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Sample records for metalloprotease invadolysin localizes

  1. Invadolysin, a conserved lipid-droplet-associated metalloproteinase, is required for mitochondrial function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Di Cara, Francesca; Duca, Edward; Dunbar, Donald R.; Cagney, Gerard; Heck, Margarete M. S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are the main producers of ATP, the principal energy source of the cell, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules. Mitochondrial morphogenesis and function depend on a hierarchical network of mechanisms in which proteases appear to be center stage. The invadolysin gene encodes an essential conserved metalloproteinase of the M8 family that is necessary for mitosis and cell migration during Drosophila development. We previously demonstrated that invadolysin is found associated with lipid droplets in cells. Here, we present data demonstrating that invadolysin interacts physically with three mitochondrial ATP synthase subunits. Our studies have focused on the genetic phenotypes of invadolysin and bellwether, the Drosophila homolog of ATP synthase α, mutants. The invadolysin mutation presents defects in mitochondrial physiology similar to those observed in bellwether mutants. The invadolysin and bellwether mutants have parallel phenotypes that affect lipid storage and mitochondrial electron transport chain activity, which result in a reduction in ATP production and an accumulation of ROS. As a consequence, invadolysin mutant larvae show lower energetic status and higher oxidative stress. Our data demonstrate an essential role for invadolysin in mitochondrial function that is crucial for normal development and survival. PMID:23943867

  2. Intracellular co-localization of trypsin-2 and matrix metalloprotease-9: possible proteolytic cascade of trypsin-2, MMP-9 and enterokinase in carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vilen, Suvi-Tuuli; Nyberg, Pia; Hukkanen, Mika; Sutinen, Meeri; Ylipalosaari, Merja; Bjartell, Anders; Paju, Annukka; Haaparanta, Virpi; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-02-15

    Tumor-associated trypsin-2 and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) are associated with cancer, particularly with invasive squamous cell carcinomas. They require activation for catalytical competence via proteolytic cascades. One cascade is formed by enterokinase, trypsin-2 and MMP-9; enterokinase activates trypsinogen-2 to trypsin-2, which is an efficient proMMP-9 activator. We describe here that oral squamous cell carcinomas express all members of this cascade: MMP-9, trypsin-2 and enterokinase. The expression of enterokinase in a carcinoma cell line not derived from the duodenum was shown here for the first time. Enterokinase directly cleaved proMMP-9 at the Lys65-Ser66 site, but failed to activate it in vitro. We demonstrated by confocal microscopy that MMP-9 and trypsin-2 co-localized in intracellular vesicles of the carcinoma cells. This co-localization of trypsin-2 and MMP-9 resulted in intracellular proMMP-9 processing that represented fully or partially activated MMP-9. However, although both proteases were present also in various bone tumor tissues, MMP-9 and trypsin-2 never co-localized at the cellular level in these tissues. This suggests that the intracellular vesicular co-localization, storage and possible activation of these proteases may be a unique feature for aggressive epithelial tumors, such as squamous cell carcinomas, but not for tumors of mesenchymal origin.

  3. Metalloproteases and the degradome.

    PubMed

    Ugalde, Alejandro P; Ordóñez, Gonzalo R; Quirós, Pedro M; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Metalloproteases comprise a heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes whose main characteristic is the utilization of a metal ion to polarize a water molecule and perform hydrolytic reactions. These enzymes represent the most densely populated catalytic class of proteases in many organisms and play essential roles in multiple biological processes. In this chapter, we will first present a general description of the complexity of metalloproteases in the context of the degradome, which is defined as the complete set of protease genes encoded by the genome of a certain organism. We will also discuss the functional relevance of these enzymes in a large variety of biological and pathological conditions. Finally, we will analyze in more detail three families of metalloproteases: ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase), ADAMTSs (ADAMs with thrombospondin domains), and MMPs (matrix metalloproteinases) which have a growing relevance in a number of human pathologies including cancer, arthritis, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Extracellular metalloproteases from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ji-Wei; Chen, Xiu-Lan

    2011-10-01

    Bacterial extracellular metalloproteases (BEMPs) are a large group of metal-containing proteases secreted by heterotrophic bacteria. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics, mechanisms of maturation, physiological roles, and applications of BEMPs are described. BEMPs are distributed among nine families of metalloproteases because of differences in primary sequences and structural characteristics. Until now, all of the BEMPs identified have been endoproteases harboring one catalytic Zn(2+) in the active centers. BEMPs are usually synthesized as inactive zymogens with a propeptide that is covalently linked to and inhibits the catalytic domain. The removal of the propeptides of BEMPs is dependent on other proteases or an autocleavage process. The main physiological function of BEMPs is to degrade environmental proteins and peptides for bacterial heterotrophic nutrition. As extracellular proteases, BEMPs vary greatly in enzymology properties to adapt to their respective environments. BEMPs have been widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. In order to broaden the application of BEMPs, it is essential to explore novel BEMPs and apply gene/protein engineering to improve the production and properties of promising BEMPs.

  5. Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Rivero-García, P C; Cruz, C Vázquez; Alonso, P Sánchez; Vaca, S; Negrete-Abascal, E

    2005-10-01

    Haemophilus paragallinarum secretes metalloproteases into different culture media lacking serum. Secreted proteins, concentrated by precipitation with 70% ammonium sulphate ((NH(4))(2)SO(4)) or methanol, displayed proteolytic activity at >100 kDa molecular mass in 10% polyacrylamide gels co-polymerized with porcine gelatin (0.1%). They were active in a broad pH range (4-9); pH 7.5 being the optimum. Protease activity was inhibited by 20 mmol EDTA/L and reactivated by calcium. The proteolytic activity was heat-stable at 40, 50, and 60 degrees C, but its activity diminished at 70 degrees C or higher. Secreted proteins partially degraded chicken immunoglobulin G (IgG) and cross-reacted with a polyclonal serum against a high molecular mass protease secreted by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Extracellular proteases could play a role in infectious coryza caused by H. paragallinarum.

  6. Metalloproteases and tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Del Buono, Angelo; Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Summary Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in the development of tendinopathy. These potent enzymes completely degrade all components of the connective tissue, modify the extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediate the development of painful tendinopathy. To control the local activity of activated proteinases, the same cells produce tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP). These latter bind to the enzyme and prevent degradation. The balance between the activities of MMPs and TIMPs regulates tendon remodeling, whereas an imbalance produces a collagen dis-regulation and disturbances in tendons. ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are cell membrane-linked enzymes with proteolytic and cell signaling functions. ADAMTSs (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) are secreted into the circulation and constitute a heterogenous family of proteases with both anabolic and catabolic functions. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanism of action, and whether these new strategies are safe and effective in larger models. PMID:23885345

  7. Metalloproteases and tendinopathy.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Angelo; Oliva, Francesco; Osti, Leonardo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) are involved in the development of tendinopathy. These potent enzymes completely degrade all components of the connective tissue, modify the extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediate the development of painful tendinopathy. To control the local activity of activated proteinases, the same cells produce tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP). These latter bind to the enzyme and prevent degradation. The balance between the activities of MMPs and TIMPs regulates tendon remodeling, whereas an imbalance produces a collagen dis-regulation and disturbances in tendons. ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are cell membrane-linked enzymes with proteolytic and cell signaling functions. ADAMTSs (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) are secreted into the circulation and constitute a heterogenous family of proteases with both anabolic and catabolic functions. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanism of action, and whether these new strategies are safe and effective in larger models.

  8. Metalloproteases secreted by Actinobacillus suis.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo; Pacheco, Sergio Vaca; Paniagua, Gloria L; Méndez, Alma Pérez; Caballero, Jorge Ibarra; Márquez, Víctor M Pérez; Tenorio, Víctor R

    2004-07-01

    Actinobacillus suis secretes metalloproteases into its medium. These secreted proteins, when concentrated by precipitation with 70% (NH4)2SO4 or methanol, displayed proteolytic activity at >200 kDa molecular mass bands in 10% polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with bovine casein (1%). They showed activity in a broad pH range (from pH 5 to pH 10) and were inhibited by 20 mM EDTA or EGTA, but could be reactivated by calcium. They were found heat stable at 40 degrees C, 50 degrees C, 60 degrees C, and 70 degrees C, but their activity diminished at 80 degrees C or higher. They degraded pig and bovine IgG and cross-reacted with a polyclonal serum against a high molecular mass secreted protease from A. pleuropneumoniae. Extracellular proteases could play a role in diseases caused by A. suis.

  9. Membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent activation of pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 by proprotein convertases.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Hun; Kim, Hee-Hyun; Park, Michael Y; Jeon, Ok-Hee; Kim, Doo-Sik

    2009-11-01

    Matrix metalloprotease-2 is implicated in many biological processes and degrades extracellular and non-extracellular matrix molecules. Matrix metalloprotease-2 maintains a latent state through a cysteine-zinc ion pairing which, when disrupted, results in full enzyme activation. This pairing can be disrupted by a conformational change or cleavage within the propeptide. The best known activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 occurs via cleavage of the propeptide by membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease. However, significant residual activation of pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 is seen in membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease knockout mice and in fibroblasts treated with metalloprotease inhibitors. These findings indicate the presence of a membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 in vivo, which prompted us to explore an alternative activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotese-2. In this study, we demonstrate membrane type-1 matrix metalloprotease-independent propeptide processing of matrix metalloprotease-2 in HEK293F and various tumor cell lines, and show that proprotein convertases can mediate the processing intracellularly as well as extracellularly. Furthermore, processed matrix metalloprotease-2 exhibits enzymatic activity that is enhanced by intermolecular autolytic cleavage. Thus, our experimental data, taken together with the broad expression of proprotein convertases, suggest that the proprotein convertase-mediated processing may be a general activation mechanism for pro-matrix metalloprotease-2 in vivo.

  10. Inhibitors of zinc-dependent metalloproteases hinder sperm passage through the cumulus oophorus during porcine fertilization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Beek, J; Nauwynck, H; Maes, D; Van Soom, A

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we report for the first time on a possible contribution of metalloproteases in sperm passage through the cumulus matrix in pigs. The presence of 20 μM 1,10-phenanthroline (1,10-PHEN), inhibitor of zinc-dependent metalloproteases, strongly inhibited the degree of sperm penetration in cumulus-intact (CI), but not in cumulus-free (CF), porcine oocytes during IVF. The inhibitory effect of 1,10-PHEN was due to the chelation of metal ions as a non-chelating analog (1,7-PHEN) did not affect IVF rates. Furthermore, incubation with 1,10-PHEN did not affect sperm binding to the zona pellucida nor sperm motility, membrane integrity, or acrosomal status. These findings led to the assumption that 1,10-PHEN interacts with a sperm- or cumulus-derived metalloprotease. Metalloproteases are key players in physiological processes involving degradation or remodeling of extracellular matrix. In vivo, their proteolytic activity is regulated by tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMP1-TIMP4). We tested the effect of TIMP3 on fertilization parameters after porcine IVF. Similar to 1,10-PHEN, TIMP3 inhibited total fertilization rate of CI but not CF oocytes and did not influence sperm quality parameters. Although the inhibitory effect was stronger in CI oocytes, TIMP3 also reduced the degree of sperm penetration in CF oocytes, suggesting the involvement of a metalloprotease in a subsequent step during fertilization. In conclusion, our results indicate the involvement of TIMP3-sensitive, zinc-dependent metalloprotease activity in sperm passage through the cumulus oophorus in pigs. The results should provide the basis for further biochemical research toward the localization and identification of the metalloprotease involved.

  11. Gold Nanoparticles Inhibit Matrix Metalloproteases without Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, M; Sasaki, J I; Yamaguchi, S; Kawai, K; Kawakami, H; Iwasaki, Y; Imazato, S

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are currently the focus of considerable attention for dental applications; however, their biological effects have not been fully elucidated. The long-term, slow release of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) digests collagen fibrils within resin-dentin bonds. Therefore, MMP inhibitors can prolong the durability of resin-dentin bonds. However, there have been few reports evaluating the combined effect of MMP inhibition and the cytotoxic effects of NPs for dentin bonding. The aim of this study was to evaluate MMP inhibition and cytotoxic responses to gold (AuNPs) and platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) stabilized by polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) in cultured murine macrophages (RAW264) by using MMP inhibition assays, measuring cell viability and inflammatory responses (quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction [RT-qPCR]), and conducting a micromorphological analysis by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Cultured RAW264 cells were exposed to metal NPs at various concentrations (1, 10, 100, and 400 µg/mL). AuNPs and PtNPs markedly inhibited MMP-8 and MMP-9 activity. Although PtNPs were cytotoxic at high concentrations (100 and 400 µg/mL), no cytotoxic effects were observed for AuNPs at any concentration. Transmission electron microscopy images showed a significant nonrandom intercellular distribution for AuNPs and PtNPs, which were mostly observed to be localized in lysosomes but not in the nucleus. RT-qPCR analysis demonstrated inflammatory responses were not induced in RAW264 cells by AuNPs or PtNPs. The cytotoxicity of nanoparticles might depend on the core metal composition and arise from a "Trojan horse" effect; thus, MMP inhibition could be attributed to the surface charge of PVP, which forms the outer coating of NPs. The negative charge of the surface coating of PVP binds to Zn(2+) from the active center of MMPs by chelate binding and results in MMP inhibition. In summary, AuNPs are attractive NPs that effectively

  12. Secreted Metalloprotease Gene Family of Microsporum canis

    PubMed Central

    Brouta, Frédéric; Descamps, Frédéric; Monod, Michel; Vermout, Sandy; Losson, Bertrand; Mignon, Bernard

    2002-01-01

    Keratinolytic proteases secreted by dermatophytes are likely to be virulence-related factors. Microsporum canis, the main agent of dermatophytosis in dogs and cats, causes a zoonosis that is frequently reported. Using Aspergillus fumigatus metalloprotease genomic sequence (MEP) as a probe, three genes (MEP1, MEP2, and MEP3) were isolated from an M. canis genomic library. They presented a quite-high percentage of identity with both A. fumigatus MEP and Aspergillus oryzae neutral protease I genes. At the amino acid level, they all contained an HEXXH consensus sequence, confirming that these M. canis genes (MEP genes) encode a zinc-containing metalloprotease gene family. Furthermore, MEP3 was found to be the gene encoding a previously isolated M. canis 43.5-kDa keratinolytic metalloprotease, and was successfully expressed as an active recombinant enzyme in Pichia pastoris. Reverse transcriptase nested PCR performed on total RNA extracted from the hair of M. canis-infected guinea pigs showed that at least MEP2 and MEP3 are produced during the infection process. This is the first report describing the isolation of a gene family encoding potential virulence-related factors in dermatophytes. PMID:12228297

  13. Zn-metalloprotease sequences in extremophiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, T.; Dehipawala, S.; Golebiewska, U.; Cheung, E.; Tremberger, G., Jr.; Williams, E.; Schneider, P.; Gadura, N.; Lieberman, D.; Cheung, T.

    2010-09-01

    The Zn-metalloprotease family contains conserved amino acid structures such that the nucleotide fluctuation at the DNA level would exhibit correlated randomness as described by fractal dimension. A nucleotide sequence fractal dimension can be calculated from a numerical series consisting of the atomic numbers of each nucleotide. The structure's vibration modes can also be studied using a Gaussian Network Model. The vibration measure and fractal dimension values form a two-dimensional plot with a standard vector metric that can be used for comparison of structures. The preference for amino acid usage in extremophiles may suppress nucleotide fluctuations that could be analyzed in terms of fractal dimension and Shannon entropy. A protein level cold adaptation study of the thermolysin Zn-metalloprotease family using molecular dynamics simulation was reported recently and our results show that the associated nucleotide fluctuation suppression is consistent with a regression pattern generated from the sequences's fractal dimension and entropy values (R-square { 0.98, N =5). It was observed that cold adaptation selected for high entropy and low fractal dimension values. Extension to the Archaemetzincin M54 family in extremophiles reveals a similar regression pattern (R-square = 0.98, N = 6). It was observed that the metalloprotease sequences of extremely halophilic organisms possess high fractal dimension and low entropy values as compared with non-halophiles. The zinc atom is usually bonded to the histidine residue, which shows limited levels of vibration in the Gaussian Network Model. The variability of the fractal dimension and entropy for a given protein structure suggests that extremophiles would have evolved after mesophiles, consistent with the bias usage of non-prebiotic amino acids by extremophiles. It may be argued that extremophiles have the capacity to offer extinction protection during drastic changes in astrobiological environments.

