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Sample records for metallic iron nanoparticles

  1. From iron coordination compounds to metal oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Iacob, Mihail; Racles, Carmen; Tugui, Codrin; Stiubianu, George; Bele, Adrian; Sacarescu, Liviu; Timpu, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Various types, shapes and sizes of iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained depending on the nature of the precursor, preparation method and reaction conditions. The mixed valence trinuclear iron acetate, [Fe2 IIIFeIIO(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]·2H2O (FeAc1), μ3-oxo trinuclear iron(III) acetate, [Fe3O(CH3COO)6(H2O)3]NO3∙4H2O (FeAc2), iron furoate, [Fe3O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeF), iron chromium furoate, FeCr2O(C4H3OCOO)6(CH3OH)3]NO3∙2CH3OH (FeCrF), and an iron complex with an original macromolecular ligand (FePAZ) were used as precursors for the corresponding oxide nanoparticles. Five series of nanoparticle samples were prepared employing either a classical thermal pathway (i.e., thermal decomposition in solution, solvothermal method, dry thermal decomposition/calcination) or using a nonconventional energy source (i.e., microwave or ultrasonic treatment) to convert precursors into iron oxides. The resulting materials were structurally characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared, Raman, energy-dispersive X-ray, and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopies, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. The morphology was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The parameters were varied within each route to fine tune the size and shape of the formed nanoparticles. PMID:28144555

  2. Methyl red removal from water by iron based metal-organic frameworks loaded onto iron oxide nanoparticle adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadfarnia, S.; Haji Shabani, A. M.; Moradi, S. E.; Emami, S.

    2015-03-01

    The objective followed by this research is the synthesis of iron based metal organic framework loaded on iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4@MIL-100(Fe)) and the study of its capability for the removal of methyl red. Effective parameters in the selection of a new adsorbent, i.e. adsorption capacity, thermodynamics, and kinetics were investigated. All the studies were carried out in batch experiments. Removal of methyl red from aqueous solutions varied with the amount of adsorbent, methyl red contact time, initial concentration of dye, adsorbent dosage, and solution pH. The capability of the synthesized adsorbent in the removal of methyl red was compared with the metal organic framework (MIL-100(Fe)) and iron oxide nanoparticles. The results show that Fe3O4@MIL-100(Fe) nanocomposite exhibits an enhanced adsorption capacity.

  3. Controlled synthesis of metallic iron nanoparticles and their magnetic hyperthermia performance in polyaniline composite nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ta-I.; Chang, Su-Hua

    2017-02-01

    Electrospun magnetic iron/polyaniline nanofibers with applicable heating performance in an AC magnetic field were developed. A new and low-cost method was introduced to synthesize metallic iron (Fe0) nanoparticles with uniform size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized in an aqueous environment at room temperature with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone and sodium citrate to tailor their particle sizes ranging from 10 to 20 nm. The experimental results showed that regulating the free iron ions present in the solution is critical for obtaining Fe0 nanoparticles with narrow size distribution. The Fe0 nanoparticles were subsequently incorporated with conductive polyaniline (PANI) to fabricate Fe0/PANI/polycaprolactone nanofibers using an electrospinning technique. The resultant composite nanofibers have controlled fiber diameters and also show electrochemical redox properties originating from the PANI polymer. The heating performance test concluded that both eddy current loss from PANI and Neel relaxation loss of magnetic Fe0 nanoparticles can contribute to the power dissipation of the prepared composite nanofibers. The optimal heating performance can be obtained by adjusting the composition of Fe0 nanoparticles and PANI in nanofibers.

  4. Associations between iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticle growth and metal adsorption/structural incorporation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, C.S.; Lentini, C.J.; Waychunas, G.A.

    2008-09-15

    The interaction of metal ions and oxyanions with nanoscale mineral phases has not yet been extensively studied despite the increased recognition of their prevalence in natural systems as a significant component of geomedia. A combination of macroscopic uptake studies to investigate the adsorption behavior of As(V), Cu(II), Hg(II), and Zn(II) onto nanoparticulate goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) as a function of aging time at elevated temperature (75 C) and synchrotron-based X-ray studies to track changes in both the sorption mode and the rate of nanoparticle growth reveal the effects that uptake has on particle growth. Metal(loid) species which sorb quickly to the iron oxyhydroxide particles (As(V), Cu(II)) appear to passivate the particle surface, impeding the growth of the nanoparticles with progressive aging; in contrast, species that sorb more slowly (Hg(II), Zn(II)) have considerably less impact on particle growth. Progressive changes in the speciation of these particular metals with time suggest shifts in the mode of metal uptake with time, possibly indicating structural incorporation of the metal(loid) into the nanoparticle; this is supported by the continued increase in uptake concomitant with particle growth, implying that metal species may transform from surface-sorbed species to more structurally incorporated forms. This type of incorporation would have implications for the long-term fate and mobility of metals in contaminated regions, and affect the strategy for potential remediation/modeling efforts.

  5. Mössbauer study of metallic iron and iron oxide nanoparticles having environmental purifying ability

    SciTech Connect

    Kubuki, Shiro Watanabe, Yuka Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Ristić, Mira; Krehula, Stjepko; Homonnay, Zoltán; Kuzmann, Ernő; Nishida, Tetsuaki

    2014-10-27

    A relationship between local structure and methylene blue (MB) decomposing ability of nanoparticles (NPs) of metallic iron (Fe{sup 0}) and maghemite (γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was investigated by {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy. γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs were successfully prepared by mixing (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅6H{sub 2}O (Mohr's salt) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}Fe(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}⋅3H{sub 2}O aqueous solution at 30 °C for 1 h, while those of Fe{sup 0} were obtained by the reduction of Mohr's salt with NaBH{sub 4}. From the Scherrer's equation, the smallest crystallite sizes of γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs and Fe{sup 0} NPs were determined to be 9.7 and 1.5 nm, respectively. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs consists of a relaxed sextet with isomer shift (δ) of 0.33{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1}, internal magnetic field (H{sub int}) of 25.8{sub ±0.5} T, and linewidth (Γ) of 0.62{sub ±0.04} mm s{sup −1}. {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectrum of Fe{sup 0} NP is mainly composed of a sextet having δ, Δ, and H{sub int} of 0.00{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1} 0.45{sub ±0.01} mm s{sup −1}, and 22.8{sub ±0.1} T, respectively. A bleaching test of the mixture of Fe{sup 0} and γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (3:7 ratio, 100 mg) in MB aqueous solution (20 mL) for 6 h showed a remarkable decrease of MB concentration with the first-order rate constant (k{sub MB}) of 6.7 × 10{sup −1} h{sup −1}. This value is larger than that obtained for the bleaching test using bulk Fe{sup 0}+γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (3:7) mixture (k{sub MB} = 6.5×10{sup −3}h{sup −1}). These results prove that MB decomposing ability is enhanced by the NPs mixture of Fe{sub 0} and γ‐Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  6. Heavy metal release due to aging effect during zero valent iron nanoparticles remediation.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Blanca; Fullana, Andres

    2015-10-15

    Zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) represent a promising agent for environmental remediation. Nevertheless, their application presents some limitations regarding their rapid oxidation and aggregation in the media. The aim of this study was to determine the effect that nZVI aging has in heavy metal remediation in water. Contaminants studied were Zn, Cd, Ni, Cu and Cr, which are typical elements found in ground and wastewater. Results show a high contaminant removal capacity by the nZVI in the first 2 h of reaction. Nevertheless, for longer reaction times, some of the metal ions that had already been adsorbed in the nZVI were delivered to the water. Cd and Ni show the maximum delivery percentages (65 and 27% respectively after 21 days of contact time). The starting delivery time was shortened when applying lower nZVI amounts. No re-dissolution of Cr was observed in any circumstance because it was the only element incorporated into the nanoparticles core, as TEM images showed. Contaminant release from nZVI is probably due to nanoparticles oxidation caused by aging, which produced a pH decrease and nZVI surface crystallization.

  7. Virus templated metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2010-12-01

    Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron.Plant viruses are considered as nanobuilding blocks that can be used as synthons or templates for novel materials. Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles have been shown to template the fabrication of metallic nanoparticles by an electroless deposition metallization process. Palladium ions were electrostatically bound to the virus capsid and, when reduced, acted as nucleation sites for the subsequent metal deposition from solution. The method, although simple, produced highly monodisperse metallic nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. <=35 nm. CPMV-templated particles were prepared with cobalt, nickel, iron, platinum, cobalt-platinum and nickel-iron. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional experimental detail, agarose gel electrophoresis results, energy dispersive X-ray spectra, ζ-potential measurements, dynamic light scattering data, nanoparticle tracking analysis and an atomic force microscopy image of Ni-CPMV. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00525h

  8. Synthesis of Functionalized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles from a Common Precursor and their Application as Heavy Metal and Actinide Sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Marvin G.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Davidson, Joseph D.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana

    2009-10-12

    We describe the use of a simple and versatile technique to generate a series of ligand stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles containing different functionalities with specificities toward heavy metals and actinides at the periphery of the stabilizing ligand shell from a common, easy to synthesize precursor nanoparticle. The resulting nanoparticles are designed to contain affinity ligands that make them excellent sorbent materials for a variety of heavy metals from contaminated aqueous systems such as river water and ground water as well as actinides from clinical samples such as blood and urine. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles make ideal reagents for extraction of heavy metal and actinide contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. In addition, these engineered nanomaterials have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g) making them ideal sorbent materials for these types of applications

  9. A simple route to diverse noble metal-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles for catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Joan M.; Zaleski, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (knorm = 2 × 107 s-1 mol(Pd)-1 5 × 106 s-1 mol(Au)-1 5 × 105 s-1 mol(PtAg)-1 7 × 105 s-1 mol(Ag)-1). These rates are the highest reported for nano-sized comparables, and are competitive with mesoparticles of similar composition. Due to their magnetic response, the particles are also suitable for magnetic recovery and maintain >99% conversion for at least four cycles. Using this synthetic route, Fe3O4@SiO2-M particles show great promise for further development as a precursor to complicated anisotropic materials or for applications ranging from nanocatalysis to biomedical sensing.Developing facile synthetic routes to multifunctional nanoparticles combining the magnetic properties of iron oxides with the optical and catalytic utility of noble metal particles remains an important goal in realizing the potential of hybrid nanomaterials. To this end, we have developed a single route to noble metal-decorated magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4@SiO2-M M = Au, Pd, Ag, and PtAg) and characterized them by HRTEM and STEM/EDX imaging to reveal their nanometer size (16 nm Fe3O4 and 1-5 nm M seeds) and uniformity. This represents one of the few examples of genuine multifunctional particles on the nanoscale. We show that these hybrid structures have excellent catalytic

  10. Characterization and Properties of Metallic Iron Nanoparticles: Spectroscopy, Electrochemistry, and Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmi, J T.; Tratnyek, P G.; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Baer, Donald R.; Amonette, James E.; Pecher, Klaus H.; Wang, Chong M.; Linehan, John C.; Matson, Dean W.; Penn, R. Lee; Driessen, Michelle D.

    2005-03-01

    There are reports that nano-sized zero-valent iron (Fe?) exhibits greater reactivity than micro-sized particles of Fe?, which may impart advantages for groundwater remediation or other environmental applications. However, most of these reports are preliminary in that they leave a host of potentially significant (and often challenging) material or process variables either uncontrolled or unresolved. To better understand the reactivity of iron nanoparticles, we have used a variety of complementary techniques to characterize two widely studied nano Fe? preparations: one synthesized by heat-reduction of goethite under H? (FeH?) and the other by reductive precipitation with borohydride (FeBH). X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (STXM) showed particles of similar size (40-80 nm), but surface area measurements varied widely with method of measurement (4-60 m? g-?). FeH? is a two-phase material consisting of ?-Fe? and Fe?O?, doped with reduced sulfur, whereas FeBH is mostly metallic Fe with an oxide shell that is high in boron. Both materials exhibit corrosion potentials that are more negative than nano-sized Fe?O?, Fe?O?, micro-sized Fe?, or a solid Fe? disk, consistent with their rapid reduction of oxygen, benzoquinone, and carbon tetrachloride. Benzoquinone-which presumably probes inner-sphere surface reactions-reacts more rapidly with FeBH than with FeH?, whereas with carbon tetrachloride, FeBH and FeH? react at similar rates, presumably by outer-sphere electron transfer. Whether either material reacts more rapidly with the probes than micro-sized Fe? is unclear due to uncertainties in the appropriate specific surface areas. The distribution of products from reduction of carbon tetrachloride is more favorable with FeH?, which produces less chloroform than reaction with FeBH.

  11. Platinum Attachments on Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika; Xu, Yaolin; An, Wei; Turner, C. H.; Bao, Yuping

    2010-04-30

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on metal oxide surfaces have shown great potential as heterogeneous catalysts to accelerate electrochemical processes, such as the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Recently, the use of magnetic supports has become a promising research topic for easy separation and recovery of catalysts using magnets, such as Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticles. The attachment of Pt on iron oxide nanoparticles is limited by the wetting ability of the Pt (metal) on ceramic surfaces. A study of Pt nanoparticle attachment on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces in an organic solvent is reported, which addresses the factors that promote or inhibit such attachment. It was discovered that the Pt attachment strongly depends on the capping molecules of the iron oxide seeds and the reaction temperature. For example, the attachment of Pt nanoparticles on oleic acid coated iron oxide nanoparticles was very challenging, because of the strong binding between the carboxylic groups and iron oxide surfaces. In contrast, when nanoparticles are coated with oleic acid/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide or oleic acid/oleylamine, a significant increase in Pt attachment was observed. Electronic structure calculations were then applied to estimate the binding energies between the capping molecules and iron ions, and the modeling results strongly support the experimental observations.

  12. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  13. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites. PMID:27538720

  14. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts.

    PubMed

    Varnell, Jason A; Tse, Edmund C M; Schulz, Charles E; Fister, Tim T; Haasch, Richard T; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I; Gewirth, Andrew A

    2016-08-19

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  15. Identification of carbon-encapsulated iron nanoparticles as active species in non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnell, Jason A.; Tse, Edmund C. M.; Schulz, Charles E.; Fister, Tim T.; Haasch, Richard T.; Timoshenko, Janis; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Gewirth, Andrew A.

    2016-08-01

    The widespread use of fuel cells is currently limited by the lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. Iron-based non-precious metal catalysts exhibit promising activity and stability, as an alternative to state-of-the-art platinum catalysts. However, the identity of the active species in non-precious metal catalysts remains elusive, impeding the development of new catalysts. Here we demonstrate the reversible deactivation and reactivation of an iron-based non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalyst achieved using high-temperature gas-phase chlorine and hydrogen treatments. In addition, we observe a decrease in catalyst heterogeneity following treatment with chlorine and hydrogen, using Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Our study reveals that protected sites adjacent to iron nanoparticles are responsible for the observed activity and stability of the catalyst. These findings may allow for the design and synthesis of enhanced non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts with a higher density of active sites.

  16. Electrospun Carbon Nanofibers with Surface Attached Zero Valent Iron Nanoparticles for Heavy Metal Remediation in Ground and Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, Nikhil Reddy

    Rapid growth of worldwide industrialization and population is leading to extensive environmental pollution. Industrial activities have resulted in elevated concentrations of a wide range of heavy metal ions in ground and waste water. Heavy metal ions such as Chromium, Copper and Nickel are highly toxic. Various methods have been attempted to remove them from water including filtration, chemical precipitation, electrodeposition etc., but these methods suffer from limitations such as disposal of metal residual sludge, membrane clogging, intensive energy consumption, and high cost. Zero valent Iron nanoparticles (nZVI) possess large capacity for remediating heavy metals in water owing to their large surface area; high reactivity, non-toxicity, and ease of production. In this study, a hierarchical nanostructure, i.e. electrospun carbon nanofibers with surface attached ZVI nanoparticles (nZVI ECNFs), were prepared by growing nZVI on ECNFs using a redox reaction. This novel nanomaterial was evaluated for heavy metal removal from a series of aqueous model solutions. nZVI ECNFs outperformed stand-alone nZVI in all cases. It is envisioned that nZVI ECNFs is going to serve as a novel ZVI based nanomaterial for efficient heavy metal remediation in contaminated ground water as well as in waste water treatment.

  17. Study of iron nanoparticle melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, A. V.; Shulgin, A. V.; Lavruk, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In paper melting process of iron nanoparticles was investigated with molecular dynamics method. Melting temperatures was found for particles with radius from 1.5 to 4 nm. Results match with data of other authors. Heat capacity was calculated based on investigation of caloric curves. Dependence between heat capacity and temperature for different size of nanoparticles was approximated. Heat conductivity of iron nanoparticles was calculated.

  18. Iron sulfide attenuates the methanogenic toxicity of elemental copper and zinc oxide nanoparticles and their soluble metal ion analogs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2016-04-01

    Elemental copper (Cu(0)) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25-75μm) and coarse (500 to 1200μm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu(0) and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu(0) NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excess of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu(0) and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens.

  19. Iron Sulfide Attenuates the Methanogenic Toxicity of Elemental Copper and Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and their Soluble Metal Ion Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Estrella, Jorge; Gallagher, Sara; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A.

    2016-01-01

    Elemental copper (Cu0) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticle (NP) toxicity to methanogens has been attributed to the release of soluble metal ions. Iron sulfide (FeS) partially controls the soluble concentration of heavy metals and their toxicity in aquatic environments. Heavy metals displace the Fe from FeS forming poorly soluble metal sulfides in the FeS matrix. Therefore, FeS may be expected to attenuate the NP toxicity. This work assessed FeS as an attenuator of the methanogenic toxicity of Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble salt analogs. The toxicity attenuation capacity of fine (25–75 µm) and coarse (500 to 1200 µm) preparations of FeS (FeS-f and FeS-c respectively) was tested in the presence of highly inhibitory concentrations of CuCl2, ZnCl2 Cu0 and ZnO NPs. FeS-f attenuated methanogenic toxicity better than FeS-c. The results revealed that 2.5× less FeS-f than FeS-c was required to recover the methanogenic activity to 50% (activity normalized to uninhibited controls). The results also indicated that a molar FeS-f/Cu0 NP, FeS-f/ZnO NP, FeS-f/ZnCl2, and FeS-f/CuCl2 ratio of 2.14, 2.14, 4.28, and 8.56 respectively, was necessary to recover the methanogenic activity to >75%. Displacement experiments demonstrated that CuCl2 and ZnCl2 partially displaced Fe from FeS. As a whole, the results indicate that not all the sulfide in FeS was readily available to react with the soluble Cu and Zn ions which may explain the need for a large stoichiometric excesses of FeS to highly attenuate Cu and Zn toxicity. Overall, this study provides evidence that FeS attenuates the toxicity caused by Cu0 and ZnO NPs and their soluble ion analogs to methanogens. PMID:26803736

  20. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  1. Iron-Based Redox Polymerization of Acrylic Acid for Direct Synthesis of Hydrogel/Membranes, and Metal Nanoparticles for Water Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Sebastián; Papp, Joseph K.; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2014-01-01

    Functionalized polymer materials with ion exchange groups and integration of nano-structured materials is an emerging area for catalytic and water pollution control applications. The polymerization of materials such as acrylic acid often requires persulfate initiator and a high temperature start. However, is generally known that metal ions accelerate such polymerizations starting from room temperature. If the metal is properly selected, it can be used in environmental applications adding two advantages simultaneously. This paper deals with this by polymerizing acrylic acid using iron as accelerant and its subsequent use for nanoparticle synthesis in hydrogel and PVDF membranes. Characterizations of hydrogel, membranes and nanoparticles were carried out with different techniques. Nanoparticles sizes of 30–60 nm were synthesized. Permeability and swelling measurements demonstrate an inverse relationship between hydrogel mesh size (6.30 to 8.34 nm) and membrane pores (222 to 110 nm). Quantitative reduction of trichloroethylene/chloride generation by Fe/Pd nanoparticles in hydrogel/membrane platforms was also performed. PMID:24954975

  2. Iron-Based Redox Polymerization of Acrylic Acid for Direct Synthesis of Hydrogel/Membranes, and Metal Nanoparticles for Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sebastián; Papp, Joseph K; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2014-01-22

    Functionalized polymer materials with ion exchange groups and integration of nano-structured materials is an emerging area for catalytic and water pollution control applications. The polymerization of materials such as acrylic acid often requires persulfate initiator and a high temperature start. However, is generally known that metal ions accelerate such polymerizations starting from room temperature. If the metal is properly selected, it can be used in environmental applications adding two advantages simultaneously. This paper deals with this by polymerizing acrylic acid using iron as accelerant and its subsequent use for nanoparticle synthesis in hydrogel and PVDF membranes. Characterizations of hydrogel, membranes and nanoparticles were carried out with different techniques. Nanoparticles sizes of 30-60 nm were synthesized. Permeability and swelling measurements demonstrate an inverse relationship between hydrogel mesh size (6.30 to 8.34 nm) and membrane pores (222 to 110 nm). Quantitative reduction of trichloroethylene/chloride generation by Fe/Pd nanoparticles in hydrogel/membrane platforms was also performed.

  3. Metallic magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hernando, A; Crespo, P; García, M A

    2005-12-22

    In this paper, we reviewed some relevant aspects of the magnetic properties of metallic nanoparticles with small size (below 4 nm), covering the size effects in nanoparticles of magnetic materials, as well as the appearance of magnetism at the nanoscale in materials that are nonferromagnetic in bulk. These results are distributed along the text that has been organized around three important items: fundamental magnetic properties, different fabrication procedures, and characterization techniques. A general introduction and some experimental results recently obtained in Pd and Au nanoparticles have also been included. Finally, the more promising applications of magnetic nanoparticles in biomedicine are indicated. Special care was taken to complete the literature available on the subject.

  4. Tannin biosynthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera-Becerra, R.; Rius, J. L.; Zorrilla, C.

    2010-08-01

    In this work, iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized with gallic acid and tannic acid are characterized using High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM). Its size, form, and structure are compared with nanoparticles obtained previously using alfalfa biomass in order to find a simpler, consistent, and environmentally friendly method in the production of iron oxide nanoparticles.

  5. Impact of carboxymethyl cellulose coating on iron sulphide nanoparticles stability, transport, and mobilization potential of trace metals present in soils and sediment.

    PubMed

    Van Koetsem, Frederik; Van Havere, Lynn; Du Laing, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The stability and transport behaviour of carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilized iron sulphide (FeS) engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) as well as their concurrent scavenging and mobilization of trace metal contaminants from field-contaminated soils and sediment was studied through a series of batch and column experiments. The synthesized CMC-FeS ENPs were shown to have a hydrodynamic diameter of 154.5 ± 5.8 nm and remained stable in suspension for a prolonged period of time (several weeks) when kept under anaerobic conditions. In the absence of CMC, much larger FeS particles were formed, which quickly aggregated and precipitated within minutes. Batch experiments indicated that the CMC-FeS ENPs have a high affinity for metal contaminants (e.g., Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn), as high amounts of these trace metals could be retrieved in the aqueous phase after treatment of the soils with the nanoparticles (i.e., up to 29 times more compared to the water-leachable metal contents). Furthermore, batch retention of the nanoparticles by the solid soil phase was low (<37%), also suggesting a high stability and potential mobility. Nanoparticle treatment of the soils also affected the CaCl2-, TCLP-, and SPLP-leachability of trace metals, although no clear trend could be observed and metal leaching appeared to depend on the specific element under consideration, the type of extraction liquid, as well as on soil properties. Column breakthrough tests demonstrated that the CMC-FeS ENPs were highly mobile in the tested soil, even without the use of an external pressure (i.e., just via gravitational percolation). Maximal breakthrough of the nanoparticles was observed after approximately 10 or 16 pore volumes (PVs) for 83.3 or 500 mg L(-1) CMC-FeS ENPs, respectively, and only about 7% of the nanoparticles were retained by the soil after 22.7 PVs. Simultaneous elution of trace elements showed that up to 19, 8.7, or 11% of the respective Cd, Pb, or Zn content originally present

  6. Antitumor Activities of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vinardell, Maria Pilar; Mitjans, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles have received much attention recently due to their use in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. In some cases, such anticancer activity has been demonstrated to hold for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have this activity alone or when loaded with an anticancer drug, such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles that show cytotoxic effects on cancer cells include cobalt oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide. The antitumor mechanism could work through the generation of reactive oxygen species or apoptosis and necrosis, among other possibilities. Here, we review the most significant antitumor results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Physiologically important metal nanoparticles and their toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Jayeeta; Ghosh, Sourav; Datta, Poulami; Gomes, Aparna; Gomes, Antony

    2014-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been setting benchmarks for the last two decades, but the origins of this technology reach back to ancient history. Today, nanoparticles of both metallic and non-metallic origin are under research and development for applications in various fields of biology/therapeutics. Physiologically important metals are of concern because they are compatible with the human system in terms of absorption, assimilation, excretion, and side effects. There are several physiologically inorganic metals that are present in the human body with a wide range of biological activities. Some of these metals are magnesium, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, copper, zinc, selenium and molybdenum. These metals are synthesized in the form of nanoparticles by different physical and chemical methods. Physiologically important nanoparticles are currently under investigation for their bio-medical applications as well as for therapeutics. Along with the applicative aspects of nanoparticles, another domain that is of great concern is the risk assessment of these nanoparticles to avoid unnecessary hazards. It has been seen that these nanoparticles have been shown to possess toxicity in biological systems. Conventional physical and chemical methods of metal nanoparticle synthesis may be one possible reason for nanoparticle toxicity that can be overcome by synthesis of nanoparticles from biological sources. This review is an attempt to establish metal nanoparticles of physiological importance to be the best candidates for future nanotechnological tools and medicines, owing to the acceptability and safety in the human body. This can only be successful if these particles are synthesized with a better biocompatibility and low or no toxicity.

  8. ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles: chelator-controlled nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenlee, Lauren F.; Rentz, Nikki S.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we characterize iron nanoparticles synthesized in water in the presence of a phosphonate chelator, amino tris(methylene phosphonic acid) (ATMP) for a range of molar ratios of ATMP to iron. An increase in the molar ratio from 0.05 to 0.8 decreases nanoparticle size from approximately 150 nm to less than 10 nm. Zeta potential measurements were used to evaluate colloidal stability. Zeta potential values varied as a function of pH, and zeta potential values decreased with increasing pH. At lower molar ratios of ATMP to iron, the zeta potential varied between 15 and -40 mV, passing through an isoelectric point at pH 7.5. At higher ratios, the zeta potential was negative across the measured pH range of 2-12 and varied from -2 to -55 mV. Diffraction analysis indicates that ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles may have a nano-crystalline structure, potentially with regions of amorphous iron. Characterization results of ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles are compared to results obtained for carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC)-stabilized iron nanoparticles. CMC stabilization caused similar peak broadening in diffraction spectra as for ATMP, suggesting similar nano-crystalline/amorphous structure; however, an increase in the molar ratio of CMC to iron did not cause the same reduction in nanoparticle size as was observed for ATMP-stabilized iron nanoparticles.

  9. Promising iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical engineering.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Vo, Toi Van; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2012-12-01

    For the past few decades biomedical engineering has imprinted its significant impact on the map of science through its wide applications on many other fields. An important example obviously proving this fact is the versatile application of magnetic nanoparticles in theranostics. Due to preferable properties such as biocompatibility, non-toxicity compared to other metal derivations, iron oxide-based magnetic nanoparticles was chosen to be addressed in this review. Aim of this review is to give the readers a whole working window of these magnetic nanoparticles in the current context of science. Thus, preparation of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the so-far techniques, methods of characterizing the nanoparticles as well as their most recent biomedical applications will be stated.

  10. Method for producing metallic nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Kroenke, William J.

    2004-02-10

    Method for producing metallic nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating non-oxidizing plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone to metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and to the plasma afterglow where it cools and condenses to form solid metallic nanoparticles.

  11. Green Synthesis of Iron Nanoparticles and Their Environmental Applications and Implications

    PubMed Central

    Saif, Sadia; Tahir, Arifa; Chen, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology have also led to the development of novel nanomaterials, which ultimately increase potential health and environmental hazards. Interest in developing environmentally benign procedures for the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles has been increased. The purpose is to minimize the negative impacts of synthetic procedures, their accompanying chemicals and derivative compounds. The exploitation of different biomaterials for the synthesis of nanoparticles is considered a valuable approach in green nanotechnology. Biological resources such as bacteria, algae fungi and plants have been used for the production of low-cost, energy-efficient, and nontoxic environmental friendly metallic nanoparticles. This review provides an overview of various reports of green synthesised zero valent metallic iron (ZVMI) and iron oxide (Fe2O3/Fe3O4) nanoparticles (NPs) and highlights their substantial applications in environmental pollution control. This review also summarizes the ecotoxicological impacts of green synthesised iron nanoparticles opposed to non-green synthesised iron nanoparticles. PMID:28335338

  12. Fabrication of Metallic Hollow Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Choi, Sr., Sang H. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Metal and semiconductor nanoshells, particularly transition metal nanoshells, are fabricated using dendrimer molecules. Metallic colloids, metallic ions or semiconductors are attached to amine groups on the dendrimer surface in stabilized solution for the surface seeding method and the surface seedless method, respectively. Subsequently, the process is repeated with additional metallic ions or semiconductor, a stabilizer, and NaBH.sub.4 to increase the wall thickness of the metallic or semiconductor lining on the dendrimer surface. Metallic or semiconductor ions are automatically reduced on the metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles causing the formation of hollow metallic or semiconductor nanoparticles. The void size of the formed hollow nanoparticles depends on the dendrimer generation. The thickness of the metallic or semiconductor thin film around the dendrimer depends on the repetition times and the size of initial metallic or semiconductor seeds.

  13. [Influence of iron nanoparticles on cardiac performance and hemodynamics in rabbits after intravenous administration in acute experiment].

    PubMed

    Doroshenko, A M

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles are possessed by high potential in the creation of effective and safe antianemic drugs due to the enhanced biological activity of metal nanoparticles. As a step of intravenous dosage form development the study of short-term effects of iron nanoparticles on the cardiovascular system is important. Dose-dependent changes of systemic hemodynamics' parameters were established in acute experiment on rabbits after several intravenous injections of zero-valent iron nanoparticles solution.

  14. Metallic nanoparticles meet metadynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavan, L.; Rossi, K.; Baletto, F.

    2015-11-01

    Metadynamics coupled with classical molecular dynamics has been successfully applied to sample the configuration space of metallic and bimetallic nanoclusters. We implement a new set of collective variables related to the pair distance distribution function of the nanoparticle to achieve an exhaustive isomer sampling. As paradigmatic examples, we apply our methodology to Ag147, Pt147, and their alloy AgshellPtcore at 2:1 and 1:1 chemical compositions. The proposed scheme is able to reproduce the known solid-solid structural transformation pathways, based on the Lipscomb's diamond-square-diamond mechanisms, both in mono and bimetallic nanoparticles. A discussion of the free energy barriers involved in these processes is provided.

  15. The synthesis and characterization of iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Tyler

    Nanoparticle synthesis has garnered attention for technological applications for catalysts, industrial processing, and medical applications. The size ranges for these is in the particles nanostructural domain. Pure iron nanoparticles have been of particular interest for their reactivity and relative biological inertness. Applications include cancer treatment and carrying medicine to a relevant site. Unfortunately, because of their reactivity, pure iron nanoparticles have been difficult to study. This is because of their accelerated tendency to form oxides in air, due to the increased surface area to volume ratio. Using synthesis processes with polyphenols or long chain amines, air stable iron nanoparticles have been produced with a diameter size range of ~ 2 to about ~10 nm, but apparently have transformed due to internal pressure and crystallographic defects to the FCC phase. The FCC crystals have been seen to form icosahedral and decahedral shapes. This size is within the range for use as a catalyst for the growth of both carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes as well for biomedical applications. The advantages of these kinds of catalysts are that nanotube growth can be for the first time separated from the catalyst formation. Additionally, the catalyst size can be preselected for a certain size nanotube to grow. In summary: (1) we found the size distributions of nanoparticles for various synthesis processes, (2) we discovered the right size range for growth of nanotubes from the iron nanoparticles, (3) the nanoparticles are under a very high internal pressure, (4) the nanoparticles are in the FCC phase, (5) they appear to be in icosahedral and decahedral structures, (6) they undergo room temperature twinning, (7) the FCC crystals are distorted due to carbon in octahedral sites, (8) the iron nanoparticles are stable in air, (9) adding small amounts of copper make the iron nanoparticles smaller.

  16. Zero-valent iron nanoparticles preparation

    SciTech Connect

    Oropeza, S.; Corea, M.; Gómez-Yáñez, C.; Cruz-Rivera, J.J.; Navarro-Clemente, M.E.

    2012-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. Highlights: ► Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}]. ► The conditions of reaction were at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. ► The synthesized nanoparticles were spherical and had diameters less than 5 nm. -- Abstract: Zero-valent iron nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrogenating [Fe[N(Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}){sub 2}]{sub 2}] at room temperature and a pressure of 3 atm. To monitor the reaction, a stainless steel pressure reactor lined with PTFE and mechanically stirred was designed. This design allowed the extraction of samples at different times, minimizing the perturbation in the system. In this way, the shape and the diameter of the nanoparticles produced during the reaction were also monitored. The results showed the production of zero-valent iron nanoparticles that were approximately 5 nm in diameter arranged in agglomerates. The agglomerates grew to 900 nm when the reaction time increased up to 12 h; however, the diameter of the individual nanoparticles remained almost the same. During the reaction, some byproducts constituted by amino species acted as surfactants; therefore, no other surfactants were necessary.

  17. Iron, hepcidin, and the metal connection

    PubMed Central

    Loréal, Olivier; Cavey, Thibault; Bardou-Jacquet, Edouard; Guggenbuhl, Pascal; Ropert, Martine; Brissot, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Identification of new players in iron metabolism, such as hepcidin, which regulates ferroportin and divalent metal transporter 1 expression, has improved our knowledge of iron metabolism and iron-related diseases. However, from both experimental data and clinical findings, “iron-related proteins” appear to also be involved in the metabolism of other metals, especially divalent cations. Reports have demonstrated that some metals may affect, directly or indirectly, the expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism. Throughout their lives, individuals are exposed to various metals during personal and/or occupational activities. Therefore, better knowledge of the connections between iron and other metals could improve our understanding of iron-related diseases, especially the variability in phenotypic expression, as well as a variety of diseases in which iron metabolism is secondarily affected. Controlling the metabolism of other metals could represent a promising innovative therapeutic approach. PMID:24926268

  18. Fate and toxicity of metallic and metal-containing nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Feng; Chen, Chunying

    2011-11-04

    It is important to obtain a better understanding of the uptake, trafficking, pharmacokinetics, clearance, and role of nanomaterials in biological systems, so that their possible undesirable effects can be avoided. A number of metallic or metal-containing nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles and nanorods, quantum dots, iron oxides nanoparticles, and endohedral metallofullerenes, have already been or will soon become very promising for biomedical applications. This review presents a summary of currently available data on the fate and toxicity of these metallic or metal-containing nanoparticles based on animal studies. Several issues regarding the nanotoxicity assessment and future directions on the study of the fate of these nanoparticles are also proposed.

  19. Water soluble dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Daou, T J; Pourroy, G; Greneche, J M; Bertin, A; Felder-Flesch, D; Begin-Colin, S

    2009-06-21

    The grafting of pegylated dendrons on 9(2) nm and 39(5) nm iron oxide nanoparticles in water, through a phosphonate group as coupling agent has been successfully achieved and its mechanism investigated, with a view to produce biocompatible magnetic nano-objects for biomedical applications. Grafting has been demonstrated to occur by interaction of negatively charged phosphonate groups with positively charged groups and hydroxyl at the iron oxide surface. The isoelectric point of the suspension of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles is shifted towards lower pH as the amount of dendron increases. It reaches 4.7 for the higher grafting rate and for both particle size. Thus, the grafting of molecules using a phosphonate group allows stabilizing electrostatically the suspensions at physiological pH, a prerequisite for biomedical applications. Moreover the grafting step has been shown to preserve the magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles due to super-super exchange interactions through the phosphonate group.

  20. Metal Nanoparticle Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Sibille, Laurent; Ignont, Erica; Snow, Lanee; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have fabricated sol-gels containing gold and silver nanoparticles. Formation of an aerogel produces a blue shift in the surface plasmon resonance as a result of the decrease in the dielectric constant of the matrix upon supercritical extraction of the solvent. However, as a result of chemical interface damping this blue shift does not obey effective medium theories. Annealing the samples in a reducing atmosphere at 400 C eliminates this discrepancy and results in narrowing and further blue shifting of the plasmon resonance. Metal particle aggregation also results in a deviation from the predictions of effective medium theories, but can be controlled through careful handling and by avoiding the use of alcohol. By applying effective medium theories to the heterogeneous interlayer surrounding each metal particle, we extend the technique of immersion spectroscopy to inhomogeneous materials characterized by spatially dependent dielectric constants, such as aerogels. We demonstrate that the shift in the surface plasmon wavelength provides the average fractional composition of each component (air and silica) in this inhomogeneous layer, i.e. the porosity of the aerogel or equivalently, for these materials, the catalytic dispersion. Additionally, the kinetics suggest that collective particle interactions in coagulated metal clusters are perturbed during silica gelation resulting in a change in the aggregate geometry.

  1. Synthesis and stability of iron nanoparticles for lunar environment studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-06-01

    Simulants of lunar dust are needed when researching the lunar environment. However, unlike the true lunar dust, today's simulants do not contain nanophase iron. Two different processes have been developed to fabricate nanophase iron to be used as part of a lunar dust simulant. (1) The first is to sequentially treat a mixture of ferric chloride, fluorinated carbon, and soda lime glass beads at about 300°C in nitrogen, at room temperature in air, and then at 1050°C in nitrogen. The product includes glass beads that are gray in color, can be attracted by a magnet, and contains α-iron nanoparticles (which seem to slowly lose their lattice structure in ambient air during a period of 12months). This product may have some similarity to the lunar glassy agglutinate, which contains FeO. (2) The second is to heat a mixture of carbon black and a lunar simulant (a mixed metal oxide that includes iron oxide) at 1050°C in nitrogen. This process simulates lunar dust reactions with the carbon in a micrometeorite at the time of impact. The product contains a chemically modified simulant that can be attracted by a magnet and has a surface layer whose iron concentration increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be α-iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which appear to grow after the fabrication process. This growth became undetectable after 6months of ambient air storage, but may last for several years or longer.

  2. Synthesis and Stability of Iron Nanoparticles for Lunar Environment Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2009-01-01

    Simulant of lunar dust is needed when researching the lunar environment. However, unlike the true lunar dust, today s simulants do not contain nanophase iron. Two different processes have been developed to fabricate nanophase iron to be used as part of the lunar dust simulant: (1) Sequentially treating a mixture of ferric chloride, fluorinated carbon, and soda lime glass beads at about 300 C in nitrogen, at room temperature in air, and then at 1050 C in nitrogen. The product includes glass beads that are grey in color, can be attracted by a magnet, and contain alpha-iron nanoparticles (which seem to slowly lose their lattice structure in ambient air during a period of 12 months). This product may have some similarity to the lunar glassy regolith that contains Fe(sup 0). (2) Heating a mixture of carbon black and a lunar simulant (a mixed metal oxide that includes iron oxide) at 1050 C in nitrogen. This process simulates lunar dust reaction to the carbon in a micrometeorite at the time of impact. The product contains a chemically modified simulant that can be attracted by a magnet and has a surface layer whose iron concentration increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be alpha-iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles, which appear to grow after the fabrication process, but stabilizes after 6 months of ambient air storage.

  3. Glucose-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by metal vapour synthesis are electively internalized in a pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line expressing GLUT1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Barbaro, Daniele; Di Bari, Lorenzo; Gandin, Valentina; Evangelisti, Claudio; Vitulli, Giovanni; Schiavi, Eleonora; Marzano, Cristina; Ferretti, Anna M; Salvadori, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) can have a variety of biomedical applications due to their visualization properties through Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and heating with radio frequency or alternating magnetic fields. In the oncological field, coating IONP with organic compounds to provide specific features and to achieve the ability of binding specific molecular targets appears to be very promising. To take advantage of the high avidity of tumor cells for glucose, we report the development of very small glucose-coated IONP (glc-IONP) by employing an innovative technique, Metal Vapor Synthesis (MVS). Moreover, we tested the internalization of our gl-IONP on a tumor line, BxPC3, over-expressing GLUT 1 transporter. Both glc-IONP and polyvinylpyrrolidone-IONP (PVP-IONP), as control, were prepared with MVS and were tested on BxPC3 at various concentrations. To evaluate the role of GLUT-1 transporter, we also investigated the effect of adding a polyclonal anti-GLUT1 antibody. After proper treatment, the iron value was assessed by atomic absorption spectrometer, reported in mcg/L and expressed in mg of protein. Our IONP prepared with MVS were very small and homogeneously distributed in a narrow range (1.75-3.75 nm) with an average size of 2.7 nm and were super-paramagnetic. Glc-IONP were internalized by BxPC3 cells in a larger amount than PVP-IONP. After 6h of treatment with 50 mcg/mL of IONPs, the content of Fe was 1.5 times higher in glc-IONP-treated cells compared with PVP-IONP-treated cells. After 1h pre-treatment with anti-GLUT1, a reduction of 41% cellular accumulation of glc-IONP was observed. Conversely, the uptake of PVP-IONPs was reduced only by 14% with antibody pretreatment. In conclusion, MVS allowed us to prepare small, homogeneous, super-paramagnetic glc-IONP, which are electively internalized by a tumor line over-expressing GLUT1. Our glc-IONP appear to have many requisites for in vivo use.

  4. Synthesis, Characterization, and Properties of Zero-Valent Iron Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Tratnyek, P. G.; Qiang, You; Amonette, James E.; Linehan, John C.; Sarathy, Vaishnavi; Nurmi, J. T.; Wang, Chong M.; Antony, Jiji

    2007-04-04

    This chapter provides an overview of synthesis, characterization and property measurements techniques important for making understanding the nature of zero valent iron nanoparticles. The chemical reactivity of nanometer-sized materials can be quite different from that of either bulk forms of a material or the individual atoms and molecules that comprise it. Advances in our ability to synthesize, visualize, characterize and model these materials have created new opportunities to control the rates and products of chemical reactions in ways not previously possible. Zero valent iron (ZVI), including non-nanoparticle forms for iron, is one of the most promising remediation technologies for the removal of mobile chlorinated hydrocarbons and reducible inorganic anions for ground water. ZVI nanoparticles may have great potential to assist environmental remediation, but there are significant scientific and technological questions that remain to be answered. Understanding of ZVI reactive metal core-shell nanoparticles requires use of particles that are as well characterized and understood as possible. In this chapter we describe the issues and provide examples that include synthesis of nanoparticles, analytical characterization of the particles and finally measurements of their chemical properties.

  5. Chemical design of biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2013-05-27

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are one of the most versatile and safe nanomaterials used in medicine. Recent progress in nanochemistry enables fine control of the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide nanoparticles. In this review, the synthesis of chemically designed biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles with improved quality and reduced toxicity is discussed for use in diverse biomedical applications.

  6. Multifunctional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles for Diagnostics, Therapy and Macromolecule Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Swee Kuan; Padmanabhan, Parasuraman; Selvan, Subramanian Tamil

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, multifunctional nanoparticles (NPs) consisting of either metal (e.g. Au), or magnetic NP (e.g. iron oxide) with other fluorescent components such as quantum dots (QDs) or organic dyes have been emerging as versatile candidate systems for cancer diagnosis, therapy, and macromolecule delivery such as micro ribonucleic acid (microRNA). This review intends to highlight the recent advances in the synthesis and application of multifunctional NPs (mainly iron oxide) in theranostics, an area used to combine therapeutics and diagnostics. The recent applications of NPs in miRNA delivery are also reviewed. PMID:24396508

  7. Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Surface Functionalization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Surface functionalized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are a kind of novel functional materials, which have been widely used in the biotechnology and catalysis. This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in preparation, structure, and magnetic properties of naked and surface functionalized iron oxide NPs and their corresponding application briefly. In order to implement the practical application, the particles must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of iron oxide NPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The problems and major challenges, along with the directions for the synthesis and surface functionalization of iron oxide NPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and prospective in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:21749733

  8. Chemical Synthesis of Iron-Nickel Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Frank; Tzitzios, Vasilias; Hadjipanayis, George

    2015-03-01

    Equiatomic FeNi alloys undergo a phase transformation, like FePt, from a disordered fcc structure to an ordered fct structure. However, unlike FePt in Fe-Ni this transformation is very sluggish and has been only observed in heavily irradiated thin films and in meteorite samples as was recently reported.1,2 In this study, we used a high temperature chemical synthesis route to investigate the possibility of fabricating fct FeNi nanoparticles. The Iron Nickel Boron nanoparticles were made using anhydrous Iron (II) Chloride and Nickel (II) Chloride using Sodium borohydrite as a reducing agent in tetraglyme under a nitrogen hydrogen atmosphere. The high temperature of the reaction allowed for the formation of as made crystalline Iron Nickel nanoparticles without additional annealing. By changing the concentration of sodium borohydrite we were able to prepare nanoparticles either in the pure fcc phase, or in a new mixed phase. The magnetic properties were improved by increasing the concentration of Iron precursor. We obtained FeNi nanoparticles with saturation magnetization of (56 emu/g) and coercivity of (190 Oe). The particle size distribution of the FeNi particles ranged from several hundred nanometers to a half micron. Work Supported by DOE-BES-DMSE (Grants No. DE-FG02-04ER4612).

  9. Iron Nanoparticles in Reactive Environmental Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Nuxoll, Eric E.; Shimotori, Tsutomu; Arnold, William A.; Cussler, Edward L.

    2003-09-23

    Zero-valent iron is cheap, environmentally innocuous, and effective at reducing chlorinated organics. It has, as a result, become a popular candidate for remediating aquifers contaminated with trichloroethylene and other halogenated pollutants. In this paper, we discuss one such system, where iron nanoparticles are synthesized and incorporated into polyvinyl alcohol membranes, forming water-permeable barriers to these pollutants. These barriers are tested against a variety of contaminants, including carbon tetrachloride, copper, and chromate.

  10. Process to Produce Iron Nanoparticle Lunar Dust Simulant Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; McNatt, Jeremiah

    2010-01-01

    A document discusses a method for producing nanophase iron lunar dust composite simulant by heating a mixture of carbon black and current lunar simulant types (mixed oxide including iron oxide) at a high temperature to reduce ionic iron into elemental iron. The product is a chemically modified lunar simulant that can be attracted by a magnet, and has a surface layer with an iron concentration that is increased during the reaction. The iron was found to be -iron and Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The simulant produced with this method contains iron nanoparticles not available previously, and they are stable in ambient air. These nanoparticles can be mass-produced simply.

  11. Metal nanoparticles in DBS card materials modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metelkin, A.; Frolov, G.; Kuznetsov, D.; Kolesnikov, E.; Chuprunov, K.; Kondakov, S.; Osipov, A.; Samsonova, J.

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years the method of collecting and storing Dried Blood Spots (DBS) on special cellulose membrane (paper) has gained wide popularity. But possible damage of biosamples caused by microorganisms in case of their incomplete drying is a disadvantage of the method. It can be overcome by treating sample-collection membranes with colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles, having antibacterial effect. The team studied antibacterial properties of nonwoven material samples with various coatings (alcohol sols of copper, aluminium, iron, titanium, silver and vanadium nanoparticles). Colloidal solutions of nanoparticles were obtained by means of electroerosion method with further low-temperature plasma condensation. Antibacterial activity of fiberglass and cellulose membrane samples with nanoparticle coatings was studied using B. cereus and plaque bacteria cultures. It was revealed that nanostructured coatings can suppress bacterial activity; in addition they can diffuse from the membrane surface into medium which leads to widening the areas of inhibiting testing cultures’ growth. Thus, membrane materials treatment with alcohol-sols of metal nanoparticles can be seen as promising for conferring antibacterial properties to DBS carriers.

  12. Synthesis metal nanoparticle

    DOEpatents

    Bunge, Scott D.; Boyle, Timothy J.

    2005-08-16

    A method for providing an anhydrous route for the synthesis of amine capped coinage-metal (copper, silver, and gold) nanoparticles (NPs) using the coinage-metal mesityl (mesityl=C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3 -2,4,6) derivatives. In this method, a solution of (Cu(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5, (Ag(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.4, or (Au(C.sub.6 H.sub.2 (CH.sub.3).sub.3).sub.5 is dissolved in a coordinating solvent, such as a primary, secondary, or tertiary amine; primary, secondary, or tertiary phosphine, or alkyl thiol, to produce a mesityl precursor solution. This solution is subsequently injected into an organic solvent that is heated to a temperature greater than approximately 100.degree. C. After washing with an organic solvent, such as an alcohol (including methanol, ethanol, propanol, and higher molecular-weight alcohols), oxide free coinage NP are prepared that could be extracted with a solvent, such as an aromatic solvent (including, for example, toluene, benzene, and pyridine) or an alkane (including, for example, pentane, hexane, and heptane). Characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy showed that the NPs were approximately 9.2.+-.2.3 nm in size for Cu.degree., (no surface oxide present), approximately 8.5.+-.1.1 nm Ag.degree. spheres, and approximately 8-80 nm for Au.degree..

  13. Dual mode nanoparticles: CdS coated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radwan, F. N.; Carroll, K. J.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2010-05-01

    Reverse micelles can be used in a sequential fashion to make core-shell nanoparticles. Using this technique it is possible to make a magnetic quantum dot, by coating an iron core with a cadmium sulfide shell. Transmission electron microscopy indicated core-shell morphology and narrow size distribution of the obtained particles. Collectively, x-ray powder diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy verified the presence of cadmium sulfide on the surface of the nanoparticles. Optical properties of the coated particles were demonstrated using fluorescence spectroscopy. A vibrating sample magnetometer was used to determine magnetic properties. Dual mode cadmium sulfide coated iron core-shell nanoparticles make unique candidates for the use in biomedical applications.

  14. Antimicrobial polymers with metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-19

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  15. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms. PMID:25607734

  16. Shape-controlled syntheses of metal oxide nanoparticles by the introduction of rare-earth metals.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyo-Won; Kim, Na-Young; Park, Ji-Eun; Ko, Jae-Hyeon; Hickey, Robert J; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, So-Jung

    2017-02-23

    Here, we report the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles through the introduction of rare-earth metals. The addition of gadolinium oleate in the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles induced sphere-to-cube shape changes of nanoparticles and generated iron oxide nanocubes coated with gadolinium. Based on experimental investigations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the shape change to the facet-selective binding of undecomposed gadolinium oleates. While many previous studies on the shape-controlled syntheses of nanoparticles rely on the stabilization of specific crystal facets by anionic surfactants or their decomposition products, this study shows that the interaction between growing transition metal oxide nanoparticles and rare-earth metal complexes can be used as a robust new mechanism for shape-controlled syntheses. Indeed, we demonstrated that this approach was applicable to other transition metal oxide nanoparticles (i.e., manganese oxide and manganese ferrite) and rare earth metals (i.e., gadolinium, europium, and cerium). This study also demonstrates that the nature of metal-ligand bonding can play an important role in the shape control of nanoparticles.

  17. Simultaneous removal of nitrate and heavy metals by iron metal.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhi-Wei; Xu, Xin-Hua; Jin, Jian; He, Ping; Liu, Yong; Wang, Da-Hui

    2005-05-01

    Great attention should be paid now to simultaneously removing common pollutants, especially inorganic pollutants such as nitrate and heavy metals, as individual removal has been investigated extensively. Removing common pollutants simultaneously by iron metal is a very effective alternative method. Near neutral pH, heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, can be removed rapidly by iron metal, while nitrate removal very much slower than that of copper and nickel, and copper can accelerate nitrate removal when both are removed simultaneously. Even a little amount of copper can enhance nitrate removal efficiently. Different mechanisms of these contaminants removal by iron metal were also discussed.

  18. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles effects iron absorption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron trans...

  19. Incorporation of metal nanoparticles into wood substrate and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rector, Kirk D; Lucas, Marcel

    2015-11-04

    Metal nanoparticles were incorporated into wood. Ionic liquids were used to expand the wood cell wall structure for nanoparticle incorporation into the cell wall structure. Nanoparticles of elemental gold or silver were found to be effective surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging contrast or sensing agents. Nanoparticles of elemental iron were found to be efficient microwave absorbers and caused localized heating for disrupting the integrity of the lignocellulosic matrix. Controls suggest that the localized heating around the iron nanoparticles reduces losses of cellulose in the form of water, volatiles and CO.sub.2. The ionic liquid is needed during the incorporation process at room temperature. The use of small amounts of ionic liquid combined with the absence of an ionic liquid purification step and a lower energy and water use are expected to reduce costs in an up-scaled pretreatment process.

  20. Preparation of uniform nanoparticles of ultra-high purity metal oxides, mixed metal oxides, metals, and metal alloys

    DOEpatents

    Woodfield, Brian F.; Liu, Shengfeng; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Liu, Qingyuan; Smith, Stacey Janel

    2012-07-03

    In preferred embodiments, metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal (alloy) nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal oxide nanoparticles are provided. According to embodiments, the nanoparticles may possess narrow size distributions and high purities. In certain preferred embodiments, methods of preparing metal nanoparticles, mixed-metal nanoparticles, metal oxide nanoparticles and mixed-metal nanoparticles are provided. These methods may provide tight control of particle size, size distribution, and oxidation state. Other preferred embodiments relate to a precursor material that may be used to form nanoparticles. In addition, products prepared from such nanoparticles are disclosed.

  1. Optical Properties of Metallic Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallée, F.

    The bright and changing colours obtained by dispersing metallic compounds in a glass matrix have been known empirically for centuries. Indeed, glasses have been coloured in the bulk by inclusion of metallic powders since ancient times to make jewellery and ornaments (see Chap. 25). Then in the Middle Ages, they were used for stained glass windows and later on for coloured glass artefacts, e.g., ruby red glass objects. However, the role played by nanoparticles in this colouring effect, i.e., the effects of nanoparticles on optical properties, were only first studied scientifically in the nineteenth century, by Michael Faraday [1].

  2. Multifunctional iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, M.; Denis, C.; Van Stappen, T.; De Meester, L.; Geukens, N.; Gils, A.; Verbiest, T.

    2015-03-01

    Multifunctional nanoparticles have attracted a lot of attention since they can combine interesting properties like magnetism, fluorescence or plasmonic effects. As a core material, iron oxide nanoparticles have been the subject of intensive research. These cost-effective and non-toxic particles are used nowadays in many applications. We developed a heterobifunctional PEG ligand that can be used to introduce functional groups (carboxylic acids) onto the surface of the NP. Via click chemistry, a siloxane functionality was added to this ligand, for a subsequent covalent ligand exchange reaction. The functionalized nanoparticles have an excellent colloidal stability in complex environments like buffers and serum or plasma. Antibodies were coupled to the introduced carboxylic acids and these NP-antibody bioconjugates were brought into contact with Legionella bacteria for magnetic separation experiments.

  3. Reversible immobilization of invertase on Cu-chelated polyvinylimidazole-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Uzun, Kerem; Çevik, Emre; Şenel, Mehmet; Baykal, Abdülhadi

    2013-12-01

    Polyvinylimidazole (PVI)-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles (PVIgMNP) were prepared by grafting of telomere of PVI on the iron oxide nanoparticles. Different metal ions (Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cr(2+), Ni(2+)) ions were chelated on polyvinylimidazole-grafted iron oxide nanoparticles, and then the metal-chelated magnetic particles were used in the adsorption of invertase. The maximum invertase immobilization capacity of the PVIgMNP-Cu(2+) beads was observed to be 142.856 mg/g (invertase/PVIgMNP) at pH 5.0. The values of the maximum reaction rate (V max) and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were determined for the free and immobilized enzymes. The enzyme adsorption-desorption studies, pH effect on the adsorption efficiency, affinity of different metal ions, the kinetic parameters and storage stability of free and immobilized enzymes were evaluated.

  4. Synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahadory, Mozhgan

    Improved methods were developed for the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles. Laboratory experiments were designed for introducing of nanotechnology into the undergraduate curriculum. An optimal set of conditions for the synthesis of clear yellow colloidal silver was investigated. Silver nanoparticles were obtained by borohydride reduction of silver nitrate, a method which produces particles with average size of 12+/-2 nm, determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The plasmon absorbance is at 397 nm and the peak width at half maximum (PWHM) is 70-75 nm. The relationship between aggregation and optical properties was determined along with a method to protect the particles using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). A laboratory experiment was designed in which students synthesize yellow colloidal silver, estimate particle size using visible spectroscopy, and study aggregation effects. The synthesis of the less stable copper nanoparticles is more difficult because copper nanopaticles are easily oxidized. Four methods were used for the synthesis of copper nanoparticles, including chemical reduction with sodium borohydride, sodium borohydride with potassium iodide, isopropyl alcohol with cetyltrimethylammonium bormide (CTAB) and reducing sugars. The latter method was also the basis for an undergraduate laboratory experiment. For each reaction, the dependence of stability of the copper nanoparticles on reagent concentrations, additives, relative amounts of reactants, and temperature is explored. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), TEM and UV-Visible Spectroscopy were used to characterize the copper nanoparticles. A laboratory experiment to produce copper nanoparticles from household chemicals was developed.

