the formation of bulk metallic glasses (MGs). Our analysis of the energy barrier to plastic relaxation in MGs relates their macroscopic strength and plasticity to the local structures developed in the MGs. The structure-dynamics perspective explains not only the composition-dependent mechanical properties but also the known correlation between the strength of MGs and the glass transition temperature.

  17. Designing heavy metal oxide glasses with threshold properties from network rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Shibalik; Boolchand, P.; Malki, M.; Micoulaut, M.

    2014-01-07

    Here, we show that a new class of glasses composed of heavy metal oxides involving transition metals (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}–TeO{sub 2}) can surprisingly be designed from very basic tools using topology and rigidity of their underlying molecular networks. When investigated as a function of composition, such glasses display abrupt changes in network packing and enthalpy of relaxation at T{sub g}, underscoring presence of flexible to rigid elastic phase transitions. We find that these elastic phases are fully consistent with polaronic nature of electronic conductivity at high V{sub 2}O{sub 5} content. Such observations have new implications for designing electronic glasses which differ from the traditional amorphous electrolytes having only mobile ions as charge carriers.

  18. Highly evolved rhyolitic glass compositions from the Toba Caldera, Sumatra

    SciTech Connect

    Chesner, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    The quartz latite to rhyolitic ash flow tuffs erupted form the Toba Caldera, perhaps the largest caldera on earth (100 by 30 kms), provide the unique opportunity to study a highly differentiated liquid in equilibrium with numerous mineral phases. Not only are the rocks very crystal rich (30-50%), but at present a minimum of 15 co-existing mineral phases have been identified. Both whole-rock and glass analyses were made by XRF techniques providing data on both major and trace elements. Whole rock chemistry of individual pumices from the youngest eruption at Toba (75,000 years ago), are suggestive of the eruption of two magma compositions across a boundary layer in the magma chamber. Glass chemistry of the pumices also show two distinct liquid compositions. The more silicic pumices, which have the most evolved glass compositions, are similar to the whole rock chemistry of the few aplitic pumices and cognate granitic xenoliths that were collected. This highly evolved composition resulted from the removal of up to 15 mineral phases and may be a fractionation buffered, univariant composition. The glasses from the less silicic pumices are similar to the whole rock chemistry of the more silicic pumice, thus falling nicely on a fractionation trend towards the univariant composition for these rocks. This set of glass compositions allows an independent test for the origin of distal ashes thought to have erupted from Toba and deposited in Malaysia, the Indian Ocean, and as far away as India.

  19. Structural Anisotropy in Metallic Glasses Induced by Mechanical Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, Wojtek; Egami, Takeshi

    2008-01-01

    Metallic glasses have been studied vigorously since the first report on amorphous gold-silicon alloy back in 1960.[1] Initially soft magnetic properties were the most promising features for industrial applications. The recent development of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs)[2 5] initiated interests in engineering applications such as structural or biomedical materials because of attractive properties such as high strength,[6] high elasticity,[7,8] and good corrosion resistance,[9,10] among others. In addition, high temperature processing of BMGs allows for near-net-shape formability,[11 13] which could simplify and possibly reduce the cost of the final product. The glasses retain the disordered atomic structure of a liquid, and ideally are isotropic solids. Frequently because of processing conditions, such as directional heat flow, some structural anisotropy is produced during quenching, and has been observed by structural investigations. Usually, annealing at high temperatures results in an isotropic structure. Also, formation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy[14] had been observed in studies of creep deformed ferromagnetic metallic glasses. Samples with a near-zero magnetostriction coefficient had been studied to establish the origin of the magnetic anisotropy. It was concluded that anisotropy resulted from the atomic level anisotropy[15] and not the heterogeneous internal stress distribution. Indeed X-ray diffraction study of the creep deformed metallic glass showed bond anisotropy.[ 16,17] Such structural studies had been cumbersome and lengthy because they required measurement of many orientations with high statistics. Recently we have shown that use of an area detector and high energy X-rays at a synchrotron source can speed up data collection without compromising statistics.[18] In this contribution, we present data showing structural anisotropy in glassy samples after homogenous (creep) and inhomogeneous (compression) mechanical deformation. The observation of the

  20. Calcium phosphate glasses: silanation process and effect on the bioactivity behavior of glass-PMMA composites.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Lizette Morejón; García-Menocal, José Ángel Delgado; Aymerich, Mariona Tarragó; Guichard, Julio Ándrés Álvarez; García-Vallés, Maite; Manent, Salvador Martínez; Ginebra, Maria-Pau

    2014-02-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the efficiency of silanation process of calcium phosphate glasses particles and its effect on the bioactivity behavior of glass- poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) composites. Two different calcium phosphate glasses: 44.5CaO-44.5P2 O5 -11Na2 O (BV11) and 44.5CaO-44.5P2 O5 -6Na2 O-5TiO2 (G5) were synthesized and treated with silane coupling agent. The glasses obtained were characterized by Microprobe and BET while the efficiency of silanation process was determined using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Thermal Analysis (DTA and TG) techniques. The content of coupling agent chemically tightly bond to the silanated glasses ascended to 1.69 ± 0.02 wt % for BV11sil glass and 0.93 ± 0.01 wt % for G5sil glass. The in vitro bioactivity test carried out in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF) revealed certain bioactive performance with the use of both silanated glasses in a 30% (by weight) as filler of the PMMA composites because of a superficial deposition of an apatite-like layer with low content of CO3 (2-) and HPO4 (2-) in its structure after soaking for 30 days occurred.

  1. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-03-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials.

  2. High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jitang

    2017-01-01

    High-rate squeezing process of bulk metallic glasses from a cylinder into an intact sheet achieved by impact loading is investigated. Such a large deformation is caused by plastic flow, accompanied with geometrical confinement, shear banding/slipping, thermo softening, melting and joining. Temperature rise during the high-rate squeezing process makes a main effect. The inherent mechanisms are illustrated. Like high-pressure torsion (HPT), equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) and surface mechanical attrition treatments (SMAT) for refining grain of metals, High-Rate Squeezing (HRS), as a multiple-functions technique, not only creates a new road of processing metallic glasses and other metallic alloys for developing advanced materials, but also directs a novel technology of processing, grain refining, coating, welding and so on for treating materials. PMID:28338092

  3. Theoretical study on the composition location of the best glass formers in Cu-Zr amorphous alloys.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da; Zhao, Shi-Jin; Liu, Li-Min

    2015-01-29

    This study combines the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and first-principles approach to explain the experimental observation that the best glass formers of Cu-Zr bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have the compositions Cu50Zr50 and Cu64Zr36. These two best glass formers are first calculated to be most abundantly composed of Cu6Zr7 and Cu8Zr5 icosahedral clusters when compared in the compositional range of CuxZr100-x (45 ≤ x ≤ 70), and then these two icosahedral clusters are calculated to have the lowest formation energy among the icosahedral clusters CuxZr13-x (3 ≤ x ≤ 10), as well as possessing some characteristics in electronic structure and chemical hardness. Through understanding the properties of specific icosahedral clusters in metallic glasses, the structural and energetic contribution to the glass-forming ability are systematically discussed.

  4. Superconducting property of Zr-Co-Al-Nb metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, D.; Nagai, R.; Motoyama, G.; Kimura, H. M.; Inoue, A.

    2011-11-01

    The superconducting property of Zr55Co(30-x)Al15Nbx (x = 0-20 at.%) metallic glasses fabricated by rapid solidification was investigated. The Zr55Co(30-x)Al15Nbx (x = 5-20 at.%) metallic glasses with a mixture structure of amorphous and nanocrystal phases exhibited superconductivity of Tc,on = 1.8-2.6 K. The maximum Tc,on = 2.6 K was obtained for the Zr55Co10Al15Nb20 metallic glass. This was attributable to the superconducting property of nanocrystalline particles contained in the Zr55Co10Al15Nb20 alloy. The increase of Nb element in the Zr55Co(30-x)Al15Nbx alloy led to the increase of Tc,on and the decrease of glass transition temperature. The glass transition temperature was between 704 and 749 K for the Zr55Co(30-x)Al15Nbx (x = 0-20 at.%) alloys. The temperature interval of supercooled liquid state was between 51 and 68 K for the Zr55Co(30-x)Al15Nbx (x = 0-20 at.%) alloys.

  5. Local Atomic Structure of Ca-Mg-Zn Metallic Glasses (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-16

    cluster packing ECP model of amor - phous structure,20 the Ca-Mg-Zn ternary glasses are repre- sented as 10,9 efficient cluster packing structures...diffraction data as the basis on which to model the amor - phous structure of a series of ternary Ca60MgXZn40−X X =10,15,20,25 at. % metallic glasses using...Reverse Monte Carlo RMC methods. The effect of alloy composition on the structure and GFA is examined and the average amor - phous structure identified

  6. Revealing the nanoparticles aspect ratio in the glass-metal nanocomposites irradiated with femtosecond laser

    PubMed Central

    Chervinskii, S.; Drevinskas, R.; Karpov, D. V.; Beresna, M.; Lipovskii, A. A.; Svirko, Yu. P.; Kazansky, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    We studied a femtosecond laser shaping of silver nanoparticles embedded in soda-lime glass. Comparing experimental absorption spectra with the modeling based on Maxwell Garnett approximation modified for spheroidal inclusions, we obtained the mean aspect ratio of the re-shaped silver nanoparticles as a function of the laser fluence. We demonstrated that under our experimental conditions the spherical shape of silver nanoparticles changed to a prolate spheroid with the aspect ratio as high as 3.5 at the laser fluence of 0.6 J/cm2. The developed approach can be employed to control the anisotropy of the glass-metal composites. PMID:26348691

  7. Evolution of elastic heterogeneity during aging in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    The properties of glasses vary widely depending on the way they are prepared, even though their structures appear similar. We show that the local potential energy landscape (PEL) sensitively reflects the stability differences through simulation of local structural excitation in a model metallic glass. It is observed that the spectrum of local structural excitation develops a pseudogap at low energies as the glass becomes more stable. We also demonstrate that the spatial variation of the atomic level shear modulus, rather than the distribution of the magnitude of the single atom shear modulus, is more closely related to the nature of the PEL and the stabilities of glasses. In particular, local aggregation of atoms with low shear modulus greatly contributes to instability of the system.

  8. Evolution of elastic heterogeneity during aging in metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2014-06-01

    The properties of glasses vary widely depending on the way they are prepared, even though their structures appear similar. We show that the local potential energy landscape (PEL) sensitively reflects the stability differences through simulation of local structural excitation in a model metallic glass. It is observed that the spectrum of local structural excitation develops a pseudogap at low energies as the glass becomes more stable. We also demonstrate that the spatial variation of the atomic level shear modulus, rather than the distribution of the magnitude of the single atom shear modulus, is more closely related to the nature of the PEL and the stabilities of glasses. In particular, local aggregation of atoms with low shear modulus greatly contributes to instability of the system.

  9. Soldering of Thin Film-Metallized Glass Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Hosking, F.M.; Hernandez, C.L.; Glass, S.J.

    1999-03-31

    The ability to produce reliable electrical and structural interconnections between glass and metals by soldering was investigated. Soldering generally requires premetallization of the glass. As a solderable surface finish over soda-lime-silicate glass, two thin films coatings, Cr-Pd-Au and NiCr-Sn, were evaluated. Solder nettability and joint strengths were determined. Test samples were processed with Sn60-Pb40 solder alloy at a reflow temperature of 210 C. Glass-to-cold rolled steel single lap samples yielded an average shear strength of 12 MPa. Solder fill was good. Control of the Au thickness was critical in minimizing the formation of AuSn{sub 4} intermetallic in the joint, with a resulting joint shear strength of 15 MPa. Similar glass-to-glass specimens with the Cr-Pd-Au finish failed at 16.5 MPa. The NiCr-Sn thin film gave even higher shear strengths of 20-22.5 MPa, with failures primarily in the glass.

  10. Diffusion between glass and metals for optical fiber preform extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Felicia Yan Xin; Zhang, Zhifeng; Kumar Chakkathara Janardhanan Nair, Dileep; Zhang, Yilei

    2015-07-01

    When silica is extruded, diffusion of metal atoms into silica results contamination to the silica being heated, and thus is a serious concern for the glass extrusion process, such as extrusion of glass fiber preform. This paper examines diffusion between fused silica and two high strength metals, the stainless steel SS410 and the superalloy Inconel 718, at 1000 °C and under the normal atmosphere condition by SEM and Electron Dispersion Spectrum. It is found that diffusion occurs between silica and SS410, and at the same time, SS410 is severely oxidized during diffusion experiment. On the contrary, the diffusion between Inconel 718 and silica is unnoticeable, suggesting excellent high temperature performance of Inconel 718 for glass extrusion.

  11. Phase transformations and thermodynamics of aluminum-based metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Changhua (Michael)

    This thesis examines the thermodynamics and associated kinetics and phase transformations of the glass forming Al-Ni-Gd and Al-Fe-Gd systems. In order to fully understand the unique glass forming ability (GFA) of Al-based metallic glasses, the ternary Al-Fe-Gd and Al-Ni-Gd systems in their Al-rich corners were examined experimentally to assist in a thermodynamic assessment. The solid-state phase equilibria are determined using XRD and TEM-EDS techniques. While this work basically confirms the solid-state equilibria in Al-Fe-Gd reported previously, the ternary phase in Al-Ni-Gd system has been identified to be Al15Ni3Gd2 rather than Al16Ni 3Gd reported in the literature. DTA analysis of 24 alloys in the Al-Fe-Gd system and 42 alloys in the Al-Ni-Gd system have yielded critical temperatures pertaining to the solid-liquid transition. Based on these data and information from the literature, a self-consistent thermodynamic database for these systems has been developed using the CALPHAD technique. Parameters describing the Gibbs free energy for various phases of the Al-Gd, Al-Fe-Gd and Al-Ni-Gd systems are manually optimized in this study. Once constructed, the database is used to calculate driving forces for nucleation of crystalline phases which can qualitatively explain the phase formation sequence during crystallization at low temperatures. It was also confirmed that alloy compositions with the lowest Gibbs free energy difference between the equilibrium state and undercooled liquid state exhibit better GFA than other chemistries. Based on 250°C isothermal devitrification phase transformations of 17 Al-Ni-Gd alloys, a phase formation sequence map is constructed. Fcc-Al nanocrystals are formed first in most of the alloys studied, but eutectic crystallization of a metastable phase and fcc-Al is also observed. Addition of Al or Ni promotes fcc-Al phase formation, while increasing Gd suppresses it. The continuous heating DSC scans revealed that crystallization in Al

  12. Ammonia-treated phosphate glasses useful for sealing to metals metals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Day, Delbert E.

    1991-01-01

    A method of improving surface-dependent properties of phosphate glass such as durability and wear resistance without significantly affecting its thermal expansion coefficient is provided which comprises annealing the glass in a dry ammonia atmosphere at temperatures approximating the transition temperature of the glass. The ammonia annealing treatment of the present invention is carried out for a time sufficient to allow incorporation of a thin layer of nitrogen into the surface of the phosphate glass, and the treatment improves the durability of the glass without the reduction in the thermal expansion coefficient that has restricted the effectiveness of prior ammonia treatments. The improved phosphate glass resulting from this method is superior in wear resistance, yet maintains suitable thermal expansion properties so that it may be used effectively in a variety of applications requiring hermetic glass-metal seals.

  13. Focus: Nucleation kinetics of shear bands in metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. Q.; Perepezko, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    The development of shear bands is recognized as the primary mechanism in controlling the plastic deformability of metallic glasses. However, the kinetics of the nucleation of shear bands has received limited attention. The nucleation of shear bands in metallic glasses (MG) can be investigated using a nanoindentation method to monitor the development of the first pop-in event that is a signature of shear band nucleation. The analysis of a statistically significant number of first pop-in events demonstrates the stochastic behavior that is characteristic of nucleation and reveals a multimodal behavior associated with local spatial heterogeneities. The shear band nucleation rate of the two nucleation modes and the associated activation energy, activation volume, and site density were determined by loading rate experiments. The nucleation activation energy is very close to the value that is characteristic of the β relaxation in metallic glass. The identification of the rate controlling kinetics for shear band nucleation offers guidance for promoting plastic flow in metallic glass.