  14. Metalloproteases and rotator cuff disease.

    PubMed

    Del Buono, Angelo; Oliva, Francesco; Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Rodeo, Scott A; Orchard, John; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    The molecular changes occurring in rotator cuff tears are still unknown, but much attention has been paid to better understand the role of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) in the development of tendinopathy. These are potent enzymes that, once activated, can completely degrade all components of the connective tissue, modify the extracellular matrix (ECM), and mediatethe development of painful tendinopathy and tendon rupture. To control the local activity of activated proteinases, the same cells produce tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) that bind to the enzymes and prevent degradation. The balance between the activities of MMPs and TIMPs regulates tendon remodeling, whereas an imbalance produces a collagen dis-regulation and disturbances intendons. ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) are cell membrane-linked enzymes with proteolytic and cell signaling functions. ADAMTSs (ADAM with thrombospondin motifs) are secreted into the circulation, and constitute a heterogenous family of proteases with both anabolic and catabolic functions. Biologic modulation of endogenous MMP activity to basal levels may reduce pathologic tissue degradation and favorably influence healing after rotator cuff repair. Further studies are needed to better define the mechanism of action, and whether these new strategies are safe and effective in larger models. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ursolic acid reduces the metalloprotease/anti-metalloprotease imbalance in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanzhe; He, Zhiyi; Deng, Shumin

    2016-01-01

    Background Activators of PPARs, particularly PPARγ, may be effective neuroprotective drugs against inflammatory responses in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion injury. Ursolic acid (UA) may act as a PPARγ agonist and serve as an anti-inflammatory agent. In this study, we used a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion model to examine how UA acts as a neuroprotective agent to modulate the metalloprotease/anti-metalloprotease balance. Methods The middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion model (occlusion for 2 hours followed by reperfusion for 48 hours) was induced in male Sprague Dawley rats. UA was administered intragastrically 0.5, 24, and 47 hours after reperfusion. Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether (a PPARγ antagonist) was intraperitoneally administered 1, 24.5, and 47.5 hours after reperfusion. Forty-eight hours after reperfusion, neurological deficits and infarct volume were estimated. The PPARγ level and the metalloprotease/anti-metalloprotease balance were examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The activation of MAPK signaling pathways was also assessed. Results UA-treated (5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) rats showed significant improvement in neurological deficit score, infarct volume, and the number of intact neurons compared with control rats (P<0.01). Both the PPARγ protein level and the percentage of PPARγ-positive cells were increased in the UA-treated groups (P<0.01). Compared with the control group, the UA-treated groups exhibited reduced protein levels of MMP2, MMP9, and activated MAPKs (P<0.01) but an increased level of TIMP1 (P<0.01). UA exerted its protective effects in a dose-dependent manner. Co-treatment with UA and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether completely abolished the UA-induced changes in PPARγ expression; however UA continued to exert a significant but partial neuroprotective effect. Conclusion UA can act as a PPARγ agonist to improve the metalloprotease/anti-metalloprotease balance, possibly by inhibiting the

  16. Novel apigenin based small molecule that targets snake venom metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Srinivasa, Venkatachalaiah; Sundaram, Mahalingam S; Anusha, Sebastian; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Chandra Nayaka, Siddaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Basappa; Girish, Kesturu S; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S

    2014-01-01

    The classical antivenom therapy has appreciably reduced snakebite mortality rate and thus is the only savior drug available. Unfortunately, it considerably fails to shield the viper bite complications like hemorrhage, local tissue degradation and necrosis responsible for severe morbidity. Moreover, the therapy is also tagged with limitations including anaphylaxis, serum sickness and poor availability. Over the last decade, snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are reported to be the primary component responsible for hemorrhage and tissue degradation at bitten site. Thus, antivenom inability to offset viper venom-induced local toxicity has been a basis for an insistent search for SVMP inhibitors. Here we report the inhibitory effect of compound 5d, an apigenin based molecule against SVMPs both in silico and in vivo. Several apigenin analogues are synthesized using multicomponent Ugi reactions. Among them, compound 5d effectively abrogated Echis carinatus (EC) venom-induced local hemorrhage, tissue necrosis and myotoxicity in a dose dependant fashion. The histopathological study further conferred effective inhibition of basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of EC venom inoculation. The compound also protected EC venom-induced fibrin and fibrinogen degradation. The molecular docking of compound 5d and bothropasin demonstrated the direct interaction of hydroxyl group of compound with Glu146 present in hydrophobic pocket of active site and does not chelate Zn2+. Hence, it is concluded that compound 5d could be a potent agent in viper bite management.

  17. Novel Apigenin Based Small Molecule that Targets Snake Venom Metalloproteases

    PubMed Central

    Anusha, Sebastian; Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Chandra Nayaka, Siddaiah; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Basappa; Girish, Kesturu S.; Rangappa, Kanchugarakoppal S.

    2014-01-01

    The classical antivenom therapy has appreciably reduced snakebite mortality rate and thus is the only savior drug available. Unfortunately, it considerably fails to shield the viper bite complications like hemorrhage, local tissue degradation and necrosis responsible for severe morbidity. Moreover, the therapy is also tagged with limitations including anaphylaxis, serum sickness and poor availability. Over the last decade, snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) are reported to be the primary component responsible for hemorrhage and tissue degradation at bitten site. Thus, antivenom inability to offset viper venom-induced local toxicity has been a basis for an insistent search for SVMP inhibitors. Here we report the inhibitory effect of compound 5d, an apigenin based molecule against SVMPs both in silico and in vivo. Several apigenin analogues are synthesized using multicomponent Ugi reactions. Among them, compound 5d effectively abrogated Echis carinatus (EC) venom-induced local hemorrhage, tissue necrosis and myotoxicity in a dose dependant fashion. The histopathological study further conferred effective inhibition of basement membrane degradation, and accumulation of inflammatory leucocytes at the site of EC venom inoculation. The compound also protected EC venom-induced fibrin and fibrinogen degradation. The molecular docking of compound 5d and bothropasin demonstrated the direct interaction of hydroxyl group of compound with Glu146 present in hydrophobic pocket of active site and does not chelate Zn2+. Hence, it is concluded that compound 5d could be a potent agent in viper bite management. PMID:25184206

  18. Catalytic Domain Architecture of Metzincin Metalloproteases*

    PubMed Central

    Gomis-Rüth, F. Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Metalloproteases cleave proteins and peptides, and deregulation of their function leads to pathology. An understanding of their structure and mechanisms of action is necessary to the development of strategies for their regulation. Among metallopeptidases are the metzincins, which are mostly multidomain proteins with ∼130–260-residue globular catalytic domains showing a common core architecture characterized by a long zinc-binding consensus motif, HEXXHXXGXX(H/D), and a methionine-containing Met-turn. Metzincins participate in unspecific protein degradation such as digestion of intake proteins and tissue development, maintenance, and remodeling, but they are also involved in highly specific cleavage events to activate or inactivate themselves or other (pro)enzymes and bioactive peptides. Metzincins are subdivided into families, and seven such families have been analyzed at the structural level: the astacins, ADAMs/adamalysins/reprolysins, serralysins, matrix metalloproteinases, snapalysins, leishmanolysins, and pappalysins. These families are reviewed from a structural point of view. PMID:19201757

  19. Molecular Dynamics Studies of Matrix Metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Natalia; Suárez, Dimas

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases are multidomain enzymes with a remarkable proteolytic activity located in the extracellular environment. Their catalytic activity and structural properties have been intensively studied during the last few decades using both experimental and theoretical approaches, but many open questions still remain. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations enable the sampling of the configurational space of a molecular system, thus contributing to the characterization of the structure, dynamics, and ligand binding properties of a particular MMP. Based on previous computational experience, we provide in this chapter technical and methodological guidelines that may be useful to and stimulate other researchers to perform molecular dynamics simulations to help address unresolved questions concerning the molecular mode of action of MMPs.

  20. Metalloprotease ADAM10 Is Required for Notch1 Site 2 Cleavage*

    PubMed Central

    van Tetering, Geert; van Diest, Paul; Verlaan, Ingrid; van der Wall, Elsken; Kopan, Raphael; Vooijs, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling is controlled by ligand binding, which unfolds a negative control region to induce proteolytic cleavage of the receptor. First, a membrane-proximal cleavage is executed by a metalloprotease, removing the extracellular domain. This allows γ-secretase to execute a second cleavage within the Notch transmembrane domain, which releases the intracellular domain to enter the nucleus. Here we show that the ADAM10 metalloprotease Kuzbanian, but not ADAM17/tumor necrosis factor α-converting enzyme, plays an essential role in executing ligand-induced extracellular cleavage at site 2 (S2) in cells and localizes this step to the plasma membrane. Importantly, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of metalloproteases still allowed extracellular cleavage of Notch, indicating the presence of unknown proteases with the ability to cleave at S2. Gain of function mutations identified in human cancers and in model organisms that map to the negative control region alleviate the requirement for ligand binding for extracellular cleavage to occur. Because cancer-causing Notch1 mutations also depend on (rate-limiting) S2 proteolysis, the identity of these alternative proteases has important implications for understanding Notch activation in normal and cancer cells. PMID:19726682

  1. Synaptic Autoregulation by Metalloproteases and γ-Secretase

    PubMed Central

    Restituito, Sophie; Khatri, Latika; Ninan, Ipe; Mathews, Paul M.; Liu, Xin; Weinberg, Richard J.; Ziff, Edward B.

    2011-01-01

    The proteoloytic machinery comprising metalloproteases and γ-secretase, an intramembrane aspartyl protease involved in Alzheimer’s disease, cleaves several substrates besides the extensively studied amyloid precursor protein (APP). Some of these substrates, such as N-cadherin, are synaptic proteins involved in synapse remodeling and maintenance. Here we show, in rat and mice that metalloproteases and γ-secretase are physiologic regulators of synapses. Both proteases are synaptic, with γ-secretase tethered at the synapse by δ-catenin, a synaptic scafolding protein which also binds to N-cadherin and, through scaffolds, to α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionate receptor (AMPAR) and a metalloprotease. Activity-dependent proteolysis by metalloproteases and γ-secretase takes place at both sides of the synapse, with the metalloprotease cleavage being N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent. This proteolysis decreases levels of synaptic proteins and diminishes synaptic transmission. Our results suggest that activity-dependent substrate cleavage by synaptic metalloproteases and γ-secretase modifies synaptic transmission, providing a novel form of synaptic autoregulation. PMID:21865451

  2. Synaptic autoregulation by metalloproteases and γ-secretase.

    PubMed

    Restituito, Sophie; Khatri, Latika; Ninan, Ipe; Mathews, Paul M; Liu, Xin; Weinberg, Richard J; Ziff, Edward B

    2011-08-24

    The proteolytic machinery comprising metalloproteases and γ-secretase, an intramembrane aspartyl protease involved in Alzheimer's disease, cleaves several substrates in addition to the extensively studied amyloid precursor protein. Some of these substrates, such as N-cadherin, are synaptic proteins involved in synapse remodeling and maintenance. Here we show, in rats and mice, that metalloproteases and γ-secretase are physiologic regulators of synapses. Both proteases are synaptic, with γ-secretase tethered at the synapse by δ-catenin, a synaptic scaffolding protein that also binds to N-cadherin and, through scaffolds, to AMPA receptor and a metalloprotease. Activity-dependent proteolysis by metalloproteases and γ-secretase takes place at both sides of the synapse, with the metalloprotease cleavage being NMDA receptor-dependent. This proteolysis decreases levels of synaptic proteins and diminishes synaptic transmission. Our results suggest that activity-dependent substrate cleavage by synaptic metalloproteases and γ-secretase modifies synaptic transmission, providing a novel form of synaptic autoregulation.

  3. Metal complexes and metalloproteases: targeting conformational diseases.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Giuseppe; Bonnet, Sylvestre

    2014-08-01

    In recent years many metalloproteases (MPs) have been shown to play important roles in the development of various pathological conditions. Although most of the literature is focused on matrix MPs (MMPs), many other MPs have been demonstrated to be involved in the degradation of peptides or proteins whose accumulation and dyshomeostasis are considered as being responsible for the development of conformational diseases, i.e., diseases where non-native protein conformations lead to protein aggregation. It seems clear that, at least in principle, it must be possible to control the levels of many aggregation-prone proteins not only by reducing their production, but also by enhancing their catabolism. Metal complexes that can perform this function were designed and tested according to at least two different strategies: (i) intervening on the endogenous MPs by directly or indirectly modulating their activity; (ii) acting as artificial MPs, replacing or synergistically functioning with endogenous MPs. These two different bioinorganic approaches are widely represented in the current literature and the aim of this review is to rationally organize and discuss both of them so as to give a critical insight into these approaches and highlighting their limitations and future perspectives.

  4. "Click" synthesis of small molecule probes for activity-based fingerprinting of matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Uttamchandani, Mahesh; Li, Junqi; Hu, Mingyu; Yao, Shao Q

    2006-09-28

    By using "Click Chemistry", we achieved the facile synthesis of various affinity-based hydroxamate probes that enable generation of activity-based fingerprints of a variety of metalloproteases, including matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), in proteomics experiments.

  5. Identification, cellular distribution and potential function of the metalloprotease-disintegrin MDC9 in the kidney.

    PubMed

    Mahimkar, R M; Baricos, W H; Visaya, O; Pollock, A S; Lovett, D H

    2000-04-01

    The complex interactions of glomerular and tubular epithelial cells with the basal laminae play a critical role in renal function. Disruption of these interactions has been widely implicated in glomerular diseases and acute renal failure. MDC are a large family of membrane-bound proteins containing metalloprotease, disintegrin (integrin interaction sites), and cysteine-rich domains. Little information is available concerning the presence of MDC in the kidney or their role in renal pathophysiology. Using degenerate PCR primers for the conserved metalloprotease and disintegrin domains of this protein family, cDNA templates from tubules, whole glomeruli, and glomerular epithelial cells (GEC) yielded a single, 195-bp product, which on sequence analysis corresponded to a region in the disintegrin domain of MDC9. Northern analysis of poly(A)+ RNA from tubules, whole glomeruli, and GEC revealed a 3.9-kb transcript, identical to that of mouse MDC9. Using antibodies generated against a 21-amino acid peptide present in the metalloprotease domain of MDC9, Western analysis of concanavalin A-enriched glomerular microsomal extracts demonstrated both processed (76 kD) and unprocessed (116 kD) forms of MDC9, which upon reduction changed to the corresponding 84- and 124-kD forms. Histochemical studies revealed a basolateral localization of intrinsic MDC9 protein in renal cortical tubule cells and glomerular visceral epithelial cells, which colocalized with the beta1 integrin chain. Expression of green fluorescence protein MDC9 chimeric constructs in GEC or polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells revealed a similar punctate basolateral surface localization. Transient overexpression of the soluble disintegrin domain-green fluorescence protein chimera in GEC led to dramatic changes in cellular morphology with rounding and detachment from cell monolayers. These studies document the presence of MDC9 in renal epithelial cells and suggest an important role for MDC9 in renal

  6. Antarease-like Zn-metalloproteases are ubiquitous in the venom of different scorpion genera.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Ernesto; Rendón-Anaya, Martha; Rego, Solange Cristina; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni; Possani, Lourival Domingos

    2014-06-01

    The venoms of several scorpion species have long been associated with pancreatitis in animal models and humans. Antarease, a Zn-metalloprotease from Tityus serrulatus, is able to penetrate intact pancreatic tissue and disrupts the normal vesicular traffic necessary for secretion, so it could play a relevant role in the onset of acute pancreatitis. The cDNA libraries from five different scorpion species were screened for antarease homologs with specific primers. The amplified PCR products were cloned and sequenced. A structural model was constructed to assess the functionality of the putative metalloproteases. A phylogenetic analysis was performed to identify clustering patterns of these venom components. Antarease-like sequences were amplified from all the screened cDNA libraries. The complete sequence of the antarease from T. serrulatus was obtained. The structural model of the putative antarease from Tityus trivittatus shows that it may adopt a catalytically active conformation, sharing relevant structural elements with previously reported metalloproteases of the ADAM family. The phylogenetic analysis reveals that the reported sequences cluster in groups that correlate with the geographical localization of the respective species. Antareases are ubiquitous to a broad range of scorpion species, where they could be catalytically active enzymes. These molecules can be used to describe the evolution of scorpion venoms under different ecogeographic constrains. For the first time the complete sequence of the antareases is reported. It is demonstrated that antareases are common in the venom of different scorpion species. They are now proposed as targets for antivenom therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Maturation pathway of metalloprotease produced by Aeromonas sobria.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eizo; Fujii, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Arimoto, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2010-10-01

    Previously, we cloned the metalloprotease gene of Aeromonas sobria (amp) and determined its nucleotide sequence (GenBank accession number DQ784565). The protease is composed of 591 amino acid residues. In this study, we purified the mature metalloprotease from the culture supernatant of A. sobria and determined the amino terminal sequence and molecular size of AMP. In addition, we examined the production of AMP diachronically and found that AMP emerges outside of the cell as an intermediate composed of mature and propeptide regions. Subsequently, we determined that the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the intermediate and found that the sequence is identical to that of the mature metalloprotease. This means that the intermediate is composed of a mature AMP region and a C-terminal propeptide. The cross culture experiment of mutants of metalloprotease and serine protease of A. sobria on skim milk agar medium indicates that the intermediate released outside of the cell is inactive and that serine protease produced by A. sobria accelerates the conversion of the intermediate from the inactive to the active form.