  5. Engineered Iron/Iron Oxide Functionalized Membranes for Selenium and Other Toxic Metal Removal from Power Plant Scrubber Water.

    PubMed

    Gui, Minghui; Papp, Joseph K; Colburn, Andrew S; Meeks, Noah D; Weaver, Benjamin; Wilf, Ilan; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2015-08-15

    The remediation of toxic metals from water with high concentrations of salt has been an emerging area for membrane separation. Cost-effective nanomaterials such as iron and iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely used in reductive and oxidative degradation of toxic organics. Similar procedures can be used for redox transformations of metal species (e.g. metal oxyanions to elemental metal), and/or adsorption of species on iron oxide surface. In this study, iron-functionalized membranes were developed for reduction and adsorption of selenium from coal-fired power plant scrubber water. Iron-functionalized membranes have advantages over iron suspension as the membrane prevents particle aggregation and dissolution. Both lab-scale and full-scale membranes were prepared first by coating polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membranes with polyacrylic acid (PAA), followed by ion exchange of ferrous ions and subsequent reduction to zero-valent iron nanoparticles. Water permeability of membrane decreased as the percent PAA functionalization increased, and the highest ion exchange capacity (IEC) was obtained at 20% PAA with highly pH responsive pores. Although high concentrations of sulfate and chloride in scrubber water decreased the reaction rate of selenium reduction, this was shown to be overcome by integration of nanofiltration (NF) and iron-functionalized membranes, and selenium concentration below 10 μg/L was achieved.

  6. Zero Valent Iron: Impact of Anions Present during Synthesis on Subsequent Nanoparticle Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Kirsten; Forsberg, Brady; Baer, Donald R.; Arnold, William A.; Penn, R. Lee

    2011-10-01

    Zero-valent iron particles are an effective remediation technology for groundwater contaminated with halogenated organic compounds. In particular, nano-scale zero-valent iron is a promising material for remediation due to its high specific surface area, which results in faster rate constants and more effective use of the iron. An aspect of iron nanoparticle reactivity that has not been explored is the impact of anions present during iron metal nanoparticle synthesis. Solutions containing chloride, phosphate, sulfate, and nitrate anions and ferric ions were used to generate iron oxide nanoparticles. The resulting materials were dialyzed to remove dissolved byproducts and then dried and reduced by hydrogen gas at high temperature. The reactivity of the resulting zero valent iron nanoparticles was quantified by monitoring the kinetics as well as products of carbon tetrachloride reduction, and significant differences in reactivity and chloroform yield were observed. The reactivity of nanoparticles prepared in the presence of sulfate and phosphate demonstrated the highest reactivity and chloroform yield. Furthermore, substantial variations in the solid-state products of oxidation (magnetite, iron sulfide, and goethite, among others) were also observed.

  7. Synchrotron speciation data for zero-valent iron nanoparticles

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This data set encompasses a complete analysis of synchrotron speciation data for 5 iron nanoparticle samples (P1, P2, P3, S1, S2, and metallic iron) to include linear combination fitting results (Table 6 and Figure 9) and ab-initio extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy fitting (Figure 10 and Table 7).Table 6: Linear combination fitting of the XAS data for the 5 commercial nZVI/ZVI products tested. Species proportions are presented as percentages. Goodness of fit is indicated by the chi^2 value.Figure 9: Normalised Fe K-edge k3-weighted EXAFS of the 5 commercial nZVI/ZVIproducts tested. Dotted lines show the best 4-component linear combination fit ofreference spectra.Figure 10: Fourier transformed radial distribution functions (RDFs) of the five samplesand an iron metal foil. The black lines in Fig. 10 represent the sample data and the reddotted curves represent the non-linear fitting results of the EXAFS data.Table 7: Coordination parameters of Fe in the samples.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Chekli, L., B. Bayatsarmadi, R. Sekine, B. Sarkar, A. Maoz Shen, K. Scheckel , W. Skinner, R. Naidu, H. Shon, E. Lombi, and E. Donner. Analytical Characterisation of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron: A Methodological Review. Richard P. Baldwin ANALYTICA CHIMICA ACTA. Elsevier Science Ltd, New York, NY, USA, 903: 13-35, (2016).

  8. Magnetic solid phase extraction of typical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from environmental water samples with metal organic framework MIL-101 (Cr) modified zero valent iron nano-particles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Lei, Man; Wu, Yalin; Yuan, Yongyong

    2017-03-03

    Metal-organic framework material has been paid more attention because of its good physical and chemical properties. Nanoscale zero valent iron is also in the center of concern recently. Combination of their merits will give impressive results. Present study firstly synthesized a new magnetic nanomaterial nano-scale zero valent iron-functionalized metal-organic framworks MIL-101 (Fe@MIL-101) by co-precipitation method. The morphology and structure of the as-prepared Fe@MIL-101 were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, etc. The experimental results showed that Fe@MIL-101 earned good adsorption ability to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The limits of detection of developed magnetic solid phase extraction were all below 0.064μgL(-1) and precision can be expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD, %) and which was better than 4.4% (n=6). The real water analysis indicated that the spiked recoveries were satisfied, and Fe@MIL-101 earned excellent reusability. All these demonstrated that Fe@MIL-101 exhibited excellent adsorption capability to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and would be a good adsorbent for development of new monitoring methods for environmental pollutants.

  9. An Iron Reservoir to the Catalytic Metal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fange; Geng, Jiafeng; Gumpper, Ryan H.; Barman, Arghya; Davis, Ian; Ozarowski, Andrew; Hamelberg, Donald; Liu, Aimin

    2015-01-01

    The rubredoxin motif is present in over 74,000 protein sequences and 2,000 structures, but few have known functions. A secondary, non-catalytic, rubredoxin-like iron site is conserved in 3-hydroxyanthranilate 3,4-dioxygenase (HAO), from single cellular sources but not multicellular sources. Through the population of the two metal binding sites with various metals in bacterial HAO, the structural and functional relationship of the rubredoxin-like site was investigated using kinetic, spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational approaches. It is shown that the first metal presented preferentially binds to the catalytic site rather than the rubredoxin-like site, which selectively binds iron when the catalytic site is occupied. Furthermore, an iron ion bound to the rubredoxin-like site is readily delivered to an empty catalytic site of metal-free HAO via an intermolecular transfer mechanism. Through the use of metal analysis and catalytic activity measurements, we show that a downstream metabolic intermediate can selectively remove the catalytic iron. As the prokaryotic HAO is often crucial for cell survival, there is a need for ensuring its activity. These results suggest that the rubredoxin-like site is a possible auxiliary iron source to the catalytic center when it is lost during catalysis in a pathway with metabolic intermediates of metal-chelating properties. A spare tire concept is proposed based on this biochemical study, and this concept opens up a potentially new functional paradigm for iron-sulfur centers in iron-dependent enzymes as transient iron binding and shuttling sites to ensure full metal loading of the catalytic site. PMID:25918158

  10. Biocompatible multishell architecture for iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wotschadlo, Jana; Liebert, Tim; Clement, Joachim H; Anspach, Nils; Höppener, Stephanie; Rudolph, Tobias; Müller, Robert; Schacher, Felix H; Schubert, Ulrich S; Heinze, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The coating of super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) with multiple shells is demonstrated by building a layer assembled from carboxymethyldextran and poly(diallydimethylammonium chloride). Three shells are produced stepwise around aggregates of SPIONs by the formation of a polyelectrolyte complex. A growing particle size from 96 to 327 nm and a zeta potential in the range of +39 to -51 mV are measured. Microscopic techniques such as TEM, SEM, and AFM exemplify the core-shell structures. Magnetic force microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer measurements confirm the architecture of the multishell particles. Cell culture experiments show that even nanoparticles with three shells are still taken up by cells.

  11. Metal nanoparticles for biodetection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldenburg, Steven; Mock, Jack; Glass, James R.; Asenjo, Ana B.; Genick, Christine C.; Smith, David R.; Schultz, David A.; Schultz, Sheldon

    2002-10-01

    The large scattering cross section of plasmon resonant gold and silver nanoparticles functionalized with the appropriate ligand allows for sensitive and specific detection of nucleic acids and proteins. By varying the size, shape, and material morphology populations with a specific peak plasmon resonance can be prepared. By varying the order and length of plasmon resonant bar segment in a composite nanowire one can obtain a large number of particle populations. Distinct populations can be used for labels for multiplexing or as a platform for biological assays. An larger number of color populations can be obtained with composite nanowires that are fabricated with various lengths of silver, gold, or nickel segments. The order and length of the different plasmon resonance rod segments can be used to uniquely identify a rod population allowing for a large degree of multiplexing within a single sample.

  12. Oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles affects iron absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahler, Gretchen J.; Esch, Mandy B.; Tako, Elad; Southard, Teresa L.; Archer, Shivaun D.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2012-04-01

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in food and pharmaceuticals is expected to increase, but the impact of chronic oral exposure to nanoparticles on human health remains unknown. Here, we show that chronic and acute oral exposure to polystyrene nanoparticles can influence iron uptake and iron transport in an in vitro model of the intestinal epithelium and an in vivo chicken intestinal loop model. Intestinal cells that are exposed to high doses of nanoparticles showed increased iron transport due to nanoparticle disruption of the cell membrane. Chickens acutely exposed to carboxylated particles (50 nm in diameter) had a lower iron absorption than unexposed or chronically exposed birds. Chronic exposure caused remodelling of the intestinal villi, which increased the surface area available for iron absorption. The agreement between the in vitro and in vivo results suggests that our in vitro intestinal epithelium model is potentially useful for toxicology studies.

  13. Noble Metal-Iron Oxide Hybrid Nanomaterials: Emerging Applications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Xuan, Shouhu

    2016-02-01

    This account provides an overview of current research activities that focus on the synthesis and applications of nanomaterials from noble metal (e.g., Au, Ag, Pd) and iron oxide (Fe3O4) hybrids. An introduction to the synthetic strategies that have been developed for generating M-Fe3O4 nanomaterials with different novel structures is presented. Surface functionalization and bioconjugation of these hybrid nanoparticles and nanocomposites are also reviewed. The utilization of the advantageous properties of both noble metals and iron oxide for a variety of applications, such as theranostics, gene delivery, biosensing, cell sorting, bioseparation, and catalysis, is discussed and highlighted. Finally, future trends and perspectives of these sophisticated nanocomposites are outlined. The fundamental requirements underpinning the effective preparation of M-Fex Oy hybrid nanomaterials shed light on the future development of heterogeneous catalysts, nanotheranostics, nanomedicines, and other chemical technologies.

  14. System and method for producing metallic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Englund, David J.; Schlichting, Mark; Meehan, John; Crouch, Jeremiah; Wilson, Logan

    2014-07-29

    A method of production of metallic iron nodules comprises assembling a hearth furnace having a moveable hearth comprising refractory material and having a conversion zone and a fusion zone, providing a hearth material layer comprising carbonaceous material on the refractory material, providing a layer of reducible material comprising and iron bearing material arranged in discrete portions over at least a portion of the hearth material layer, delivering oxygen gas into the hearth furnace to a ratio of at least 0.8:1 ponds of oxygen to pounds of iron in the reducible material to heat the conversion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material and to heat the fusion zone to a temperature sufficient to at least partially reduce the reducible material, and heating the reducible material to form one or more metallic iron nodules and slag.

  15. Metal nanoparticle inks

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Jennifer A.; Ahn, Bok Yeop; Duoss, Eric B.

    2011-04-12

    Stabilized silver particles comprise particles comprising silver, a short-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles, and a long-chain capping agent adsorbed on the particles. The short-chain capping agent is a first anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at most 10,000, and the long-chain capping agent is a second anionic polyelectrolyte having a molecular weight (Mw) of at least 25,000. The stabilized silver particles have a solid loading of metallic silver of at least 50 wt %.

  16. Iron oxide nanoparticle enhancement of radiation cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, Courtney M.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Gladstone, David J.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2013-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been investigated as a promising means for inducing tumor cell-specific hyperthermia. Although the ability to generate and use nanoparticles that are biocompatible, tumor specific, and have the ability to produce adequate cytotoxic heat is very promising, significant preclinical and clinical development will be required for clinical efficacy. At this time it appears using IONP-induced hyperthermia as an adjunct to conventional cancer therapeutics, rather than as an independent treatment, will provide the initial IONP clinical treatment. Due to their high-Z characteristics, another option is to use intracellular IONPs to enhance radiation therapy without excitation with AMF (production of heat). To test this concept IONPs were added to cell culture media at a concentration of 0.2 mg Fe/mL and incubated with murine breast adenocarcinoma (MTG-B) cells for either 48 or 72 hours. Extracellular iron was then removed and all cells were irradiated at 4 Gy. Although samples incubated with IONPs for 48 hrs did not demonstrate enhanced post-irradiation cytotoxicity as compared to the non-IONP-containing cells, cells incubated with IONPs for 72 hours, which contained 40% more Fe than 48 hr incubated cells, showed a 25% decrease in clonogenic survival compared to their non-IONP-containing counterparts. These results suggest that a critical concentration of intracellular IONPs is necessary for enhancing radiation cytotoxicity.

  17. Magnetically Induced Continuous CO2 Hydrogenation Using Composite Iron Carbide Nanoparticles of Exceptionally High Heating Power.

    PubMed

    Bordet, Alexis; Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Fazzini, Pier-Francesco; Carrey, Julian; Soulantica, Katerina; Chaudret, Bruno

    2016-12-19

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles to convert electromagnetic energy into heat is known to be a key strategy for numerous biomedical applications but is also an approach of growing interest in the field of catalysis. The heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles is limited by the poor magnetic properties of most of them. Here we show that the new generation of iron carbide nanoparticles of controlled size and with over 80 % crystalline Fe2.2 C leads to exceptional heating properties, which are much better than the heating properties of currently available nanoparticles. Associated to catalytic metals (Ni, Ru), iron carbide nanoparticles submitted to magnetic excitation very efficiently catalyze CO2 hydrogenation in a dedicated continuous-flow reactor. Hence, we demonstrate that the concept of magnetically induced heterogeneous catalysis can be successfully applied to methanation of CO2 and represents an approach of strategic interest in the context of intermittent energy storage and CO2 recovery.

  18. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  19. Metallic nano-particles for trapping light.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yongan; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2013-02-07

    We study metallic nano-particles for light trapping by investigating the optical absorption efficiency of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin film with and without metallic nano-particles on its top. The size and shape of these nano-particles are investigated as to their roles of light trapping: scattering light to the absorption medium and converting light to surface plasmons. The optical absorption enhancement in the red light region (e.g., 650nm) due to the light trapping of the metallic nano-particles is observed when a layer of metallic nano-particle array has certain structures. The investigation of the light with incident angles shows the importance of the coupling efficiency of light to surface plasmons in the metallic nano-particle light trapping. PACS: 73.20.Mf, 42.25.s, 88.40.hj.

  20. Safety assessment of chronic oral exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamorro, Susana; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Vaquero, María Pilar; Verdoy, Dolores; Salas, Gorka; Luengo, Yurena; Brenes, Agustín; José Teran, Francisco

    2015-05-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles with engineered physical and biochemical properties are finding a rapidly increasing number of biomedical applications. However, a wide variety of safety concerns, especially those related to oral exposure, still need to be addressed for iron oxide nanoparticles in order to reach clinical practice. Here, we report on the effects of chronic oral exposure to low doses of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in growing chickens. Animal observation, weight, and diet intake reveal no adverse signs, symptoms, or mortality. No nanoparticle accumulation was observed in liver, spleen, and duodenum, with feces as the main excretion route. Liver iron level and duodenal villi morphology reflect the bioavailability of the iron released from the partial transformation of γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles in the acid gastric environment. Duodenal gene expression studies related to the absorption of iron from γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles indicate the enhancement of a ferric over ferrous pathway supporting the role of mucins. Our findings reveal that oral administration of iron oxide nanoparticles is a safe route for drug delivery at low nanoparticle doses.

  1. Environmentally friendly preparation of metal nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    The book chapter summarizes the “state of the art” in the exploitation of various environmentally-friendly synthesis approaches, reaction precursors and conditions to manufacture metal and metal oxide nanoparticles for a vast variety of purposes.

  2. Application of novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles to sentinel lymph node identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousins, Aidan; Howard, Douglas; Henning, Anna M.; Nelson, Melanie R. M.; Tilley, Richard D.; Thierry, Benjamin

    2015-12-01

    Current `gold standard' staging of breast cancer and melanoma relies on accurate in vivo identification of the sentinel lymph node. By replacing conventional tracers (dyes and radiocolloids) with magnetic nanoparticles and using a handheld magnetometer probe for in vivo identification, it is believed the accuracy of sentinel node identification in nonsuperficial cancers can be improved due to increased spatial resolution of magnetometer probes and additional anatomical information afforded by MRI road-mapping. By using novel iron core/iron oxide shell nanoparticles, the sensitivity of sentinel node mapping via MRI can be increased due to an increased magnetic saturation compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. A series of in vitro magnetic phantoms (iron core vs. iron oxide nanoparticles) were prepared to simulate magnetic particle accumulation in the sentinel lymph node. A novel handheld magnetometer probe was used to measure the relative signals of each phantom, and determine if clinical application of iron core particles can improve in vivo detection of the sentinel node compared to traditional iron oxide nanoparticles. The findings indicate that novel iron core nanoparticles above a certain size possess high magnetic saturation, but can also be produced with low coercivity and high susceptibility. While some modification to the design of handheld magnetometer probes may be required for particles with large coercivity, use of iron core particles could improve MRI and magnetometer probe detection sensitivity by up to 330 %.

  3. Characterization and Reactivity of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared with Added Cu, Pd, and Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, Chan Lan; Baer, Donald R.; Matson, Dean W.; Amonette, James E.; Penn, Ryland L.

    2010-07-01

    The presence of a secondary metal on iron particles affects redox reactivity in engineered remediation systems. However, the structural characteristics of the metal additives and mechanism responsible for changes in reactivity have not been fully elucidated. Here, we synthesized iron nanoparticles with Cu, Pd, and Ni content ranging from 0-2 mol% via a solution deposition process (SDP), hydrogen reduction process (HRP), or hydrogen reduction of ferrihydrite coprecipitated with the metal cations (HRCO). Results from solid-state characterization show that the synthetic methods produced similar iron core/magnetite shell particles but produced substantial differences in terms of the distribution of the metal additive. In SDP, the metal additives were heterogeneous distributed on the surface of the particles. The metal additives were clearly discernable in TEM images as spherical nanoparticles (2-4 nm) on the HRP and HRCO particles. In addition, we hypothesize that the metal additive is also present as solute within the iron core of the HRCO particles. Kinetic batch experiments of carbon tetrachloride (CT) degradation were performed to quantitatively compare the redox reactivity of the particles. Overall, metal additives resulted in enhanced overall pseudo-first order rate constants of CT degradation (kO,CT) compared to that of the iron nanoparticles. For the bimetallic iron nanoparticles prepared by SDP and HRP, kO,CT increased with the concentration of metal additives. The values of chloroform yield (YCF) were independent of the identity and amount of metal additives. However, both kO,CT and YCF of the HRCO iron particles were significantly greater. Results suggest that it is the distribution of the metal additives that most strongly impacts reactivity and product distribution. For example, for materials with ca. 0.9 50 mol% Ni, reactivity and YCF varied substantially (HRCO>SDP>HRP), and HRCO-NiFe resulted in the lowest final chloroform concentration because the

  4. Binary iron-carbon nanoparticle synthesis in photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with methane and acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Mikheyeva, E. Yu; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    The experimental investigation of iron-carbon nanoparticles synthesis by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl in the mixture with methane or acetylene has been carried out. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under uv radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. It was assumed that the active catalytic surface of metal nanoparticles could activate the hydrocarbon molecules up to carbon layer formation on their surface. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle sizes were measured by microphotographs treatment. The sizes of synthesized particles from methane-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture were found to be in a range of 4-16 nm with a count median diameter of 8.9 nm and standard deviation of 1.13. These particles consisted of iron oxide without any carbon content. The particles formed in photolysis of acetylene-iron-pentacarbonyl mixture had the sizes of 3-7 nm with count median diameter of 4 nm and standard deviation of 1.28 and contained the essential amount of carbon. The iron cores were surrounded with a carbon shell.

  5. Biogenic Fabrication of Iron/Iron Oxide Nanoparticles and Their Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; ur Rahman, Aziz; Tajuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-11-01

    Enshrined in this review are the biogenic fabrication and applications of coated and uncoated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles. Depending on their magnetic properties, they have been used in the treatment of cancer, drug delivery system, MRI, and catalysis and removal of pesticides from potable water. The polymer-coated iron and iron oxide nanoparticles are made biocompatible, and their slow release makes them more effective and lasting. Their cytotoxicity against microbes under aerobic/anaerobic conditions has also been discussed. The magnetic moment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles changes with their interaction with biomolecules as a consequence of which their size decreases. Their biological efficacy has been found to be dependent on the shape, size, and concentration of these nanoparticles.

  6. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Mendoza, Daniel; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  7. Effect of iron oxide and gold nanoparticles on bacterial growth leading towards biological application

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nanoparticle-metal oxide and gold represents a new class of important materials that are increasingly being developed for use in research and health related activities. The biological system being extremely critical requires the fundamental understanding on the influence of inorganic nanoparticles on cellular growth and functions. Our study was aimed to find out the effect of iron oxide (Fe3O4), gold (Au) nanoparticles on cellular growth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and also try to channelize the obtained result by functionalizing the Au nanoparticle for further biological applications. Result Fe3O4 and Au nanoparticles were prepared and characterized using Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). Preliminary growth analysis data suggest that the nanoparticles of iron oxide have an inhibitory effect on E. coli in a concentration dependant manner, whereas the gold nanoparticle directly showed no such activity. However the phase contrast microscopic study clearly demonstrated that the effect of both Fe3O4 and Au nanoparticle extended up to the level of cell division which was evident as the abrupt increase in bacterial cell length. The incorporation of gold nanoparticle by bacterial cell was also observed during microscopic analysis based on which glutathione functionalized gold nanoparticle was prepared and used as a vector for plasmid DNA transport within bacterial cell. Conclusion Altogether the study suggests that there is metal nanoparticle-bacteria interaction at the cellular level that can be utilized for beneficial biological application but significantly it also posses potential to produce ecotoxicity, challenging the ecofriendly nature of nanoparticles. PMID:21859494

  8. Effects of iron chelators, iron salts, and iron oxide nanoparticles on the proliferation and the iron content of oligodendroglial OLN-93 cells.

    PubMed

    Hohnholt, Michaela; Geppert, Mark; Dringen, Ralf

    2010-08-01

    The oligodendroglial cell line OLN-93 was used as model system to investigate the consequences of iron deprivation or iron excess on cell proliferation. Presence of ferric or ferrous iron chelators inhibited the proliferation of OLN-93 cells in a time and concentration dependent manner, while the application of a molar excess of ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) prevented the inhibition of proliferation by the chelator deferoxamine. Proliferation of OLN-93 cells was not affected by incubation with 300 microM iron that was applied in the form of FAC, FeCl(2), ferrous ammonium sulfate or iron oxide nanoparticles, although the cells efficiently accumulated iron during exposure to each of these iron sources. The highest specific iron content was observed for cells that were exposed to the nanoparticles. These data demonstrate that the proliferation of OLN-93 cells depends strongly on the availability of iron and that these cells efficiently accumulate iron from various extracellular iron sources.

  9. Metal ion binding to iron oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponthieu, M.; Juillot, F.; Hiemstra, T.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Benedetti, M. F.

    2006-06-01

    The biogeochemistry of trace elements (TE) is largely dependent upon their interaction with heterogeneous ligands including metal oxides and hydrous oxides of iron. The modeling of TE interactions with iron oxides has been pursued using a variety of chemical models. The objective of this work is to show that it is possible to model the adsorption of protons and TE on a crystallized oxide (i.e., goethite) and on an amorphous oxide (HFO) in an identical way. Here, we use the CD-MUSIC approach in combination with valuable and reliable surface spectroscopy information about the nature of surface complexes of the TE. The other objective of this work is to obtain generic parameters to describe the binding of the following elements (Cd, Co, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) onto both iron oxides for the CD-MUSIC approach. The results show that a consistent description of proton and metal ion binding is possible for goethite and HFO with the same set of model parameters. In general a good prediction of almost all the collected experimental data sets corresponding to metal ion binding to HFO is obtained. Moreover, dominant surface species are in agreement with the recently published surface complexes derived from X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) data. Until more detailed information on the structure of the two iron oxides is available, the present option seems a reasonable approximation and can be used to describe complex geochemical systems. To improve our understanding and modeling of multi-component systems we need more data obtained at much lower metal ion to iron oxide ratios in order to be able to account eventually for sites that are not always characterized in spectroscopic studies.

  10. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  11. Magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles prepared by exploding wire technique.

    PubMed

    Alqudami, Abdullah; Annapoorni, S; Lamba, Subhalakshmi; Kothari, P C; Kotnala, R K

    2007-06-01

    Nanoparticles of iron were prepared in distilled water using very thin iron wires and sheets, by the electro-exploding wire technique. Transmission electron microscopy reveals the size of the nanoparticles to be in the range 10 to 50 nm. However, particles of different sizes can be segregated by using ultrahigh centrifuge. X-ray diffraction studies confirm the presence of the cubic phase of iron. These iron nanoparticles were found to exhibit fluorescence in the visible region in contrast to the normal bulk material. The room temperature hysteresis measurements upto a field of 1.0 tesla were performed on a suspension of iron particles in the solution as well as in the powders obtained by filtration. The hysteresis loops indicate that the particles are superparamagnetic in nature. The saturation magnetizations was approximately 60 emu/gm. As these iron particles are very sensitive to oxygen a coating of non-magnetic iron oxide tends to form around the particles giving it a core-shell structure. The core particle size is estimated theoretically from the magnetization measurements. Suspensions of iron nanoparticles in water have been proposed to be used as an effective decontaminant for ground water.

  12. Uptake And Intracellular Distribution Of Functionalized Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panariti, A.; Lettiero, B.; Morjan, I.; Alexandreascu, R.; Wang, D.; Bucci, C.; Miserocchi, G.; Rivolta, I.

    2010-10-01

    Iron oxide Nanoparticles represents promising nanocarrier for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), targeted drug and gene delivery. In our study we investigated the interaction between lung alveolar epithelial cells and iron oxide NPs coated with L-Dihydroxyphenylalanina (L-Dopa)-TRITC. Our data suggest that particles crossed the plasma membrane with an energy-dependent process.

  13. Metal-metal bonding using silver/copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Maeda, T.; Yasuda, Y.; Morita, T.

    2016-08-01

    A method for producing nanoparticles composed of silver and copper and a metal-metal bonding technique using the silver/copper nanoparticles are proposed. The method consists of three steps. First, copper oxide nanoparticles are produced by mixing Cu(NO3)2 aqueous solution and NaOH aqueous solution. Second, copper metal nanoparticles are fabricated by reducing the copper oxide nanoparticles with hydrazine in the presence of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). Third, silver/copper nanoparticles are synthesized by reducing Ag+ ions with hydrazine in the presence of the copper metal nanoparticles. Initial concentrations in the final silver/copper particle colloid, composed of 0.0075 M Cu2+, 0.0025 M Ag+, 1.0 g/L PVP, and 0.6 M hydrazine, produced silver/copper nanoparticles with an average size of 49 nm and a crystal size of 16.8 nm. Discs of copper metal were successfully bonded by the silver/copper nanoparticles under annealing at 400 °C and pressurizing at 1.2 MPa for 5 min in not only hydrogen gas but also nitrogen gas. The shear force required to separate the bonded discs was 22.3 MPa for the hydrogen gas annealing and 14.9 MPa for the nitrogen gas annealing (namely, 66.8 % of that for hydrogen gas annealing).

  14. Optical Spectroscopy of Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-07

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Optical studies of semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs), metal nanoparticles (MNPs), and their hybrid nanomaterials are...Distribution Unlimited Final Report: Optical Spectroscopy of Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles The views, opinions and/or findings...Semiconductor Quantum Dots and Metal Nanoparticles Report Title Optical studies of semiconductor quantum dots (SQDs), metal nanoparticles (MNPs), and their

  15. Assembly of metals and nanoparticles into novel nanocomposite superstructures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiaquan; Chen, Lianyi; Choi, Hongseok; Konish, Hiromi; Li, Xiaochun

    2013-01-01

    Controlled assembly of nanoscale objects into superstructures is of tremendous interests. Many approaches have been developed to fabricate organic-nanoparticle superstructures. However, effective fabrication of inorganic-nanoparticle superstructures (such as nanoparticles linked by metals) remains a difficult challenge. Here we show a novel, general method to assemble metals and nanoparticles rationally into nanocomposite superstructures. Novel metal-nanoparticle superstructures are achieved by self-assembly of liquid metals and nanoparticles in immiscible liquids driven by reduction of free energy. Superstructures with various architectures, such as metal-core/nanoparticle-shell, nanocomposite-core/nanoparticle-shell, network of metal-linked core/shell nanostructures, and network of metal-linked nanoparticles, were successfully fabricated by simply tuning the volume ratio between nanoparticles and liquid metals. Our approach provides a simple, general way for fabrication of numerous metal-nanoparticle superstructures and enables a rational design of these novel superstructures with desired architectures for exciting applications.

  16. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the 'jammed' nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems 'chemoelectronic'. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also 'green', in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  17. Chemoelectronic circuits based on metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yong; Warren, Scott C.; Fuller, Patrick; Grzybowski, Bartosz A.

    2016-07-01

    To develop electronic devices with novel functionalities and applications, various non-silicon-based materials are currently being explored. Nanoparticles have unique characteristics due to their small size, which can impart functions that are distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. The use of semiconductor nanoparticles has already led to improvements in the efficiency of solar cells, the processability of transistors and the sensitivity of photodetectors, and the optical and catalytic properties of metal nanoparticles have led to similar advances in plasmonics and energy conversion. However, metals screen electric fields and this has, so far, prevented their use in the design of all-metal nanoparticle circuitry. Here, we show that simple electronic circuits can be made exclusively from metal nanoparticles functionalized with charged organic ligands. In these materials, electronic currents are controlled by the ionic gradients of mobile counterions surrounding the ‘jammed’ nanoparticles. The nanoparticle-based electronic elements of the circuitry can be interfaced with metal nanoparticles capable of sensing various environmental changes (humidity, gas, the presence of various cations), creating electronic devices in which metal nanoparticles sense, process and ultimately report chemical signals. Because the constituent nanoparticles combine electronic and chemical sensing functions, we term these systems ‘chemoelectronic’. The circuits have switching times comparable to those of polymer electronics, selectively transduce parts-per-trillion chemical changes into electrical signals, perform logic operations, consume little power (on the scale of microwatts), and are mechanically flexible. They are also ‘green’, in the sense that they comprise non-toxic nanoparticles cast at room temperature from alcohol solutions.

  18. Acid and organic aerosol coatings on magnetic nanoparticles increase iron concentrations in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ghio, Andrew J; Dailey, Lisa A; Richards, Judy H; Jang, Myoseon

    2009-07-01

    Numerous industrial applications for man-made nanoparticles have been proposed. Interactions of nanoparticles with agents in the atmosphere may impact human health. We tested the postulate that in vitro exposures of respiratory epithelial cells to airborne magnetic nanoparticles (MNP; Fe(3)O(4)) with and without a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and an inorganic acid could affect iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and interleukin (IL)-8 release. Cell iron concentrations were increased after exposures to MNP and values were further elevated with co-exposures to either SOA or inorganic acid. Increased expression of ferritin and elevated levels of RNA for DMT1, proteins for iron storage and transport respectively, followed MNP exposures, but values were significant for only those with co-exposures to inorganic acid and organic aerosols. Cell iron concentration corresponded to a measure of oxidative stress in the airway epithelial cells; MNP with co-exposures to SOA and inorganic acid increased both available metal and indices of oxidant generation. Finally, the release of a proinflammatory cytokine (i.e. IL-8) by the exposed cells similarly increased with cell iron concentration. We conclude that MNP can interact with a SOA and an inorganic acid to present metal in a catalytically reactive state to cultured respiratory cells. This produces an oxidative stress to affect a release of IL-8.

  19. Thiol-Ene Induced Diphosphonic Acid Functionalization of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, Ryan D.; Warner, Cynthia L.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Addleman, Raymond S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-07-20

    Multi-functional organic molecules represent an interesting challenge for nanoparticle functionalization due to the potential for undesirable interactions between the substrate material and the variable functionalities, making it difficult to control the final orientation of the ligand. In the present study, UV-induced thiol-ene click chemistry has been utilized as a means of directed functionalization of bifunctional ligands on an iron oxide nanoparticle surface. Allyl diphosphonic acid ligand was covalently deposited on the surface of thiol-presenting iron oxide nanoparticles via the formation of a UV-induced thioether. This method of thiol-ene click chemistry offers a set of reaction conditions capable of controlling the ligand deposition and circumventing the natural affinity exhibited by the phosphonic acid moiety for the iron oxide surface. These claims are supported via a multimodal characterization platform which includes thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and metal contact analysis and are consistent with a properly oriented, highly active ligand on the nanoparticle surface. These experiments suggest thiol-ene click chemistry as both a practical and generally applicable strategy for the directed deposition of multi-functional ligands on metal oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  20. Synthesis of binary iron-carbon nanoparticles by UV laser photolysis of Fe(CO)5 with various hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Musikhin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this study the laser photolysis of the mixtures containing vapors of various hydrocarbons and iron pentacarbonyl was implemented to nanoparticle formation. The radiation source used for photo-dissociation of precursors was a pulsed Nd:Yag laser operated at a wavelength of 266 nm. Under UV radiation the molecules of Fe(CO)5 decomposed, forming atomic iron vapor and unsaturated carbonyls at well-known and readily controllable parameters. The subsequent condensation of supersaturated metal vapor resulted in small iron clusters and nanoparticles formation. The growth process of the nanoparticles was observed by a method of laser light extinction. Laser induced incandescence technique was applied for particle sizing during the process of their formation. Additionally nanoparticle samples were investigated by a transmission electron microscope. The particle size distribution was measured by statistical treatment of microphotographs. The elemental analysis by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction pattern gave the composition and structure of nanoparticles. The core-shell iron-carbon nanoparticles were synthesized by joint laser photolysis of iron pentacarbonyl with benzene and acetylene. The photolysis of the mixtures of toluene, butanol and methane with iron pentacarbonyl revealed in a pure iron particles formation which fast oxidized in air when were extracted out of the reactor.

  1. Different effect of hydrogelation on antifouling and circulation properties of dextran-iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Karmali, Priya Prakash; Chao, Ying; Park, Ji-Ho; Sailor, Michael J; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Esener, Sadik C; Simberg, Dmitri

    2012-03-05

    Premature recognition and clearance of nanoparticulate imaging and therapeutic agents by macrophages in the tissues can dramatically reduce both the nanoparticle half-life and delivery to the diseased tissue. Grafting nanoparticles with hydrogels prevents nanoparticulate recognition by liver and spleen macrophages and greatly prolongs circulation times in vivo. Understanding the mechanisms by which hydrogels achieve this "stealth" effect has implications for the design of long-circulating nanoparticles. Thus, the role of plasma protein absorption in the hydrogel effect is not yet understood. Short-circulating dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles could be converted into stealth hydrogel nanoparticles by cross-linking with 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane. We show that hydrogelation did not affect the size, shape and zeta potential, but completely prevented the recognition and clearance by liver macrophages in vivo. Hydrogelation decreased the number of hydroxyl groups on the nanoparticle surface and reduced the binding of the anti-dextran antibody. At the same time, hydrogelation did not reduce the absorption of cationic proteins on the nanoparticle surface. Specifically, there was no effect on the binding of kininogen, histidine-rich glycoprotein, and protamine sulfate to the anionic nanoparticle surface. In addition, hydrogelation did not prevent activation of plasma kallikrein on the metal oxide surface. These data suggest that (a) a stealth hydrogel coating does not mask charge interactions with iron oxide surface and (b) the total blockade of plasma protein absorption is not required for maintaining iron oxide nanoparticles' long-circulating stealth properties. These data illustrate a novel, clinically promising property of long-circulating stealth nanoparticles.

  2. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bull, Elizabeth; Madani, Seyed Yazdan; Sheth, Roosey; Seifalian, Amelia; Green, Mark; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.

  3. Impact of metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles on wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Chiqian; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Metallic and metal oxide nanomaterials have been increasingly used in consumer products (e.g. sunscreen, socks), the medical and electronic industries, and environmental remediation. Many of them ultimately enter wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) or landfills. This review paper discusses the fate and potential effects of four types of nanoparticles, namely, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), nano ZnO, nano TiO2, and nano zero valent iron (NZVI), on waste/wastewater treatment and anaerobic digestion. The stabilities and chemical properties of these nanoparticles (NPs) result in significant differences in antimicrobial activities. Analysis of published data of metallic and metal oxide NPs suggests that oxygen is often a prerequisite for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for AgNPs and NZVI, while illumination is necessary for ROS generation for nano TiO2 and nano ZnO. Furthermore, such nanoparticles are capable of being oxidized or dissolved in water and can release metal ions, leading to metal toxicity. Therefore, AgNPs and nano TiO2 are chemically stable NPs that have no adverse effects on microbes under anaerobic conditions. Although the toxicity of nanomaterials has been studied intensively under aerobic conditions, more research is needed to address their fate in anaerobic waste/wastewater treatment systems and their long-term effects on the environment.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of the metals and metal oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dizaj, Solmaz Maleki; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Barzegar-Jalali, Mohammad; Zarrintan, Mohammad Hossein; Adibkia, Khosro

    2014-11-01

    The ever increasing resistance of pathogens towards antibiotics has caused serious health problems in the recent years. It has been shown that by combining modern technologies such as nanotechnology and material science with intrinsic antimicrobial activity of the metals, novel applications for these substances could be identified. According to the reports, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles represent a group of materials which were investigated in respect to their antimicrobial effects. In the present review, we focused on the recent research works concerning antimicrobial activity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles together with their mechanism of action. Reviewed literature indicated that the particle size was the essential parameter which determined the antimicrobial effectiveness of the metal nanoparticles. Combination therapy with the metal nanoparticles might be one of the possible strategies to overcome the current bacterial resistance to the antibacterial agents. However, further studies should be performed to minimize the toxicity of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to apply as proper alternatives for antibiotics and disinfectants especially in biomedical applications.

  5. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by atmospheric microplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Kaur, Parvin; Tan, Augustine Tuck Lee; Singh, Rajveer; Lee, Paul Choon Keat; Springham, Stuart Victor; Ramanujan, Raju V.; Rawat, R. S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles using the atmospheric microplasma (AMP). The properties of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized using AMP are compared with particles (i) formed in as-prepared solution and (ii) prepared using thermal decomposition method. Iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by all the 3 treatment methods exhibit quite soft ferromagnetic properties with coercivities less than 10 G. The AMP synthesis technique was found to be more efficient and better than thermal decomposition method due to ultra-shorter experiment time (around 2.5 min) as compared to 90 min required for thermal decomposition method. Moreover, AMP synthesized nanoparticles are better isolated and of smaller size than thermal decomposition ones. The effect of plasma discharge timings on synthesized nanoparticles has also been studied in this work. Coercivity of synthesized nanoparticles decreases with the increasing plasma discharge timings from 3 to 10 min. The nanoparticles synthesized using plasma discharge timing of 10 min exhibit the smallest coercivity of around 3 G. This suggests a high possibility of achieving super-paramagnetic nanoparticles by optimizing the plasma discharge timings of AMP.

  6. Bulk photoemission from metal films and nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ikhsanov, R Sh; Babicheva, V E; Protsenko, I E; Uskov, A V; Guzhva, M E

    2015-01-31

    Internal emission of photoelectrons from metal films and nanoparticles (nanowires and nanospheres) into a semiconductor matrix is studied theoretically by taking into account the jump of the effective electron mass at the metal – semiconductor interface and the cooling effect of hot electrons due to electron – electron collisions in the metal. The internal quantum efficiency of photoemission for the film and nanoparticles of two types (nanospheres and nanowires) is calculated. It is shown that the reduction of the effective mass of the electron during its transition from metal to semiconductor may lead to a significant (orders of magnitude and higher) decrease in the internal quantum efficiency of bulk photoemission. (nanostructures)

  7. Design strategies of hybrid metallic nanoparticles for theragnostic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, J.; Allard-Vannier, E.; Hervé-Aubert, K.; Soucé, M.; Chourpa, I.

    2013-11-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) such as iron oxide and gold nanoparticles are interesting platforms to build theragnostic nanocarriers which combine both therapeutic and diagnostic functions within a single nanostructure. Nevertheless, their surface must be functionalized to be suitable for in vivo applications. Surface functionalization also provides binding sites for targeting ligands, and for drug loading. This review focuses on the materials and surface chemistry used to build hybrid nanocarriers that are inorganic cores functionalized with organic materials. The surface state of the MNPs largely depends on their synthesis routes, and dictates the strategies used for functionalization. Two main strategies can be found in the literature: the design of core-shell nanosystems, or embedding nanoparticles in organic materials. Emerging tendencies such as the use of clusters or alternative coating materials are also described. To present both hydrophilic and lipophilic nanosystems, we chose the doxorubicin anticancer agent as an example, as the molecule presents an affinity for both types of materials.

  8. Structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles fabricated through a reduction reaction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei Syuan; Lin, Hong Ming; Brzozka, Katarzyna; Lewinska, Sabina; Nedelko, Natalia; Slawska-Waniewska, Anna; Borysiuk, Jolanta; Wasik, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Summary The main goal of this work is to study the structural and magnetic properties of iron nanowires and iron nanoparticles, which have been fabricated in almost the same processes. The only difference in the synthesis is an application of an external magnetic field in order to form the iron nanowires. Both nanomaterials have been examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffractometry and Mössbauer spectrometry to determine their structures. Structural investigations confirm that obtained iron nanowires as well as nanoparticles reveal core–shell structures and they are composed of crystalline iron cores that are covered by amorphous or highly defected phases of iron and iron oxides. Magnetic properties have been measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The obtained values of coercivity, remanent magnetization, saturation magnetization as well as Curie temperature differ for both studied nanostructures. Higher values of magnetizations are observed for iron nanowires. At the same time, coercivity and Curie temperature are higher for iron nanoparticles. PMID:26425415

  9. Applications of metal nanoparticles in environmental cleanup

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iron nanoparticles (INPs) are one of the fastest-developing fields. INPs have a number of key physicochemical properties, such as high surface area, reactivity, optical and magnetic properties, and oxidation and reduction capacities, that make them attractive for water purificati...

  10. Stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Anmin; Lu, Rongwen; Veser, Götz

    2010-11-07

    Metal nanoparticles hold great promise for heterogeneous catalysis due to their high dispersion, large concentration of highly undercoordinated surface sites, and the presence of quantum confinement effects, which can drastically alter their reactivity. However, the poor thermal stability of nano-sized particles limits their use to low temperature conditions and constitutes one of the key hurdles towards industrial application. The present perspective paper briefly reviews the mechanisms underlying nanoparticle sintering, and then gives an overview of emerging approaches towards stabilizing metal nanoparticles for heterogeneous catalysis. We conclude by highlighting the current needs for further developments in the field.

  11. Magnesium and iron nanoparticles production using microorganisms and various salts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaul, R. K.; Kumar, P.; Burman, U.; Joshi, P.; Agrawal, A.; Raliya, R.; Tarafdar, J. C.

    2012-09-01

    Response of five fungi and two bacteria to different salts of magnesium and iron for production of nanoparticles was studied. Pochonia chlamydosporium, and Aspergillus fumigatus were exposed to three salts of magnesium while Curvularia lunata, Chaetomium globosum, A. fumigatus, A. wentii and the bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis and Bacillus coagulans were exposed to two salts of iron for nanoparticle production. The results revealed that P. chlamydosporium induces development of extracellular nanoparticles in MgCl2 solution while A. fumigatus produces also intracellular nanoparticles when exposed to MgSO4 solution. C. globosum was found as the most effective in producing nanoparticles when exposed to Fe2O3 solution. The FTIR analysis of the nanoparticles obtained from Fe2O3 solution showed the peaks similar to iron (Fe). In general, the species of the tested microbes were selective to different chemicals in their response for synthesis of nanoparticles. Further studies on their characterization and improving the efficiency of promising species of fungi need to be undertaken before tapping their potential as nanonutrients for plants.

  12. Photopolymerization of conductive polymeric metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xichen; Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Neckers, Douglas C

    2009-11-01

    5-Mercapto-2,2'-bithiophene functionalized metal nanoparticles BTSMs [M: copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and gold (Au)] of different diameters (2-8 nm) were synthesized. Conductive polymeric metal nanoparticles were formed from BTSM by UV irradiation. The photopolymerization mechanism was investigated using transient absorption measurements. Intramolecular electron transfer from the ligand to the metal nano-core was confirmed. Nanoparticle size, as well as plasmon electronic interactions, are important factors. The smaller the nanoparticle and the stronger the electronic interactions, the faster the electron transfer is. The three-dimensional structure of the polymerized BTSM was identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The conductivity of polymerized BTSM measured in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) film is higher than that of the nonpolymerized BTSM.

  13. Laser trapping of colloidal metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lehmuskero, Anni; Johansson, Peter; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Tong, Lianming; Käll, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Optical trapping using focused laser beams (laser tweezers) has been proven to be extremely useful for contactless manipulation of a variety of small objects, including biological cells, organelles within cells, and a wide range of other dielectric micro- and nano-objects. Colloidal metal nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in the field of optical trapping because of their unique interactions with electromagnetic radiation, caused by surface plasmon resonance effects, enabling a large number of nano-optical applications of high current interest. Here we try to give a comprehensive overview of the field of laser trapping and manipulation of metal nanoparticles based on results reported in the recent literature. We also discuss and describe the fundamentals of optical forces in the context of plasmonic nanoparticles, including effects of polarization, optical angular momentum, and laser heating effects, as well as the various techniques that have been used to trap and manipulate metal nanoparticles. We conclude by suggesting possible directions for future research.

  14. Biomolecule-coated metal nanoparticles on titanium.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Stephen L; Chatt, Amares; Zhang, Peng

    2012-02-07

    Immobilizations of nanoparticles and biomolecules on biocompatible substrates such as titanium are two promising approaches to bringing new functionalities to Ti-based biomaterials. Herein, we used a variety of X-ray spectroscopic techniques to study and better understand metal-thiolate interactions in biofunctionalized metal nanoparticle systems supported on Ti substrates. Using a facile one-step procedure, a series of Au nanoparticle samples with varied biomolecule coatings ((2-mercatopropionyl)glycine (MPG) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and biomolecule concentrations are prepared. Ag and Pd systems are also studied to observe change with varying metal composition. The structure and properties of these biomolecule-coated nanoparticles are investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and element-specific X-ray techniques, including extended X-ray absorption fine structure (Au L(3)-edge), X-ray absorption near-edge structure (Au L(3), Ag L(3), Pd L(3), and S K-edge), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (Au 4f, Ag 3d, Pd 3d, and S 2p core level). It was found that, by comparison of SEM and X-ray spectroscopy results, the coating of metal nanoparticles with varying model biomolecule systems can have a significant effect on both surface coverage and organization. This work offers a facile chemical method for bio- and nanofunctionalization of Ti substrates as well as provides a physical picture of the structure and bonding of biocoated metal nanoparticles, which may lead to useful applications in orthopedics and biomedicine.

  15. Exchange Bias Effects in Iron Oxide-Based Nanoparticle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Manh-Huong; Alonso, Javier; Khurshid, Hafsa; Lampen-Kelley, Paula; Chandra, Sayan; Stojak Repa, Kristen; Nemati, Zohreh; Das, Raja; Iglesias, Óscar; Srikanth, Hariharan

    2016-01-01

    The exploration of exchange bias (EB) on the nanoscale provides a novel approach to improving the anisotropic properties of magnetic nanoparticles for prospective applications in nanospintronics and nanomedicine. However, the physical origin of EB is not fully understood. Recent advances in chemical synthesis provide a unique opportunity to explore EB in a variety of iron oxide-based nanostructures ranging from core/shell to hollow and hybrid composite nanoparticles. Experimental and atomistic Monte Carlo studies have shed light on the roles of interface and surface spins in these nanosystems. This review paper aims to provide a thorough understanding of the EB and related phenomena in iron oxide-based nanoparticle systems, knowledge of which is essential to tune the anisotropic magnetic properties of exchange-coupled nanoparticle systems for potential applications. PMID:28335349

  16. Multifunctional superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: promising tools in cancer theranostics.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Poornima Budime; Ulrih, Nataša Poklar

    2013-08-09

    Iron-oxide nanoparticles of small dimensions that have superparamagnetic properties show immense potential to revolutionize the future of cancer theranostics, the combinatorial diagnosis and therapeutic approach towards cancer. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have unique magnetic properties, due to which they show excellent tumor-targeting efficiency, and this paves the way for effective personalized cancer treatment. The aim of this review is to focus on the ability of SPIONs to perform multiple roles in the field of cancer biology, such as in diagnosis, monitoring, targeting and therapy. Also, other topics are discussed, including the synthesis of SPIONs, the challenges and recent advances.

  17. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia: focus on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Sophie; Dutz, Silvio; Häfeli, Urs O; Mahmoudi, Morteza

    2011-08-10

    Due to their unique magnetic properties, excellent biocompatibility as well as multi-purpose biomedical potential (e.g., applications in cancer therapy and general drug delivery), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are attracting increasing attention in both pharmaceutical and industrial communities. The precise control of the physiochemical properties of these magnetic systems is crucial for hyperthermia applications, as the induced heat is highly dependent on these properties. In this review, the limitations and recent advances in the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for hyperthermia are presented.

  18. Metal-insulator-metal capacitor using electrosprayed nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Véliz, Bremnen; Bermejo, Sandra; Coll, Arnau; Castañer, Luis

    2014-07-01

    An electrospray technique has been used to deposit SiO2 nanoparticles as insulator layer of a metal-insulator-metal device. Impedance spectroscopy measurements show that a 4.4 factor increase in capacitance is achieved compared to a continuous dielectric layer of the same permittivity and dimensions.

  19. Optimization Review, Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site, Portsmouth, Virginia

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Peck Iron and Metal Superfund Site is a 33-acre property located in Norfolk County, Portsmouth, Virginia. PIM (Figure 1) is the site of a former scrap metal storage and recycling facility that began operation in the 1940s.

  20. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1999-03-23

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag. 4 figs.

  1. Process for removing technetium from iron and other metals

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    1999-01-01

    A process for removing technetium from iron and other metals comprises the steps of converting the molten, alloyed technetium to a sulfide dissolved in manganese sulfide, and removing the sulfide from the molten metal as a slag.

  2. Superconductivity in alkali metal intercalated iron selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzton-Maziopa, A.; Svitlyk, V.; Pomjakushina, E.; Puzniak, R.; Conder, K.

    2016-07-01

    Alkali metal intercalated iron selenide superconductors A x Fe2-y Se2 (where A  =  K, Rb, Cs, Tl/K, and Tl/Rb) are characterized by several unique properties, which were not revealed in other superconducting materials. The compounds crystallize in overall simple layered structure with FeSe layers intercalated with alkali metal. The structure turned out to be pretty complex as the existing Fe-vacancies order below ~550 K, which further leads to an antiferromagnetic ordering with Néel temperature fairly above room temperature. At even lower temperatures a phase separation is observed. While one of these phases stays magnetic down to the lowest temperatures the second is becoming superconducting below ~30 K. All these effects give rise to complex relationships between the structure, magnetism and superconductivity. In particular the iron vacancy ordering, linked with a long-range magnetic order and a mesoscopic phase separation, is assumed to be an intrinsic property of the system. Since the discovery of superconductivity in those compounds in 2010 they were investigated very extensively. Results of the studies conducted using a variety of experimental techniques and performed during the last five years were published in hundreds of reports. The present paper reviews scientific work concerning methods of synthesis and crystal growth, structural and superconducting properties as well as pressure investigations.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of iron based nanoparticles for novel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurshid, Hafsa

    The work in this thesis has been focused on the fabrication and characterization of iron based nanoparticles with controlled size and morphology with the aim: (i) to investigate their properties for potential applications in MICR toners and biomedical field and (ii) to study finite size effects on the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. For the biomedical applications, core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide and hollow shell nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of iron organometallic compounds [Fe(CO)5] at high temperature. Core/shell structured iron/iron-oxide nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. Particle size and composition was controlled by varying the reaction parameters during synthesis. The as-made particles are hydrophobic and not dispersible in water. Water dispersibility was achieved by ligand exchange a with double hydrophilic diblock copolymer. Relaxometery measurements of the transverse relaxation time T2 of the nanoparticles solution at 3 Tesla confirm that the core/shell nanoparticles are an excellent MRI contrast agent using T2 weighted imaging sequences. In comparison to conventionally used iron oxide nanoparticles, iron/iron-oxide core/shell nanoparticles offer four times stronger T2 shortening effect at comparable core size due to their higher magnetization. The magnetic properties were studied as a function of particle size, composition and morphology. Hollow nanostructures are composed of randomly oriented grains arranged together to make a shell layer and make an interesting class of materials. The hollow morphology can be used as an extra degree of freedom to control the magnetic properties. Owing to their hollow morphology, they can be used for the targeted drug delivery applications by filling the drug inside their cavity. For the magnetic toners applications, particles were synthesized by chemically reducing iron salt using sodium borohydride and then coated with polyethylene

  4. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications.

  5. Biobased green method to synthesise palladium and iron nanoparticles using Terminalia chebula aqueous extract.

    PubMed

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Siva Kumar, Koppala; Sreedhara Reddy, Pamanji; Sreedhar, Bojja

    2013-02-01

    There are many methods to synthesise metal and metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs) using different reducing agents which are hazardous in nature. Although some researchers have used biobased materials for synthesis of these NPs, further research is needed in this area. To explore the scope of bio-extract for the synthesis of transition metal NPs, the present paper synthesises metal NPs replacing hazardous traditional reducing agents. This paper reports the synthesis of palladium and iron NPs, using aqueous extract of Terminalia chebula fruit. Reduction potential of aqueous extract of polyphenolic rich T. chebula was 0.63V vs. SCE by cyclic voltammetry study which makes it a good green reducing agent. This helps to reduce palladium and iron salts to palladium and iron NPs respectively. Powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analyses revealed that amorphous iron NPs were within the size less than 80 nm and cubic palladium NPs were within the size less than 100 nm. The synthesised nanomaterials were remarkably stable for a long period and synthesis of stable metal NPs will need to be explored using biobased materials as reducing agents.

  6. Advanced Organic Ligands for Protecting Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jonathan Ka-Wing

    Organic monolayer protected metal nanoparticles have been utilized in many different fields such as catalysis, drug delivery, and sensor chemistry. However, these nanomaterials are prone to increase in size consequently losing its function at the nanoscale. The stability these nanoparticles have been a great interest of research. This thesis focuses on the synthesis of a novel cross-linkable ligand for the protection of metal nanoparticles. Chapter 1 reviews key concepts of nanoparticles, its usefulness in applications, some of the stabilizing strategies employed, and the scope of the thesis project. Chapter 2 describes the synthetic attempts and optimization of the novel cross-linkable ligand. In addition, its characterization data is also included. Section 2.8 also highlights another fully synthesized novel hydrophobic ligand. Chapter 3 contains the summary of the work and closing remarks. Future works is also included to describe the prospects of the synthesis of the novel ligand. Chapter 4 entails the experimental data and supplementary information.

  7. Intratumoral iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and radiation cancer treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. J.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Gibson, U. J.; Zeng, Q.; Pierce, Z. E.; Savellano, M.; Tate, J. A.; Ogden, J. A.; Baker, I.; Ivkov, R.; Foreman, A. R.

    2007-02-01

    The potential synergism and benefit of combined hyperthermia and radiation for cancer treatment is well established, but has yet to be optimized clinically. Specifically, the delivery of heat via external arrays /applicators or interstitial antennas has not demonstrated the spatial precision or specificity necessary to achieve appropriate a highly positive therapeutic ratio. Recently, antibody directed and possibly even non-antibody directed iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia has shown significant promise as a tumor treatment modality. Our studies are designed to determine the effects (safety and efficacy) of iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and external beam radiation in a murine breast cancer model. Methods: MTG-B murine breast cancer cells (1 x 106) were implanted subcutaneous in 7 week-old female C3H/HeJ mice and grown to a treatment size of 150 mm3 +/- 50 mm3. Tumors were then injected locally with iron oxide nanoparticles and heated via an alternating magnetic field (AMF) generator operated at approximately 160 kHz and 400 - 550 Oe. Tumor growth was monitored daily using standard 3-D caliper measurement technique and formula. specific Mouse tumors were heated using a cooled, 36 mm diameter square copper tube induction coil which provided optimal heating in a 1 cm wide region in the center of the coil. Double dextran coated 80 nm iron oxide nanoparticles (Triton Biosystems) were used in all studies. Intra-tumor, peri-tumor and rectal (core body) temperatures were continually measured throughout the treatment period. Results: Preliminary in vivo nanoparticle-AMF hyperthermia (167 KHz and 400 or 550 Oe) studies demonstrated dose responsive cytotoxicity which enhanced the effects of external beam radiation. AMF associated eddy currents resulted in nonspecific temperature increases in exposed tissues which did not contain nanoparticles, however these effects were minor and not injurious to the mice. These studies also suggest that iron oxide nanoparticle

  8. Formation and characterization of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction of oolitic iron ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong-sheng; Han, Yue-xin; Li, Yan-feng; Li, Yan-jun

    2017-02-01

    To reveal the formation and characteristics of metallic iron grains in coal-based reduction, oolitic iron ore was isothermally reduced in various reduction times at various reduction temperatures. The microstructure and size of the metallic iron phase were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and a Bgrimm process mineralogy analyzer. In the results, the reduced Fe separates from the ore and forms metallic iron protuberances, and then the subsequent reduced Fe diffuses to the protuberances and grows into metallic iron grains. Most of the metallic iron grains exist in the quasi-spherical shape and inlaid in the slag matrix. The cumulative frequency of metallic iron grain size is markedly influenced by both reduction time and temperature. With increasing reduction temperature and time, the grain size of metallic iron obviously increases. According to the classical grain growth equation, the growth kinetic parameters, i.e., time exponent, growth activation energy, and pre-exponential constant, are estimated to be 1.3759 ± 0.0374, 103.18 kJ·mol-1, and 922.05, respectively. Using these calculated parameters, a growth model is established to describe the growth behavior of metallic iron grains.