  14. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-17

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  15. Producing Magnesium Metallic Glass By Disintegrated Melt Deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanthi, M.; Gupta, M.; Jarfors, A. E. W.; Tan, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses are new class of engineering materials that exhibit high resistance to crystallization in the under cooled liquid state. The development of bulk metallic glasses of thickness 1cm or less has opened new doors for fundamental studies of both liquid state and glass transition previously not feasible in metallic materials. Moreover, bulk metallic glasses exhibit superior hardness, strength, specific strength, and elastic strain limit, along with good corrosion and wear resistance. Thus they are potential candidates in various sports, structural, engineering and medical applications. Among several BMGs investigated, magnesium-based BMGs have attracted considerable attention because of their low density and superior mechanical properties. The major drawback of this magnesium based BMGs is poor ductility. This can be overcome by the addition of ductile particles/reinforcement to the matrix. In this study, a new technique named disintegrated melt deposition technique was used to synthesize magnesium based BMGs. Rods of different sizes are cast using the current method. Mechanical characterization studies revealed that the amorphous rods produced by the current technique showed superior mechanical properties.

  16. Structural anisotropy in metallic glasses induced by mechanical deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmowski, W.; Egami, T.

    2009-03-06

    We observed structural anisotropy in metallic glasses samples deformed by homogenous mechanical creep and by inhomogeneous compression using high energy X-ray diffraction. Pair distribution function analysis indicates bond anisotropy in the first atomic shell. This suggests that mechanical deformation involves rearrangements in a cluster of atoms by a bond reformation.

  17. Metal-matrix composites: Status and prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Applications of metal matrix composites for air frames and jet engine components are discussed. The current state of the art in primary and secondary fabrication is presented. The present and projected costs were analyzed to determine the cost effectiveness of metal matrix composites. The various types of metal matrix composites and their characteristics are described.

  18. The Critical Criterion on Runaway Shear Banding in Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Sun, B A; Yang, Y; Wang, W H; Liu, C T

    2016-02-19

    The plastic flow of metallic glasses (MGs) in bulk is mediated by nanoscale shear bands, which is known to proceed in a stick-slip manner until reaching a transition state causing catastrophic failures. Such a slip-to-failure transition controls the plasticity of MGs and resembles many important phenomena in natural science and engineering, such as friction, lubrication and earthquake, therefore has attracted tremendous research interest over past decades. However, despite the fundamental and practical importance, the physical origin of this slip-to-failure transition is still poorly understood. By tracking the behavior of a single shear band, here we discover that the final fracture of various MGs during compression is triggered as the velocity of the dominant shear band rises to a critical value, the magnitude of which is independent of alloy composition, sample size, strain rate and testing frame stiffness. The critical shear band velocity is rationalized with the continuum theory of liquid instability, physically originating from a shear-induced cavitation process inside the shear band. Our current finding sheds a quantitative insight into deformation and fracture in disordered solids and, more importantly, is useful to the design of plastic/tough MG-based materials and structures.

  19. APT Characterization of Some Iron-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Liu, Chain T; Wright, J. A.; Tang, W.; Hildal, K.

    2006-01-01

    A microstructural characterization was performed on 3 iron-based bulk metallic glasses. These alloys were an arc cast Fe{sub 61}Y{sub 2}Zr{sub 8}Co{sub 6}Al{sub 1}Mo{sub 7}B{sub 15}A2 alloy, a twin roll cast Fe{sub 68}Y{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}Cr{sub 1.5}V{sub 4.5}B{sub 20} DarpaQ21 alloy and a vacuum induction melted Fe{sub 50.7}Y{sub 1.5}Cr{sub 14.5}Mo{sub 13}C{sub 14.8}B{sub 5.5} Darva101-Y alloy. The alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography in the as-cast condition. Some micrometer and nanometer scale precipitates were observed in all 3 alloys indicating that the alloy compositions are not fully optimized in the as-cast state. The Darva101-Y alloy was also characterized after annealing above the onset of crystallization temperature for 1 h at 610 C. This annealing treatment produced a mixture of crystalline phase: M{sub 6}(BC) and Fe{sub 14}Y{sub 2}B in addition to a high temperature M{sub 23}C{sub 6} phase that is indicated from XRD and previous research.

  20. The Critical Criterion on Runaway Shear Banding in Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, B. A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-01-01

    The plastic flow of metallic glasses (MGs) in bulk is mediated by nanoscale shear bands, which is known to proceed in a stick-slip manner until reaching a transition state causing catastrophic failures. Such a slip-to-failure transition controls the plasticity of MGs and resembles many important phenomena in natural science and engineering, such as friction, lubrication and earthquake, therefore has attracted tremendous research interest over past decades. However, despite the fundamental and practical importance, the physical origin of this slip-to-failure transition is still poorly understood. By tracking the behavior of a single shear band, here we discover that the final fracture of various MGs during compression is triggered as the velocity of the dominant shear band rises to a critical value, the magnitude of which is independent of alloy composition, sample size, strain rate and testing frame stiffness. The critical shear band velocity is rationalized with the continuum theory of liquid instability, physically originating from a shear-induced cavitation process inside the shear band. Our current finding sheds a quantitative insight into deformation and fracture in disordered solids and, more importantly, is useful to the design of plastic/tough MG-based materials and structures. PMID:26893196

  1. Friction and wear of some ferrous-base metallic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1984-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, and electron microscopy and diffraction studies were conducted with ferrous base metallic glasses (amorphous alloys) in contact with aluminium oxide at temperatures to 750 C in a vacuum. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted in argon and air atmospheres. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction increases with increasing temperature to 350 C in vacuum. The increase in friction is due to an increase in adhesion resulting from surface segregation of boric oxide and/or silicon oxide to the surface of the foil. Above 500 C the coefficient of friction decreased rapidly. The decrease correlates with the segregation of boron nitride to the surface. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the material to the surface upon heating and impart boric oxide and/or silicon oxide at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The segregation of contaminants is responsible for the friction behavior. The amorphous alloys have superior wear resistance to crystalline 304 stainless steel. The relative concentrations of the various constituents at the surfaces of the amorphous alloys are very different from the nominal bulk compositions.

  2. Friction and wear of some ferrous-base metallic glasses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, and electron microscopy and diffraction studies were conducted with ferrous base metallic glasses (amorphous alloys) in contact with aluminum oxide at temperatures to 750 C in a vacuum. Sliding friction experiments were also conducted in argon and air atmospheres. The results of the investigation indicate that the coefficient of friction increases with increasing temperature to 350 C in vacuum. The increase in friction is due to an increase in adhesion resulting from surface segregation of boric oxide and/or silicon oxide to the surface of the foil. Above 500 C the coefficient of friction decreased rapidly. The decrease correlates with the segregation of boron nitride to the surface. Contaminants can come from the bulk of the material to the surface upon heating and impart boric oxide and/or silicon oxide at 350 C and boron nitride above 500 C. The segregation of contaminants is responsible for the friction behavior. The amorphous alloys have superior wear resistance to crystalline 304 stainless steel. The relative concentrations of the various constituents at the surfaces of the amorphous alloys are very different from the nominal bulk compositions.

  3. The Critical Criterion on Runaway Shear Banding in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, B. A.; Yang, Y.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, C. T.

    2016-02-01

    The plastic flow of metallic glasses (MGs) in bulk is mediated by nanoscale shear bands, which is known to proceed in a stick-slip manner until reaching a transition state causing catastrophic failures. Such a slip-to-failure transition controls the plasticity of MGs and resembles many important phenomena in natural science and engineering, such as friction, lubrication and earthquake, therefore has attracted tremendous research interest over past decades. However, despite the fundamental and practical importance, the physical origin of this slip-to-failure transition is still poorly understood. By tracking the behavior of a single shear band, here we discover that the final fracture of various MGs during compression is triggered as the velocity of the dominant shear band rises to a critical value, the magnitude of which is independent of alloy composition, sample size, strain rate and testing frame stiffness. The critical shear band velocity is rationalized with the continuum theory of liquid instability, physically originating from a shear-induced cavitation process inside the shear band. Our current finding sheds a quantitative insight into deformation and fracture in disordered solids and, more importantly, is useful to the design of plastic/tough MG-based materials and structures.

  4. Bioactive glass reinforced elastomer composites for skeletal regeneration: A review.

    PubMed

    Zeimaran, Ehsan; Pourshahrestani, Sara; Djordjevic, Ivan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Kadri, Nahrizul Adib; Towler, Mark R

    2015-08-01

    Biodegradable elastomers have clinical applicability due to their biocompatibility, tunable degradation and elasticity. The addition of bioactive glasses to these elastomers can impart mechanical properties sufficient for hard tissue replacement. Hence, a composite with a biodegradable polymer matrix and a bioglass filler can offer a method of augmenting existing tissue. This article reviews the applications of such composites for skeletal augmentation.

  5. Major element composition of glasses in three Apollo 15 soils.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, A. M.; Warner, J.; Ridley, W. I.; Brown, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Approximately 180 glasses in each of three Apollo 15 soils have been analyzed for nine elements. Cluster analysis techniques allow the recognition of preferred glass compositions that are equated with parent rock compositions. Green glass rich in Fe and Mg, poor in Al and Ti may be derived from deep-seated pyroxenitic material now present at the Apennine Front. Fra Mauro basalt (KREEP) is most abundant in the LM soil and is tentatively identified as ray material from the Aristillus-Autolycus area. Highland basalt (anorthositic gabbro), believed to be derived from the lunar highlands, has the same composition as at other landing sites, but is less abundant. The Apennine Front is probably not true highland material but may contain a substantial amount of material with the composition of Fra Mauro basalt, but lacking the high-K content.

  6. Flexural Strength of Glass and Polyethylene Fiber Combined with Three Different Composites

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, F; Alavi, AA; Talei, Z

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: The flexure of the fiber- reinforced composites (FRC) which can be generally used instead of fixed metal- framework prostheses have been more advocated due to the enormous demands for the conservative and esthetic restoration. The flexure of the fiber should be well-fitted to its covering composite. No study has been reported the comparison of the combination of glass and polyethylene fiber with particulate filled composite and fiber reinforced composite yet. Purpose: This study compared the flexural strength of two types of fibers combined with three types of composites. Materials and Method: Sixty-six specimens were prepared in a split mold (25×2×2 mm). The specimens were divided into six groups according to the type of resin and the fiber (N = 11): group 1: Z250 composite + Polyethylene fiber; group 2: Build It composite + Polyethylene fiber; group 3: Nulite F composite+ Polyethylene fiber; group 4: glass fiber + Z250 composite; group 5: glass fiber + Build-It composite and group 6: glass fiber + Nulite F. The mean flexural strengths (MPa) values were determined in a 3-point bending test at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min by a universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany). The results were statistically analyzed, using one and two- way ANOVA and LSD post-hoc tests (p< 0.05). Results: The highest flexural strength was registered for glass fiber in combination with Z250 composite (500 MPa) and the lowest for polyethylene fiber in combination with Build-It composite (188 MPa). One-way ANOVA test revealed that there was no statistically significant difference between polyethylene fiber combinations (p= 0.62) but there was a significant difference between glass fiber combinations (p= 0.0001). Two-way ANOVA revealed that the fiber type had a significant effect on flexural strength (p= 0.0001). Conclusion: The choice of fiber and composite type was shown to have a significant positive influence on the flexural properties of the

  7. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature. PMID:26491304

  8. A highly efficient degradation mechanism of methyl orange using Fe-based metallic glass powders.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shenghui; Huang, Ping; Kruzic, Jamie J; Zeng, Xierong; Qian, Haixia

    2016-02-23

    A new Fe-based metallic glass with composition Fe76B12Si9Y3 (at. %) is found to have extraordinary degradation efficiency towards methyl orange (MO, C14H14N3SO3) in strong acidic and near neutral environments compared to crystalline zero-valent iron (ZVI) powders and other Fe-based metallic glasses. The influence of temperature (294-328 K) on the degradation reaction rate was measured using ball-milled metallic glass powders revealing a low thermal activation energy barrier of 22.6 kJ/mol. The excellent properties are mainly attributed to the heterogeneous structure consisting of local Fe-rich and Fe-poor atomic clusters, rather than the large specific surface and strong residual stress in the powders. The metallic glass powders can sustain almost unchanged degradation efficiency after 13 cycles at room temperature, while a drop in degradation efficiency with further cycles is attributed to visible surface oxidation. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis conducted during the reaction was used to elucidate the underlying degradation mechanism. The present findings may provide a new, highly efficient and low cost commercial method for azo dye wastewater treatment.

  9. A highly efficient degradation mechanism of methyl orange using Fe-based metallic glass powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shenghui; Huang, Ping; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Zeng, Xierong; Qian, Haixia

    2016-02-01

    A new Fe-based metallic glass with composition Fe76B12Si9Y3 (at. %) is found to have extraordinary degradation efficiency towards methyl orange (MO, C14H14N3SO3) in strong acidic and near neutral environments compared to crystalline zero-valent iron (ZVI) powders and other Fe-based metallic glasses. The influence of temperature (294–328 K) on the degradation reaction rate was measured using ball-milled metallic glass powders revealing a low thermal activation energy barrier of 22.6 kJ/mol. The excellent properties are mainly attributed to the heterogeneous structure consisting of local Fe-rich and Fe-poor atomic clusters, rather than the large specific surface and strong residual stress in the powders. The metallic glass powders can sustain almost unchanged degradation efficiency after 13 cycles at room temperature, while a drop in degradation efficiency with further cycles is attributed to visible surface oxidation. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis conducted during the reaction was used to elucidate the underlying degradation mechanism. The present findings may provide a new, highly efficient and low cost commercial method for azo dye wastewater treatment.

  10. Biocompatibility evaluation of sputtered zirconium-based thin film metallic glass-coated steels.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Balasubramanian; Maruthamuthu, Sundaram; Rajan, Senthilperumal Thanka

    2015-01-01

    Thin film metallic glasses comprised of Zr48Cu36Al8Ag8 (at.%) of approximately 1.5 μm and 3 μm in thickness were prepared using magnetron sputtering onto medical grade 316L stainless steel. Their structural and mechanical properties, in vitro corrosion, and antimicrobial activity were analyzed. The amorphous thin film metallic glasses consisted of a single glassy phase, with an absence of any detectable peaks corresponding to crystalline phases. Elemental composition close to the target alloy was noted from EDAX analysis of the thin film. The surface morphology of the film showed a smooth surface on scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In vitro electrochemical corrosion studies indicated that the zirconium-based metallic glass could withstand body fluid, showing superior resistance to corrosion and electrochemical stability. Interactions between the coated surface and bacteria were investigated by agar diffusion, solution suspension, and wet interfacial contact methods. The results indicated a clear zone of inhibition against the growth of microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, confirming the antimicrobial activity of the thin film metallic glasses. Cytotoxicity studies using L929 fibroblast cells showed these coatings to be noncytotoxic in nature.

  11. A highly efficient degradation mechanism of methyl orange using Fe-based metallic glass powders

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shenghui; Huang, Ping; Kruzic, Jamie J.; Zeng, Xierong; Qian, Haixia

    2016-01-01

    A new Fe-based metallic glass with composition Fe76B12Si9Y3 (at. %) is found to have extraordinary degradation efficiency towards methyl orange (MO, C14H14N3SO3) in strong acidic and near neutral environments compared to crystalline zero-valent iron (ZVI) powders and other Fe-based metallic glasses. The influence of temperature (294–328 K) on the degradation reaction rate was measured using ball-milled metallic glass powders revealing a low thermal activation energy barrier of 22.6 kJ/mol. The excellent properties are mainly attributed to the heterogeneous structure consisting of local Fe-rich and Fe-poor atomic clusters, rather than the large specific surface and strong residual stress in the powders. The metallic glass powders can sustain almost unchanged degradation efficiency after 13 cycles at room temperature, while a drop in degradation efficiency with further cycles is attributed to visible surface oxidation. Triple quadrupole mass spectrometry analysis conducted during the reaction was used to elucidate the underlying degradation mechanism. The present findings may provide a new, highly efficient and low cost commercial method for azo dye wastewater treatment. PMID:26902824

  12. Dealloying of Cu-Based Metallic Glasses in Acidic Solutions: Products and Energy Storage Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifeng; Liu, Jiangyun; Qin, Chunling; Yu, Hui; Xia, Xingchuan; Wang, Chaoyang; Zhang, Yanshan; Hu, Qingfeng; Zhao, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Dealloying, a famous ancient etching technique, was used to produce nanoporous metals decades ago. With the development of dealloying techniques and theories, various interesting dealloying products including nanoporous metals/alloys, metal oxides and composites, which exhibit excellent catalytic, optical and sensing performance, have been developed in recent years. As a result, the research on dealloying products is of great importance for developing new materials with superior physical and chemical properties. In this paper, typical dealloying products from Cu-based metallic glasses after dealloying in hydrofluoric acid and hydrochloric acid solutions are summarized. Several potential application fields of these dealloying products are discussed. A promising application of nanoporous Cu (NPC) and NPC-contained composites related to the energy storage field is introduced. It is expected that more promising dealloying products could be developed for practical energy storage applications. PMID:28347030

  13. Graphite-Fiber-Reinforced Glass-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    G/GI structural composite material made of graphite fibers embedded in borosilicate glass exhibit excellent strength, fracture toughness, and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures. It is made by passing graphite-fiber yarn through slurry containing suspension of fine glass particles in carrier liquid and winding on drum to produce prepegged uniaxial tape. After drying, tapes are cut into appropriate lengths and laid up in graphite die in desired stacking scheme. Stack is consolidated by hot pressing in furnace.