  8. Comparative expression and tissue distribution analyses of astacin-like squid metalloprotease in squid and cuttlefish.

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Ogawa, Takuya; Asakura, Masanori; Okiyama, Keisuke; Honda, Michiyo; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2008-01-01

    Astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM) is a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases. In the present study, we investigated the expression and tissue distribution of ALSM in bigfin reef squid (Sepioteuthis lessoniana) and golden cuttlefish (Sepia esculenta). Myosin heavy chain hydrolysis tests showed ALSM-I-like activity in both species. We isolated partial cDNA clones showing high sequence similarity to ALSM-I and -III, suggesting that ALSM is common to squid and cuttlefish. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ALSMs are classified into two clades: ALSM-I forms one clade, and ALSM-II and -III form the other. ALSM was expressed in several tissues in bigfin reef squid, though expression was confined to the liver in cuttlefish. ALSMs are distributed in digestive organs but not in mantle muscle of squid and cuttlefish. Immunofluorescence analysis further showed that cellular localization of ALSM is evident not only in hepatic cells but also in pancreatic cells of bigfin reef squid. Thus, ALSM is commonly expressed in squid and cuttlefish, but its expression levels and distribution are distinct.

  9. A rapid and sensitive fluorometric method for the quantitative analysis of snake venom metalloproteases and their inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Biardi, J. E.; Nguyen, K. T.; Lander, S.; Whitley, M.; Nambiar, K. P.

    2011-01-01

    Metalloproteases are responsible for the hemorrhagic effects of many snake venoms and contribute to other pathways that lead to local tissue damage. Methods that quantify snake venom metalloproteases (SVMP) are therefore valuable tools in research on the clinical, physiological, and biochemical effects of envenomation. Comparative analysis of individual, population, and species differences requires screening of large numbers of samples and treatments, and therefore require a method of quantifying SVMP activity that is simple, rapid, and sensitive. This paper demonstrates the properties of a new fluorometric assay of SVMP activity that can provide a measure of metalloprotease activity in one hour. The assay is reliable, with variation among replicates sufficiently small to reliably detect differences in between species (F19,60 = 2924, p < 0.001), even for those venoms with low overall activity. It is also sensitive enough to detect differences among venoms using < 2 ng of whole venom protein. We provide an example use of this assay to detect the presence of natural SVMP inhibitors in minute samples of blood plasma from rock squirrels (S. variegatus), a natural prey species for North American rattlesnakes. We propose this assay is a useful addition to the set of tools used to characterize venoms, as well as high-throughput screening of natural or synthetic inhibitors, or other novel therapeutic agents against SVMP effects. PMID:21187109

  10. A rapid and sensitive fluorometric method for the quantitative analysis of snake venom metalloproteases and their inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Biardi, J E; Nguyen, K T; Lander, S; Whitley, M; Nambiar, K P

    2011-02-01

    Metalloproteases are responsible for the hemorrhagic effects of many snake venoms and contribute to other pathways that lead to local tissue damage. Methods that quantify snake venom metalloproteases (SVMP) are therefore valuable tools in research on the clinical, physiological, and biochemical effects of envenomation. Comparative analysis of individual, population, and species differences requires screening of large numbers of samples and treatments, and therefore require a method of quantifying SVMP activity that is simple, rapid, and sensitive. This paper demonstrates the properties of a new fluorometric assay of SVMP activity that can provide a measure of metalloprotease activity in 1 h. The assay is reliable, with variation among replicates sufficiently small to reliably detect differences in between species (F(19,60) = 2924, p < 0.001), even for those venoms with low overall activity. It is also sensitive enough to detect differences among venoms using <2 ng of whole venom protein. We provide an example use of this assay to detect the presence of natural SVMP inhibitors in minute samples of blood plasma from rock squirrels (S. variegatus), a natural prey species for North American rattlesnakes. We propose this assay is a useful addition to the set of tools used to characterize venoms, as well as high-throughput screening of natural or synthetic inhibitors, or other novel therapeutic agents against SVMP effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae metalloprotease: cloning and in vivo expression.

    PubMed

    García González, Octavio; García, Rosa M; de la Garza, Mireya; Vaca, Sergio; Paniagua, Gloria Luz; Mejía, Ricardo; Tenorio, Víctor R; Negrete-Abascal, Erasmo

    2004-05-01

    The complete amino acid and nucleotide sequence of a secreted metalloprotease produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 is reported. A clone showing proteolytic activity in cell-free culture media was selected from a genomic library of A. pleuropneumoniae serotype 1 in pUC 19. The sequence obtained contained an open reading frame encoding a protein with 869 amino acids. This protein was identified as a zinc neutral-metalloprotease belonging to the aminopeptidase family, with a predicted molecular weight of approximately 101 kDa. This sequence showed high homology with other predicted or sequenced aminopeptidases reported for different Gram-negative bacteria. Expression of the protease was observed in lung tissue from pigs that died of porcine pleuropneumonia suggesting a role in pathogenesis.

  12. Gallibacterium anatis-secreted metalloproteases degrade chicken IgG.

    PubMed

    García-Gómez, E; Vaca, S; Pérez-Méndez, A; Ibarra-Caballero, J; Pérez-Márquez, V; Tenorio, V R; Negrete-Abascal, E

    2005-10-01

    Gallibacterium anatis (previously named Pasteurella haemolytica-like) is considered a normal inhabitant of genital and upper respiratory tracts of healthy chickens, but it is also associated with different pathological conditions. Secreted metalloproteases from field and reference G. anatis cultures were obtained by methanol precipitation and were characterized. Proteins of molecular mass higher than 100 kDa showing proteolytic activity were observed in 10% polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with 1% bovine casein. They were active at alkaline pH, and inhibited by ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid. Their activity was stable at 50 degrees C, but partially inhibited at 60 degrees C, and totally inhibited at higher temperatures. Secreted proteins were able to degrade chicken IgG after 24 h of incubation, and cross-reacted with a polyclonal antibody against purified protease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae. Secreted metalloproteases could play a role in infections caused by G. anatis.

  13. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM): Historical Overview of Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Giebeler, Nives; Zigrino, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first disintegrin protein from snake venom and the following identification of a mammalian membrane-anchored metalloprotease-disintegrin implicated in fertilization, almost three decades of studies have identified additional members of these families and several biochemical mechanisms regulating their expression and activity in the cell. Most importantly, new in vivo functions have been recognized for these proteins including cell partitioning during development, modulation of inflammatory reactions, and development of cancers. In this review, we will overview the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family of proteases highlighting some of the major research achievements in the analysis of ADAMs’ function that have underscored the importance of these proteins in physiological and pathological processes over the years. PMID:27120619

  14. Electrophysiological Characterization of the Antarease Metalloprotease from Tityus serrulatus Venom

    PubMed Central

    Zornetta, Irene; Scorzeto, Michele; Mendes Dos Reis, Pablo Victor; De Lima, Maria E.; Montecucco, Cesare; Megighian, Aram; Rossetto, Ornella

    2017-01-01

    Scorpions are among the oldest venomous living organisms and the family Buthidae is the largest and most medically relevant one. Scorpion venoms include many toxic peptides, but recently, a metalloprotease from Tityus serrulatus called antarease was reported to be capable of cleaving VAMP2, a protein involved in the neuroparalytic syndromes of tetanus and botulism. We have produced antarease and an inactive metalloprotease mutant in a recombinant form and analyzed their enzymatic activity on recombinant VAMP2 in vitro and on mammalian and insect neuromuscular junction. The purified recombinant antarease paralyzed the neuromuscular junctions of mice and of Drosophila melanogaster whilst the mutant was inactive. We were unable to demonstrate any cleavage of VAMP2 under conditions which leads to VAMP proteolysis by botulinum neurotoxin type B. Antarease caused a reduced release probability, mainly due to defects upstream of the synaptic vesicles fusion process. Paired pulse experiments indicate that antarease might proteolytically inactivate a voltage-gated calcium channel. PMID:28264432

  15. Electrophysiological Characterization of the Antarease Metalloprotease from Tityus serrulatus Venom.

    PubMed

    Zornetta, Irene; Scorzeto, Michele; Mendes Dos Reis, Pablo Victor; De Lima, Maria E; Montecucco, Cesare; Megighian, Aram; Rossetto, Ornella

    2017-02-27

    Scorpions are among the oldest venomous living organisms and the family Buthidae is the largest and most medically relevant one. Scorpion venoms include many toxic peptides, but recently, a metalloprotease from Tityus serrulatus called antarease was reported to be capable of cleaving VAMP2, a protein involved in the neuroparalytic syndromes of tetanus and botulism. We have produced antarease and an inactive metalloprotease mutant in a recombinant form and analyzed their enzymatic activity on recombinant VAMP2 in vitro and on mammalian and insect neuromuscular junction. The purified recombinant antarease paralyzed the neuromuscular junctions of mice and of Drosophila melanogaster whilst the mutant was inactive. We were unable to demonstrate any cleavage of VAMP2 under conditions which leads to VAMP proteolysis by botulinum neurotoxin type B. Antarease caused a reduced release probability, mainly due to defects upstream of the synaptic vesicles fusion process. Paired pulse experiments indicate that antarease might proteolytically inactivate a voltage-gated calcium channel.

  16. The Secreted Metalloprotease ADAMTS20 Is Required for Melanoblast Survival

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Debra L.; Hou, Ling; Somerville, Robert; Young, Mary E.; Apte, Suneel S.; Pavan, William J.

    2008-01-01

    ADAMTS20 (A disintegrin-like and metalloprotease domain with thrombospondin type-1 motifs) is a member of a family of secreted metalloproteases that can process a variety of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and secreted molecules. Adamts20 mutations in belted (bt) mice cause white spotting of the dorsal and ventral torso, indicative of defective neural crest (NC)-derived melanoblast development. The expression pattern of Adamts20 in dermal mesenchymal cells adjacent to migrating melanoblasts led us to initially propose that Adamts20 regulated melanoblast migration. However, using a Dct-LacZ transgene to track melanoblast development, we determined that melanoblasts were distributed normally in whole mount E12.5 bt/bt embryos, but were specifically reduced in the trunk of E13.5 bt/bt embryos due to a seven-fold higher rate of apoptosis. The melanoblast defect was exacerbated in newborn skin and embryos from bt/bt animals that were also haploinsufficient for Adamts9, a close homolog of Adamts20, indicating that these metalloproteases functionally overlap in melanoblast development. We identified two potential mechanisms by which Adamts20 may regulate melanoblast survival. First, skin explant cultures demonstrated that Adamts20 was required for melanoblasts to respond to soluble Kit ligand (sKitl). In support of this requirement, bt/bt;Kittm1Alf/+ and bt/bt;KitlSl/+ mice exhibited synergistically increased spotting. Second, ADAMTS20 cleaved the aggregating proteoglycan versican in vitro and was necessary for versican processing in vivo, raising the possibility that versican can participate in melanoblast development. These findings reveal previously unrecognized roles for Adamts proteases in cell survival and in mediating Kit signaling during melanoblast colonization of the skin. Our results have implications not only for understanding mechanisms of NC-derived melanoblast development but also provide insights on novel biological functions of secreted

  17. Neprilysin II: A putative novel metalloprotease and its isoforms in CNS and testis.

    PubMed

    Ouimet, T; Facchinetti, P; Rose, C; Bonhomme, M C; Gros, C; Schwartz, J C; Tanja, O

    2000-05-19

    Metalloproteases of the M13 subfamily, comprising namely neprylisin (NEP) and endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE), are involved in the metabolism of various neuronal and hormonal peptides, and inhibitors thereof have already led to therapeutically useful agents. Using homology cloning, we have identified a new member of this family in rat tissues. It is a glycosylated, type II integral membrane protein of 774 amino acids, containing a zinc-binding consensus motif, highly homologous to NEP and, therefore, designated NEPII. We have characterized multiple splice variants of NEPII mRNA with distinct expression patterns in brain regions, pituitary and testis. In situ hybridization of testis, where levels of the NEPII gene transcript are the highest, reveals a localization within round spermatids. In brain, NEPII is expressed heterogeneously among several neuronal populations and according to a pattern grossly complementary to that of NEP.

  18. The enterotoxin of Bacteroides fragilis is a metalloprotease.

    PubMed Central

    Moncrief, J S; Obiso, R; Barroso, L A; Kling, J J; Wright, R L; Van Tassell, R L; Lyerly, D M; Wilkins, T D

    1995-01-01

    During the past decade, strains of Bacteroides fragilis that produce an enterotoxin have been implicated in diarrheal disease in animals and humans. The extracellular enterotoxin has been purified and characterized as a single polypeptide (M(r), approximately 20,000). Single specific primer-PCR was used to clone a portion of the B. fragilis enterotoxin gene. The recombinant protein expressed by the cloned gene fragment reacted with monospecific antibodies to B. fragilis enterotoxin by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblot analysis. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a signature zinc-binding consensus motif (HEXXHXXGXXH/Met-turn) characteristic of metalloproteases termed metzincins. Sequence comparisons showed close identity to matrix metalloproteases (e.g., human fibroblast collagenase) within the zinc-binding and Met-turn region. Purified enterotoxin contained 1 g-atom of Zn2+ per molecule and hydrolyzed gelatin, azocoll, actin, tropomyosin, and fibrinogen. The enterotoxin also underwent autodigestion. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of two autodigestion products were identical to the deduced amino acid sequence of the recombinant enterotoxin and revealed cleavage at Cys-Leu and Ser-Leu peptide bonds. Gelatinase (type IV collagenase) activity comigrated with the toxin when analyzed by gel fractionation and zymography, indicating that protease activity is due to the enterotoxin and not to a contaminating protease(s). Optimal proteolytic activity occurred at 37 degrees C and pH 6.5. Primary proteolytic cleavage sites in actin were identified, revealing cleavage at Gly-Met and Thr-Leu peptide bonds. Enzymatic activity was inhibited by metal chelators but not by inhibitors of other classes of proteases. Additionally, cytotoxic activity of the enterotoxin on human carcinoma HT-29 cells was inhibited by acetoxymethyl ester EDTA. The metalloprotease activity of the enterotoxin suggests a possible mechanism for enterotoxicity and may have additional

  19. Identification of a human cDNA sequence which encodes a novel membrane-associated protein containing a zinc metalloprotease motif.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ying-Chun; Tsuruga, Hiromichi; Hirai, Momoki; Yasuda, Kazuki; Yokoi, Norihide; Kitamura, Toshio; Kumagai, Hidetoshi

    2003-06-30

    We report the cloning and characterization of a human cDNA predicted to encode a novel hydrophobic protein containing four transmembrane domains and a zinc metalloprotease motif, HEXXH, between the third and fourth transmembrane domains, and have named the molecule metalloprotease-related protein-1 (MPRP-1). The MPRP-1 gene was localized to chromosome 1-p32.3 by radiation hybrid mapping, and Northern blot analysis revealed expression in many organs, with strong expression in the heart, skeletal muscle, kidney and liver. Immunohistochemical analyisis showed that MPRP-1 was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and not in the Golgi compartment. Fragments of DNA encoding a segment homologous to the HEXXH motif of MPRP-1 are widely found in bacteria, yeast, plants, and animals. These results suggest that the MPRP-1 may have highly conserved functions, such as in intracellular proteolytic processing in the ER.

  20. Functional analysis of a breast cancer-associated mutation in the intracellular domain of the metalloprotease ADAM12.

    PubMed

    Stautz, Dorte; Wewer, Ulla M; Kveiborg, Marie

    2012-01-01

    A recently identified breast cancer-associated mutation in the metalloprotease ADAM12 alters a potential dileucine trafficking signal, which could affect protein processing and cellular localization. ADAM12 belongs to the group of A Disintegrin And Metalloproteases (ADAMs), which are typically membrane-associated proteins involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion, and signaling. ADAM12 as well as several members of the ADAM family are over-expressed in various cancers, correlating with disease stage. Three breast cancer-associated somatic mutations were previously identified in ADAM12, and two of these, one in the metalloprotease domain and another in the disintegrin domain, were investigated and found to result in protein misfolding, retention in the secretory pathway, and failure of zymogen maturation. The third mutation, p.L792F in the ADAM12 cytoplasmic tail, was not investigated, but is potentially significant given its location within a di-leucine motif, which is recognized as a potential cellular trafficking signal. The present study was motivated both by the potential relevance of this documented mutation to cancer, as well as for determining the role of the di-leucine motif in ADAM12 trafficking. Expression of ADAM12 p.L792F in mammalian cells demonstrated quantitatively similar expression levels and zymogen maturation as wild-type (WT) ADAM12, as well as comparable cellular localizations. A cell surface biotinylation assay demonstrated that cell surface levels of ADAM12 WT and ADAM12 p.L792F were similar and that internalization of the mutant occurred at the same rate and extent as for ADAM12 WT. Moreover, functional analysis revealed no differences in cell proliferation or ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor (EGF), a known ADAM12 substrate between WT and mutant ADAM12. These data suggest that the ADAM12 p.L792F mutation is unlikely to be a driver (cancer causing)-mutation in breast cancer.