  9. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, D.E.

    1998-05-12

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe{sup 3+} provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided. 21 figs.

  10. Iron phosphate compositions for containment of hazardous metal waste

    DOEpatents

    Day, Delbert E.

    1998-01-01

    An improved iron phosphate waste form for the vitrification, containment and long-term disposition of hazardous metal waste such as radioactive nuclear waste is provided. The waste form comprises a rigid iron phosphate matrix resulting from the cooling of a melt formed by heating a batch mixture comprising the metal waste and a matrix-forming component. The waste form comprises from about 30 to about 70 weight percent P.sub.2 O.sub.5 and from about 25 to about 50 weight percent iron oxide and has metals present in the metal waste chemically dissolved therein. The concentration of iron oxide in the waste form along with a high proportion of the iron in the waste form being present as Fe.sup.3+ provide a waste form exhibiting improved chemical resistance to corrosive attack. A method for preparing the improved iron phosphate waste forms is also provided.

  11. Noble Metal Nanoparticles for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João; Veigas, Bruno; Giestas, Leticia; Almeida, Carina; Assunção, Maria; Rosa, João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade the use of nanomaterials has been having a great impact in biosensing. In particular, the unique properties of noble metal nanoparticles have allowed for the development of new biosensing platforms with enhanced capabilities in the specific detection of bioanalytes. Noble metal nanoparticles show unique physicochemical properties (such as ease of functionalization via simple chemistry and high surface-to-volume ratios) that allied with their unique spectral and optical properties have prompted the development of a plethora of biosensing platforms. Additionally, they also provide an additional or enhanced layer of application for commonly used techniques, such as fluorescence, infrared and Raman spectroscopy. Herein we review the use of noble metal nanoparticles for biosensing strategies—from synthesis and functionalization to integration in molecular diagnostics platforms, with special focus on those that have made their way into the diagnostics laboratory. PMID:22438731

  12. Metallic and semiconducting nanoparticles in LCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshul; Urbanski, Martin; Mori, Taizo; Kitzerow, Heinz-S.; Hegmann, Torsten

    This chapter provides an overview of recent advances in nanoparticleliquid crystal dispersions with a particular focus on bulk versus surface effects. Surface effects will include the role of surface functionalization of metal and semiconducting nanoparticles as well as interfacial effects, alignment and anchoring in thin liquid crystal films related to nanoparticle segregation. We will also try to provide a practical guide for experimental work on nanoparticle-liquid crystal dispersions, including tips and best practices for preparing dispersions, detecting and preventing inhomogeneities as well as Dos and Don'ts for handling samples and filling test cells for electrooptic, spectroscopic, and other experiments critical for research in this area.

  13. Aggregation of nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides and corresponding effects on metal uptake, retention, and speciation: II. Temperature and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stegemeier, J. P.; Reinsch, B. C.; Lentini, C. J.; Dale, J. G.; Kim, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation and growth of nanosized particles can greatly impact their capacity to sorb and retain dissolved metals, thus affecting metal fate and transport in contaminated systems. Aqueous suspensions of synthesized nanoscale iron oxyhydroxides were exposed to dissolved Zn(II) or Cu(II) and aged at room temperature (∼20 °C), 50 °C, and 75 °C for timeframes ranging from 0 to 96 h before sorbed metal ions were desorbed by lowering the suspension pH. Atomic absorption spectroscopic analysis of supernatants both before and after the desorption step determined how temperature and time affect macroscopic metal uptake and retention capacities. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy analysis described the local binding environment of the sorbed/retained metals on the solid phase. With increasing aging temperature and time, the initial ∼5-nm oblong nanoparticles formed dense aggregates, lost reactive surface area, and retained progressively larger fractions of the initially-introduced Zn(II) and Cu(II) following the desorption step, with the copper species inhibiting the oriented aggregation of the nanoparticles into nanorods. Based on EXAFS analysis, the speciation of the sorbed metal species evolves with increasing time and temperature from surface-sorbed metal ions, which readily desorb and return to solution, to more strongly-bound, structurally-incorporated metal ions. These retained metals appear to associate intimately with the nanoparticle aggregates by substituting for iron in the nanoparticle lattice or by binding within nanoparticle aggregate pore spaces.

  14. High-Performance, Superparamagnetic, Nanoparticle-Based Heavy Metal Sorbents for Removal of Contaminants from Natural Waters

    SciTech Connect

    Warner, Cynthia L.; Addleman, Shane; Cinson, Anthony D.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nash, Michael A.; Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Marvin G.

    2010-06-01

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle based heavy metal sorbents with various surface chemistries that demonstrate an excellent affinity for the separation of heavy metals in contaminated water systems (i.e. spiked Columbia river water). The magnetic nanoparticle sorbents are prepared from an easy to synthesize iron oxide precursor, followed by a simple, one-step ligand exchange technique to introduce the organic surface functionality of interest chosen to target either specific or broader classes of heavy metals. Functionalized superparamagnetic nanoparticles are excellent sorbent materials for the extraction of heavy metal contaminants from environmental and clinical samples since they are easily removed from the media once bound to the contaminant by simply applying a magnetic field. These engineered magnetic nanoparticle sorbents have an inherently high active surface area (often > 100 m2/g), allowing for increased binding capacity. To demonstrate the potential sorbent performance of each of the surface modified magnetic nanoparticles, river water was spiked with Hg, Pb, Cd, Ag, Co, Cu, and Tl and exposed to low concentrations of the functionalized nanoparticles. The samples were analyzed to determine the metal content before and after exposure to the magnetic nanoparticle sorbents. In almost all cases reported here the nanoparticles were found to be superior to commercially available sorbents binding a wide range of different heavy metals with extremely high affinity. Detailed characterization of the functionalized magnetic nanoparticle sorbents including FT-IR, BET surface analysis, TGA, XPS and VSM as well as the heavy metal removal experiments are presented.

  15. Metal nanoparticles (other than gold or silver) prepared using plant extracts for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasca, Roxana-Diana; Santa, Szabolcs; Racz, Levente Zsolt; Racz, Csaba Pal

    2016-12-01

    There are many modalities to prepare metal nanoparticles, but the reducing of the metal ions with plant extracts is one of the most promising because it is considerate less toxic for the environment, suitable for the use of those nanoparticles in vivo and not very expensive. Various metal ions have been already studied such as: cobalt, copper, iron, platinum, palladium, zinc, indium, manganese and mercury and the number of plant extracts used is continuously increasing. The prepared systems were characterized afterwards with a great number of methods of investigation: both spectroscopic (especially UV-Vis spectroscopy) and microscopic (in principal, electron microscopy-TEM) methods. The applications of the metal nanoparticles obtained are diverse and not completely known, but the medical applications of such nanoparticles occupy a central place, due to their nontoxic components, but some diverse industrial applications do not have to be forgotten.

  16. Iron nanoparticle growth induced by Kr-F excimer laser photolysis of Fe(CO)5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, A. V.; Gurentsov, E. V.; Priemchenko, K. Yu

    2013-06-01

    In this article the process of nanoparticle formation under the condensation of highly supersaturated atomic vapor produced by the photodissociation of metal-bearing compounds was investigated. The iron nanoparticles were synthesized by Kr-F laser pulse photolysis of Fe(CO)5. The measurements of an optical density of condensed phase were performed using a laser light extinction at a wavelength 633 nm. The particle size during their formation process was measured by a two-color time-resolved laser-induced incandescence. The final iron particle sizes and their structure were analyzed by a transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that the process of iron particle formation in the investigated conditions could be divided onto three stages: the fast nucleation of iron atoms during 1-2 μs, the surface growth of particles up to the sizes of 1-6 nm with increasing volume fraction of condensed phase during 100-250 μs, and the relatively slow particle coagulation up to the final sizes of 5-9 nm. The effective rate constants of iron clusters and particle growth were extracted using laser light extinction measurements. The essential role of the reactions of iron clusters and particles with the parental Fe(CO)5 molecules was established. The kinetic mechanism of iron nanoparticle growth induced by photo-dissociation of Fe(CO)5 at room temperature based on obtained experimental results and known literature data has been suggested. The results obtained could be used for the developments of methods of synthesis of catalysts, magnetic nanopowders, and others nanomaterials at room temperature. Besides that, the presented experimental data could be useful for the validation of kinetic models of gas-phase condensation of supersaturated vapor of solids.

  17. Controlled oxidation of iron nanoparticles in chemical vapour synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruusunen, Jarno; Ihalainen, Mika; Koponen, Tarmo; Torvela, Tiina; Tenho, Mikko; Salonen, Jarno; Sippula, Olli; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Jokiniemi, Jorma; Lähde, Anna

    2014-02-01

    In the present study, iron oxide nanoparticles (primary particle size of 80-90 nm) with controlled oxidation state were prepared via an atmospheric pressure chemical vapour synthesis (APCVS) method. Iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5], a precursor material, was thermally decomposed to iron in the APCVS reactor. Subsequently, the iron was oxidized with controlled amount of oxygen in the reactor to produce nearly pure magnetite or haematite particles depending on the oxygen concentration. Size, morphology and crystal structure of the synthesized nanoparticles were studied with scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In addition, thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and computational fluid dynamics model were used to predict the oxidation state of the iron oxides and the reaction conditions during mixing. Aggregates of crystalline particles were formed, determined as magnetite at the oxygen volumetric fraction of 0.1 % and haematite at volumetric fraction of 0.5 %, according to the XRD. The geometric mean electrical mobility diameter of the aggregates increased from 110 to 155 nm when the volumetric fraction of oxygen increased from 0.1 to 0.5 %, determined using the SMPS. The aggregates were highly sintered based on TEM analyses. As a conclusion, APCVS method can be used to produce nearly pure crystalline magnetite or haematite nanoparticles with controlled oxidation in a continuous one-stage gas-phase process.

  18. Removal of Heavy Metals from Aqueous Systems with Thiol Functionalized Superparamagnetic Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Yantasee, Wassana; Warner, Cynthia L.; Sangvanich, Thanapon; Addleman, Raymond S.; Carter, Timothy G.; Wiacek, Robert J.; Fryxell, Glen E.; Timchalk, Chuck; Warner, Marvin G.

    2007-06-09

    We have shown that superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles with a surface functionalization of dimercaptosuccinic acid is an effective, magnetic, sorbent material for toxic metals such as Hg, Ag, Pb, Cd and other soft cations. The chemical affinity, stability, capacity and kinetics of the functionalized nanoparticles has been explored and compared to conventional resin based sorbents and nanoporous silica materials with similar surface chemistries.

  19. Facile synthesis of Curcuma longa tuber powder engineered metal nanoparticles for bioimaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankar, Renu; Rahman, Pattanathu K. S. M.; Varunkumar, Krishnamoorthy; Anusha, Chidambaram; Kalaiarasi, Arunachalam; Shivashangari, Kanchi Subramanian; Ravikumar, Vilwanathan

    2017-02-01

    Nanomaterials based fluorescent agents are rapidly becoming significant and promising transformative tools for improving medical diagnostics for extensive in vivo imaging modalities. Compared with conventional fluorescent agents, nano-fluorescence has capabilities to improve the in vivo detection and enriched targeting efficiencies. In our laboratory we synthesized fluorescent metal nanoparticles of silver, copper and iron using Curcuma longa tuber powder by simple reduction. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized metal nanoparticles were attained using UV-visible spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy with EDAX spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The Curcuma longa tuber powder has one of the bioactive compound Curcumin might act as a capping agent during the synthesis of nanoparticles. The synthesized metal nanoparticles fluorescence property was confirmed by spectrofluorometry. When compared with copper and iron nanoparticles the silver nanoparticles showed high fluorescence intensity under spectrofluorometry. Moreover, in vitro cell images of the silver nanoparticles in A549 cell lines also correlated with the results of spectrofluorometry. These silver nanoparticles show inspiring cell-imaging applications. They enter into cells without any further modifications, and the fluorescence property can be utilized for fluorescence-based cell imaging applications.

  20. Mercury removal in wastewater by iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vélez, E.; Campillo, G. E.; Morales, G.; Hincapié, C.; Osorio, J.; Arnache, O.; Uribe, J. I.; Jaramillo, F.

    2016-02-01

    Mercury is one of the persistent pollutants in wastewater; it is becoming a severe environmental and public health problem, this is why nowadays its removal is an obligation. Iron oxide nanoparticles are receiving much attention due to their properties, such as: great biocompatibility, ease of separation, high relation of surface-area to volume, surface modifiability, reusability, excellent magnetic properties and relative low cost. In this experiment, Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized using iron salts and NaOH as precipitation agents, and Aloe Vera as stabilizing agent; then these nanoparticles were characterized by three different measurements: first, using a Zetasizer Nano ZS for their size estimation, secondly UV-visible spectroscopy which showed the existence of resonance of plasmon at λmax∼360 nm, and lastly by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to determine nanoparticles form. The results of this characterization showed that the obtained Iron oxides nanoparticles have a narrow size distribution (∼100nm). Mercury removal of 70% approximately was confirmed by atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Structure and Energy Stability of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Hector; Palomares-Baez, Juan Pedro; Velazquez-Salazar, Jesus; Rodriguez-Lopez, Jose Luis; Jose-Yacaman, Miguel; University of Texas at San Antonio Collaboration; Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientufica y Tecnologica Collaboration

    2011-03-01

    In this work we present a theoretical model for the structural evolution and energy stability for metal nanoparticles from the small (1-2 nm) to the big (~ 50 nm) size ranges. We have found that the appearances of structural lattice defects as well as surface reconstructions are important factors that highly influence the growth process. A simple assembly model for a path transformation for metal nanoparticles is presented and compare with experimental evidence. Acknowledgements: Financial support from National Science Foundation Grant DMR-0934218 is acknowledged, as well as grants for the use of High Performance Computational Resources from the supercomputer center TACC-University of Texas at Austin.

  2. Electroluminescence Efficiency Enhancement using Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-22

    the vicinity of isolated metal nanoparticles and their arrays. Using the example of an InGaN /GaN quantum-well active region positioned in close...emitters placed in the vicinity of isolated metal nanoparticles and their arrays. Using the example of an InGaN /GaN quantum-well active region...electron-hole pair states are localized on the scale of the coherent length on the order of a few nanometers at room temperature, the spontaneous

  3. Laser-Induced Transfer of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Arseniy I.; Koch, Jürgen; Chichkov, Boris N.

    2010-10-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of metallic micro- and nanostructures based on femtosecond laser-induced transfer of metallic nanodroplets is developed. The size of the transferred droplets depends on the volume of laser-molten metal and can be varied by changing the laser beam focus on the sample surface and the metal film thickness. Controllable fabrication of high quality spherical gold micro- and nanoparticles with sizes between 170 nm and 1500 nm is realized. Fabrication of miscellaneous structures consisting of gold particles as elementary building blocks is demonstrated.

  4. Whole-body retention and distribution of orally administered radiolabelled zerovalent iron nanoparticles in mice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Michael F; Long, Thomas C; Boyes, William K; Ramabhadran, Ram

    2013-09-01

    Zerovalent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) are used for in situ remediation of contaminated ground water, raising the possibility that nZVI particles or their altered residues could contaminate the ground water. Therefore, it is important to study their effects on humans and other organisms in vivo. The objective of this study was to assess the whole-body retention and terminal disposition of neutron-activated radioactive nZVI administered by oral gavage in mice. Radioactivity was primarily eliminated in the faeces within 1 day of administration. However, a small amount of iron-derived radioactivity appeared in the liver after three repeated daily doses. This prototypic study further suggests that neutron activation applied judiciously may be broadly applicable to studies of nanoparticles derived from other biologically abundant metals.

  5. Alloy metal nanoparticles for multicolor cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, Pedro V.; Doria, Gonçalo; Conde, João

    2011-03-01

    Cancer is a multigenic complex disease where multiple gene loci contribute to the phenotype. The ability to simultaneously monitor differential expression originating from each locus results in a more accurate indicator of degree of cancerous activity than either locus alone. Metal nanoparticles have been thoroughly used as labels for in vitro identification and quantification of target sequences. We have synthesized nanoparticles with assorted noble metal compositions in an alloy format and functionalized them with thiol-modified ssDNA (nanoprobes). These nanoprobes were then used for the simultaneous specific identification of several mRNA targets involved in cancer development - one pot multicolor detection of cancer expression. The different metal composition in the alloy yield different "colors" that can be used as tags for identification of a given target. Following a non-cross-linking hybridization procedure previously developed in our group for gold nanoprobes, these multicolor nanoprobes were used for the molecular recognition of several different targets including differently spliced variants of relevant genes (e.g. gene products involved in chronic myeloid leukemia BCR, ABL, BCR-ABL fusion product). Based on the spectral signature of mixtures, before and after induced aggregation of metal nanoparticles, the correct identification could be made. Further application to differentially quantify expression of each locus in relation to another will be presented. The differences in nanoparticle stability and labeling efficiency for each metal combination composing the colloids, as well as detection capability for each nanoprobe will be discussed. Additional studies will be conducted towards allele specific expression studies.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging contrast of iron oxide nanoparticles developed for hyperthermia is dominated by iron content

    PubMed Central

    Wabler, Michele; Zhu, Wenlian; Hedayati, Mohammad; Attaluri, Anilchandra; Zhou, Haoming; Mihalic, Jana; Geyh, Alison; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Ivkov, Robert; Artemov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and hyperthermia for cancer treatment. The relationship between MRI signal intensity and cellular iron concentration for many new formulations, particularly MNPs having magnetic properties designed for heating in hyperthermia, is lacking. In this study, we examine the correlation between MRI T2 relaxation time and iron content in cancer cells loaded with various MNP formulations. Materials and methods Human prostate carcinoma DU-145 cells were loaded with starch-coated bionised nanoferrite (BNF), iron oxide (Nanomag® D-SPIO), Feridex™, and dextran-coated Johns Hopkins University (JHU) particles at a target concentration of 50 pg Fe/cell using poly-D-lysine transfection reagent. T2-weighted MRI of serial dilutions of these labelled cells was performed at 9.4 T and iron content quantification was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Clonogenic assay was used to characterise cytotoxicity. Results No cytotoxicity was observed at twice the target intracellular iron concentration (~100 pg Fe/cell). ICP-MS revealed highest iron uptake efficiency with BNF and JHU particles, followed by Feridex and Nanomag-D-SPIO, respectively. Imaging data showed a linear correlation between increased intracellular iron concentration and decreased T2 times, with no apparent correlation among MNP magnetic properties. Conclusions This study demonstrates that for the range of nanoparticle concentrations internalised by cancer cells the signal intensity of T2-weighted MRI correlates closely with absolute iron concentration associated with the cells. This correlation may benefit applications for cell-based cancer imaging and therapy including nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery and hyperthermia. PMID:24773041

  7. System and method for producing metallic iron

    SciTech Connect

    Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

    2012-01-17

    A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  8. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOEpatents

    Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

    2013-09-17

    A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  9. Homogeneous Iron Phosphate Nanoparticles by Combustion of Sprays

    PubMed Central

    Rudin, Thomas; Pratsinis, Sotiris E.

    2013-01-01

    Low-cost synthesis of iron phosphate nanostructured particles is attractive for large scale fortification of basic foods (rice, bread, etc.) as well as for Li-battery materials. This is achieved here by flame-assisted and flame spray pyrolysis (FASP and FSP) of inexpensive precursors (iron nitrate, phosphate), solvents (ethanol), and support gases (acetylene and methane). The iron phosphate powders produced here were mostly amorphous and exhibited excellent solubility in dilute acid, an indicator of relative iron bioavailability. The amorphous and crystalline fractions of such powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their cumulative size distribution by X-ray disk centrifuge. Fine and coarse size fractions were obtained also by sedimentation and characterized by microscopy and XRD. The coarse size fraction contained maghemite Fe2O3 while the fine was amorphous iron phosphate. Furthermore, the effect of increased production rate (up to 11 g/h) on product morphology and solubility was explored. Using increased methane flow rates through the ignition/pilot flame of the FSP-burner and inexpensive powder precursors resulted in also homogeneous iron phosphate nanoparticles essentially converting the FSP to a FASP process. The powders produced by FSP at increased methane flow had excellent solubility in dilute acid as well. Such use of methane or even natural gas might be economically attractive for large scale flame-synthesis of nanoparticles. PMID:23407874

  10. Homogeneous Iron Phosphate Nanoparticles by Combustion of Sprays.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Thomas; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2012-06-13

    Low-cost synthesis of iron phosphate nanostructured particles is attractive for large scale fortification of basic foods (rice, bread, etc.) as well as for Li-battery materials. This is achieved here by flame-assisted and flame spray pyrolysis (FASP and FSP) of inexpensive precursors (iron nitrate, phosphate), solvents (ethanol), and support gases (acetylene and methane). The iron phosphate powders produced here were mostly amorphous and exhibited excellent solubility in dilute acid, an indicator of relative iron bioavailability. The amorphous and crystalline fractions of such powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and their cumulative size distribution by X-ray disk centrifuge. Fine and coarse size fractions were obtained also by sedimentation and characterized by microscopy and XRD. The coarse size fraction contained maghemite Fe(2)O(3) while the fine was amorphous iron phosphate. Furthermore, the effect of increased production rate (up to 11 g/h) on product morphology and solubility was explored. Using increased methane flow rates through the ignition/pilot flame of the FSP-burner and inexpensive powder precursors resulted in also homogeneous iron phosphate nanoparticles essentially converting the FSP to a FASP process. The powders produced by FSP at increased methane flow had excellent solubility in dilute acid as well. Such use of methane or even natural gas might be economically attractive for large scale flame-synthesis of nanoparticles.

  11. Synthesis and heating effect of iron/iron oxide composite and iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Q.; Baker, I.; Loudis, J. A.; Liao, Y.F.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    Fe/Fe oxide nanoparticles, in which the core consists of metallic Fe and the shell is composed of Fe oxides, were obtained by reduction of an aqueous solution of FeCl3 within a NaBH4 solution, or, using a water-in-oil micro-emulsion with CTAB as the surfactant. The reduction was performed either in an inert atmosphere or in air, and passivation with air was performed to produce the Fe/Fe3O4 core/shell composite. Phase identification and particle size were determined by X-ray diffraction and TEM. Thermal analysis was performed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The quasistatic magnetic properties were measured using a VSM, and the specific absorption rates (SARs) of both Fe oxide and Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles either dispersed in methanol or in an epoxy resin were measured by Luxtron fiber temperature sensors in an alternating magnetic field of 150 Oe at 250 kHz. It was found that the preparation conditions, including the concentrations of solutions, the mixing procedure and the heat treatment, influence the particle size, the crystal structure and consequently the magnetic properties of the particles. Compared with Fe oxides, the saturation magnetization (MS) of Fe/Fe3O4 particles (100–190 emu/g) can be twice as high, and the coercivity (HC) can be tunable from several Oe to several hundred Oe. Hence, the SAR of Fe/Fe3O4 composite nanoparticles can be much higher than that of Fe oxides, with a maximum SAR of 345 W/g. The heating behavior is related to the magnetic behavior of the nanoparticles. PMID:25301983

  12. Development and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (Part 1): Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Lodhia, J; Mandarano, G; Ferris, NJ; Eu, P; Cowell, SF

    2010-01-01

    Contrast agents, such as iron oxide, enhance MR images by altering the relaxation times of tissues in which the agent is present. They can also be used to label targeted molecular imaging probes. Unfortunately, no molecular imaging probe is currently available on the clinical MRI market. A promising platform for MRI contrast agent development is nanotechnology, where superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONS) are tailored for MR contrast enhancement, and/or for molecular imaging. SPIONs can be produced using a range of methods and the choice of method will be influenced by the characteristics most important for a particular application. In addition, the ability to attach molecular markers to SPIONS heralds their application in molecular imaging. There are many reviews on SPION synthesis for MRI; however, these tend to be targeted to a chemistry audience. The development of MRI contrast agents attracts experienced researchers from many fields including some researchers with little knowledge of medical imaging or MRI. This situation presents medical radiation practitioners with opportunities for involvement, collaboration or leadership in research depending on their level of commitment and their ability to learn. Medical radiation practitioners already possess a large portion of the understanding, knowledge and skills necessary for involvement in MRI development and molecular imaging. Their expertise in imaging technology, patient care and radiation safety provides them with skills that are directly applicable to research on the development and application of SPIONs and MRI. In this paper we argue that MRI SPIONs, currently limited to major research centres, will have widespread clinical use in the future. We believe that knowledge about this growing area of research provides an opportunity for medical radiation practitioners to enhance their specialised expertise to ensure best practice in a truly multi-disciplinary environment. This review outlines how and

  13. Photo-Switching of Magnetization in Iron Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aqtash, Nabil; Hostetter, Alexander; Sabirianov, Renat

    2012-02-01

    We report the theoretical studies of light induced switching in core-shell nanoparticles. The core of the nanoparticle is made of Fe coated with the shell of azobenzene. The latter is a photochromic material with the reversible trans-cis photoisomerization upon irradiation by UV and visible light. The magnetization of nanoparticles can be reversibly switched by using specific wavelengths of light. trans-cis photoisomerization of azobenzene induces both the change in surface local magnetic moments and alters the exchange interactions on the surfaces of the nanoparticles. These two mechanisms can lead to induced magnetization switchable by light pulse. We study the effects of photoisomerization of azobenzene on iron (Fe) nanoparticle. Ab initio calculations using SIESTA code show that the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) exchange interaction in Fe dimer increase by 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene. While an infinite flat Fe monolayer shows variation on the exchange interactions on the surfaces as result of photoisomerization. The local magnetic moments of Fe sheet increase by 6% due to photoisomerization. Using an ab initio parameterization of magnetic interactions, we propose statistical model based on competing exchange interactions for the investigation of Fe nanoparticle magnetization. We performed Monte Carlo simulations of magnetization of the core-shell nanoparticle as a function of temperature. The results show that Fe nanoparticles magnetization at room temperature can change by at least 40% due to photoisomerization of azobenzene.

  14. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticle synthesis from metal organic frameworks (MOFs): finding the border of metal and metal oxides.

    PubMed

    Das, Raja; Pachfule, Pradip; Banerjee, Rahul; Poddar, Pankaj

    2012-01-21

    Herein, for the first time, we report a generalized strategy for the successful synthesis of highly crystalline metal and metal oxide nanoparticles embedded in a carbon matrix by the controlled thermolysis of metal organic frameworks (MOFs). The rationalized synthesis strategy of a broad range of metal and metal oxides nanoparticles, such as Cu/CuO, Co/Co(3)O(4), ZnO, Mn(2)O(3), MgO and CdS/CdO, by thermolysis of MOFs demonstrates for the first time that metal ions with a reduction potential of -0.27 volts or higher present in MOFs always form pure metal nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2), whereas metal ions with a reduction potential lower than -0.27 volts form metal oxide nanoparticles during thermolysis in N(2). Another point of interest is the fact that we have found a unique relationship between the nanoparticle size and the distance between the secondary building units inside the MOF precursors. Interestingly, the crystallinity of the carbon matrix was also found to be greatly influenced by the environment (N(2) and air) during thermolysis. Moreover, these nanoparticles dispersed in a carbon matrix showed promising H(2) and CO(2) adsorption properties depending on the environment used for the thermolysis of MOFs.

  15. Synthesis of Graphite Encapsulated Metal Nanoparticles and Metal Catalyzed Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWal, R. L.; Dravid, V. P.

    1999-01-01

    This work focuses on the growth and inception of graphite encapsulated metal nanoparticles and metal catalyzed nanotubes using combustion chemistry. Deciphering the inception and growth mechanism(s) for these unique nanostructures is essential for purposeful synthesis. Detailed knowledge of these mechanism(s) may yield insights into alternative synthesis pathways or provide data on unfavorable conditions. Production of these materials is highly desirable given many promising technological applications.

  16. Terahertz pulse generation from metal nanoparticle ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Kosaku; Takano, Keisuke; Tadokoro, Yuzuru; Phan, Thanh Nhat Khoa; Nakajima, Makoto

    2016-11-01

    Terahertz pulse generation from metallic nanostructures irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses is of interest because the conversion efficiency from laser pulses to terahertz waves is increased by the local field enhancement resulting from the plasmon oscillation. In this talk we present our recent study on terahertz generation from metal nanoparticle ink. We baked a silver nanoparticle ink spin-coated onto a glass coverslip in various temperatures. On the surface of the baked ink, bumpy nanostructures are spontaneously formed, and the average size of bumps depends on the baking temperature. These structures are expected to lead to local field enhancement and then large nonlinear polarizations on the surface. The baked ink was irradiated by the output of regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser at an incidence angle of 45°. Waveforms of generated terahertz pulses are detected by electro-optical sampling. The generation efficiency was high when the average diameter of bumps was around 100 nm, which is realized when the ink is baked in 205 to 235°C in our setup. One of our next research targets is terahertz wave generation from micro-patterned metallic nanoparticle ink. It is an advantage of the metal nanoparticle ink that by using inkjet printers one can fabricate various patterns with micrometer scales, in which terahertz waves have a resonance. Combination of microstructures made by a printer and nanostructure spontaneously formed in the baking process will provide us terahertz emitters with unique frequency characteristics.

  17. Evaluation of iron oxide nanoparticle biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Hanini, Amel; Schmitt, Alain; Kacem, Kamel; Chau, François; Ammar, Souad; Gavard, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is an exciting field of investigation for the development of new treatments for many human diseases. However, it is necessary to assess the biocompatibility of nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo before considering clinical applications. Our characterization of polyol-produced maghemite γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles showed high structural quality. The particles showed a homogeneous spherical size around 10 nm and could form aggregates depending on the dispersion conditions. Such nanoparticles were efficiently taken up in vitro by human endothelial cells, which represent the first biological barrier to nanoparticles in vivo. However, γ-Fe(2)O(3) can cause cell death within 24 hours of exposure, most likely through oxidative stress. Further in vivo exploration suggests that although γ-Fe(2)O(3) nanoparticles are rapidly cleared through the urine, they can lead to toxicity in the liver, kidneys and lungs, while the brain and heart remain unaffected. In conclusion, γ-Fe(2)O(3) could exhibit harmful properties and therefore surface coating, cellular targeting, and local exposure should be considered before developing clinical applications.

  18. Genotoxicity of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pöttler, Marina; Staicu, Andreas; Zaloga, Jan; Unterweger, Harald; Weigel, Bianca; Schreiber, Eveline; Hofmann, Simone; Wiest, Irmi; Jeschke, Udo; Alexiou, Christoph; Janko, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles that are aimed at targeting cancer cells, but sparing healthy tissue provide an attractive platform of implementation for hyperthermia or as carriers of chemotherapeutics. According to the literature, diverse effects of nanoparticles relating to mammalian reproductive tissue are described. To address the impact of nanoparticles on cyto- and genotoxicity concerning the reproductive system, we examined the effect of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) on granulosa cells, which are very important for ovarian function and female fertility. Human granulosa cells (HLG-5) were treated with SPIONs, either coated with lauric acid (SEONLA) only, or additionally with a protein corona of bovine serum albumin (BSA; SEONLA-BSA), or with dextran (SEONDEX). Both micronuclei testing and the detection of γH2A.X revealed no genotoxic effects of SEONLA-BSA, SEONDEX or SEONLA. Thus, it was demonstrated that different coatings of SPIONs improve biocompatibility, especially in terms of genotoxicity towards cells of the reproductive system. PMID:26540051

  19. Size-dependent magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patsula, Vitalii; Moskvin, Maksym; Dutz, Silvio; Horák, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Uniform iron oxide nanoparticles in the size range from 10 to 24 nm and polydisperse 14 nm iron oxide particles were prepared by thermal decomposition of Fe(III) carboxylates in the presence of oleic acid and co-precipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) chlorides by ammonium hydroxide followed by oxidation, respectively. While the first method produced hydrophobic oleic acid coated particles, the second one formed hydrophilic, but uncoated, nanoparticles. To make the iron oxide particles water dispersible and colloidally stable, their surface was modified with poly(ethylene glycol) and sucrose, respectively. Size and size distribution of the nanoparticles was determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and X-ray diffraction. Surface of the PEG-functionalized and sucrose-modified iron oxide particles was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Magnetic properties were measured by means of vibration sample magnetometry and specific absorption rate in alternating magnetic fields was determined calorimetrically. It was found, that larger ferrimagnetic particles showed higher heating performance than smaller superparamagnetic ones. In the transition range between superparamagnetism and ferrimagnetism, samples with a broader size distribution provided higher heating power than narrow size distributed particles of comparable mean size. Here presented particles showed promising properties for a possible application in magnetic hyperthermia.

  20. Tactic response of bacteria to zero-valent iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio; Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Pratarolo, Paolo; Pullin, Huw; Scott, Thomas B; Thompson, Ian P

    2016-06-01

    The microbial assessment of pollutant toxicity rarely includes behavioral responses. In this study, we investigated the tactic response of Pseudomonas putida G7, a representative of soil bacterium, towards engineered zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVIs), as a new end-point assessment of toxicity. The study integrated the characterization of size distribution and charge of nZVIs and tactic reaction response by means of inverted capillary assay and computer-assisted motion analysis of motility behavior. Iron nanoparticles (diameter ≤ 100 nm) were prepared in the absence of oxygen to prevent aggregation, and then exposed in aerobic conditions. We first demonstrate that iron nanoparticles can elicit a negative tactic response in bacteria at low but environmentally-relevant, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 μg/L). Cells were repelled by nZVIs in the concentration gradients created inside the capillaries, and a significant increase in turning events, characteristic of negative taxis, was detected under exposure to nZVIs. These tactic responses were not detectable after sustained exposure of the nanoparticles to oxygen. This new behavioral assessment may be prospected for the design of sensitive bioassays for nanomaterial toxicity.

  1. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Shih-Ger; Littlejohn, David; Shi, Yao

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH.sub.3. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20.degree. and 90.degree. C. to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution.

  2. Metal regeneration of iron chelates in nitric oxide scrubbing

    DOEpatents

    Chang, S.G.; Littlejohn, D.; Shi, Y.

    1997-08-19

    The present invention relates to a process of using metal particles to reduce NO to NH{sub 3}. More specifically, the invention concerns an improved process to regenerate iron (II) (CHELATE) by reduction of iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) complex, which process comprises: (a) contacting an aqueous solution containing iron (II) (CHELATE) (NO) with metal particles at between about 20 and 90 C to reduce NO present, produce ammonia or an ammonium ion, and produce free iron (II) (CHELATE) at a pH of between about 3 and 8. The process is useful to remove NO from flue gas and reduce pollution. 34 figs.

  3. Reversible immobilization of BSA on Cu-chelated PAMAM dendrimer modified iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, M.; Şenel, M.; Baykal, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer coated superparamagnetite nanoparticles were synthesized by growing of PAMAM on amino-silane coated iron oxide nanoparticles. The PAMAM modified superparamagnetite nanoparticles were used as reversible protein immobilization host materials. During the reversible immobilization studies the effect of different metal ions such as; Cu+2, Zn+2, Co+2, Ni+2 on immobilization efficiency of BSA were evaluated. The maximum BSA adsorption capacity of the PAMAM-MNP- Cu+2 beads was observed to be 52.84 mg/g (BSA/PAMAM-MNP) at pH 7.0. Various characteristics of immobilized BSA such as; effect of generation, effect of pH, BSA concentration, temperature, salt concentration and reusability of PAMAM-MNP were evaluated.

  4. Development of Iron Doped Silicon Nanoparticles as Bimodal Imaging Agents

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mani P.; Atkins, Tonya M.; Muthuswamy, Elayaraja; Kamali, Saeed; Tu, Chuqiao; Louie, Angelique Y.; Kauzlarich, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of water-soluble allylamine terminated Fe doped Si (SixFe) nanoparticles as bimodal agents for optical and magnetic imaging. The preparation involves the synthesis of a single source iron containing precursor, Na4Si4 with x% Fe (x = 1, 5, 10), and its subsequent reaction with NH4Br to produce hydrogen terminated SixFe nanoparticles. The hydrogen-capped nanoparticles are further terminated with allylamine via thermal hydrosilylation. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicates that the average particle diameter is ~3.0±1.0 nm. The Si5Fe nanoparticles show strong photoluminescence quantum yield in water (~ 10 %) with significant T2 contrast (r2/r1value of 4.31). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and Mössbauer spectroscopies indicate that iron in the nanoparticles is in the +3 oxidation state. Analysis of cytotoxicity using the resazurin assay on HepG2 liver cells indicates that the particles have minimal toxicity. PMID:22616623

  5. Bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes obtained by the pyrolysis of ferrocene hydrocarbon mixtures: role of the metal nanoparticles produced in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satishkumar, B. C.; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1999-07-01

    Aligned nanotube bundles have been produced by the pyrolysis of ferrocene along with methane, acetylene or butane. Ferrocene-acetylene mixtures are found to be ideal for the production of compact aligned nanotube bundles. The nanotube bundles are associated with iron nanoparticles of diameters in the range 2-13 nm. These nanoparticles are ferromagnetic, showing low saturation magnetization compared to bulk iron. The ferromagnetism of the transition metal nanoparticles is likely to be responsible for the alignment of the nanotubes.

  6. In situ thermolysis of magnetic nanoparticles using non-hydrated iron oleate complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Meng Meng; Kim, Do Kyung

    2012-02-01

    A novel strategy for the fabrication of nanostructured materials based on preparation of metallic surfactants is presented and some examples are demonstrated in this article. The suggested synthetic procedure of metal oleate is universal, potentially able to produce bulk quantities, and can be applicable to the synthesis of other metal oxide and metal nanoparticles. In general, organometallic compounds are quite expensive and are mostly classified as a highly toxic substance. In this study, we used simple, inexpensive, and eco-friendly approaches to prepare the metallic surfactants. As an example, non-hydrated iron oleate (FeOl) complexes are prepared as precursors for the in situ-fabricated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) by thermolysis. The different coordination of the non-hydrated FeOl complexes are directly relating to the competition between nucleation and crystal growth. The in situ preparation of SPIONs involves the reaction of metal nitrate and carboxylic acid at 120 °C to synthesize the non-hydrated FeOl complexes and following the thermolysis of FeOl at 300 °C in non-coordination solvent. The coordination modes and distinct thermal behaviors of intermediates non-hydrated FeOl complexes are comparatively investigated by means of thermo-analytic techniques complimented by differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The potential chemical structures of non-hydrated FeOl and their reaction mechanism by thermolysis were elucidated. The resulting lipid-coated SPIONs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, FTIR, differential temperature analysis, and TGA. These data suggested a bimodal interaction of organic shell and nanoparticle surface, with chemically absorbed inner layer and physically absorbed outer layer of carboxylic acid.

  7. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg-1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  8. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix.

    PubMed

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-09-15

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am(2) kg(-1) is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications.

  9. Air-stable superparamagnetic metal nanoparticles entrapped in graphene oxide matrix

    PubMed Central

    Tuček, Jiří; Sofer, Zdeněk; Bouša, Daniel; Pumera, Martin; Holá, Kateřina; Malá, Aneta; Poláková, Kateřina; Havrdová, Markéta; Čépe, Klára; Tomanec, Ondřej; Zbořil, Radek

    2016-01-01

    Superparamagnetism is a phenomenon caused by quantum effects in magnetic nanomaterials. Zero-valent metals with diameters below 5 nm have been suggested as superior alternatives to superparamagnetic metal oxides, having greater superspin magnitudes and lower levels of magnetic disorder. However, synthesis of such nanometals has been hindered by their chemical instability. Here we present a method for preparing air-stable superparamagnetic iron nanoparticles trapped between thermally reduced graphene oxide nanosheets and exhibiting ring-like or core-shell morphologies depending on iron concentration. Importantly, these hybrids show superparamagnetism at room temperature and retain it even at 5 K. The corrected saturation magnetization of 185 Am2 kg–1 is among the highest values reported for iron-based superparamagnets. The synthetic concept is generalized exploiting functional groups of graphene oxide to stabilize and entrap cobalt, nickel and gold nanoparticles, potentially opening doors for targeted delivery, magnetic separation and imaging applications. PMID:27628898

  10. Influence of Microbial Iron and Nitrate Reduction on Subsurface Iron Biogeochemistry and Contaminant Metal Mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Flynn W. Picardal

    2002-04-10

    Although toxic metal and radionuclide contaminants can not be destroyed, their toxicity and mobility can be dramatically altered by microbial activity. In addition to toxic metals, many contaminated sites contain both iron-containing minerals and co-contaminants such as nitrate NO{sub 3}{sup -}. Successful implementation of metal and radionuclide bioremediation strategies in such environments requires an understanding of the complex microbial and geochemical interactions that influence the redox speciation and mobility of toxic metals. Our specific objectives have been to (1) determine the effect of iron oxide mineral reduction on the mobility of sorbed, representative toxic metals (Zn{sup 2+}), (2) study the biogeochemical interactions that may occur during microbial reduction of NO{sub 3}{sup -} and iron oxide minerals, and (3) evaluate the kinetics of NO{sub 3}{sup -}-dependent, microbial oxidation of ferrous iron (Fe{sup 2+}).

  11. Nanovectors for anticancer agents based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Douziech-Eyrolles, Laurence; Marchais, Hervé; Hervé, Katel; Munnier, Emilie; Soucé, Martin; Linassier, Claude; Dubois, Pierre; Chourpa, Igor

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade, the application of nanotechnologies for anticancer drug delivery has been extensively explored, hoping to improve the efficacy and to reduce side effects of chemotherapy. The present review is dedicated to a certain kind of anticancer drug nanovectors developed to target tumors with the help of an external magnetic field. More particularly, this work treats anticancer drug nanoformulations based on superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles coated with biocompatible polymers. The major purpose is to focus on the specific requirements and technological difficulties related to controlled delivery of antitumoral agents. We attempt to state the problem and its possible perspectives by considering the three major constituents of the magnetic therapeutic vectors: iron oxide nanoparticles, polymeric coating and anticancer drug. PMID:18203422

  12. Stimuli responsive release of metalic nanoparticles on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Cordoba, Miguel; Topal, Özge; Allara, David L; Kalkan, A Kaan; Demirel, Melik C

    2012-04-10

    Optically active metal nanoparticles have been of recent and broad interest for applications to biomarker detection because of their ability to enable high sensitivity enhancements in various optical detection techniques. Here, we report stimuli responsive release of metallic nanoparticles on a semiconductor thin film array structure based on pH change. The metallic nanoparticles are obtained by a simple redox procedure on the semiconductor surface. This approach allows controlling nanoparticle surface coatings in situ for biomolecule conjugation, such as DNA probes on nanoparticles, and rapid stimuli responsive release of these nanoparticles upon pH change.

  13. Visualization of custom-tailored iron oxide nanoparticles chemistry, uptake, and toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Kai; Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro; Ahlinder, Linnea; Guldevall, Karolin; Pazik, Robert; Kępiński, Leszek; Kvashnina, Kristina O.; Butorin, Sergei M.; Brismar, Hjalmar; Önfelt, Björn; Österlund, Lars; Seisenbaeva, Gulaim A.; Kessler, Vadim G.

    2012-11-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide generated by wearing of vehicles have been modelled with a tailored solution of size-uniform engineered magnetite particles produced by the Bradley reaction, a solvothermal metal-organic approach rendering hydrophilic particles. The latter does not bear any pronounced surface charge in analogy with that originating from anthropogenic sources in the environment. Physicochemical properties of the nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by a wide range of methods, including XPD, TEM, SEM, DLS and spectroscopic techniques. The magnetite nanoparticles were found to be sensitive for transformation into maghemite under ambient conditions. This process was clearly revealed by Raman spectroscopy for high surface energy magnetite particles containing minor impurities of the hydromaghemite phase and was followed by quantitative measurements with EXAFS spectroscopy. In order to assess the toxicological effects of the produced nanoparticles in humans, with and without surface modification with ATP (a model of bio-corona formed in alveolar liquid), a pathway of potential uptake and clearance was modelled with a sequence of in vitro studies using A549 lung epithelial cells, lymphocyte 221-B cells, and 293T embryonal kidney cells, respectively. Raman microscopy unambiguously showed that magnetite nanoparticles are internalized within the A549 cells after 24 h co-incubation, and that the ATP ligand is retained on the nanoparticles throughout the uptake process. The toxicity of the nanoparticles was estimated using confocal fluorescence microscopy and indicated no principal difference for unmodified and modified particles, but revealed considerably different biochemical responses. The IL-8 cytokine response was found to be significantly lower for the magnetite nanoparticles compared to TiO2, while an enhancement of ROS was observed, which was further increased for the ATP-modified nanoparticles, implicating involvement of the ATP signalling pathway in

  14. Dopamine Serves as a Stable Surface Modifier for Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xiaomin; Hu, Juan; Wang, Lirong; Gao, Jinhao; Zhang, Bei; Zhang, Xixiang

    2013-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are an important class of nanomaterials in a broad range of biomedical applications because of their superparamagnetism and biocompatibility. The success of biomedical applications of iron oxide nanoparticles relies on the particles' surface functionalization, which requires robust and versatile surface anchors. Here, we report on a detailed examination of the dopamine-based surface modification of iron oxide nanoparticles. We used dopamine (2-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethylamine) and L-dopa (3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine) as two surface modifiers and chose Fe2O3 hollow nanoparticles and Fe3O4 nanoparticles as two representative substrates. Optical and TEM images showed that iron oxide nanoparticles dispersed very well in water after surface modification. The analysis of the UV-Vis spectra indicated that dopamine and L-dopa are stable after being immobilized on the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles when the pH value of the environment is about 7. The magnetic properties analysis further showed that the blocking temperature of the dopamine- or L-dopa-decorated iron oxide nanoparticles hardly changed over 20 days, confirming long-term stability of these surface modified nanoparticles. Cell assay indicated that these dopamine- or L-dopa-modified iron oxide nanoparticles were biocompatible. These results confirm that dopamine serves as a stable modifier and a robust anchor to functionalize iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  15. Biosynthesised magnetic iron nanoparticles for sludge dewatering via Fenton process.

    PubMed

    Ealias, Anu Mary; Jose, Jephin Varughese; Saravanakumar, M P

    2016-11-01

    The magnetic iron nanoparticles (MFeNp) were biosynthesised using the extract of Cinnamomum tamala (bay leaf) and examined for its efficacy on sludge dewatering. The characteristics of MFeNp were studied using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and x-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) techniques. The presence of polyphenolic compounds were confirmed by FTIR and XPS analysis. The reduction in capillary suction time (CST) (71.36 to 16.5 s) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) (53.71 × 10(11) to 1.47 × 10(11) m/kg) values have indicated that the use of Fenton nanocatalyst enhanced the sludge dewaterability. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis has shown that the mass of bound water in the treated sludge was decreased significantly from 1.45 to 0.92 kg H2O/kg DS. The breakdown of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) by the MFeNp leads to the significant reduction in proteins, polysaccharides, water content and heavy metals. The optimisation using response surface modelling (RSM) have shown that the maximum removal efficiency of water from the sludge was 85.9 % when the optimum pH (3) MFeNp dosage (50 mg/g DS) and H2O2 dosage (500 mg/g DS) were maintained. The experimental results and the statistical optimisation have suggested that MFeNp can be used as a potential nanocatalyst for the sludge dewaterability and hence it can be used for the agricultural purpose. Graphical abstract Schematic representation of sludge dewatering process.

  16. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Chen, Gang; Poudel, Bed; Kumar, Shankar; Wang, Wenzhong; Dresselhaus, Mildred

    2009-09-08

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  17. Metal-doped semiconductor nanoparticles and methods of synthesis thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ren, Zhifeng (Inventor); Chen, Gang (Inventor); Poudel, Bed (Inventor); Kumar, Shankar (Inventor); Wang, Wenzhong (Inventor); Dresselhaus, Mildred (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to binary or higher order semiconductor nanoparticles doped with a metallic element, and thermoelectric compositions incorporating such nanoparticles. In one aspect, the present invention provides a thermoelectric composition comprising a plurality of nanoparticles each of which includes an alloy matrix formed of a Group IV element and Group VI element and a metallic dopant distributed within the matrix.

  18. Toxicity assessment of zero valent iron nanoparticles on Artemia salina.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rajdeep; Parashar, Abhinav; Raichur, Ashok M; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan; Mukherjee, Anita; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2017-01-19

    The present study deals with the toxicity assessment of two differently synthesized zero valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI, chemical and biological) as well as Fe(2+) ions on Artemia salina at three different initial concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 mg/L of these particles. The assessment was done till 96 h at time intervals of 24 h. EC50 value was calculated to evaluate the 50% mortality of Artemia salina at all exposure time durations. Between chemically and biologically synthesized nZVI nanoparticles, insignificant differences in the level of mortality were demonstrated. At even 24 h, Fe(2+) ion imparted complete lethality at the highest exposure concentration (100 mg/L). To understand intracellular oxidative stress because of zero valent iron nanoparticles, ROS estimation, SOD activity, GSH activity, and catalase activity was performed which demonstrated that ionic form of iron is quite lethal at high concentrations as compared with the same concentration of nZVI exposure. Lower concentrations of nZVI were more toxic as compared with the ionic form and was in order of CS-nZVI > BS-nZVI > Fe(2+) . Cell membrane damage and bio-uptake of nanoparticles were also evaluated for all three concentrations of BS-nZVI, CS-nZVI, and Fe(2+) using adult Artemia salina in marine water; both of which supported the observations made in toxicity assessment. This study can be further explored to exploit Artemia salina as a model organism and a biomarker in an nZVI prone aquatic system to detect toxic levels of these nanoparticles.

  19. Super-iron Nanoparticles with Facile Cathodic Charge Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    M Farmand; D Jiang; B Wang; S Ghosh; D Ramaker; S Licht

    2011-12-31

    Super-irons contain the + 6 valence state of iron. One advantage of this is that it provides a multiple electron opportunity to store additional battery charge. A decrease of particle size from the micrometer to the nanometer domain provides a higher surface area to volume ratio, and opportunity to facilitate charge transfer, and improve the power, voltage and depth of discharge of cathodes made from such salts. However, super-iron salts are fragile, readily reduced to the ferric state, with both heat and contact with water, and little is known of the resultant passivating and non-passivating ferric oxide products. A pathway to decrease the super-iron particle size to the nano-domain is introduced, which overcomes this fragility, and retains the battery capacity advantage of their Fe(VI) valence state. Time and power controlled mechanosynthesis, through less aggressive, dry ball milling, leads to facile charge transfer of super-iron nanoparticles. Ex-situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy is used to explore the oxidation state and structure of these iron oxides during discharge and shows the significant change in stability of the ferrate structure to lower oxidation state when the particle size is in the nano-domain.

  20. Solution voltammetry of 4 nm magnetite iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Joseph J P; Westgard, John A; Cooper, Laura M; Murray, Royce W

    2014-07-30

    The voltammetry of solution-dispersed magnetite iron oxide Fe3O4 nanoparticles is described. Their currents are controlled by nanoparticle transport rates, as shown with potential step chronoamperometry and rotated disk voltammetry. In pH 2 citrate buffer with added NaClO4 electrolyte, solution cyclic voltammetry of these nanoparticles (average diameter 4.4 ± 0.9 nm, each containing ca. 30 Fe sites) displays an electrochemically irreversible oxidation with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.52 V and an irreversible reduction with E(PEAK) at ca. +0.2 V vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode. These processes are presumed to correspond to the formal potentials for one-electron oxidation of Fe(II) and reduction of Fe(III) at their different sites in the magnetite nanoparticle structure. The heterogeneous electrode reaction rates of the nanoparticles are very slow, in the 10(-5) cm/s range. The nanoparticles are additionally characterized by a variety of tools, e.g., TEM, UV/vis, and XPS spectroscopies.

  1. Uptake and metabolism of iron oxide nanoparticles in brain cells.

    PubMed

    Petters, Charlotte; Irrsack, Ellen; Koch, Michael; Dringen, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are used for various applications in biomedicine, for example as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging, for cell tracking and for anti-tumor treatment. However, IONPs are also known for their toxic effects on cells and tissues which are at least in part caused by iron-mediated radical formation and oxidative stress. The potential toxicity of IONPs is especially important concerning the use of IONPs for neurobiological applications as alterations in brain iron homeostasis are strongly connected with human neurodegenerative diseases. Since IONPs are able to enter the brain, potential adverse consequences of an exposure of brain cells to IONPs have to be considered. This article describes the pathways that allow IONPs to enter the brain and summarizes the current knowledge on the uptake, the metabolism and the toxicity of IONPs for the different types of brain cells in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles: cellulose at work.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Jacco; Versluijs-Helder, Marjan; Vlietstra, Edward J; Geus, John W; Jenneskens, Leonardus W

    2015-03-01

    Pyrolysis of base metal salt loaded microcrystalline cellulose spheres gives a facile access to carbon-supported base metal nanoparticles, which have been characterized with temperature-dependent XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP-MS and elemental analysis. The role of cellulose is multifaceted: 1) it facilitates a homogeneous impregnation of the aqueous base metal salt solutions, 2) it acts as an efficacious (carbonaceous) support material for the uniformly dispersed base metal salts, their oxides and the metal nanoparticles derived therefrom, and 3) it contributes as a reducing agent via carbothermal reduction for the conversion of the metal oxide nanoparticles into the metal nanoparticles. Finally, the base metal nanoparticles capable of forming metastable metal carbides catalytically convert the carbonaceous support into a mesoporous graphitic carbon material.

  3. Biosurfactant Mediated Biosynthesis of Selected Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Płaza, Grażyna A.; Chojniak, Joanna; Banat, Ibrahim M.

    2014-01-01

    Developing a reliable experimental protocol for the synthesis of nanomaterials is one of the challenging topics in current nanotechnology particularly in the context of the recent drive to promote green technologies in their synthesis. The increasing need to develop clean, nontoxic and environmentally safe production processes for nanoparticles to reduce environmental impact, minimize waste and increase energy efficiency has become essential in this field. Consequently, recent studies on the use of microorganisms in the synthesis of selected nanoparticles are gaining increased interest as they represent an exciting area of research with considerable development potential. Microorganisms are known to be capable of synthesizing inorganic molecules that are deposited either intra- or extracellularly. This review presents a brief overview of current research on the use of biosurfactants in the biosynthesis of selected metallic nanoparticles and their potential importance. PMID:25110864

  4. Noble Metal Nanoparticles Applications in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Conde, João; Doria, Gonçalo; Baptista, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Nanotechnology has prompted new and improved materials for biomedical applications with particular emphasis in therapy and diagnostics. Special interest has been directed at providing enhanced molecular therapeutics for cancer, where conventional approaches do not effectively differentiate between cancerous and normal cells; that is, they lack specificity. This normally causes systemic toxicity and severe and adverse side effects with concomitant loss of quality of life. Because of their small size, nanoparticles can readily interact with biomolecules both at surface and inside cells, yielding better signals and target specificity for diagnostics and therapeutics. This way, a variety of nanoparticles with the possibility of diversified modification with biomolecules have been investigated for biomedical applications including their use in highly sensitive imaging assays, thermal ablation, and radiotherapy enhancement as well as drug and gene delivery and silencing. Here, we review the available noble metal nanoparticles for cancer therapy, with particular focus on those already being translated into clinical settings. PMID:22007307

  5. Comparative study on the uptake and bioimpact of metal nanoparticles released into environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andries, Maria; Pricop, Daniela; Grigoras, Marian; Lupu, Nicoleta; Sacarescu, Liviu; Creanga, Dorina; Iacomi, Felicia

    2015-12-01

    Metallic particles of very small size are ubiquitously released in the air, water and soil from various natural and artificial sources - the last ones with enhanced extent since nanotechnology development accelerated exponentially. In this study we focused on the impact of metal nanoparticles in vegetal species of agroindustrial interest namely the maize (Zea mais L.). Laboratory simulation of environmental pollution was carried out by using engineered nanoparticles of two types: iron oxides with magnetic properties and gold nanoparticles supplied in the form of dilutes stable suspensions in the culture medium of maize seedlings. Magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs) preparation was performed by applying chemical route from iron ferric and ferrous precursor salts in alkali reaction medium at relatively high temperature (over 80 °C). Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) synthesis was accomplished from auric hydrochloride acid in alkali reaction medium in similar temperature conditions. In both types of metallic nanoparticles citrate ions were used as coating shell with role of suspension stabilization. Plantlet response was assessed at the level of assimilatory pigment contents in green tissue of seedlings in early ontogenetic stages.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of platinum decorated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchoudhury, Soubantika

    This dissertation focuses on the development of a bifunctional nanoparticle system that can potentially offer simultaneous imaging and therapy in the future. Recently, small platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (< 5 nm) have shown great potential in therapeutic applications, such as DNA dissociation, radiation therapy, and oxidative stress treatment. Therefore, the small Pt nanoparticles of size comparable to DNA grooves are chosen as potential therapeutic components in this research. However, such small sized Pt nanoparticles tends to aggregate, and are difficult to target. Therefore, this research reports the synthesis, characterization, and DNA interaction of small Pt decorated iron oxide nanoparticles. The iron oxide carriers provide stability to the small Pt nanoparticles, and can potentially serve as MRI contrast agents. The hypothesis of this research is that the Pt nanoparticles supported on iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces can effectively interact with DNA molecules similar to the free Pt nanoparticles. A reproducible synthetic technique was first developed to prepare iron oxide nanoparticles with excellent size control and narrow size distribution. Subsequently, two different approaches were utilized to produce multiple small Pt nanoparticle attached iron oxide nanoparticles. The first route involved attachment of Pt nanoparticles onto iron oxide seeds of various shapes in an organic solvent, followed by an aqueous phase transfer. Here, the shape of the nanoparticles was controlled to facilitate heterogeneous nucleation of Pt nanoparticles. The protective biocompatible polymer coating (polyacrylic acid) in this method could prevent interaction of the Pt nanoparticles with undesirable biomolecules. Several non-spherical iron oxide nanoparticles were explored, including whiskers, worms, plates, and flowers. In the second method, an aqueous phase ligand exchange process was performed first, prior to the deposition of multiple Pt nanoparticles. This facile method

  7. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world's children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability.