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Seal Glass - BN Nanotubes Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Choi, Sung R.; Hurst, Janet B.; Garg, Anita

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell seal glass G18 composites reinforced with approx.4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated via hot pressing. Room temperature strength and fracture toughness of the composite were determined by four-point flexure and single edge V-notch beam methods, respectively. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90% and 35%, respectively, than those of the glass G18. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces using SEM and TEM showed pullout of the BN nanotubes, similar in feature to fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with weak interfaces. Other mechanical and physical properties of the composite will also be presented.

  15. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Chathoth, S. M.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.

    2015-09-28

    Extensive efforts have been made to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. In this work, we have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  16. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; ...

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is themore » primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.« less

  17. Microscopic insight into the origin of enhanced glass-forming ability of metallic melts on micro-alloying

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C. J.; Podlesnyak, A.; Mamontov, E.; Wang, W. H.; Chathoth, S. M.

    2015-09-28

    We've made extensive efforts to develop metallic-glasses with large casting diameter. Such efforts were hindered by the poor understanding of glass formation mechanisms and the origin of the glass-forming ability (GFA) in metallic glass-forming systems. We have investigated relaxation dynamics of a model bulk glass-forming alloy system that shows the enhanced at first and then diminished GFA on increasing the percentage of micro-alloying. The micro-alloying did not have any significant impact on the thermodynamic properties. The GFA increasing on micro-alloying in this system cannot be explained by the present theoretical knowledge. Finally, our results indicate that atomic caging is the primary factor that influences the GFA. The composition dependence of the atomic caging time or residence time is found to be well correlated with GFA of the system.

  18. Method of joining metallic and composite components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method is provided for joining a metallic member to a structure made of a composite matrix material. One or more surfaces of a portion of the metallic member that is to be joined to the composite matrix structure is provided with a plurality of outwardly projecting studs. The surface including the studs is brought into engagement with a portion of an uncured composite matrix material so that fibers of the composite matrix material intertwine with the studs, and the metallic member and composite structure form an assembly. The assembly is then companion cured so as to join the metallic member to the composite matrix material structure.

  19. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  20. Predicting bioactive glass properties from the molecular chemical composition: glass transition temperature.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Matthew D

    2011-05-01

    The glass transition temperature (T(g)) of inorganic glasses is an important parameter than can be used to correlate with other glass properties, such as dissolution rate, which governs in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. Seven bioactive glass compositional series reported in the literature (77 in total) were analysed here with T(g) values obtained by a number of different methods: differential thermal analysis, differential scanning calorimetry and dilatometry. An iterative least-squares fitting method was used to correlate T(g) from thermal analysis of these compositions with the levels of individual oxide and fluoride components in the glasses. When all seven series were fitted a reasonable correlation was found between calculated and experimental values (R(2)=0.89). When the two compositional series that were designed in weight percentages (the remaining five were designed in molar percentage) were removed from the model an improved fit was achieved (R(2)=0.97). This study shows that T(g) for a wide range in compositions (e.g. SiO(2) content of 37.3-68.4 mol.%) can be predicted to reasonable accuracy enabling processing parameters to be predicted such as annealing, fibre-drawing and sintering temperatures.

  1. Melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebadian, M.A.; Xin, R.C.; Liu, Y.Z.

    1998-01-01

    Several high-temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to support these processes. This research project involves an experimental investigation of the melting, solidification, remelting, and separation of glass and metal and the development of an efficient separation technology. The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. This two-year project commenced in October 1995 (FY96). In the first fiscal year, the following tasks were accomplished: (1) A literature review and an assessment of the baseline glass and metal separation technologies were performed. The results indicated that the baseline technology yields a high percentage of glass in the metal phase, requiring further separation. (2) The main melting and solidification system setup was established. A number of melting and solidification tests were conducted. (3) Temperature distribution, solidification patterns, and flow field in the molten metal pool were simulated numerically for the solidification processes of molten aluminum and iron steel. (4) Initial designs of the laboratory-scale DCS and CS technologies were also completed. The principal demonstration separation units were constructed. (5) An application for a patent for an innovative liquid-liquid separation technology was submitted and is pending.

  2. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components. PMID:27471073

  3. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-07-01

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  4. Liquid-solid joining of bulk metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongjiang; Xue, Peng; Guo, Shu; Wu, Yang; Cheng, Xiang; Fan, Hongbo; Ning, Zhiliang; Cao, Fuyang; Xing, Dawei; Sun, Jianfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-07-29

    Here, we successfully welded two bulk metallic glass (BMG) materials, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9 and Zr50.7Cu28Ni9Al12.3 (at. %), using a liquid-solid joining process. An atomic-scale metallurgical bonding between two BMGs can be achieved. The interface has a transition layer of ~50 μm thick. The liquid-solid joining of BMGs can shed more insights on overcoming their size limitation resulting from their limited glass-forming ability and then promoting their applications in structural components.

  5. Optical response of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass

    SciTech Connect

    Burchianti, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Bogi, A; Marmugi, L; Giomi, S; Maccari, M; Veronesi, S; Moi, L

    2014-03-28

    We study the influence of optical radiation on adsorption and desorption processes of alkali metal atoms confined in nanoporous glass matrices. Exposure of the sample to near-IR or visible light changes the atomic distribution inside the glass nanopores, forcing the entire system to evolve towards a different state. This effect, due to both atomic photodesorption and confinement, causes the growth and evaporation of metastable nanoparticles. It is shown that, by a proper choice of light characteristics and pore size, these processes can be controlled and tailored, thus opening new perspectives for fabrication of nanostructured surfaces. (nanoobjects)

  6. Correlation between average melting temperature and glass transition temperature in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhibin; Li, Jiangong

    2009-02-01

    The correlation between average melting temperature (⟨Tm⟩) and glass transition temperature (Tg) in metallic glasses (MGs) is analyzed. A linear relationship, Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩, is observed. This correlation agrees with Egami's suggestion [Rep. Prog. Phys. 47, 1601 (1984)]. The prediction of Tg from ⟨Tm⟩ through the relationship Tg=0.385⟨Tm⟩ has been tested using experimental data obtained on a large number of MGs. This relationship can be used to predict and design MGs with a desired Tg.

  7. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  8. Optimizing Misch-Metal Compositions In Metal Hydride Anodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Electrochemical cells based on metal hydride anodes investigated experimentally in effort to find anode compositions maximizing charge/discharge-cycle performances. Experimental anodes contained misch metal alloyed with various proportions of Ni, Co, Mn, and Al, and experiments directed toward optimization of composition of misch metal.

  9. Effect of glass composition on activation energy of viscosity in glass-melting-temperature range

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Han, Sang Soo

    2012-08-01

    In the high-temperature range, where the viscosity (Eta) of molten glass is <10{sup 3} Pa s, the activation energy (B) is virtually ln(Eta) = A + B/T, is nearly independent of melt composition. Hence, the viscosity-composition relationship for Eta < 10{sup 3} Pa s is defined by B as a function of composition. Using a database encompassing over 1300 compositions of high-level waste glasses with nearly 7000 viscosity data, we developed mathematical models for B(x), where x is the composition vector in terms of mass fractions of components. In this paper, we present 13 versions of B(x) as first- and second-order polynomials with coefficients for 15 to 39 components, including Others, a component that sums constituents having little effect on viscosity.

  10. Chemical Composition Measurements of LAWA44 Glass Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Riley, W.

    2016-11-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide expert evaluation and experimental work in support of the River Protection Project vitrification technology development. DOE is building the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in Washington to remediate 55 million gallons of radioactive waste that is temporarily stored in 177 underground tanks. The low-activity waste (LAW) fraction will be partitioned from the high-level waste (HLW). Both the LAW and HLW will then be vitrified into borosilicate glass using Joule-heated ceramic melters. Efforts are being made to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in the glass while conforming to processing requirements and product quality regulations. DOE-ORP has requested that SRNL support the advancement of glass formulations and process control strategies in key technical areas, as defined in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP). One of these areas is enhancing waste glass composition/property models and broadening the compositional regions over which those models are applicable. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analysis results for several samples of a simulated LAW glass, designated LAWA44, provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as part of an ongoing development task. The objective of the PNNL task is to determine the durability of this glass using EPA Method 1313, which will include test participants at Vanderbilt University and the University of Sheffield. A report on the compositions of similar glasses (referred to as the EPA-series glasses) was issued in March 2016.

  11. Characterization of Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Chun, H. J.; Karalekas, D.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed, adapted, and applied to the characterization of a metal matrix composite system, namely, silicon carbide/aluminim (SCS-2/6061 Al), and its constituents. The silicon carbide fiber was characterized by determining its modulus, strength, and coefficient of thermal expansion. The aluminum matrix was characterized thermomechanically up to 399 C (750 F) at two strain rates. The unidirectional SiC/Al composite was characterized mechanically under longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear loading up to 399 C (750 F). Isothermal and non-isothermal creep behavior was also measured. The applicability of a proposed set of multifactor thermoviscoplastic nonlinear constitutive relations and a computer code was investigated. Agreement between predictions and experimental results was shown in a few cases. The elastoplastic thermomechanical behavior of the composite was also described by a number of new analytical models developed or adapted for the material system studied. These models include the rule of mixtures, composite cylinder model with various thermoelastoplastic analyses and a model based on average field theory. In most cases satisfactory agreement was demonstrated between analytical predictions and experimental results for the cases of stress-strain behavior and thermal deformation behavior at different temperatures. In addition, some models yielded detailed three-dimensional stress distributions in the constituents within the composite.

  12. Optical properties of polymer/chalcogenide glass composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Pogreb, Roman; Sutovski, Semion

    2000-06-01

    The novel composite material based on middle density polyethylene on one hand and thermoplastic chalcogenide glass on other hand has been worked out. Both materials used in the research are highly transparent in the middle and far IR but refraction indexes of components differ dramatically. The basic materials, polymer and glass, have close viscosities at the temperature of polyethylene processing. This fact allowed use of the extrusion technique for homogenization purposes. We proved, that the controlled structure of a composite could be derived through the varying of technological parameters of the mixing process. Single- and twin screw extrusion processes obtained compositions, which contain up to 50% particles of chalcogenide glass, which were dispersed in the polymer matrix. The highly homogeneous compositions that contain perfect spherical glass particles of 1-2 micrometers in diameter dispersed into polymer matrix were obtained as well. Highly oriented structures involving chalcogenide glass fibers immersed in the polymer matrix were prepared under high stretch speeds as well. Such fiberlike structures exhibited pronounced polarization properties. We studied the optical properties of the composite and came to the conclusion that the controlled structure of the composite allows variation in its optical properties. It was established that it is possible to produce a composite that is opaque in the visible and near IR, and highly transparent in the 2-25-micrometers wave length band. Light scattering on oriented and disordered structures was studied by the IR spectro-goniometer. The novel composite which was developed by our group is intended for various IR-optics applications.

  13. Glass-reinforced hydroxyapatite: a comprehensive study of the effect of glass composition on the crystallography of the composite.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M A; Santos, J D; Monteiro, F J; Knowles, J C

    1998-02-01

    Glass-reinforced HA composites were produced using phosphate-based glasses, and a structure refinement was carried out to determine the effect of the glass on the structure of the residual HA. Quantitative phase analysis showed that the glass causes some of the HA to decompose to beta-TCP and, at higher temperatures, to alpha-TCP. It also was indicated that when three phases were present, the formation of the alpha-TCP arose from decomposition of the beta-TCP and not from further decomposition of HA to alpha-TCP. The unit cell dimensions showed a decrease in the a axis and an increase in the c axis, giving an overall unit cell decrease in volume. There also was a significant effect based on the amount of glass added. The changes found in the composite containing the 4 wt% glass were attributed to the loss of carbonate and loss of hydroxyl. This was expected to cause shrinkage in the unit cell; however this was not seen, and therefore the major changes in the unit cell were attributed to the ions from the glass taking an interstitial role in the HA structure, thus not allowing the unit cell to shrink as much as expected.

  14. High-temperature testing of glass/ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandell, John F.; Grande, Dodd H.; Dannemann, Kathryn A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent advances in ceramic and other high-temperature composites have created a need for test methods that can be used at 1000 C and above. Present test methods usually require adhesively bonded tabs that cannot be used at high temperatures. This paper discusses some of the difficulties with high-temperature test development and describes several promising test methods. Stress-strain data are given for Nicalon ceramic fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites tested in air at temperatures up to 1000 C.

  15. High-throughput Exploration of Glass Formation via Laser Deposition and the Study of Heterogeneous Microstructure in a Bulk Metallic Glass Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Peter T.

    Bulk metallic glasses are a relatively novel class of engineering alloys characterized by a "disordered" atomic structure devoid of long-range translational symmetry. Compared to crystalline alloys, the confluence of metallic bonding and amorphous structure imbues bulk metallic glasses with a unique set of properties that makes them particularly attractive for a wide variety of structural applications. Such properties include exceptional yield strengths, high elastic resilience, resistance to corrosion, and in particular, the unparalleled ability among metals to be thermoplastically formed across a wide range of length scales when heated above the glass transition temperature. Formation of metallic glass from a molten liquid depends on whether cooling is sufficiently rapid to bypass crystallization and vitrify into an amorphous solid; for a given alloy composition, the ease with which full vitrification can occur upon cooling from the liquid state is termed the alloy's "glass forming ability". Unfortunately, relatively few excellent glass formers have been reported in the vast, multicomponent composition space in which they reside. The apparent slowness of progress may be attributed largely to the inefficiency of the one-at-a-time experimental approach to discovery and design. In this thesis work, a high-throughput combinatorial methodology was developed to expedite the discovery process of new bulk metallic glasses. Laser deposition was used to fabricate continuously-graded composition libraries of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Ti alloys. By processing the libraries with a range of laser heat input, the best glass formers in each alloy system could be efficiently and systematically deduced. Furthermore, instrumented nanoindentation performed on the libraries enabled rapid evaluation of mechanical property trends. Despite boasting high strengths, monolithic bulk metallic glasses generally suffer from an intrinsic lack of damage tolerance compared to other high performance alloys

  16. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; ...

    2016-03-31

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disordermore » transitions in condensed matter systems.« less

  17. Low Temperature Heat Capacity of a Severely Deformed Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bünz, Jonas; Brink, Tobias; Tsuchiya, Koichi; Meng, Fanqiang; Wilde, Gerhard; Albe, Karsten

    2014-04-01

    The low temperature heat capacity of amorphous materials reveals a low-frequency enhancement (boson peak) of the vibrational density of states, as compared with the Debye law. By measuring the low-temperature heat capacity of a Zr-based bulk metallic glass relative to a crystalline reference state, we show that the heat capacity of the glass is strongly enhanced after severe plastic deformation by high-pressure torsion, while subsequent thermal annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a significant reduction. The detailed analysis of corresponding molecular dynamics simulations of an amorphous Zr-Cu glass shows that the change in heat capacity is primarily due to enhanced low-frequency modes within the shear band region.

  18. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems. PMID:27030071

  19. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-03-31

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems.

  20. ‘Crystal Genes’ in Metallic Liquids and Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Yue; Fang, Xiaowei; Ding, Zejun; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Ott, Ryan T.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the underlying structural order that transcends liquid, glass and crystalline states in metallic systems. A genetic algorithm is applied to search for the most common energetically favorable packing motifs in crystalline structures. These motifs are in turn compared to the observed packing motifs in the actual liquid or glass structures using a cluster-alignment method. Using this method, we have revealed the nature of the short-range order in Cu64Zr36 glasses. More importantly, we identified a novel structural order in the Al90Sm10 system. In addition, our approach brings new insight into understanding the origin of vitrification and describing mesoscopic order-disorder transitions in condensed matter systems.