  1. A novel synthetic quinolinone inhibitor presents proteolytic and hemorrhagic inhibitory activities against snake venom metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Patrícia T; Magro, Angelo J; Matioli, Fábio F; Marcussi, Silvana; Lemke, Ney; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Correa, Arlene G; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-02-01

    Metalloproteases play a fundamental role in snake venom envenomation inducing hemorrhagic, fibrigen(ogen)olytic and myotoxic effects in their victims. Several snake venoms, such as those from the Bothrops genus, present important local effects which are not efficiently neutralized by conventional serum therapy. Consequently, these accidents may result in permanent sequelae and disability, creating economic and social problems, especially in developing countries, leading the attention of the World Health Organization that considered ophidic envenomations a neglected tropical disease. Aiming to produce an efficient inhibitor against bothropic venoms, we synthesized different molecules classified as quinolinones - a group of low-toxic chemical compounds widely used as antibacterial and antimycobacterial drugs - and tested their inhibitory properties against hemorrhage caused by bothropic venoms. The results from this initial screening indicated the molecule 2-hydroxymethyl-6-methoxy-1,4-dihydro-4-quinolinone (Q8) was the most effective antihemorrhagic compound among all of the assayed synthetic quinolinones. Other in vitro and in vivo experiments showed this novel compound was able to inhibit significantly the hemorrhagic and/or proteolytic activities of bothropic crude venoms and isolated snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) even at lower concentrations. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations were also performed to get insights into the structural basis of Q8 inhibitory mechanism against proteolytic and hemorrhagic SVMPs. These structural studies demonstrated that Q8 may form a stable complex with SVMPs, impairing the access of substrates to the active sites of these toxins. Therefore, both experimental and structural data indicate that Q8 compound is an interesting candidate for antiophidic therapy, particularly for the treatment of the hemorrhagic and necrotic effects induced by bothropic venoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de

  2. Molecular characterization of metalloproteases from Bothrops alternatus snake venom.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Fernando Fonseca Pereira; Ribeiro, Juliana Uema; Santos, Livia Mara; de Souza, Dulce Helena Ferreira; Leonardecz, Eduardo; Henrique-Silva, Flávio; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa Sobreiro

    2014-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that alternagin-C (ALT-C), a disintegrin-like, Cys-rich protein isolated from Bothrops alternatus snake venom, induces human vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation and angiogenesis in in vitro and in vivo assays. Therefore this protein could be interesting as a new approach for tissue regeneration studies. However, its primary sequence was not completely determined since the protein isolated from crude venom is usually a mixture of isoforms. Here we describe the transcriptome analysis of B. alternatus from the venom glands of a single male specimen. About 800 good-quality contigs were screened for snake venom metalloproteases/disintegrins, resulting in the following expression profile for these enzymes: 4% for P-I, 7% for P-II and 89% for P-III SVMPs. The PII-SVMP sequence code for RGD-disintegrins and all the expressed PIII-sequences have the ECD adhesive motif. A cDNA sequence coding for an ALT-C homolog was completely sequenced and characterized. Comparative sequence and structural analyses suggested new features that distinguish SVMP classes such as two prolyl endopetidase cleavage sites. All these data add new information on the expression pattern of metalloproteases of B. alternatus venom and may have practical applications for the production of recombinant disintegrins for cell adhesion studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Profiling Platform for the Identification of Selective Metalloprotease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    ANTCZAK, CHRISTOPHE; RADU, CONSTANTIN; DJABALLAH, HAKIM

    2008-01-01

    Although proteases represent an estimated 5% to 10% of potential drug targets, inhibitors for metalloproteases (MPs) account for only a small proportion of all approved drugs, failures of which have typically been associated with lack of selectivity. In this study, the authors describe a novel and universal binding assay based on an actinonin derivative and show its binding activities for several MPs and its lack of activity toward all the non-MPs tested. This newly developed assay would allow for the rapid screening for inhibitors of a given MP and for the selectivity profiling of the resulting hits. The assay has successfully enabled for the first time simultaneous profiling of 8 well-known inhibitors against a panel of selected MPs. Previously published activities for these inhibitors were confirmed, and the authors have also discovered new molecular targets for some of them. The authors conclude that their profiling platform provides a generic assay solution for the identification of novel metalloprotease inhibitors as well as their selectivity profiling using a simple and homogeneous assay. PMID:18349423

  4. Metalloprotease-dependent onset of blood circulation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Iida, Atsuo; Sakaguchi, Kazuya; Sato, Kiyoaki; Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Nishimura, Daigo; Iwaki, Aya; Takeuchi, Miki; Kobayashi, Makoto; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Kawahara, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko

    2010-06-22

    The primitive blood circulation requires intravascular plasma flow. However, it remains unclear whether the onset of earliest blood circulation is dependent solely on establishment of a functional circulatory organ or whether it also requires active processes inherent in blood cells. In this study, we present novel mechanisms for the onset of blood circulation by monitoring fluorescently labeled blood precursors and blood vessels in zebrafish. The earliest blood circulation occurs synchronously. This synchrony is achieved by the retention of erythroid precursors on the lumen of the vasculature after their invasion from the subaortic region, and then by simultaneous release of these precursors into the flow. Morphological and biochemical analyses suggest that the onset of blood circulation accompanies disruption of blood cell-to-vessel adhesion and requires metalloprotease-dependent processes. ADAM8, a member of the a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family, mediates the onset of blood circulation. In ADAM8-depleted embryos, erythroid cells fail to detach from the vascular lumen and stagnate. Expression of a protease-defective ADAM8 in erythroid cells causes dominant-negative effects on blood circulation, suggesting cell-autonomous roles of ADAM8. Based on these findings, we propose that the first erythroid cells require both flow-dependent passive and proteolysis-dependent active processes to enter the circulation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic inactivation of ADAMTS15 metalloprotease in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Viloria, Cristina G; Obaya, Alvaro J; Moncada-Pazos, Angela; Llamazares, María; Astudillo, Aurora; Capellá, Gabriel; Cal, Santiago; López-Otín, Carlos

    2009-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases have been traditionally linked to cancer dissemination through their ability to degrade most extracellular matrix components, thus facilitating invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. However, recent functional studies have revealed that some metalloproteases, including several members of the ADAMTS family, also exhibit tumor suppressor properties. In particular, ADAMTS1, ADAMTS9, and ADAMTS18 have been found to be epigenetically silenced in malignant tumors of different sources, suggesting that they may function as tumor suppressor genes. Herein, we show that ADAMTS15 is genetically inactivated in colon cancer. We have performed a mutational analysis of the ADAMTS15 gene in human colorectal carcinomas, with the finding of four mutations in 50 primary tumors and 6 colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, functional in vitro and in vivo studies using HCT-116 and SW-620 colorectal cancer cells and severe combined immunodeficient mice have revealed that ADAMTS15 restrains tumor growth and invasion. Furthermore, the presence of ADAMTS15 in human colorectal cancer samples showed a negative correlation with the histopathologic differentiation grade of the corresponding tumors. Collectively, these results provide evidence that extracellular proteases, including ADAMTS15, may be targets of inactivating mutations in human cancer and further validate the concept that secreted metalloproteases may show tumor suppressor properties.

  6. Control of Entamoeba histolytica adherence involves metallosurface protease 1, an M8 family surface metalloprotease with homology to leishmanolysin.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Jose E; Sateriale, Adam; Bessoff, Kovi E; Huston, Christopher D

    2012-06-01

    Invasive amebiasis due to Entamoeba histolytica infection is an important cause of morbidity in developing countries. The E. histolytica genome contains two homologues to the metalloprotease leishmanolysin gene, Entamoeba histolytica MSP-1 (EhMSP-1) and EhMSP-2, while the commensal ameba Entamoeba dispar has lost EhMSP-1. In this study, we sought to characterize E. histolytica metallosurface protease 1 (EhMSP-1). Using immunoprecipitation and a model substrate, we found that EhMSP-1 was a functional metalloprotease. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry revealed that EhMSP-1 localized to the cell surface and revealed the existence of distinct, nonclonal trophozoite populations with high and low EhMSP-1 surface abundance that became synchronized following serum starvation. Phenotypic assays were performed after silencing EhMSP-1. Adherence of EhMSP-1-deficient trophozoites to tissue culture cell monolayers was more than five times greater than that of control amebas, but surface staining of several antigens, including the galactose adherence lectin, was unchanged. EhMSP-1 silencing similarly increased adherence to both viable and apoptotic Jurkat lymphocytes. Tissue culture cell monolayer destruction was reduced by EhMSP-1 silencing, although it was blocked almost completely by inhibiting cysteine proteases. Consistent with a primary defect in regulation of amebic adherence, EhMSP-1 silencing also resulted in reduced mobility on tissue culture cell monolayers and in increased phagocytosis. In conclusion, EhMSP-1 was shown to be a surface metalloprotease involved in regulation of amebic adherence, with additional effects on cell motility, cell monolayer destruction, and phagocytosis.

  7. Do Matrix Metalloproteases and Tissue Inhibitors of Metalloproteases in Tenocytes of the Rotator Cuff Differ with Varying Donor Characteristics?

    PubMed

    Klatte-Schulz, Franka; Aleyt, Thomas; Pauly, Stephan; Geißler, Sven; Gerhardt, Christian; Scheibel, Markus; Wildemann, Britt

    2015-06-09

    An imbalance between matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) may have a negative impact on the healing of rotator cuff tears. The aim of the project was to assess a possible relationship between clinical and radiographic characteristics of patients such as the age, sex, as well as the degenerative status of the tendon and the MMPs and TIMPs in their tenocyte-like cells (TLCs). TLCs were isolated from ruptured supraspinatus tendons and quantitative Real-Time PCR and ELISA was performed to analyze the expression and secretion of MMPs and TIMPs. In the present study, MMPs, mostly gelatinases and collagenases such as MMP-2, -9 and -13 showed an increased expression and protein secretion in TLCs of donors with higher age or degenerative status of the tendon. Furthermore, the expression and secretion of TIMP-1, -2 and -3 was enhanced with age, muscle fatty infiltration and tear size. The interaction between MMPs and TIMPs is a complex process, since TIMPs are not only inhibitors, but also activators of MMPs. This study shows that MMPs and TIMPs might play an important role in degenerative tendon pathologies.

  8. The Metalloprotease Neprilysin Degrades and Inactivates Apelin Peptides.

    PubMed

    McKinnie, Shaun M K; Fischer, Conrad; Tran, Kelvin M H; Wang, Wang; Mosquera, Fabricio; Oudit, Gavin Y; Vederas, John C

    2016-08-17

    The apelinergic system is a mammalian peptide hormone network with key physiological roles. Apelin isoforms and analogues are believed to be promising therapeutics for cardiovascular disease. Despite extensive studies on apelin-13 degradation patterns, only one protease, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), had been implicated in its physiological regulation. Through use of a peptide-based fluorescent probe, we identified the metalloprotease neprilysin (NEP, a target for Entresto used in treatment of heart failure) as an enzyme that cleaves apelin isoforms. In vitro NEP proteolysis generated fragments that lacked the ability to bind to the apelin receptor, thereby making NEP the first protease to fully inactivate apelin. The involvement of NEP in the apelinergic system contributes to the understanding of its role in cardiovascular physiology.

  9. Differential Evolution and Neofunctionalization of Snake Venom Metalloprotease Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Andreas; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A.B.; Vetter, Irina; Yang, Daryl C.; Casewell, Nicholas R.; Jackson, Timothy N. W.; Koludarov, Ivan; Alewood, Paul F.; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Lewis, Richard J.; King, Glenn F.; Antunes, Agostinho; Hendrikx, Iwan; Fry, Bryan G.

    2013-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases (SVMP) are composed of five domains: signal peptide, propeptide, metalloprotease, disintegrin, and cysteine-rich. Secreted toxins are typically combinatorial variations of the latter three domains. The SVMP-encoding genes of Psammophis mossambicus venom are unique in containing only the signal and propeptide domains. We show that the Psammophis SVMP propeptide evolves rapidly and is subject to a high degree of positive selection. Unlike Psammophis, some species of Echis express both the typical multidomain and the unusual monodomain (propeptide only) SVMP, with the result that a lower level of variation is exerted upon the latter. We showed that most mutations in the multidomain Echis SVMP occurred in the protease domain responsible for proteolytic and hemorrhagic activities. The cysteine-rich and disintegrin-like domains, which are putatively responsible for making the P-III SVMPs more potent than the P-I and P-II forms, accumulate the remaining variation. Thus, the binding sites on the molecule's surface are evolving rapidly whereas the core remains relatively conserved. Bioassays conducted on two post-translationally cleaved novel proline-rich peptides from the P. mossambicus propeptide domain showed them to have been neofunctionalized for specific inhibition of mammalian a7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We show that the proline rich postsynaptic specific neurotoxic peptides from Azemiops feae are the result of convergent evolution within the precursor region of the C-type natriuretic peptide instead of the SVMP. The results of this study reinforce the value of studying obscure venoms for biodiscovery of novel investigational ligands. PMID:23242553

  10. Heterodimerization of endothelin-converting enzyme-1 isoforms regulates the subcellular distribution of this metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Barret, Alain; Etienne, Eric; Meidan, Rina; Valdenaire, Olivier; Corvol, Pierre; Tougard, Claude

    2003-01-03

    Endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE) is a membrane metalloprotease that generates endothelin from its direct precursor big endothelin. Four isoforms of ECE-1 are produced from a single gene through the use of alternate promoters. These isoforms share the same extracellular catalytic domain and contain unique cytosolic tails, which results in their specific subcellular targeting. We investigated the distribution of ECE-1 isoforms in transfected AtT-20 neuroendocrine cells. Whereas ECE-1a and 1c were present at the plasma membrane, ECE-1b and ECE-1d were retained inside the cells. We found that both intracellular isoforms were concentrated in the endosomal system: ECE-1d in recycling endosomes, and ECE-1b in late endosomes/multivesicular bodies. Leucine-based motifs were involved in the intracellular retention of these isoforms, and the targeting of ECE-1b to the degradation pathway required an additional signal in the N terminus. The concentration of ECE-1 isoforms in the endosomal system suggested new functions for these enzymes. Potential novel functions include redistribution of other isoforms through direct interaction. We have showed that ECE-1 isoforms could heterodimerize, and that in such heterodimers the ECE-1b targeting signal was dominant. Interaction of a plasma membrane isoform with ECE-1b resulted in its intracellular localization and decreased its extracellular activity. These data demonstrated that the targeting signals specific for ECE-1b constitute a regulatory domain per se that could modulate the localization and the activity of other isoforms.