  8. Solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with iron to overcome barriers for treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Hosny, Khaled Mohamed; Banjar, Zainy Mohammed; Hariri, Amani H; Hassan, Ali Habiballah

    2015-01-01

    According to the World Health Organization, 46% of the world’s children suffer from anemia, which is usually treated with iron supplements such as ferrous sulfate. The aim of this study was to prepare iron as solid lipid nanoparticles, in order to find an innovative way for alleviating the disadvantages associated with commercially available tablets. These limitations include adverse effects on the digestive system resulting in constipation and blood in the stool. The second drawback is the high variability in the absorption of iron and thus in its bioavailability. Iron solid lipid nanoparticles (Fe-SLNs) were prepared by hot homogenization/ultrasonication. Solubility of ferrous sulfate in different solid lipids was measured, and effects of process variables such as the surfactant type and concentration, homogenization and ultrasonication times, and charge-inducing agent on the particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency were determined. Furthermore, in vitro drug release and in vivo pharmacokinetics were studied in rabbits. Results indicated that Fe-SLNs consisted of 3% Compritol 888 ATO, 1% Lecithin, 3% Poloxamer 188, and 0.2% dicetylphosphate, with an average particle size of 25 nm with 92.3% entrapment efficiency. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed more than fourfold enhanced bioavailability. In conclusion, Fe-SLNs could be a promising carrier for iron with enhanced oral bioavailability. PMID:25609917

  9. Microbial-mediated method for metal oxide nanoparticle formation

    DOEpatents

    Rondinone, Adam J.; Moon, Ji Won; Love, Lonnie J.; Yeary, Lucas W.; Phelps, Tommy J.

    2015-09-08

    The invention is directed to a method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles, the method comprising: (i) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbial-mediated formation of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprise: metal-reducing microbes, a culture medium suitable for sustaining said metal-reducing microbes, an effective concentration of one or more surfactants, a reducible metal oxide component containing one or more reducible metal species, and one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said metal-reducing microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said metal-reducing microbes; and (ii) isolating said metal oxide nanoparticles, which contain a reduced form of said reducible metal oxide component. The invention is also directed to metal oxide nanoparticle compositions produced by the inventive method.

  10. Metallic nanoparticles and their medicinal potential. Part II: aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots and cochleates.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Leena; Scarabelli, Tiziano

    2013-09-01

    Metallic miniaturization techniques have taken metals to nanoscale size where they can display fascinating properties and their potential applications in medicine. In recent years, metal nanoparticles such as aluminium, silicon, iron, cadmium, selenium, indium and calcium, which find their presence in aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, quantum dots (Q-dots) and cochleates, have caught attention of medical industries. The increasing impact of metallic nanoparticles in life sciences has significantly advanced the production techniques for these nanoparticles. In this Review, the various methods for the synthesis of nanoparticles are outlined, followed by their physicochemical properties, some recent applications in wound healing, diagnostic imaging, biosensing, assay labeling, antimicrobial activity, cancer therapy and drug delivery are listed, and finally their toxicological impacts are revised. The first half of this article describes the medicinal uses of two noble nanoparticles - gold and silver. This Review provides further information on the ability of aluminum, silicon, iron, selenium, indium, calcium and zinc to be used as nanoparticles in biomedical sciences. Aluminosilicates find their utility in wound healing and antibacterial growth. Iron-oxide nanoparticles enhance the properties of MRI contrast agents and are also used as biomagnets. Cadmium, selenium, tellurium and indium form the core nanostructures of tiny Q-dots used in cellular assay labeling, high-resolution cell imaging and biosensing. Cochleates have the bivalent nano ions calcium, magnesium or zinc imbedded in their structures and are considered to be highly effective agents for drug and gene delivery. The aluminosilicates, nanobiomagnets, Q-dots and cochleates are discussed in the light of their properties, synthesis and utility.

  11. Quantum plasmonics with a metal nanoparticle array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyoup; Tame, Mark; Lim, James; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2012-06-01

    We investigate an array of metal nanoparticles as a channel for nanophotonic quantum communication and the generation of quantum plasmonic interference. We consider the transfer of quantum states, including single qubits as plasmonic wave packets, and highlight the necessity of a quantum-mechanical description by comparing the predictions of quantum theory with those of classical electromagnetic theory. The effects of loss in the metal are included, thus putting our investigation into a practical setting and enabling the quantification of the performance of realistic nanoparticle arrays as plasmonic quantum channels. We explore the interference of single plasmons, finding nonlinear absorption effects associated with the quantum properties of the plasmon excitations. This work highlights the benefits and drawbacks of using nanophotonic periodic systems for quantum plasmonic applications, such as quantum communication and the generation of quantum interference.

  12. Suppressing iron oxide nanoparticle toxicity by vascular targeted antioxidant polymer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cochran, David B; Wattamwar, Paritosh P; Wydra, Robert; Hilt, J Zach; Anderson, Kimberly W; Eitel, Richard E; Dziubla, Thomas D

    2013-12-01

    The biomedical use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles has been of continued interest in the literature and clinic. Their ability to be used as contrast agents for imaging and/or responsive agents for remote actuation makes them exciting materials for a wide range of clinical applications. Recently, however, concern has arisen regarding the potential health effects of these particles. Iron oxide toxicity has been demonstrated in in vivo and in vitro models, with oxidative stress being implicated as playing a key role in this pathology. One of the key cell types implicated in this injury is the vascular endothelial cells. Here, we report on the development of a targeted polymeric antioxidant, poly(trolox ester), nanoparticle that can suppress oxidative damage. As the polymer undergoes enzymatic hydrolysis, active trolox is locally released, providing a long term protection against pro-oxidant agents. In this work, poly(trolox) nanoparticles are targeted to platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecules (PECAM-1), which are able to bind to and internalize in endothelial cells and provide localized protection against the cytotoxicity caused by iron oxide nanoparticles. These results indicate the potential of using poly(trolox ester) as a means of mitigating iron oxide toxicity, potentially expanding the clinical use and relevance of these exciting systems.

  13. Synthesis of iron nanoparticles via chemical reduction with palladium ion seeds.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Cheng; Ehrman, Sheryl H

    2007-01-30

    We report on the synthesis of highly monodisperse iron nanoparticles, using a chemical reduction method. Iron nanoparticles with an average diameter of 6 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.3 were synthesized at a pH of 9.50 from ferric chloride precursor with sodium borohydride as the reducing agent, polyacrylic acid as the dispersing agent, and palladium ions as seeds for iron nanoparticle nucleation. The resulting nanoparticles were ferromagnetic at 5 K and superparamagnetic at 350 K. The dispersing agent polyacrylic acid (PAA) was shown to prevent iron nanoparticles and possibly palladium clusters from aggregating; in the absence of PAA, only aggregated iron nanoparticles were obtained. The addition of palladium ions decreased the diameter of iron nanoparticles presumably by providing sites for heterogeneous nucleation onto palladium clusters. In the absence of palladium ions, the mean diameter of iron nanoparticles was approximately 110 nm and the standard deviation increased to 2.0. The pH of the solution also was found to have a significant effect on the particle diameter, likely by affecting PAA ionization and altering the conformation of the polymer chains. At lower pH (8.75), the PAA is less ionized and its ability to disperse palladium clusters is reduced, so the number of palladium seeds decreases. Therefore, the resulting iron nanoparticles were larger, 59 nm in diameter, versus 6 nm for nanoparticles formed at a pH of 9.50.

  14. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jatish; Thomas, K George; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2016-10-18

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided.

  15. Nanoscale chirality in metal and semiconductor nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, K. George

    2016-01-01

    The field of chirality has recently seen a rejuvenation due to the observation of chirality in inorganic nanomaterials. The advancements in understanding the origin of nanoscale chirality and the potential applications of chiroptical nanomaterials in the areas of optics, catalysis and biosensing, among others, have opened up new avenues toward new concepts and design of novel materials. In this article, we review the concept of nanoscale chirality in metal nanoclusters and semiconductor quantum dots, then focus on recent experimental and theoretical advances in chiral metal nanoparticles and plasmonic chirality. Selected examples of potential applications and an outlook on the research on chiral nanomaterials are additionally provided. PMID:27752651

  16. On the Tannic Acid Interaction with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, J.; García de Saldaña, E.; Jaén, J. A.

    2001-05-01

    The reaction between tannic acid and metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric tannate complexes. The degree of conversion was followed from 1 day to 6 months. In the very early stages of reaction the product consists of a mono-type complex, while in the later stages a mixture of mono- and bis-type complexes were formed. The conversion reaction of metallic iron to tannate complexes follows a first-order reaction kinetics.

  17. Environment friendly route of iron oxide nanoparticles from Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin Hui, Yau; Yi Peng, Teoh; Wei Wen, Liu; Zhong Xian, Ooi; Peck Loo, Kiew

    2016-11-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared from the reaction between the Zingiber officinale (ginger) root extracts and ferric chloride solution at 50°C for 2 h in mild stirring condition. The synthesized powder forms of nanoparticles were further characterized by using UV-Vis spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction spectrometry. UV-Vis analysis shows the absorption peak of iron oxide nanoparticles is appeared at 370 nm. The calculation of crystallite size from the XRD showed that the average particle size of iron oxide nanoparticles was 68.43 nm. Therefore, this eco-friendly technique is low cost and large scale nanoparticles synthesis to fulfill the demand of various applications.

  18. System and method for producing metallic iron nodules

    DOEpatents

    Bleifuss, Rodney L.; Englund, David J.; Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2011-09-20

    A method for producing metallic iron nodules by assembling a shielding entry system to introduce coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh in to the furnace atmosphere at location(s) where the temperature of the furnace atmosphere adjacent at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material is between about 2200 and 2650.degree. F. (1200 and 1450.degree. C.), the shielding entry system adapted to inhibit emission of infrared radiation from the furnace atmosphere and seal the furnace atmosphere from exterior atmosphere while introducing coarse carbonaceous material greater than 6 mesh into the furnace to be distributed over the at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material, and heating the covered at least partially reduced reducible iron bearing material in a fusion atmosphere to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material during fusion to assist in fusion and inhibit reoxidation of the reduced material in forming metallic iron nodules.

  19. The Effect of Metal Oxide on Nanoparticles from Thermite Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lewis Ryan

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine how metal oxide used in a thermite reaction can impact the production of nanoparticles. The results showed the presence of nanoparticles (less than 1 micron in diameter) of at least one type produced by each metal oxide. The typical particles were metallic spheres, which ranged from 300 nanometers in…

  20. Screening Methods for Metal-Containing Nanoparticles in Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Screening-level analysis of water for metal-containing nanoparticles is achieved with single particle-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SP-ICPMS). This method measures both the concentration of nanoparticles containing an analyte metal and the mass of the metal in eac...

  1. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOEpatents

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Kiesel, Richard F.; Englund, David J; Hendrickson, Dave

    2012-12-18

    A method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets may include providing multiple layers of agglomerates, such as briquettes, balls and extrusions, of a reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and of a reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) on a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material) and providing a coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material over at least some of the agglomerates. Heating the agglomerates of reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, applications, and challenges of iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Attarad; Zafar, Hira; Zia, Muhammad; ul Haq, Ihsan; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Ali, Joham Sarfraz; Hussain, Altaf

    2016-01-01

    Recently, iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted much consideration due to their unique properties, such as superparamagnetism, surface-to-volume ratio, greater surface area, and easy separation methodology. Various physical, chemical, and biological methods have been adopted to synthesize magnetic NPs with suitable surface chemistry. This review summarizes the methods for the preparation of iron oxide NPs, size and morphology control, and magnetic properties with recent bioengineering, commercial, and industrial applications. Iron oxides exhibit great potential in the fields of life sciences such as biomedicine, agriculture, and environment. Nontoxic conduct and biocompatible applications of magnetic NPs can be enriched further by special surface coating with organic or inorganic molecules, including surfactants, drugs, proteins, starches, enzymes, antibodies, nucleotides, nonionic detergents, and polyelectrolytes. Magnetic NPs can also be directed to an organ, tissue, or tumor using an external magnetic field for hyperthermic treatment of patients. Keeping in mind the current interest in iron NPs, this review is designed to report recent information from synthesis to characterization, and applications of iron NPs. PMID:27578966

  3. Stabilization and functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amstad, Esther; Textor, Marcus; Reimhult, Erik

    2011-07-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface presentation of functionalities. This review is focused on different aspects of the stability of superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs, from its practical definition to its implementation by molecular design of the dispersant shell around the iron oxide core and further on to its influence on the magnetic properties of the superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. Special attention is given to the selection of molecular anchors for the dispersant shell, because of their importance to ensure colloidal and functional stability of sterically stabilized superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs. We further detail how dispersants have been optimized to gain close control over iron oxide NP stability, size and functionalities by independently considering the influences of anchors and the attached sterically repulsive polymer brushes. A critical evaluation of different strategies to stabilize and functionalize core-shell superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs as well as a brief introduction to characterization methods to compare those strategies is given.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are used in a rapidly expanding number of research and practical applications in the biomedical field, including magnetic cell labeling separation and tracking, for therapeutic purposes in hyperthermia and drug delivery, and for diagnostic purposes, e.g., as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. These applications require good NP stability at physiological conditions, close control over NP size and controlled surface

  4. Exploring the potential of metallic nanoparticles within synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Edmundson, Matthew C; Capeness, Michael; Horsfall, Louise

    2014-12-25

    The fields of metallic nanoparticle study and synthetic biology have a great deal to offer one another. Metallic nanoparticles as a class of material have many useful properties. Their small size allows for more points of contact than would be the case with a similar bulk compound, making nanoparticles excellent candidates for catalysts or for when increased levels of binding are required. Some nanoparticles have unique optical qualities, making them well suited as sensors, while others display para-magnetism, useful in medical imaging, especially by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Many of these metallic nanoparticles could be used in creating tools for synthetic biology, and conversely the use of synthetic biology could itself be utilised to create nanoparticle tools. Examples given here include the potential use of quantum dots (QDs) and gold nanoparticles as sensing mechanisms in synthetic biology, and the use of synthetic biology to create nanoparticle-sensing devices based on current methods of detecting metals and metalloids such as arsenate. There are a number of organisms which are able to produce a range of metallic nanoparticles naturally, such as species of the fungus Phoma which produces anti-microbial silver nanoparticles. The biological synthesis of nanoparticles may have many advantages over their more traditional industrial synthesis. If the proteins involved in biological nanoparticle synthesis can be put into a suitable bacterial chassis then they might be manipulated and the pathways engineered in order to produce more valuable nanoparticles.

  5. Mössbauer study of carbon coated iron magnetic nanoparticles produced by simultaneous reduction/pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, Fernanda G.; Ardisson, José D.; Rosmaninho, Marcelo G.; Lago, Rochel M.; Tristão, Juliana C.

    2011-11-01

    Magnetic iron nanoparticles immersed in a carbon matrix were produced by a combined process of controlled dispersion of Fe3 + ions in sucrose, thermal decomposition with simultaneous reduction of iron cores and the formation of the porous carbonaceous matrix. The materials were prepared with iron contents of 1, 4 and 8 in %wt in sucrose and heated at 400, 600 and 800°. The samples were analyzed by XRD, Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetization measurements, TG, SEM and TEM. The materials prepared at 400° are composed essentially of Fe3O4 particles and carbon, while treatments at higher temperatures, e.g. 600 and 800° produced as main phases Fe0 and Fe3C. The Mössbauer spectra of samples heated at 400° showed two sextets characteristic of a magnetite phase and other contributions compatible with Fe3 + and Fe2 + phases in a carbonaceous matrix. Samples treated at temperatures above 600° showed the presence of metallic iron with concentrations between 16-43%. The samples heated at 800° produced higher amounts of Fe3C (between 20% and 58%). SEM showed for the iron 8% sample treated at 600-800°C particle sizes smaller than 50 nm. Due to the presence of Fe0 particles in the carbonaceous porous matrix the materials have great potential for application as magnetic adsorbents.

  6. Properties of SBA-15 modified by iron nanoparticles as potential hydrogen adsorbents and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouazizi, N.; Ouargli, R.; Nousir, S.; Slama, R. Ben; Azzouz, A.

    2015-02-01

    SBA-15-Fe was synthesized via the incorporation of Fe0 nanoparticles (Fe(0)-Nps) in the mesoporous channels. Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that dispersion of fine iron NPs occurs mainly inside the channels of SBA-15, producing a slight structure compaction. This was accompanied by a significant improvement of both the affinity towards hydrogen and electrical conductivity, as supported by hydrogen adsorption tests and impedance measurements. CO2 thermal programmed desorption measurements revealed an attenuation of the acid character of the solid surface. This was explained in terms of strong iron interaction with the lattice oxygen atoms that reduces the SiO-H bond polarity. The close vicinity of fine Fe(0)-Nps combined with the large pore size of SBA-15 appear to contribute to a synergistic improvement of the electrical conductivity. The results reported herein open new prospects for SBA-15 as potential adsorbents for hydrogen storage and carriers for hydrogen sensors. The use of iron in lieu of noble metals for designing such materials is a novelty, because such applications of iron-loaded silica have not been envisaged so far due to the high reactivity of iron towards air and water. The development of such technologies, if any, should address this issue.

  7. Nonaqueous synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles: Short review and doped titanium dioxide as case study for the preparation of transition metal-doped oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Djerdj, Igor Arcon, Denis; Jaglicic, Zvonko; Niederberger, Markus

    2008-07-15

    The liquid-phase synthesis of metal oxide nanoparticles in organic solvents under exclusion of water is nowadays a well-established alternative to aqueous sol-gel chemistry. In this article, we highlight some of the advantages of these routes based on selected examples. The first part reviews some recent developments in the synthesis of ternary metal oxide nanoparticles by surfactant-free nonaqueous sol-gel routes, followed by the discussion of the morphology-controlled synthesis of lanthanum hydroxide nanoparticles, and the presentation of structural peculiarities of manganese oxide nanoparticles with an ordered Mn vacancy superstructure. These examples show that nonaqueous systems, on the one hand, allow the preparation of compositionally complex oxides, and, on the other hand, make use of the organic components (initially present or formed in situ) in the reaction mixture to tailor the morphology. Furthermore, obviously even the crystal structure can differ from the corresponding bulk material like in the case of MnO nanoparticles. In the second part of the paper we present original results regarding the synthesis of dilute magnetic semiconductor TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles doped with cobalt and iron. The structural characterization as well as the magnetic properties with special attention to the doping efficiency is discussed. - Graphical abstract: In the first part of this article, nonaqueous sol-gel routes to ternary metal oxide nanoparticles are briefly reviewed, followed by the discussion of the morphology-controlled synthesis of lanthanum hydroxide nanoparticles, and the appearance of an unprecedented superstructure in MnO nanoparticles. In the second part, doping experiments of TiO{sub 2} with Fe and Co are presented, along with their characterization including magnetic measurements.

  8. Iron oxide nanoparticle layer templated by polydopamine spheres: a novel scaffold toward hollow-mesoporous magnetic nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Foda, Mohamed F; Su, Wu

    2015-01-14

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layers with high packing density and controlled thickness were in situ deposited on metal-affinity organic templates (polydopamine spheres), via one-pot thermal decomposition. The as synthesized hybrid structure served as a facile nano-scaffold toward hollow-mesoporous magnetic carriers, through surfactant-assisted silica encapsulation and its subsequent calcination. Confined but accessible gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into these carriers to form a recyclable catalyst, showing quick magnetic response and a large surface area (642.5 m(2) g(-1)). Current nano-reactors exhibit excellent catalytic performance and high stability in reduction of 4-nitrophenol, together with convenient magnetic separability and good reusability. The integration of compact iron oxide nanoparticle layers with programmable polydopamine templates paves the way to fabricate magnetic-response hollow structures, with high permeability and multi-functionality.

  9. Intracellular imaging of quantum dots, gold, and iron oxide nanoparticles with associated endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dandan; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Zhang, Leshuai W

    2017-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles (NP) have been used for biomedical applications especially for imaging. Compared to nonmetallic NP, metallic NP provide high contrast images because of their optical light scattering, magnetic resonance, X-ray absorption, or other physicochemical properties. In this review, a series of in vitro imaging techniques for metallic NP will be introduced, meanwhile their strengths and weaknesses will be discussed. By utilizing these imaging methods, the cellular uptake of metallic NP can be easily visualized to better understand the endocytic mechanisms of NP intracellular delivery. Several types of metallic NP that are used for imaging or as contrast agents such as quantum dots, gold, iron oxide, and other metallic NP will be presented. Cellular uptake of metallic NP and associated endocytic mechanisms highly depends upon the NP size, charge, surface coating, shape, or other factors such as cell type, cell differentiation status, cell surface status, external forces, protein binding, temperature, and the biological milieu. Classical endocytic routes such as lipid raft-mediated pathways, clathrin or caveolae-mediated pathways, macropinocytosis, and phagocytosis have been investigated, yet there is still a demand to determine other endocytic pathways. Knowing the different methodologies used to determine the endocytic pathways will increase the understanding of NP toxicity, cancer cell targeting, and imaging, so that surface coatings can be created for efficient cell uptake of metallic NP with minimal cytotoxicity WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2017, 9:e1419. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1419 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  10. Crystal structure of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesized from ferritin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krispin, Michael; Ullrich, Aladin; Horn, Siegfried

    2012-02-01

    We have investigated the crystal structure of nanosized iron-oxide by X-ray diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure measurements at the iron K-edge as well as by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Iron-oxide nanoparticles were produced by thermal treatment of horse spleen ferritin molecules. The structure of these particles was compared to α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 nanopowder references. The thermal treatment of a submonolayer film of ferritin molecules results in pure γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while for films above a certain thickness α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 coexist, exhibiting two different crystallite sizes. TEM shows a characteristic particle diameter of 7 nm for γ-Fe2O3 resulting from thermal treatment of monolayers, consistent with the crystallite size of the γ-phase as obtained from XRD measurements on multi-layered samples. XRD shows the α-Fe2O3 phase to be characterized by a crystallite size of 34 nm.

  11. Silicon nanocrystal-noble metal hybrid nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, H.; Fujii, M.; Imakita, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion.We report a novel and facile self-limiting synthesis route of silicon nanocrystal (Si NC)-based colloidally stable semiconductor-metal (gold, silver and platinum) hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). For the formation of hybrid NPs, we employ ligand-free colloidal Si NCs with heavily boron (B) and phosphorus (P) doped shells. By simply mixing B and P codoped colloidal Si NCs with metal salts, hybrid NPs consisting of metal cores and Si NC shells are spontaneously formed. We demonstrate the synthesis of highly uniform and size controllable hybrid NPs. It is shown that codoped Si NCs act as a reducing agent for metal salts and also as a protecting layer to stop metal NP growth. The process is thus self-limiting. The development of a variety of Si NC-based hybrid NPs is a promising first step for the design of biocompatible multifunctional NPs with broad material choices for biosensing, bioimaging and solar energy conversion. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional TEM images and extinction spectra of Si-metal hybrid NPs are shown in Fig. S1

  12. GAS-PHASE FLAME SYNTHESIS AND PROPERTIES OF MAGNETIC IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES WITH REDUCED OXIDATION STATE

    PubMed Central

    Kumfer, Benjamin M; Shinoda, Kozo; Jeyadevan, Balachandran; Kennedy, Ian M

    2010-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles of reduced oxidation state, mainly in the form of magnetite, have been synthesized utilizing a new continuous, gas-phase, nonpremixed flame method using hydrocarbon fuels. This method takes advantage of the characteristics of the inverse flame, which is produced by injection of oxidizer into a surrounding flow of fuel. Unlike traditional flame methods, this configuration allows for the iron particle formation to be maintained in a more reducing environment. The effects of flame temperature, oxygen-enrichment and fuel dilution (i.e. the stoichiometric mixture fraction), and fuel composition on particle size, Fe oxidation state, and magnetic properties are evaluated and discussed. The crystallite size, Fe(II) fraction, and saturation magnetization were all found to increase with flame temperature. Flames of methane and ethylene were used, and the use of ethylene resulted in particles containing metallic Fe(0), in addition to magnetite, while no Fe(0) was present in samples synthesized using methane. PMID:20228941

  13. Effect of nanoscale zero-valent iron and magnetite (Fe3O4) on the fate of metals during anaerobic digestion of sludge.

    PubMed

    Suanon, Fidèle; Sun, Qian; Mama, Daouda; Li, Jiangwei; Dimon, Biaou; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is one of the most widely used processes to stabilize waste sewage sludge and produce biogas renewable energy. In this study, two different iron nanoparticles [nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) and magnetite (Fe3O4)] were used in the mesophilic AD processes (37 ± 1 °C) to improve biogas production. In addition, changes of heavy metal (Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr) speciation during AD of sludge with and without iron nanoparticles have been investigated. Concentrations of metals in the initial sludge were as follows: 63.1, 73.4, 1102.2, 2060.3, 483.9 and 604.1 mg kg(-1) (dry sludge basis) for Cd, Co, Cu, Zn, Ni and Cr, respectively. Sequential fractionation showed that metals were predominantly bonded to organic matter and carbonates in the initial sludge. Compared with AD without iron nanoparticles, the application of iron nanoparticles (at dose of 0.5% in this study) showed positive impact not only on biogas production, but also on improvement of metals stabilization in the digestate. Metals were found concentrated in Fe-Mn bound and residual fractions and little was accumulated in the liquid digestate and most mobile fractions of solid digestate (water soluble, exchangeable and carbonates bound). Therefore, iron nanoparticles when properly used, could improve not only biogas yield, but also regulate and control the mobilization of metals during AD process. However, our study also observed that iron nanoparticles could promote the immobilization of phosphorus within the sludge during AD, and more research is needed to fully address the mechanism behind this phenomenon and the impact on future phosphorus reuse.

  14. Kinetic Study of Nitrate Removal from Aqueous Solutions Using Copper-Coated Iron Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Vilardi, Giorgio; Di Palma, Luca

    2017-03-01

    Nitrates are considered hazard compounds for human health due to their tendency to be reduced to nitrites, in particular in reducing environment. Nano zero valent iron (nZVI) represents an efficient and low-cost adsorbent/reductive agent for nitrate removal from groundwater and wastewaters and a little addition of a second metal species (Cu, Pd, Ni, Ag) has proven to increase process effectiveness, by enhancing stability and oxidation resistance of nanoparticles. In this work Cu/Fe nanoparticles were loaded in a NO3(-) solution (100 mg L(-1)) and the removal efficiency was tested by monitoring nitrate concentration at selected time intervals. Results showed that the nitrate removal process involves both reduction and adsorption processes: the removal mechanism has been investigated, and the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order-adsorption kinetic models were successfully tested.

  15. Iron oxide nanoparticle layer templated by polydopamine spheres: a novel scaffold toward hollow-mesoporous magnetic nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Liang; Ao, Lijiao; Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Foda, Mohamed F.; Su, Wu

    2014-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layers with high packing density and controlled thickness were in situ deposited on metal-affinity organic templates (polydopamine spheres), via one-pot thermal decomposition. The as synthesized hybrid structure served as a facile nano-scaffold toward hollow-mesoporous magnetic carriers, through surfactant-assisted silica encapsulation and its subsequent calcination. Confined but accessible gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into these carriers to form a recyclable catalyst, showing quick magnetic response and a large surface area (642.5 m2 g-1). Current nano-reactors exhibit excellent catalytic performance and high stability in reduction of 4-nitrophenol, together with convenient magnetic separability and good reusability. The integration of compact iron oxide nanoparticle layers with programmable polydopamine templates paves the way to fabricate magnetic-response hollow structures, with high permeability and multi-functionality.Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle layers with high packing density and controlled thickness were in situ deposited on metal-affinity organic templates (polydopamine spheres), via one-pot thermal decomposition. The as synthesized hybrid structure served as a facile nano-scaffold toward hollow-mesoporous magnetic carriers, through surfactant-assisted silica encapsulation and its subsequent calcination. Confined but accessible gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into these carriers to form a recyclable catalyst, showing quick magnetic response and a large surface area (642.5 m2 g-1). Current nano-reactors exhibit excellent catalytic performance and high stability in reduction of 4-nitrophenol, together with convenient magnetic separability and good reusability. The integration of compact iron oxide nanoparticle layers with programmable polydopamine templates paves the way to fabricate magnetic-response hollow structures, with high permeability and multi

  16. “Green” Nanotechnologies: Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticles Using Plants

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, V. V.; Love, A. J.; Sinitsyna, O. V.; Makarova, S. S.; Yaminsky, I. V.; Taliansky, M. E.; Kalinina, N. O.

    2014-01-01

    While metal nanoparticles are being increasingly used in many sectors of the economy, there is growing interest in the biological and environmental safety of their production. The main methods for nanoparticle production are chemical and physical approaches that are often costly and potentially harmful to the environment. The present review is devoted to the possibility of metal nanoparticle synthesis using plant extracts. This approach has been actively pursued in recent years as an alternative, efficient, inexpensive, and environmentally safe method for producing nanoparticles with specified properties. This review provides a detailed analysis of the various factors affecting the morphology, size, and yield of metal nanoparticles. The main focus is on the role of the natural plant biomolecules involved in the bioreduction of metal salts during the nanoparticle synthesis. Examples of effective use of exogenous biomatrices (peptides, proteins, and viral particles) to obtain nanoparticles in plant extracts are discussed. PMID:24772325

  17. High efficiency removal of dissolved As(III) using iron nanoparticle-embedded macroporous polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Savina, Irina N; English, Christopher J; Whitby, Raymond L D; Zheng, Yishan; Leistner, Andre; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Cundy, Andrew B

    2011-09-15

    Novel nanocomposite materials where iron nanoparticles are embedded into the walls of a macroporous polymer were produced and their efficiency for the removal of As(III) from aqueous media was studied. Nanocomposite gels containing α-Fe(2)O(3) and Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles were prepared by cryopolymerisation resulting in a monolithic structure with large interconnected pores up to 100 μm in diameter and possessing a high permeability (ca. 3 × 10(-3) ms(-1)). The nanocomposite devices showed excellent capability for the removal of trace concentrations of As(III) from solution, with a total capacity of up to 3mg As/g of nanoparticles. The leaching of iron was minimal and the device could operate in a pH range 3-9 without diminishing removal efficiency. The effect of competing ions such as SO(4)(2-) and PO(4)(3-) was negligible. The macroporous composites can be easily configured into a variety of shapes and structures and the polymer matrix can be selected from a variety of monomers, offering high potential as flexible metal cation remediation devices.

  18. The fate of iron nanoparticles in environmental waters treated with nanoscale zero-valent iron, FeONPs and Fe3O4NPs.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Kelly; Lespes, Gaëtane; Zuliani, Tea; Ščančar, Janez; Milačič, Radmila

    2016-05-01

    Among the different nanoparticles (NPs) that are used in the remediation of contaminated environmental waters, iron nanoparticles (FeNPs) are the most frequently applied. However, if these FeNPs remain in the waters after the treatment, they can cause a hazard to the environment. In this work the time dependent size distribution of iron particles was investigated in Milli-Q water, forest spring water and landfill leachate after a variety of FeNP treatments. The efficiency of the metal removal by the FeNPs was also examined. The concentrations of the metals in the aqueous samples were determined before and after the nano-remediation by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The data revealed that the settling and removal of the FeNPs after the treatment of the waters was related to the sample characteristics and the ways of dispersing the NPs. When mixing was used for the dispersion, the nano zero-valent iron (nZVI), FeONPs and Fe3O4NPs settled quickly in the Milli-Q water, the forest spring water and the landfill leachate. Dispersion with tertramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) resulted in a slower settling of the iron aggregates. In the Milli-Q and forest spring waters treated with FeONPs and dispersed by TMAH, the nanosized iron remained in solution as long as 24 h after the treatment and could represent a potential threat in environmental waters with a low ionic strength. The removal of the metals strongly depended on the type of FeNPs, the chemical speciation of the elements and the sample matrix. If the FeNPs are contaminated by a particular metal, this contaminant could be, during the NPs treatment, released into the water that is being remediated.

  19. Biosynthesis of stable iron oxide nanoparticles in aqueous extracts of Hordeum vulgare and Rumex acetosa plants.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Valentin V; Makarova, Svetlana S; Love, Andrew J; Sinitsyna, Olga V; Dudnik, Anna O; Yaminsky, Igor V; Taliansky, Michael E; Kalinina, Natalia O

    2014-05-27

    We report the synthesis and characterization of amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles from iron salts in aqueous extracts of monocotyledonous (Hordeum vulgare) and dicotyledonous (Rumex acetosa) plants. The nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, absorbance spectroscopy, SAED, EELS, XPS, and DLS methods and were shown to contain mainly iron oxide and iron oxohydroxide. H. vulgare extracts produced amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles with diameters of up to 30 nm. These iron nanoparticles are intrinsically unstable and prone to aggregation; however, we rendered them stable in the long term by addition of 40 mM citrate buffer pH 3.0. In contrast, amorphous iron oxide nanoparticles (diameters of 10-40 nm) produced using R. acetosa extracts are highly stable. The total protein content and antioxidant capacity are similar for both extracts, but pH values differ (H. vulgare pH 5.8 vs R. acetosa pH 3.7). We suggest that the presence of organic acids (such oxalic or citric acids) plays an important role in the stabilization of iron nanoparticles, and that plants containing such constituents may be more efficacious for the green synthesis of iron nanoparticles.

  20. Binding studies of creatinine and urea on iron-nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Banerji, Biswadip; Pramanik, Sumit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Kidney diseases are complicated and can be fatal. Dialysis and transplantation are the only survival solutions to the patients suffering from kidney failures. Both hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis are risky, due to the possibility of infection and these are expensive and time consuming. The development of simple and reliable technique for the clearance of creatinine and urea from the body is an important part of biotechnology. We have synthesized an iron nanoparticle (INP) and studied its binding with creatinine and urea. The DLS, TEM, AFM, FT-IR and Powder-XRD studies demonstrate strong binding of creatinine and urea to the nanoparticles. This finding may be helpful if it is used in the dialysis technologies. The proposed method may substantially decrease dialysis time and improve its quality in terms of urea and creatinine clearances.

  1. Generation of oxidant response to copper and iron nanoparticles and salts: Stimulation by ascorbate

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Robert H.; Vidrio, Edgar A.; Kumfer, Benjamin M.; Qin, Qin; Willits, Neil H.; Kennedy, Ian M.; Anastasio, Cort

    2009-01-01

    The present work describes a two-stage approach to analyzing combustion-generated samples for their potential to produce oxidant stress. This approach is illustrated with the two commonly encountered transition metals, copper and iron. First, their abilities to generate hydroxyl radical were measured in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline solution containing ascorbate and/or citrate. Second, their abilities to induce heme oxygenase-1 in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were assessed in cell culture. Combustion-generated copper oxide nanoparticles were active in both assays and were found to be soluble in culture medium. Depletion of glutathione in the cells or loading the cells with ascorbate greatly increased heme oxygenase-1 induction in the presence of copper. By contrast, iron oxide nanoparticles were active in the phosphate buffered saline but not in cell culture, and they aggregated in culture medium. Soluble salts of copper and iron exhibited the same contrast in activities as the respective combustion-generated particles. The results suggest that the capability of combustion-generated environmental samples to produce oxidant stress can be screened effectively in a two step process, first in phosphate buffered saline with ascorbate and subsequently in epithelial cell culture for those exhibiting activity initially. The results also point to an unanticipated interaction in cells of oxidant stress-generating metals with an anti-oxidant (ascorbate) that is usually missing in culture medium formulations. Thus, ascorbate supplementation of cultured human cells is likely to improve their ability to model the in vivo effects of particulate matter containing copper and other redox-active metals. PMID:19683516

  2. Generation of oxidant response to copper and iron nanoparticles and salts: Stimulation by ascorbate.

    PubMed

    Rice, Robert H; Vidrio, Edgar A; Kumfer, Benjamin M; Qin, Qin; Willits, Neil H; Kennedy, Ian M; Anastasio, Cort

    2009-10-30

    The present work describes a two-stage approach to analyzing combustion-generated samples for their potential to produce oxidant stress. This approach is illustrated with the two commonly encountered transition metals, copper and iron. First, their abilities to generate hydroxyl radical were measured in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline solution containing ascorbate and/or citrate. Second, their abilities to induce heme oxygenase-1 in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes were assessed in cell culture. Combustion-generated copper oxide nanoparticles were active in both assays and were found to be soluble in culture medium. Depletion of glutathione in the cells or loading the cells with ascorbate greatly increased heme oxygenase-1 induction in the presence of copper. By contrast, iron oxide nanoparticles were active in the phosphate-buffered saline but not in cell culture, and they aggregated in culture medium. Soluble salts of copper and iron exhibited the same contrast in activities as the respective combustion-generated particles. The results suggest that the capability of combustion-generated environmental samples to produce oxidant stress can be screened effectively in a two step process, first in phosphate-buffered saline with ascorbate and subsequently in epithelial cell culture for those exhibiting activity initially. The results also point to an unanticipated interaction in cells of oxidant stress-generating metals with an antioxidant (ascorbate) that is usually missing in culture medium formulations. Thus, ascorbate supplementation of cultured human cells is likely to improve their ability to model the in vivo effects of particulate matter containing copper and other redox-active metals.

  3. Surface energy of metal alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takrori, Fahed M.; Ayyad, Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    The measurement of surface energy of alloy nanoparticles experimentally is still a challenge therefore theoretical work is necessary to estimate its value. In continuation of our previous work on the calculation of the surface energy of pure metallic nanoparticles we have extended our work to calculate the surface energy of different alloy systems, namely, Co-Ni, Au-Cu, Cu-Al, Cu-Mg and Mo-Cs binary alloys. It is shown that the surface energy of metallic binary alloy decreases with decreasing particle size approaching relatively small values at small sizes. When both metals in the alloy obey the Hume-Rothery rules, the difference in the surface energy is small at the macroscopic as well as in the nano-scale. However when the alloy deviated from these rules the difference in surface energy is large in the macroscopic and in the nano scales. Interestingly when solid solution formation is not possible at the macroscopic scale according to the Hume-Rothery rules, it is shown it may form at the nano-scale. To our knowledge these findings here are presented for the first time and is challenging from fundamental as well as technological point of views.

  4. Iron oxide nanoparticles for plant nutrition? A preliminary Mössbauer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homonnay, Z.; Tolnai, Gy.; Fodor, F.; Solti, Á.; Kovács, K.; Kuzmann, E.; Ábrahám, A.; Szabó, E. Gy.; Németh, P.; Szabó, L.; Klencsár, Z.

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important micronutrients for plants is iron. We have prepared iron(III) oxyhydroxide and magnetite nanoparticles with the aim to use them as possible nutrition source for plants. The iron(III)-oxide/oxyhydroxide nanoparticles prepared under our experimental conditions as colloidal suspensions proved to be 6-line ferrihydrite nanoparticles as verified by XRD, TEM/SAED and Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements. 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of magnetite nanoparticles prepared under different preparation conditions could be analyzed on the basis of a common model based on the superposition of four sextet components displaying Gaussian-shaped hyperfine magnetic field distributions.

  5. Peculiarities of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained in acoustoplasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Nikiforov, V. N.; Shevchenko, S. N.; Yakunin, V. G.; Timoshenko, V. Yu.; Bychenko, A. B.; Sredin, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    Nanoparticles of tungsten, copper, iron, and zinc oxides were synthesized in acoustoplasma discharge. Their size distribution was studied by electron microscopy and laser correlation spectroscopy. Ultrasound was found to narrow significantly the size distribution width of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Water suspensions of zinc oxide nanoparticles showed photoluminescence in red and near infrared spectral ranges, which makes them a promising material for luminescent diagnostics of biological systems.

  6. Photoactivable caps for reactive metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ashish

    The synthesis and stabilization of reactive metal nanoparticles is often challenging under normal atmospheric conditions. This problem can be alleviated by capping and passivation. Our lab has focused on forming polymer coatings on the surface of reactive metal nanoparticles. We discovered a convenient and effective route for stabilization of aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs), which uses the nascent metal core as a polymerization initiator for various organic monomers. In our previous work, we used this method to passivate the Al NPs using variety of epoxides and copolymers of epoxides and alkenes. These products have demonstrated air stability for weeks to months with little to no degradation in the active Al content. Since our previously synthesized Al NP's were not beneficial for rapid and efficient thermodynamic access to the active Al core, our goal was find polymers that could easily be photochemically activated to enhance such access. Since poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) has photodegrading properties, we used PMMA as a capping agent to passivate Al NPs. In this work, we present capping and stabilization of Al NPs with PMMA, and also with 1,2-epoxyhexane/ PMMA. In our previous work, we increased the stability of Al NP capped with 1,2-epoxy-9-decene by adding 1,13-tetradecadiene as a cross-linker. Here, we used the methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer as cross-linker for Al NP capped with 1,2-epoxy-9-decene. We have also used the MMA as capping agent. We use powder x-ray diffractametry (PXRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and thermogravity analysis (TGA) to confirm the presence of elemental Al and ATR-FTIR to confirm the presence of polymers.

  7. Crystallization behavior of iron-based amorphous nanoparticles prepared sonochemically.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Naoya; Hirata, Shingo; Inada, Miki; Hayashi, Katsuro

    2017-03-01

    In general, a rapid quenching is required to obtain an amorphous metal. It is known that an intensive ultrasonication generates a very high temperature within cavitation bubbles in a very short moment, which enables a rapid quenching process in a liquid phase synthesis. In this study, the sonochemically-derived "amorphous iron" from Fe(CO)5 was carefully examined by XRD, TEM, TG-DTA. The product was found to be an amorphous containing a certain amount (∼15%) of volatile component that can be removed by heating in a nitrogen flow. After annealed in the inert atmosphere at 600°C, cooled down to room temperature, and then exposed in air (oxygen), the sample showed a strong exotherm accompanied by a weight gain. This is due to oxidation of fine metallic iron. Experimental operations of such a reactive material were examined.

  8. Optical Properties of Controlled Nanoscale Assemblies of Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westcott, S. L.; Oldenburg, S. J.; Lee, T. R.; Halas, N. J.

    1998-03-01

    The optical response of a metal nanoparticle in an assembly of nanoparticles is affected by scattering from the other nanoparticles in the assembly. In general, this interaction leads to the appearance of lower energy peaks in the absorption spectrum with their location dependent on the geometry of the assembly(M. Quinten and U. Kreibig, Surface Science 172), 557 (1986).. We construct two types of assemblies using functionalized silica nanoparticles as substrates for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles. First, surprisingly monodisperse clusters of small gold nanoparticles spontaneously form and attach to the silica nanoparticles under appropriate solvent conditions. Second, controlled aggregates of metal nanoparticles are synthesized using bifunctional molecular linkers in a step-by-step procedure. The distances between the constituent metallic nanoparticles, as well as the electronic properties of the region between the nanoparticles, are controlled by the choice of bifunctional molecular linker. As a result of either assembly method, metallic nanoparticles can be brought sufficiently close to each other so that interactions may be observed.

  9. Shape control of the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles under different chain length of reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Ngoi, Kuan Hoon; Chia, Chin-Hua Zakaria, Sarani; Chiu, Wee Siong

    2015-09-25

    We report on the effect of using reducing agents with different chain-length on the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of iron (III) acetylacetonate in 1-octadecene. This modification allows us to control the shape of nanoparticles into spherical and cubic iron oxide nanoparticles. The highly monodisperse 14 nm spherical nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-dodecanediol and average 14 nm edge-length cubic iron oxide nanoparticles are obtained under 1,2-tetradecanediol. The structural characterization such as transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows similar properties between two particles with different shapes. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) shows no significant difference between spherical and cubic nanoparticles, which are 36 emu/g and 37 emu/g respectively and superparamagnetic in nature.

  10. Method and system for producing metallic iron nuggets

    DOEpatents

    Iwasaki, Iwao; Lindgren, Andrew J.; Kiesel, Richard F.

    2013-06-25

    Method and system for producing metallic nuggets includes providing reducible mixture of reducing material (such as carbonaceous material) and reducible iron bearing material (such as iron oxide) that may be arranged in discrete portions, such as mounds or briquettes, on at least a portion of a hearth material layer (such as carbonaceous material). A coarse overlayer of carbonaceous material may be provided over at least some of the discrete portions. Heating the reducible mixture to 1425.degree. C. or 1400.degree. C. or 1375.degree. C. results in formation of an intermediate product of one or more metallic iron nuggets, which may have a sulfur content of less than 0.03%, and slag, which may have less than 5% mass MgO, which may have a ratio of percent by weight sulfur in the slag over percent by weight sulfur in the metallic nuggets of at least about 12 or at least about 15.

  11. Electrotransport in binary iron-based metal melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tekuchev, V. V.; Kalinkin, D. P.; Ivanova, I. V.

    2016-12-01

    The mobility of ions in binary iron-based liquid metal systems is calculated for the first time, based on studies on the specific resistance and self-diffusion coefficient in a wide range of concentrations. It is established that iron ions move toward the anode in Fe-V and Fe-Mo systems, and toward the cathode in Fe-W and Fe-Pt systems; i.e., there is inversion of electrotransport for iron ions. When the concentration of a component is reduced, the mobility of its ions grows in modulus.

  12. Carbon in the Metal of Iron Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, N.; Beckett, J. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Stolper, E. M.

    1996-03-01

    Magmatic iron meteorites (e.g., group IIIAB) are believed to represent the slowly cooled cores of asteroidal-sized bodies. Concentration gradients of Ni in taenite (gamma-alloy) adjacent to kamacite (alpha-alloy) have been studied extensively following the early work of Wood and Goldstein and Ogilvie, and can be used to constrain the rate at which the meteorite cooled through -700 degrees-400 degrees C. Studies on non-anomalous irons have also shown zoning profiles in C, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, and Ge. Zoning patterns of elements other than Ni can provide independent constraints on the thermal histories of iron meteorites at lower temperatures, provided as in the case of C, N and P, that the elements diffuse significantly faster than Ni. We report here ion microprobe measurements of the distribution

  13. Synthesis of highly magnetic iron nanoparticles suitable for field structuring using a β-diketone surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Dale L.; Venturini, Eugene L.; Martin, James E.; Provencio, Paula P.; Patel, Rina J.

    2004-07-01

    We describe the synthesis of highly magnetic iron nanoparticles using a novel surfactant, a β-diketone. We have produced 6 nm iron nanoparticles with an unusually high saturation magnetization of more than 80% the value of bulk iron. Additionally, we measured a particle susceptibility of 14 (MKS units), which is far above the value possible for micron-scale spherical particles. These properties will allow for formation of composites that can be highly structured by magnetic fields.

  14. Cerebral Blood Volume MRI with Intravascular Superparamagentic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gi; Harel, Noam; Jin, Tao; Kim, Tae; Lee, Phil; Zhao, Fuqiang

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral blood volume (CBV) is a crucial physiological indicator of tissue viability and vascular reactivity. Thus, non-invasive CBV mapping has been of great interest. For this, ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO) including monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION) can be used as long half-life, intravascular susceptibility agents of CBV MRI measurements. Also, CBV-weighted fMRI with USPIO provides enhanced sensitivity, reduced large vessel contribution, and improved spatial specificity compared to conventional blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) fMRI, and measures a single physiological parameter that is easily interpretable. We review physiochemical and magnetic properties as well as pharmacokinetics of USPIO in brief. We then extensively discuss quantifications of baseline CBV, vessel size index, and functional CBV change. We also provide reviews of dose-dependent sensitivity, vascular filter function, specificity, characteristics, and impulse response function of CBV fMRI. Examples of CBV fMRI specificity at the laminar and columnar resolution are provided. Finally, we briefly review application of CBV measurements to functional and pharmacological studies in animals. Overall, the use of USPIO can determine baseline CBV and its changes induced by functional activity and pharmacological interventions. PMID:23208650

  15. Programmed iron oxide nanoparticles disintegration in anaerobic digesters boosts biogas production.

    PubMed

    Casals, Eudald; Barrena, Raquel; García, Ana; González, Edgar; Delgado, Lucía; Busquets-Fité, Martí; Font, Xavier; Arbiol, Jordi; Glatzel, Pieter; Kvashnina, Kristina; Sánchez, Antoni; Puntes, Víctor

    2014-07-23

    A novel concept of dosing iron ions using Fe3O4 engineered nanoparticles is used to improve biogas production in anaerobic digestion processes. Since small nanoparticles are unstable, they can be designed to provide ions in a controlled manner, and the highest ever reported improvement of biogas production is obtained. The nanoparticles evolution during operation is followed by an array of spectroscopic techniques.

  16. Properties and suspension stability of dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI applications.

    PubMed

    Basly, B; Felder-Flesch, D; Perriat, P; Pourroy, G; Bégin-Colin, S

    2011-01-01

    Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles have attracted an increasing interest in the last 10 years as contrast agents for MRI. One challenge is to obtain homogeneous and stable aqueous suspensions of iron oxide nanoparticles without aggregates. Iron oxide nanoparticles with sizes around 10 nm were synthesized by two methods: the particle size distribution in water suspension of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method was improved by a process involving two steps of ligand exchange and phase transfer and was compared with that of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition and functionalized by the same dendritic molecule. The saturation magnetization of dendronized nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition was lower than that of nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation. The r(2) relaxivity values were shown to decrease with the agglomeration state in suspension and high r(2) values and r(2) /r(1) ratios were obtained with nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation by comparison with those of commercial products. Dendronized iron oxide nanoparticles thus have potential properties as contrast agent.

  17. Interactions between microbial iron reduction and metal geochemistry: effect of redox cycling on transition metal speciation in iron bearing sediments.

    PubMed

    Cooper, D Craig; Picardal, Flynn F; Coby, Aaron J

    2006-03-15

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respectto Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a -3x increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by approximately 12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These

  18. Removal of chromium(VI) and dye Alizarin Red S (ARS) using polymer-coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanif, Sara; Shahzad, Asma

    2014-06-01

    The present research was conducted with an aim to develop such adsorbent system: polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles which can remove heavy metal and dye from water of different concentration. Synthesis of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for contaminated water purification has been one of the outcomes of application of rapidly growing field of Nanotechnology in Environmental Science. In the present study, the efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles for removal of Cr(VI) and dye (alizarin) from water solutions of known concentrations were evaluated. The nanoparticles were prepared by co-precipitation method and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Polymer-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles carrying functional groups on their surface were synthesized by different methods for permanent magnet-assisted removal of heavy metal (chromium) and dye (Alizarin Red S) from water. The characterization showed that synthesized nanoparticles were in the size range of 10-50 nm. The adsorption capacities of the Fe3O4 using polyMETAC-coated particles for dye (Alizarin Red S) removal were 80-96 % and chromium 62-91 %. The chromium concentration was determined after magnetic separation using atomic absorption spectrophotometer and dye concentration was estimated with UV-visible spectrophotometer. Nanoparticles of polymer coated showed the highest removal capacity from water for metal and dye. The developed adsorbents had higher capacity for removal of heavy metal ions and dye.

  19. Mossbauer Spectrum of Iron-57 in Iron Metal at Very High Pressures.

    PubMed

    Nicol, M; Jura, G

    1963-09-13

    The effect of pressure on the Mössbauer spectrum of Fe(57) in iron metal has been studied as the pressure was increased presumably to more than 140 kbar. At pressures up to 120 kbar, a six-line spectrum characteristic of alpha-iron was observed. At 140 kbar, a seventh line appeared in the spectrum at -0.12 +/- 0.06 mm/sec relative to stainless steel. This line was attributed to the appearance of the high-pressure phase of iron.

  20. Solid-State Combustion of Metallic Nanoparticles: New Possibilities for an Alternative Energy Carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Beach, David B; Labinov, Solomon Davidovich; Richards, Roger K; Rondinone, Adam Justin

    2007-01-01

    As an alternative to conventional methods of conveying and delivering energy in mobile applications or to remote locations, we have examined the combustion of nanostructured metal particles assembled into metal clusters. Clusters containing iron nanoparticles (~50 nm in diameter) were found to combust entirely in the solid state due to the high surface-to-volume ratio typical of nanoparticles. Optical temperature measurements indicated that combustion was rapid (~500 msec), and occurred at relatively low peak combustion temperatures (1000-1200 K). Combustion produces a mixture of Fe(III) oxides. Xray diffraction and gravimetric analysis indicated that combustion was nearly complete (93-95% oxidation). Oxide nanoparticles could be readily reduced at temperatures between 673 and 773 K using hydrogen at 1 atmosphere pressure, and then passivated by the growth of a thin oxide layer. The nanostructuring of the particles is retained throughout the combustion-regeneration cycle. Modeling of the combustion process is in good agreement with observed combustion characteristics.

  1. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  2. Fabrication of ordered metallic and magnetic heterostructured DNA-Nanoparticle hybrids.

    PubMed

    Kinsella, Joseph M; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2008-06-01

    Here we provide a method based on enzymatically catalyzed reactions to cleave and ligate DNA molecules coated with nanoparticles to fabricate multi-component structures. This is done by simultaneously digesting two solutions of nanoparticle coated DNA, one with iron oxide particles the other gold particles, which yields short DNA fragments with complementary single stranded overhangs. When added together and re-attached using ligase enzymes multi-component nanoparticle coated structures are formed providing a novel method to fabricate complicated nanoparticle arrangements from the bottom up. We evaluated the fabrication by characterizing the samples with gel electrophoresis and magnetic force microscopy (MFM). The electrophoresis provides proof that the coated DNA molecules were digested with restriction enzymes and ligated by the T4 ligase enzymes. MFM experiments allow us to visualize the multi-component strands and analyze the magnetic versus metallic segments.