  1. Tomographic Imaging of Glass/Epoxy Composite with a Laser Based Ultrasonics Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Khanna, N.; Raghuram, V.; Munshi, P.; Kishore, N. N.; Arnold, W.

    2008-09-26

    The present work is an attempt to augment the classical laser-based-ultrasonics setup for tomographic imaging purposes. A Glass/epoxy composite with steel insert is the test specimen and time-of-flight data has been used for tomographic reconstruction. Multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique is used for this limited-view experiment. The resulting image is able to bring out the strong metal features.

  2. Melting, Solidification, Remelting, and Separation of Glass and Metal

    SciTech Connect

    M. A. Ebadian; R. C.Xin; Z. F. Dong

    1998-11-02

    Several kinds of radioactive waste exist in mixed forms at DOE sites throughout the United States. These Wastes consist of radionuclides and some usefil bme materials. One purpose of waste treatment technologies is to vitrify the radionuclides into durable, stable glass-like materials to reduce the size of the waste form requiring final disposal. The other purpose is to recycle and reuse most of the usefi.d base materials. Thus, improved techniques for the separation of molten metal and glass are essential. Several high temperature vitrification technologies have been developed for the treatment of a wide range of mixed waste types in both the low-level waste and transuranic (TRU) mixed waste categories currently in storage at DOE sites throughout the nation. These processes include the plasma hearth process, which is being developed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), and the arc melter vitrification process, which is being developed at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The products of these processes are an oxide slag phase and a reduced metal phase. The metal phase has the potential to be recycled within the DOE Complex. Enhanced slag/metal separation methods are needed to suppoti these process. A separation method is also needed for the radioactively contaminated scrap metal recycling processe; in order to obtain highly refined recycled metals.

  3. Composition and property measurements for PHA Phase 4 glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-25

    The results presented in this report are for nine Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) Phase 4 glasses. Three of the glasses contained HM sludge at 22, 26, and 30 wt% respectively, 10 wt% PHA and 1.25 wt% monosodium titanate (MST), all on an oxide basis. The remaining six glasses were selected from the Phase 1 and Phase 2 studies (Purex sludge) but with an increased amount of MST. The high-end target for MST of 2.5 wt% oxide was missed in Phases 1 and 2 due to {approximately}30 wt% water content of the MST. A goal of this Phase 4 study was to determine whether this increase in titanium concentration from the MST had any impact on glass quality or processibility. Two of the glasses, pha14c and pha15c, were rebatched and melted due to apparent batching errors with pha14 and pha15. The models currently in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) were used to predict durability, homogeneity, liquidus, and viscosity for these nine glasses. All of the HM glasses and half of the Purex glasses were predicted to be phase separated, and consequently prediction of glass durability is precluded with the cument models for those glasses that failed the homogeneity constraint. If one may ignore the homogeneity constraint, the measured durabilities were within the 95% prediction limits of the model. Further efforts will be required to resolve this issue on phase separation (inhomogeneity). The liquidus model predicted unacceptable liquidus temperatures for four of the nine glasses. The approximate, bounding liquidus temperatures measured for all had upper limits of 1,000 C or less. Given the fact that liquidus temperatures were only approximated, the 30 wt% loading of Purex may be near or at the edge of acceptability for liquidus. The measured viscosities were close to the predictions of the model. For the Purex glasses, pha12c and pha15c, the measured viscosities of 28 and 23 poise, respectively, indicate that DWPF processing may be

  4. Effect of temperature and magnetic field on magnetomechanical damping of Fe-based bulk metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrens-Serra, J.; Solivelles, F.; Corró, M. L.; Stoica, M.; Kustov, S.

    2016-12-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependence of magnetomechanical damping (MMD) of two ferromagnetic Fe-based bulk metallic glasses with different Curie temperatures, T C, have been studied over a broad temperature interval from the para-ferromagnetic transition down to 15 K. The damping has been scanned under periodic magnetic field at certain preselected temperatures in the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases. The selection of bulk metallic glasses for investigations allowed us to eliminate all dislocation-related anelastic effects and facilitated separation of the MMD components. Under zero field, the non-linear MMD emerges at T C and first increases linearly with (T C  -  T), then levels off until a maximum is formed at around 36 K. At lower temperatures, the magnetic domain wall related non-linear MMD component is partially or completely supressed, depending on the alloy composition. Qualitatively similar anomaly is found in the temperature dependence of the linear macroeddy current damping. These anomalies in the temperature spectra are concomitant with the emergence of a notable hysteresis in MMD versus periodic field dependences and of a maximum of non-linear MMD close to the position of the macroeddy damping peak. The uncovered phenomena are attributed to abrupt change of magnetic properties of ferromagnetic bulk metallic glasses at low temperatures, presumably due to the re-entrant spin glass transition.

  5. Volcanic Coatings on Picritic Apollo 17 Glasses; Submicrometer-Deposits of Fe-CR-Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, David S.; Wentworth, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Ross, K.; Clementt, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of our ongoing investigations of Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange and black volcanic glasses are threefold: first, to increase our understanding of the volcanic origin of the glasses; second, to determine the nature of the coating materials deposited on the glasses during their cooling in the volcanic environment; and, third, to help determine the nature of the gases involved in the volcanic fire-fountaining that occurred at approximately 3.5 Ga on the moon. We are continuing studies of coatings on volcanic glasses using analytical techniques not available when these glasses were originally studied; these include high-resolution FE-TEM and X-ray mapping, along with other highly detailed methods including TEM electron diffraction analysis. Initial studies of Apollo 15 green volcanic glasses using the techniques described above revealed for the first time the presence of areas containing distinct layering of volcanic surface deposits. S was associated with some of the inner layer of metallic Fe but was absent from the outer layer. Zn was associated with S in some places in the inner layer. An example of a typical spherule used for this study is shown in Fig. 1. It is a black (quench-crystallized) bead from near the bottom of the 74001/2 double drive tube; black beads such as this one are essentially identical in composition to the orange (uncrystallized) beads of the 74001/2 core.

  6. Glass ceramics for sealing to high-thermal-expansion metals

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, Jr., J. A.

    1980-10-01

    Glass ceramics were studied, formulated in the Na/sub 2/O CaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, Na/sub 2/O.BaOP/sub 2/O/sub 5/, Na/sub 2/O.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/, and Li/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems to establish their suitability for sealing to high thermal expansion metals, e.g. aluminum, copper, and 300 series stainless steels. Glass ceramics in Na/sub 2/O.CaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and Na/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems have coefficients of thermal expansion in the range 140 x 10/sup -1/ per /sup 0/C less than or equal to ..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 225 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C and fracture toughness values generally greater than those of phosphate glasses; they are suitable for fabricating seals to high thermal expansion metals. Crystal phases include NaPo/sub 3/, (NaPO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, NaBa(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/, and NaCa(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/. Glass ceramics formed in the Na/sub 2/O.Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ systems have coefficients of thermal expansion greater than 240 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C, but they have extensive microcracking. Due to their low thermal expansion values (..cap alpha.. less than or equal to 120 x 10/sup -7/ per /sup 0/C), glass ceramics in the Li/sub 2/O.BaO.P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ system are unsuitable for sealing to high thermal expansion metals.

  7. Characterization of Mechanical, Thermal and Wear Properties of Titanium Rich Metallic Glasses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-20

    I D-Ai23 595 CHRACTERIZATION OF MECHANICAL THERMAL AND NEAR / I PROPERTIES OF TITANIUM RI..(U) NORTHEASTERN UNIY BOSTON INA INST OF CHEMICAL ANALYSIS...Mechanical, Thermal andJun 78 - 15 ar 82 Wear Properties of Titanium Rich Metallic Glasses 6. PERFORMINGORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) G. CONTRACT OR GRANT...b, blockh nmibor) metallic glasses transition metal glasses 2 titanium alloy glasses . /reactive alloys /alloys - properties " ABSTRAc C (emwn sm

  8. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  9. Bacterial adhesion to glass and metal-oxide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Baikun; Logan, Bruce E

    2004-07-15

    Metal oxides can increase the adhesion of negatively-charged bacteria to surfaces primarily due to their positive charge. However, the hydrophobicity of a metal-oxide surface can also increase adhesion of bacteria. In order to understand the relative contribution of charge and hydrophobicity to bacterial adhesion, we measured the adhesion of 8 strains of bacteria, under conditions of low and high-ionic strength (1 and 100 mM, respectively) to 11 different surfaces and examined adhesion as a function of charge, hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and surface energy. Inorganic surfaces included three uncoated glass surfaces and eight metal-oxide thin films prepared on the upper (non-tin-exposed) side of float glass by chemical vapor deposition. The Gram-negative bacteria differed in lengths of lipopolysaccharides on their outer surface (three Escherichia coli strains), the amounts of exopolysaccharides (two Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains), and their known relative adhesion to sand grains (two Burkholderia cepacia strains). One Gram positive bacterium was also used that had a lower adhesion to glass than these other bacteria (Bacillus subtilis). For all eight bacteria, there was a consistent increase in adhesion between with the type of inorganic surface in the order: float glass exposed to tin (coded here as Si-Sn), glass microscope slide (Si-m), uncoated air-side float glass surface (Si-a), followed by thin films of (Co(1-y-z)Fe(y)Cr(z))3O4, Ti/Fe/O, TiO2, SnO2, SnO2:F, SnO2:Sb, A1(2)O3, and Fe2O3 (the colon indicates metal doping, a slash indicates that the metal is a major component, while the dash is used to distinguish surfaces). Increasing the ionic strength from 1 to 100 mM increased adhesion by a factor of 2.0 +/- 0.6 (73% of the sample results were within the 95% CI) showing electrostatic charge was important in adhesion. However, adhesion was not significantly correlated with bacterial charge and contact angle. Adhesion (A) of the eight strains was

  10. Study of Alkali-Metal Vapor Diffusion into Glass Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kiminori

    2013-08-01

    To investigate nanodispersion of alkali metals into glass materials, potassium vapor diffusion is conducted using SiO2 glass under well-controlled temperature conditions. It is found that potassium vapor significantly diffuses into the bulk of SiO2 glass with less precipitation on the surface when the host material is kept at a temperature slightly higher than that of the guest material. Positron annihilation spectroscopy reveals that angstrom-scale open spaces in the SiO2 matrix contribute to potassium vapor diffusion. The analysis of potassium concentration obtained by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) mapping with Fick's second law yields an extremely low potassium diffusion coefficient of 5.1×10-14 cm2 s-1, which arises from the overall diffusion from open spaces of various sizes. The diffusion coefficient attributable to angstrom-scale open spaces is thus expected to be less than ˜10-14 cm2 s-1. The present findings imply that angstrom-scale open spaces play an important role in loading alkali metals into glass materials.

  11. Ductile-to-brittle transition in spallation of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.; Ling, Z.; Dai, L. H.

    2014-10-14

    In this paper, the spallation behavior of a binary metallic glass Cu{sub 50}Zr{sub 50} is investigated with molecular dynamics simulations. With increasing the impact velocity, micro-voids induced by tensile pulses become smaller and more concentrated. The phenomenon suggests a ductile-to-brittle transition during the spallation process. Further investigation indicates that the transition is controlled by the interaction between void nucleation and growth, which can be regarded as a competition between tension transformation zones (TTZs) and shear transformation zones (STZs) at atomic scale. As impact velocities become higher, the stress amplitude and temperature rise in the spall region increase and micro-structures of the material become more unstable. Therefore, TTZs are prone to activation in metallic glasses, leading to a brittle behavior during the spallation process.

  12. Optical reflectivity improvement by upgrading metallic glass film quality

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, W. H.; Hsu, J. H.; Huang, J. C.

    2013-10-14

    The effects of atomic-defect and free-volume amounts of metallic glassy film on the optical reflectivity and mechanical properties of the sputtered metallic glass thin films are explored. With a lower Ar working pressure and the proper post-annealing at temperatures slightly lower than the glass-transition temperature T{sub g}, film free volumes and defects would reduce, resulting in better atomic bonding and higher film hardness/modulus, which in turn leads to lower electric resistivity and higher optical reflectivity. Annealing above T{sub g} would induce crystalline structure which would lead to competition with the optical transition of the Drude free electrons and hinder the optical reflectivity in the visible range.

  13. Elastic properties and atomic bonding character in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rouxel, T.; Yokoyama, Y.

    2015-07-28

    The elastic properties of glasses from different metallic systems were studied in the light of the atomic packing density and bonding character. We found that the electronegativity mismatch (Δe{sup −}) between the host- and the major solute-elements provides a plausible explanation to the large variation observed for Poisson's ratio (ν) among metallic glasses (MGs) (from 0.28 for Fe-based to 0.43 for Pd-based MGs), notwithstanding a similar atomic packing efficiency (C{sub g}). Besides, it is found that ductile MGs correspond to Δe{sup −} smaller than 0.5 and to a relatively steep atomic potential well. Ductility is, thus, favored in MGs exhibiting a weak bond directionality on average and opposing a strong resistance to volume change.

  14. An electronic criterion for assessing intrinsic brittleness of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. F.; Jones, T. E.; Wu, Y.; Lu, Z. P.; Halas, S.; Durakiewicz, T.; Eberhart, M. E.

    2014-07-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are characterized by a number of remarkable physical and mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these same materials are often intrinsically brittle, which limits their utility. Consequently, considerable effort has been expended searching for correlations between the phenomenologically complex mechanical properties of metallic glasses and more basic properties, such correlations might provide insight into the structure and bonding controlling the deformation properties of BMGs. While conducting such a search, we uncovered a weak correlation between a BMG’s work function and its susceptibility to brittle behavior. We argue that the basis for this correlation is a consequence of a component of the work function – the surface dipole – and a fundamental bond property related to the shape of the charge density at a bond critical point. Together these observations suggest that simple first principle calculations might be useful in the search for tougher BMGs.

  15. An electronic criterion for assessing intrinsic brittleness of metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Wang, X F; Jones, T E; Wu, Y; Lu, Z P; Halas, S; Durakiewicz, T; Eberhart, M E

    2014-07-14

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) are characterized by a number of remarkable physical and mechanical properties. Unfortunately, these same materials are often intrinsically brittle, which limits their utility. Consequently, considerable effort has been expended searching for correlations between the phenomenologically complex mechanical properties of metallic glasses and more basic properties, such correlations might provide insight into the structure and bonding controlling the deformation properties of BMGs. While conducting such a search, we uncovered a weak correlation between a BMG's work function and its susceptibility to brittle behavior. We argue that the basis for this correlation is a consequence of a component of the work function - the surface dipole - and a fundamental bond property related to the shape of the charge density at a bond critical point. Together these observations suggest that simple first principle calculations might be useful in the search for tougher BMGs.

  16. Spectroscopic and ultrasonic investigations on structural characterization of borate glass specimen doped with transition metal ions.

    PubMed

    Sathish, K; Thirumaran, S

    2015-08-05

    The present work describes the glass samples of composition (x% V₂O₅-(80-x)% B₂O₃-20% Na₂CO₃) VBS glass system and (x%MnO₂-(80-x)% B₂O₃-20% Na₂CO₃) in MBS glass system with mol% ranging from x=3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 in steps of 3 mol% are prepared by melt quenching technique. For these prepared glass systems, sound velocity (longitudinal and shear velocities) and density have been measured. The sound velocity (longitudinal and shear) was measured by using pulse-echo technique at 5 MHz. The XRD study was carried to out to ascertain the amorphous nature of the glass specimen. Using these measured values, the elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, Debye temperature, acoustic impedance and thermal expansion coefficient of the two glass systems were evaluated. The elastic and mechanical properties of the prepared glass systems are analyzed from ultrasonic study and the structural characterization from spectroscopic study. The effects due to the doping of transition metal ions with borate have been discussed. In the V₂O₅ doped glass system,(VBS glass system) the sound velocity, density and elastic moduli, steeply increases after 12 mol% comparatively with MnO₂ doped glass system (VBS glass system). The present study critically observes the doping of V₂O₅ with borate enhances the strengthening of network linkage and hardening of the glassy network structure than MnO₂. The IR spectral analysis reveals depolymerization of the borate network and conversion of BO₃ or BO4 units with the formation of non-bridging oxygen. The FTIR spectral studies confirm the presence of various functional groups of the sample. FTIR spectrum of sample exhibits broad absorption bands indicating the wide distribution of borate structural units. The effect of Na₂CO₃, V₂O₅ and MnO₂ contents on the structures of borate glass is evaluated from the FTIR spectra. The topological aspects of the prepared glass samples are exhaustively reported from SEM micrographs.