  11. Detection of a secreted metalloprotease within the nuclei of liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Ryan C.; Geetha, S; Allen, Courtni E.; Hershko, Klilah; Fathke, Robert; Kong, Philip L.; Plum, Elizabeth; Struble, Evi Budo; Soejima, Kenji; Friedman, Scott; Garfield, Susan; Balaji, S; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2011-01-01

    ADAMTS13 is a secreted zinc metalloprotease expressed by various cell types. Here, we investigate its cellular pathway in endogenously expressing liver cell lines and after transient transfection with ADAMTS13. Besides compartmentalizations of the cellular secretory system, we detected an appreciable level of endogenous ADAMTS13 within the nucleus. A positively charged amino acid cluster (R-Q-R-Q-R-Q-R-R) present in the ADAMTS13 propeptide may act as a nuclear localization signal (NLS). Fusing this NLS-containing region to eGFP greatly potentiated its nuclear localization. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the ADAMTS13 CUB-2 domain has a double-stranded beta helix (DSBH) structural architecture characteristic of various protein-protein interaction modules like nucleoplasmins, class I collagenase, tumor necrosis factor ligand superfamily, supernatant protein factor (SPF) and the B1 domain of neuropilin-2. Based on this contextual evidence and that largely conserved polar residues could be mapped on to a template CUB domain homolog, we hypothesize that a region in the ADAMTS13 CUB-2 domain with conserved polar residues might be involved in protein-protein interaction within the nucleus. PMID:21479334

  12. ADM-1, a protein with metalloprotease- and disintegrin-like domains, is expressed in syncytial organs, sperm, and sheath cells of sensory organs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Podbilewicz, B

    1996-01-01

    A search was carried out for homologues of possible fusogenic proteins to study their function in a genetically tractable animal. The isolation, molecular, and cellular characterization of the Caenorhabditis elegans adm-1 gene (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain) are described. A glycoprotein analogous to viral fusion proteins has been identified on the surface of guinea pig sperm (PH-30/fertilin) and is implicated in sperm-egg fusion. adm-1 is the first reported invertebrate gene related to PH-30 and a family of proteins containing snake venom disintegrin- and metalloprotease-like domains. ADM-1 shows a domain organization identical to PH-30. It contains prepro, metalloprotease, disintegrin, cysteine rich with putative fusion peptide, epidermal growth factor-like repeat, transmembrane, and cytoplasmic domains. Antibodies which recognize ADM-1 protein in immunoblots were generated. Using immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization, the products of adm-1 have been detected in specific cells during different stages of development. The localization of ADM-1 to the plasma membrane of embryonic cells and to the sheath cells of sensory organs suggests a function in cell adhesion. ADM-1 expression in the hypodermis, pharynx, vulva, and mature sperm is consistent with a putative role in somatic and gamete cell fusions. Images PMID:8970152

  13. Proteomic profiling of metalloprotease activities with cocktails of active-site probes

    PubMed Central

    Sieber, Stephan A; Niessen, Sherry; Hoover, Heather S; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2006-01-01

    Metalloproteases are a large, diverse class of enzymes involved in many physiological and disease processes. Metalloproteases are regulated by post-translational mechanisms that diminish the effectiveness of conventional genomic and proteomic methods for their functional characterization. Chemical probes directed at active sites offer a potential way to measure metalloprotease activities in biological systems; however, large variations in structure limit the scope of any single small-molecule probe aimed at profiling this enzyme class. Here, we address this problem by creating a library of metalloprotease-directed probes that show complementary target selectivity. These probes were applied as a ‘cocktail’ to proteomes and their labeling profiles were analyzed collectively using an advanced liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry platform. More than 20 metalloproteases were identified, including members from nearly all of the major branches of this enzyme class. These findings suggest that chemical proteomic methods can serve as a universal strategy to profile the activity of the metalloprotease superfamily in complex biological systems. PMID:16565715

  14. Tetraspanin 8 is an interactor of the metalloprotease meprin β within tetraspanin-enriched microdomains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Frederike; Müller, Miryam; Prox, Johannes; Arnold, Philipp; Schönherr, Caroline; Tredup, Claudia; Minder, Petra; Ebsen, Henriette; Janssen, Ottmar; Annaert, Wim; Pietrzik, Claus; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk; Sterchi, Erwin E; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    Meprin β is a dimeric type I transmembrane protein and acts as an ectodomain sheddase at the cell surface. It has been shown that meprin β cleaves the amyloid precursor protein (APP), thereby releasing neurotoxic amyloid β peptides and implicating a role of meprin β in Alzheimer's disease. In order to identify non-proteolytic regulators of meprin β, we performed a split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen using a small intestinal cDNA library. In this screen we identified tetraspanin 8 (TSPAN8) as interaction partner for meprin β. As several members of the tetraspanin family were described to interact with metalloproteases thereby affecting their localization and/or activity, we hypothesized similar functions of TSPAN8 in the regulation of meprin β. We employed cell biological methods to confirm direct binding of TSPAN8 to meprin β. Surprisingly, we did not observe an effect of TSPAN8 on the catalytic activity of meprin β nor on the specific cleavage of its substrate APP. However, both proteins were identified as present in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. Therefore we hypothesize that TSPAN8 might be important for the orchestration of meprin β at the cell surface with impact on certain proteolytic processes that have to be further identified.

  15. Tetraspanin 8 is an interactor of the metalloprotease meprin β within tetraspanin-enriched microdomains.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Frederike; Müller, Miryam; Prox, Johannes; Arnold, Philipp; Schönherr, Caroline; Tredup, Claudia; Minder, Petra; Ebsen, Henriette; Janssen, Ottmar; Annaert, Wim; Pietrzik, Claus; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk; Sterchi, Erwin E; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2016-05-14

    Meprin β is a dimeric type I transmembrane protein and acts as an ectodomain sheddase at the cell surface. It was shown that meprin β cleaves the amyloid precursor protein (APP), thereby releasing neurotoxic amyloid β peptides and implicating a role of meprin β in Alzheimer's disease. In order to identify non-proteolytic regulators of meprin β, we performed a split ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid screen using a small intestinal cDNA library. In this screen we identified tetraspanin 8 (TSPAN8) as interaction partner for meprin β. Since several members of the tetraspanin family were described to interact with metalloproteases thereby affecting their localization and/or activity, we hypothesized similar functions of TSPAN8 in the regulation of meprin β. We employed cell biological methods to confirm direct binding of TSPAN8 to meprin β. Surprisingly, we did not observe an effect of TSPAN8 on the catalytic activity of meprin β nor on the specific cleavage of its substrate APP. However, both proteins were identified being present in tetraspanin-enriched microdomains. Therefore we hypothesize that TSPAN8 might be important for the orchestration of meprin β at the cell surface with impact on certain proteolytic processes that have to be further identified.

  16. The emerging role of matrix metalloproteases of the ADAM family in male germ cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Urriola-Muñoz, Paulina; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl

    2011-01-01

    Constitutive germ cell apoptosis during mammalian spermatogenesis is a key process for controlling sperm output and to eliminate damaged or unwanted cells. An increase or decrease in the apoptosis rate has deleterious consequences and leads to low sperm production. Apoptosis in spermatogenesis has been widely studied, but the mechanism by which it is induced under physiological or pathological conditions has not been clarified. We have recently identified the metalloprotease ADAM17 (TACE) as a putative physiological inducer of germ cell apoptosis. The mechanisms involved in regulating the shedding of the ADAM17 extracellular domain are still far from being understood, although they are important in order to understand cell-cell communications. Here, we review the available data regarding apoptosis during mammalian spermatogenesis and the localization of ADAM proteins in the male reproductive tract. We propose an integrative working model where ADAM17, p38 MAPK, protein kinase C (PKC) and the tyrosine kinase c-Abl participate in the physiological signalling cascade inducing apoptosis in germ cells. In our model, we also propose a role for the Sertoli cell in regulating the Fas/FasL system in order to induce the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis in germ cells. This working model could be applied to further understand constitutive apoptosis in spermatogenesis and in pathological conditions (e.g., varicocele) or following environmental toxicants exposure (e.g., genotoxicity or xenoestrogens). PMID:22319668

  17. C5a receptor is cleaved by metalloproteases induced by sphingomyelinase D from Loxosceles spider venom.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Carmen W; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; Okamoto, Cinthya K; Tambourgi, Denise V

    2012-09-01

    Neutrophils are involved in numerous pathologies and are considered to be major contributors to the establishment of cutaneous loxoscelism after envenomation by the Loxosceles spider. Neutrophils are attracted to the site of envenomation by locally generated C5a and contribute to the tissue destruction. We have investigated the effects of this spider venom on the receptor for C5a: C5aR/CD88, a seven transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor. We show here that the Loxosceles venom induces the cleavage of the C5aR at two sites, resulting in the release of the extracellular N-terminus, while retaining part of the transmembrane regions. Using specific inhibitors, it was shown that the cleavage was induced by activation of an endogenous metalloprotease of the adamalysin (ADAM) family, which was activated by the sphingomyelinase D in the venom. Although it resulted in the near complete loss of the N-terminus, C5a was still able to induce a small increase in intracellular calcium and increase secretion of IL-8. The cleavage of the C5aR may well be a protective response after envenomation, rather than contributing to the pathology of Loxosceles envenomation and may represent a general mechanism for how the body protects itself against excess C5a generation in pathological circumstances such as sepsis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. ADAMTS metalloproteases generate active versican fragments that regulate interdigital web regression

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Daniel R.; Nelson, Courtney M.; Dixon, Laura J.; Silver, Debra L.; Wylie, James D.; Lindner, Volkhard; Sasaki, Takako; Cooley, Marion A.; Argraves, W. Scott; Apte, Suneel S.

    2009-01-01

    We show that combinatorial mouse alleles for the secreted metalloproteases Adamts5, Adamts20 (bt), and Adamts9 result in fully penetrant soft-tissue syndactyly. Interdigital webs in Adamts5−/−; bt/bt mice had reduced apoptosis and decreased cleavage of the proteoglycan versican; however, the BMP-FGF axis, which regulates interdigital apoptosis was unaffected. BMP4 induced apoptosis, but without concomitant versican proteolysis. Haploinsufficiency of either Vcan or Fbln1, a co-factor for versican processing by ADAMTS5, led to highly penetrant syndactyly in bt mice, suggesting that cleaved versican was essential for web regression. The local application of an amino-terminal versican fragment corresponding to ADAMTS-processed versican, induced cell death in Adamts5−/−; bt/bt webs. Thus, ADAMTS proteases cooperatively maintain versican proteolysis above a required threshold to create a permissive environment for apoptosis. The data highlight the developmental significance of proteolytic action on the ECM, not only as a clearance mechanism, but also as a means to generate bioactive versican fragments. PMID:19922873

  19. Immunoprotective potential of a Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abid; Parizi, Luís Fernando; Guizzo, Melina Garcia; Tirloni, Lucas; Seixas, Adriana; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Termignoni, Carlos

    2015-01-15

    Ticks have serious impacts on animal and human health, causing significant economic losses in cattle breeding. Besides damage due to the hematophagous behavior, they transmit several pathogens. Low cost and environmental safety have made vaccines a promising alternative control method against tick infestation. Metalloproteases (MPs) have been shown to be essential for diverse biological functions in hematophagous organisms, inhibiting blood clotting, degrading extracellular matrix proteins, and inhibiting host tissue repair via anti-angiogenic activity. In this study, we analyzed the immunoprotective potential of a recombinant MP against Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus infestation. First, a cDNA encoding R. microplus amino acids sequence with highly conserved regions of the metzincin (reprolysin) group of MP was identified (BrRm-MP4). After expression and purification, recombinant BrRm-MP4 was used as a vaccinal antigen against R. microplus infestation in cattle (Bos taurus taurus). All vaccinated bovines developed immune response to the antigen, resulting in increased antibody level throughout the immunization protocol. Immunization with rBrRm-MP4 reduced tick feeding success, decreasing the number of engorged females and their reproduction potential, representing a 60% overall protection. These results show that rBrRm-MP4 provides protection against tick infestation, placing it is a potential candidate for an anti-tick vaccine.

  20. Characterization of the astacin family of metalloproteases in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Astacins are a large family of zinc metalloproteases found in bacteria and animals. They have diverse roles ranging from digestion of food to processing of extracellular matrix components. The C. elegans genome contains an unusually large number of astacins, of which the majority have not been functionally characterized yet. Results We analyzed the expression pattern of previously uncharacterized members of the astacin family to try and obtain clues to potential functions. Prominent sites of expression for many members of this family are the hypodermis, the alimentary system and several specialized cells including sensory sheath and sockets cells, which are located at openings in the body wall. We isolated mutants affecting representative members of the various subfamilies. Mutants in nas-5, nas-21 and nas-39 (the BMP-1/Tolloid homologue) are viable and have no apparent phenotypic defects. Mutants in nas-6 and nas-6; nas-7 double mutants are slow growing and have defects in the grinder of the pharynx, a cuticular structure important for food processing. Conclusions Expression data and phenotypic characterization of selected family members suggest a diversity of functions for members of the astacin family in nematodes. In part this might be due to extracellular structures unique to nematodes. PMID:20109220

  1. Activity-based probes for the proteomic profiling of metalloproteases

    PubMed Central

    Saghatelian, Alan; Jessani, Nadim; Joseph, Arul; Humphrey, Mark; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2004-01-01

    Metalloproteases (MPs) are a large and diverse class of enzymes implicated in numerous physiological and pathological processes, including tissue remodeling, peptide hormone processing, and cancer. MPs are tightly regulated by multiple posttranslational mechanisms in vivo, hindering their functional analysis by conventional genomic and proteomic methods. Here we describe a general strategy for creating activity-based proteomic probes for MPs by coupling a zinc-chelating hydroxamate to a benzophenone photocrosslinker, which promote selective binding and modification of MP active sites, respectively. These probes labeled active MPs but not their zymogen or inhibitor-bound counterparts and were used to identify members of this enzyme class up-regulated in invasive cancer cells and to evaluate the selectivity of MP inhibitors in whole proteomes. Interestingly, the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001 (ilomastat), which is currently in clinical development, was found to also target the neprilysin, aminopeptidase, and dipeptidylpeptidase clans of MPs. These results demonstrate that MPs can display overlapping inhibitor sensitivities despite lacking sequence homology and stress the need to evaluate MP inhibitors broadly across this enzyme class to develop agents with suitable target selectivities in vivo. Activity-based profiling offers a powerful means for conducting such screens, as this approach can be carried out directly in whole proteomes, thereby facilitating the discovery of disease-associated MPs concurrently with inhibitors that selectively target these proteins. PMID:15220480

  2. Recent advances in the design of matrix metalloprotease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Matter, Hans; Schudok, Manfred

    2004-07-01

    Inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) for the treatment of diseases, such as cancer, arthritis and other diseases associated with tissue remodeling, has become an area of intense interest in the pharmaceutical industry in recent years. Despite tremendous efforts over the last decade to explore individual members of this target family, along with multiple inhibitor classes, simple and effective drugs for inhibiting individual MMPs have not yet emerged. This review highlights the major developments in research into MMPs and their inhibitors, from the recent medicinal chemistry literature, with a focus on structure-based design, selectivity and pharmacokinetic (PK) properties. The increasing availability of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures for many members of this protein family makes MMPs ideally suited for structure-based design approaches, which are now routinely used in this area. The most challenging aspect of lead optimization for MMP inhibitors is in finding candidates having acceptable pharmacological, PK and selectivity profiles. Clinical trials in cancer giving disappointing results have led to discussions on how to gain adequate MMP selectivity in order to minimize side effects. Unfortunately, careful analysis of X-ray crystal structures has not suggested any simple solutions. These areas collectively constitute the main challenges in the current search for orally available MMP inhibitors, and will be discussed in this review.

  3. Purification and characterization of fibrinolytic metalloprotease from Perenniporia fraxinea mycelia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Choi, Bong-Suk; Park, Se-Eun; Sapkota, Kumar; Kim, Seung; Lee, Hyun-Hwa; Kim, Chun-Sung; Park, Yeal; Kim, Myung-Kon; Kim, Yoon-Sik; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2008-08-01

    In this study we purified and characterized a fibrinolytic protease from the mycelia of Perenniporia fraxinea. The apparent molecular mass of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 42kDa by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), fibrin zymography and size exclusion using fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC). The first 20 amino acid residues of the N-terminal sequence were ASYRVLPITKELLPPEFFVA, which shows a high degree of similarity with a fungalysin metallopeptidase from Coprinopsis cinerea. The optimal reaction pH value and temperature were pH 6.0 and 35-40 degrees C, respectively. Results for the fibrinolysis pattern showed that the protease rapidly hydrolyzed the fibrin alpha-chain followed by the beta-chain. The gamma-gamma chains were also hydrolyzed, but more slowly. The purified protease effectively hydrolyzed fibrinogen, preferentially digesting the Aalpha-chains of fibrinogen, followed by Bbeta- and gamma-chains. We found that protease activity was inhibited by Cu(2+), Fe(3+), and Zn(2+), but enhanced by the additions of Mn(2+), Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) metal ions. Furthermore, the protease activity was inhibited by EDTA, and it was found to exhibit a higher specificity for the chromogenic substrate S-2586 for chymotrypsin, indicating that the enzyme is a chymotrypsin-like metalloprotease. The mycelia of P. fraxinea may thus represent a source of new therapeutic agents to treat thrombosis.

  4. Time-dependent botulinum neurotoxin serotype A metalloprotease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Pai, Ramdas; Nuss, Jonathan E.; Peet, Norton P.; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most lethal of biological substances, and are categorized as class A biothreat agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. There are currently no drugs to treat the deadly flaccid paralysis resulting from BoNT intoxication. Among the seven BoNT serotypes, the development of therapeutics to counter BoNT/A is a priority (due to its long half-life in the neuronal cytosol and its ease of production). In this regard, the BoNT/A enzyme light chain (LC) component, a zinc metalloprotease responsible for the intracellular cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, is a desirable target for developing post-BoNT/A intoxication rescue therapeutics. In an earlier study, we reported the high throughput screening of a library containing 70,000 compounds, and uncovered a novel class of benzimidazole acrylonitrile-based BoNT/A LC inhibitors. Herein, we present both structure-activity relationships and a proposed mechanism of action for this novel inhibitor chemotype. PMID:22082667

  5. Impact of Leishmania metalloprotease GP63 on macrophage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Isnard, Amandine; Shio, Marina T.; Olivier, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The intramacrophage protozoan parasites of Leishmania genus have developed sophisticated ways to subvert the innate immune response permitting their infection and propagation within the macrophages of the mammalian host. Several Leishmania virulence factors have been identified and found to be of importance for the development of leishmaniasis. However, recent findings are now further reinforcing the critical role played by the zinc-metalloprotease GP63 as a virulence factor that greatly influence host cell signaling mechanisms and related functions. GP63 has been found to be involved not only in the cleavage and degradation of various kinases and transcription factors, but also to be the major molecule modulating host negative regulatory mechanisms involving for instance protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Those latter being well recognized for their pivotal role in the regulation of a great number of signaling pathways. In this review article, we are providing a complete overview about the role of Leishmania GP63 in the mechanisms underlying the subversion of macrophage signaling and functions. PMID:22919663

  6. A fluorescent peptide substrate for the surface metalloprotease of Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, J; Schneider, P; Malcolm, B

    1993-03-01

    A fluorescent oligopeptide substrate for the promastigote surface protease (PSP) of Leishmania was designed using the data reported for the substrate specificity of the enzyme (Bouvier, J., Schneider, P., Etges, R. J., and Bordier, C. 1990. Biochemistry 29, 10113-10119). The indole fluorescence of the tryptophan residue was efficiently quenched through resonance energy transfer by an N-terminal dansyl group located five amino acid residues away. The heptapeptide, dansyl-A-Y-L-K-K-W-V-NH2, was cleaved by PSP between the tyrosine and leucine residues with a kcat/Km ratio of 8.8 x 10(6) M-1sec-1. Hydrolysis by the enzyme results in a time-dependent increase of fluorescence intensity of 3.7-fold. Assays can be designed based on the tryptophan fluorescence at 360 nm or by individual product analyses using thin-layer chromatography. The synthetic substrate is readily cleaved by the metalloprotease at the surface of fixed promastigotes. The specificity and sensitivity of such internally quenched fluorescent peptide substrate will facilitate the identification of novel inhibitors for the enzyme and aid in detailed studies on its enzymology.