  3. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: magnetic nanoplatforms as drug carriers

    PubMed Central

    Wahajuddin; Arora, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    A targeted drug delivery system is the need of the hour. Guiding magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with the help of an external magnetic field to its target is the principle behind the development of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as novel drug delivery vehicles. SPIONs are small synthetic γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) or Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles with a core ranging between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. These magnetic particles are coated with certain biocompatible polymers, such as dextran or polyethylene glycol, which provide chemical handles for the conjugation of therapeutic agents and also improve their blood distribution profile. The current research on SPIONs is opening up wide horizons for their use as diagnostic agents in magnetic resonance imaging as well as for drug delivery vehicles. Delivery of anticancer drugs by coupling with functionalized SPIONs to their targeted site is one of the most pursued areas of research in the development of cancer treatment strategies. SPIONs have also demonstrated their efficiency as nonviral gene vectors that facilitate the introduction of plasmids into the nucleus at rates multifold those of routinely available standard technologies. SPION-induced hyperthermia has also been utilized for localized killing of cancerous cells. Despite their potential biomedical application, alteration in gene expression profiles, disturbance in iron homeostasis, oxidative stress, and altered cellular responses are some SPION-related toxicological aspects which require due consideration. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of SPIONs with regard to their method of preparation, their utility as drug delivery vehicles, and some concerns which need to be resolved before they can be moved from bench top to bedside. PMID:22848170

  4. Macroscopic and microscopic biodistribution of intravenously administered iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Adwiteeya; Petryk, Alicia A.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Hoopes, P. Jack

    2015-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONP) are being developed for use as a cancer treatment. They have demonstrated efficacy when used either as a monotherapy or in conjunction with conventional chemotherapy and radiation. The success of IONP as a therapeutic tool depends on the delivery of a safe and controlled cytotoxic thermal dose to tumor tissue following activation with an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Prior to clinical approval, knowledge of IONP toxicity, biodistribution and physiological clearance is essential. This preliminary time-course study determines the acute toxicity and biodistribution of 110 nm dextran-coated IONP (iron) in mice, 7 days post systemic, at doses of 0.4, 0.6, and 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight. Acute toxicity, manifested as changes in the behavior of mice, was only observed temporarily at 1.0 mg Fe/ g mouse bodyweight, the highest dose administered. Regardless of dose, mass spectrometry and histological analysis demonstrated over 3 mg Fe/g tissue in organs within the reticuloendotheilial system (i.e. liver, spleen, and lymph nodes). Other organs (brain, heart, lungs, and kidney) had less than 0.5 mg Fe/g tissue with iron predominantly confined to the organ vasculature.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticles in modern microbiology and biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Dinali, Ranmadugala; Ebrahiminezhad, Alireza; Manley-Harris, Merilyn; Ghasemi, Younes; Berenjian, Aydin

    2017-01-10

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONs) are one of the most developed and used nanomaterials in biotechnology and microbiology. These particles have unique physicochemical properties, which make them unique among nanomaterials. Therefore, many experiments have been conducted to develop facile synthesis methods for these particles and to make them biocompatible. Various effects of IONs on microorganisms have been reported. Depending on the microbial strain and nanoparticle (NP) concentration, IONs can stimulate or inhibit microbial growth. Due to the superparamagnetic properties of IONs, these NPs have used as nano sources of heat for hyperthermia in infected tissues. Antibiotic-loaded IONs are used for targeted delivery of chemical therapy direct to the infected organ and IONs have been used as a dirigible carrier for more potent antimicrobial nanomaterials such as silver nanoparticles. Magnetic NPs have been used for specific separation of pathogen and non-pathogen bacterial strains. Very recently, IONs were used as a novel tool for magnetic immobilization of microbial cells and process intensification in a biotechnological process. This review provides an overview of application of IONs in different microbial processes. Recommendations are also given for areas of future research.

  6. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  7. Iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetically assisted patterned coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodi, Gianina; Hritcu, Doina; Draganescu, Dan; Popa, Marcel I.

    2015-08-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles able to magnetically assemble during the curing stage of a polymeric support to create micro-scale surface protuberances in a controlled manner were prepared and characterized. The bare Fe3O4 particles were obtained by two methods: co-precipitation from an aqueous solution containing Fe3+/Fe2+ ions with a molar ratio of 2:1 and partial oxidation of ferrous ions in alkaline conditions. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetization measurement. They were subsequently functionalized using oleic acid, sodium oleate, or non-ionic surfactant mixtures with various hydrophilic to lipophilic balance (HLB) values. Composite nanoparticle-polymer films prepared by spraying were deposited and cured by drying on glass slides under a static magnetic field in the range of 1.5-5.5 mT. Magnetic field generated surface roughness was evidenced by optical and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum hierarchical patterning was obtained with the nanoparticles produced by partial oxidation and functionalized with hydrophobic surfactants. Possible applications may include ice-phobic composite coatings.

  8. The deposition of iron and silver nanoparticles in graphene-polyelectrolyte brushes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ming; Chen, Zhongxin; Wang, Sizhi; Lu, Hongbin

    2012-03-02

    The high surface area of graphene nanosheets (GNs) enables them to load metal nanoparticles (NPs) for various applications such as catalysis, sensors and biomedicine. To optimize the performance, it is desired to establish an effective approach that can tune the morphology of metal nanoparticles (NPs) on GNs. We here demonstrate that GN-poly(acrylic acid) (GN/PAA) brushes can control the size and spatial distributions of iron and silver NPs. Results of Raman, Fourier transform infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirm the covalent bonding between PAA chains and GNs. Thermogravimetric analysis reveals a PAA grafting density of ~0.055 chain nm(-2). Transmission electron microscopy is used to study the effect of PAA chain length and precursor concentration on the morphology of the metal NPs deposited on PAA brushes and graphene oxide (GO). Short PAA brushes are found to be effective for controlling the spatial and size distributions of the NPs, resulting in small particle sizes and homogeneous distributions compared to those deposited on GO. The concentration of precursors has a limited effect on the dimension of the NPs in the brushes due to the key role that polyelectrolyte brushes play in controlling the growth of NPs.

  9. Toxicity of zero-valent iron nanoparticles to a trichloroethylene-degrading groundwater microbial community.

    PubMed

    Zabetakis, Kara M; Niño de Guzmán, Gabriela T; Torrents, Alba; Yarwood, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    The microbiological impact of zero-valent iron used in the remediation of groundwater was investigated by exposing a trichloroethylene-degrading anaerobic microbial community to two types of iron nanoparticles. Changes in total bacterial and archaeal population numbers were analyzed using qPCR and were compared to results from a blank and negative control to assess for microbial toxicity. Additionally, the results were compared to those of samples exposed to silver nanoparticles and iron filings in an attempt to discern the source of toxicity. Statistical analysis revealed that the three different iron treatments were equally toxic to the total bacteria and archaea populations, as compared with the controls. Conversely, the silver nanoparticles had a limited statistical impact when compared to the controls and increased the microbial populations in some instances. Therefore, the findings suggest that zero-valent iron toxicity does not result from a unique nanoparticle-based effect.

  10. Comparison of characteristics of selected metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles produced by picosecond laser ablation at 532 and 1064 nm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamad, Abubaker; Li, Lin; Liu, Zhu

    2016-10-01

    Picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles was only recently reported. The effect of laser wavelength in picosecond laser generation of nanoparticles is not yet fully understood. This investigation reports the new findings comparing the characteristics of Au, Ag, Ag-TiO2, TiO2, ZnO and iron oxide nanoparticles generated by picosecond laser ablation in deionised water at 532 and 1064 nm laser wavelengths. The laser ablation was carried out at a fixed pulse width of 10 ps, a repetition rate of 400 kHz and a scan speed of 250 mm/s. The nanoparticles were characterised by UV-Vis optical spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The work shows that there is no noticeable difference in the size of the metal oxide nanoparticles produced at 532 and 1064 nm, especially for the TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles; however, a considerable size difference can be seen for metallic (e.g. Au) and metallic compound (e.g. Ag-TiO2) nanoparticles at the two wavelengths. It demonstrates that noble metals are more profoundly affected by laser wavelengths. The reasons behind these results are discussed. In addition, the work shows that there are different crystalline structures of the TiO2 nanoparticles at 1064 and 532 nm wavelengths.

  11. Effects of engineered iron nanoparticles on the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) Bruch & Schimp, after foliar exposure.

    PubMed

    Canivet, L; Dubot, P; Garçon, G; Denayer, F-O

    2015-03-01

    The effects of iron nanoparticles on bryophytes (Physcomitrella patens) were studied following foliar exposure. We used iron nanoparticles (Fe-NP) representative of industrial emissions from the metallurgical industries. After a characterization of iron nanoparticles and the validation of nanoparticle internalization in cells, the effects (cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation of membrane) of iron nanoparticles were determined through the axenic culturing of Physcomitrella patens exposed at five different concentrations (5 ng, 50 ng, 500 ng, 5 µg and 50 µg per plant). Following exposure, the plant health, measured as ATP concentrations, was not impacted. Moreover, we studied oxidative stress in three ways: through the measure of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, through malondialdehyde (MDA) production and also through glutathione regulation. At concentrations tested over a short period, the level of ROS, MDA and glutathione were not significantly disturbed.

  12. Iron oxide nanoparticles induce Pseudomonas aeruginosa growth, induce biofilm formation, and inhibit antimicrobial peptide function†

    PubMed Central

    Borcherding, Jennifer; Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Chen, Haihan; Stebounova, Larissa; Wu, Chia-Ming; Rubasinghege, Gayan; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A.; Caraballo, Juan Carlos; Zabner, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Given the increased use of iron-containing nanoparticles in a number of applications, it is important to understand any effects that iron-containing nanoparticles can have on the environment and human health. Since iron concentrations are extremely low in body fluids, there is potential that iron-containing nanoparticles may influence the ability of bacteria to scavenge iron for growth, affect virulence and inhibit antimicrobial peptide (AMP) function. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) and AMPs were exposed to iron oxide nanoparticles, hematite (α-Fe2O3), of different sizes ranging from 2 to 540 nm (2 ± 1, 43 ± 6, 85 ± 25 and 540 ± 90 nm) in diameter. Here we show that the greatest effect on bacterial growth, biofilm formation, and AMP function impairment is found when exposed to the smallest particles. These results are attributed in large part to enhanced dissolution observed for the smallest particles and an increase in the amount of bioavailable iron. Furthermore, AMP function can be additionally impaired by adsorption onto nanoparticle surfaces. In particular, lysozyme readily adsorbs onto the nanoparticle surface which can lead to loss of peptide activity. Thus, this current study shows that co-exposure of nanoparticles and known pathogens can impact host innate immunity. Therefore, it is important that future studies be designed to further understand these types of impacts. PMID:25221673

  13. The detection of HBV DNA with gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle gene probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Dong; Luo, XiaoPing; Lu, QiangHua; Yao, KaiLun; Liu, ZuLi; Ning, Qin

    2008-03-01

    Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by the citrate reduction of tetra-chloroauric acid in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles which were added as seeds. With a fluorescence-based method, the maximal surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotides and the maximal percentage of hybridization strands on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles were (120 ± 8) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and (14 ± 2%), respectively, which were comparable with those of (132 ± 10) and (22 ± 3%) in Au nanoparticle groups. Large network aggregates were formed when gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probe was applied to detect HBV DNA molecules as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy and the high specificity was verified by blot hybridization. Our results further suggested that detecting DNA with iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic separator was feasible and might be an alternative effective method.

  14. Assessment of Morphological and Functional Changes in Organs of Rats after Intramuscular Introduction of Iron Nanoparticles and Their Agglomerates

    PubMed Central

    Sizova, Elena; Miroshnikov, Sergey; Yausheva, Elena; Polyakova, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The research was performed on male Wistar rats based on assumptions that new microelement preparations containing metal nanoparticles and their agglomerates had potential. Morphological and functional changes in tissues in the injection site and dynamics of chemical element metabolism (25 indicators) in body were assessed after repeated intramuscular injections (total, 7) with preparation containing agglomerate of iron nanoparticles. As a result, iron depot was formed in myosymplasts of injection sites. The quantity of muscle fibers having positive Perls' stain increased with increasing number of injections. However, the concentration of the most chemical elements and iron significantly decreased in the whole skeletal muscle system (injection sites are not included). Consequently, it increased up to the control level after the sixth and the seventh injections. Among the studied organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen), Caspase-3 expression was revealed only in spleen. The expression had a direct dependence on the number of injections. Processes of iron elimination from preparation containing nanoparticles and their agglomerates had different intensity. PMID:25789310

  15. Biocompatibility of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Tharajak, Jirasak; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C.; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2014-07-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, manganese, and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental compositions of the nanoparticles were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle size of the nanoparticles was investigated using particle size analyzer, and the zeta potentials were measured using zeta potential analyzer. The phase components of the synthesized transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were studied using Raman spectroscopy. The biocompatibility of the nanoparticles was assessed using osteoblast-like cells. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals strongly influences the physical, chemical properties, and biocompatibility of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  16. Marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for synthesis of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Nam, Seung Yun; Oh, Junghwan

    2016-11-01

    The use of marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles is a relatively new field of research with considerable prospects. This method is eco-friendly, time saving, and inexpensive and can be easily scaled up for large-scale synthesis. The increasing need to develop simple, nontoxic, clean, and environmentally safe production methods for nanoparticles and to decrease environmental impact, minimize waste, and increase energy productivity has become important in this field. Marine microorganisms are tiny organisms that live in marine ecosystems and account for >98% of biomass of the world's ocean. Marine microorganisms synthesize metallic nanoparticles either intracellularly or extracellularly. Marine microbially-produced metallic nanoparticles have received considerable attention in recent years because of their expected impact on various applications such as medicine, energy, electronic, and space industries. The present review discusses marine microorganisms as potential biofactories for the green synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and their potential applications.

  17. Shape Evolution of Metal Nanoparticles in Water Vapor Environment.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Beien; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Chunlei; Gao, Yi

    2016-04-13

    The structures of the metal nanoparticles are crucial for their catalytic activities. How to understand and even control the shape evolution of nanoparticles under reaction condition is a big challenge in heterogeneous catalysis. It has been proved that many reactive gases hold the capability of changing the structures and properties of metal nanoparticles. One interesting question is whether water vapor, such a ubiquitous environment, could induce the shape evolution of metal nanoparticles. So far this question has not received enough attention yet. In this work, we developed a model based on the density functional theory, the Wulff construction, and the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to explore the shape of metal nanoparticle at given temperature and water vapor pressure. By this model, we show clearly that water vapor could notably increase the fraction of (110) facets and decrease that of (111) facets for 3-8 nm Cu nanoparticles, which is perfectly consistent with the experimental observations. Further investigations indicate the water vapor has different effects on the different metal species (Cu, Au, Pt, and Pd). This work not only helps to understand the water vapor effect on the structures of metal nanoparticles but also proposes a simple but effective model to predict the shape of nanoparticles in certain environment.

  18. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as drug delivery system in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcu, A.; Pop, S.; Dumitrache, F.; Mocanu, M.; Niculite, C. M.; Gherghiceanu, M.; Lungu, C. P.; Fleaca, C.; Ianchis, R.; Barbut, A.; Grigoriu, C.; Morjan, I.

    2013-09-01

    Present work was focused on producing improved iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in breast cancer. Nanometric-sized iron oxide particles were synthesized by laser pyrolysis and were morphologically/structurally characterized. These new nanoparticles were compared with some commercial, chemically prepared iron oxide ones. Cytotoxicity and the anti-proliferation effects of nanoparticles were tested in vitro on the breast adenocarcinoma cell line MCF-7. Nanoparticles were further coated with the antracyclinic antibiotic Violamycine B1 and tested for the anti-tumor effect on MCF-7 cells. The nanoparticles produced by us seem more effective in vitro than the commercial ones, with respect to cellular uptake and VB1 delivery. Violamycine B1 bound on nanoparticles is as efficient as the free form, but is better delivered into tumor cells.

  19. The transition metals copper and iron in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Mancía, Susana; Pérez-Neri, Iván; Ríos, Camilo; Tristán-López, Luis; Rivera-Espinosa, Liliana; Montes, Sergio

    2010-07-30

    Neurodegenerative diseases constitute a worldwide health problem. Metals like iron and copper are essential for life, but they are also involved in several neurodegenerative mechanisms such as protein aggregation, free radical generation and oxidative stress. The role of Fe and Cu, their pathogenic mechanisms and possible therapeutic relevance are discussed regarding four of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases as well as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Metal-mediated oxidation by Fenton chemistry is a common feature for all those disorders and takes part of a self-amplifying damaging mechanism, leading to neurodegeneration. The interaction between metals and proteins in the nervous system seems to be a crucial factor for the development or absence of neurodegeneration. The present review also deals with the therapeutic strategies tested, mainly using metal chelating drugs. Metal accumulation within the nervous system observed in those diseases could be the result of compensatory mechanisms to improve metal availability for physiological processes.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of poly(divinylbenzene)-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as precursor for the formation of air-stable carbon-coated iron crystalline nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Boguslavsky, Yonit; Margel, Shlomo

    2008-01-01

    Maghemite (gamma-Fe2O3) nanoparticles of 15 +/- 3 nm diameter were prepared by nucleation of gelatin/iron oxide followed by growth of gamma-Fe2O3 films onto these nuclei. The gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were coated with polydivinylbenzene (PDVB) by emulsion polymerization of divinylbenzene (DVB) in an aqueous continuous phase containing the gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. The PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, dispersed in water, were separated from homo-PDVB nanoparticles using the high gradient magnetic field (HGMF) technique. The influence of DVB concentration on the amount of PDVB coating, on the size and size distribution of the coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles and on their magnetic properties, has been investigated. Air-stable carbon-coated iron (alpha-Fe/C) crystalline nanoparticles of 41 +/- 12 nm diameter have been prepared by annealing the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles at 1050 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. These nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization value (83 emu g(-1)) and excellent resistance to oxidation. Characterization of the PDVB-coated gamma-Fe2O3 and of the alpha-Fe/C nanoparticles has been accomplished by TEM, HRTEM, DLS, FTIR, XRD, thermal analysis, zeta-potential, and magnetic measurements.

  1. Characterization, Quantification, and Determination of the Toxicity of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to the Bone Marrow Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paik, Sae-Yeol-Rim; Kim, Jong-Seok; Shin, Sung Jae; Ko, Sanghoon

    2015-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) have been used to develop iron supplements for improving the bioavailability of iron in patients with iron deficiency, which is one of the most serious nutritional deficiencies in the world. Accurate information about the characteristics, concentration, and cytotoxicity of IONPs to the developmental and reproductive cells enables safe use of IONPs in the supplement industry. The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical properties and cytotoxicity of IONPs in bone marrow cells. We prepared three different types of iron samples (surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles (SMNPs), IONPs, and iron citrate) and analyzed their physicochemical properties such as particle size distribution, zeta potential, and morphology. In addition, we examined the cytotoxicity of the IONPs in various kinds of bone marrow cells. We analyzed particle size distribution, zeta potential, iron levels, and subcellular localization of the iron samples in bone marrow cells. Our results showed that the iron samples were not cytotoxic to the bone marrow cells and did not affect the expression of cell surface markers and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced the secretion of cytokines by murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs). Our results may be used to investigate the interactions between nanoparticles and cells and tissues and the developmental toxicity of nanoparticles. PMID:26389886

  2. Structural and magnetic properties of polymer coated iron based nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Srinivasan

    reduction of the metal salt solution. Since our intention is to synthesize iron based nanoparticles we used iron salts such as FeCl3. A polymer such as polyethylene glycol is coated onto the oxide shell to make it biocompatible. Parameters such as length of the tube, diameter of the Y-tube junction and concentration of the reactants were varied to study the effect on particle size, structure and morphology of the magnetic nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the particles typically contain three iron based phases such as a crystalline (alpha-Fe), nanocrystalline/amorphous (a-FeB/n-Fe) and Fe-oxide. By controlling the synthesis parameters such as length of the reaction tube, inner diameter of the Y-tube and concentration of the reagents the volume percentage of the three phases of the nanoparticles, viz. crystalline phase, amorphous phase and Fe-Oxide phases can be controlled effectively. The Fe-Oxide phase could not be determined whether is magnetite and maghemite phase because of the very broad nature of the peak. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the particle size and the microstructural property of the samples. Samples with particle size in the range of 3 nm to 30 nm were fabricated. The magnetic properties of the nanoparticles studied were measured with a vibrating sample magnetometer with a maximum field of 1 Tesla. The particles magnetic properties such as magnetization and coercivity were typical of a soft ferromagnetic material with a high magnetization (in emu/g) and the coercivity was in range of 50 to 450 Oe. The nanoparticles synthesized were used to study their performance in magnetic fluid hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging applications. In the hyperthermia, the power loss due to an alternating magnetic field had a direct correlation with the magnetization and the particle size of the nanoparticle. The power loss in magnetic fluid hyperthermia is an outcome from four loss mechanism, they are Brownian rotational

  3. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Robert M.; Monson, Todd C.; Gullapalli, Rama R.

    2014-06-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a `green' thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization.

  4. Paper surfaces for metal nanoparticle inkjet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öhlund, Thomas; Örtegren, Jonas; Forsberg, Sven; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2012-10-01

    The widespread usage of paper and board offer largely unexploited possibilities for printed electronics applications. Reliability and performance of printed devices on comparatively rough and inhomogenous surfaces of paper does however pose challenges. Silver nanoparticle ink has been deposited on ten various paper substrates by inkjet printing. The papers are commercially available, and selected over a range of different types and construction. A smooth nonporous polyimide film was included as a nonporous reference substrate. The substrates have been characterized in terms of porosity, absorption rate, apparent surface energy, surface roughness and material content. The electrical conductivity of the resulting printed films have been measured after drying at 60 °C and again after additional curing at 110 °C. A qualitative analysis of the conductivity differences on the different substrates based on surface characterization and SEM examination is presented. Measurable parameters of importance to the final conductivity are pointed out, some of which are crucial to achieve conductivity. When certain criteria of the surfaces are met, paper media can be used as low cost, but comparably high performance substrates for metal nanoparticle inks in printed electronics applications.

  5. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garg, Vijayendra K.; Kuzmann, Erno; Sharma, Virender K.; Kumar, Arun; Oliveira, Aderbal C.

    2016-10-01

    Studies of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been extensively carried out. Since the earlier work on Mössbauer studies on SPIONs in 1970s, many biomedical applications and their uses in innovative methods to produce new materials with improved performance have appeared. Applications of SPIONs in environmental remediation are also forthcoming. Several different methods of synthesis and coating of the magnetic particles have been described in the literature, and Mössbauer spectroscopy has been an important tool in the characterization of these materials. It is quite possible that the interpretation of the Mössbauer spectra might not be entirely correct because the possible presence of maghemite in the end product of SPIONs might not have been taken into consideration. Nanotechnology is an emerging field that covers a wide range of new technologies under development in nanoscale (1 to 100 nano meters) to produce new products and methodology.

  6. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Pan, W.; Zhu, J. F.; Li, J. C.; Gao, N.; Liu, C.; Ji, L.; Yu, E. T.; Kang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates.

  7. Asymmetric light reflectance from metal nanoparticle arrays on dielectric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Pan, W; Zhu, J F; Li, J C; Gao, N; Liu, C; Ji, L; Yu, E T; Kang, J Y

    2015-12-18

    Asymmetric light reflectance associated with localized surface plasmons excited in metal nanoparticles on a quartz substrate is observed and analyzed. This phenomenon is explained by the superposition of two waves, the wave reflected by the air/quartz interface and that reflected by the metal nanoparticles, and the resulting interference effects. Far field behavior investigation suggests that zero reflection can be achieved by optimizing the density of metal nanoparticles. Near field behavior investigation suggests that the coupling efficiency of localized surface plasmon can be additionally enhanced by separating the metal NPs from substrates using a thin film with refractive index smaller than the substrate. The latter behavior is confirmed via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies using metal nanoparticles on Si/SiO2 substrates.

  8. Interference between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, A. N.; Aude Garcia, C.; Candéias, S.; Casanova, A.; Catty, P.; Charbonnier, P.; Chevallet, M.; Collin-Faure, V.; Cuillel, M.; Douki, T.; Herlin-Boime, N.; Lelong, C.; Luche, S.; Mintz, E.; Moulis, J. M.; Nivière, V.; Ollagnier de Choudens, S.; Rabilloud, T.; Ravanat, J. L.; Sauvaigo, S.; Carrière, M.; Michaud-Soret, I.

    2011-07-01

    The TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) are now produced abundantly and widely used in a variety of consumer products. Due to the important increase in the production of TiO2-NPs, potential widespread exposure of humans and environment may occur during both the manufacturing process and final use. Therefore, the potential toxicity of TiO2-NPs on human health and environment has attracted particular attention. Unfortunately, the results of the large number of studies on the toxicity of TiO2-NPs differ significantly, mainly due to an incomplete characterization of the used nanomaterials in terms of size, shape and crystalline structure and to their unknown state of agglomeration/aggregation. The purpose of our project entitled NanoBioMet is to investigate if interferences between nanoparticles and metal homeostasis could be observed and to study the toxicity mechanisms of TiO2-NPs with well-characterized physicochemical parameters, using proteomic and molecular approaches. A perturbation of metal homeostasis will be evaluated upon TiO2-NPs exposure which could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Moreover, oxidative stress consequences such as DNA damage and lipid peroxidation will be studied. The toxicity of TiO2-NPs of different sizes and crystalline structures will be evaluated both in prokaryotic (E. coli) and eukaryotic cells (A549 human pneumocytes, macrophages, and hepatocytes). First results of the project will be presented concerning the dispersion of TiO2-NPs in bacterial medium, proteomic studies on total extracts of macrophages and genotoxicity on pneumocytes.

  9. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Niluka M; Current, Kelley M; Obare, Sherine O

    2015-09-30

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism's ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the OPEN ACCESS Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2015, 16 23483 transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells.

  10. Mutagenic Effects of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles on Biological Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, Niluka M.; Current, Kelley M.; Obare, Sherine O.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increased interest in the design and use of iron oxide materials with nanoscale dimensions for magnetic, catalytic, biomedical, and electronic applications. The increased manufacture and use of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) in consumer products as well as industrial processes is expected to lead to the unintentional release of IONPs into the environment. The impact of IONPs on the environment and on biological species is not well understood but remains a concern due to the increased chemical reactivity of nanoparticles relative to their bulk counterparts. This review article describes the impact of IONPs on cellular genetic components. The mutagenic impact of IONPs may damage an organism’s ability to develop or reproduce. To date, there has been experimental evidence of IONPs having mutagenic interactions on human cell lines including lymphoblastoids, fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, bone marrow cells, lung epithelial cells, alveolar type II like epithelial cells, bronchial fibroblasts, skin epithelial cells, hepatocytes, cerebral endothelial cells, fibrosarcoma cells, breast carcinoma cells, lung carcinoma cells, and cervix carcinoma cells. Other cell lines including the Chinese hamster ovary cells, mouse fibroblast cells, murine fibroblast cells, Mytilus galloprovincialis sperm cells, mice lung cells, murine alveolar macrophages, mice hepatic and renal tissue cells, and vero cells have also shown mutagenic effects upon exposure to IONPs. We further show the influence of IONPs on microorganisms in the presence and absence of dissolved organic carbon. The results shed light on the transformations IONPs undergo in the environment and the nature of the potential mutagenic impact on biological cells. PMID:26437397

  11. Enhancement of Raman scattering from molecules placed near metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbiellini, B.

    2017-01-01

    Large Raman scattering cross sections from molecules on surfaces of metallic nanoparticles are described within a renormalization-group theory. In this approach the valence electrons of the molecules are embedded in an effective medium described by a dielectric function, which integrates out the effect of the plasmonic excitations of the metallic nanoparticles. The source of the enhanced photon inelastic scattering is produced by the resonant excitation of surface plasmons at the metallic nanoparticles. A similar theory has been successfully used to explain the resonant x-ray inelastic scattering and the behavior of nonlinear susceptibilities at the x-ray edges.

  12. Biomolecular crystals for material applications and a mechanistic study of an iron oxide nanoparticle synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkner, Joshua Charles

    The three projects within this work address the difficulties of controlling biomolecular crystal formats (i.e. size and shape), producing 3-D ordered composite materials from biomolecular crystal templates, and understanding the mechanism of a practical iron oxide synthesis. The unifying thread consistent throughout these three topics is the development of methods to manipulate nanomaterials using a bottom-up approach. Biomolecular crystals are nanometer to millimeter sized crystals that have well ordered mesoporous solvent channels. The overall physical dimensions of these crystals are highly dependent on crystallization conditions. The controlled growth of micro- and nanoprotein crystals was studied to provide new pathways for creating smaller crystalline protein materials. This method produced tetragonal hen egg-white lysozyme crystals (250--100,000 nm) with near monodisperse size distributions (<15%). With this degree of control, existing protein crystal applications such as drug delivery and analytical sensors can reach their full potential. Applications for larger crystals with inherently ubiquitous pore structures could extend to materials used for membranes or templates. In this work, the porous structure of larger cowpea mosaic virus crystals was used to template metal nanoparticle growth within the body centered cubic crystalline network. The final composite material was found to have long range ordering of palladium and platinum nonocrystal aggregates (10nm) with symmetry consistent to the virus template. Nanoparticle synthesis itself is an immense field of study with an array of diverse applications. The final piece of this work investigates the mechanism behind a previously developed iron oxide synthesis to gain more understanding and direction to future synthesis strategies. The particle growth mechanism was found to proceed by the formation of a solvated iron(III)oleate complex followed by a reduction of iron (III) to iron (II). This unstable iron

  13. Novel mechanochemical approaches for the synthesis of surface-functionalized metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Brandon Wade

    A novel mechanochemical milling technique, homogeneous media milling (HMM) is used to generate copious nanoparticles from a metal, parent media. Through the addition of surface-active capping agents, this method removes material from inch-scale parent material, via spallation and abrasion, resulting in gram-scale quantities of nanoparticles. Based on the principal of lowering a materials surface free energy through the chemisorption of a liquid or gaseous reagent, ductile and malleable metals can now be effectively and efficiently reduced to the nano scale. Acetonitrile was discovered to be an exceptionally good reagent for producing active aluminum nanoparticles, and oleic acid could be used to subsequently functionalize the particle surface, rendering them air-stable and hydrocarbon-fuel dispersible. In the interest of generality this process was used to make iron and copper nanoparticles via a similar method. It was discovered that acetonitrile decomposes on the surface of aluminum during HMM, resulting in the liberation of methyl group and hydrogen, which was detected as H2, CH4, and C2H6 in the headspace of the milling jar. Ammonia and methylamine, in gaseous form, are also reported to be highly effective surface-active milling agents for the production of aluminum nanoparticles. Methylamine, in particular, produced active, pyrophoric nanoparticles. For both acetonitrile and methylamine evidence of a stable surface adduct can be detected post milling using X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  14. Iron-Based Nanoparticles for Toxic Organic Degradation: Silica Platform and Green Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Noah D.; Smuleac, Vasile; Stevens, Christopher; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2012-01-01

    Iron and iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) are finding wide applications for the remediation of various toxic chloro-organic compounds (such as trichloroethylene, TCE), via reductive and oxidative processes. In this study, Fe NPs (30-50 nm) are synthesized by reduction from ferric ions immobilized (by ion exchange) on a platform (two types of sulfonated silica particles), in order to prevent the NP agglomeration. Next, the Fe NPs are oxidized and their effectiveness for the oxidative dechlorination of TCE via the heterogeneous decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to OH• on the surface of the iron oxide NPs was demonstrated. For the reductive approach, the use of ascorbic acid as a “green” reducing agent in conjunction with a secondary metal (Pd) inhibits NP oxidation and agglomeration through surface adsorbed species. The Fe/Pd NPs have been successfully applied for the dechlorination of TCE (kSA, surface-area normalized reaction rate, = 8.1 ×10-4 L/m2h). PMID:22899876

  15. The unexpected properties of alkali metal iron selenide superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Dagotto, Elbio R

    2013-01-01

    The iron-based superconductors that contain FeAs layers as the fundamental building block in the crystal structures have been rationalized in the past using ideas based on the Fermi surface nesting of hole and electron pockets when in the presence of weak Hubbard U interactions. This approach seemed appropriate considering the small values of the magnetic moments in the parent compounds and the clear evidence based on photoemission experiments of the required electron and hole pockets. However, recent results in the context of alkali metal iron selenides, with generic chemical composition AxFe2ySe2 (A alkali metal element), have challenged those previous ideas since at particular compositions y the low-temperature ground states are insulating and display antiferromagnetic order with large iron magnetic moments. Moreover, angle-resolved photoemission studies have revealed the absence of hole pockets at the Fermi level in these materials. The present status of this exciting area of research, with the potential to alter conceptually our understanding of the ironbased superconductors, is here reviewed, covering both experimental and theoretical investigations. Other recent related developments are also briefly reviewed, such as the study of selenide two-leg ladders and the discovery of superconductivity in a single layer of FeSe. The conceptual issues considered established for the alkali metal iron selenides, as well as several issues that still require further work, are discussed.

  16. HREM analysis of graphite-encapsulated metallic nanoparticles for possible medical applications.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Robert; Li, He; Madsen, Steven; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-11-01

    High resolution electron microscopy has been applied to study the structure of metallic nanoparticles. These have sparked considerable interest as contrast agents in the field of biological imaging, including in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). Here, we describe a method of synthesizing sub-10nm superparamagnetic metal and alloy nanoparticles by reduction of metallic salts. Annealing at 900°C in a methane/hydrogen environment forms a thin graphitic-carbon shell which is expected to improve stability, biocompatibility, and functionalization. Subsequent high resolution electron microscopy verifies graphitization and allows for crystallographic analysis. Most particles consist of single crystals in the phase predicted for the bulk material at the annealing temperature. Electron energy loss spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and lattice constant measurements show large variation in composition for alloy nanoparticles from a single synthesis. The magnetization relaxation time (T2) measurements demonstrate that Fe and AuFe nanoparticles compete with commercially available iron oxide MRI contrast agents. X-ray attenuation measurements of an AuFe alloy nanoparticle solution gave a relative radiodensity of 280 Hounsfield Units, demonstrating promise as a dual-purpose contrast agent in CT and MRI. Long term stability in an atmospheric environment was also tested, with no signs of corrosion or oxidation after several years of storage.

  17. Formulation design for target delivery of iron nanoparticles to TCE zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ziheng; Acosta, Edgar

    2013-12-01

    Nanoparticles of zero-valent iron (NZVI) are effective reducing agents for some dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminants such as trichloroethylene (TCE). However, target delivery of iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones in the aquifer remains an elusive feature for NZVI technologies. This work discusses three strategies to deliver iron nanoparticles to DNAPL zones. To this end, iron oxide nanoparticles coated with oleate (OL) ions were used as stable analogs for NZVI. The OL-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are rendered lipophilic via (a) the addition of CaCl2, (b) acidification, or (c) the addition of a cationic surfactant, benzethonium chloride (BC). Mixtures of OL and BC show promise as a target delivery strategy due to the high stability of the nanoparticles in water, and their preferential partition into TCE in batch experiments. Column tests show that while the OL-BC coated iron oxide nanoparticles remain largely mobile in TCE-free columns, a large fraction of these particles are retained in TCE-contaminated columns, confirming the effectiveness of this target delivery strategy.

  18. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: Synthesis and surface coating techniques for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Sheng-Nan; Wei, Chao; Zhu, Zan-Zan; Hou, Yang-Long; Subbu, S. Venkatraman; Xu, Zhi-Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are the most popular magnetic nanoparticles used in biomedical applications due to their low cost, low toxicity, and unique magnetic property. Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, including magnetite (Fe3O4) and maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), usually exhibit a superparamagnetic property as their size goes smaller than 20 nm, which are often denoted as superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and utilized for drug delivery, diagnosis, therapy, and etc. This review article gives a brief introduction on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in terms of their fundamentals of magnetism, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and drug delivery, as well as the synthesis approaches, surface coating, and application examples from recent key literatures. Because the quality and surface chemistry play important roles in biomedical applications, our review focuses on the synthesis approaches and surface modifications of iron oxide nanoparticles. We aim to provide a detailed introduction to readers who are new to this field, helping them to choose suitable synthesis methods and to optimize the surface chemistry of iron oxide nanoparticles for their interests.

  19. Mechanism of the reduction of hexavalent chromium by organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pingxiao; Li, Shuzhen; Ju, Liting; Zhu, Nengwu; Wu, Jinhua; Li, Ping; Dang, Zhi

    2012-06-15

    Iron nanoparticles exhibit greater reactivity than micro-sized Fe(0), and they impart advantages for groundwater remediation. In this paper, supported iron nanoparticles were synthesized to further enhance the speed and efficiency of remediation. Natural montmorillonite and organo-montmorillonite were chosen as supporting materials. The capacity of supported iron nanoparticles was evaluated, compared to unsupported iron nanoparticles, for the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI). The reduction of Cr(VI) was much greater with organo-montmorillonite supported iron nanoparticles and fitted the pseudo-second order equation better. With a dose at 0.47 g/L, a total removal capacity of 106 mg Cr/g Fe(0) was obtained. Other factors that affect the efficiency of Cr(VI) removal, such as pH values, the initial Cr(VI) concentration and storage time of nanoparticles were investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) were used to figure out the mechanism of the removal of Cr(VI). XPS indicated that the Cr(VI) bound to the particle surface was completely reduced to Cr(III) under a range of conditions. XANES confirmed that the Cr(VI) reacted with iron nanoparticles was completely reduced to Cr(III).

  20. Synthesis of Lithium Metal Oxide Nanoparticles by Induction Thermal Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Manabu; Kageyama, Takuya; Sone, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Shuhei; Okamoto, Daisuke; Watanabe, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Lithium metal oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by induction thermal plasma. Four different systems—Li–Mn, Li–Cr, Li–Co, and Li–Ni—were compared to understand formation mechanism of Li–Me oxide nanoparticles in thermal plasma process. Analyses of X-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy showed that Li–Me oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in Li–Mn, Li–Cr, and Li–Co systems. Spinel structured LiMn2O4 with truncated octahedral shape was formed. Layer structured LiCrO2 or LiCoO2 nanoparticles with polyhedral shapes were also synthesized in Li–Cr or Li–Co systems. By contrast, Li–Ni oxide nanoparticles were not synthesized in the Li–Ni system. Nucleation temperatures of each metal in the considered system were evaluated. The relationship between the nucleation temperature and melting and boiling points suggests that the melting points of metal oxides have a strong influence on the formation of lithium metal oxide nanoparticles. A lower melting temperature leads to a longer reaction time, resulting in a higher fraction of the lithium metal oxide nanoparticles in the prepared nanoparticles.

  1. Actinomycetes mediated biogenic synthesis of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Manimaran, Manickavelu; Kannabiran, Krishnan

    2017-03-07

    Actinomycetes mediated biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles and their antimicrobial activities are well documented. Actinomycetes facilitate both intracellular and extracellular metal nanoparticles synthesis and are efficient candidates for the production of polydispersed, stable and ultra-small size metal nanoparticles. Secondary metabolites and new chemical entities derived from actinomycetes have not been extensively studied for the synthesis of metal/ metal oxide nanoparticles. The present review focuses on biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles from actinomycetes and the scope for exploring actinomycetes derived compounds (enzymes, organics acids and bioactive compounds) as metal and metal oxide reducing agents for the synthesis of desired nanoparticles. This review also focuses on challenges faced in the applications nanoparticles and the methods to synthesise biogenic metal nanoparticles with desired physiochemical properties such as ultra-small size, large surface to mass ratio, high reactivity etc. Methods to evade their toxicity and unique interactions with biological systems to improve their chance as an alternative therapeutic agent in medical and pharmaceutical industry are also discussed. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Gallic Acid, Ellagic Acid and Pyrogallol Reaction with Metallic Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, J. A.; González, L.; Vargas, A.; Olave, G.

    2003-06-01

    The reaction between gallic acid, ellagic acid and pyrogallol with metallic iron was studied using infrared and Mössbauer spectroscopy. Most hydrolysable tannins with interesting anticorrosive or inhibition properties are structurally related to these compounds, thus they may be used as models for the study of hydrolysable tannins and related polyphenols. The interaction was followed up to 3 months. Results indicated two different behaviors. At polyphenol concentrations higher than 1% iron converts to sparingly soluble and amorphous ferric (and ferrous) polyphenolate complexes. At lower concentrations (0.1%), the hydrolysis reactions are dominant, resulting in the formation of oxyhydroxides, which can be further reduced to compounds like magnetite by the polyphenols.

  3. Surface functionalization of dopamine coated iron oxide nanoparticles for various surface functionalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Jennifer; Xu, Yaolin; Lovas, Kira; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2017-04-01

    We present effective conjugation of four small molecules (glutathione, cysteine, lysine, and Tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane) onto dopamine-coated iron oxide nanoparticles. Conjugation of these molecules could improve the surface functionality of nanoparticles for more neutral surface charge at physiological pH and potentially reduce non-specific adsorption of proteins to nanoparticles surfaces. The success of conjugation was evaluated with dynamic light scattering by measuring the surface charge changes and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy for surface chemistry analysis. The stability of dopamine-coated nanoparticles and the ability of conjugated nanoparticles to reduce the formation of protein corona were evaluated by measuring the size and charge of the nanoparticles in biological medium. This facile conjugation method opens up possibilities for attaching various surface functionalities onto iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces for biomedical applications.

  4. Biomedical microdevices synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles using a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Bin; Weng, Chen-Hsun; Cheng, Fong-Yu; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Lei, Huan-Yao; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2009-02-01

    The preparation of nanoparticles is essential in the application of many nanotechnologies and various preparation methods have been explored in the previous decades. Among them, iron oxide nanoparticles have been widely investigated in applications ranging from bio-imaging to bio-sensing due to their unique magnetic properties. Recently, microfluidic systems have been utilized for synthesis of nanoparticles, which have the advantages of automation, well-controlled reactions, and a high particle uniformity. In this study, a new microfluidic system capable of mixing, transporting and reacting was developed for the synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. It allowed for a rapid and efficient approach to accelerate and automate the synthesis of the iron oxide nanoparticles as compared with traditional methods. The microfluidic system uses micro-electro-mechanical-system technologies to integrate a new double-loop micromixer, two micropumps, and a microvalve on a single chip. When compared with large-scale synthesis systems with commonly-observed particle aggregation issues, successful synthesis of dispersed and uniform iron oxide nanoparticles has been observed within a shorter period of time (15 min). It was found that the size distribution of these iron oxide nanoparticles is superior to that of the large-scale systems without requiring any extra additives or heating. The size distribution had a variation of 16%. This is much lower than a comparable large-scale system (34%). The development of this microfluidic system is promising for the synthesis of nanoparticles for many future biomedical applications.

  5. Iron nanoparticles embedded in carbon films: structural and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashayekhi, Fatemeh; Shafiekhani, Azizollah; Sebt, Seyed Ali

    2016-06-01

    In the present work amorphous hydrogenated carbon films with sputtered iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs @ a-C:H) were deposited by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods using acetylene gas and iron target on quartz and silicon substrates. Samples were prepared in different initial pressures and during constant deposition time. The crystalline structure of Fe NPs @ a-C:H was studied using X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction patterns. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis presents that increasing the initial pressure decreases the atomic ratio of Fe/C and the sp3-hybridized carbon content in prepared samples. The transmission electron microscope image shows the encapsulated Fe NPs in carbon films. The optical properties and localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of samples were studied using UV-visible spectrophotometry, which is shown that increasing of Fe content decreases the intensity of LSPR peak and increases the optical band gap.

  6. Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems for Biotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Mok, Hyejung; Zhang, Miqin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION)-based carrier systems have many advantages over other nanoparticle-based systems. They are biocompatible, biodegradable, facilely tunable, and superparamagnetic and thus controllable by an external magnetic field. These attributes enable their broad biomedical applications. In particular, magnetically-driven carriers are drawing considerable interest as an emerging therapeutic delivery system because of their superior delivery efficiency. Area covered This article reviews the recent advances in use of SPION-based carrier systems to improve the delivery efficiency and target specificity of biotherapeutics. We examine various formulations of SPION-based delivery systems, including SPION micelles, clusters, hydrogels, liposomes, and micro/nanospheres, as well as their specific applications in delivery of biotherapeutics. Expert opinion Recently, biotherapeutics including therapeutic cells, proteins and genes have been studied as alternative treatments to various diseases. Despite the advantages of high target specificity and low adverse effects, clinical translation of biotherapeutics has been hindered by the poor stability and low delivery efficiency compared to chemical drugs. Accordingly, biotherapeutic delivery systems that can overcome these limitations are actively pursued. SPION-based materials can be ideal candidates for developing such delivery systems because of their excellent biocompatibility and superparamagnetism that enables long-term accumulation/retention at target sites by utilization of a suitable magnet. In addition, synthesis technologies for production of finely-tuned, homogeneous SPIONs have been well developed, which may promise their rapid clinical translation. PMID:23199200

  7. Morphology of Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle-Dispersed Glass Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketomi, Susamu

    2004-10-01

    We obtained dispersed-nanocrystal/glass composites by impregnating amorphous yttrium iron garnet (YIG) nanoparticles (produced by an alkoxide method) into the 49 nm diameter pores in the spongelike structure of porous silica glass (controlled pore glass or CPG) followed by heat treatment at 1000°C for 0.1 h. We observed the surface and cross section of the sample by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The backscattered electron image (BSEI) of the sample surface clearly showed the nanoparticles while the secondary electron image (SEI) showed them obscurely. A similar observation of the sample cross section revealed that the CPG fused together ˜2 μm in depth from the surface while its inner core preserved the spongelike network structure. The particles were independently dispersed with sizes ranging from 20 nm to 40 nm in this fused shell with an average particle density of approximately 100 μm-2. No particles were found in the inner core. Even in the fused shell, no particles were found in those areas in which the spongelike structure was preserved. It is concluded that the particles act as seeds for triggering the fusion of the spongelike glass.

  8. Are iron oxide nanoparticles safe? Current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Fernández-Bertólez, Natalia; Kiliç, Gözde; Costa, Carla; Costa, Solange; Fraga, Sonia; Bessa, Maria Joao; Pásaro, Eduardo; Teixeira, João Paulo; Laffon, Blanca

    2016-12-01

    Due to their unique physicochemical properties, including superparamagnetism, iron oxide nanoparticles (ION) have a number of interesting applications, especially in the biomedical field, that make them one of the most fascinating nanomaterials. They are used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging, in targeted drug delivery, and for induced hyperthermia cancer treatments. Together with these valuable uses, concerns regarding the onset of unexpected adverse health effects following exposure have been also raised. Nevertheless, despite the numerous ION purposes being explored, currently available information on their potential toxicity is still scarce and controversial data have been reported. Although ION have traditionally been considered as biocompatible - mainly on the basis of viability tests results - influence of nanoparticle surface coating, size, or dose, and of other experimental factors such as treatment time or cell type, has been demonstrated to be important for ION in vitro toxicity manifestation. In vivo studies have shown distribution of ION to different tissues and organs, including brain after passing the blood-brain barrier; nevertheless results from acute toxicity, genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity and reproductive toxicity investigations in different animal models do not provide a clear overview on ION safety yet, and epidemiological studies are almost inexistent. Much work has still to be done to fully understand how these nanomaterials interact with cellular systems and what, if any, potential adverse health consequences can derive from ION exposure.

  9. Cell Labeling and Targeting with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tefft, Brandon J.; Uthamaraj, Susheil; Harburn, J. Jonathan; Klabusay, Martin; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan; Sandhu, Gurpreet S.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted delivery of cells and therapeutic agents would benefit a wide range of biomedical applications by concentrating the therapeutic effect at the target site while minimizing deleterious effects to off-target sites. Magnetic cell targeting is an efficient, safe, and straightforward delivery technique. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) are biodegradable, biocompatible, and can be endocytosed into cells to render them responsive to magnetic fields. The synthesis process involves creating magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles followed by high-speed emulsification to form a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) coating. The PLGA-magnetite SPIONs are approximately 120 nm in diameter including the approximately 10 nm diameter magnetite core. When placed in culture medium, SPIONs are naturally endocytosed by cells and stored as small clusters within cytoplasmic endosomes. These particles impart sufficient magnetic mass to the cells to allow for targeting within magnetic fields. Numerous cell sorting and targeting applications are enabled by rendering various cell types responsive to magnetic fields. SPIONs have a variety of other biomedical applications as well including use as a medical imaging contrast agent, targeted drug or gene delivery, diagnostic assays, and generation of local hyperthermia for tumor therapy or tissue soldering. PMID:26554870

  10. Lead coprecipitation with iron oxyhydroxide nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peng; Nuhfer, Noel T.; Kelly, Shelly; Li, Qin; Konishi, Hiromi; Elswick, Erika; Zhu, Chen

    2011-08-01

    Pb 2+ and Fe 3+ coprecipitation was studied with sorption edge measurements, desorption experiments, sorbent aging, High Resolution Transmission and Analytical Electron Microscopy (HR TEM-AEM), and geochemical modeling. Companion adsorption experiments were also conducted for comparison. The macroscopic chemical and near atomic scale HRTEM data supplemented our molecule scale analysis with EXAFS ( Kelly et al., 2008). Coprecipitation of Pb 2+ with ferric oxyhydroxides occurred at ˜pH 4 and is more efficient than adsorption in removing Pb 2+ from aqueous solutions at similar sorbate/sorbent ratios and pH. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) shows peaks of lepidocrocite and two additional broad peaks similar to fine particles of 2-line ferrihydrite (2LFh). HRTEM of the Pb-Fe coprecipitates shows a mixture of 2-6 nm diameter spheres and 8-20 by 200-300 nm needles, both uniformly distributed with Pb 2+. Geochemical modeling shows that surface complexation models fit the experimental data of low Pb:Fe ratios when a high site density is used. Desorption experiments show that more Pb 2+ was released from loaded sorbents collected from adsorption experiments than from Pb to Fe coprecipitates at dilute EDTA concentrations. Desorbed Pb 2+ versus dissolved Fe 3+ data show a linear relationship for coprecipitation (CPT) desorption experiments but a parabolic relationship for adsorption (ADS) experiments. Based on these results, we hypothesize that Pb 2+ was first adsorbed onto the nanometer-sized, metastable, iron oxyhydroxide polymers of 2LFh with domain size of 2-3 nm. As these nano-particles assembled into larger particles, some Pb 2+ was trapped in the iron oxyhydroxide structure and re-arranged to form solid solutions. Therefore, the CPT contact method produced more efficient removal of Pb 2+ than the adsorption contact method, and Pb 2+ bound in CPT solids represent a more stable sequestration of Pb 2+ in the environment than Pb 2+ adsorbed on iron oxyhydroxide surfaces.

  11. Interactions Between Microbial Iron Reduction and Metal Geochemistry: Effect of Redox Cycling on Transition Metal Speciation in Iron Bearing Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    D. Craig Cooper; Flynn W. Picardal; Aaron J. Coby

    2006-02-01

    Microbial iron reduction is an important biogeochemical process that can affect metal geochemistry in sediments through direct and indirect mechanisms. With respect to Fe(III) (hydr)oxides bearing sorbed divalent metals, recent reports have indicated that (1) microbial reduction of goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures preferentially removes ferrihydrite, (2) this process can incorporate previously sorbed Zn(II) into an authigenic crystalline phase that is insoluble in 0.5 M HCl, (3) this new phase is probably goethite, and (4) the presence of nonreducible minerals can inhibit this transformation. This study demonstrates that a range of sorbed transition metals can be selectively sequestered into a 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase and that the process can be stimulated through sequential steps of microbial iron reduction and air oxidation. Microbial reduction experiments with divalent Cd, Co, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn indicate that all metals save Mn experienced some sequestration, with the degree of metal incorporation into the 0.5 M HCl insoluble phase correlating positively with crystalline ionic radius at coordination number = 6. Redox cycling experiments with Zn adsorbed to synthetic goethite/ferrihydrite or iron-bearing natural sediments indicate that redox cycling from iron reducing to iron oxidizing conditions sequesters more Zn within authigenic minerals than microbial iron reduction alone. In addition, the process is more effective in goethite/ferrihydrite mixtures than in iron-bearing natural sediments. Microbial reduction alone resulted in a ~3× increase in 0.5 M HCl insoluble Zn and increased aqueous Zn (Zn-aq) in goethite/ferrihydrite, but did not significantly affect Zn speciation in natural sediments. Redox cycling enhanced the Zn sequestration by ~12% in both goethite/ferrihydrite and natural sediments and reduced Zn-aq to levels equal to the uninoculated control in goethite/ferrihydrite and less than the uninoculated control in natural sediments. These data suggest

  12. Physicochemical Characterization of Nebulized Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPIONs)

    PubMed Central

    Graczyk, Halshka; Bryan, Louise C.; Lewinski, Nastassja; Suarez, Guillaume; Coullerez, Geraldine; Bowen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Aerosol-mediated delivery of nano-based therapeutics to the lung has emerged as a promising alternative for treatment and prevention of lung diseases. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have attracted significant attention for such applications due to their biocompatibility and magnetic properties. However, information is lacking about the characteristics of nebulized SPIONs for use as a therapeutic aerosol. To address this need, we conducted a physicochemical characterization of nebulized Rienso, a SPION-based formulation for intravenous treatment of anemia. Methods: Four different concentrations of SPION suspensions were nebulized with a one-jet nebulizer. Particle size was measured in suspension by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS), and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and in the aerosol by a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Results: The average particle size in suspension as measured by TEM, PCS, and NTA was 9±2 nm, 27±7 nm, and 56±10 nm, respectively. The particle size in suspension remained the same before and after the nebulization process. However, after aerosol collection in an impinger, the suspended particle size increased to 159±46 nm as measured by NTA. The aerosol particle concentration increased linearly with increasing suspension concentration, and the aerodynamic diameter remained relatively stable at around 75 nm as measured by SMPS. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the total number and particle size in the aerosol were modulated as a function of the initial concentration in the nebulizer. The data obtained mark the first known independent characterization of nebulized Rienso and, as such, provide critical information on the behavior of Rienso nanoparticles in an aerosol. The data obtained in this study add new knowledge to the existing body of literature on potential applications of SPION suspensions as inhaled aerosol therapeutics. PMID

  13. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  14. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    PubMed

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  15. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)–Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension. PMID:23038172

  16. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  17. Recent progress on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, surface functional strategies and biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Wu, Zhaohui; Yu, Taekyung; Jiang, Changzhong; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the recent development and various strategies in the preparation, microstructure, and magnetic properties of bare and surface functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs); their corresponding biological application was also discussed. In order to implement the practical in vivo or in vitro applications, the IONPs must have combined properties of high magnetic saturation, stability, biocompatibility, and interactive functions at the surface. Moreover, the surface of IONPs could be modified by organic materials or inorganic materials, such as polymers, biomolecules, silica, metals, etc. The new functionalized strategies, problems and major challenges, along with the current directions for the synthesis, surface functionalization and bioapplication of IONPs, are considered. Finally, some future trends and the prospects in these research areas are also discussed. PMID:27877761

  18. Structure and magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles synthesized by chemical vapor condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, D. H.; Jang, T. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, B. K.

    2004-06-01

    Iron nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical vapor condensation (CVC) without the aid of LN2 chiller. The powder synthesized at 400 °C was a mixture of amorphous and crystalline -Fe. Fully crystallized iron particles were then obtained at and above 600 °C. When the reactor temperature was 1000 °C, however, nonmagnetic -Fe was stabilized together with -Fe. The synthesized particles, mostly possessing the core-shell type structure, were all nearly spherical, but the average particle size rapidly increased as the temperature increased. The surface layer that enclosed the iron core and became thicker in smaller particles was Fe3O4 or Fe3O4-related amorphous. Except for the one synthesized at 1000 °C, the iron nanoparticles were not fully saturated. The iron nanoparticles (20 nm) synthesized at 600 °C exhibited iHc 1.0 kOe and Ms 170 emu/g.

  19. Chemical synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications.

    PubMed

    Ling, Daishun; Lee, Nohyun; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2015-05-19

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles have been extensively investigated for their various biomedical applications including diagnostic imaging, biological sensing, drug, cell, and gene delivery, and cell tracking. Recent advances in the designed synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles have brought innovation in the field of nanomedicine. This Account provides a review on the recent progresses in the controlled synthesis and assembly of uniformly sized iron oxide nanoparticles for medical applications. In particular, it focuses on three topics: stringent control of particle size during synthesis via the "heat-up" process, surface modification for the high stability and biocompatibility of the nanoparticles for diagnostic purposes, and assembly of the nanoparticles within polymers or mesoporous silica matrices for theranostic applications. Using extremely small 3 nm sized iron oxide nanoparticles (ESION), a new nontoxic T1 MRI contrast agent was realized for high-resolution MRI of blood vessels down to 0.2 mm. Ferrimagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (FION) that are larger than 20 nm exhibit extremely large magnetization and coercivity values. The cells labeled with FIONs showed very high T2 contrast effect so that even a single cell can be readily imaged. Designed assembly of iron oxide nanoparticles with mesoporous silica and polymers was conducted to fabricate multifunctional nanoparticles for theranostic applications. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles are excellent scaffolds for iron oxide nanoparticles, providing magnetic resonance and fluorescence imaging modalities as well as the functionality of the drug delivery vehicle. Polymeric ligands could be designed to respond to various biological stimuli such as pH, temperature, and enzymatic activity. For example, we fabricated tumor pH-sensitive magnetic nanogrenades (termed PMNs) composed of self-assembled iron oxide nanoparticles and pH-responsive ligands. They were utilized to visualize

  20. General and programmable synthesis of hybrid liposome/metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Shin, Yonghee; Lee, Wooju; Whang, Keumrai; Kim, Dongchoul; Lee, Luke P.; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kang, Taewook

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid liposome/metal nanoparticles are promising candidate materials for biomedical applications. However, the poor selectivity and low yield of the desired hybrid during synthesis pose a challenge. We designed a programmable liposome by selective encoding of a reducing agent, which allows self-crystallization of metal nanoparticles within the liposome to produce stable liposome/metal nanoparticles alone. We synthesized seven types of liposome/monometallic and more complex liposome/bimetallic hybrids. The resulting nanoparticles are tunable in size and metal composition, and their surface plasmon resonance bands are controllable in visible and near infrared. Owing to outer lipid bilayer, our liposome/Au nanoparticle shows better colloidal stability in biologically relevant solutions as well as higher endocytosis efficiency than gold nanoparticles without the liposome. We used this hybrid in intracellular imaging of living cells via surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, taking advantage of its improved physicochemical properties. We believe that our method greatly increases the utility of metal nanoparticles in in vivo applications. PMID:28028544

  1. Effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on the permeability properties of Sf21 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianye; Zhao, Gang; Shu, Zhiquan; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Yunxia; Gao, Dayong

    2016-02-01

    It was recently reported that nanoparticles could significantly modulate the thermal properties of solutions at subzero temperatures, and as a result, nanoparticles have been widely used in both cryopreservation and cryosurgery. In cryopreservation, the water permeability coefficient of cell membrane is an essential parameter for quantitative investigation of cell dehydration and intracellular ice formation. However, few studies were focused on the effects of nanoparticles on the permeability properties of cell membrane. In order to optimize the processes of cryopreservation with nanoparticles, we measured the permeability properties of Sf21 cells in the presence of iron oxide nanoparticles in this study. The responses of Sf21 cells with iron oxide nanoparticles were obtained by the microperfusion system at -2, 5, 15 and 25 °C, respectively. The osmotically inactive cell volume (Vb), the cell membrane hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and it's activation energy (ELp), and the reference value of Lp at the reference temperature (Lpg) with 0.02%, 0.1% and 0.5% (w/w) iron oxide nanoparticles were determined by 2-parameter (2-p) model at -2, 5, 15 and 25 °C. We analyzed the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles on the permeability properties of the Sf21 cells. The results indicated that iron oxide nanoparticles have a significant influence on membrane permeability properties (Lpg and ELp) of Sf21 cells. The introduction of iron oxide nanoparticles tends to increase the values of Vb and Lpg, while decrease the value of ELp. These findings may provide a new route to optimize the biomaterial cryopreservation.