  17. Spectroscopic and ultrasonic investigations on structural characterization of borate glass specimen doped with transition metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathish, K.; Thirumaran, S.

    2015-08-01

    The present work describes the glass samples of composition (x% V2O5-(80-x)% B2O3-20% Na2CO3) VBS glass system and (x% MnO2-(80-x)% B2O3-20% Na2CO3) in MBS glass system with mol% ranging from x = 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 in steps of 3 mol% are prepared by melt quenching technique. For these prepared glass systems, sound velocity (longitudinal and shear velocities) and density have been measured. The sound velocity (longitudinal and shear) was measured by using pulse-echo technique at 5 MHz. The XRD study was carried to out to ascertain the amorphous nature of the glass specimen. Using these measured values, the elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, Debye temperature, acoustic impedance and thermal expansion coefficient of the two glass systems were evaluated. The elastic and mechanical properties of the prepared glass systems are analyzed from ultrasonic study and the structural characterization from spectroscopic study. The effects due to the doping of transition metal ions with borate have been discussed. In the V2O5 doped glass system, (VBS glass system) the sound velocity, density and elastic moduli, steeply increases after 12 mol% comparatively with MnO2 doped glass system (VBS glass system). The present study critically observes the doping of V2O5 with borate enhances the strengthening of network linkage and hardening of the glassy network structure than MnO2. The IR spectral analysis reveals depolymerization of the borate network and conversion of BO3 or BO4 units with the formation of non-bridging oxygen. The FTIR spectral studies confirm the presence of various functional groups of the sample. FTIR spectrum of sample exhibits broad absorption bands indicating the wide distribution of borate structural units. The effect of Na2CO3, V2O5 and MnO2 contents on the structures of borate glass is evaluated from the FTIR spectra. The topological aspects of the prepared glass samples are exhaustively reported from SEM micrographs.

  18. Microstructural characterization of Mg-based bulk metallic glass and nanocomposite

    SciTech Connect

    Babilas, Rafał; Nowosielski, Ryszard; Pawlyta, Mirosława; Fitch, Andy; Burian, Andrzej

    2015-04-15

    New magnesium-based bulk metallic glasses Mg{sub 60}Cu{sub 30}Y{sub 10} have been prepared by pressure casting. Glassy alloys were successfully annealed to become nanocomposite containing 200 nm crystallites in an amorphous matrix. The microstructure of bulk glassy alloy and nanocomposite obtained during heat treatment was examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning and high-resolution electron microscopy. Metallic glass has been also studied to explain the structural characteristics by the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling based on the diffraction data. The HRTEM images allow to indicate some medium-range order (MRO) regions about 2–3 nm in size and formation of local atomic clusters. The RMC modeling results confirmed some kinds of short range order (SRO) structures. It was found that the structure of bulk metallic glass formed by the pressure casting is homogeneous. The composite material contained very small particles in the amorphous matrix. Homogeneous glassy alloy had better corrosion resistance than a composite containing nanocrystalline particles in a glassy matrix. - Highlights: • RMC modeling demonstrates some kinds of SRO structures in Mg-based BMGs. • HRTEM indicated MRO regions about 2–3 nm and SRO regions about 0.5 nm in size. • Mg-based glassy alloys were successfully annealed to become nanocomposite material. • Crystalline particles have spherical morphology with an average diameter of 200 nm. • Glassy alloy had higher corrosion resistance than a nanocomposite sample.

  19. Solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-01-01

    The recent development of metallic glass-matrix composites represents a particular milestone in engineering materials for structural applications owing to their remarkable combination of strength and toughness. However, metallic glasses are highly susceptible to cyclic fatigue damage, and previous attempts to solve this problem have been largely disappointing. Here, we propose and demonstrate a microstructural design strategy to overcome this limitation by matching the microstructural length scales (of the second phase) to mechanical crack-length scales. Specifically, semisolid processing is used to optimize the volume fraction, morphology, and size of second-phase dendrites to confine any initial deformation (shear banding) to the glassy regions separating dendrite arms having length scales of ≈2 μm, i.e., to less than the critical crack size for failure. Confinement of the damage to such interdendritic regions results in enhancement of fatigue lifetimes and increases the fatigue limit by an order of magnitude, making these “designed” composites as resistant to fatigue damage as high-strength steels and aluminum alloys. These design strategies can be universally applied to any other metallic glass systems. PMID:19289820

  20. On a solution to the problem of the poor cyclic fatigue resistance of bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Johnson, William L.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2009-01-09

    The recent development of metallic glass-matrix composites represents a particular milestone in engineering materials for structural applications owing to their remarkable combinations of strength and toughness. However, metallic glasses are highly susceptible to cyclic fatigue damage and previous attempts to solve this problem have been largely disappointing. Here we propose and demonstrate a microstructural design strategy to overcome this limitation by matching the microstructural length scales (of the second phase) to mechanical crack-length scales. Specifically, semi-solid processing is used to optimize the volume fraction, morphology, and size of second phase dendrites to confine any initial deformation (shear banding) to the glassy regions separating dendrite arms having length scales of {approx} 2 {micro}m, i.e., to less than the critical crack size for failure. Confinement of the damage to such interdendritic regions results in enhancement of fatigue lifetimes and increases the fatigue limit by an order of magnitude making these 'designed' composites as resistant to fatigue damage as high-strength steels and aluminum alloys. These design strategies can be universally applied to any other metallic glass systems.

  1. Metal-To-Composite Shaft Splice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kish, Jules; Nguyen, Dean; Lauder, Tim

    1992-01-01

    Strong, lightweight shaft formed without awkward bolted flanges. Composite and metal portions of shaft joined by winding composite portion onto outer surface and into spiral groove of metal portion. Groove and composite material constitute structural bond. If opposing spiral grooves used, then two shafts locked together against torques in both directions.

  2. An Assessment of Binary Metallic Glasses: Correlations Between Structure, Glass Forming Ability and Stability (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    elements (Figure 2). Solutes or solvents are taken from alkaline earth metals, early and late transition metals, lanthanides and actinide elements ...CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) D.B. Miracle (AFRL/RXLM) Dmitri Louzguine-Luzgin...compositions given by the pre-melting weight of the elements − measured compositions are rarely reported. Measured weight loss is sometimes given, and

  3. Nano-scale solute partitioning in devitrified bulk metalic glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Miller, M. K.; Wang, X. L.; Liu, C. T.; Stoica, A. D.; Ma, D.; Almer, J.; Shi, D.; ORNL; Univ. of Cincinnati; Univ. of Tennessee

    2009-01-01

    Devitrification of bulk metallic glass leads to a novel microstructure, with high-density nanoscale crystalline precipitates evenly distributed in a glassy matrix. Significant chemical segregation is revealed at unprecedented detail by atom-probe tomography. This level of detail is crucial for understanding the interference peaks observed in small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering experiments, an unsolved mystery for over a decade.

  4. Medium-range structure and glass forming ability in Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glasses

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Pei; Maldonis, Jason J.; Besser, M. F.; ...

    2016-03-05

    Fluctuation electron microscopy experiments combined with hybrid reverse Monte Carlo modeling show a correlation between medium-range structure at the nanometer scale and glass forming ability in two Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys. Both Zr50Cu35Al15 and Zr50Cu45Al5 exhibit two nanoscale structure types, one icosahedral and the other more crystal-like. In Zr50Cu35Al15, the poorer glass former, the crystal-like structure is more stable under annealing below the glass transition temperature, Tg, than in Zr50Cu45Al5. Variable resolution fluctuation microscopy of the MRO clusters show that in Zr50Cu35Al15 on sub-Tg annealing, the crystal-like clusters shrink even as they grow more ordered, while icosahedral-like clustersmore » grow. Furthermore, the results suggest that achieving better glass forming ability in this alloy system may depend more on destabilizing crystal-like structures than enhancing non-crystalline structures.« less

  5. Medium-range structure and glass forming ability in Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pei; Maldonis, Jason J.; Besser, M. F.; Kramer, M. J.; Voyles, Paul M.

    2016-03-05

    Fluctuation electron microscopy experiments combined with hybrid reverse Monte Carlo modeling show a correlation between medium-range structure at the nanometer scale and glass forming ability in two Zr–Cu–Al bulk metallic glass (BMG) alloys. Both Zr50Cu35Al15 and Zr50Cu45Al5 exhibit two nanoscale structure types, one icosahedral and the other more crystal-like. In Zr50Cu35Al15, the poorer glass former, the crystal-like structure is more stable under annealing below the glass transition temperature, Tg, than in Zr50Cu45Al5. Variable resolution fluctuation microscopy of the MRO clusters show that in Zr50Cu35Al15 on sub-Tg annealing, the crystal-like clusters shrink even as they grow more ordered, while icosahedral-like clusters grow. Furthermore, the results suggest that achieving better glass forming ability in this alloy system may depend more on destabilizing crystal-like structures than enhancing non-crystalline structures.

  6. Effect of glass composition on the degradation properties and ion release characteristics of phosphate glass--polycaprolactone composites.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Roopa L; Brocchini, Steve; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2005-05-01

    A series of polycaprolactone and ternary-based (Na(2)O)(0.55-x)(CaO)(x)(P(2)O(5))(0.45) glass composites were created, each containing 20% volume percentage of glass with various calcium compositions. A short-term degradation study was carried out to investigate the physical and ion release behaviour of these composites, utilising analytical techniques such as dynamical mechanical analysis, and ion chromatography. All the composites experienced significant loss of weight and stiffness throughout the study, with the 24 mol% calcium composites losing the greatest amount of weight and stiffness. The pH profile of the aqueous solutions in which the composites were placed were initially acidic, but began to neutralise mid-way through the study, with the 36 mol% solution achieving the most acidic conditions. The ion release behaviour mirrored the mass loss behaviour of the glass component of the composites. The cations (sodium and calcium ions) release was comparable with the initial stages of composite mass degradation, both of which exhibited almost immediate release when placed into solution. The 24 mol% composites underwent rapid rates of cation release, while the 36 mol% experienced the slowest rates of release. By contrast, anion (phosphates and polyphosphates) release showed a dissimilar trend, with rapid release of the P(2)O(7) and P(3)O(10) occurring during the first few hours in solution, whilst the P(3)O(9) structure released steadily during the first 48 h in solution. Finally, PO(4) release was at a constant rate over the duration of the study, releasing up to 300 ppm from the 32 and 36 mol% samples by the end of 200 h. To summarise, these results show that by combining phosphate glasses with biodegradable polymer, it is possible to create composites whose rate of degradation can be controlled to meet the needs of their end application.

  7. Effects of short glass fibers on the mechanical properties of glass fiber fabric/PVC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su Bin; Lee, Joon Seok; Kim, Jong Won

    2017-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites using glass fiber and polyvinylchloride (PVC) have been used widely as architectural materials, electrical applications, automotive sector, and packing materials because of their reasonable price, chemical resistance, and dimensional stability. On the other hand, most of the composites are short fiber-reinforced PVC composites. In particular, in the case of fabric reinforced composites, undulated regions exist where there is only resin due to the characteristics of the weave construction, which causes a decrease in strength. In this paper, PVC was reinforced with chopped glass fibers with different lengths and contents to produce glass fiber fabric/PVC composites. The physical properties of the composites, such as thickness, density, volume fraction (V f), and void content (V c) were identified. The mechanical properties, including tensile strength, flexural strength, and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) were also identified. A cross section of the composites was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to the fabric reinforced composite without chopped glass fiber, the tensile strength was increased by 3.90% (from 316.15 MPa to 328.48 MPa at 5 wt.% chopped fibers with 3 mm length), flexural strength was increased by 7.15% (from 87.07 MPa to 93.30 MPa at 10 wt.% chopped fibers with 2 mm length), and ILSS was increased by 8.71% (from 7.34 MPa to 7.98 MPa at 10 wt.% chopped fibers with 1 mm length). Therefore, the critical fiber aspect ratio of chopped fiber works differently on each of the three mechanical properties.

  8. Mechanical properties of non-woven glass fiber geopolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Pola, M.; Kovářík, T.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This experimental research focuses on mechanical properties of non-woven glass fabric composites bound by geopolymeric matrix. This study investigates the effect of different matrix composition and amount of granular filler on the mechanical properties of final composites. Matrix was selected as a metakaolin based geopolymer hardened by different amount of potassium silicate activator. The ceramic granular filler was added into the matrix for investigation of its impact on mechanical properties and workability. Prepared pastes were incorporated into the non-woven fabrics by hand roller and final composites were stacked layer by layer to final thickness. The early age hardening of prepared pastes were monitored by small amplitude dynamic rheology approach and after 28 days of hardening the mechanical properties were examined. The electron microscopy was used for detail description of microstructural properties. The imaging methods revealed good wettability of glass fibers by geopolymeric matrix and results of mechanical properties indicate usability of these materials for constructional applications.

  9. Apollo 15 green glass - Relationships between texture and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, Alison M.

    1992-01-01

    A suite of 365 Apollo 15 green-glass particles was analyzed by INAA and then described petrographically so that comparisons between composition and physical characteristics could be made. Nonuniform compositional distributions of crystalline and elongate particles were evident, although differences in the distribution of volatile-element coatings and extent of particle breakage were not as striking. A binomial evaluation of these textures on an intergroup basis supports the previously proposed hypothesis that the green-glass groups formed during discrete eruptive events because the groups that were defined compositionally also show significant differences in the average texture and structure of particles. Furthermore, in at least one case (Group D), intragroup differences in the distribution of vitrophyric and vitric particles were apparent. An extension of previous models for pyroclastic volcanism suggests that this feature may indicate that a systematic change in the composition of ejecta occurred as eruption progressed.

  10. Search for the microscopic origin of defects and shear localization in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Mo

    2001-11-10

    This proposed research addresses one of the long outstanding fundamental problems in materials science, the mechanisms of deformation in amorphous metals. Due to the lack of long-range translational order, details of structural defects and their behaviors in metallic glasses have not been accessible in experiments. In addition, the small dimensions of the amorphous alloys made early by rapid quenching impose severe limit on many standard mechanical and microscopy testing. As a result, the microscopic mechanism of deformation in the amorphous materials has not been established. The recent success in synthesis of bulk metallic glass overcomes the difficulty in standard testing; but the barrier for understanding the defect process and microscopic mechanisms of deformation still remains. Amorphous metals deform in a unique way by shear banding. As a result, there is no work hardening, little macroscopic plasticity, and catastrophic failure. To retain and improve the inherent high strength, large elastic strain, and high toughness in amorphous metals, a variety of synthesis activities are currently underway including making metallic glass matrix composites. These new explorations call for a quantitative understanding of deformation mechanisms in both the monolithic metallic glasses as well as their composites. The knowledge is expected to give insight and guide to design, processing and applications of this new generation of engineering materials. This DOE funded research takes the approach of computer simulation and modeling to tackle this problem. It is expected that with the increasing power of computers, the numerical modeling could provide the answers that are difficult or impossible to get from experiments. Three parallel research tasks were planned in this work. One is on search of atomic structural defects and other microscopic mechanisms underlying the deformation process. The second is the formulate a general model to describe shear localization, shear band

  11. Experimental and theoretical study on the driving force and glass flow by laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass

    PubMed Central

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Wada, Jun; Iwamoto, Tatsuki; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Kishi, Tetsuo; Morita, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Light is able to remotely move matter. Among various driving forces, laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass has been reported. The temperature on the laser-illuminated side of the sphere was higher than that on the non-illuminated side. This temperature gradient caused non-uniformity in the interfacial tension between the glass and the melted metal as the tension decreased with increasing temperature. In the present study, we investigated laser-induced metal sphere migration in different glasses using thermal flow calculations, considering the temperature dependence of the material parameters. In addition, the velocity of the glass flow generated by the metal sphere migration was measured and compared with thermal flow calculations. The migration velocity of the stainless steel sphere increased with increasing laser power density; the maximum velocity was 104 μm/s in borosilicate glass and 47 μm/s in silica glass. The sphere was heated to more than 2000 K. The temperature gradient of the interfacial tension between the stainless steel sphere and the glass was calculated to be −2.29 × 10−5 N/m/K for borosilicate glass and −2.06 × 10−5 N/m/K for silica glass. Glass flowed in the region 15–30 μm from the surface of the sphere, and the 80-μm sphere migrated in a narrow softened channel. PMID:27934897

  12. Experimental and theoretical study on the driving force and glass flow by laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidai, Hirofumi; Wada, Jun; Iwamoto, Tatsuki; Matsusaka, Souta; Chiba, Akira; Kishi, Tetsuo; Morita, Noboru

    2016-12-01

    Light is able to remotely move matter. Among various driving forces, laser-induced metal sphere migration in glass has been reported. The temperature on the laser-illuminated side of the sphere was higher than that on the non-illuminated side. This temperature gradient caused non-uniformity in the interfacial tension between the glass and the melted metal as the tension decreased with increasing temperature. In the present study, we investigated laser-induced metal sphere migration in different glasses using thermal flow calculations, considering the temperature dependence of the material parameters. In addition, the velocity of the glass flow generated by the metal sphere migration was measured and compared with thermal flow calculations. The migration velocity of the stainless steel sphere increased with increasing laser power density; the maximum velocity was 104 μm/s in borosilicate glass and 47 μm/s in silica glass. The sphere was heated to more than 2000 K. The temperature gradient of the interfacial tension between the stainless steel sphere and the glass was calculated to be -2.29 × 10-5 N/m/K for borosilicate glass and -2.06 × 10-5 N/m/K for silica glass. Glass flowed in the region 15-30 μm from the surface of the sphere, and the 80-μm sphere migrated in a narrow softened channel.