  7. The Wnt receptor Frizzled-4 modulates ADAM13 metalloprotease activity

    PubMed Central

    Abbruzzese, Genevieve; Gorny, Anne-Kathrin; Kaufmann, Lilian T.; Cousin, Hélène; Kleino, Iivari; Steinbeisser, Herbert; Alfandari, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cranial neural crest (CNC) cells are a transient population of stem cells that originate at the border of the neural plate and the epidermis, and migrate ventrally to contribute to most of the facial structures including bones, cartilage, muscles and ganglia. ADAM13 is a cell surface metalloprotease that is essential for CNC cell migration. Here, we show in Xenopus laevis embryos that the Wnt receptor Fz4 binds to the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM13 and negatively regulates its proteolytic activity in vivo. Gain of Fz4 function inhibits CNC cell migration and can be rescued by gain of ADAM13 function. Loss of Fz4 function also inhibits CNC cell migration and induces a reduction of mature ADAM13, together with an increase in the ADAM13 cytoplasmic fragment that is known to translocate into the nucleus to regulate gene expression. We propose that Fz4 associates with ADAM13 during its transport to the plasma membrane to regulate its proteolytic activity. PMID:25616895

  8. Efficient Extracellular Expression of Metalloprotease for Z-Aspartame Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fucheng; Liu, Feng; Wu, Bin; He, Bingfang

    2016-12-28

    Metalloprotease PT121 and its mutant Y114S (Tyr114 was substituted to Ser) are effective catalysts for the synthesis of Z-aspartame (Z-APM). This study presents the selection of a suitable signal peptide for improving expression and extracellular secretion of proteases PT121 and Y114S by Escherichia coli. Co-inducers containing IPTG and arabinose were used to promote protease production and cell growth. Under optimal conditions, the expression levels of PT121 and Y114S reached >500 mg/L, and the extracellular activity of PT121/Y114S accounted for 87/82% of the total activity of proteases. Surprisingly, purer protein was obtained in the supernatant, because arabinose reduced cell membrane permeability, avoiding cell lysis. Comparison of Z-APM synthesis and caseinolysis between proteases PT121 and Y114S showed that mutant Y114S presented remarkably higher activity of Z-APM synthesis and considerably lower activity of caseinolysis. The significant difference in substrate specificity renders these enzymes promising biocatalysts.

  9. The plastid metalloprotease FtsH6 and small heat shock protein HSP21 jointly regulate thermomemory in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Sedaghatmehr, Mastoureh; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Balazadeh, Salma

    2016-01-01

    Acquired tolerance to heat stress is an increased resistance to elevated temperature following a prior exposure to heat. The maintenance of acquired thermotolerance in the absence of intervening stress is called ‘thermomemory' but the mechanistic basis for this memory is not well defined. Here we show that Arabidopsis HSP21, a plastidial small heat shock protein that rapidly accumulates after heat stress and remains abundant during the thermomemory phase, is a crucial component of thermomemory. Sustained memory requires that HSP21 levels remain high. Through pharmacological interrogation and transcriptome profiling, we show that the plastid-localized metalloprotease FtsH6 regulates HSP21 abundance. Lack of a functional FtsH6 protein promotes HSP21 accumulation during the later stages of thermomemory and increases thermomemory capacity. Our results thus reveal the presence of a plastidial FtsH6–HSP21 control module for thermomemory in plants. PMID:27561243

  10. Metalloprotease vsm is the major determinant of toxicity for extracellular products of Vibrio splendidus.

    PubMed

    Binesse, Johan; Delsert, Claude; Saulnier, Denis; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Zagorec, Monique; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Mazel, Didier; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2008-12-01

    Genomic data combined with reverse genetic approaches have contributed to the characterization of major virulence factors of Vibrio species; however, these studies have targeted primarily human pathogens. Here, we investigate virulence factors in the oyster pathogen Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and show that toxicity is correlated to the presence of a metalloprotease and its corresponding vsm gene. Comparative genomics showed that an avirulent strain closely related to LGP32 lacked the metalloprotease. The toxicity of LGP32 metalloprotease was confirmed by exposing mollusk and mouse fibroblastic cell lines to extracellular products (ECPs) of the wild type (wt) and a vsm deletion mutant (Deltavsm mutant). The ECPs of the wt induced a strong cytopathic effect whose severity was cell type dependent, while those of the Deltavsm mutant were much less toxic, and exposure to purified protein demonstrated the direct toxicity of the Vsm metalloprotease. Finally, to investigate Vsm molecular targets, a proteomic analysis of the ECPs of both LGP32 and the Deltavsm mutant was performed, revealing a number of differentially expressed and/or processed proteins. One of these, the VSA1062 metalloprotease, was found to have significant identity to the immune inhibitor A precursor, a virulence factor of Bacillus thuringiensis. Deletion mutants corresponding to several of the major proteins were constructed by allelic exchange, and the ECPs of these mutants proved to be toxic to both cell cultures and animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Vsm is the major toxicity factor in the ECPs of V. splendidus.

  11. Purification and Characterization of a Serratia marcescens Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Lyerly, David; Kreger, Arnold

    1979-01-01

    An extracellular, nonelastolytic, neutral metalloprotease of Serratia marcescens was purified by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, hydroxyapatite adsorption chromatography, flat-bed isoelectric focusing, and Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. The protease preparation had a 280/260 nm absorbance ratio of 1.8, was free of detectable amounts of endotoxin, carbohydrate, phosphorus, and other known extracellular enzymes of S. marcescens, and was homogeneous by Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion and Grabar-Williams immunoelectrophoresis. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis, thin-layer electrofocusing in polyacrylamide gel, and polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis showed three to four closely migrating, Coomassie blue-staining components in the protease preparation. However, zymogram analyses of the patterns showed that protease activity was associated with each component and that the protease was, therefore, microheterogeneous. The isoelectric point and sedimentation coefficient of the protease were approximately 5.3 to 5.4 and 4.2S, respectively, and the molecular weight estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by gel filtration was approximately 52,500 and 44,000, respectively. The pH optimum range, with azocasein as the substrate, was 5.5 to 7.5. The enzyme contained a high percentage of acidic amino acids, no cysteine, and 1 g-atom of Zn2+ and 7 g-atoms of Ca2+ per mol. Various heavy metal ions and chelating agents and heating at 60°C for 15 min inactivated the enzyme. Intracorneal, intratracheal, and intradermal administration of the protease into rabbits elicited rapid and extensive tissue damage. The minimum lethal intravenous dose for mice was approximately 17 mg/kg of body weight. Images PMID:37166

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Zinc Metalloprotease-1 Assists Mycobacterial Dissemination in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Vemula, Mani H.; Medisetti, Raghavender; Ganji, Rakesh; Jakkala, Kiran; Sankati, Swetha; Chatti, Kiranam; Banerjee, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    Zinc metalloprotease-1 (Zmp1) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), the tuberculosis (TB) causing bacillus, is a virulence factor involved in inflammasome inactivation and phagosome maturation arrest. We earlier reported that Zmp1 was secreted under granuloma-like stress conditions, induced Th2 cytokine microenvironment and was highly immunogenic in TB patients as evident from high anti-Zmp1 antibody titers in their sera. In this study, we deciphered a new physiological role of Zmp1 in mycobacterial dissemination. Exogenous treatment of THP-1 cells with 500 nM and 1 μM of recombinant Zmp1 (rZmp1) resulted in necrotic cell death. Apart from inducing secretion of necrotic cytokines, TNFα, IL-6, and IL-1β, it also induced the release of chemotactic chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and IL-8, suggesting its likely function in cell migration and mycobacterial dissemination. This was confirmed by Gap closure and Boyden chamber assays, where Zmp1 treated CHO or THP-1 cells showed ∼2 fold increased cell migration compared to the untreated cells. Additionally, Zebrafish-M. marinum based host–pathogen model was used to study mycobacterial dissemination in vivo. Td-Tomato labeled M. marinum (TdM. marinum) when injected with rZmp1 showed increased dissemination to tail region from the site of injection as compared to the untreated control fish in a dose-dependent manner. Summing up these observations along with the earlier reports, we propose that Zmp1, a multi-faceted protein, when released by mycobacteria in granuloma, may lead to necrotic cell damage and release of chemotactic chemokines by surrounding infected macrophages, attracting new immune cells, which in turn may lead to fresh cellular infections, thus assisting mycobacterial dissemination. PMID:27621726

  13. Thiolutin is a zinc chelator that inhibits the Rpn11 and other JAMM metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Lauinger, Linda; Li, Jing; Shostak, Anton; Cemel, Ibrahim Avi; Ha, Nati; Zhang, Yaru; Merkl, Philipp E; Obermeyer, Simon; Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Schafmeier, Tobias; Wever, Walter J; Bowers, Albert A; Carter, Kyle P; Palmer, Amy E; Tschochner, Herbert; Melchior, Frauke; Deshaies, Raymond J; Brunner, Michael; Diernfellner, Axel

    2017-07-01

    Thiolutin is a disulfide-containing antibiotic and anti-angiogenic compound produced by Streptomyces. Its biological targets are not known. We show that reduced thiolutin is a zinc chelator that inhibits the JAB1/MPN/Mov34 (JAMM) domain-containing metalloprotease Rpn11, a deubiquitinating enzyme of the 19S proteasome. Thiolutin also inhibits the JAMM metalloproteases Csn5, the deneddylase of the COP9 signalosome; AMSH, which regulates ubiquitin-dependent sorting of cell-surface receptors; and BRCC36, a K63-specific deubiquitinase of the BRCC36-containing isopeptidase complex and the BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex. We provide evidence that other dithiolopyrrolones also function as inhibitors of JAMM metalloproteases.

  14. Wound bed preparation 2014 update: management of critical colonization with a gentian violet and methylene blue absorbent antibacterial dressing and elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases with an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing.

    PubMed

    Sibbald, R Gary; Ovington, Liza G; Ayello, Elizabeth A; Goodman, Laurie; Elliott, James A

    2014-03-01

    Wound bed preparation (WBP) is a paradigm for holistic patient care that includes treatment of the cause along with patient-centered concerns before optimizing the components of local wound care (debridement, infection/inflammation, moisture balance, and, when required, the edge effect). This review incorporates a methylene blue and gentian violet bound foam dressing for critical colonization and an ovine collagen extracellular matrix dressing for reduction of elevated levels of matrix metalloproteases into the WBP paradigm.

  15. Helicobacter pylori and gastritis: the role of extracellular matrix metalloproteases, their inhibitors, and the disintegrins and metalloproteases--a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Sampieri, Clara L

    2013-10-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the etiologic agent of gastritis; it has been estimated that 50 % of the world's population could be infected by this bacteria. Gastritis may progress to chronic atrophic gastritis, a condition associated with the development of gastric cancer (GC). Several matrix metalloproteases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of MMPs (TIMP) as well as disintegrins and metalloproteases (ADAM) have been reported as being involved in gastritis. Among other processes, these protein families participate in remodeling the extracellular matrix, cell signaling, immune response, angiogenesis, inflammation and epithelial mesenchymal transition. This systematic review analyzes the scientific evidence surrounding the relationship between members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families and infection by H. pylori in gastritis, considering both in vitro and in vivo studies. Given the potential clinical value of certain members of the MMP, TIMP and ADAM families as molecular markers in gastritis and the association of gastritis with GC, the need for further study is highlighted.

  16. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-01-01

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. PMID:26702056

  17. A genetic fiber modification to achieve matrix-metalloprotease-activated infectivity of oncolytic adenovirus.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Luna, Jeroni; Giménez-Alejandre, Marta; Vaquero, Eva; García de la Torre, Beatriz; Andreu, David; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2014-10-28

    Selective tumor targeting of oncolytic adenovirus at the level of cell entry remains a major challenge to improve efficacy and safety. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors and in particular in pancreatic cancer. In the current work, we have exploited the expression of MMPs together with the penetration capabilities of a TAT-like peptide to engineer tumor selective adenoviruses. We have generated adenoviruses containing CAR-binding ablated fibers further modified with a C-terminus TAT-like peptide linked to a blocking domain by an MMP-cleavable sequence. This linker resulted in a MMP-dependent cell transduction of the reporter MMP-activatable virus AdTATMMP and in efficient transduction of neoplastic cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts. Intravenous and intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice showed very low AdTATMMP activity in the normal pancreas, whereas increased transduction was observed in pancreatic tumors of transgenic Ela-myc mice. Intraductal administration of AdTATMMP into mice bearing orthotopic tumors led to a 25-fold increase in tumor targeting compared to the wild type fiber control. A replication competent adenovirus, Ad(RC)MMP, with the MMP-activatable fiber showed oncolytic efficacy and increased antitumor activity compared to Adwt in a pancreatic orthotopic model. Reduced local and distant metastases were observed in Ad(RC)MMP treated-mice. Moreover, no signs of pancreatic toxicity were detected. We conclude that MMP-activatable adenovirus may be beneficial for pancreatic cancer treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Putative Chloroplast Thylakoid Metalloprotease VIRESCENT3 Regulates Chloroplast Development in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yafei; Liu, Xiayan; Liang, Shuang; Wang, Rui; Li, Yuanfeng; Zhao, Jun; Shao, Jingxia; An, Lijun; Yu, Fei

    2016-02-12

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis and many other essential plant metabolic processes, and chloroplast development is an integral part of plant growth and development. Mutants defective in chloroplast development can display various color phenotypes including the intriguing virescence phenotype, which shows yellow/white coloration at the leaf base and greening toward the leaf tip. Through large scale genetic screens, we identified a series of new virescent mutants including virescent3-1 (vir3-1), vir4-1, and vir5-1 in Arabidopsis thaliana. We showed that VIR3 encodes a putative chloroplast metalloprotease by map-based cloning. Through site-directed mutagenesis, we showed that the conserved histidine 235 residue in the zinc binding motif HEAGH of VIR3 is indispensable for VIR3 accumulation in the chloroplast. The chloroplast localization of VIR3 was confirmed by the transient expression of VIR3-GFP in leaf protoplasts. Furthermore, taking advantage of transgenic lines expressing VIR3-FLAG, we demonstrated that VIR3 is an intrinsic thylakoid membrane protein that mainly resides in the stromal lamellae. Moreover, topology analysis using transgenic lines expressing a dual epitope-tagged VIR3 indicated that both the N and C termini of VIR3 are located in the stroma, and the catalytic domain of VIR3 is probably facing the stroma. Blue native gel analysis indicated that VIR3 is likely present as a monomer or part of a small complex in the thylakoid membrane. This work not only implicates VIR3 as a new factor involved in early chloroplast development but also provides more insight into the roles of chloroplast proteases in chloroplast biogenesis. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Activation of the human keratinocyte B1 bradykinin receptor induces expression and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 by transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Matus, Carola E; Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Pavicic, Francisca; González, Carlos B; Concha, Miguel; Bhoola, Kanti D; Burgos, Rafael A; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2016-09-01

    The B1 bradykinin receptor (BDKRB1) is a component of the kinin cascade localized in the human skin. Some of the effects produced by stimulation of BDKRB1 depend on transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), but the mechanisms involved in this process have not been clarified yet. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a BDKRB1 agonist on wound healing in a mouse model and the migration and secretion of metalloproteases 2 and 9 from human HaCaT keratinocytes and delineate the signalling pathways that triggered their secretion. Although stimulation of BDKRB1 induces weak chemotactic migration of keratinocytes and wound closure in an in vitro scratch-wound assay, the BDKRB1 agonist improved wound closure in a mouse model. BDKRB1 stimulation triggers synthesis and secretion of both metalloproteases, effects that depend on the activity of EGFR and subsequent phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and PI3K/Akt. In the mouse model, immunoreactivity for both gelatinases was concentrated around wound borders. EGFR transactivation by BDKRB1 agonist involves Src kinases family and ADAM17. In addition to extracellular matrix degradation, metalloproteases 2 and 9 regulate cell migration and differentiation, cell functions that are associated with the role of BDKRB1 in keratinocyte differentiation. Considering that BDKRB1 is up-regulated by inflammation and/or by cytokines that are abundant in the inflammatory milieu, more stable BDKRB1 agonists may be of therapeutic value to modulate wound healing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Metalloprotease Peptide Inhibitors: A Semester-Long Organic Synthetic Research Project for the Introductory Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long research project to synthesize unique compounds designed after published metalloprotease peptide inhibitors is presented. The research project encompasses a set of nine organic chemistry reactions traditionally taught in the second semester lab course, and the procedures are derived from scientific literature. The two principle…