  2. A molecular dynamics study of the phase transition in bcc metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shibuta, Yasushi; Suzuki, Toshio

    2008-10-14

    The phase transition between liquid and solid phases in body-centered cubic (bcc) metal nanoparticles of iron, chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten with size ranging from 2000 to 31,250 atoms was investigated using a molecular dynamics simulation. The nucleation from an undercooled liquid droplet was observed during cooling in all nanoparticles considered. It was found that a nucleus was generated near one side of the particle and solidification spread toward the other side the during nucleation process. On the other hand, the surface melting and subsequent inward melting of the solid core of the nanoparticles were observed during heating. The depression of the melting point was proportional to the inverse of the particle radius due to the Gibbs-Thomson effect. On the other hand, the depression of the nucleation temperature during cooling was not monotonic with respect to the particle radius since the nucleation from an undercooled liquid depends on the event probability of an embryo or a nucleus.

  3. Lattice measurement and alloy compositions in metal and bimetallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tsen, S-C Y; Crozier, P A; Liu, J

    2003-12-01

    A new reliable method for determining the lattice spacings of metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles in phase contrast high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) images was developed. In this study, we discuss problems in applying HREM techniques to single metal (Pt and Au) and bimetallic (AuPd) nanoparticles of unknown shapes and random orientations. Errors arising from particle tilt and edge effects are discussed and analysis criteria are presented to reduce these errors in measuring the lattice parameters of nanoparticles. The accuracy of an individual particle lattice measurement is limited by an effective standard deviation which depends on the size of the individual nanoparticle. For example, the standard deviation for 20-30 A Pt or Au nanoparticles is about 1.5%. To increase the accuracy in determining the lattice spacings of nanoparticles, statistical methods have to be used to obtain the average lattice spacing of an ensemble of nanoparticles. We measured approximately 100 nanoparticles with sizes in the range of 20-30 A and found that the mean lattice spacing can be determined to within 0.2%. By applying Vegard's law to the AuPd bimetallic systems we successfully detected the presence of alloying. For 30 A nanoparticles, the estimated ultimate error in determining the composition of the AuPd alloy is about 3% provided that at least 100 particles are measured. Finally, the challenges in determining the presence of more than one alloy phases in bimetallic nanoparticle systems were also discussed.

  4. Atomically Precise Colloidal Metal Nanoclusters and Nanoparticles: Fundamentals and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rongchao; Zeng, Chenjie; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Yuxiang

    2016-09-28

    Colloidal nanoparticles are being intensely pursued in current nanoscience research. Nanochemists are often frustrated by the well-known fact that no two nanoparticles are the same, which precludes the deep understanding of many fundamental properties of colloidal nanoparticles in which the total structures (core plus surface) must be known. Therefore, controlling nanoparticles with atomic precision and solving their total structures have long been major dreams for nanochemists. Recently, these goals are partially fulfilled in the case of gold nanoparticles, at least in the ultrasmall size regime (1-3 nm in diameter, often called nanoclusters). This review summarizes the major progress in the field, including the principles that permit atomically precise synthesis, new types of atomic structures, and unique physical and chemical properties of atomically precise nanoparticles, as well as exciting opportunities for nanochemists to understand very fundamental science of colloidal nanoparticles (such as the stability, metal-ligand interfacial bonding, ligand assembly on particle surfaces, aesthetic structural patterns, periodicities, and emergence of the metallic state) and to develop a range of potential applications such as in catalysis, biomedicine, sensing, imaging, optics, and energy conversion. Although most of the research activity currently focuses on thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters, important progress has also been achieved in other ligand-protected gold, silver, and bimetal (or alloy) nanoclusters. All of these types of unique nanoparticles will bring unprecedented opportunities, not only in understanding the fundamental questions of nanoparticles but also in opening up new horizons for scientific studies of nanoparticles.

  5. Flame synthesis and in vitro biocompatibility assessment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: cellular uptake, toxicity and proliferation studies.

    PubMed

    Buyukhatipoglu, K; Miller, T A; Clyne, A Morss

    2009-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. In the current work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis, which has improved nanoparticle property control and is capable of commercial production rates with minimal post-processing. The iron oxide nanoparticle material characteristics were analyzed by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, flame synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with endothelial cells was compared to commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. Flame synthesis produced a heterogeneous mixture of 6-12 nm diameter hematite and magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties. Endothelial cell scanning electron microscopy, confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, demonstrated that flame synthesized nanoparticles are ingested into cells in a similar manner to commercially available nanoparticles. The flame synthesized particles showed no statistically significant toxicity difference from commercially available nanoparticles, as measured by Live/Dead assay, Alamar blue, and lactase dehydrogenase release. Neither type of nanoparticle affected cell proliferation induced by fibroblast growth factor-2. These data suggest that combustion synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to commercially available nanoparticles for biological applications, yet flame synthesis is a simpler process with higher purity products and lower manufacturing costs. Future work will include functionalizing nanoparticles for specific cell targeting and bioactive factor delivery.

  6. Iron Drinking Water Pipe Corrosion Products: Concentrators of Toxic Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Metals Tammie L. Gerke and J. Barry Maynard Department of Geology University of Cincinnati Cincinnati, OH, 45221-0013 USA Todd P. Luxton and...Kirk G. Scheckel U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NRMRL, LRPCD 26 West Martin Luther King Dr. Cincinnati, OH, 45268 USA Brenda J...Little Naval Research Laboratory Stennis Space Center, MS 39525 USA ABSTRACT The capability of iron pipe corrosion products in active drinking water

  7. RGD-conjugated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging contrast enhancement and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Zheng, S W; Huang, M; Hong, R Y; Deng, S M; Cheng, L F; Gao, B; Badami, D

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a specific targeting magnetic nanoparticle probe for magnetic resonance imaging and therapy in the form of local hyperthermia. Carboxymethyl dextran-coated ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with carboxyl groups were coupled to cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic peptides for integrin α(v)β₃ targeting. The particle size, magnetic properties, heating effect, and stability of the arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide were measured. The arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide demonstrates excellent stability and fast magneto-temperature response. Magnetic resonance imaging signal intensity of Bcap37 cells incubated with arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide was significantly decreased compared with that incubated with plain ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide. The preferential uptake of arginine-glycine-aspartic-ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide by target cells was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  8. Plasmonics Resonance Enhanced Active Photothermal Effects of Aluminum and Iron Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chong, Xinyuan; Abboud, Jacques; Zhang, Zhili

    2015-03-01

    Localized Surface Plasmonics Resonance (LSPR) enhanced active photothermal effects of both aluminum nanoparticles (Al NPs) and iron nanoparticles (Fe NPs) are experimentally observed. Photothermally activated motion and ignition by low-energy xenon flash are quantitatively measured. For nanoparticles of comparable sizes, photothermally activated motion height of Fe NPs is about 60% lower than that of Al NPs, while photothermal Minimum Ignition Energy (MIE) of Fe NPs is about 50% lower than that of Al NPs. Joule heating by LSPR enhanced photothermal effects among nanoparticles and subsequently triggered oxidation reactions are found responsible for the motion and ignition of the nanoparticles.

  9. Pallasites - Metal composition, classification and relationships with iron meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, E. R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A comparative study was conducted of the metal composition of 34 pallasites in order to shed further light on the origin of these meteorites. Concentrations of Au, As, Co, Ga, Ge, Ir, Ni, and W in pallasitic metal were determined. Most pallasites are found to have similar compositions indicating a close genetic relationship, and are designated as main group. The Eagle Station Trio is unrelated to the main group as indicated by higher Ni, Ge, and Ir and lower As, Au, and Ga contents in the metal, and olivine richer in Fe and Sc and poorer in Mg and Mn. The trio of Springwater, Rawlinna and Phillips County have metal compositions appropriate to high-Ni main group members, but their fayalite contents suggest they are not closely related to it. Pavlodar and Glorieta Mountain appear to be unique pallasites, and Brenham an anomalous main group member. Krasnoyarsk is classified as a main group member. Main group pallasites have metal compositions which overlap those of IIIAB iron meteorites on a Ga-Ge plot, and they have similar Au, As, Cr, Ir, Ni and W contents to high-Ni IIIAB irons.

  10. Mössbauer study of iron carbide nanoparticles produced by laser ablation in alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagasa, S.; Nishida, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Iron carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation of iron in alcohols (methanol and ethanol). A new cell, designed to allow the ablation to be conducted in a flowing solvent, enabled separation and collection of the nanoparticles immediately after production, thus preventing further photochemical reactions of the colloids. The nanoparticles were investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. In methanol, they consisted of α-iron, γ-iron, iron carbide, and amorphous paramagnetic iron carbides, whereas in ethanol they consisted of iron carbides and amorphous paramagnetic iron carbides. The difference in products depending on the alcohol was attributed to the different carbon supplies for methanol and ethanol. For both solvents, the average particle size was found to be 16 nm, and the nanoparticles were dispersed in amorphous carbon. We also examined the effect of further laser irradiation of the colloids using stagnant solvent, and the particle size was found to increase and a very small amount of carbonization was observed.

  11. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I.; Xu, J. J.

    2009-02-01

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 µm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 µm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  12. Fabrication of a nanocomposite from in situ iron nanoparticle reinforced copper alloy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zidong; Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Qiangsong; Shih, I; Xu, J J

    2009-02-18

    In situ iron nanoparticle reinforced Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy has been fabricated by centrifugal casting in a vacuum chamber with a medium frequency electrical furnace. The microstructure of this alloy was analyzed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), and the results show that the grains of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy without iron have a typical dendrite structure with dimensions from 500 to 1500 microm, and the grains of the alloy with the addition of 1% iron are small and equiaxed, with dimensions from 20 to 60 microm. Then, the relatively uniform dispersed particles in the copper matrix were identified with the HRTEM to be pure iron with dimensions in the order of 2-20 nm. The mechanical properties of the alloys were measured and the results show a significant increase in the tensile strength of the alloy with iron nanoparticles and a slight increase of the elongation compared to that without iron. The mechanism of formation of the iron nanoparticles was analyzed by thermodynamic and dynamic theories, and the results indicate that the in situ iron nanoparticles of Cu-3Sn-8Zn-6Pb alloy can reasonably form during solidification in the centrifugal casting technique.

  13. VAPOR PHASE MERCURY SORPTION BY ORGANIC-SULFIDE COATED BIMETALLIC IRON-COPPER NANOPARTICLE AGGREGATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tetra sulfide silane coated iron-copper nano-particle aggregates are found to be potentially very high capacity sorbents for vapor phase mercury capture. High equilibrium capacities were obtained for the silane coated iron copper nano-aggregate sorbent at 70 oC and 120 oC. Even a...

  14. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications. PMID:27004738

  15. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  16. Solvent-surface interactions control the phase structure in laser-generated iron-gold core-shell nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Philipp; Jakobi, Jurij; Rehbock, Christoph; Chakravadhanula, Venkata Sai Kiran; Thede, Claas; Wiedwald, Ulf; Bartsch, Mathias; Kienle, Lorenz; Barcikowski, Stephan

    2016-03-23

    This work highlights a strategy for the one-step synthesis of FeAu nanoparticles by the pulsed laser ablation of alloy targets in the presence of different solvents. This method allows particle generation without the use of additional chemicals; hence, solvent-metal interactions could be studied without cross effects from organic surface ligands. A detailed analysis of generated particles via transmission electron microscopy in combination with EDX elemental mapping could conclusively verify that the nature of the used solvent governs the internal phase structure of the formed nanoparticles. In the presence of acetone or methyl methacrylate, a gold shell covering a non-oxidized iron core was formed, whereas in aqueous media, an Au core with an Fe3O4 shell was generated. This core-shell morphology was the predominant species found in >90% of the examined nanoparticles. These findings indicate that fundamental chemical interactions between the nanoparticle surface and the solvent significantly contribute to phase segregation and elemental distribution in FeAu nanoparticles. A consecutive analysis of resulting Fe@Au core-shell nanoparticles revealed outstanding oxidation resistance and fair magnetic and optical properties. In particular, the combination of these features with high stability magnetism and plasmonics may create new opportunities for this hybrid material in imaging applications.

  17. Utilization of bog iron ores as sorbents of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Rzepa, Grzegorz; Bajda, Tomasz; Ratajczak, Tadeusz

    2009-03-15

    Sorption properties of bog iron ores with respect to Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr are evaluated at various pH. Maximum sorption determined in the experiments equals to 97.0, 25.2, 25.5, 55.0mg/g for lead(II), copper(II), zinc(II), and chromium(III), respectively. Chromium(VI) is bound in the amount of up to 10.0mg/g. The values of desorption indicate that most of the metals remain stably bound to the surface of bog iron ores, indicating that the chemisorption process prevails. The metals are sorbed as cations at the pH values from 4 to 9. Within this pH range up to 100% of the initial metal amount is immobilized. 90-100% of Cr(VI) is sorbed at pH between 3 and 5. Such properties, combined with favorable conditions of shallow mining and resultant low costs, may be regarded as an incentive for local utilization of bog iron ores in the environmental protection practice.

  18. Lipidoid-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for efficient DNA and siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shan; Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Love, Kevin T; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G

    2013-03-13

    The safe, targeted and effective delivery of gene therapeutics remains a significant barrier to their broad clinical application. Here we develop a magnetic nucleic acid delivery system composed of iron oxide nanoparticles and cationic lipid-like materials termed lipidoids. Coated nanoparticles are capable of delivering DNA and siRNA to cells in culture. The mean hydrodynamic size of these nanoparticles was systematically varied and optimized for delivery. While nanoparticles of different sizes showed similar siRNA delivery efficiency, nanoparticles of 50-100 nm displayed optimal DNA delivery activity. The application of an external magnetic field significantly enhanced the efficiency of nucleic acid delivery, with performance exceeding that of the commercially available lipid-based reagent, Lipofectamine 2000. The iron oxide nanoparticle delivery platform developed here offers the potential for magnetically guided targeting, as well as an opportunity to combine gene therapy with MRI imaging and magnetic hyperthermia.

  19. Structural characterization, antibacterial and catalytic effect of iron oxide nanoparticles synthesised using the leaf extract of Cynometra ramiflora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groiss, Silvia; Selvaraj, Raja; Varadavenkatesan, Thivaharan; Vinayagam, Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    In the present investigation, the leaf extract of Cynometra ramiflora was used to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles. Within minutes of adding iron sulphate to the leaf extract, iron oxide nanoparticles were formed and thus, the method is very simple and fast. UV-VIS spectra showed the strong absorption band in the visible region. SEM images showed discrete spherical shaped particles and EDS spectra confirmed the iron and oxygen presence. The XRD results depicted the crystalline structure of iron oxide nanoparticles. FT-IR spectra portrayed the existence of functional groups of phytochemicals which are probably involved in the formation and stabilization of nanoparticles. The iron oxide nanoparticles exhibited effective inhibition against E. coli and S. epidermidis which may find its applications in the antibacterial drug development. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the nanoparticles as Fenton-like catalyst was successfully investigated for the degradation of Rhodamine-B dye. This outcome could play a prominent role in the wastewater treatment.

  20. MR Imaging of Tumor Associated Macrophages with Clinically-Applicable Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Golovko, Daniel; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Castaneda, Rosalinda; Ansari, Celina; Rao, Jianghong; Tikhomirov, Grigory A.; Wendland, Mike; Corot, Claire; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The presence of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in breast cancer correlates strongly with poor outcome. The purpose of this study was to develop a clinically applicable, non-invasive diagnostic assay for selective targeting and visualization of TAMs in breast cancer, based on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and clinically applicable iron oxide nanoparticles. Experimental Design F4/80-negative mammary carcinoma cells and F4/80-positive TAMs were incubated with iron oxide nanoparticles and were compared regarding MR signal changes and iron uptake. MMTV-PyMT transgenic mice harboring mammary carcinomas underwent nanoparticle-enhanced MR up to 1 hour (h) and at 24 h post injection (p.i.). The tumor enhancement on MR images was correlated with the presence and location of TAMs and nanoparticles on confocal microscopy. Results In vitro studies revealed that iron oxide nanoparticles are preferentially phagocytosed by TAMs, but not by malignant tumor cells. In vivo, all tumors demonstrated an initial contrast agent perfusion on immediate postcontrast MR images with gradual transendothelial leakage into the tumor interstitium. At 24 h p.i., all tumors demonstrated a persistent signal decline on MR scans. TAM-depletion via αCSF1 mAb lead to significant inhibition of tumor nanoparticle enhancement. Detection of iron using DAB-enhanced Prussian Blue staining, and immunodetection of CD68 localized iron oxide nanoparticles to TAMs, indicating that the MR signal effects on delayed MR images were largely due to TAM-mediated uptake of contrast agent. Conclusion These data indicate that tumor-enhancement with clinically applicable iron oxide nanoparticles may serve as a new biomarker for long-term prognosis, related treatment decisions and the evaluation of new immune-targeted therapies. PMID:21791632

  1. Conjunctive effect of CMC-zero-valent iron nanoparticles and FYM in the remediation of chromium-contaminated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavi, Vemula; Prasad, Tollamadugu Naga Venkata Krishna Vara; Reddy, Balam Ravindra; Reddy, Ambavaram Vijay Bhaskar; Gajulapalle, Madhavi

    2014-04-01

    Chromium is an important industrial metal used in various products and processes but at the same time causing lethal environmental hazards. Remediation of Cr-contaminated soils poses both technological and economic challenges, as conventional methods are often too expensive and difficult to operate. Zero-valent iron particles at nanoscale are proposed to be one of the important reductants of Cr(VI), transforming the same into nontoxic Cr(III). In the present investigation, soils contaminated with Cr(VI) are allowed to react with the various loadings of zero-valent iron nanoparticles (Fe0) for a reaction period of 24 h. Fe0 nanoparticles were synthesized by the reduction of ferrous sulfate in the presence of sodium borohydride and stabilized with carboxy methyl cellulose and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-vis spectrophotometer, Fourier transform-infra red spectrophotometer, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering technique and zeta potential. Further, this work demonstrates the potential utilization of farm yard manure (FYM) and Fe0 nanoparticles in combination and individually for the effective remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soils. An increase in the reduction of Cr(VI) from 60 to 80 % was recorded with the increase in the loading of Fe0 nanoparticles from 0.1 to 0.3 mg/100 g individually and in combination with FYM ranging from 50 to 100 mg/100 g soil.

  2. Biogenic synthesis of metallic nanoparticles and prospects toward green chemistry.

    PubMed

    Adil, Syed Farooq; Assal, Mohamed E; Khan, Mujeeb; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2015-06-07

    The immense importance of nanoparticles and their applications is a strong motivation for exploring new synthetic techniques. However, due to strict regulations that manage the potential environmental impacts greener alternatives for conventional synthesis are the focus of intense research. In the scope of this perspective, a concise discussion about the use of green reducing and stabilizing agents toward the preparation of metal nanoparticles is presented. Reports on the synthesis of noble metal nanoparticles using plant extracts, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate as green reagents are summarized and discussed, pointing toward an urgent need of understanding the mechanistic aspects of the involved reactions.

  3. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  4. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea).

    PubMed

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer.

  5. Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a Potential Iron Fertilizer for Peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Mengmeng; Ma, Chuanxin; Hao, Yi; Guo, Jing; Rui, Yukui; Tang, Xinlian; Zhao, Qi; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Zetian; Hou, Tianqi; Zhu, Siyuan

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in practically every aspect of modern life, including agriculture. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2O3 NPs) as a fertilizer to replace traditional Fe fertilizers, which have various shortcomings. The effects of the Fe2O3 NPs and a chelated-Fe fertilizer (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid-Fe; EDTA-Fe) fertilizer on the growth and development of peanut (Arachis hypogaea), a crop that is very sensitive to Fe deficiency, were studied in a pot experiment. The results showed that Fe2O3 NPs increased root length, plant height, biomass, and SPAD values of peanut plants. The Fe2O3 NPs promoted the growth of peanut by regulating phytohormone contents and antioxidant enzyme activity. The Fe contents in peanut plants with Fe2O3 NPs and EDTA-Fe treatments were higher than the control group. We used energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to quantitatively analyze Fe in the soil. Peanut is usually cultivated in sandy soil, which is readily leached of fertilizers. However, the Fe2O3 NPs adsorbed onto sandy soil and improved the availability of Fe to the plants. Together, these results show that Fe2O3 NPs can replace traditional Fe fertilizers in the cultivation of peanut plants. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research on the Fe2O3 NPs as the iron fertilizer. PMID:27375665

  6. Formation of iron nanoparticles and increase in iron reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Baker, Alex R; Jickells, Timothy D; Benning, Liane G

    2009-09-01

    The formation of iron (Fe) nanoperticles and increase in Fe reactivity in mineral dust during simulated cloud processing was investigated using high-resolution microscopy and chemical extraction methods. Cloud processing of dust was experimentally simulated via an alternation of acidic (pH 2) and circumneutral conditions (pH 5-6) over periods of 24 h each on presieved (<20 microm) Saharan soil and goethite suspensions. Microscopic analyses of the processed soil and goethite samples reveal the neo-formation of Fe-rich nanoparticle aggregates, which were not found initially. Similar Fe-rich nanoparticles were also observed in wet-deposited Saharen dusts from the western Mediterranean but not in dry-deposited dust from the eastern Mediterranean. Sequential Fe extraction of the soil samples indicated an increase in the proportion of chemically reactive Fe extractable by an ascorbate solution after simulated cloud processing. In addition, the sequential extractions on the Mediterranean dust samples revealed a higher content of reactive Fe in the wet-deposited dust compared to that of the dry-deposited dust These results suggestthat large variations of pH commonly reported in aerosol and cloud waters can trigger neo-formation of nanosize Fe particles and an increase in Fe reactivity in the dust

  7. Synthesis and deposition of metal nanoparticles by gas condensation process

    SciTech Connect

    Maicu, Marina Glöß, Daniel; Frach, Peter; Schmittgens, Ralph; Gerlach, Gerald; Hecker, Dominic

    2014-03-15

    In this work, the synthesis of Pt and Ag nanoparticles by means of the inert gas phase condensation of sputtered atomic vapor is presented. The process parameters (power, sputtering time, and gas flow) were varied in order to study the relationship between deposition conditions and properties of the nanoparticles such as their quantity, size, and size distribution. Moreover, the gas phase condensation process can be combined with a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition procedure in order to deposit nanocomposite coatings consisting of metallic nanoparticles embedded in a thin film matrix material. Selected examples of application of the generated nanoparticles and nanocomposites are discussed.

  8. Rheological characterization of a magnetorheological ferrofluid using iron nitride nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Ahuré-Powell, Louise A.; Wereley, Norman M.

    2015-05-01

    Magnetorheology of a magnetorheological ferrofluid (MRFF) was investigated to study the role of a ferromagnetic nanoparticle (NP) additive in magnetorheological fluids (MRFs). Iron nitride (Fe16N2) NPs, nominally within the diameter range of ˜16-45 nm (spherical NPs) and ˜30-66 nm (cubic NPs), were coated with carboxy-polyethylene glycol (carboxy-PEG) and dispersed in silicone oil in order to produce a magnetic carrier fluid or ferrofluid for two solids loadings: 2 vol. % and 5 vol. %. Conventional spherical carbonyl iron (CI) particles, varying in diameter from 6 to 10 μm, were suspended in the ferrofluid at 25 vol. % solids loading. Rheological properties of the MRFF synthesized with the carboxy-PEG-based ferromagnetic carrier fluid were compared to the MRF synthesized with silicone oil to determine how ferrofluid can influence dynamic viscosity and yield stress. Rheological measurements of both MRF and MRFF samples were carried out using a Paar Physica 300 rheometer to estimate the field-off viscosity and to measure flow curves (i.e., shear stress vs. shear rate) as a function of magnetic field. A Bingham-plastic model was used to characterize the flow curves, and results show that there is an increase in the dynamic viscosity of the MRFF over the MRF. The ferromagnetic carrier fluid greatly increases yield stress as only 2 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs improves the yield stress performance by almost 5%. A second MRFF sample synthesized with 5 vol. % of added carboxy-PEG NPs contained in the ferrofluid significantly enhanced the yield stress performance by 13% over the MRF at the same CI solids loading (25 vol. %).

  9. Shape effects on nanoparticle engulfment for metal matrix nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozsoy, Istemi Baris; Li, Gang; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Obtaining a uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles and their structural integrity in metal matrix is a prominent obstacle to use the intrinsic properties of metal matrix nanocomposites (MMNCs) to the full extent. In this study, a potential way to overcome the scientific and technical barrier of nanoparticle dispersion in high performance lightweight MMNCs is presented. The goal is to identify the shape and size of Al2O3 nanoparticle for its optimal dispersion in Al matrix. Critical velocity of solidification is calculated numerically for spherical, cylindrical and disk-shaped nanoparticles using an analytical model which incorporates drag force, intermolecular force and inertia effect. The results show that it is possible to reduce the critical solidification velocity for nanoparticle capture by 6 times with proper shape modification.

  10. Synthesis of phase-pure and monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Hufschmid, Ryan D.; Arami, Hamed; Ferguson, R. Matthew; Gonzales, Marcela; Teeman, Eric M.; Brush, Lucien N.; Browning, Nigel D.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-06-03

    We present a comprehensive template for the design and synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles with control over size, size distribution, phase, and resulting properties. Monodisperse superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by thermal decomposition of three different iron containing precursors (iron oleate, iron pentacarbonyl, and iron oxyhydroxide) in organic solvents under a variety of synthetic conditions. We compare the suitability of these three kinetically controlled synthesis protocols, which have in common the use of iron oleate as a starting precursor or reaction intermediate, for producing nanoparticles with specific size and magnetic properties. Monodisperse particles were produced over a tunable range of sizes from approximately 2-30 nm. Reaction parameters such as precursor concentration, addition of surfactant, temperature, ramp rate, and time were adjusted to kinetically control size and size-distribution. In particular, large quantities of excess surfactant (up to 25:1 molar ratio) alter reaction kinetics and result in larger particles with uniform size; however, there is often a trade-off between large particles and a narrow size distribution. Iron oxide phase is also critical for establishing magnetic properties. As an example, we show the importance of obtaining the required iron oxide phase for application to Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI), and describe how phase purity can be controlled.

  11. Magnetic field calculations for iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Ricardo; Mendez Rojas, Miguel; Dies Suarez, Pilar; Hidalgo Tobón, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The susceptibility effects of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) functionalized with triethylenglycol (TREG) and Polyethylen Glycol (PEG) has been studied, those nanoparticles have the necessary properties to be used in the clinic as contrast media in imaging by MRI[1-3]. We are considering the behavior of the magnetic field as plane wave to explain the electrical and magnetic field produced by SPIONs. Images were acquired on a 1.5T imager Philips, using mFFE Sequence. Three glass capillary tubes with a) TREG (10nm) concentration of 300 μg/ml, and PEGCOOH 6000(10nm) with 300 μg/ml, and 2% agarosa. Magnetic field simulations were calculated in Matlab. The plane wave that comes in contact with a sphere of radius a, an propagation constant k1, and it is in an homogeneous space k2. We consider that the electric field is linearly polarized on x-direction, with a propagation on z-positive-axis. The secondary induced field can be explained from the interior of the sphere and valid exterior points. The referred waves are transmitted and reflected, this is valid only when the wavelength is smaller than the radius of the sphere. The obtained vibrational mode is an answer of the electrical oscillation and this is projection of the disturbed magnetic field. TREG-SPIONs produce more serious susceptibility artefacts compared to PEG-SPIONs. This study is promissory due to the concordance of the results of the simulations and the inhomogeneities showed in the MR images.

  12. Synthesis of lithium iron phosphate/carbon microspheres by using polyacrylic acid coated iron phosphate nanoparticles derived from iron(III) acrylate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongwei; He, Yan-Bing; Chu, Xiaodong; Ding, Zhaojun; Li, Baohua; He, Jianfu; Du, Hongda; Qin, Xianying; Kang, Feiyu

    2015-03-01

    Lithium iron phosphate/carbon (LiFePO4 /C) microspheres with high rate and cycling performance are synthesized from iron phosphate/polyacrylic acid (FePO4 /PAA) nanoparticles. Iron(III) acrylate is used as a precursor for both the iron and carbon sources. FePO4 nanoparticles are first produced by a coprecipitation reaction. The byproduct, acrylic acid ions, is polymerized in situ to form a uniform PAA layer on the surface of the FePO4 nanoparticles. The as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres are composed of primary nanoparticles with sizes of 40-50 nm. The nanoparticles are fully coated with a thin, uniform carbon layer derived from the decomposition of the PAA layer. The uniform carbon-coating layer cooperates with interstitial and boundary carbon derived from sucrose successfully to construct an excellent interconnecting conductive network in the microspheres. As a result of the unique structure, the as-prepared LiFePO4 /C microspheres display both high electronic and ionic conductivities, which contribute to their high rate performance (162.9 mAh g(-1) at 0.1C and 126.1 mAh g(-1) at 5C) and excellent cycling stability (97.1% of capacity retention after 500 cycles at 5C/5C).

  13. In Situ Synthesis of Metal Nanoparticle Embedded Hybrid Soft Nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Divya, Kizhmuri P; Miroshnikov, Mikhail; Dutta, Debjit; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Ajayan, Pulickel M; John, George

    2016-09-20

    The allure of integrating the tunable properties of soft nanomaterials with the unique optical and electronic properties of metal nanoparticles has led to the development of organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials. A promising method for the synthesis of such organic-inorganic hybrid nanomaterials is afforded by the in situ generation of metal nanoparticles within a host organic template. Due to their tunable surface morphology and porosity, soft organic materials such as gels, liquid crystals, and polymers that are derived from various synthetic or natural compounds can act as templates for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes. This method provides stabilization to the metal nanoparticles by the organic soft material and advantageously precludes the use of external reducing or capping agents in many instances. In this Account, we exemplify the green chemistry approach for synthesizing these materials, both in the choice of gelators as soft material frameworks and in the reduction mechanisms that generate the metal nanoparticles. Established herein is the core design principle centered on conceiving multifaceted amphiphilic soft materials that possess the ability to self-assemble and reduce metal ions into nanoparticles. Furthermore, these soft materials stabilize the in situ generated metal nanoparticles and retain their self-assembly ability to generate metal nanoparticle embedded homogeneous organic-inorganic hybrid materials. We discuss a remarkable example of vegetable-based drying oils as host templates for metal ions, resulting in the synthesis of novel hybrid nanomaterials. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles via polymers and self-assembled materials fabricated via cardanol (a bioorganic monomer derived from cashew nut shell liquid) are also explored in this Account. The organic-inorganic hybrid structures were characterized by several techniques such as UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and

  14. Fabrication of Metal Nanoparticles from Fungi and Metal Salts: Scope and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-02-01

    Fungi secrete enzymes and proteins as reducing agents which can be used for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles from metal salts. Large-scale production of nanoparticles from diverse fungal strains has great potential since they can be grown even in vitro. In recent years, various approaches have been made to maximize the yield of nanoparticles of varying shape, size, and stability. They have been characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffractometry, SEM/TEM, zeta potential measurements, UV-vis, and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In this review, we focus on the biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles by fungi to explore the chemistry of their formation extracellularly and intracellularly. Emphasis has been given to the potential of metal nanoparticles as an antimicrobial agent to inhibit the growth of pathogenic fungi, and on other potential applications.

  15. Optical forces on metallic nanoparticles induced by a photonic nanojet.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xudong; Erni, Daniel; Hafner, Christian

    2008-09-01

    We investigate the optical forces acting on a metallic nanoparticle when the nanoparticle is introduced within a photonic nanojet (PNJ). Optical forces at resonance and off-resonance conditions of the microcylinder or nanoparticle are investigated. Under proper polarization conditions, the whispering gallery mode can be excited in the microcylinder, even at off resonance provided that scattering from the nanoparticle is strong enough. The optical forces are enhanced at resonance either of the single microcylinder or of the nanoparticle with respect to the forces under off-resonant illuminations. We found that the optical forces acting on the nanoparticle depend strongly on the dielectric permittivity of the nanoparticle, as well as on the intensity and the beam width of the PNJ. Hence, metallic sub-wavelength nanoparticle can be efficiently trapped by PNJs. Furthermore, the PNJ's attractive force can be simply changed to a repulsive force by varying the polarization of the incident beam. The changed sign of the force is related to the particle's polarizability and the excitation of localized surface plasmons in the nanoparticle.

  16. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  17. Self-assembled patterns of iron oxide nanoparticles by hydrothermal chemical-vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengjun; Wei, B. Q.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2001-12-01

    Here, we report a hydrothermal chemical-vapor deposition process, which produces self-assembled patterns of iron oxide nanoparticles. By exposing a planar silica substrate to a prevaporized mixture of water, ferrocene [Fe(C5H5)2] and xylene (C8H10), at temperatures of ˜1000 °C, Fe2O3 nanoparticles are deposited on the substrate surface, in regular circular patterns. The particle sizes are less than 100 nm, and are organized into submicron-size patterns. The same process without water produces arrays of carbon nanotubes catalyzed by iron nanoparticles that are formed by the decomposition of ferrocene molecules.

  18. Continuous Polyol Synthesis of Metal and Metal Oxide Nanoparticles Using a Segmented Flow Tubular Reactor (SFTR).

    PubMed

    Testino, Andrea; Pilger, Frank; Lucchini, Mattia Alberto; Quinsaat, Jose Enrico Q; Stähli, Christoph; Bowen, Paul

    2015-06-08

    Over the last years a new type of tubular plug flow reactor, the segmented flow tubular reactor (SFTR), has proven its versatility and robustness through the water-based synthesis of precipitates as varied as CaCO3, BaTiO3, Mn(1-x)NixC2O4·2H2O, YBa oxalates, copper oxalate, ZnS, ZnO, iron oxides, and TiO2 produced with a high powder quality (phase composition, particle size, and shape) and high reproducibility. The SFTR has been developed to overcome the classical problems of powder production scale-up from batch processes, which are mainly linked with mass and heat transfer. Recently, the SFTR concept has been further developed and applied for the synthesis of metals, metal oxides, and salts in form of nano- or micro-particles in organic solvents. This has been done by increasing the working temperature and modifying the particle carrying solvent. In this paper we summarize the experimental results for four materials prepared according to the polyol synthesis route combined with the SFTR. CeO2, Ni, Ag, and Ca3(PO4)2 nanoparticles (NPs) can be obtained with a production rate of about 1-10 g per h. The production was carried out for several hours with constant product quality. These findings further corroborate the reliability and versatility of the SFTR for high throughput powder production.

  19. Optical absorption enhancement of hybrid-plasmonic-based metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector incorporating metal nanogratings and embedded metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chee Leong; Karar, Ayman; Alameh, Kamal; Lee, Yong Tak

    2013-01-28

    We propose and numerically demonstrate a high absorption hybrid-plasmonic-based metal semiconductor metal photodetector (MSM-PD) comprising metal nanogratings, a subwavelength slit and amorphous silicon or germanium embedded metal nanoparticles (NPs). Simulation results show that by optimizing the metal nanograting parameters, the subwavelength slit and the embedded metal NPs, a 1.3 order of magnitude increase in electric field is attained, leading to 28-fold absorption enhancement, in comparison with conventional MSM-PD structures. This is 3.5 times better than the absorption of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) based MSM-PD structures employing metal nanogratings and a subwavelength slit. This absorption enhancement is due to the ability of the embedded metal NPs to enhance their optical absorption and scattering properties through light-stimulated resonance aided by the conduction electrons of the NPs.

  20. Iron-Functionalized Membranes for Nanoparticle Synthesis and Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Scott; Smuleac, Vasile; Montague, Alex; Bachas, Leonidas; Bhattacharyya, Dibakar

    2010-01-01

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. More recent developments in membrane functionalization have made the use of membrane science important in diverse fields, from tunable separations to catalysis. The focus of this work is to create a common membrane platform for the incorporation of technologies capable of degrading target pollutants. Functionalized membranes capable of metal capture were created using water-based and solvent-based acrylic acid polymerization to synthesize poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) within poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membrane pores. The COO− groups of PAA were used to capture Fe(II), which was then either reduced and doped with Pd to form Fe/Pd nanoparticles or used as-is for free radical generation with hydrogen peroxide. Fe/Pd nanoparticles were synthesized within the pores of a PAA/PVDF membrane functionalized via aqueous (green) chemistry and used to dechlorinate trichloroethylene (TCE) and 2,2′-dichlorobiphenyl (DiCB). A PAA/PVDF membrane containing immobilized Fe(III) was used to obtain controlled free radical generation and target organic (pentachlorophenol) degradation within the membrane pore under convective flow conditions. PMID:20556223

  1. Significance of surface charge and shell material of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION) based core/shell nanoparticles on the composition of the protein corona.

    PubMed

    Sakulkhu, Usawadee; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Maurizi, Lionel; Coullerez, Geraldine; Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe; Vries, Marcel; Motazacker, Mahdi; Rezaee, Farhad; Hofmann, Heinrich

    2015-02-01

    As nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly used in many applications their safety and efficient applications in nanomedicine have become concerns. Protein coronas on nanomaterials' surfaces can influence how the cell "recognizes" nanoparticles, as well as the in vitro and in vivo NPs' behaviors. The SuperParamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticle (SPION) is one of the most prominent agents because of its superparamagnetic properties, which is useful for separation applications. To mimic surface properties of different types of NPs, a core-shell SPION library was prepared by coating with different surfaces: polyvinyl alcohol polymer (PVA) (positive, neutral and negative), SiO2 (positive and negative), titanium dioxide and metal gold. The SPIONs with different surfaces were incubated at a fixed serum : nanoparticle surface ratio, magnetically trapped and washed. The tightly bound proteins were quantified and identified. The surface charge has a great impact on protein adsorption, especially on PVA and silica where proteins preferred binding to the neutral and positively charged surfaces. The importance of surface material on protein adsorption was also revealed by preferential binding on TiO2 and gold coated SPION, even negatively charged. There is no correlation between the protein net charge and the nanoparticle surface charge on protein binding, nor direct correlation between the serum proteins' concentration and the proteins detected in the coronas.

  2. Toxicity of heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles on plants.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ghazala; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-08-01

    Plants are under the continual threat of changing climatic conditions that are associated with various types of abiotic stresses. In particular, heavy metal contamination is a major environmental concern that restricts plant growth. Plants absorb heavy metals along with essential elements from the soil and have evolved different strategies to cope with the accumulation of heavy metals. The use of proteomic techniques is an effective approach to investigate and identify the biological mechanisms and pathways affected by heavy metals and metal-containing nanoparticles. The present review focuses on recent advances and summarizes the results from proteomic studies aimed at understanding the response mechanisms of plants under heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress. Transport of heavy metal ions is regulated through the cell wall and plasma membrane and then sequestered in the vacuole. In addition, the role of different metal chelators involved in the detoxification and sequestration of heavy metals is critically reviewed, and changes in protein profiles of plants exposed to metal-containing nanoparticles are discussed in detail. Finally, strategies for gaining new insights into plant tolerance mechanisms to heavy metal and metal-containing nanoparticle stress are presented. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  3. Large enhancements of magnetic anisotropy in oxide-free iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Todd C.; Venturini, Eugene L.; Petkov, Valeri; Ren, Yang; Lavin, Judith M.; Huber, Dale L.

    2013-04-01

    Magnetic characterization of spherical, oxide-free, bcc iron nanoparticles synthesized with β-diketone surfactants has been performed. The results of this characterization, which included particles with diameters ranging between 2 and 5 nm show that the nanoparticles have an average anisotropy of 1.9×106±0.3×106 J/m3, which is more than an order of magnitude greater than the magnetocrystalline anisotropy of bulk iron. Despite their unusually large anisotropy, these particles can have saturation magnetizations of up to 210 A m2/kg (slightly lower than bulk iron). High-energy X-ray diffraction data indicates that the Fe particles have a distorted bcc lattice, which could, at least in part, explain the magnetic behavior of these nanoparticles. Dipolar coupling between particles, while present, is weak and cannot account for the high anisotropy of these nanoparticles.

  4. Defective iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by high temperature plasma processing: a magnetic characterisation versus temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasubramanian, C.; Joseph, B.; Orpe, PB; Saini, NL; Mukherjee, S.; Dziedzic-Kocurek, K.; Stanek, J.; Di Gioacchino, D.; Marcelli, A.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic properties and phase compositions of iron-oxide nanoparticles synthesised by a high temperature arc plasma route have been investigated by Mössbauer spectroscopy and high harmonic magnetic AC susceptibility measurements, and correlated with morphological and structural properties for different synthesis conditions. The Mössbauer spectra precisely determined the presence of different iron-oxide fractions in the investigated nanoparticles, while the high harmonic magnetic susceptibility measurements revealed the occurrence of metastable magnetic phases evolving in temperature and time. This study illustrates magnetic properties and dynamics of the magnetic configurations of iron-oxide nanoparticles grown by high temperature plasma, a process less explored so far but extremely useful for synthesising large numbers of nanoparticles for industrial applications.

  5. Microwave Absorption Properties of Iron Nanoparticles Prepared by Ball-Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xuan T. A.; Ta, Bach N.; Ngo, Le T. H.; Do, Manh H.; Nguyen, Phuc X.; Nam, Dao N. H.

    2016-05-01

    A nanopowder of iron was prepared using a high-energy ball milling method, which is capable of producing nanoparticles at a reasonably larger scale compared to conventional chemical methods. Analyses using x-ray diffraction and magnetic measurements indicate that the iron nanoparticles are a single phase of a body-centered cubic structure and have quite stable magnetic characteristics in the air. The iron nanoparticles were then mixed with paraffin and pressed into flat square plates for free-space microwave transmission and reflection measurements in the 4-8 GHz range. Without an Al backing plate, the Fe nanoparticles seem to only weakly absorb microwave radiation. The reflected signal S 11 drops to zero and a very large negative value of reflection loss ( RL) are observed for Al-backed samples, suggesting the existence of a phase matching resonance near frequency f ˜ 6 GHz.

  6. Size-Controlled Pd Nanoparticle Catalysts Prepared by Galvanic Displacement into a Porous Si-Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Host.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeho; Fu, Xin; Warther, David; Sailor, Michael J

    2017-02-21

    Porous silicon nanoparticles containing both Pd and iron oxide nanoparticles are prepared and studied as magnetically recoverable catalysts for organic reductions. The Pd nanoparticles are generated in situ by electroless deposition of Pd(NH3)4(2+), where the porous Si skeleton acts as both a template and as a reducing agent and the released ammonia ligands raise the local pH to exert control over the size of the Pd nanoparticles. The nanocomposites are characterized by transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, X-ray diffraction, superconducting quantum interference device magnetization, and dynamic light scattering. The nanocomposite consists of a porous Si nanoparticle (150 nm mean diameter) containing ∼20 nm pores, uniformly decorated with a high loading of surfactant-free Pd nanoparticles (12 nm mean diameter) and superparamagnetic γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (∼7 nm mean diameter). The reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol by sodium borohydride is catalyzed by the nanocomposite, which is stable through the course of the reaction. Catalytic reduction of the organic dyes methylene blue and rhodamine B is also demonstrated. The conversion efficiency and catalytic activity are found to be superior to a commercial Pd/C catalyst compared under comparable reaction conditions. The composite catalyst can be recovered from the reaction mixture by applying an external magnetic field due to the existence of the superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in the construct. The recovered particles retain their catalytic activity.

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of microvessels using iron-oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olamaei, N.; Cheriet, F.; Martel, S.

    2013-03-01

    The visualization of microstructures including blood vessels with an inner overall cross-sectional area below approximately 200 μm remains beyond the capabilities of current clinical imaging modalities. But with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, magnetic entities cause susceptibility artifacts in the images by disrupting the homogeneous magnetic field in a much larger scale than their actual size. As validated in this paper through simulation and in-vitro experiments, these artifacts can serve as a source of contrast, enabling microvessels with an inner diameter below the spatial resolution of any medical imaging modalities to be visualized using a clinical MR scanner. For such experiments, micron-sized agglomerations of iron-oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were injected in microchannels with internal diameters of 200 and 50 μm equivalent to a narrower artery or a larger arteriole, and down to a smaller arteriole, respectively. The results show the feasibility of the proposed method for micro-particle detection and the visualization of microvessels using a 1.5 T clinical MR scanner. It was confirmed that the method is reproducible and accurate at the sub-pixel level.

  8. Exceedingly small iron oxide nanoparticles as positive MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Wei, He; Bruns, Oliver T; Kaul, Michael G; Hansen, Eric C; Barch, Mariya; Wiśniowska, Agata; Chen, Ou; Chen, Yue; Li, Nan; Okada, Satoshi; Cordero, Jose M; Heine, Markus; Farrar, Christian T; Montana, Daniel M; Adam, Gerhard; Ittrich, Harald; Jasanoff, Alan; Nielsen, Peter; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2017-02-28

    Medical imaging is routine in the diagnosis and staging of a wide range of medical conditions. In particular, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is critical for visualizing soft tissue and organs, with over 60 million MRI procedures performed each year worldwide. About one-third of these procedures are contrast-enhanced MRI, and gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs) are the mainstream MRI contrast agents used in the clinic. GBCAs have shown efficacy and are safe to use with most patients; however, some GBCAs have a small risk of adverse effects, including nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), the untreatable condition recently linked to gadolinium (Gd) exposure during MRI with contrast. In addition, Gd deposition in the human brain has been reported following contrast, and this is now under investigation by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To address a perceived need for a Gd-free contrast agent with pharmacokinetic and imaging properties comparable to GBCAs, we have designed and developed zwitterion-coated exceedingly small superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (ZES-SPIONs) consisting of ∼3-nm inorganic cores and ∼1-nm ultrathin hydrophilic shell. These ZES-SPIONs are free of Gd and show a high T1 contrast power. We demonstrate the potential of ZES-SPIONs in preclinical MRI and magnetic resonance angiography.

  9. Chemically synthesized Iron-Platinum binary alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Levent

    In this dissertation, we explored the fabrication of FePt nanoparticles prepared by a solution-phase synthesis route and characterized their structural/ microstructural and magnetic properties both to gain a fundamental understanding and to check their compatibility for technological applications in ultra high density magnetic storage media. Monodispersed Fe-Pt alloy NPs (nanoparticles) have been prepared by thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl [Fe(CO)5] and reduction of platinum acetylacetonate [Pt(acac)2] with dibenzyl ether in the presence of oleic acid (OA) and oleyl amine (OAm) as surfactants. The composition of the nanoparticles was adjusted by changing the Fe(CO)5/Pt(acac) 2 molar ratio while fixing the Pt(acac)2 amount. Two phases of Fe-Pt binary alloy, FePt3 and FePt, were obtained successfully with the molar ratios of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively. The size of FePt NPs was tuned in the range of 3-6 nm by controlling the injection temperature of the iron precursor. It was found that, low injection temperature of precursors and the usage of surfactants as a reaction solvent, together with a slow heating to a low refluxing temperature were the key parameters for the formation of cubic nanoparticles. Spherical, cubic (with rounded edges) and octapod shapes were successfully produced by changing the OAm/OA molar ratio. Nanorods were formed by simply adjusting the injection time of the surfactants. Although it was reported in the literature that the dominant mechanism of formation of NPs involves the initial formation of platinum rich clusters followed by the gradual diffusion of iron atoms into these clusters during the synthesis, in this work it is clearly shown that Fe rich seeds do form in the early stages of the reaction. And it was these competitive nucleation sites that cause a compositional distribution between individual FePt particles in the final sample, although a narrow distribution is measured for the overall composition. As-synthesized NPs

  10. Tailored functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles for MRI, drug delivery, magnetic separation and immobilization of biosubstances.

    PubMed

    Hola, Katerina; Markova, Zdenka; Zoppellaro, Giorgio; Tucek, Jiri; Zboril, Radek

    2015-11-01

    In this critical review, we outline various covalent and non-covalent approaches for the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs). Tuning the surface chemistry and design of magnetic nanoparticles are described in relation to their applicability in advanced medical technologies and biotechnologies including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, targeted drug delivery, magnetic separations and immobilizations of proteins, enzymes, antibodies, targeting agents and other biosubstances. We review synthetic strategies for the controlled preparation of IONPs modified with frequently used functional groups including amine, carboxyl and hydroxyl groups as well as the preparation of IONPs functionalized with other species, e.g., epoxy, thiol, alkane, azide, and alkyne groups. Three main coupling strategies for linking IONPs with active agents are presented: (i) chemical modification of amine groups on the surface of IONPs, (ii) chemical modification of bioactive substances (e.g. with fluorescent dyes), and (iii) the activation of carboxyl groups mainly for enzyme immobilization. Applications for drug delivery using click chemistry linking or biodegradable bonds are compared to non-covalent methods based on polymer modified condensed magnetic nanoclusters. Among many challenges, we highlight the specific surface engineering allowing both therapeutic and diagnostic applications (theranostics) of IONPs and magnetic/metallic hybrid nanostructures possessing a huge potential in biocatalysis, green chemistry, magnetic bioseparations and bioimaging.

  11. Iron oxide nanoparticles modified with oleic acid: Vibrational and phase determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Paula P.; Barcellos, Geórgia S.; Petzhold, Cesar L.; Lavayen, Vladimir

    2016-12-01

    A simple path methodology to detect the phase composition of iron oxide nanoparticles modified with oleic acid based on vibrational spectroscopy is present here and applied on three different nanoparticles prepared by co-precipitation method. Firstly, the phase composition, magnetite, maghemite, and hematite, is determined using a reference intensity ratio methodology on X-ray diffraction pattern. Also, the size of each sample was calculated by Scherrer equation. Scanning, transmission electron microscopy, microanalysis and electron diffraction show a core magnetite particles size of around 10 nm for all particles. Based on lattice vibrations, we find a concentration of around 80% of magnetite and a hematite phase lower than 5%. Whereas, the magnetite composition from X-ray diffraction shows 76%. We also investigate the metal-organic interaction and disorder degree of organic molecule conformation by infrared and Raman spectroscopy analysis. Hematite lattice vibrations show more alterations as it interacts with the organic acid. Finally, magnetic measurements at room temperature of the modified particles, suggest a superparamagnetic behavior and high saturation magnetization.

  12. Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity Of Antibiotics Mixed With Metal Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Neeraj; Bhanjana, Gaurav; Thakur, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2011-12-01

    Current producers of antimicrobial technology have a long lasting, environmentally safe, non-leaching, water soluble solution that will eventually replace all poisons and heavy metals. The transition metal ions inevitably exist as metal complexes in biological systems by interaction with the numerous molecules possessing groupings capable of complexation or chelation. Nanoparticles of metal oxides offer a wide variety of potential applications in medicine due to the unprecedented advances in nanobiotechnology research. the bacterial action of antibiotics like penicillin, erythryomycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, kanamycin etc. and that of a mixture of antibiotics and metal and metal oxide nanoparticles like zinc oxide, zirconium, silver and gold on microbes was examined by the agar-well-diffusion method, enumeration of colony-forming units (CFU) and turbidimetry.

  13. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T2 contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM-1 S-1, which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM-1 S-1). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM-1 S-1, which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM-1 S-1). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary figures and experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr04691e

  14. Characterization of the oleic acid/iron oxide nanoparticle interface by magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masur, S.; Zingsem, B.; Marzi, T.; Meckenstock, R.; Farle, M.

    2016-10-01

    The synthesis of colloidal nanoparticles involves surfactant molecules, which bind to the particle surface and stabilize nanoparticles against aggregation. In many cases these protecting shells also can be used for further functionalization. In this study, we investigated monodisperse single crystalline iron oxide core/shell nanoparticles (FexOy-NPs) in situ covered with an oleic acid layer which showed two electron spin resonance (ESR) signals. The nanoparticles with the ligands attached were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and ferro- and paramagnetic resonance (FMR, EPR). Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of the functional groups and revealed that the oleic acid (OA) is chemisorbed as a carboxylate on the iron oxide and is coordinated symmetrically to the oxide atoms. We show that the EPR signal of the OA ligand molecule can be used as a local probe to determine the temperature changes at the surface of the nanoparticle.

  15. Super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for use in extrapulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-N; Wang, Y-M; Lai, W-F; Chen, T-J; Yu, M-C; Fang, C-L; Yu, F-L; Tsai, Y-H; Chang, W H-S; Zuo, C S; Renshaw, P F

    2012-06-01

    The limited sensitivity of serological tests for mycobacterial antigens has encouraged the development of a nanoparticle probe specific for the extrapulmonary form of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We developed an innovative probe comprised of super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles conjugated with Mtb surface antibody (MtbsAb-nanoparticles) to provide ultrasensitive imaging of biomarkers involved in extrapulmonary Mtb infection. MtbsAb-nanoparticles were significantly conjugated with Mtb bacilli. The extent of contrast enhancement reduction on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Mtb and human monocytic THP1 cells was proportional to the concentration of MtbsAb-nanoparticles. When MtbsAb-nanoparticles were intravenously injected into mice bearing Mtb granulomas, the granulomatous site showed a 14-fold greater reduction in signal intensity enhancement on T(2) -weighted MR images compared with an opposing site that received PBS injection. Mtb sAb-nanoparticles represent a new non-invasive technology for the diagnosis of extrapulmonary Mtb.

  16. Magnetic labeling of non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Boutry, Sébastien; Brunin, Stéphanie; Mahieu, Isabelle; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert N

    2008-01-01

    Small particles of iron oxide (SPIO) and ultrasmall particles of iron oxide (USPIO), inducing a strong negative contrast on T(2) and T(2)*-weighted MR images, are the most commonly used systems for the magnetic labeling of cultured cells and their subsequent detection by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The purpose of this work is to study the influence of iron incubation concentration, nanoparticle size and nanoparticle coating on the magnetic labeling and the viability of non-phagocytic adherent cells in culture. The magnetic labeling of 3T6 fibroblasts was studied by T(2)-weighted MRI at 4.7 T and by dosing-or cytochemical revealing-of iron through methods based on Perl's Prussian blue staining. Cells were incubated for 48 h with increasing iron concentrations of SPIO (25-1000 microg Fe/ml Endorem. Sinerem, a USPIO (20-40 nm) coated with neutral dextran, and Resovist (65 nm), a SPIO bearing an anionic carboxydextran coating, were compared with Endorem (dextran-coated, 80-150 nm) as magnetic tags. The iron loading of marrow stromal cell primary cultures (MSCs) isolated from rat femurs was compared with that of 3T6 fibroblasts. The SPIO-labeling of cells with Endorem was found to be dependent on the iron incubation concentration. MSCs, more sparsely distributed in the culture, exhibited higher iron contents than more densely populated 3T6 fibroblast cultures. A larger iron loading was achieved with Resovist than with Endorem, which in turn was more efficient than Sinerem as a magnetic tag. The magnetic labeling of cultured non-phagocytic adherent cells with iron oxide nanoparticles was thus found to be dependent on the relative concentration of the magnetic tag and of the cells in culture, on the nanoparticle size, and on the coating type. The viability of cells, estimated by methods assessing cell membrane permeability, was not affected by magnetic labeling in the conditions used in this work.

  17. For Better or Worse, Iron Overload by Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles as a MRI Contrast Agent for Chronic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qibing; Wei, Yushuang

    2017-01-17

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have recently been used as an effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent for the noninvasive diagnosis of chronic liver diseases including nonalcohol fatty liver diseases, nonalcohol steatohepatitis, and cirrhosis as well as liver tumors. However, the potential risk of the iron overload by SPIONs has been highly underestimated in chronic liver diseases. While most of SPIONs have been shown safe in the healthy group, significant toxicity potential by the iron overload has been revealed through immunotoxicity, lipid peroxidation, and fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism in cirrhosis as a high risk factor. As a result, the systems toxicology assessments of SPIONs are crucial in both healthy ones and chronic liver disease models to determine the margin of safety. In addition, the challenge of the iron overload by SPIONs requires better designed SPIONs as MRI contrast agents for chronic liver diseases such as the biodegradable nanocluster assembly with urine clearance.