  13. MELTING, SOLIDIFICATION, REMELTING, AND SEPARATION OF GLASS AND METAL

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1998-11-01

    The ultimate goal of this project is to find an efficient way to separate the slag phase from the metal phase in the molten state. A basic knowledge of the thermal, transport, and metallurgical phenomena that occur in the melting and solidification of glass, metal, and their mixtures is the foundation of the development of the separation methods. In association with this project, an innovative liquid-liquid extractor/separator will be developed to meet the separation needs for efficient extraction/separation devices for the various DOE liquid waste treatment processes.

  14. Energy efficiency of iron–boron–silicon metallic glasses in sulfuric acid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, K.; Jiang, W.; Rahman, B. M. A.; Grattan, K. T. V.

    2017-03-01

    A criterion of the energy efficiency of iron–boron–silicon metallic glasses in sulfuric acid solutions is proposed for the first time. The criterion has been derived based on calculating the limit of the ratio value of the conductivity of a metallic glass in aqueous solution to the conductivity of the metallic glass in air. In other words, the conductivity ratio of a metallic glass in aqueous solution to the conductivity of the metallic glass in air  = 1, was applied to determine the energy efficiency of the metallic glass in the aqueous solution when the conductivity of a metallic glass in air became equal (decreased) to the steady conductivity of the metallic glass in aqueous solution as a function of time of the exposure of the metallic glass to the aqueous solution. This criterion was not only used to determine the energy efficiency of different metallic glasses, but also, the criterion was used to determine the energy efficiency of metallic glasses exposed to a wide range of sulfuric acid concentrations. These conductivity values were determined by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). In addition, the criterion can be applied under diverse test conditions with a predetermined period of the operational life of the metallic glasses as functional materials. Furthermore, variations of the energy efficiency of the metallic glasses as a function of the acid concentration and time were produced by fitting the experimental data to a numerical model using a nonlinear regression method. The profiles of the metallic glasses exhibit a less conservative behavior of the energy efficiency than the proposed analytical criterion.

  15. Metallic glass thin films for potential biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Neelam; Sharma, Parmanand; Ahadian, Samad; Khademhosseini, Ali; Takahashi, Masaharu; Makino, Akihiro; Tanaka, Shuji; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2014-10-01

    We introduce metallic glass thin films (TiCuNi) as biocompatible materials for biomedical applications. TiCuNi metallic glass thin films were deposited on the Si substrate and their structural, surface, and mechanical properties were investigated. The fabricated films showed good biocompatibility upon exposure to muscle cells. Also, they exhibited an average roughness of <0.2 nm, high wear resistance, and high mechanical properties (hardness ∼6.9 GPa and reduced modulus ∼130 GPa). Top surface of the TiCuNi films was shown to be free from Ni and mainly composed of a thin titanium oxide layer, which resulted in the high surface biocompatibility. In particular, there was no cytotoxicity effect of metallic glass films on the C2C12 myoblasts and the cells were able to proliferate well on these substrates. Low cost, viscoelastic behavior, patternability, high electrical conductivity, and the capability to coat various materials (e.g., nonbiocompatible materials) make TiCuNi as an attractive material for biomedical applications.

  16. Bioactive glass/ZrO2 composites for orthopaedic applications.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-02-01

    Binary biocomposites were realized by combining yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) with a bioactive glass matrix. Few works are available regarding composites containing zirconia and a relatively high content of glass because the resulting samples are usually biocompatible but not bioactive after thermal treatment. In the present research, the promising properties of the new BG_Ca-K glass, with its low tendency to crystallize and high apatite-forming ability, allowed us to sinter the composites at a relatively low temperature with excellent effects in terms of bioactivity. In addition, it was possible to benefit from the good mechanical behaviour of Y-TZP, thus obtaining samples with microhardness values that were among the highest reported in the literature. After a detailed analysis regarding the thermal behaviour of the composite powders, the sintered bodies were fully characterized by means of x-ray diffraction, SEM equipped with EDS, density measurements, volumetric shrinkage determination, mechanical testing and in vitro evaluation in a simulated body fluid (SBF) solution. According to the experimental results, the presence of Y-TZP improved the mechanical performance. Meanwhile, the BG_Ca-K glass, which mainly preserved its amorphous structure after sintering, provided the composites with a good apatite-forming ability in SBF.

  17. Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites: mechanical properties and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bellucci, Devis; Sola, Antonella; Anesi, Alexandre; Salvatori, Roberta; Chiarini, Luigi; Cannillo, Valeria

    2015-06-01

    Bioactive glass/hydroxyapatite composites for bone tissue repair and regeneration have been produced and discussed. The use of a recently developed glass, namely BG_Ca/Mix, with its low tendency to crystallize, allowed one to sinter the samples at a relatively low temperature thus avoiding several adverse effects usually reported in the literature, such as extensive crystallization of the glassy phase, hydroxyapatite (HA) decomposition and reaction between HA and glass. The mechanical properties of the composites with 80wt.% BG_Ca/Mix and 20wt.% HA are sensibly higher than those of Bioglass® 45S5 reference samples due to the presence of HA (mechanically stronger than the 45S5 glass) and to the thermal behaviour of the BG_Ca/Mix, which is able to favour the sintering process of the composites. Biocompatibility tests, performed with murine fibroblasts BALB/3T3 and osteocites MLO-Y4 throughout a multi-parametrical approach, allow one to look with optimism to the produced composites, since both the samples themselves and their extracts do not induce negative effects in cell viability and do not cause inhibition in cell growth.

  18. Combinatorial development of antibacterial Zr-Cu-Al-Ag thin film metallic glasses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yanhui; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Cheung, Bettina; Liu, Jingbei; Chen, Zheng; Scanley, B. Ellen; Wesolowski, Donna; Pressley, Mariyah; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Altman, Sidney; Schwarz, Udo D.; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Schroers, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Metallic alloys are normally composed of multiple constituent elements in order to achieve integration of a plurality of properties required in technological applications. However, conventional alloy development paradigm, by sequential trial-and-error approach, requires completely unrelated strategies to optimize compositions out of a vast phase space, making alloy development time consuming and labor intensive. Here, we challenge the conventional paradigm by proposing a combinatorial strategy that enables parallel screening of a multitude of alloys. Utilizing a typical metallic glass forming alloy system Zr-Cu-Al-Ag as an example, we demonstrate how glass formation and antibacterial activity, two unrelated properties, can be simultaneously characterized and the optimal composition can be efficiently identified. We found that in the Zr-Cu-Al-Ag alloy system fully glassy phase can be obtained in a wide compositional range by co-sputtering, and antibacterial activity is strongly dependent on alloy compositions. Our results indicate that antibacterial activity is sensitive to Cu and Ag while essentially remains unchanged within a wide range of Zr and Al. The proposed strategy not only facilitates development of high-performing alloys, but also provides a tool to unveil the composition dependence of properties in a highly parallel fashion, which helps the development of new materials by design. PMID:27230692

  19. Combinatorial development of antibacterial Zr-Cu-Al-Ag thin film metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanhui; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Cheung, Bettina; Liu, Jingbei; Chen, Zheng; Scanley, B. Ellen; Wesolowski, Donna; Pressley, Mariyah; Broadbridge, Christine C.; Altman, Sidney; Schwarz, Udo D.; Kyriakides, Themis R.; Schroers, Jan

    2016-05-01

    Metallic alloys are normally composed of multiple constituent elements in order to achieve integration of a plurality of properties required in technological applications. However, conventional alloy development paradigm, by sequential trial-and-error approach, requires completely unrelated strategies to optimize compositions out of a vast phase space, making alloy development time consuming and labor intensive. Here, we challenge the conventional paradigm by proposing a combinatorial strategy that enables parallel screening of a multitude of alloys. Utilizing a typical metallic glass forming alloy system Zr-Cu-Al-Ag as an example, we demonstrate how glass formation and antibacterial activity, two unrelated properties, can be simultaneously characterized and the optimal composition can be efficiently identified. We found that in the Zr-Cu-Al-Ag alloy system fully glassy phase can be obtained in a wide compositional range by co-sputtering, and antibacterial activity is strongly dependent on alloy compositions. Our results indicate that antibacterial activity is sensitive to Cu and Ag while essentially remains unchanged within a wide range of Zr and Al. The proposed strategy not only facilitates development of high-performing alloys, but also provides a tool to unveil the composition dependence of properties in a highly parallel fashion, which helps the development of new materials by design.

  20. Combinatorial development of antibacterial Zr-Cu-Al-Ag thin film metallic glasses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanhui; Padmanabhan, Jagannath; Cheung, Bettina; Liu, Jingbei; Chen, Zheng; Scanley, B Ellen; Wesolowski, Donna; Pressley, Mariyah; Broadbridge, Christine C; Altman, Sidney; Schwarz, Udo D; Kyriakides, Themis R; Schroers, Jan

    2016-05-27

    Metallic alloys are normally composed of multiple constituent elements in order to achieve integration of a plurality of properties required in technological applications. However, conventional alloy development paradigm, by sequential trial-and-error approach, requires completely unrelated strategies to optimize compositions out of a vast phase space, making alloy development time consuming and labor intensive. Here, we challenge the conventional paradigm by proposing a combinatorial strategy that enables parallel screening of a multitude of alloys. Utilizing a typical metallic glass forming alloy system Zr-Cu-Al-Ag as an example, we demonstrate how glass formation and antibacterial activity, two unrelated properties, can be simultaneously characterized and the optimal composition can be efficiently identified. We found that in the Zr-Cu-Al-Ag alloy system fully glassy phase can be obtained in a wide compositional range by co-sputtering, and antibacterial activity is strongly dependent on alloy compositions. Our results indicate that antibacterial activity is sensitive to Cu and Ag while essentially remains unchanged within a wide range of Zr and Al. The proposed strategy not only facilitates development of high-performing alloys, but also provides a tool to unveil the composition dependence of properties in a highly parallel fashion, which helps the development of new materials by design.

  1. Compositional dependence of in vitro response to commercial silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlicka, Amy B.

    Materials are often incorporated into the human body, interacting with surrounding fluids, cells and tissues. The reactions that occur between a material and this surrounding biological system are not fundamentally understood. Basic knowledge of material biocompatibility and the controlling processes is lacking. This thesis examines material biocompatibility of a series of silicate-based glasses on a primary level determining cell response to material composition and durability. The silicate glass system studied included two BioglassRTM compositions with known biologically favorable response, two fiberglass compositions, with demonstrated 'not-unfavorable' in vitro response, a ternary soda-lime-silicate glass, a binary alkali silicate glass, and pure silica. Chemical durability was analyzed in three different fluids through solution analysis and material characterization. In vitro response to the substrates was observed. Cell behavior was then directly correlated to the material behavior in cell culture medium under the same conditions as the in vitro test, yet in the absence of cells. The effect of several physical and chemical surface treatments on substrates with predetermined biocompatible behavior was subsequently determined. The chemically durable glasses with no added B2O3 elicited similar cell response as the control polystyrene substrate. The addition of B2O3 resulted in polygonal cell shape and restricted cell proliferation. The non-durable glasses presented a dynamic surface to the cells, which did not adversely affect in vitro response. Extreme dissolution of the binary alkali silicate glass in conjunction with increased pH resulted in unfavorable cell response. Reaction of the Bioglass RTM compositions, producing a biologically favorable calcium-phosphate surface film, caused enhanced cell attachment and spreading. Surface energy increase due to sterilization procedures did not alter cellular response. Surface treatment procedures influencing substrate

  2. Vitrified metal finishing wastes I. Composition, density and chemical durability.

    PubMed

    Bingham, P A; Hand, R J

    2005-03-17

    Durable phosphate glasses were formed by vitrifying waste filter cakes from two metal finishing operations. Some melts formed crystalline components during cooling. Compositional analysis of dried, heat treated and vitrified samples was made using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and Leco induction furnace combustion analysis. Hydrolytic dissolution, measured by an adapted product consistency test, was reduced by up to 3 orders of magnitude upon heat treatment or vitrification, surpassing the performance of borosilicate glass in some cases. This was attributed to the high levels of iron and zinc in the wastes, which greatly improve the durability of phosphate glasses. One of the wastes arose from a metal phosphating process and was particularly suitable for vitrification due to its high P2O5 content and favourable melting behaviour. The other waste, which arose from a number of processes, was less suitable as it had a low P2O5 content and during heating it emitted harmful corrosive gases and underwent violent reactions. Substantial volume reductions were obtained by heat treatment and vitrification of both wastes. Compositions and performances of some vitrified wastes were comparable with those of glasses which are under consideration for the immobilisation of toxic and nuclear wastes.

  3. Mechanical spectrum study of glass transition by a composite method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Y. H.; Zhang, L.; Wang, X. L.; Ying, X. N.; Yan, F.; Huang, Y. N.; Zhu, J. S.; Wang, Y. N.

    2009-11-01

    Normalized mechanical spectra of glycerol, 1,2-propanediol carbonate and poly(vinyl chloride)/di(2-ethyl-hexyl) phthalate (PVC/DOP) blends were studied in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K by a composite method. The dynamic glass transition was observed, which exhibits a peak of temperature-dependent loss modulus. The peak moves toward higher temperature with higher measuring frequency, which accords with the relaxation feature of the dynamic glass transition. Another characteristic temperature can be marked in the mechanical spectrum by the onset of storage modulus change, which is labeled as T gm. T gm is found to be nearly equal to the calorimetric glass transition temperature in glycerol, 1,2-propanediol carbonate and di(2-ethyl-hexyl) phthalate. As we expected, this onset temperature in the mechanical spectrum has an intimate relation with the calorimetric glass transition of materials, and it can be regarded as a representative when the calorimetric glass transition temperature is not available. Finally, normalized mechanical spectra of PVC/DOP blends with different PVC content were obtained and mechanical glass transition temperatures T gm were determined.