  1. Metalloprotease Peptide Inhibitors: A Semester-Long Organic Synthetic Research Project for the Introductory Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pontrello, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long research project to synthesize unique compounds designed after published metalloprotease peptide inhibitors is presented. The research project encompasses a set of nine organic chemistry reactions traditionally taught in the second semester lab course, and the procedures are derived from scientific literature. The two principle…

  2. Metalloprotease Vsm Is the Major Determinant of Toxicity for Extracellular Products of Vibrio splendidus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Binesse, Johan; Delsert, Claude; Saulnier, Denis; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Zagorec, Monique; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène; Mazel, Didier; Le Roux, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    Genomic data combined with reverse genetic approaches have contributed to the characterization of major virulence factors of Vibrio species; however, these studies have targeted primarily human pathogens. Here, we investigate virulence factors in the oyster pathogen Vibrio splendidus LGP32 and show that toxicity is correlated to the presence of a metalloprotease and its corresponding vsm gene. Comparative genomics showed that an avirulent strain closely related to LGP32 lacked the metalloprotease. The toxicity of LGP32 metalloprotease was confirmed by exposing mollusk and mouse fibroblastic cell lines to extracellular products (ECPs) of the wild type (wt) and a vsm deletion mutant (Δvsm mutant). The ECPs of the wt induced a strong cytopathic effect whose severity was cell type dependent, while those of the Δvsm mutant were much less toxic, and exposure to purified protein demonstrated the direct toxicity of the Vsm metalloprotease. Finally, to investigate Vsm molecular targets, a proteomic analysis of the ECPs of both LGP32 and the Δvsm mutant was performed, revealing a number of differentially expressed and/or processed proteins. One of these, the VSA1062 metalloprotease, was found to have significant identity to the immune inhibitor A precursor, a virulence factor of Bacillus thuringiensis. Deletion mutants corresponding to several of the major proteins were constructed by allelic exchange, and the ECPs of these mutants proved to be toxic to both cell cultures and animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Vsm is the major toxicity factor in the ECPs of V. splendidus. PMID:18836018

  3. Contribution of metalloproteases, serine proteases and phospholipases A2 to the inflammatory reaction induced by Bothrops jararaca crude venom in mice.

    PubMed

    Zychar, Bianca Cestari; Dale, Camila Squazoni; Demarchi, Denise Soares; Gonçalves, Luis Roberto C

    2010-01-01

    Various toxins isolated from Bothrops snake venoms induce inflammatory reactions and have been claimed to contribute to the severity of local symptoms present in this envenomation. Notwithstanding, the relative participation of serine proteases, metalloproteases and phospholipases A(2) in the inflammatory reaction produced by crude Bothrops venoms is poorly understood. Herein, crude Bothrops jararaca venom was treated with phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), 1,10-phenanthroline (oPhe), or p-bromophenacyl-bromide (p-BPB) to inhibit those classes of enzymes, respectively, and inflammatory parameters were evaluated and compared to those induced by the control crude venom. The intensity of edema and hyperalgesia/allodynia was remarkably reduced in animals administered with oPhe-treated venom. Leukocyte-endothelium interactions (LEI), such as adhesion and migration of leukocytes, were also modified at 2h and 24h. Edema and LEI parameters induced by p-BPB-treated venom were similar to those observed with the control venom, but hyperalgesia/allodynia was significantly lower. Inflammatory parameters induced by PMSF-treated venom were similar to those induced by the crude venom, except for a mild reduction in edema intensity. Our results indicate that metalloproteases have a pivotal role in the inflammatory reactions induced by B. jararaca venom, and phospholipases A(2) and serine proteases have a minor role. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression and prognostic significance of metalloproteases and their inhibitors in luminal A and basal-like phenotypes of breast carcinoma.

    PubMed

    González, Luis O; Corte, María D; Junquera, Sara; González-Fernández, Raquel; del Casar, José M; García, Carmen; Andicoechea, Alejandro; Vázquez, Julio; Pérez-Fernández, Román; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2009-09-01

    To analyze the expression and prognostic value of matrix metalloproteases and their tissue inhibitors in luminal A and basal-like breast carcinomas, an immunohistochemical study was performed on cancer specimens from 93 randomly selected patients with invasive primary ductal tumors of the breast (46 with and 47 without distant metastasis) and with luminal A (n = 48) (ER+, HER2-) or basal-like (HER2-, ER-, PgR-) (n = 45) lesions. Luminal B cases were too few to analyze. Specimens were also studied using tissue microarrays and specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteases 1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 13, and 14 and tissue inhibitors 1, 2, and 3. There were no significant differences in matrix metalloprotease or tissue inhibitor expression in the 2 phenotypes of tumors. In basal-like carcinomas, high scores for matrix metalloproteases 9 and 11 were significantly associated with a high distant metastasis rate. Likewise, data showed associations between matrix metalloprotease/tissue inhibitor expression by either stromal fibroblasts or mononuclear inflammatory cells and distant relapse-free survival in both tumor phenotypes. In addition, in infiltrating luminal A and basal-like tumors, we identified a prometastatic phenotype of mononuclear inflammatory cells, showing a high matrix metalloprotease/tissue inhibitor molecular profile. Expression of matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors is related to the characteristics of breast tumor cells. As prognostic factors in breast carcinomas of both luminal A and basal-like phenotypes, our results point to the importance of the expression of matrix metalloproteases and tissue inhibitors by the stromal cells.

  5. Molecular detection and analysis of a novel metalloprotease gene of entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens strains in infected Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Tambong, J T; Xu, R; Sadiku, A; Chen, Q; Badiss, A; Yu, Q

    2014-04-01

    Serratia marcescens strains isolated from entomopathogenic nematodes (Rhabditis sp.) were examined for their pathogenicity and establishment in wax moth (Galleria mellonella) larvae. All the Serratia strains were potently pathogenic to G. mellonella larvae, leading to death within 48 h. The strains were shown to possess a metalloprotease gene encoding for a novel serralysin-like protein. Rapid establishment of the bacteria in infected larvae was confirmed by specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection of a DNA fragment encoding for this protein. Detection of the viable Serratia strains in infected larvae was validated using the SYBR Green reverse transcriptase real-time PCR assay targeting the metalloprotease gene. Nucleotide sequences of the metalloprotease gene obtained in our study showed 72 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and 3 insertions compared with the metalloprotease gene of S. marcescens E-15. The metalloprotease gene had 60 synonymous and 8 nonsynonymous substitutions relative to the closest GenBank entry, S. marcescens E-15. A comparison of the amino acid composition of the new serralysin-like protein with that of the serralysin protein of S. marcescens E-15 revealed differences at 11 positions and a new aspartic acid residue. Analysis of the effect of protein variation suggests that a new aspartic acid residue resulting from nonsynonymous nucleotide mutations in the protein structure could have the most significant effect on its biological function. The new metalloprotease gene and (or) its product could have applications in plant agricultural biotechnology.

  6. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus: is there a correlation with disease status?

    PubMed

    Klonizakis, P; Tselios, K; Sarantopoulos, A; Gougourellas, I; Rouka, E; Onufriadou, Z; Kapali, P; Kyriakou, D; Boura, P

    2013-04-01

    To clarify the role of ADAMTS-13 in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathy in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) we evaluated ADAMTS-13 profile (metalloprotease antigen levels, anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibody levels, activity) in distinct patient groups according to disease activity, extent of cumulative tissue damage and history of antiphospholipid syndrome or end-organ damage. Forty-one lupus patients were analysed. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels and anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies were evaluated by ELISA. ADAMTS-13 activity was measured by Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique. ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels were significantly decreased in patients with Systemic Lupus International Collaborative Clinics/American College of Rheumatology (SLICC/ACR) >1 (p<0.05). ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease antigen levels also exhibited a significant inverse correlation with anti-dsDNA levels (r= -0.60, p<0.05). Anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies were marginally higher in patients with positive anti-dsDNA (p=0.08). Additionally, patients with positive anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies exhibited the lowest activity levels (p<0.05). To our knowledge ADAMTS-13 profile in SLE has not been studied in regard to composite structured indices. The results of this study suggest that in patients with active SLE or considerable cumulative tissue damage, ADAMTS-13 levels may be decreased and anti-ADAMTS-13 autoantibodies may partially mediate this reduction. Further evaluation of ADAMTS-13 profile may explain its role in the pathogenesis of thrombotic microangiopathy in lupus patients and reveal a potential prognostic marker of microthrombotic manifestations in SLE.

  7. Comparison of the Internal Dynamics of Metalloproteases Provides New Insights on Their Function and Evolution.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Henrique F; Roque, Ana C A; Iranzo, Olga; Branco, Ricardo J F

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteases have evolved in a vast number of biological systems, being one of the most diverse types of proteases and presenting a wide range of folds and catalytic metal ions. Given the increasing understanding of protein internal dynamics and its role in enzyme function, we are interested in assessing how the structural heterogeneity of metalloproteases translates into their dynamics. Therefore, the dynamical profile of the clan MA type protein thermolysin, derived from an Elastic Network Model of protein structure, was evaluated against those obtained from a set of experimental structures and molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. A close correspondence was obtained between modes derived from the coarse-grained model and the subspace of functionally-relevant motions observed experimentally, the later being shown to be encoded in the internal dynamics of the protein. This prompted the use of dynamics-based comparison methods that employ such coarse-grained models in a representative set of clan members, allowing for its quantitative description in terms of structural and dynamical variability. Although members show structural similarity, they nonetheless present distinct dynamical profiles, with no apparent correlation between structural and dynamical relatedness. However, previously unnoticed dynamical similarity was found between the relevant members Carboxypeptidase Pfu, Leishmanolysin, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A, despite sharing no structural similarity. Inspection of the respective alignments shows that dynamical similarity has a functional basis, namely the need for maintaining proper intermolecular interactions with the respective substrates. These results suggest that distinct selective pressure mechanisms act on metalloproteases at structural and dynamical levels through the course of their evolution. This work shows how new insights on metalloprotease function and evolution can be assessed with comparison schemes that incorporate

  8. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 17 in the Cardiovascular and Central Nervous Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiaxi; Mukerjee, Snigdha; Silva-Alves, Cristiane R. A.; Carvalho-Galvão, Alynne; Cruz, Josiane C.; Balarini, Camille M.; Braga, Valdir A.; Lazartigues, Eric; França-Silva, Maria S.

    2016-01-01

    ADAM17 is a metalloprotease and disintegrin that lodges in the plasmatic membrane of several cell types and is able to cleave a wide variety of cell surface proteins. It is somatically expressed in mammalian organisms and its proteolytic action influences several physiological and pathological processes. This review focuses on the structure of ADAM17, its signaling in the cardiovascular system and its participation in certain disorders involving the heart, blood vessels, and neural regulation of autonomic and cardiovascular modulation. PMID:27803674

  9. Comparison of the Internal Dynamics of Metalloproteases Provides New Insights on Their Function and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Henrique F.; Roque, Ana C. A.; Iranzo, Olga; Branco, Ricardo J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Metalloproteases have evolved in a vast number of biological systems, being one of the most diverse types of proteases and presenting a wide range of folds and catalytic metal ions. Given the increasing understanding of protein internal dynamics and its role in enzyme function, we are interested in assessing how the structural heterogeneity of metalloproteases translates into their dynamics. Therefore, the dynamical profile of the clan MA type protein thermolysin, derived from an Elastic Network Model of protein structure, was evaluated against those obtained from a set of experimental structures and molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. A close correspondence was obtained between modes derived from the coarse-grained model and the subspace of functionally-relevant motions observed experimentally, the later being shown to be encoded in the internal dynamics of the protein. This prompted the use of dynamics-based comparison methods that employ such coarse-grained models in a representative set of clan members, allowing for its quantitative description in terms of structural and dynamical variability. Although members show structural similarity, they nonetheless present distinct dynamical profiles, with no apparent correlation between structural and dynamical relatedness. However, previously unnoticed dynamical similarity was found between the relevant members Carboxypeptidase Pfu, Leishmanolysin, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A, despite sharing no structural similarity. Inspection of the respective alignments shows that dynamical similarity has a functional basis, namely the need for maintaining proper intermolecular interactions with the respective substrates. These results suggest that distinct selective pressure mechanisms act on metalloproteases at structural and dynamical levels through the course of their evolution. This work shows how new insights on metalloprotease function and evolution can be assessed with comparison schemes that incorporate

  10. Identification and purification of metalloprotease from dry grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Vadde; Rajasekhar, Sake; Reddy, Lokireddy Sudarsana

    2010-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes play a central role in the biochemical mechanism of germination. The present study reported the presence of Zn(2+)-dependent endoproteases in the dry seeds of grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) with maximum caseinolytic activity observed at pH 8.0. Studies with class-specific inhibitors (specific for cysteine, serine, aspartate, and metalloproteases) on crude extract identified the inhibitory effect of 1,10-phenanthroline. This inhibitory effect was overcome by addition of Zn(2+), not with Fe, Ca, Cu, Mg, or Co and indicates that the protease is Zn(2+) dependent. This metalloprotease was further characterized by attempting gelatin-PAGE zymography and observed three distinct zones of proteolytic activity with higher mobility. The protease fraction consisted of three isoforms as evidenced by the appearance of three different bands on gelatin-PAGE zymogram. We also purified these proteases to 110-fold by a three-step procedure comprising crude extract from dry seeds, (NH(4))(2)SO(4) fractionation, and casein-alginate affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of isoforms of metalloproteases is 25, 18, and 14 kDa.

  11. Metalloproteases regulate T-cell proliferation and effector function via LAG-3

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianyu; Wang, Yao; Forbes, Karen; Vignali, Kate M; Heale, Bret S; Saftig, Paul; Hartmann, Dieter; Black, Roy A; Rossi, John J; Blobel, Carl P; Dempsey, Peter J; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2007-01-01

    Tight control of T-cell proliferation and effector function is essential to ensure an effective but appropriate immune response. Here, we reveal that this is controlled by the metalloprotease-mediated cleavage of LAG-3, a negative regulatory protein expressed by all activated T cells. We show that LAG-3 cleavage is mediated by two transmembrane metalloproteases, ADAM10 and ADAM17, with the activity of both modulated by two distinct T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling-dependent mechanisms. ADAM10 mediates constitutive LAG-3 cleavage but increases ∼12-fold following T-cell activation, whereas LAG-3 shedding by ADAM17 is induced by TCR signaling in a PKCθ-dependent manner. LAG-3 must be cleaved from the cell surface to allow for normal T-cell activation as noncleavable LAG-3 mutants prevented proliferation and cytokine production. Lastly, ADAM10 knockdown reduced wild-type but not LAG-3−/− T-cell proliferation. These data demonstrate that LAG-3 must be cleaved to allow efficient T-cell proliferation and cytokine production and establish a novel paradigm in which T-cell expansion and function are regulated by metalloprotease cleavage with LAG-3 as its sole molecular target. PMID:17245433

  12. Molecular and functional characterization of metalloserrulases, new metalloproteases from the Tityus serrulatus venom gland.

    PubMed

    Carmo, A O; Oliveira-Mendes, B B R; Horta, C C R; Magalhães, B F; Dantas, A E; Chaves, L M; Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Kalapothakis, E

    2014-11-01

    Tityus serrulatus is a Brazilian scorpion species with great medical significance. While the effects of neurotoxins have been extensively studied, little is known about the proteases expressed in the venom gland of this arthropod. In this study, clones from a T. serrulatus (Ts) venom gland cDNA library were selected according to homology to proteases. The sequences were aligned in the database and classified by homology. Similarity and identity analyses of the sequences were carried out, and a phylogenetic tree was constructed with the sequences of other proteases. These cDNA sequences correspond to ten different metalloproteases, named metalloserrulases (TsMS). TsMS 1-9 belong to the metzincin family, which has three domains: signal peptide, propeptide, and metalloprotease domain; while TsMS 10 belongs to the gluzincin family. The proteolytic activity of the venom was inferred from the cleavage of fibrinogen, and the residues recognized by the proteases were determined by cleavage of a tripeptide library using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay. The Ts venom showed proteolytic activity on fibrinogen and preferential cleavage close to the basic residues K and R. Its activity could be inhibited by EDTA, indicating that the venom from this scorpion predominantly consists of metalloproteases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in both torn and intact rotator cuff tendons.