  18. 75 FR 36629 - Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-28

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-888 Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof..., metal-top ironing tables and certain parts thereof (ironing tables) from the People's Republic of China... Floor-Standing, Metal-Top Ironing Tables and Certain Parts Thereof from the People's Republic of...

  19. The impact of engineered cobalt, iron, nickel and silver nanoparticles on soil bacterial diversity under field conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Vishal; Collins, Daniel; Walker, Virginia K.; Shah, Shreya

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of how engineered nanoparticles (NPs) migrate through soil and affect microbial communities is scarce. In the current study we examined how metal NPs, including those from the iron triad (iron, cobalt and nickel), moved through pots of soil maintained under winter field conditions for 50 days, when mesophilic bacteria may not be dividing. Based on total metal analysis, cobalt and nickel were localized in the top layer of soil, even after exposure to high precipitation and freeze-thaw cycles. In contrast, a bimodal distribution of silver was observed. Due to high endogenous levels of iron, the migration pattern of these NPs could not be determined. Pyrosequence analysis of the bacterial communities revealed that there was no significant engineered NP-mediated decline in microbial richness. However, analysis of individual genera showed that Sphingomonas and Lysobacter were represented by fewer sequences in horizons containing elevated metal levels whereas there was an increase in the numbers of Flavobacterium and Niastella. Collectively, the results indicate that along with the differential migration behavior of NPs in the soil matrix, their impact on soil bacterial diversity appears to be dependent on environmental parameters.

  20. Manipulation of resonant metallic nanoparticle using 4Pi focusing system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Rui, Guanghao; Gong, Liping; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping

    2016-10-17

    Metallic nanoparticles have fascinated scientists for over a century and are now heavily utilized in biomedical sciences and engineering. Due to its noncontact and holding nature, optical trapping is suitable to be combined with various applications to manipulate metallic nanoparticles. However, stable trapping of resonant metallic nanoparticles remains challenging due to the strong axial scattering force and severe optical heating effect. In this work, we propose novel optical tweezers constructed around a 4Pi focusing system that is capable of manipulating metallic nanoparticles even under the resonant condition. By properly modulating the spatial distribution of the illumination and adjusting the focusing condition, specific numbers of spherical spots with controllable locations can be generated in the focal region, providing multiple probes to interrogate the sample properties. Besides, stable three-dimensional optical trapping can be formed since the axial scattering force is canceled by the counter-propagating light. The greatly enhanced optical force arising from the extremely high focusing efficiency of the 4Pi focusing system enables to avoid the overheating effect by reducing the input power without destroying the mechanical stability. Moreover, complex motion trajectory of the metallic nanoparticles can be realized via introducing specific phase modulation to the illumination sequentially. The technique demonstrated in this work may open up new avenues for optical manipulation and their applications in various scientific fields.

  1. Thermally modulated photoacoustic imaging with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaohua; Gao, Fei; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-06-15

    Thermally modulated photoacoustic imaging (TMPI) is reported here for contrast enhancement when using nanoparticles as contrast agents. Exploiting the excellent sensitivity of the photoacoustic (PA) process on temperature and the highly selective heating capability of nanoparticles under electromagnetic field, the PA signals stemming from the nanoparticles labeled region can be efficiently modulated whereas those from highly light absorptive backgrounds are minimally affected. A coherent difference imaging procedure reduces the background signal and thus improves the imaging contrast. Phantom experiments with super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as contrast agents and alternating magnetic fields for heating are demonstrated. Further improvements toward clinical applications are also discussed.

  2. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  3. Physicochemical model of detonation synthesis of nanoparticles from metal carboxylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolochko, B. P.; Chernyshev, A. P.; Ten, K. A.; Pruuel, E. R.; Zhogin, I. L.; Zubkov, P. I.; Lyakhov, N. Z.; Luk'yanchikov, L. A.; Sheromov, M. A.

    2008-02-01

    We have shown previously that when metal carboxylates are subjected to a shock-wave action, diamond nanoparticles and nanoparticles of metals (Ag, Bi, Co, Fe, Pb) are formed and their characteristic size is about 30-200 Å. The metal nanoparticles formed are covered by an amorphous-carbon layer up to 20 Å thick. In this work we put forward a physicochemical model of the formation of diamond and metal nanoparticles from metal carboxylates upon shock-wave action. The energy released upon detonation inside the precursor is lower than in regions not occupied by the stearates. The characteristic time of temperature equalization has been estimated to be on the order of ˜10-3 s, which is greater by a factor of ˜103 than the characteristic reaction time. Due to the adiabatic nature of the processes occurring, the typical temperature of a "particle" will be lower than the temperature of the surrounding medium. In the framework of the model suggested, it has been assumed that the growth of metal clusters should occur by the diffusion mechanism; i.e., the "building material" is supplied through diffusion. The calculation using our previous experimental data on the reaction time and average size of metal particles has shown that the diffusion properties of the medium in which the metal nanoparticles are formed are close to those of the liquid state of the substance. The temperature and pressure under detonation conditions markedly exceed the analogous parameters characteristic of experiments on the thermodestruction of metal carboxylates. The small time of existence of the reaction mixture is compensated by the high mobility and concentration of reagents.

  4. Preparation and characterization of thermosensitive PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shengmao; Zhang, Linna; He, Benfang; Wu, Zhishen

    2008-08-01

    A new and facile approach was established to fabricate thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAA) coated iron oxide nanoparticles in a non-aqueous medium. The morphology and structure of the nanoparticle-doped composite were analyzed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transformation infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The thermosensitivity of the composite was also investigated. Results indicated that the oil-soluble iron oxide nanoparticles encapsulated with PNIPAA, composed of an inorganic iron oxide core and biocompatible PNIPAA shell, were dispersed well in water and had a sphere-like shape. The PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles with such a kind of core-shell structure showed excellent thermosensitivity. Namely, the aqueous suspension of PNIPAA-coated iron oxide nanoparticles dramatically changed from transparent to opaque as the temperature increased from room temperature to 38 °C, showing potential as optical transmittance switch materials and their significance in the fields of protein adsorption and purification controlled release, and drug delivery.

  5. Stabilization and cellular delivery of chitosan-polyphosphate nanoparticles by incorporation of iron.

    PubMed

    Giacalone, Giovanna; Hillaireau, Hervé; Capiau, Pauline; Chacun, Hélène; Reynaud, Franceline; Fattal, Elias

    2014-11-28

    Chitosan (CS) nanoparticles are typically obtained by complexation with tripolyphosphate (TPP) ions, or more recently using triphosphate group-containing drugs such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP). ATP is an active molecule we aim to deliver in order to restore its depletion in macrophages, when associated with their death leading to plaque rupture in atherosclerotic lesions. Despite high interest in CS nanoparticles for drug delivery, due to the biodegradability of CS and to the ease of the preparation process, these systems tend to readily disintegrate when diluted in physiological media. Some stabilization strategies have been proposed so far but they typically involve the addition of a coating agent or chemical cross-linkers. In this study, we propose the complexation of CS with iron ions prior to nanoparticle formation as a strategy to improve the carrier stability. This can be achieved thanks to the ability of iron to strongly bind both chitosan and phosphate groups. Nanoparticles were obtained from either TPP or ATP and chitosan-iron (CS-Fe) complexes containing 3 to 12% w/w iron. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the binding affinity of TPP and ATP to CS-Fe increased with the iron content of CS-Fe complexes. The stability of these nanoparticles in physiological conditions was evaluated by turbidity and by fluorescence fluctuation in real time upon dilution by electrolytes, and revealed an important stabilization effect of CS-Fe compared to CS, increasing with the iron content. Furthermore, in vitro studies on two macrophage cell lines (J774A.1 and THP-1) revealed that ATP uptake is improved consistently with the iron content of CS-Fe/ATP nanoparticles, and correlated to their lower dissociation in biological medium, allowing interesting perspectives for the intracellular delivery of ATP.

  6. Substitution of manganese and iron into hydroxyapatite: Core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Meejoo, Siwaporn; Tang, I.-Ming

    2008-08-04

    The bioceramics, hydroxyapatite (HAP), is a material which is biocompatible to the human body and is well suited to be used in hyperthermia applications for the treatment of bone cancer. We investigate the substitution of iron and manganese into the hydroxyapatite to yield ceramics having the empirical formula Ca{sub 9.4}Fe{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}. The samples were prepared by the co-precipitation method. The formation of the nanocrystallites in the HAP structure as the heating temperatures were raised to obtain a glass-ceramic system are confirmed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED) and electron spin resonance (ESR). TEM images show the core/shell structure of the nanoparticles, with the core being formed by the ferrites and the shell by the hydroxyapatite. The ED patterns indicate the nanoparticles formed at 500 deg. C have an amorphous structure while the nanoparticles formed at 1000 deg. C are crystalline. ESR spectroscopy indicated that the Fe{sup 3+} ions have a g-factor of 4.23 and the Mn{sup 2+} ions have a g-factor of 2.01. The values of the parameters in the spin Hamiltonian which describes the interaction between the transition metal ions and the Ca{sup 2+} ions, indicate that the Mn{sup 2+} ion substitute into the Ca{sup 2+} sites which are ninefold coordinated, i.e., the Ca(1) sites.

  7. Spectral dependence of fluorescence near plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yeechi

    The optical properties of fluorophores are significantly modified when placed within the near field (0--100 nm) of plasmon resonant metal nanostructures, due to the competition between increased decay rates and "hotspots" of concentrated electric fields. The decay rates and effective electric field intensities are highly dependent on the relative position of dye and metal and the overlap between plasmon resonance and dye absorption and emission. Understanding these dependencies can greatly improve the performance of biosensing and nanophotonic devices. In this dissertation, the fluorescence intensity of organic dyes and CdSe quantum dots near single metal nanoparticles is studied as a function of the local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the nanoparticle. Single metal nanoparticles have narrow, well-defined, intense local surface plasmon resonances that are tunable across the visible spectrum by changes in size and shape. First, we show that organic dyes can be self-assembled on single silver nanoprisms into known configurations by the hybridization of thiolated DNA oligomers. We correlate the fluorescence intensity of the dyes to the LSPR of the individual nanoprism to which they are attached. For each of three different organic dyes, we observe a strong correlation between the fluorescence intensity of the dye and the degree of spectral overlap with the plasmon resonance of the nanoparticle. On average, we observe the brightest fluorescence from dyes attached to metal nanoparticles that have a LSPR scattering peak 40--120 meV higher in energy than the emission peak of the fluorophore. Second, the plasmon-enhanced fluorescence from CdSe/CdS/CdZnS/ZnS core/shell quantum dots is studied near a variety of silver and gold nanoparticles. With single-particle scattering spectroscopy, the localized surface plasmon resonance spectra of single metal nanoparticles is correlated with the photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of the nearby quantum dots. The PLE

  8. Study on Metallized Reduction and Magnetic Separation of Iron from Fine Particles of High Iron Bauxite Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng-Gen; Chu, Man-Sheng; Wang, Zheng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Jue

    2017-01-01

    High iron bauxite ore is a typical unmanageable polyparagenetic resource and owns high comprehensive utilization value. Separation of iron from fine particles of high iron bauxite ore by the process of metallized reduction and magnetic dressing was researched systemically. The effect of magnetic field intensity, reduction temperature, reduction time, mole ratio of fixed carbon to reducible oxygen (FC/O) and ore particles size on separation indexes was researched. The results show that, with the conditions of reduction temperature of 1,400 °C, reduction time of 180 min, FC/O of 2.0, ore particle size of -2.0 mm and magnetic field intensity of 40 KA/m, about 89.24 % of the iron could be removed from high iron bauxite ore as metallic iron. Meanwhile, 86.09 % of the aluminum is stayed in non-magnetic fraction as alumina. However, the formation of hercynite (FeAl2O4) limits the reduction rate of iron oxides to metallic iron. The lower reduction conditions and higher recovery ratio of iron could be achieved with adopting ore-coal composite agglomerates or adding catalyst.

  9. Size-dependent redox behavior of iron observed by in-situ single nanoparticle spectro-microscopy on well-defined model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Waiz; Kleibert, Armin; Hartfelder, Urs; Balan, Ana; Gobrecht, Jens; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the chemistry of nanoparticles is crucial in many applications. Their synthesis in a controlled manner and their characterization at the single particle level is essential to gain deeper insight into chemical mechanisms. In this work, single nanoparticle spectro-microscopy with top-down nanofabrication is demonstrated to study individual iron nanoparticles of nine different lateral dimensions from 80 nm down to 6 nm. The particles are probed simultaneously, under same conditions, during in-situ redox reaction using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy elucidating the size effect during the early stage of oxidation, yielding time-dependent evolution of iron oxides and the mechanism for the inter-conversion of oxides in nanoparticles. Fabrication of well-defined system followed by visualization and investigation of singled-out particles eliminates the ambiguities emerging from dispersed nanoparticles and reveals a significant increase in the initial rate of oxidation with decreasing size, but the reactivity per active site basis and the intrinsic chemical properties in the particles remain the same in the scale of interest. This advance of nanopatterning together with spatially-resolved single nanoparticle X-ray absorption spectroscopy will guide future discourse in understanding the impact of confinement of metal nanoparticles and pave way to solve fundamental questions in material science, chemical physics, magnetism, nanomedicine and nanocatalysis.

  10. Distribution Behavior of Phosphorus and Metallization of Iron Oxide in Carbothermic Reduction of High-Phosphorus Iron Ore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Ji-Whoe; Kim, Dong-Yuk; Jung, Sung-Mo

    2015-10-01

    Distribution behavior of phosphorus and metallization of iron ore in the carbothermic reduction of high-phosphorus iron ore were investigated. Reduction degree of the iron oxide was evaluated by quadruple mass spectrometry connected to thermogravimetric analysis. The distribution of some elements including phosphorus was examined by electron probe micro-analyzer mapping analyses. The reduction behavior of high-phosphorus iron ore was evaluated as a function of reduction temperature, C/O molar ratio, and CaO addition. High reduction temperature accelerated the reduction of both iron oxide and hydroxylapatite, and high C/O molar ratio also promotes both of them. Those were contradictory to the targets of higher reduction degree of iron oxide and of lower one of hydroxylapatite. It was confirmed that appropriate amount of CaO addition could enhance the reduction of iron oxide, and regulate the reduction of hydroxylapatite.

  11. Photothermal effects of plasmonic metal nanoparticles in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, Stephen J.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-02-01

    There is a strong interest in the use of plasmonic metal nanoparticles in medical applications involving photothermal therapy. In this study, the problem of calculating the temperature elevation of a fluid arising from the absorption of light by a suspension of plasmonic nanoparticles is examined. The dependence of this temperature increase on the absorption cross section of nanoparticles of different shapes, in particular, nanospheres, nanospheroids, and nanostars, is studied. The nanoparticles behave as point sources of heat production and the time-dependent heat transfer equation is solved assuming that the nanoparticles are confined to a limited region. From this solution, the steady-state temperature of the fluid medium can be calculated and the time constant to achieve this temperature determined.

  12. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles for the fluorescent detection of metal ions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yongming; Zhang, Lianfeng; Zhang, Shushen; Yang, Yan; Chen, Xihan; Zhang, Mingchao

    2015-01-15

    Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles (F-CNPs) as a new kind of fluorescent nanoparticles, have recently attracted considerable research interest in a wide range of applications due to their low-cost and good biocompatibility. The fluorescent detection of metal ions is one of the most important applications. In this review, we first present the general detection mechanism of F-CNPs for the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including fluorescence turn-off, fluorescence turn-on, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and ratiometric response. We then focus on the recent advances of F-CNPs in the fluorescent detection of metal ions, including Hg(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and other metal ions. Further, we discuss the research trends and future prospects of F-CNPs. We envision that more novel F-CNPs-based nanosensors with more accuracy and robustness will be widely used to assay and remove various metal ions, and there will be more practical applications in coming years.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    PubMed Central

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10–20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity. PMID:26437582

  14. Antimicrobial activity of iron oxide nanoparticle upon modulation of nanoparticle-bacteria interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakha, Manoranjan; Pal, Sweta; Samantarrai, Devyani; Panigrahi, Tapan K.; Mallick, Bairagi C.; Pramanik, Krishna; Mallick, Bibekanand; Jha, Suman

    2015-10-01

    Investigating the interaction patterns at nano-bio interface is a key challenge for safe use of nanoparticles (NPs) to any biological system. The study intends to explore the role of interaction pattern at the iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP)-bacteria interface affecting antimicrobial propensity of IONP. To this end, IONP with magnetite like atomic arrangement and negative surface potential (n-IONP) was synthesized by co-precipitation method. Positively charged chitosan molecule coating was used to reverse the surface potential of n-IONP, i.e. positive surface potential IONP (p-IONP). The comparative data from fourier transform infrared spectroscope, XRD, and zeta potential analyzer indicated the successful coating of IONP surface with chitosan molecule. Additionally, the nanocrystals obtained were found to have spherical size with 10-20 nm diameter. The BacLight fluorescence assay, bacterial growth kinetic and colony forming unit studies indicated that n-IONP (<50 μM) has insignificant antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli. However, coating with chitosan molecule resulted significant increase in antimicrobial propensity of IONP. Additionally, the assay to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) indicated relatively higher ROS production upon p-IONP treatment of the bacteria. The data, altogether, indicated that the chitosan coating of IONP result in interface that enhances ROS production, hence the antimicrobial activity.

  15. Biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles from actinomycetes: biomedical applications and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Golinska, Patrycja; Wypij, Magdalena; Ingle, Avinash P; Gupta, Indarchand; Dahm, Hanna; Rai, Mahendra

    2014-10-01

    Biogenic synthesis of metal nanoparticles has been well proved by using bacteria, fungi, algae, actinomycetes, plants, etc. Among the different microorganisms used for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, actinomycetes are less known. Although, there are reports, which have shown that actinomycetes are efficient candidates for the production of metal nanoparticles both intracellularly and extracellularly. The nanoparticles synthesized by the members of actinomycetes present good polydispersity and stability and possess significant biocidal activities against various pathogens. The present review focuses on biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles and their application in medicine. In addition, the toxicity of these biogenic metal nanoparticles to human beings and environment has also been discussed.

  16. Humic acid facilitates the transport of ARS-labeled hydroxyapatite nanoparticles in iron oxyhydroxide-coated sand.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dengjun; Bradford, Scott A; Harvey, Ronald W; Gao, Bin; Cang, Long; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-03-06

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHAP) have been widely used to remediate soil and wastewater contaminated with metals and radionuclides. However, our understanding of nHAP transport and fate is limited in natural environments that exhibit significant variability in solid and solution chemistry. The transport and retention kinetics of Alizarin red S (ARS)-labeled nHAP were investigated in water-saturated packed columns that encompassed a range of humic acid concentrations (HA, 0-10 mg L(-1)), fractional surface coverage of iron oxyhydroxide coatings on sand grains (λ, 0-0.75), and pH (6.0-10.5). HA was found to have a marked effect on the electrokinetic properties of ARS-nHAP, and on the transport and retention of ARS-nHAP in granular media. The transport of ARS-nHAP was found to increase with increasing HA concentration because of enhanced colloidal stability and the reduced aggregate size. When HA = 10 mg L(-1), greater ARS-nHAP attachment occurred with increasing λ because of increased electrostatic attraction between negatively charged nanoparticles and positively charged iron oxyhydroxides, although alkaline conditions (pH 8.0 and 10.5) reversed the surface charge of the iron oxyhydroxides and therefore decreased deposition. The retention profiles of ARS-nHAP exhibited a hyperexponential shape for all test conditions, suggesting some unfavorable attachment conditions. Retarded breakthrough curves occurred in sands with iron oxyhydroxide coatings because of time-dependent occupation of favorable deposition sites. Consideration of the above effects is necessary to improve remediation efficiency of nHAP for metals and actinides in soils and subsurface environments.

  17. Regenerability of hydrotalcite-derived nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles for syngas production from biomass tar.

    PubMed

    Li, Dalin; Koike, Mitsuru; Wang, Lei; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Xu, Ya; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2014-02-01

    Nickel-iron/magnesium/aluminum bimetallic catalysts were prepared by the calcination and reduction of nickel-magnesium-iron-aluminum hydrotalcite-like compounds. Characterization suggests that, at iron/nickel≤0.5, both nickel and iron species are homogeneously distributed in the hydrotalcite precursor and incorporated into the Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O periclase after calcination, giving rise to uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles after reduction. Ni-Fe/Mg/Al (Fe/Ni=0.25) exhibits the best catalytic performance for the steam reforming of tar derived from the pyrolysis of biomass. It is suggested that the uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles and the synergy between nickel and iron are responsible for the high catalytic performance. Moreover, the Ni-Fe/Mg/Al catalyst exhibits much better regenerability toward oxidation-reduction treatment for the removal of deposited coke than that of conventional Ni-Fe/α-Al2 O3 . This property can be attributed to the better regeneration of Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles through the formation and reduction of Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O.

  18. Structure Evolution of Metal Nanoparticles in Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yi; Zhu, Beien

    Metal nanoparticles have drawn extensive attentions in materials science due to their widespread applications in electronics, engineering and catalysis. A very fundamental question is their structure evolution and surface segregation. Many recent observations have shown that reactive gases or supports may have strong effects on the morphology change and surface segregation. However, the effect of water--the most common solvent and environment--has not received enough attention. Here, we will give two examples to show water adsorption could induce the morphology change and strong surface segregation tendencies for the metal nanoparticles. This finding not only prompts us to re-examine the potential effects of water on metal nanoparticles, but would be also very helpful as a guide for the further theoretical and experimental studies in this field.

  19. Precipitation of heterogeneous nanostructures: Metal nanoparticles and dielectric nanocrystallites

    SciTech Connect

    Masai, Hirokazu; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi; Tokuda, Yomei; Yoko, Toshinobu

    2010-07-15

    Heterogeneous precipitation of nanocrystallites of metallic Bi and anatase was observed in CaO-Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramics. Addition of AlN reduced the Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} to Bi metal nanoparticles, which were uniformly dispersed in the glass. After heat-treatment of the Bi-precipitated glass around the glass transition temperature, nanocrystalline anatase precipitated out without aggregation of the Bi metal particles. It was found that the anatase nanocrystal size was affected by the distance between a nanocrystal and a precipitated Bi nanoparticle. The glass-ceramic produced is a functional material containing a random dispersion of different types of nanoparticles with different dielectric constants.

  20. Manipulation of metallic nanoparticle with evanescent vortex Bessel beam.

    PubMed

    Rui, Guanghao; Wang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-10-05

    In this work, we propose a novel strategy to optically trap and manipulate metallic nanoparticles using evanescent vortex Bessel beam (EVBB). A versatile method is presented to generate evanescent Bessel beam with tunable optical angular momentum by focusing a radially polarized vortex beam onto a one-dimensional photonics band gap structure. The behavior of a metallic nanoparticle in the EVBB is numerically studied. We show that such particle can be stably trapped near the surface. The orbital angular momentum drives the metallic nanoparticle to orbit around the beam axis, and the direction of the orbital motion is controlled by the handedness of the helical phase front. The technique demonstrated in this work may open up new avenues for optical manipulation, and the non-contact tunable orbiting dynamics of the trapped particle may find important applications in higher resolution imaging techniques.

  1. Optical studies of ion-beam synthesized metal alloy nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivatsava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Sairam, T. N.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2015-06-01

    AuxAg1-x alloy nanoparticles with tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been synthesized on a silica glass substrate. A small Au foil on an Ag foil is irradiated as target substrates such that ion beam falls on both Ag foil and Au foils. Silica slides are kept at an angle ˜45° with respect to the metallic foils. While irradiating the metallic foils with 100 keV Ar+ ions, sputtered Au and Ag atoms get deposited on the silica-glass. In this configuration the foils have been irradiated by Ar+ ions to various fluences at room temperature and the sputtered species are collected on silica slides. Formation of AuxAg1-x nanoparticles has been confirmed from the optical absorption measurements. With respect to the exposure area of Au and Ag foils to the ion beam, the SPR peak position varies from 450 to 500 nm. Green photoluminescence has been observed from these alloy metal nanoparticles.

  2. Ultrasonic computed tomography imaging of iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlman, Or; Azhari, Haim

    2017-02-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) are becoming increasingly used and intensively investigated in the field of medical imaging. They are currently FDA approved for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and it would be highly desirable to visualize them by ultrasound as well. Previous reports using the conventional ultrasound B-scan (pulse-echo) imaging technique have shown very limited detectability of these particles. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of imaging IONPs using the through-transmission ultrasound methodology and demonstrate their detectability using ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT). Commercially available IONPs were acoustically analysed to quantify their effect on the speed of sound (SOS) and acoustic attenuation as a function of concentration. Next, through-transmission projection and UCT imaging were performed on a breast mimicking phantom and on an ex vivo tissue model, to which IONPs were injected. Finally, an MRI scan was performed to verify that the same particles examined in the ultrasound experiment can be imaged by magnetic resonance, using the same clinically relevant concentrations. The results have shown a consistent concentration dependent speed of sound increase (1.86 \\text{m}{{\\text{s}}^{-1}} rise per 100 µg · ml-1 IONPs). Imaging based on this property has shown a substantial contrast-to-noise ratio improvement (up to 5 fold, p  <  0.01). The SOS-related effect generated a well discernible image contrast and allowed the detection of the particles existence and location, in both raster-scan projection and UCT imaging. Conversely, no significant change in the acoustic attenuation coefficient was noted. Based on these findings, it is concluded that IONPs can be used as an effective SOS-based contrast agent, potentially useful for ultrasonic breast imaging. Furthermore, the particle offers the capacity of significantly enhancing diagnosis accuracy using multimodal MRI-ultrasound imaging capabilities.

  3. Synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of glutathione-PEG-iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddad, Paula S.; Santos, Marconi C.; de Guzzi Cassago, Carolina Aparecida; Bernardes, Juliana S.; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Seabra, Amedea B.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, increasing interest is spent on the synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, followed by their characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity towards tumorigenic cell lines. In this work, magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized by the polyol method and coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and glutathione (GSH), leading to the formation of PEG-Fe3O4 and GSH-PEG-Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were characterized by state-of-the-art techniques: dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetic measurements. PEG-Fe3O4 and GSH-PEG-Fe3O4 nanoparticles have crystallite sizes of 10 and 5 nm, respectively, indicating compression in crystalline lattice upon addition of GSH on the nanoparticle surface. Both nanoparticles presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature, and AFM images revealed the regular spherical shape of the nanomaterials and the absence of particle aggregation. The average hydrodynamic sizes of PEG-Fe3O4 and GSH-PEG-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were 69 ± 37 and 124 nm ± 75 nm, respectively. The cytotoxicity of both nanoparticles was screened towards human prostatic carcinoma cells (PC-3). The results demonstrated a decrease in PC-3 viability upon treatment with PEG-Fe3O4 or GSH-PEG-Fe3O4 nanoparticles in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the cytotoxicity was not time-dependent. Due to the superparamagnetic behavior of PEG-Fe3O4 or GSH-PEG-Fe3O4 nanoparticles, upon the application of an external magnetic field, those nanoparticles can be guided to the target site yielding local toxic effects to tumor cells with minimal side effects to normal tissues, highlighting the promising uses of iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedical applications.

  4. Silver-copper alloy nanoparticles for metal enhanced luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Sanchari; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R.; Sen, Rajan

    2009-09-01

    Large metal enhanced luminescence was realized at the vicinity of easily fabricated Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles upon tuning of their surface plasmon resonance spectra by changing only one experimental variable—the annealing temperature, for maximum spectral overlap with the emission and excitation spectra of the luminophores. We observed strong emission enhancement of luminophores (141.48±19.20 times for Alexa Fluor 488 and 23.91±12.37 times for Alexa Fluor 594) at the vicinity of these Ag-Cu nanoparticles, which is significantly larger than for pure Ag nanoparticles. We present theoretical calculations to provide insights into these experimental findings.

  5. Sonochemical Synthesis and Magnetic Imaging of Hollow-Shell Iron-Platinum Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Remmi; Barnes, Paris; Martell, Eric

    2015-04-01

    As science has continued to evolve, scientists have been diving deeper and deeper, researching and analyzing the tiniest of objects. Interestingly, materials such as gold, silver, iron, and platinum behave differently on the nanoscale than the macroscale. Discrepancies between the behaviors of macro- and nanoparticles of the same substance are not well understood, which has led scientists to pursue the question as to why nanoparticles behave differently. Further research into the fabrication of hollow-shell iron-platinum nanoparticles and their unique properties may lead to real-world applications. Iron-platinum (FePt) nanoparticles are recognized for their unique magnetic properties; however, these properties have largely not been researched. FePt samples were prepared using sonochemical techniques. We report on the magnetic force microscopy imaging for self-assembled hollow-shell FePt nanoparticles, and relate our findings to the physical characteristics of the hollow-shell FePt nanoparticles. Additionally, we investigate the magnetic properties for FePt nanoparticles by analyzing the role of the electrons and their interactions occurring within the magnetic domain.

  6. Influence of carbon chain length on the synthesis and yield of fatty amine-coated iron-platinum nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles are among the most widely used and characterized magnetic nanoparticles. However, metal alloys such as superparamagnetic iron-platinum particles (SIPPs), which have better magnetic properties, are receiving increased attention. Scalable techniques to routinely synthesize SIPPs in bulk need further study. Here, we focus on the role played by the fatty amine ligand in the formation of the bimetallic FePt nanocrystal. More specifically, we compare the effect of varying lengths of fatty amine ligands on the shape, structure, uniformity, composition, and magnetic properties of the SIPPs. We synthesized SIPPs by employing a ‘green’ thermal decomposition reaction using fatty amine ligands containing 12 to 18 carbons in length. Greater fatty amine chain length increased the polydispersity, particle concentration, iron concentration, and the stability of the SIPPs. Additionally, longer reflux times increased the diameter of the particles, but decreased the iron concentration, suggesting that shorter reaction times are preferable. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of the SIPPs indicates that the ligands are successfully bound to the FePt cores through the amine group. Superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry measurements suggest that all of the SIPPs were superparamagnetic at room temperature and that SIPPs synthesized using tetradecylamine had the highest saturation magnetization. Our findings indicate that the octadecylamine ligand, which is currently used for the routine synthesis of SIPPs, may not be optimal. Overall, we found that using tetradecylamine and a 30-min reflux reaction resulted in optimal particles with the highest degree of monodispersity, iron content, stability, and saturation magnetization. PACS 81.07.-b; 75.75.Fk; 61.46.Df PMID:25006334

  7. Removal of Metal Nanoparticles Colloidal Solutions by Water Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovych, Olga; Svietlova, Nataliia; Konotop, Yevheniia; Karaushu, Olena; Hrechishkina, Svitlana

    2016-11-01

    The ability of seven species of aquatic plants ( Elodea canadensis, Najas guadelupensis, Vallisneria spiralis L., Riccia fluitans L., Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes L., and Salvinia natans L.) to absorb metal nanoparticles from colloidal solutions was studied. It was established that investigated aquatic plants have a high capacity for removal of metal nanoparticles from aqueous solution (30-100%) which indicates their high phytoremediation potential. Analysis of the water samples content for elements including the mixture of colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ag + Ag2O) before and after exposure to plants showed no significant differences when using submerged or free-floating hydrophytes so-called pleuston. However, it was found that the presence of submerged hydrophytes in aqueous medium ( E. canadensis, N. guadelupensis, V. spiralis L., and R. fluitans L.) and significant changes in the content of photosynthetic pigments, unlike free-floating hydrophytes ( L. laevigatum, P. stratiotes L., S. natans L.), had occur. Pleuston possesses higher potential for phytoremediation of contaminated water basins polluted by metal nanoparticles. In terms of removal of nanoparticles among studied free-floating hydrophytes, P. stratiotes L. and S. natans L. deserve on special attention.

  8. Magnesium solubility in metallic iron during core formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badro, J.; Siebert, J.; Nimmo, F.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial core formation occurred by gravitational segregation of immiscible metal and silicate melts in an extensively molten proto-Earth. This stripped the bulk silicate Earth of most of its siderophile elements, which were concentrated in the core. The process occurs by virtue of partitioning through a redox reaction (e.g. [1]) whereby iron in the metal exchanges for a bonded siderophile element in the mantle. By performing metal-silicate equilibration experiments at extreme pressures and temperatures using the laser-heated diamond anvil cell, we find that the major lithophile component of the silicate Earth, namely MgO, can also become soluble in the metal. At close to 5000 K, our experiments show that up to 1.2 % MgO can be incorporated in the metal. We show that Mg incorporation in the metal isn't a redox reaction as with siderophile element partitioning, but rather a direct solubility of the MgO component as temperatures approach the metal-silicate solvus; in that respect, our results are fully consistent with the recently calculated Fe-MgO solvus [2]. This confirms that significant amounts of magnesium could have been added to the early core, provided that a giant impact had generated the necessary temperature increase. The subsequent exsolution of MgO driven by core cooling would have provided a significant buoyancy source, likely sufficient to drive core convection and producing an ancient magnetic field [3]. [1] J. Wade and B. J. Wood, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 236, 78-95 (2005) [2] S. M. Wahl and B. Militzer, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 410, 25-33 (2015) [3] D. J. Stevenson, DI11C-03, Fall AGU 2012.

  9. Immobilization of Iron Nanoparticles on Multi Substrates and Its Reduction Removal of Chromium (VI) from Waste Streams

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article describes the in-situ synthesis and immobilization of iron nanoparticles on several substrates at room temperature using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and ascorbic acid as capping agent. The method is very effective in protecting iron nanoparticles from air oxidation for...

  10. High-performance iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic particle imaging - guided hyperthermia (hMPI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Lisa M.; Situ, Shu F.; Griswold, Mark A.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal through selective doping of magnetite nanoparticles with zinc. Moreover, we demonstrated focused magnetic hyperthermia heating by adapting the field gradient used in MPI. By saturating the iron oxide nanoparticles outside of a field free region (FFR) with an external static field, we can selectively heat a target region in our test sample. By comparing zinc-doped magnetite cubic nanoparticles with undoped spherical nanoparticles, we could show a 5-fold improvement in the specific absorption rate (SAR) in magnetic hyperthermia while providing good MPI signal, thereby demonstrating the potential for high-performance focused hyperthermia therapy through an MPI-guided approach (hMPI).Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging imaging modality that allows the direct and quantitative mapping of iron oxide nanoparticles. In MPI, the development of tailored iron oxide nanoparticle tracers is paramount to achieving high sensitivity and good spatial resolution. To date, most MPI tracers being developed for potential clinical applications are based on spherical undoped magnetite nanoparticles. For the first time, we report on the systematic investigation of the effects of changes in chemical composition and shape anisotropy on the MPI performance of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. We observed a 2-fold enhancement in MPI signal

  11. Nucleation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Mms6 Protein in Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Sanjay; Woehl, Taylor J; Liu, Xunpei; Mallapragada, Surya K; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-09-23

    Biomineralization proteins are widely used as templating agents in biomimetic synthesis of a variety of organic–inorganic nanostructures. However, the role of the protein in controlling the nucleation and growth of biomimetic particles is not well understood, because the mechanism of the bioinspired reaction is often deduced from ex situ analysis of the resultant nanoscale mineral phase. Here we report the direct visualization of biomimetic iron oxide nanoparticle nucleation mediated by an acidic bacterial recombinant protein, Mms6, during an in situ reaction induced by the controlled addition of sodium hydroxide to solution-phase Mms6 protein micelles incubated with ferric chloride. Using in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy we observe the liquid iron prenucleation phase and nascent amorphous nanoparticles forming preferentially on the surface of protein micelles. Our results provide insight into the early steps of protein-mediated biomimetic nucleation of iron oxide and point to the importance of an extended protein surface during nanoparticle formation.

  12. Preparation of iron oxide nanoparticles from FeCl3 solid powder using microemulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassar, Nashaat; Husein, Maen

    2006-05-01

    Nanoparticles of iron oxide were prepared by subjecting iron chloride powder to (w/o) microemulsions consisting of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT), isooctane and water. FeCl3 was first dissolved in the water pools of the microemulsion, and then reacted with NaOH added as an aqueous solution to form iron oxide. The amount of NaOH solution was limited so that single microemulsion phase is obtained. This technique serves as an in-situ nanoparticle preparation technique aimed at minimizing particle aggregation associated with particle transportation to required sites. In this study, the effects of AOT concentration and water to AOT mole ratio on the nanoparticle size were investigated. UV/Vis spectrophotometry and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to measure the particle size distribution.

  13. Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a compositional and microstructural study

    DOE PAGES

    Hachtel, J. A.; Yu, S.; Lupini, A. R.; ...

    2016-03-11

    The combination of iron oxide and gold in a single nanoparticle results in both magnetic and plasmonic properties that can stimulate novel applications in bio-sensing, medical imaging, or therapeutics. Microwave assisted heating allows the fabrication of multi-component, multi-functional nanostructures by promoting selective heating at desired sites. Recently, we reported a microwave-assisted polyol route yielding gold nanotriangles decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we present an in-depth microstructural and compositional characterization of the system by using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) spectroscopy. A method to remove the iron oxide nanoparticles from the gold nanocrystals and somemore » insights on crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms are also provided.« less

  14. Gold nanotriangles decorated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a compositional and microstructural study

    SciTech Connect

    Hachtel, J. A.; Yu, S.; Lupini, A. R.; Pantelides, S. T.; Gich, M.; Laromaine, A.; Roig, A.

    2016-03-11

    The combination of iron oxide and gold in a single nanoparticle results in both magnetic and plasmonic properties that can stimulate novel applications in bio-sensing, medical imaging, or therapeutics. Microwave assisted heating allows the fabrication of multi-component, multi-functional nanostructures by promoting selective heating at desired sites. Recently, we reported a microwave-assisted polyol route yielding gold nanotriangles decorated with iron oxide nanoparticles. Here, we present an in-depth microstructural and compositional characterization of the system by using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss (EELS) spectroscopy. A method to remove the iron oxide nanoparticles from the gold nanocrystals and some insights on crystal nucleation and growth mechanisms are also provided.

  15. Growth of textured thin Au coatings on iron oxide nanoparticles with near infrared absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, L L; Borwankar, A U; Willsey, B W; Yoon, K Y; Tam, J O; Sokolov, K V; Feldman, M D; Milner, T E; Johnston, K P

    2013-01-01

    A homologous series of Au-coated iron oxide nanoparticles, with hydrodynamic diameters smaller than 60 nm was synthesized with very low Auto-iron mass ratios as low as 0.15. The hydrodynamic diameter was determined by dynamic light scattering and the composition by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Unusually low Au precursor supersaturation levels were utilized to nucleate and grow Au coatings on iron oxide relative to formation of pure Au nanoparticles. This approach produced unusually thin coatings, by lowering autocatalytic growth of Au on Au, as shown by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Nearly all of the nanoparticles were attracted by a magnet indicating a minimal amount of pure Au particles The coatings were sufficiently thin to shift the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to the near infrared (NIR), with large extinction coefficients., despite the small particle hydrodynamic diameters, observed from dynamic light scattering to be less than 60 nm. PMID:23238021

  16. The convenient preparation of stable aryl-coated zerovalent iron nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Guselnikova, Olga A; Galanov, Andrey I; Gutakovskii, Anton K

    2015-01-01

    Summary A novel approach for the in situ synthesis of zerovalent aryl-coated iron nanoparticles (NPs) based on diazonium salt chemistry is proposed. Surface-modified zerovalent iron NPs (ZVI NPs) were prepared by simple chemical reduction of iron(III) chloride aqueous solution followed by in situ modification using water soluble arenediazonium tosylate. The resulting NPs, with average iron core diameter of 21 nm, were coated with a 10 nm thick organic layer to provide long-term protection in air for the highly reactive zerovalent iron core up to 180 °C. The surface-modified iron NPs possess a high grafting density of the aryl group on the NPs surface of 1.23 mmol/g. FTIR spectroscopy, XRD, HRTEM, TGA/DTA, and elemental analysis were performed in order to characterize the resulting material. PMID:26171295

  17. Iron-induced turnover of the Arabidopsis IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 metal transporter requires lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Kerkeb, Loubna; Mukherjee, Indrani; Chatterjee, Iera; Lahner, Brett; Salt, David E; Connolly, Erin L

    2008-04-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient but is toxic if accumulated at high levels. Thus, iron uptake and distribution in plants are controlled by precise regulatory mechanisms. IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER1 (IRT1) is the major high affinity iron transporter responsible for iron uptake from the soil in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Previously, we showed that IRT1 is subject to posttranscriptional regulation; when expressed from the constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter, IRT1 protein accumulates only in iron-deficient roots. IRT1 contains an intracellular loop that may be critical for posttranslational regulation by metals. Of particular interest are a histidine (His) motif (HGHGHGH) that might bind metals and two lysine residues that could serve as attachment sites for ubiquitin. We constructed a set of mutant IRT1 alleles: IRT1H154Q, IRT1H156Q, IRT1H158Q, IRT1H160Q, IRT14HQ (quadruple His mutant), IRT1K146R, IRT1K171R, and a double mutant (IRT1K146R,K171R). Mutation of the His or lysine residues did not eliminate the ability of IRT1 to transport iron or zinc. Expression of each of the IRT1 variants and an IRT1intact construct in plants from the 35S promoter revealed that either K146 or K171 is required for iron-induced protein turnover, and 35S-IRT1K146R,K171R plants contain higher levels of iron as compared to 35S-IRT1 and wild type. Furthermore, accumulation of metals in 35S-IRT1K146R,K171R plants was not associated with an increase in ferric chelate reductase activity; this result indicates that, at least under conditions when iron is abundant, reduction of ferric iron may not be the rate-limiting step in iron uptake by strategy I plants such as Arabidopsis.

  18. Laser fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A I; Kiyan, R; Chichkov, B N

    2010-09-27

    A novel method for fabrication of 2D and 3D metal nanoparticle structures and arrays is proposed. This technique is based on laser-induced transfer of molten metal nanodroplets from thin metal films. Metal nanoparticles are produced by solidification of these nanodroplets. The size of the transferred nanoparticles can be controllably changed in the range from 180 nm to 1500 nm. Several examples of complex 2D and 3D microstructures generated form gold nanoparticles are demonstrated.

  19. Confined Growth of Metal Nanoparticles Within 3D DNA Origami Molds.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Shen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Manufacturing prescribed shaped metal nanoparticles promises emerging applications in plasmonics, energy, and disease diagnosis. The key to the shape-controllable synthesis is generating local environments encoded with prescribed geometrical information. Here, we describe a general strategy that uses 3D self-assembled DNA origami as mold to confine the casting growth of metal nanoparticle. By transferring the shape information from DNA cavities to metal nanoparticles, metal nanoparticles with prescribed shapes, dimensions, and surface binding features could be rationally designed and synthesized.

  20. In situ hybridization of superparamagnetic iron-biomolecule nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Moghimi, Nafiseh; Donkor, Apraku David; Mohapatra, Mamata; Thomas, Joseph Palathinkal; Su, Zhengding; Tang, Xiaowu Shirley; Leung, Kam Tong

    2014-07-23

    The increase in interest in the integration of organic-inorganic nanostructures in recent years has promoted the use of hybrid nanoparticles (HNPs) in medicine, energy conversion, and other applications. Conventional hybridization methods are, however, often long, complicated, and multistepped, and they involve biomolecules and discrete nanostructures as separate entities, all of which hinder the practical use of the resulting HNPs. Here, we present a novel, in situ approach to synthesizing size-specific HNPs using Fe-biomolecule complexes as the building blocks. We choose an anticancer peptide (p53p, MW 1.8 kDa) and an enzyme (GOx, MW 160 kDa) as model molecules to demonstrate the versatility of the method toward different types of molecules over a large size range. We show that electrostatic interaction for complex formation of metal hydroxide ion with the partially charged side of biomolecule in the solution is the key to hybridization of metal-biomolecule materials. Electrochemical deposition is then used to produce hybrid NPs from these complexes. These HNPs with controllable sizes ranging from 30 nm to 3.5 μm are found to exhibit superparamagnetic behavior, which is a big challenge for particles in this size regime. As an example of greatly improved properties and functionality of the new hybrid material, in vitro toxicity assessment of Fe-GOx HNPs shows no adverse effect, and the Fe-p53p HNPs are found to selectively bind to cancer cells. The superparamagnetic nature of these HNPs (superparamagnetic even above the size regime of 15-20 nm!), their biocompatibility, and the direct integration approach are fundamentally important to biomineralization and general synthesis strategy for bioinspired functional materials.

  1. Nonlinear optical susceptibilities of semiconductor quantum dot - metal nanoparticle hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzis, A. F.; Kosionis, S. G.; Boviatsis, J.; Paspalakis, E.

    2016-03-01

    We theoretically study nonlinear optical effects of a semiconductor quantum dot and a spherical metal nanoparticle coupled via long-range Coulomb interaction. We solve the relevant density matrix equations in steady state and use proper perturbation theory to obtain closed-form analytical expressions for the nonlinear susceptibilities of the quantum dot, the metal nanoparticle, and the entire coupled system, up to fifth order. We also investigate the influence of the material of the semiconductor and the impact of the interparticle distance on the form of the spectra of the nonlinear susceptibilities.

  2. Radiation damping in metal nanoparticle pairs.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Christian; Schmidt, Benjamin; von Plessen, Gero

    2007-02-01

    The radiation damping rate of plasmon resonances in pairs of spherical gold nanoparticles is calculated. The radiative line width of the plasmon resonance indicates significant far-field coupling between the nanoparticles over distances many times the particle diameter. The radiation damping of the coupled particle-plasmon mode alternates between superradiant and subradiant behavior when the particle spacing is varied. At small particle spacings where near-field coupling occurs, the radiation damping rate lies far below that of an isolated particle.

  3. Studies on the effects of zerovalent iron nanoparticles on bacteria from the mangrove ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Kharangate-Lad, Amrita; Pereira, Flancy; Fernandes, Julio; Bhosle, Saroj

    2016-01-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) nanoparticles are gaining popularity in bioremediation of contaminated ground water and antimicrobial studies. In this study, ZVI nanoparticles were synthesized by borohydride method. The effect of these nanoparticles to alter the cell surface hydrophobicity of mangrove bacteria was studied by bacterial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay. The effect of these nanoparticles on the growth and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of a novel bacterial strain Halobacillus trueperi MXM-16 from mangroves was evaluated by growing the culture in the presence of ZVI nanoparticles and SEM. The change in the emulsifying ability of the cell-free supernatant of Halobacillus trueperi MXM-16 when grown in media amended with ZVI nanoparticles was also investigated by spectrophotometric analysis.

  4. Iron nanoparticles produced by high-energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Jorge E.; Cervantes, Janeth; Esparza, Rodrigo; Rosas, Gerardo

    2007-10-01

    In this investigation, the chemical and structural characteristics of Fe nanoparticles synthesized by high-energy ball milling have been explored. After the milling process the nanoparticles were collected using a magnetic field. The structure, morphology and composition of the powders were obtained using high-resolution electron microscopy. HREM images confirmed the nanoparticles' presence with approximately 2-4 nm in size. It was found that using this method allowed the formation of nanoparticles in a smaller size range than other synthesis methods. Also, it was confirmed by HREM images that the obtained nanoparticles were mainly of the fcc nature and some of them of the MTP type.

  5. Iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dendritic polyglycerols as selective MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Nordmeyer, Daniel; Stumpf, Patrick; Gröger, Dominic; Hofmann, Andreas; Enders, Sven; Riese, Sebastian B; Dernedde, Jens; Taupitz, Matthias; Rauch, Ursula; Haag, Rainer; Rühl, Eckart; Graf, Christina

    2014-08-21

    Monodisperse small iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with dendritic polyglycerol (dPG) or dendritic polyglycerol sulfate (dPGS) are prepared. They are highly stable in aqueous solutions as well as physiological media. In particular, oleic acid capped iron oxide particles (core diameter = 11 ± 1 nm) were modified by a ligand exchange process in a one pot synthesis with dPG and dPGS bearing phosphonate as anchor groups. Dynamic light scattering measurements performed in water and different biological media demonstrate that the hydrodynamic diameter of the particles is only slightly increased by the ligand exchange process resulting in a final diameter of less than 30 nm and that the particles are stable in these media. It is also revealed by magnetic resonance studies that their magnetic relaxivity is reduced by the surface modification but it is still sufficient for high contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Additionally, incubation of dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles with human umbilical vein endothelial cells showed a 50% survival at 85 nM (concentration of nanoparticles). Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies demonstrate that the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles inhibit L-selectin ligand binding whereas the particles containing only dPG do not show this effect. Experiments in a flow chamber with human myelogenous leukemia cells confirmed L-selectin inhibition of the dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles and with that the L-selectin mediated leukocyte adhesion. These results indicate that dPGS functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles are a promising contrast agent for inflamed tissue probed by MRI.

  6. Structure of carbohydrate-bound polynuclear iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in parenteral formulations.

    PubMed

    Kudasheva, Dina S; Lai, Jriuan; Ulman, Abraham; Cowman, Mary K

    2004-11-01

    Intravenous iron therapy is used to treat anemia associated with chronic kidney disease. The chemical structures of parenteral iron agents have not been characterized in detail, and correlations between structure, efficiency of iron delivery, and toxicity via catalysis of oxygen-derived free radical creation remain to be established. In this study, two formulations of parenteral iron have been characterized by absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and elemental analysis. The samples studied were Venofer (Iron Sucrose Injection, USP) and Ferrlecit (Sodium Ferric Gluconate in Sucrose Injection). The 250-800-nm absorption spectra and the XRD patterns showed that both formulations contain a mineral core composed of iron oxyhydroxide in the beta-FeOOH mineral polymorph known as akaganeite. This was further confirmed for each formulation by imaging using TEM and AFM. The average core size for the nanoparticles, after dialysis to remove unbound or loosely bound carbohydrate, was approximately 3+/-2 nm for the iron-sucrose, and approximately 2+/-1 nm for the iron-gluconate. Each of the nanoparticles consists of a mineral core, surrounded by a layer of bound carbohydrate. The overall diameter of the average bead in the dialyzed preparations was approximately 7+/-4 nm for the iron-sucrose, and 3+/-1 nm for the iron-gluconate. Undialyzed preparations have particles with larger average sizes, depending on the extent of dilution of unbound and loosely bound carbohydrate. At a dilution corresponding to a final Fe concentration of 5 mg/mL, the average particle diameter in the iron-sucrose formulation was approximately 22+/-9 nm, whereas that of the iron-gluconate formulation was approximately 12+/-5 nm.

  7. The electrochemisty of surface modified <10 nm metal oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Joseph J. P.

    Chapter One provides a general introduction of the research on metal oxide nanoparticles (MOx), highlighting their synthesis, surface modification, and functionalization. Emphasis is given to the different synthetic route for producing small (<10 nm) MOx nanoparticles with narrow size distributions. Different methods for modifying their surface with small organic molecules are discussed with focus given to silanes and phosphates. Furthermore, functionalizing surface modified nanoparticles for specific functions is addressed, with markers for analytically relevant nanoscale quantification being the primary focus. Chapter Two describes in detail the thermal degradation synthesis used for the generation of small MOx nanoparticles. It demonstrates the versatile of the synthesis by successfully synthesizing ZrO 2 and IrO2 nanoparticles. Preliminary work involving the formation of Bi2S3, Bi2O3, and RuO2 nanomaterials is also addressed. The solvothermal synthesis of indium tin oxide (ITO) is also shown for comparison to ITO produced by thermal degradation. Chapter Three details the surface modification of ITO nanoparticles and subsequent electrochemical tagging with a ferrocene moiety. ITO nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal degradation. These nanoparticles underwent a ligand exchange with a covalently binding mondentate silane terminated with a primary amine. Acyl chloride coupling between the amine and chlorocarbonylferrocene provided an electrochemical tag to quantify the level of surface modification. Electrochemisty of the quasi-diffusing nanoparticles was evaluated via cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and mircodisk electrode (microE) experiments. Chapter Four investigates spectroscopic tagging of ITO and ZrO2 nanoparticles as well as electrochemical tagging of ZrO 2 and IrO2 nanoparticles. An unbound azo-dye was synthesized and attempts were made to attach the dye to the surface of ITO nanoparticles. Imine couple between a spectroscopic tag

  8. Bubble nucleation and migration in a lead–iron hydr(oxide) core–shell nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Kaiyang; Frolov, Timofey; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Junling; Asta, Mark; Zheng, Haimei

    2015-01-01

    Iron hydroxide is found in a wide range of contexts ranging from biominerals to steel corrosion, and it can transform to anhydrous oxide via releasing O2 gas and H2O. However, it is not well understood how gases transport through a crystal lattice. Here, we present in situ observation of the nucleation and migration of gas bubbles in iron (hydr)oxide using transmission electron microscopy. We create Pb–FeOOH model core–shell nanoparticles in a liquid cell. Under electron irradiation, iron hydroxide transforms to iron oxide, during which bubbles are generated, and they migrate through the shell to the nanoparticle surface. Geometric phase analysis of the shell lattice shows an inhomogeneous stain field at the bubbles. Our modeling suggests that the elastic interaction between the core and the bubble provides a driving force for bubble migration. PMID:26438864

  9. Solid-stabilized emulsion formation using stearoyl lactylate coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vengsarkar, Pranav S.; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2014-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can exhibit highly tunable physicochemical properties that are extremely important in applications such as catalysis, biomedicine and environmental remediation. The small size of iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions due to their high energy of adsorption at the interface of oil droplets in water. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of the primary particle characteristics and stabilizing agent chemistry on the stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using stoichiometric amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+ salts. Sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL), a Food and Drug Administration approved food additive, was used to functionalize the iron oxide nanoparticles. SSL is useful in the generation of fat-in-water emulsions due to its high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and its bilayer-forming capacity. Generation of a monolayer or a bilayer coating on the nanoparticles was controlled through systematic changes in reagent concentrations. The coated particles were then characterized using various analytical techniques to determine their size, their crystal structure and surface functionalization. The capacity of these bilayer coated nanoparticles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions under various salt concentrations and pH values was also systematically determined using various characterization techniques. This study successfully demonstrated the ability to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles (20-40 nm) coated with SSL in order to generate stable Pickering emulsions that were pH-responsive and resistant to significant destabilization in a saline environment, thereby lending themselves to applications in advanced oil spill recovery and remediation.

  10. Metal nanoparticles in the presence of lipopolysaccharides trigger the onset of metal allergy in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Toshiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Izumi, Natsumi; Ichihashi, Ko-Ichi; Handa, Takayuki; Nishijima, Nobuo; Uemura, Eiichiro; Sagami, Ko-Ichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yamaguchi, Manami; Nagano, Kazuya; Mukai, Yohei; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Ishii, Ken J.; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2016-09-01

    Many people suffer from metal allergy, and the recently demonstrated presence of naturally occurring metal nanoparticles in our environment could present a new candidate for inducing metal allergy. Here, we show that mice pretreated with silver nanoparticles (nAg) and lipopolysaccharides, but not with the silver ions that are thought to cause allergies, developed allergic inflammation in response to the silver. nAg-induced acquired immune responses depended on CD4+ T cells and elicited IL-17A-mediated inflammation, similar to that observed in human metal allergy. Nickel nanoparticles also caused sensitization in the mice, whereas gold and silica nanoparticles, which are minimally ionizable, did not. Quantitative analysis of the silver distribution suggested that small nAg (≤10 nm) transferred to the draining lymph node and released ions more readily than large nAg (>10 nm). These results suggest that metal nanoparticles served as ion carriers to enable metal sensitization. Our data demonstrate a potentially new trigger for metal allergy.

  11. Synthesis and Magneto-Thermal Actuation of Iron Oxide Core–PNIPAM Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles have been proposed for many applications in biotechnology and medicine. In this paper, it is demonstrated how the excellent colloidal stability and magnetic properties of monodisperse and individually densely grafted iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to manipulate reversibly the solubility of nanoparticles with a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)nitrodopamine shell. “Grafting-to” and “grafting-from” methods for synthesis of an irreversibly anchored brush shell to monodisperse, oleic acid coated iron oxide cores are compared. Thereafter, it is shown that local heating by magnetic fields as well as global thermal heating can be used to efficiently and reversibly aggregate, magnetically extract nanoparticles from solution and spontaneously redisperse them. The coupling of magnetic and thermally responsive properties points to novel uses as smart materials, for example, in integrated devices for molecular separation and extraction. PMID:26270412

  12. Synthesis of core-shell iron nanoparticles via a new (novel) approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Rakesh P.; Koymen, Ali R.

    2014-03-01

    Carbon-encapsulated iron (Fe) nanoparticles were synthesized by a newly developed method in toluene. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of the as prepared sample reveal that core-shell nanostructures have been formed with Fe as core and graphitic carbon as shell. Fe nanoparticles with diameter 11nm to 102 nm are encapsulated by 6-8 nm thick graphitic carbon layers. There was no iron carbide formation observed between the Fe core and the graphitic shell. The Fe nanoparticles have body centered cubic (bcc) crystal structure. The magnetic hysteresis loop of the as synthesized powder at room temperature showed a saturation magnetization of 9 Am2 kg-1. After thermal treatment crystalline order of the samples improved and hence saturation magnetization increased to 24 Am2kg-1. We foresee that the carbon-encapsulated Fe nanoparticles are biologically friendly and could have potential applications in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Photothermal cancer therapy.