  4. Boron, graphite, glass, metal and aramid fiber reinforced plastics. January, 1973-May, 1981 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association Data Base). Report for January 1973-May 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    The citations cover information about advanced reinforced composites such as boron, graphite, glass, metal, and aramid. Topics include applications, fabrication processes, proerties, nondestructive testing, and economics of composite materials. (Contains 90 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  5. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  6. Cytotoxicity of Resin Composites Containing Bioactive Glass Fillers

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Satin; Gwinner, Fernanda; Mitchell, John C; Pfeifer, Carmem; Ferracane, Jack L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the in vitro cytotoxicity of dental composites containing bioactive glass fillers. Methods Dental composites (50:50 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin: 72.5wt% filler, 67.5%Sr-glass and 5% OX50) containing different concentrations (0, 5, 10 and 15 wt %) of two sol-gel bioactive glasses, BAG65 (65 mole% SiO2, 31 mole% CaO, 4 mole% P2O5) and BAG62 (3 mole% F added) were evaluated for cytotoxicity using Alamar Blue assay. First, composite extracts were obtained from 7 day incubations of composite in cell culture medium at 37° C. Undifferentiated pulp cells (OD-21) were exposed to dilutions of the original extracts for 3, 5, and 7 days. Then freshly cured composite disks were incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 2 days. Subsequently, fresh composite disks were incubated in culture medium at 37°C for 7 days, and then the extracted disks were incubated with OD-21 cells for 2 days. Finally, fresh composites disks were light cured for 3, 5, and 20 seconds and incubated with OD-21 cells (n=5) for 1, 3, 5, and 7 days. To verify that the three different curing modes produced different levels of degree of conversion (DC), the DC of each composite was determined by FTIR. Groups (n=5) were compared with ANOVA/Tukey’s (α≤0.05). Results Extracts from all composites significantly reduced cell viability until a dilution of 1:8 or lower, where the extract became equal to the control. All freshly-cured composites showed significantly reduced cell viability at two days. However, no reduction in cell viability was observed for any composite that had been previously soaked in media before exposure to the cells. Composites with reduced DC (3 s vs. 20 s cure), as verified by FTIR, showed significantly reduced cell viability. Significance The results show that the composites, independent of composition, had equivalent potency in terms of reducing the viability of the cells in culture. Soaking the composites for 7 days before exposing them to the cells suggested that the

  7. Microstructural Analysis of a Laser-Processed Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Flores, K. M.

    2010-07-01

    Laser processing is a precision manufacturing technique capable of producing materials with highly nonequilibrium microstructures. Due to the localized heat input and high cooling rate inherent to the process, this technology is attractive for the production of metallic glasses. In the present work, we use a laser deposition process to deposit a Zr-based metallic glass forming powder on both amorphous and crystalline substrates of the same nominal composition. Amorphous melt zones are observed surrounded by distinct crystalline heat-affected zones (HAZs). Detailed examination of the HAZ in the glassy substrates reveals the formation of microscale spherulites, in contrast to the nanocrystalline phases observed following crystallization by isothermal annealing of the glass at the crystallization temperature as well as in the HAZ of the crystalline substrates. The spherulites have a different crystal morphology and structure from the nanocrystalline phases, indicating that the more stable nanocrystalline phases are completely bypassed when the glass is devitrified at the higher heating rate. Reducing the heat input during laser processing results in the near elimination of the crystalline HAZ in the amorphous substrates, suggesting that a critical heating rate range is required to avoid devitrification.

  8. Negative strain rate sensitivity in bulk metallic glass and its similarities with the dynamic strain aging effect during deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalla Torre, Florian H.; Dubach, Alban; Siegrist, Marco E.; Loeffler, Joerg F.

    2006-08-28

    Detailed investigations were carried out on the deformation behavior of Zr-based monolithic bulk metallic glass and bulk metallic glass matrix composites. The latter, due to splitting and multiplication of shear bands, exhibits larger compressive strains than the former, without significant loss of strength. Serrated flow in conjunction with a negative strain rate sensitivity was observed in both materials. This observation, together with an increase in stress drops with increasing strain and their decrease with increasing strain rate, indicates phenomenologically close similarities with the dynamic strain aging deformation mechanism known for crystalline solids. The micromechanical mechanism of a shear event is discussed in light of these results.

  9. Fatigue-Resistance Enhancements by Glass-Forming Metallic Films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F. X.; Liaw, Peter K; Jiang, W. H.; Chiang, C L; Gao, Yanfei; Guan, Y F; Chu, J. P.; Rack, P. D.

    2007-01-01

    Zr-based glass-forming metallic films were coated on a 316L stainless steel and a Ni-based alloy by the magnetron-sputter deposition. Four-point-bending fatigue tests were conducted on those coated materials with the film surface on the tensile side. Results showed that the fatigue life and fatigue-endurance limit of the materials could be considerably improved, and the enhancements vary with the maximum applied stress and the substrate material. Fractographs showed that the film remained well adhered to the substrate even after the severe plastic deformation. Surface-roughness measurements indicated the improvement of the surface finishes due to the deposition of the glass-forming film. Nanoindentation test results suggested that the thin film exhibited both high yield strength and good ductility. The reduction of the surface roughness, good adhesion between the film and the substrate, and the excellent strength and ductility of the glass-forming metallic film are the major factors for the fatigue-resistance enhancements of the coated material. A micromechanical model is developed to illustrate the mechanisms of fatigue-resistance enhancements through the interaction between the amorphous film and the substrate slip bands.

  10. Towards the Better: Intrinsic Property Amelioration in Bulk Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Sarac, Baran; Zhang, Long; Kosiba, Konrad; Pauly, Simon; Stoica, Mihai; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the intrinsic length-scale effects in bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) via post-heat treatment necessitates a systematic analyzing strategy. Although various achievements were made in the past years to structurally enhance the properties of different BMG alloys, the influence of short-term sub-glass transition annealing on the relaxation kinetics is still not fully covered. Here, we aim for unraveling the connection between the physical, (thermo)mechanical and structural changes as a function of selected pre-annealing temperatures and time scales with an in-house developed Cu46Zr44Al8Hf2 based BMG alloy. The controlled formation of nanocrystals below 50 nm with homogenous distribution inside the matrix phase via thermal treatment increase the material’s resistance to strain softening by almost an order of magnitude. The present work determines the design aspects of metallic glasses with enhanced mechanical properties via nanostructural modifications, while postulating a counter-argument to the intrinsic property degradation accounted for long-term annealing. PMID:27273477

  11. Thermal fatigue of ceramic fiber glass matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zawada, L.P.; Wetherhold, R.C.

    1989-10-01

    The thermal fatigue (TF) of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) introduces stresses within the composite due to the inevitable thermal expansion mismatch of fiber and matrix; this will affect the lifetime and dimensional stability of the composite. A Nicalon/glass composite has been subjected to rapid, controlled TF from 250-700 C and 250-800 C under no load and dead load conditions in order to illustrate a variety of elastic and inelastic cyclic strain conditions. After TF, the surfaces of the composites were characterized using SEM for evidence of thermal damage and microcracking. The composites were then tested for flexural modulus and strength. Results from the mechanical properties tests are present and correlated with observed thermal degradation. 7 refs.

  12. Crystallization behavior and glass formation of selected lunar compositions.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherer, G.; Hopper, R. W.; Uhlmann, D. R.

    1972-01-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth have been determined over a wide range of temperature, from 800 to 1219 C, for lunar compositions 14259 and 14310. At all temperatures for both compositions the extent of crystal growth is found to be a linear function of time. For both materials, the growth rate versus temperature relations exhibit the form generally found with glass-forming materials. At all temperatures measured, the crystal growth rate of composition 14259 is smaller than that of composition 14310. The maximum growth rate for both compositions occurs at a temperature of about 1120 C. The growth rate data are combined with viscosity data obtained on the same compositions to construct the reduced growth rate versus undercooling relations.

  13. Use of copper slag in glass-epoxy composites for improved wear resistance.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sandhyarani; Satapathy, Alok

    2010-07-01

    Copper slag is a by-product obtained during matte smelting and refining of copper. The common management options for copper slag are recycling, recovery of metal and production of value-added products. In the present study using copper slag as a filler in glass-epoxy composites, the tensile modulus increased from 8.77 GPa to 9.64 GPa when using up to 10 wt% of copper slag but on further addition of copper slag (up to 20 wt%), the tensile modulus started to decrease down to 7.11 GPa. Similar trends were observed in the case of flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength. With the incorporation of copper slag particles, the impact strength increased about 10-15%. This work includes the processing, characterization and study of the erosion behaviour of a class of such copper slag filled glass-epoxy composites based on Taguchi's experimental approach to characterise erosion behaviour. The results show that peak erosion takes place at an impingement angle of 60 degrees for the unfilled composites whereas for the copper slag filled glass-epoxy composites it occurs at a 45 degrees impingement angle. This paper considers the possible utilisation of copper slag as filler material for the preparation of composite materials and preparation of added-value products such as abrasive tools, cutting tools and railroad ballast.

  14. Atomic and electronic structure of Ni-Nb metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, C. C.; Yang, Y.-F. Xi, X. K.

    2013-12-07

    Solid state {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been employed to investigate the atomic and electronic structures in Ni-Nb based metallic glass (MG) model system. {sup 93}Nb nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) isotropic metallic shift of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Sn{sub 5} has been found to be ∼100 ppm lower than that of Ni{sub 60}Nb{sub 35}Zr{sub 5} MG, which is correlated with their intrinsic fracture toughness. The evolution of {sup 93}Nb NMR isotropic metallic shifts upon alloying is clearly an electronic origin, as revealed by both local hyperfine fields analysis and first-principle computations. This preliminary result indicates that, in addition to geometrical considerations, atomic form factors should be taken into a description of atomic structures for better understanding the mechanical behaviors of MGs.

  15. Interface Engineering in Alumina/Glass Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-29

    BN coating applied to the fibers disappeared during the fabrication process. Coating thicknesses as much as 0.3 jim was found to be assimilated during...E-200 Alumina Fiber Tin Dioxide ’ -300 - PD - 166 coating,30 -1(0.8 un) -400 00, -600 " 9.4 9.6 9.S 10.0 10.2 r ( jim ) Fig. 2. Fracture surface of...of the specimens Chemical composition’(wt.%) were polished, with 0.5 jim alumina powder, to mini- .i. 71 mize surface flaw effects. Strengih

  16. Fretting maps of glass fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Turki, C.; Salvia, M.; Vincent, L.

    1993-12-31

    Industrial development of new materials are often limited due to an insufficient knowledge in their functional properties. The paper deals with fretting behavior of glass fiber reinforced epoxy/metal contacts. Fretting is a plague for all industries, especially in the case of quasi-static loadings. Furthermore friction testing under small displacements appeared well fitted to understand the effect of fiber orientations and to relate results to microstructure (fiber, matrix and interface).

  17. Composite Laminate With Coefficient of Thermal Expansion Matching D263 Glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, David; Rodini, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The International X-ray Observatory project seeks to make an X-ray telescope assembly with 14,000 flexible glass segments. The glass used is commercially available SCHOTT D263 glass. Thermal expansion causes the mirror to distort out of alignment. A housing material is needed that has a matching coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) so that when temperatures change in the X-ray mirror assembly, the glass and housing pieces expand equally, thus reducing or eliminating distortion. Desirable characteristics of this material include a high stiffness/weight ratio, and low density. Some metal alloys show promise in matching the CTE of D263 glass, but their density is high compared to aluminum, and their stiffness/weight ratio is not favorable. A laminate made from carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) should provide more favorable characteristics, but there has not been any made with the CTE matching D263 Glass. It is common to create CFRP laminates of various CTEs by stacking layers of prepreg material at various angles. However, the CTE of D263 glass is 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which is quite high, and actually unachievable solely with carbon fiber and resin. A composite laminate has been developed that has a coefficient of thermal expansion identical to that of SCHOTT D263 glass. The laminate is made of a combination of T300 carbon fiber, Eglass, and RS3C resin. The laminate has 50% uni-T300 plies and 50% uni-E-glass plies, with each fiber-layer type laid up in a quasi-isotropic laminate for a total of 16 plies. The fiber volume (percent of fiber compared to the resin) controls the CTE to a great extent. Tests have confirmed that a fiber volume around 48% gives a CTE of 6.3 ppm/ C. This is a fairly simple composite laminate, following well established industry procedures. The unique feature of this laminate is a somewhat unusual combination of carbon fiber with E-glass (fiberglass). The advantage is that the resulting CTE comes out to 6.3 ppm/ C at 20 C, which matches D

  18. High-entropy bulk metallic glasses as promising magnetic refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Juntao; Huo, Lishan; Li, Jiawei; Men, He; Wang, Xinmin; Inoue, Akihisa; Chang, Chuntao; Wang, Jun-Qiang; Li, Run-Wei

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the Ho20Er20Co20Al20RE20 (RE = Gd, Dy, and Tm) high-entropy bulk metallic glasses (HE-BMGs) with good magnetocaloric properties are fabricated successfully. The HE-BMGs exhibit a second-order magnetic phase transition. The peak of magnetic entropy change ( ΔSMpk ) and refrigerant capacity (RC) reaches 15.0 J kg-1 K-1 and 627 J kg-1 at 5 T, respectively, which is larger than most rare earth based BMGs. The heterogeneous nature of glasses also contributes to the large ΔSMpk and RC. In addition, the magnetic ordering temperature, ΔSMpk and RC can be widely tuned by alloying different rare earth elements. These results suggest that the HE-BMGs are promising magnetic refrigerant at low temperatures.

  19. Density variations of plastic carriers in metallic glasses during aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    Thermally induced deformation in metallic glasses was investigated by sampling the potential energy landscape (PEL) and probing the changes in the atomic properties (e.g. energy, displacement, stress). We demonstrate that there exists a universal plastic carrier in amorphous materials, which corresponds to the hopping between local minima on PEL. However very interestingly, the density of plastic carrier is largely affected by the aging history of the glasses. The higher fictive temperature (i . e . fast cooling rate), the larger density of plastic carrier is contained in the system. In particular, we observe a scaling of ρ~exp(- α/Tfic) , which is consistent with the prediction of shear transformation zone theory. The work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Thermal expansion in metal/lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, E. G.

    1988-03-01

    Lithia-alumina-silica (LAS) with metallic dispersions offers a new approach toward near-zero, isotropic, thermal expansion composites. The metallic phase contributes a positive coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) to the negative CTE of the glass/ceramic matrix. In addition, the metal will increase the electrical and thermal conductivities over those of the matrix alone. The LAS system offers tailorable negative CTEs and light weight compared to other negative CTE ceramics. The most negative CTE phase is crystalline β-eucryptite, whose proportion in an initially glassy matrix can be controlled by heat treatment. Dispersed metal powders were both hot-pressed and cold-pressed and sintered together with LAS matrices prepared by sol gel methods. Super Invar powder was studied for its minimal CTE mismatch, while titanium powders offered a compromise between light weight and low CTE. An ultralow-expansion (ULE) glass- and linear variable differential transducer (LVDT)-based differential dilatometer was developed for rapid screening of compositions, while a double-laser Michelson interferometer was used for precise near-zero CTE measurements. The reinforced β-eucryptite glass/ceramic matrix exhibited both a U-shaped ΔL/L curve with temperature and some thermal hysteresis, depending on the fabrication and heat treatment sequences. The temperature of the zero-CTE portion of this curve was found to change with increasing titanium powder content. Results are also given for mixtures of Super Invar powders in ULE glass and β-eucryptite matrices. Negative CTEs in a LAS matrix above ambient temperatures were more difficult to obtain than below, although the use of petalite (high-silica LAS) appears promising.

  1. Reentrant spin glass ordering in an Fe-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Qiang; Shen, Jun

    2015-02-07

    We report the results of the complex susceptibility, temperature, and field dependence of DC magnetization and the nonequilibrium dynamics of a bulk metallic glass Fe{sub 40}Co{sub 8}Cr{sub 15}Mo{sub 14}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}Er{sub 2}. Solid indication of the coexistence of reentrant spin glass (SG) and ferromagnetic orderings is determined from both DC magnetization and AC susceptibility under different DC fields. Dynamics scaling of AC susceptibility indicates critical slowing down to a reentrant SG state with a static transition temperature T{sub s} = ∼17.8 K and a dynamic exponent zv = ∼7.3. The SG nature is further corroborated from chaos and memory effects, magnetic hysteresis, and aging behavior. We discuss the results in terms of the competition among random magnetic anisotropy and exchange interactions and compare them with simulation predictions.

  2. Product consistency testing of West Valley Compositional Variation Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.M.; Marschman, S.C.; Piepel, G.F.; Whiting, G.K.

    1994-11-01

    Nuclear waste glass produced by the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) must meet the requirements of the Waste Acceptance Preliminary Specification (WAPS) as developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE). To assist WVDP in complying with WAPS, the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) used the Product Consistency Test (PCT) to evaluate 44 West Valley glasses that had previously been tested in FY 1987 and FY 1988. This report summarizes the results of the PCTs. The glasses tested, which were fabricated as sets of Compositional Variation Glasses for studies performed by the West Valley Support Task (WVST) at PNL during FY 1987 and FY 1988, were doped with Th and U and were variations of West Valley reference glasses. In addition, Approved Reference Material-1 (ARM-1) was used as a test standard (ARM-1 is supplied by the MCC). The PCT was originated at Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) by C. M. Jantzen and N. R. Bibler (Jantzen and Bibler 1989). The test is a seven-day modified MCC-3 test that uses crushed glass in the size range -100 +200 mesh with deionized water in a Teflon container. There is no agitation during the PCT, and no attempt to include CO{sub 2} from the test environment. Based on B and Li release, the glasses performed about the same as in previous modified MCC-3 testing performed in FY 1987 and FY 1988 (Reimus et al. 1988). The modified MCC-3 tests performed by Reimus et al. were similar to the PCT containers and the exclusion of CO{sub 2} from the tests.