  13. Noble Metal Nanoparticle-loaded Mesoporous Oxide Microspheres for Catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhao

    Noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals have attracted much attention as catalysts due to their unique characteristics, including high surface areas and well-controlled facets, which are not often possessed by their bulk counterparts. To avoid the loss of their catalytic activities brought about by their size and shape changes during catalytic reactions, noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals are usually dispersed and supported finely on solid oxide supports to prevent agglomeration, nanoparticle growth, and therefore the decrease in the total surface area. Moreover, metal oxide supports can also play important roles in catalytic reactions through the synergistic interactions with loaded metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals. In this thesis, I use ultrasonic aerosol spray to produce hybrid microspheres that are composed of noble metal nanoparticles/nanocrystals embedded in mesoporous metal oxide matrices. The mesoporous metal oxide structure allows for the fast diffusion of reactants and products as well as confining and supporting noble metal nanoparticles. I will first describe my studies on noble metal-loaded mesoporous oxide microspheres as catalysts. Three types of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) and three types of metal oxide substrates (TiO2, ZrO2, Al 2O3) were selected, because they are widely used for practical catalytic applications involved in environmental cleaning, pollution control, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical syntheses. By considering every possible combination of the noble metals and oxide substrates, nine types of catalyst samples were produced. I characterized the structures of these catalysts, including their sizes, morphologies, crystallinity, and porosities, and their catalytic performances by using a representative reduction reaction from nitrobenzene to aminobenzene. Comparison of the catalytic results reveals the effects of the different noble metals, their incorporation amounts, and oxide substrates on the catalytic abilities. For this particular

  14. Colloidal Stability and Monodispersible Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles in Biotechnology Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamili, K.; Rajesh, E. M.; Rajendran, R.; Madhan Shankar, S. R.; Elango, M.; Abitha Devi, N.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are promising material for various biological applications. In the recent decades, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MNPs) have great attention in biomedical applications such as drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH). This review focuses on the colloidal stability and monodispersity properties of MNPs, which pay more attention toward biomedical applications. The simplest and the most promising method for the synthesis of MNPs is co-precipitation. The biocompatible MNPs are more interested in MRI application. This review also apportions synthesis, characterization and applications of MNP in biological and biomedical as theranostics and imaging.

  15. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  16. Catechol versus bisphosphonate ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles: towards multi-functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guénin, Erwann; Lalatonne, Yoann; Bolley, Julie; Milosevic, Irena; Platas-Iglesias, Carlos; Motte, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    We report an investigation of the ligand exchange at the surface of iron oxide nanoparticles in water. For this purpose we compared two strong chelating agents on the iron oxide surface containing catechol and bisphosphonate moieties. Interactions between the coating agents (catechol/bisphosphonate) and the nanoparticle's surface were studied by FTIR and DFT calculations. Ligand exchange experiments were performed using sonication and the exchange yield was characterized by FTIR and EDX. This methodology allowed introducing bisphosphonates with various functionalities (alkyne or biotin) permitting multi-functionalization.

  17. Effects of Nanoparticle Size on Cellular Uptake and Liver MRI with PVP-Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jing; Bu, Lihong; Xie, Jin; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Zhen; Li, Xingguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of nanoparticle size (30–120 nm) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hepatic lesions in vivo has been systematically examined using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-IOs). Such biocompatible PVP-IOs with different sizes were synthesized by a simple one-pot pyrolysis method. These PVP-IOs exhibited good crystallinity and high T2 relaxivities, and the relaxivity increased with the size of the magnetic nanoparticles. It was found that cellular uptake changed with both size and surface physiochemical properties, and that PVP-IO-37 with a core size of 37 nm and hydrodynamic particle size of 100 nm exhibited higher cellular uptake rate and greater distribution than other PVP-IOs and Feridex. We systematically investigated the effect of nanoparticle size on MRI of normal liver and hepatic lesions in vivo. The physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles influenced their pharmacokinetic behavior, which ultimately determined their ability to accumulate in the liver. The contrast enhancement of PVP-IOs within the liver was highly dependent on the overall size of the nanoparticles, and the 100 nm PVP-IO-37 nanoparticles exhibited the greatest enhancement. These results will have implications in designing engineered nanoparticles that are optimized as MR contrast agents or for use in therapeutics. PMID:21043459

  18. Effects of nanoparticle size on cellular uptake and liver MRI with polyvinylpyrrolidone-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Bu, Lihong; Xie, Jin; Chen, Kai; Cheng, Zhen; Li, Xingguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2010-12-28

    The effect of nanoparticle size (30-120 nm) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of hepatic lesions in vivo has been systematically examined using polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-IOs). Such biocompatible PVP-IOs with different sizes were synthesized by a simple one-pot pyrolysis method. These PVP-IOs exhibited good crystallinity and high T(2) relaxivities, and the relaxivity increased with the size of the magnetic nanoparticles. It was found that cellular uptake changed with both size and surface physiochemical properties, and that PVP-IO-37 with a core size of 37 nm and hydrodynamic particle size of 100 nm exhibited higher cellular uptake rate and greater distribution than other PVP-IOs and Feridex. We systematically investigated the effect of nanoparticle size on MRI of normal liver and hepatic lesions in vivo. The physical and chemical properties of the nanoparticles influenced their pharmacokinetic behavior, which ultimately determined their ability to accumulate in the liver. The contrast enhancement of PVP-IOs within the liver was highly dependent on the overall size of the nanoparticles, and the 100 nm PVP-IO-37 nanoparticles exhibited the greatest enhancement. These results will have implications in designing engineered nanoparticles that are optimized as MR contrast agents or for use in therapeutics.

  19. Mechanisms of enhanced osteoblast gene expression in the presence of hydroxyapatite coated iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Nhiem; Hall, Douglas; Webster, Thomas J.

    2012-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) coated iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetic nanoparticles have been shown to enhance osteoblast (bone forming cells) proliferation and osteoblast differentiation into calcium depositing cells (through increased secretion of alkaline phosphatase, collagen and calcium deposition) compared to control samples without nanoparticles. Such nanoparticles are, thus, very promising for numerous orthopedic applications including magnetically directed osteoporosis treatment. The objective of the current study was to elucidate the mechanisms of the aforementioned improved osteoblast responses in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Results demonstrated large amounts of fibronectin (a protein known to increase osteoblast functions) adsorption on HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Specifically, fibronectin adsorption almost doubled when HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticle concentrations increased from 12.5 to 100 μg ml-1, and from 12.5 to 200 μg ml-1, a four fold increase was observed. Results also showed greater osteoblast gene regulation (specifically, osteocalcin, type I collagen and cbfa-1) in the presence of HA coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Collectively, these results provide a mechanism for the observed enhanced osteoblast functions in the presence of HA coated iron oxide nanoparticles, allowing their further investigation for a number of orthopedic applications.

  20. How to assess cytotoxicity of (iron oxide-based) nanoparticles: a technical note using cationic magnetoliposomes.

    PubMed

    Soenen, Stefaan J H; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    The range of different types of nanoparticles and their biomedical applications is rapidly growing, creating a need to thoroughly examine the effects these particles have on biological entities. One of the most commonly used nanoparticle types is iron oxide nanoparticles, which can be used as MRI contrast agents. The main research topic is the in vitro labeling of cells with iron oxide nanoparticles to render the cells detectable for MRI upon in vivo transplantation. For the correct evaluation of cell function and behavior in vivo, any effects of the nanoparticles on the cells must be completely ruled out. The present work provides a technical note where a detailed overview is given of several assays that could be useful to determine nanoparticle toxicity. The assays described focus on (i) nanoparticle internalization, (ii) immediate cell toxicity, (iii) cell proliferation, (iv) cell morphology, (v) cell functionality and (vi) cell physiology. Potential pitfalls, appropriate controls and advantages/disadvantages of the different assays are given. The main focus of this work is to provide a detailed guide to help other researchers in the field interested in setting up nanoparticle-toxicity studies.

  1. Absorption properties of metal-semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shaviv, Ehud; Schubert, Olaf; Alves-Santos, Marcelo; Goldoni, Guido; Di Felice, Rosa; Vallée, Fabrice; Del Fatti, Natalia; Banin, Uri; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2011-06-28

    The optical response of hybrid metal-semiconductor nanoparticles exhibits different behaviors due to the proximity between the disparate materials. For some hybrid systems, such as CdS-Au matchstick-shaped hybrids, the particles essentially retain the optical properties of their original components, with minor changes. Other systems, such as CdSe-Au dumbbell-shaped nanoparticles, exhibit significant change in the optical properties due to strong coupling between the two materials. Here, we study the absorption of these hybrids by comparing experimental results with simulations using the discrete dipole approximation method (DDA) employing dielectric functions of the bare components as inputs. For CdS-Au nanoparticles, the DDA simulation provides insights on the gold tip shape and its interface with the semiconductor, information that is difficult to acquire by experimental means alone. Furthermore, the qualitative agreement between DDA simulations and experimental data for CdS-Au implies that most effects influencing the absorption of this hybrid system are well described by local dielectric functions obtained separately for bare gold and CdS nanoparticles. For dumbbell shaped CdSe-Au, we find a shortcoming of the electrodynamic model, as it does not predict the "washing out" of the optical features of the semiconductor and the metal observed experimentally. The difference between experiment and theory is ascribed to strong interaction of the metal and semiconductor excitations, which spectrally overlap in the CdSe case. The present study exemplifies the employment of theoretical approaches used to describe the optical properties of semiconductors and metal nanoparticles, to achieve better understanding of the behavior of metal-semiconductor hybrid nanoparticles.

  2. Ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications: improving the colloidal and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Costo, Rocio; Bello, Valentina; Robic, Caroline; Port, Marc; Marco, Jose F; Puerto Morales, M; Veintemillas-Verdaguer, Sabino

    2012-01-10

    A considerable increase in the saturation magnetization, M(s) (40%), and initial susceptibility of ultrasmall (<5 nm) iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by laser pyrolysis was obtained through an optimized acid treatment. Moreover, a significant enhancement in the colloidal properties, such as smaller aggregate sizes in aqueous media and increased surface charge densities, was found after this chemical protocol. The results are consistent with a reduction in nanoparticle surface disorder induced by a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism.

  3. Methods of preparation and modification of advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles, their properties and application in water treatment technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Jan; Kašlík, Josef; Medřík, Ivo; Petala, Eleni; Zbořil, Radek; Slunský, Jan; Černík, Miroslav; Stavělová, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Zero-valent iron nanoparticles are commonly used in modern water treatment technologies. Compared to conventionally-used macroscopic iron or iron microparticles, the using of nanoparticles has the advantages given mainly by their generally large specific surface area (it drives their high reactivity and/or sorption capacity), small dimensions (it allows their migration e.g. in ground water), and particular physical and chemical properties. Following the applications of zero-valent iron particles in various pilot tests, there arose several critical suggestions for improvements of used nanomaterials and for development of new generation of reactive nanomaterials. In the presentation, the methods of zero-valent iron nanoparticles synthesis will be summarized with a special attention paid to the thermally-induced solid-state reaction allowing preparation of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in an industrial scale. Moreover, the method of thermal reduction of iron-oxide precursors enables to finely tune the critical parameters (mainly particle size and morphology, specific surface area, surface chemistry of nanoparticles etc.) of resulting zero-valet iron nanoparticles. The most important trends of advanced nanoparticles development will be discussed: (i) surface modification of nanomaterilas, (ii) development of nanocomposites and (iii) development of materials for combined reductive-sorption technologies. Laboratory testing of zero-valent iron nanoparticles reactivity and migration will be presented and compared with the field observations: the advanced zero-valent iron nanoparticles were used for groundwater treatment at the locality contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons (VC, DCE, TCE and PCE) and reacted nanoparticles were extracted from the sediments for their fate assessment. The authors gratefully acknowledge the support by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic "Competence Centres" (project No. TE01020218) and the EU FP7 (project NANOREM).

  4. Iron overload by Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles is a High Risk Factor in Cirrhosis by a Systems Toxicology Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yushuang; Zhao, Mengzhu; Yang, Fang; Mao, Yang; Xie, Hang; Zhou, Qibing

    2016-06-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as a contrast agent have been widely used in magnetic resonance imaging for tumor diagnosis and theranostics. However, there has been safety concern of SPIONs with cirrhosis related to excess iron-induced oxidative stress. In this study, the impact of iron overload by SPIONs was assessed on a mouse cirrhosis model. A single dose of SPION injection at 0.5 or 5 mg Fe/kg in the cirrhosis group induced a septic shock response at 24 h with elevated serum levels of liver and kidney function markers and extended impacts over 14 days including high levels of serum cholesterols and persistent low serum iron level. In contrast, full restoration of liver functions was found in the normal group with the same dosages over time. Analysis with PCR array of the toxicity pathways revealed the high dose of SPIONs induced significant expression changes of a distinct subset of genes in the cirrhosis liver. All these results suggested that excess iron of the high dose of SPIONs might be a risk factor for cirrhosis because of the marked impacts of elevated lipid metabolism, disruption of iron homeostasis and possibly, aggravated loss of liver functions.

  5. The role of metal nanoparticles and nanonetworks in alloy degradation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Z; Natesan, K; Cai, Z; Darling, S B

    2008-08-01

    Oxide scale, which is essential to protect structural alloys from high-temperature degradation such as oxidation, carburization and metal dusting, is usually considered to consist simply of oxide phases. Here, we report on a nanobeam X-ray and magnetic force microscopy investigation that reveals that the oxide scale actually consists of a mixture of oxide materials and metal nanoparticles. The metal nanoparticles self-assemble into nanonetworks, forming continuous channels for carbon transport through the oxide scales. To avoid the formation of these metallic particles in the oxide scale, alloys must develop a scale without spinel phase. We have designed a novel alloy that has been tested in a high-carbon-activity environment. Our results show that the incubation time for carbon transport through the oxide scale of the new alloy is more than an order of magnitude longer compared with commercial alloys with similar chromium content.

  6. Adhesion of metals to a clean iron surface studied with LEED and Auger emission spectroscopy.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1972-01-01

    Discussion of the results of adhesion experiments conducted with various metals contacting a clean iron surface. The metals included gold, silver, nickel, platinum, lead, tantalum, aluminum, and cobalt. Some of the metals were examined with oxygen present on their surface as well as in the clean state. The results indicate that, with the various metals contacting iron, the cohesively weaker will adhere and transfer to the cohesively stronger. The chemical activity of the metal also influenced the adhesive forces measured. With oxygen present on the metal surface, the adhesive forces measured could be correlated with the binding energy of the metal to oxygen.

  7. Maghemite nanoparticles and ferrous sulfate for the stimulation of iron plaque formation and arsenic immobilization in Phragmites australis.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Tania; Martínez-Fernández, Domingo; de la Fuente, Carlos; Clemente, Rafael; Komárek, Michael; Bernal, M Pilar

    2016-12-01

    Wetland plants are considered as suitable biofilters for the removal of metal(loid)s and other contaminants from waters and wastewaters, due to their ability to accumulate and retain the contaminants in their roots. The iron plaque (IP) on the root surface influences the metal(loid)s retention processes. The stimulation of the IP development on roots of Phragmites australis by the external supply of a novel synthetic nanomaterial (nanomaghemite, nFe2O3) and FeSO4 (alone or in combination) was studied. An hydroponic experiment was carried out to evaluate the iron plaque formation after external iron addition, as well as their influence on arsenic immobilization capacity. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were utilized to assess the distribution of Fe and As in the roots. The addition of Fe stimulated the generation of the IP, especially when FeSO4 was involved. The nanoparticles alone were not efficient with regard to IP formation or As adsorption, even though they adhered to the root surface and did not enter into epithelial root cells. The combination of FeSO4 and nFe2O3 was the most effective treatment for improving the As removal capacity, and it seems to be an effective way to enhance the rhizofiltration potential of P. australis in As contaminated (waste)waters.

  8. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V.R.; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  9. Surveying the South Pole-Aitken basin magnetic anomaly for remnant impactor metallic iron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, Joshua T.S.; Hagerty, Justin J.; Lawrence, David M.; Klima, Rachel L.; Blewett, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon has areas of magnetized crust ("magnetic anomalies"), the origins of which are poorly constrained. A magnetic anomaly near the northern rim of South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin was recently postulated to originate from remnant metallic iron emplaced by the SPA basin-forming impactor. Here, we remotely examine the regolith of this SPA magnetic anomaly with a combination of Clementine and Lunar Prospector derived iron maps for any evidence of enhanced metallic iron content. We find that these data sets do not definitively detect the hypothesized remnant metallic iron within the upper tens of centimeters of the lunar regolith.

  10. Low-temperature metallic alloying of copper and silver nanoparticles with gold nanoparticles through digestive ripening.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Alexander B; Klabunde, Kenneth J; Sorensen, Christopher M; Ponce, Audaldo A; Mwale, Benny

    2006-02-09

    We describe a remarkable and simple alloying procedure in which noble metal intermetallic nanoparticles are produced in gram quantities via digestive ripening. This process involves mixing of separately prepared colloids of pure Au and pure Ag or Cu particles and then heating in the presence of an alkanethiol under reflux. The result after 1 h is alloy nanoparticles. Particles synthesized according to this procedure were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, EDX analysis, and high-resolution electron microscopy, the results of which confirm the formation of alloy particles. The particles of 5.6+/-0.5 nm diameter for Au/Ag and 4.8+/-1.0 nm diameter for Cu/Au undergo facile self-assembly to form 3-D superlattice ordering. It appears that during this digestive ripening process, the organic ligands display an extraordinary chemistry in which atom transfer between atomically pure copper, silver, and gold metal nanoparticles yields monodisperse alloy nanoparticles.

  11. Fluorophore Conjugated Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Labeling and Analysis of Engrafting Human Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Dustin J.; Bonde, Jesper; Hess, David A.; Hohm, Sarah A.; Lahey, Ryan; Creer, Michael H.; Piwnica-Worms, David; Nolta, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    The use of nanometer-sized iron oxide particles combined with molecular imaging techniques enable dynamic studies of homing and trafficking of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Identifying clinically applicable strategies for loading nanoparticles into primitive HSC requires strictly defined culture conditions to maintain viability without inducing terminal differentiation. In the current study, fluorescent molecules were covalently linked to dextran-coated iron oxide nanoparticles (Feridex) to characterize human HSC labeling to monitor the engraftment process. Conjugating fluorophores to the dextran coat for FACS purification eliminated spurious signals from non-sequestered nanoparticle contaminants. A short-term defined incubation strategy was developed which allowed efficient labeling of both quiescent and cycling HSC, with no discernable toxicity in vitro or in vivo. Transplantation of purified primary human cord blood lineage-depleted and CD34+ cells into immunodeficient mice allowed detection of labeled human HSC in the recipient bones. Flow cytometry was used to precisely quantitate the cell populations that had sequestered the nanoparticles, and to follow their fate post-transplantation. Flow cytometry endpoint analysis confirmed the presence of nanoparticle-labeled human stem cells in the marrow. The use of fluorophore-labeled iron oxide nanoparticles for fluorescence imaging in combination with flow cytometry allows evaluation of labeling efficiencies and homing capabilities of defined human HSC subsets. PMID:18055451

  12. Lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles for targeting brain glioma cells in magnetic particle imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomitaka, Asahi; Arami, Hamed; Gandhi, Sonu; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2015-10-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new real-time imaging modality, which promises high tracer mass sensitivity and spatial resolution directly generated from iron oxide nanoparticles. In this study, monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles with median core diameters ranging from 14 to 26 nm were synthesized and their surface was conjugated with lactoferrin to convert them into brain glioma targeting agents. The conjugation was confirmed with the increase of the hydrodynamic diameters, change of zeta potential, and Bradford assay. Magnetic particle spectrometry (MPS), performed to evaluate the MPI performance of these nanoparticles, showed no change in signal after lactoferrin conjugation to nanoparticles for all core diameters, suggesting that the MPI signal is dominated by Néel relaxation and thus independent of hydrodynamic size difference or presence of coating molecules before and after conjugations. For this range of core sizes (14-26 nm), both MPS signal intensity and spatial resolution improved with increasing core diameter of nanoparticles. The lactoferrin conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles (Lf-IONPs) showed specific cellular internalization into C6 cells with a 5-fold increase in MPS signal compared to IONPs without lactoferrin, both after 24 h incubation. These results suggest that Lf-IONPs can be used as tracers for targeted brain glioma imaging using MPI.

  13. Controllable synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles in porous NaCl matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurapov, Yury A.; Litvin, Stanislav E.; Romanenko, Sergey M.; Didikin, Gennadii G.; Oranskaya, Elena I.

    2017-03-01

    The paper gives the results of studying the structure of porous condensates of Fe + NaCl composition, chemical and phase compositions and dimensions of nanoparticles produced from the vapor phase by EB-PVD. Iron nanoparticles at fast removal from the vacuum oxidize in air and possess significant sorption capacity relative to oxygen and moisture. At heating in air, reduction of porous condensate weight occurs right to the temperature of 650 °C, primarily, due to desorption of physically sorbed moisture. Final oxidation of Fe3O4 to Fe2O3 proceeds in the range of 380 °C–650 °C, due to the remaining fraction of physically adsorbed oxygen. At iron concentrations of up to 10–15 at%, condensate sorption capacity is markedly increased with increase of iron concentration, i.e. of the quantity of fine particles. Increase of condensation temperature is accompanied by increase of nanoparticle size, resulting in a considerable reduction of the total area of nanoparticle surface, and, hence of their sorption capacity. In addition to condensation temperature, the size and phase composition of nanoparticles can also be controlled by heat treatment of initial condensate, produced at low condensation temperatures. Magnetite nanoparticles can be transferred into stable colloid systems.

  14. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Si-feng; Jia, Jing-fu; Guo, Xiao-kui; Zhao, Ya-ping; Chen, De-sheng; Guo, Yong-yuan; Zhang, Xian-long

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use. PMID:27994455

  15. Reduced Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation in the presence of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Si-Feng; Jia, Jing-Fu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Zhao, Ya-Ping; Chen, De-Sheng; Guo, Yong-Yuan; Zhang, Xian-Long

    Staphylococcus aureus can adhere to most foreign materials and form biofilm on the surface of medical devices. Biofilm infections are difficult to resolve. The goal of this in vitro study was to explore the use of chitosan-coated nanoparticles to prevent biofilm formation. For this purpose, S. aureus was seeded in 96-well plates to incubate with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in order to study the efficiency of biofilm formation inhibition. The biofilm bacteria count was determined using the spread plate method; biomass formation was measured using the crystal violet staining method. Confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to study the biofilm formation. The results showed decreased viable bacteria numbers and biomass formation when incubated with chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles at all test concentrations. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed increased dead bacteria and thinner biofilm when incubated with nanoparticles at a concentration of 500 µg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles inhibited biofilm formation in polystyrene plates. Future studies should be performed to study these nanoparticles for anti-infective use.

  16. Optimization of preparation of chitosan-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications by chemometrics approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honary, Soheila; Ebrahimi, Pouneh; Rad, Hossein Asgari; Asgari, Mahsa

    2013-08-01

    Functionalized magnetic nanoparticles are used in several biomedical applications, such as drug delivery, magnetic cell separation, and magnetic resonance imaging. Size and surface properties of iron oxide nanoparticles are the two important factors which could dramatically affect the nanoparticle efficiency as well as their stability. In this study, the chemometrics approach was applied to optimize the coating process of iron oxide nanoparticles. To optimize the size of nanoparticles, the effect of two experimental parameters on size was investigated by means of multivariate analysis. The factors considered were chitosan molecular weight and chitosan-to-tripolyphosphate concentration ratio. The experiments were performed according to face-centered cube central composite response surface design. A second-order regression model was obtained which characterized by both descriptive and predictive abilities. The method was optimized with respect to the percent of Z average diameter's increasing after coating as response. It can be concluded that experimental design provides a suitable means of optimizing and testing the robustness of iron oxide nanoparticle coating method.

  17. Oscillatory characteristics of metallic nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Fatemeh; Ansari, Reza; Darvizeh, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    This study is concerned with the oscillatory behavior of metallic nanoparticles, and in particular silver and gold nanoparticles, inside lipid nanotubes (LNTs) using the continuum approximation along with the 6-12 Lennard-Jones (LJ) potential function. The nanoparticle is modeled as a dense sphere and the LNT is assumed to be comprised of six layers including two head groups, two intermediate layers and two tail groups. To evaluate van der Waals (vdW) interactions, analytical expressions are first derived through undertaking surface and volume integrals which are then validated by a fully numerical scheme based on the differential quadrature (DQ) technique. Using the actual force distribution between the two interacting molecules, the equation of motion is directly solved utilizing the Runge-Kutta numerical integration scheme to arrive at the time history of displacement and velocity of the inner core. Also, a semi-analytical expression incorporating both geometrical parameters and initial conditions is introduced for the precise evaluation of oscillation frequency. A comprehensive study is conducted to gain an insight into the influences of nanoparticle radius, LNT length, head and tail group thicknesses and initial conditions on the oscillatory behavior of the metallic nanoparticles inside LNTs. It is found that the escape velocity and oscillation frequency of silver nanoparticles are higher than those of gold ones. It is further shown that the oscillation frequency is less affected by the tail group thickness when compared to the head group thickness.

  18. Improving proton therapy by metal-containing nanoparticles: nanoscale insights

    PubMed Central

    Schlathölter, Thomas; Eustache, Pierre; Porcel, Erika; Salado, Daniela; Stefancikova, Lenka; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, Francois; Mowat, Pierre; Biegun, Aleksandra K; van Goethem, Marc-Jan; Remita, Hynd; Lacombe, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles to enhance the effect of radiation-based cancer treatments is a growing field of study and recently, even nanoparticle-induced improvement of proton therapy performance has been investigated. Aiming at a clinical implementation of this approach, it is essential to characterize the mechanisms underlying the synergistic effects of nanoparticles combined with proton irradiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of platinum- and gadolinium-based nanoparticles on the nanoscale damage induced by a proton beam of therapeutically relevant energy (150 MeV) using plasmid DNA molecular probe. Two conditions of irradiation (0.44 and 3.6 keV/μm) were considered to mimic the beam properties at the entrance and at the end of the proton track. We demonstrate that the two metal-containing nanoparticles amplify, in particular, the induction of nanosize damages (>2 nm) which are most lethal for cells. More importantly, this effect is even more pronounced at the end of the proton track. This work gives a new insight into the underlying mechanisms on the nanoscale and indicates that the addition of metal-based nanoparticles is a promising strategy not only to increase the cell killing action of fast protons, but also to improve tumor targeting. PMID:27143877

  19. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into silica nanoparticles by inelastic collision via ultrasonic field: Role of colloidal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Azlan, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-24

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION)/Silica composite nanoparticles were prepared by ultrasonically irradiating colloidal suspension of silica and SPION mixture. Both silica and SPION were synthesized independently via co-precipitation and sol-gel method, respectively. Their mixtures were sonicated at different pH between 3 and 5. Electrophoresis measurement and other physicochemical analyses of the products demonstrate that at lower pH SPION was found incorporated into the silica. However, at pH greater than 4, SPION was unstable and unable to withstand the turbulence flow and shock wave from the ultrasonic field. Results suggest that the formation of the SPION/silica composite nanoparticles is strongly related to the inelastic collision induced by ultrasonic irradiation. More so, the formation the composite nanoparticles via the ultrasonic field are dependent on the zeta potential and colloidal stability of the particles.

  20. Bioinspired nanoreactors for the biomineralisation of metallic-based nanoparticles for nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Bain, Jennifer; Staniland, Sarah S

    2015-06-28

    This review explores the synthesis of inorganic metallic-based nanoparticles (MBNPs) (metals, alloys, metal oxides) using biological and biologically inspired nanoreactors for precipitation/crystallisation. Such nanoparticles exhibit a range of nanoscale properties such as surface plasmon resonance (nobel metals e.g. Au), fluorescence (semiconductor quantum dots e.g. CdSe) and nanomagnetism (magnetic alloys e.g. CoPt and iron oxides e.g. magnetite), which are currently the subject of intensive research for their applicability in diagnostic and therapeutic nanomedicine. For such applications, MBNPs are required to be biocompatible, of a precise size and shape for a consistent signal or output and be easily modified with biomolecules for applications. Ideally the MBNPs would be obtained via an environmentally-friendly synthetic route. A biological or biologically inspired nanoreactor synthesis of MBNPs is shown to address these issues. Biological nanoreactors for crystallizing MBNPs within cells (magnetosomes), protein cages (ferritin) and virus capsids (cowpea chlorotic mottle, cowpea mosaic and tobacco mosaic viruses), are discussed along with how these have been modified for applications and for the next generation of new materials. Biomimetic liposome, polymersome and even designed self-assembled proteinosome nanoreactors are also reviewed for MBNP crystallisation and further modification for applications. With the advent of synthetic biology, the research and understanding in this field is growing, with the goal of realising nanoreactor synthesis of MBNPs for biomedical applications within our grasp in the near future.

  1. Resonance energy transfer: Dye to metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wari, M. N.; Pujar, G. H.; Inamdar, S. R.

    2015-06-24

    In the present study, surface energy transfer (SET) from Coumarin 540A (C540 A) to Gold nanoparticle (Au) is demonstrated. The observed results show pronounced effect on the photoluminescence intensity and shortening of the lifetime of Coumarin 540A upon interaction with the spherical gold nanoparticle, also there are measured effects on radiative rate of the dye. Experimental results are analyzed with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and SET theories. The results obtained from distance-dependent quenching provide experimental evidence that the efficiency curve slope and distance of quenching is best modeled by surface energy transfer process.

  2. Synthesis of composite nanoparticles using co-precipitation of a magnetic iron-oxide shell onto core nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primc, Darinka; Belec, Blaž; Makovec, Darko

    2016-03-01

    Composite nanoparticles can be synthesized by coating a shell made of one material onto core nanoparticles made of another material. Here we report on a novel method for coating a magnetic iron oxide onto the surface of core nanoparticles in an aqueous suspension. The method is based on the heterogeneous nucleation of an initial product of Fe3+/Fe2+ co-precipitation on the core nanoparticles. The close control of the supersaturation of the precipitating species required for an exclusively heterogeneous nucleation and the growth of the shell were achieved by immobilizing the reactive Fe3+ ions in a nitrate complex with urea ([Fe((CO(NH2)2)6](NO3)3) and by using solid Mg(OH)2 as the precipitating reagent. The slow thermal decomposition of the complex at 60 °C homogeneously releases the reactive Fe3+ ions into the suspension of the core nanoparticles. The key stage of the process is the thermal hydrolysis of the released Fe3+ ions prior to the addition of Mg(OH)2. The thermal hydrolysis results in the formation of γ-FeOOH, exclusively at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. After the addition of the solid hydroxide Mg(OH)2, the pH increases and at pH 5.7 the Fe2+ precipitates and reacts with the γ-FeOOH to form magnetic iron oxide with a spinel structure (spinel ferrite) at the surfaces of the core nanoparticles. The proposed low-temperature method for the synthesis of composite nanoparticles is capable of forming well-defined interfaces between the two components, important for the coupling of the different properties. The procedure is environmentally friendly, inexpensive, and appropriate for scaling up to mass production.

  3. [Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles].

    PubMed

    Konotop, Ie O; Kovalenko, M S; Ulynets', V Z; Meleshko, A O; Batsmanova, L M; Taran, N Iu

    2014-01-01

    Phytotoxicity of colloidal solutions of metal-containing nanoparticles (Ag, Cu, Fe, Zn, Mn) has been investigated using a standard Allium cepa (L.) test system. Toxicity of experimental solutions at the organism level was evaluated in terms of biomass growth of onion roots, and cytotoxicity was estimated by the mitotic index of root meristem cells. The colloidal solutions of metal nanoparticles inhibited the growth of Allium cepa (L.) roots due to their ability to penetrate into cells and interact with their components, and thus to inhibit mitosis. According to our results cytotoxicity of test solutions decreases in the following order: Cu > or = Zn > Ag > or = Fe. Solution of Mn-containing nanoparticles revealed physiological activity according to root growth reaction.

  4. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  5. Structure of reverse microemulsion-templated metal hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The droplet phase of a reverse microemulsion formed by the surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium ferrocyanide was used as a matrix to synthesize nanoparticles of nickel hexacyanoferrate by adding just a solution of NiCl2 to the microemulsion media. Dynamic light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering measurements show that the reverse microemulsion droplets employed have a globular structure, with sizes that depend on water content. Transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction are used to obtain information about the structure of the synthesized nanoparticles. The results show that the size and shape of the coordination compound nanoparticles correspond with the size and shape of the droplets, suggesting that the presented system constitutes an alternative method of the synthesis of metal hexacyanoferrate nanoparticles. PMID:22264404

  6. Phytochemicals and Biogenic Metallic Nanoparticles as Anticancer Agents

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Nallappan, Devi; Madhavi, Kondeti; Rahman, Shafiqur; Jun Wei, Lim; Gan, Siew Hua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. Several classes of drugs are available to treat different types of cancer. Currently, researchers are paying significant attention to the development of drugs at the nanoscale level to increase their target specificity and to reduce their concentrations. Nanotechnology is a promising and growing field with multiple subdisciplines, such as nanostructures, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles. These materials have gained prominence in science due to their size, shape, and potential efficacy. Nanomedicine is an important field involving the use of various types of nanoparticles to treat cancer and cancerous cells. Synthesis of nanoparticles targeting biological pathways has become tremendously prominent due to the higher efficacy and fewer side effects of nanodrugs compared to other commercial cancer drugs. In this review, different medicinal plants and their active compounds, as well as green-synthesized metallic nanoparticles from medicinal plants, are discussed in relation to their anticancer activities. PMID:27057273

  7. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-18

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  8. Nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chao; Chen, Lianyi; Cao, Chezheng; Li, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    Effective control of melting and solidification behaviours of materials is significant for numerous applications. It has been a long-standing challenge to increase the melted zone (MZ) depth while shrinking the heat-affected zone (HAZ) size during local melting and solidification of materials. In this paper, nanoparticle-induced unusual melting and solidification behaviours of metals are reported that effectively solve this long-time dilemma. By introduction of Al2O3 nanoparticles, the MZ depth of Ni is increased by 68%, while the corresponding HAZ size is decreased by 67% in laser melting at a pulse energy of 0.18 mJ. The addition of SiC nanoparticles shows similar results. The discovery of the unusual melting and solidification of materials that contain nanoparticles will not only have impacts on existing melting and solidification manufacturing processes, such as laser welding and additive manufacturing, but also on other applications such as pharmaceutical processing and energy storage.

  9. Tunable plasmon polaritons in arrays of interacting metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weick, Guillaume; Mariani, Eros

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simple cubic array of metallic nanoparticles supporting extended collective plasmons that arise from the near-field dipolar interaction between localized surface plasmons in each nanoparticle. We develop a fully analytical quantum theory of the strong-coupling regime between these collective plasmons and photons resulting in plasmon polaritons in the nanoparticle array. Remarkably, we show that the polaritonic band gap and the dielectric function of the metamaterial can be significantly modulated by the polarization of light. We unveil how such an anisotropic behavior in the plasmonic metamaterial is crucially mediated by the dipolar interactions between the nanoparticles despite the symmetry of the underlying lattice. Our results thus pave the way towards the realization of tunable quantum plasmonic metamaterials presenting interaction-driven birefringence.

  10. Understanding the role of iron in the magnetism of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, J J; Barrero, C A; Punnoose, A

    2015-06-21

    The actual role of transition metals like iron in the room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) of Fe doped ZnO nanoparticles is still an unsolved problem. While some studies concluded that the Fe ions participate in the magnetic interaction, others in contrast do not believe Fe to play a direct role in the magnetic exchange interaction. To contribute to the understanding of this issue, we have carefully investigated the structural, optical, vibrational and magnetic properties of sol-gel synthesized Zn1-xFexO (0 < x < 0.10) nanoparticles. No Fe(2+) was detected in any sample. We found that high spin Fe(3+) ions are substitutionally incorporated at the Zn(2+) in the tetrahedral-core sites and in pseudo-octahedral surface sites in ZnO. Superficial OH(-) was observed in all samples. For x ≤ 0.03, an increment in Fe doping concentration decreased a and c lattice parameters, average Zn-O bond length, average crystallite size and band gap; while it increased the degree of distortion and quadrupole splitting. Undoped ZnO nanoparticles exhibited very weak RTFM with a saturation magnetization (Ms) of ∼0.47 memu g(-1) and this value increased to ∼2.1 memu g(-1) for Zn0.99Fe0.01O. Very interestingly, the Ms for Zn0.99Fe0.01O and Zn0.97Fe0.03O increased by a factor of about ∼2.3 by increasing annealing for 1 h to 3 h. For x ≥ 0.05, ferrimagnetic disordered spinel ZnFe2O4 was formed and this phase was found to become more ordered with increasing annealing time. Fe does not contribute directly to the RTFM, but its presence promoted the formation of additional single charged oxygen vacancies, zinc vacancies, and more oxygen-ended polar terminations at the nanoparticle surface. These defects, which are mainly superficial, altered the electronic structure and are considered as the main sources of the observed ferromagnetism.

  11. Noble metal nanoparticles: Optical forces, electrochemical Ostwald ripening, and photovoltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redmond, Peter

    This thesis describes three distinct aspects of the chemical properties of noble metal nanoparticles. The first chapter introduces the surface plasmon resonance of noble metal nanoparticles. The second chapter presents an electrodynamic model for the calculation of the attractive optical forces that arise when two dielectric particles are irradiated in a light field. These forces show resonances at dipolar plasmon wavelengths, similar to resonances in the near-field electromagnetic intensities. At MW/cm2 intensities, optical forces can be stronger than van der Waals forces. The third chapter investigates the size dependent electrochemical properties of silver nanoparticles. These thermally evaporated silver nanoparticles spontaneously evolve in size when immersed in pure water on conducting substrates. The process is understood through an electrochemical Ostwald ripening mechanism driven by the size dependence of the work function and standard electrode potential. The fourth and fifth chapters consider photo-induced surface reactivity of noble metal particles. First, in the fourth chapter, the light driven deposition of copper onto gold nanoparticle electrodes is presented. The photocurrent is a nonlinear function of laser intensity and increases sharply with cathodic voltage in the underpotential deposition region. The photoreduction is attributed to laser heating (caused by decay of the plasmon oscillation) of the Au nanoparticles, rather than "hot electron" processes. Secondly, in the fifth chapter, the photo-induced oxidation of citrate is studied on silver nanoparticle electrodes. Irradiation of the citrate coated particles is shown to cause the particles to charge negatively from the irreversible transfer of electrons from citrate to the particles. It is hypothesized that the particle plasmon oscillation decays into electron hole pair(s) that causes the photo-oxidation of the surface bound citrate. Both the gold and silver particle systems are simulated using

  12. Silica-coated super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as biocompatible contrast agent in biomedical photoacoustics.

    PubMed

    Alwi, Rudolf; Telenkov, Sergey; Mandelis, Andreas; Leshuk, Timothy; Gu, Frank; Oladepo, Sulayman; Michaelian, Kirk

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we report for the first time the use of silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) as contrast agents in biomedical photoacoustic imaging. Using frequency-domain photoacoustic correlation (the photoacoustic radar), we investigated the effects of nanoparticle size, concentration and biological media (e.g. serum, sheep blood) on the photoacoustic response in turbid media. Maximum detection depth and the minimum measurable SPION concentration were determined experimentally. The nanoparticle-induced optical contrast ex vivo in dense muscular tissues (avian pectus and murine quadricept) was evaluated and the strong potential of silica-coated SPION as a possible photoacoustic contrast agents was demonstrated.

  13. Recent advances in synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles with silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodipo, Bashiru Kayode; Aziz, Azlan Abdul

    2016-10-01

    Research on synthesis of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) and its surface modification for biomedical applications is of intense interest. Due to superparamagnetic property of SPION, the nanoparticles have large magnetic susceptibility, single magnetic domain and controllable magnetic behaviour. However, owing to easy agglomeration of SPION, surface modification of the magnetic particles with biocompatible materials such as silica nanoparticle has gained much attention in the last decade. In this review, we present recent advances in synthesis of SPION and various routes of producing silica coated SPION.

  14. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhika Devi, A.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh; Murty, B. S.

    2014-03-01

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  15. Generation of drugs coated iron nanoparticles through high energy ball milling

    SciTech Connect

    Radhika Devi, A.; Murty, B. S.; Chelvane, J. A.; Prabhakar, P. K.; Padma Priya, P. V.; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-03-28

    The iron nanoparticles coated with oleic acid and drugs such as folic acid/Amoxicillin were synthesized by high energy ball milling and characterized by X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscope, zeta potential, dynamic light scattering, Fourier Transform Infra red (FT-IR) measurements, and thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA measurements show good adsorption of drugs on oleic acid coated nanoparticles. Magnetic measurements indicate that saturation magnetization is larger for amoxicillin coated particles compared to folic acid coated particles. The biocompatibility of the magnetic nanoparticles prepared was evaluated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay using L929 cells as model cells.

  16. Fabrication of metallic microstructures by micromolding nanoparticles

    DOEpatents

    Morales, Alfredo M.; Winter, Michael R.; Domeier, Linda A.; Allan, Shawn M.; Skala, Dawn M.

    2002-01-01

    A method is provided for fabricating metallic microstructures, i.e., microcomponents of micron or submicron dimensions. A molding composition is prepared containing an optional binder and nanometer size (1 to 1000 nm in diameter) metallic particles. A mold, such as a lithographically patterned mold, preferably a LIGA or a negative photoresist mold, is filled with the molding composition and compressed. The resulting microstructures are then removed from the mold and the resulting metallic microstructures so provided are then sintered.

  17. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  18. Designed synthesis and surface engineering strategies of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Jiang, Chang Zhong; Roy, Vellaisamy A L

    2016-12-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) hold great promise for future biomedical applications because of their magnetic properties as well as other intrinsic properties such as low toxicity, colloidal stability, and surface engineering capability. Numerous related studies on iron oxide NPs have been conducted. Recent progress in nanochemistry has enabled fine control over the size, crystallinity, uniformity, and surface properties of iron oxide NPs. This review examines various synthetic approaches and surface engineering strategies for preparing naked and functional iron oxide NPs with different physicochemical properties. Growing interest in designed and surface-engineered iron oxide NPs with multifunctionalities was explored in in vitro/in vivo biomedical applications, focusing on their combined roles in bioseparation, as a biosensor, targeted-drug delivery, MR contrast agents, and magnetic fluid hyperthermia. This review outlines the limitations of extant surface engineering strategies and several developing strategies that may overcome these limitations. This study also details the promising future directions of this active research field.

  19. Synthesis, characterization, and in vitro biological evaluation of highly stable diversely functionalized superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dipsikha; Sahu, Sumanta K.; Banerjee, Indranil; Das, Manasmita; Mishra, Debashish; Maiti, Tapas K.; Pramanik, Panchanan

    2011-09-01

    In this article, we report the design and synthesis of a series of well-dispersed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) using chitosan as a surface modifying agent to develop a potential T 2 contrast probe for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl, and thiol functionalities were introduced on chitosan-coated magnetic probe via simple reactions with small reactive organic molecules to afford a series of biofunctionalized nanoparticles. Physico-chemical characterizations of these functionalized nanoparticles were performed by TEM, XRD, DLS, FTIR, and VSM. The colloidal stability of these functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles was investigated in presence of phosphate buffer saline, high salt concentrations and different cell media for 1 week. MRI analysis of human cervical carcinoma (HeLa) cell lines treated with nanoparticles elucidated that the amine-functionalized nanoparticles exhibited higher amount of signal darkening and lower T 2 relaxation in comparison to the others. The cellular internalization efficacy of these functionalized SPIONs was also investigated with HeLa cancer cell line by magnetically activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence microscopy and results established selectively higher internalization efficacy of amine-functionalized nanoparticles to cancer cells. These positive attributes demonstrated that these nanoconjugates can be used as a promising platform for further in vitro and in vivo biological evaluations.

  20. Enhanced cellular uptake of aminosilane-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in mammalian cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Lee, Siu-Fung; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Da-Wei; Lai, Josie MY; Wan, Chao; Cheng, Christopher HK; Ahuja, Anil T

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cellular uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of aminosilane (SiO2-NH2)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO@SiO2-NH2) nanoparticles with three other types of SPIO nanoparticles coated with SiO2 (SPIO@SiO2), dextran (SPIO@dextran), or bare SPIO in mammalian cell lines. Materials and methods Four types of monodispersed SPIO nanoparticles with a SPIO core size of 7 nm and an overall size in a range of 7–15 nm were synthesized. The mammalian cell lines of MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, HT-29, RAW264.7, L929, HepG2, PC-3, U-87 MG, and mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were incubated with four types of SPIO nanoparticles for 24 hours in the serum-free culture medium Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM) with 4.5 μg/mL iron concentration. The cellular uptake efficiencies of SPIO nanoparticles were compared by Prussian blue staining and intracellular iron quantification. In vitro magnetic resonance imaging of MSC pellets after SPIO labeling was performed at 3 T. The effect of each SPIO nanoparticle on the cell viability of RAW 264.7 (mouse monocyte/macrophage) cells was also evaluated. Results Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated surface coating with SiO2-NH2, SiO2, and dextran prevented SPIO nanoparticle aggregation in DMEM culture medium. MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, and HT-29 cells failed to show notable iron uptake. For all the remaining six cell lines, Prussian blue staining and intracellular iron quantification demonstrated that SPIO@ SiO2-NH2 nanoparticles had the highest cellular uptake efficiency. SPIO@SiO2-NH2, bare SPIO, and SPIO@dextran nanoparticles did not affect RAW 264.7 cell viability up to 200 μg Fe/mL, while SPIO@SiO2 reduced RAW 264.7 cell viability from 10 to 200 μg Fe/mL in a dose-dependent manner. Conclusion Cellular uptake efficiency of SPIO nanoparticles depends on both the cell type and SPIO surface characteristics. Aminosilane surface coating enhanced the cellular uptake efficiency without inducing cytotoxicity in a

  1. Iron oxide-based nanoparticles with different mean sizes obtained by the laser pyrolysis: structural and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Morjan, I; Alexandrescu, R; Dumitrache, F; Birjega, R; Fleaca, C; Soare, I; Luculescu, C R; Filoti, G; Kuncer, V; Vekas, L; Popa, N C; Prodan, G; Ciupina, V

    2010-02-01

    Nano-sized iron oxide-based particles have been directly synthesized by the laser induced pyrolysis of a mixture containing iron pentacarbonyl/air (as oxidizer)/ethylene (as sensitizer). In this paper we further demonstrate the possibility to vary the chemical composition and the nanoparticle dimensions of the iron oxide-based materials by handling the oxidation procedure in the frame of the laser pyrolysis process. Thus, nanoparticles with major maghemite/magnetite content may change composition into mixtures with variable amounts of three components: major gamma-Fe2O3/Fe3O4 iron oxide, metallic Fe and cementite Fe3C. By X-ray diffraction (XRD) it is found that the relative proportion of these phases differs in function of the reaction temperature (laser power). As revealed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), mean particle sizes between about 4 nm and 6 nm and between about 9 and 11 nm may be prepared by varying the oxidation procedure and the laser power, respectively. By the controlled heating of samples (maximum temperature 185 degrees C), increased crystallinity for the gamma-Fe2O3/Fe3O4 oxide phase was found as well as an increase of the mean particle diameters. The examination of the magnetization curves for samples obtained for different laser powers indicates notable differences in the magnetic behavior and parameters. The temperature dependent Mossbauer measurements confirm the formation of larger particles at higher laser power densities as well as the presence of inter-particle magnetic interactions. On this basis, the estimation of phase composition for the different representative samples is given.

  2. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T(2) contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM(-1) S(-1), which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM(-1) S(-1)). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.

  3. Effect of substrate interface on the magnetism of supported iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Balan, A; Fraile Rodríguez, A; Vaz, C A F; Kleibert, A; Nolting, F

    2015-12-01

    In situ X-ray photo-emission electron microscopy is used to investigate the magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles deposited on different single crystalline substrates, including Si(001), Cu(001), W(110), and NiO(001). We find that, in our room temperature experiments, Fe nanoparticles deposited on Si(001) and Cu(001) show both superparamagnetic and magnetically stable (blocked) ferromagnetic states, while Fe nanoparticles deposited on W(110) and NiO(001) show only superparamagnetic behaviour. The dependence of the magnetic behaviour of the Fe nanoparticles on the contact surface is ascribed to the different interfacial bonding energies, higher for W and NiO, and to a possible relaxation of point defects within the core of the nanoparticles on these substrates, that have been suggested to stabilise the ferromagnetic state at room temperature when deposited on more inert surfaces such as Si and Cu.

  4. Water dispersible superparamagnetic Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salunkhe, Ashwini B.; Khot, Vishwajeet M.; Ruso, Juan M.; Patil, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe2O4) are synthesized chemically, and dispersed in an aqueous suspension for hyperthermia therapy application. Different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, particle concentration which regulates the competence of CoFe2O4 nanoparticle as a heating agents in hyperthermia are investigated. Specific absorption rate (SAR) decreases with increase in the particle concentration and increases with increase in applied magnetic field intensity. Highest value of SAR is found to be 91.84 W g-1 for 5 mg. mL-1 concentration. Oleic acid conjugated polyethylene glycol (OA-PEG) coated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles have shown superior cyto-compatibility over uncoated nanoparticles to L929 mice fibroblast cell lines for concentrations below 2 mg. mL-1. Present work provides the underpinning for the use of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles as a potential heating mediator for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

  5. The role of interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism in FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Desautels, R. D.; Freeland, J. W.; Rowe, M. P.; Lierop, J. van

    2015-05-07

    We have investigated the role of spontaneously formed interfacial metal silicates on the magnetism of FeCo/SiO{sub 2} and Fe{sub 49%}Co{sub 49%}V{sub 2%}/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanoparticles. Element specific x-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments have identified the characteristic spectral features of metallic iron and cobalt from within the nanoparticle core. In addition, metal silicates of iron, cobalt, and vanadium were found to have formed spontaneously at the interface between the nanoparticle core and silica shell. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments indicated that the elemental magnetism was a result of metallic iron and cobalt with small components from the iron, cobalt, and vanadium silicates. Magnetometry experiments have shown that there was no exchange bias loop shift in the FeCo nanoparticles; however, exchange bias from antiferromagnetic vanadium oxide was measured in the V-doped nanoparticles. These results showed clearly that the interfacial metal silicates played a significant role in the magnetism of these core/shell nanoparticles, and that the vanadium percolated from the FeCo-cores into the SiO{sub 2}-based interfacial shell.

  6. All Metal Iron Core For A Low Aspect Ratio Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Gates, C. Jun, I. Zatz, A. Zolfaghari

    2010-06-02

    A novel concept for incorporating a iron core transformer within a axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device with a high neutron flux is described. This design enables conceptual design of low aspect ratio devices which employ standard transformer-driven plasma startup by using all-metal high resistance separators between the toroidal field windings. This design avoids the inherent problems of a multiturn air core transformer which will inevitably suffer from strong neutron bombardment and hence lose the integrity of its insulation, both through long term material degradation and short term neutron- induced conductivity.. A full 3-dimensional model of the concept has been developed within the MAXWELL program and the resultant loop voltage calculated. The utility of the result is found to be dependent on the resistivity of the high resistance separators. Useful loop voltage time histories have been obtained using achievable resistivities.

  7. Metal nanoparticles via the atom-economy green approach.

    PubMed

    Kalidindi, Suresh Babu; Sanyal, Udishnu; Jagirdar, Balaji R

    2010-05-03

    Metal nanoparticles (NPs) of Cu (air-stable), Ag, and Au have been prepared using an atom-economy green approach. Simple mechanical stirring of solid mixtures (no solvent) of a metal salt and ammonia borane at 60 degrees C resulted in the formation of metal NPs. In this reaction, ammonia borane is transformed into a BNH(x) polymer, which protects the NPs formed and halts their growth. This results in the formation of the BNH(x) polymer protected monodisperse NPs. Thus, ammonia borane used in these reactions plays a dual role (reducing agent and precursor for the stabilizing agent).

  8. Comparative toxicity of silicon dioxide, silver and iron oxide nanoparticles after repeated oral administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Seung-Hyun; You, Ji-Ran; Kim, Woo Ho; Jang, Ja-June; Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Hee Chan; Chung, Doo Hyun; Jeong, Jayoung; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Che, Jeong-Hwan

    2015-06-01

    Although silicon dioxide (SiO2), silver (Ag) and iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles are widely used in diverse applications from food to biomedicine, in vivo toxicities of these nanoparticles exposed via the oral route remain highly controversial. To examine the systemic toxicity of these nanoparticles, well-dispersed nanoparticles were orally administered to Sprague-Dawley rats daily over a 13-week period. Based on the results of an acute toxicity and a 14-day repeated toxicity study, 975.9, 1030.5 and 1000 mg kg(-1) were selected as the highest dose of the SiO2 , Ag and Fe2O3 nanoparticles, respectively, for the 13-week repeated oral toxicity study. The SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not induce dose-related changes in a number of parameters associated with the systemic toxicity up to 975.9 and 1000 mg kg(-1) , respectively, whereas the Ag nanoparticles resulted in increases in serum alkaline phosphatase and calcium as well as lymphocyte infiltration in liver and kidney, raising the possibility of liver and kidney toxicity induced by the Ag nanoparticles. Compared with the SiO2 and Fe2O3 nanoparticles showing no systemic distribution in all tissues tested, the Ag concentration in sampled blood and organs in the Ag nanoparticle-treated group significantly increased with a positive and/or dose-related trend, meaning that the systemic toxicity of the Ag nanoparticles, including liver and kidney toxicity, might be explained by extensive systemic distribution of Ag originating from the Ag nanoparticles. Our current results suggest that further study is required to identify that Ag detected outside the gastrointestinal tract were indeed a nanoparticle form or ionized form.

  9. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Miazek, Krystian; Iwanek, Waldemar; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles) from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed. PMID:26473834

  10. Effect of Metals, Metalloids and Metallic Nanoparticles on Microalgae Growth and Industrial Product Biosynthesis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Miazek, Krystian; Iwanek, Waldemar; Remacle, Claire; Richel, Aurore; Goffin, Dorothee

    2015-10-09

    Microalgae are a source of numerous compounds that can be used in many branches of industry. Synthesis of such compounds in microalgal cells can be amplified under stress conditions. Exposure to various metals can be one of methods applied to induce cell stress and synthesis of target products in microalgae cultures. In this review, the potential of producing diverse biocompounds (pigments, lipids, exopolymers, peptides, phytohormones, arsenoorganics, nanoparticles) from microalgae cultures upon exposure to various metals, is evaluated. Additionally, different methods to alter microalgae response towards metals and metal stress are described. Finally, possibilities to sustain high growth rates and productivity of microalgal cultures in the presence of metals are discussed.

  11. Bismuth nanoparticles integration into heavy metal electrochemical stripping sensor.

    PubMed

    Cadevall, Miquel; Ros, Josep; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-08-01

    Between their many applications bismuth nanoparticles (BiNPs) are showing interest as pre-concentrators in heavy metals detection while being applied as working electrode modifiers used in electrochemical stripping analysis. From the different reported methods to synthesize BiNPs we are focused on the typical polyol method, largely used in these types of metallic and semi-metallic nanoparticles. This study presents the strategy for an easy control of the shape and size of BiNPs including nanocubes, nanosferes and triangular nanostructures. To improve the BiNP size and shape, different reducing agents (ethylene glycol or sodium hypophosphite) and stabilizers (polyvinyl pyrrolidone, PVP, in different amounts) have been studied. The efficiency of BiNPs for heavy metals analysis in terms of detection sensitivity while being used as modifiers of screen-printed carbon electrodes including the applicability of the developed device in real sea water samples is shown. A parallel study between the obtained nanoparticles and their performance in heavy metal sensing has been described in this communication.

  12. Biocompatible Colloidal Suspensions Based on Magnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization and Toxicological Profile

    PubMed Central

    Coricovac, Dorina-Elena; Moacă, Elena-Alina; Pinzaru, Iulia; Cîtu, Cosmin; Soica, Codruta; Mihali, Ciprian-Valentin; Păcurariu, Cornelia; Tutelyan, Victor A.; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Dehelean, Cristina-Adriana

    2017-01-01

    The use of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in biomedicine has evolved intensely in the recent years due to the multiple applications of these nanomaterials, mainly in domains like cancer. The aim of the present study was: (i) to develop biocompatible colloidal suspensions based on magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as future theranostic tools for skin pathology and (ii) to test their effects in vitro on human keratinocytes (HaCat cells) and in vivo by employing an animal model of acute dermal toxicity. Biocompatible colloidal suspensions were obtained by coating the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles resulted during the solution combustion synthesis with a double layer of oleic acid, as innovative procedure in increasing bioavailability. The colloidal suspensions were characterized in terms of dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in vitro effects of these suspensions were tested by means of Alamar blue assay and the noxious effects at skin level were measured using non-invasive methods. The in vitro results indicated a lack of toxicity on normal human cells induced by the iron oxide nanoparticles colloidal suspensions after an exposure of 24 h to different concentrations (5, 10, and 25 μg·mL−1). The dermal acute toxicity test showed that the topical applications of the colloidal suspensions on female and male SKH-1 hairless mice were not associated with significant changes in the quality of barrier skin function.