  3. Stability of Bulk Metallic Glass Structure. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, H.; Williams, D. B.

    2003-06-01

    The fundamental origins of the stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} bulk metallic glasses (BMGs), a prototype for a whole class of BMG formers, were explored. While much of the properties of their BMGs have been characterized, their glass-stability have not been explained in terms of the atomic and electronic structure. The local structure around all three constituent atoms was obtained, in a complementary way, using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), to probe the nearest neighbor environment of the metals, and extended energy loss fine structure (EXELFS), to investigate the environment around P. The occupied electronic structure was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs receive their stability from cumulative, and interrelated, effects of both atomic and electronic origin. The stability of the (Pd-Ni){sub 80}P{sub 20} BMGs can be explained in terms of the stability of Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20}, glasses at the end of BMG formation. The atomic structure in these alloys is very similar to those of the binary phosphide crystals near x=0 and x=80, which are trigonal prisms of Pd or Ni atoms surrounding P atoms. Such structures are known to exist in dense, randomly-packed systems. The structure of the best glass former in this series, Pd{sub 40}Ni{sub 40}P{sub 20} is further described by a weighted average of those of Pd{sub 30}Ni{sub 50}P{sub 20} and Pd{sub 60}Ni{sub 20}P{sub 20}. Bonding states present only in the ternary alloys were found and point to a further stabilization of the system through a negative heat of mixing between Pd and Ni atoms. The Nagel and Tauc criterion, correlating a decrease in the density of states at the Fermi level with an increase in the glass stability, was consistent with greater stability of the Pd{sub x}Ni{sub 80-x}P{sub 20} glasses with respect to the binary alloys of P. A valence electron concentration of 1.8 e/a, which

  4. Investigation of medium range order and glass forming ability of metallic glass Co69Fe x Si21-x B10 (x  =  3, 5, and 7)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. P.; Das, N.; Sharma, S. K.; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, D.; Pujari, P. K.; Dey, G. K.

    2016-06-01

    Metallic glass of composition Co69Fe x Si21-x B10 (x  =  3, 5, and 7) was studied using spatially resolved x-ray diffraction and positron annihilation spectroscopy. It was observed that the solute centered clusters forming the metallic glasses were connected to a fractal network of a reduced dimension of 2.18. The medium range order in the present system is described with a correlation function and its validity is discussed. A theoretical estimation of its glass forming ability (GFA) complimented the observations made on the local structural changes due to variation in Si content. The distribution of open volume defects in the metallic glasses during processing was found to be related to the relative GFA of the alloy compositions.

  5. Lithium isotope composition of basalt glass reference material.

    PubMed

    Kasemann, Simone A; Jeffcoate, Alistair B; Elliott, Tim

    2005-08-15

    We present data on the lithium isotope compositions of glass reference materials from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) determined by multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), and secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS). Our data on the USGS basaltic glass standards agree within 2 per thousand, independent of the sample matrix or Li concentration. For SIMS analysis, we propose use of the USGS glasses GSD-1G (delta(7)Li 31.14 +/- 0.8 per thousand, 2sigma) and BCR-2G (delta(7)Li 4.08 +/- 1.0 per thousand, 2sigma) as suitable standards that cover a wide range of Li isotope compositions. Lithium isotope measurements on the silica-rich NIST 600 glass series by MC-ICPMS and TIMS agree within 0.8 per thousand, but SIMS analyses show systematic isotopic differences. Our results suggest that SIMS Li isotope analyses have a significant matrix bias in high-silica materials. Our data are intended to serve as a reference for both microanalytical and bulk analytical techniques and to improve comparisons between Li isotope data produced by different methodologies.

  6. Glass fibres reinforced polyester composites degradation monitoring by surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croitoru, Catalin; Patachia, Silvia; Papancea, Adina; Baltes, Liana; Tierean, Mircea

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents a novel method for quantification of the modifications that occur on the surface of different types of gel-coated glass fibre-reinforced polyester composites under artificial UV-ageing at 254 nm. The method implies the adsorption of an ionic dye, namely methylene blue, on the UV-aged composite, and computing the CIELab colour space parameters from the photographic image of the coloured composite's surface. The method significantly enhances the colour differences between the irradiated composites and the reference, in contrast with the non-coloured ones. The colour modifications that occur represent a good indicative of the surface degradation, alteration of surface hydrophily and roughness of the composite and are in good correlation with the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and optical microscopy results. The proposed method is easier, faster and cheaper than the traditional ones.

  7. Development of a glass polymer composite sewer pipe from waste glass. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Rayfiel, R.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1980-02-01

    A range of polymer-aggregate composites for applications in industry which appear to be economically attractive and contribute to energy conservation were developed at BNL. Waste glass is the aggregate in one such material, which is called glass-polymer-composite (GPC). This report assays the economics and durability of GPC in piping for storm drains and sewers. The properties of the pipe are compared statistically with the requirements of industrial specifications. These establish the raw materials requirements. The capital and operating costs for producing pipe are then estimated. Using published sales values for competing materials, the return on investment is calculated for two cases. The ultimate energy requirement of the raw materials in GPC is compared with the corresponding requirement for vitrified clay pipe. The strengths of GPC, reinforced concrete, vitrified clay and asbestos cement pipe are compared after extended exposure to various media. The status of process and product development is reviewed and recommendations are made for future work.

  8. An Assessment of Binary Metallic Glasses: Correlations Between Structure, Glass Forming Ability and Stability (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    metals, lanthanides and actinide elements . Other metal elements include Al, Ga, Sn and Pb. Nearly all of the metalloids, including B, Si, Ge, As, Sb...PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Daniel B. Miracle (AFRL/RXLMD) Dmitri...melting weight of the elements measured compositions are rarely reported. Measured weight loss is sometimes given, and this data supports reporting

  9. Composite yarns of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with metallic electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Randeniya, Lakshman K; Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Philip J; Tran, Canh-Dung

    2010-08-16

    Unique macrostructures known as spun carbon-nanotube fibers (CNT yarns) can be manufactured from vertically aligned forests of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). These yarns behave as semiconductors with room-temperature conductivities of about 5 x 10(2) S cm(-1). Their potential use as, for example, microelectrodes in medical implants, wires in microelectronics, or lightweight conductors in the aviation industry has hitherto been hampered by their insufficient electrical conductivity. In this Full Paper, the synthesis of metal-CNT composite yarns, which combine the unique properties of CNT yarns and nanocrystalline metals to obtain a new class of materials with enhanced electrical conductivity, is presented. The synthesis is achieved using a new technique, self-fuelled electrodeposition (SFED), which combines a metal reducing agent and an external circuit for transfer of electrons to the CNT surface, where the deposition of metal nanoparticles takes place. In particular, the Cu-CNT and Au-CNT composite yarns prepared by this method have metal-like electrical conductivities (2-3 x 10(5) S cm(-1)) and are mechanically robust against stringent tape tests. However, the tensile strengths of the composite yarns are 30-50% smaller than that of the unmodified CNT yarn. The SFED technique described here can also be used as a convenient means for the deposition of metal nanoparticles on solid electrode supports, such as conducting glass or carbon black, for catalytic applications.

  10. High temperature behavior of polypropylene and polypropylene / glass composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipley, Katherine Mary Herber

    Solid state die drawing of polymer matrix composite materials offers an opportunity to make products that cannot be produced by any other method. This is done by heating a composite billet to a temperature just below the melting point and drawing it through a heated converging die by pulling from the downstream side. Since this is done at high temperatures, it is imperative to understand the behavior of the polymer and the composites at high temperature. Therefore, in this work, the stress-strain behavior of neat polypropylene and polypropylene composites with glass flake and glass bead fillers was studied at 23°C, 130°C, and 145°C. The onset of debonding was found to occur at a lower stress and strain for the composites tested at higher temperature, while the loss of reinforcement was slower at the elevated temperatures. The interfacial interaction between the filler and matrix was also determined to be greater at elevated temperatures. The presence of filler particles also changed the character of the stress-strain curves at higher temperatures. Specifically, the filler induced a sharper neck region in the composites at elevated temperature. Annealing for one hour at temperatures between 130°C and 145°C produced a secondary, lower melting temperature peak in the DSC curves, which increased in prominence with increasing temperature. This increase in prominence was greater for the composites than for the neat polymer. Finally, the onset of debonding was studied using transverse strain vs. stress curves for the two composites. The debonding stress decreased with increasing temperature for both materials, and it was determined that stress amplification at the interface is greater for the flake composite than for the bead composite.

  11. The Effect of Cutting Speed in Metallic Glass Grinding

    SciTech Connect

    Serbest, Erdinc; Bakkal, Mustafa; Karipcin, Ilker; Derin, Bora

    2011-01-17

    In this paper, the effects of the cutting speed in metallic glass grinding were investigated in dry conditions. The results showed that grinding forces decrease as grinding energy increase with the increasing cutting speeds. The present investigations on ground surface and grinding chips morphologies -shows that material removal and surface formation of the BMG are mainly due to the ductile chip deformation and ploughing as well as brittle fracture of some particles from the edges of the tracks. The roughness values obtained with the Cubic Boron Nitride wheels are acceptable for the grinding operation.

  12. Precisely predicting and designing the elasticity of metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn; Wang, R. F.; Qu, R. T.; Zhang, Z. F. E-mail: zhfzhang@imr.ac.cn

    2014-05-28

    We reveal that the elastic moduli of metallic glasses (MGs) invariably vary in a much steeper manner than that predicted by the conventional “rule of mixtures” in individual alloy systems. Such deviations are proved to originate fundamentally from their disordered atomic structures and intrinsic local heterogeneities. By treating the MGs as atomic-level dual phase hybrids, we further propose universal relations to be capable of precisely predicting and designing the elastic constants of MGs. This may contribute to the development of MGs with intended properties and behaviors, and allow new understandings on the structures and properties as well as their relationships in MGs.

  13. Structural Signature of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Li, M. Z.; Wang, W. H.

    2011-04-01

    The structure feature of a model CuZr metallic glass during deformation is investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. A spatially heterogeneous irreversible rearrangement is observed in terms of nonaffine displacement. We find that regions with smaller nonaffine displacement have more Voronoi pentagons, while in those with larger nonaffine displacement other types of faces are more populated. We use the degree of local fivefold symmetry (LFFS) as the structural indicator to predict plastic deformation of local structures and find that the plastic events prefer to be initiated in regions with a lower degree of LFFS and propagate toward regions with a higher degree of LFFS.

  14. Crossover from localized to cascade relaxations in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-07-21

    Thermally activated deformation is investigated in two metallic glass systems with different cooling histories. By probing the atomic displacements and stress changes on the potential energy landscape, two deformation modes, a localized process and cascade process, have observed. The localized deformation involves fewer than 30 atoms and appears in both systems, and its size is invariant with cooling history. However, the cascade deformation is more frequently observed in the fast quenched system than in the slowly quenched system. As a result, the origin of the cascade process in the fast quenched system is attributed to the higher density of local minima on the underlying potential energy landscape.

  15. The kinetic origin of delayed yielding in metallic glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Y. F.; Liu, X. D.; Wang, S.; Fan, J.; Liu, C. T.; Yang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Recent experiments showed that irreversible structural change or plasticity could occur in metallic glasses (MGs) even within the apparent elastic limit after a sufficiently long waiting time. To explain this phenomenon, a stochastic shear transformation model is developed based on a unified rate theory to predict delayed yielding in MGs, which is validated afterwards through extensive atomistic simulations carried out on different MGs. On a fundamental level, an analytic framework is established in this work that links time, stress, and temperature altogether into a general yielding criterion for MGs.

  16. Crossover from Localized to Cascade Relaxations in Metallic Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yue; Iwashita, Takuya; Egami, Takeshi

    2015-07-01

    Thermally activated deformation is investigated in two metallic glass systems with different cooling histories. By probing the atomic displacements and stress changes on the potential energy landscape, two deformation modes, a localized process and cascade process, have observed. The localized deformation involves fewer than 30 atoms and appears in both systems, and its size is invariant with cooling history. However, the cascade deformation is more frequently observed in the fast quenched system than in the slowly quenched system. The origin of the cascade process in the fast quenched system is attributed to the higher density of local minima on the underlying potential energy landscape.

  17. Structure, phases, and mechanical response of Ti-alloy bioactive glass composite coatings.

    PubMed

    Nelson, G M; Nychka, J A; McDonald, A G

    2014-03-01

    Porous titanium alloy-bioactive glass composite coatings were manufactured via the flame spray deposition process. The porous coatings, targeted for orthodontic and bone-fixation applications, were made from bioactive glass (45S5) powder blended with either commercially pure titanium (Cp-Ti) or Ti-6Al-4V alloy powder. Two sets of spray conditions, two metallic particle size distributions, and two glass particle size distributions were used for this study. Negative control coatings consisting of pure Ti-6Al-4V alloy or Cp-Ti were sprayed under both conditions. The as-sprayed coatings were characterized through quantitative optical cross-sectional metallography, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and ASTM Standard C633 tensile adhesion testing. Determination of the porosity and glassy phase distribution was achieved by using image analysis in accordance with ASTM Standard E2109. Theoretical thermodynamic and heat transfer modeling was conducted to explain experimental observations. Thermodynamic modeling was performed to estimate the flame temperature and chemical environment for each spray condition and a lumped capacitance heat transfer model was developed to estimate the temperatures attained by each particle. These models were used to establish trends among the choice of alloy, spray condition, and particle size distribution. The deposition parameters, alloy composition, and alteration of the feedstock powder size distribution had a significant effect on the coating microstructure, porosity, phases present, mechanical response, and theoretical particle temperatures that were attained. The most promising coatings were the Ti-6Al-4V-based composite coatings, which had bond strength of 20±2MPa (n=5) and received reinforcement and strengthening from the inclusion of a glassy phase. It was shown that the use of the Ti-6Al-4V-bioactive glass composite coatings may be a superior choice due to the possible osteoproductivity from the bioactive glass, the potential ability to

  18. Synthesis and characterization of bulk metallic glasses prepared by laser direct deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Xiaoyang

    Fe-based and Zr-based metallic glasses have attracted extensive interest for structural applications due to their excellent glass forming ability, superior mechanical properties, unique thermal and corrosion properties. In this study, the feasibility of synthesizing metallic glasses with good ductility by laser direct deposition is explored. Both in-situ synthesis with elemental powder mixture and ex-situ synthesis with prealloyed powder are discussed. Microstructure and properties of laser direct deposited metallic glass composites are analyzed. Synthesis of Fe-Cr-Mo-W-Mn-C-Si-B metallic glass composite with a large fraction of amorphous phase was accomplished using laser direct deposition. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy investigations revealed the existence of amorphous structure. Microstructure analyses by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated the periodically repeated microstructures of amorphous and crystalline phases. Partially crystallized structure brought by laser reheating and remelting during subsequent laser scans aggregated in the overlapping area between each scan. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline particle embedded in the amorphous matrix was Cr 1.07Fe18.93 phase. No significant microstructural differences were found from the first to the last layer. Microhardness of the amorphous phase (HV0.2 1591) showed a much higher value than that of the crystalline phase (HV0.2 947). Macrohardness of the top layer had a value close to the microhardness of the amorphous region. Wear resistance property of deposited layers showed a significant improvement with the increased fraction of amorphous phase. Zr65Al10Ni10Cu15 amorphous composites with a large fraction of amorphous phase were in-situ synthesized by laser direct deposition. X-ray diffraction confirmed the existence of both amorphous and crystalline phases. Laser parameters were optimized in order to increase the fraction of amorphous phase

  19. 2014 Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Isabelle; Pegg, Ian L.; Joseph, Innocent; Gilbo, Konstantin

    2015-10-28

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Enhanced LAW Glass Property-Composition Models, VSL-13T3050-1, Rev. 0 Test Plan. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The te4st results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  20. Surface coatings of bioactive glasses on high strength ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martorana, S.; Fedele, A.; Mazzocchi, M.; Bellosi, A.

    2009-04-01

    Dense and ultrafine alumina-zirconia composites (Al 2O 3-16 wt%ZrO 2 and ZrO 2-20 wt%Al 2O 3) are developed and characterized for load bearing prosthetic applications. The improvement of the ceramic/bone interface, namely of the ceramic bioactivity, is performed by a glass coating on the surface of the composites. A new composition is used to produce the glass powder, by melting at 1550 °C the mixture of oxide raw materials. The processing to obtain a homogeneous and adherent coating on the ceramic substrates is investigated: the optimal temperature for the glazing treatment is 1200 °C. The microstructure of the coating and of the ceramic/coating interface, the adhesion and some mechanical properties of the prepared glass and of the coating are analyzed. Besides, the in vitro bioactive responses, by incubation of osteoblast-like cells on the coated samples, are evaluated: positive results are confirmed after 24 h and 72 h.