    PubMed

    Castagna, A; Cesari, E; Gigante, A; Conti, M; Garofalo, R

    2013-06-01

    We evaluated the role of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors which are involved in extracellular matrix remodeling and degradation, in the pathogenesis of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus biopsy specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon more than 1 cm from the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior one third of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon used as control. Histological analysis and an evaluation of the activity of specific metalloproteases and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease (TIMP-1, TIMP-2) was done blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA (Search-Light technology) in each specimen Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a tear of the rotator cuff, and not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There was a significant increase in MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3 and in TIMP-1, TIMP-2 levels in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and in the control specimens The tissue in the ruptured area of the supraspinatus tendon undergoes marked rearrangement at molecular levels. This involves the activity of MMP 1, 2 and 3, and supports the critical role of MMPs in the tendon physiology. Seemingly intact parts of the injured supraspinatus tendon can present tendinopathic features, with altered cellular metabolism.

  14. Modulation of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) by bacterial metalloproteases and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Michael B; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions.

  15. Modulation of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC) by Bacterial Metalloproteases and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, Michael B.; Zhang, Liang; Liu, Xiaoning; Shanks, Robert M.; Thibodeau, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    The serralysin family of metalloproteases is associated with the virulence of multiple gram-negative human pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens. The serralysin proteases share highly conserved catalytic domains and show evolutionary similarity to the mammalian matrix metalloproteases. Our previous studies demonstrated that alkaline protease (AP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of activating the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), leading to an increase in sodium absorption in airway epithelia. The serralysin proteases are often co-expressed with endogenous, intracellular or periplasmic inhibitors, which putatively protect the bacterium from unwanted or unregulated protease activities. To evaluate the potential use of these small protein inhibitors in regulating the serralysin induced activation of ENaC, proteases from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcescens were purified for characterization along with a high affinity inhibitor from Pseudomonas. Both proteases showed activity against in vitro substrates and could be blocked by near stoichiometric concentrations of the inhibitor. In addition, both proteases were capable of activating ENaC when added to the apical surfaces of multiple epithelial cells with similar slow activation kinetics. The high-affinity periplasmic inhibitor from Pseudomonas effectively blocked this activation. These data suggest that multiple metalloproteases are capable of activating ENaC. Further, the endogenous, periplasmic bacterial inhibitors may be useful for modulating the downstream effects of the serralysin virulence factors under physiological conditions. PMID:24963801

  16. Mitochondrial impairment induced by 3-nitropropionic acid is enhanced by endogenous metalloprotease activity inhibition in cultured rat striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    de Oca Balderas, Pavel Montes; Ospina, Gabriel Gutiérrez; Del Ángel, Abel Santamaría

    2013-06-24

    Metalloproteases from the metzincin family mediate molecule processing at the cell membrane termed ectodomain shedding (ES). This mechanism enables the generation of intracellular and extracellular fragments from cell membrane molecules that exert additional functions involved in cell processes including cell death, beyond those of full length molecules. Micotoxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) induces striatal neuronal degeneration in vivo and in vitro through mitochondrial complex II inhibition. In this study, we hypothesized that metalloproteases regulate mitochondrial activity in cultured rat striatal neurons undergoing degeneration. To test this idea, striatal neuronal cultures characterized by NeuN and GAD-67 expression were treated with 3-NP together with the metalloprotease inhibitor GM6001 and their mitochondrial activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Our results showed that metalloprotease inhibition potentiated mitochondrial activity impairment induced by 3-NP whereas the inhibitor alone had no effect. These results indicate that metalloproteases regulate and promote mitochondrial functionality in striatal neurons undergoing degeneration induced by 3-NP. Since NMDA receptor is involved in the excitotoxic neuronal death triggered by 3-NP and is known to undergo ES, we analyzed NMDAR subunit NR1 phenotypic distribution by immunofluorescence. 3-NP and GM6001 induced abnormal perinuclear NR1 accumulation that was not observed with 3-NP or GM6001 alone. This observation suggests that metalloproteases are involved in NR1 cellular reorganization induced by 3-NP, and that their inhibition results in abnormal NR1 distribution. Together results indicate that endogenous metalloproteases are activated during striatal neurodegeneration induced by 3-NP eliciting an adaptative or compensatory response that protects mitochondrial functionality.

  17. Immune cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory responses induced by a P-I metalloprotease and a phospholipase A2 from Bothrops atrox venom.

    PubMed

    Menaldo, Danilo L; Bernardes, Carolina P; Zoccal, Karina F; Jacob-Ferreira, Anna L; Costa, Tássia R; Del Lama, Maria P F M; Naal, Rose M Z G; Frantz, Fabiani G; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Sampaio, Suely V

    2017-05-01

    Bothrops envenomations can promote severe inflammatory responses by inducing edema, pain, leukocyte recruitment and release of chemical mediators by local cells. In the present study, two toxins from Bothrops atrox venom (the P-I metalloprotease Batroxase and the acidic phospholipase A2 BatroxPLA2) were evaluated in relation to their inflammatory effects induced in vivo and in vitro, mainly focusing on the participation of different immune cells and inflammatory mediators. Both toxins mainly promoted acute inflammatory responses with significant recruitment of neutrophils in the early hours (1-4h) after administration into the peritoneal cavity of C57BL/6 mice, and increased infiltration of mononuclear cells especially after 24h. Among the mediators induced by both toxins are IL-6, IL-10 and PGE2, with Batroxase also inducing the release of L-1β, and BatroxPLA2 of LTB4 and CysLTs. These responses pointed to possible involvement of immune cells such as macrophages and mast cells, which were then evaluated in vitro. Mice peritoneal macrophages stimulated with Batroxase produced significant levels of IL-6, IL-1β, PGE2 and LTB4, whereas stimulus with BatroxPLA2 induced increases of IL-6, PGE2 and LTB4. Furthermore, both toxins were able to stimulate degranulation of RBL-2H3 mast cells, but with distinct concentration-dependent effects. Altogether, these results indicated that Batroxase and BatroxPLA2 promoted local and acute inflammatory responses related to macrophages and mast cells and to the production of several mediators. Our findings should contribute for better understanding the different mechanisms of toxicity induced by P-I metalloproteases and phospholipases A2 after snakebite envenomations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure-Based Design and Synthesis of a New Phenylboronic-Modified Affinity Medium for Metalloprotease Purification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Xu, Ximing; Lin, Shengxiang; Wang, Yuejun; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2016-01-01

    Metalloproteases are emerging as useful agents in the treatment of many diseases including arthritis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and fibrosis. Studies that could shed light on the metalloprotease pharmaceutical applications require the pure enzyme. Here, we reported the structure-based design and synthesis of the affinity medium for the efficient purification of metalloprotease using the 4-aminophenylboronic acid (4-APBA) as affinity ligand, which was coupled with Sepharose 6B via cyanuric chloride as spacer. The molecular docking analysis showed that the boron atom was interacting with the hydroxyl group of Ser176 residue, whereas the hydroxyl group of the boronic moiety is oriented toward Leu175 and His177 residues. In addition to the covalent bond between the boron atom and hydroxyl group of Ser176, the spacer between boronic acid derivatives and medium beads contributes to the formation of an enzyme-medium complex. With this synthesized medium, we developed and optimized a one-step purification procedure and applied it for the affinity purification of metalloproteases from three commercial enzyme products. The native metalloproteases were purified to high homogeneity with more than 95% purity. The novel purification method developed in this work provides new opportunities for scientific, industrial and pharmaceutical projects. PMID:28036010

  19. Rosiglitazone attenuates the metalloprotease/anti-metalloprotease imbalance in emphysema induced by cigarette smoke: involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and NFκB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gang; Yin, Yan; Han, Dan; Wang, Qiu-yue; Kang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated how rosiglitazone attenuated cigarette smoke (CS)-induced emphysema in a rat model. In particular, we focused on its possible effects on the imbalance between metalloprotease (MMP) and anti-MMP activity, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cell (NFκB) signaling pathway over-activation. Methods A total of 36 Wistar rats were divided into three groups (n=12 each): animals were exposed to CS for 12 weeks in the absence (the CS group) or presence of 30 mg/kg rosiglitazone (the rosiglitazone-CS [RCS] group); a control group was treated with the rosiglitazone vehicle only, without any CS exposure. Histopathology of lung tissue in all groups was evaluated to grade severity of the disease. Expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), MMP2, and MMP9 in lung tissue were determined and compared using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Activation of MAPKs, NFκB, and the nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cell inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) phosphorylation in lung tissue was examined by Western blotting. Results Emphysema-related pathology, based on inter-alveolar wall distance and alveolar density, was less severe in the RCS group than in the CS group. Compared with the CS group, levels of PPARγ were higher in the RCS group, and levels of MMP2 and MMP9 proteins were lower in the RCS rats. Levels of activated MAPKs and NFκB were also lower, while the IκBαphosphorylation was increased in the lung tissue of RCS rats. Conclusion Our findings suggest that oral administration of rosiglitazone attenuates the metalloprotease activity induced by CS, and the underlying mechanism might involve the activation of signaling pathways dependent on MAPKs or NFκB. Our results further suggest that PPARγ contributes to the pathogenesis of emphysema as well as airway inflammation induced by CS. PMID:25897215

  20. Cloning and expression of ADAM-related metalloproteases in equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Michael J; Cousin, Hélène; Loftus, John P; Johnson, Philip J; Belknap, James K; Gradil, Carlos M; Black, Samuel J; Alfandari, Dominique

    2009-06-15

    Equine laminitis is a debilitating disease affecting the digital laminae that suspend the distal phalanx within the hoof. While the clinical progression of the disease has been well documented, the molecular events associated with its pathogenesis remain largely unknown. Using real time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we have investigated the expression of genes coding for proteins containing a Disintegrin and Metalloprotease domain (ADAM), as well as genes encoding the natural inhibitors of these enzymes (tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease; TIMP) in horses with naturally-acquired (acute, chronic and aggravated chronic clinical cases) or experimentally-induced (black walnut extract (BWE) and starch gruel models) laminitis. Changes in expression of these enzymes and regulators may underlie the pathologic remodeling of lamellar tissue in laminitis. Genes encoding ADAMs involved in inflammation (ADAM-10 and ADAM-17), as well as those implicated in arthritis (ADAMTS-1, ADAMTS-4 and ADAMTS-5) were cloned, and the sequences used to generate specific oligonucleotide primers for the RT-qPCR experiments. Our results show that genes encoding ADAM-10 and ADAM-17 were not induced in most laminitic animals, whereas ADAMTS-4 gene expression was strongly upregulated in nearly all horses with experimentally-induced and naturally-acquired laminitis. The expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMP)-9 and ADAMTS-5 was also increased in many of the laminitic horses. In addition, TIMP-2 gene expression was decreased in most laminitic horses, whereas expression of genes encoding other TIMPs, namely TIMP-1 and TIMP-3, was randomly increased or decreased in the various models. We conclude that increased expression of lamellar ADAMTS-4 is a common feature of laminitis consistent with a central role of the gene product in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  1. Metalloproteases Affecting Blood Coagulation, Fibrinolysis and Platelet Aggregation from Snake Venoms: Definition and Nomenclature of Interaction Sites

    PubMed Central

    Kini, R. Manjunatha; Koh, Cho Yeow

    2016-01-01

    Snake venom metalloproteases, in addition to their contribution to the digestion of the prey, affect various physiological functions by cleaving specific proteins. They exhibit their activities through activation of zymogens of coagulation factors, and precursors of integrins or receptors. Based on their structure–function relationships and mechanism of action, we have defined classification and nomenclature of functional sites of proteases. These metalloproteases are useful as research tools and in diagnosis and treatment of various thrombotic and hemostatic conditions. They also contribute to our understanding of molecular details in the activation of specific factors involved in coagulation, platelet aggregation and matrix biology. This review provides a ready reference for metalloproteases that interfere in blood coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet aggregation. PMID:27690102

  2. Notch modulates VEGF action in endothelial cells by inducing Matrix Metalloprotease activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the vasculature, Notch signaling functions as a downstream effecter of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) signaling. VEGF regulates sprouting angiogenesis in part by inducing and activating matrix metalloproteases (MMPs). This study sought to determine if VEGF regulation of MMPs was mediated via Notch signaling and to determine how Notch regulation of MMPs influenced endothelial cell morphogenesis. Methods and Results We assessed the relationship between VEGF and Notch signaling in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Overexpression of VEGF-induced Notch4 and the Notch ligand, Dll4, activated Notch signaling, and altered endothelial cell morphology in a fashion similar to that induced by Notch activation. Expression of a secreted Notch antagonist (Notch1 decoy) suppressed VEGF-mediated activation of endothelial Notch signaling and endothelial morphogenesis. We demonstrate that Notch mediates VEGF-induced matrix metalloprotease activity via induction of MMP9 and MT1-MMP expression and activation of MMP2. Introduction of a MMP inhibitor blocked Notch-mediated endothelial morphogenesis. In mice, analysis of VEGF-induced dermal angiogenesis demonstrated that the Notch1 decoy reduced perivascular MMP9 expression. Conclusions Taken together, our data demonstrate that Notch signaling can act downstream of VEGF signaling to regulate endothelial cell morphogenesis via induction and activation of specific MMPs. In a murine model of VEGF-induced dermal angiogenesis, Notch inhibition led to reduced MMP9 expression. PMID:21349159

  3. Purification and properties of a new psychrophilic metalloprotease (Fpp2) in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Secades, P; Alvarez, B; Guijarro, J A

    2003-09-26

    To go further into the characterization of the proteolysis exocellular system of the salmonid pathogen Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the purification and characterization of a novel protease designated Fpp2 (F. psychrophilum protease 2) was undertaken. A protease (Fpp2) hydrolyzing azocasein was purified. The Fpp2 can be defined as a metalloprotease, it had an estimated molecular mass of 62 kDa with calcium playing an important role in the thermostability of the enzyme. Proteolytic activity was optimal at pH 6.0-7.0 and 24 degrees C and activation energy for the hydrolysis of azocasein was determined to be 5.4 kcal mol(-1), being inactive at temperatures above 42 degrees C. All these results are characteristic of 'cold adapted enzymes'. Fpp2 proved to be a broad range hydrolytic enzyme because in optimal conditions it was able to hydrolyze matrix and muscular proteins. It can be concluded that the Fpp1, a previously characterized 55 kDa metalloprotease, and the Fpp2 protease were produced under different physiological conditions and were immunologically as well as biochemically different.

  4. Expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors in different histological types of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Del Casar, J M; González-Reyes, S; González, L O; González, J M; Junquera, S; Bongera, M; García, M F; Andicoechea, A; Serra, C; Vizoso, F J

    2010-06-01

    Metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) are involved in several key aspects of tumoral growth, invasion and metastasis. The purpose of this study was to characterize on how the different histological types of breast cancer differ in the expression of several components of this enzymatic system. An immunohistochemical study was performed in 50 ductal, 23 lobular, 14 mucinous, 7 tubular, 4 papillary and 5 medullary invasive carcinomas, using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against 7 MMPs and 3 tisullar TIMPs. Staining results were categorized by means of a specific software program (score values). Carcinomas of the ductal type showed higher score values for MMPs and TIMPs than the other histological types; whereas mucinous carcinomas had lower scores values for expressions of the majority of these proteins. Stromal fibroblasts were more frequently positive for MMP-1, -7 and -13 and TIMP-1 and -3, when present in carcinomas of the ductal type than in other histological types of breast carcinomas. Stromal mononuclear inflammatory cells were more frequently positive for MMP-1 and TIMP-3, but more often negative for MMP-7, -9 and -11, when located in carcinomas of the ductal type than in other histological types of breast carcinomas. We found variations in MMP/TIMP expressions among the different histological subtypes of breast carcinomas suggesting differences in their tumor pathophysiology.

  5. Soluble artificial metalloproteases with broad substrate selectivity, high reactivity, and high thermal and chemical stabilities.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Gyum; Yoo, Sang Ho; Chei, Woo Suk; Lee, Tae Yeon; Kim, Hye Mi; Suh, Junghun

    2010-09-01

    To design soluble artificial proteases that cleave peptide backbones of a wide range of proteins with high reactivity, artificial active sites comprising the Cu(II) complex of 1-oxa-4,7,10-triazacyclodedecane (oxacyclen) and the aldehyde group were synthesized. The aldehyde group was employed as the binding site in view of its ability to reversibly form imine bonds with ammonium groups exposed on the surfaces of proteins, and Cu(II) oxacyclen was exploited as the catalytic group for peptide hydrolysis. The artificial metalloproteases synthesized in the present study cleaved all of the protein substrates examined (albumin, gamma-globulin, myoglobin, and lysozyme). In addition, the activity of the best soluble artificial protease was enhanced by up to 190-fold in terms of kcat/Km. When the temperature was raised to 80 degrees C, the activities of the artificial proteases were significantly enhanced. The activity of the artificial protease was not greatly affected by surfactants, including sodium dodecyl sulfate. The intermediacy of the imine complex formed between the artificial protease and the protein substrate was supported by an experiment using sodium cyanoborohydride. Soluble artificial metalloproteases with broad substrate selectivity, high reactivity, high thermal and chemical stabilities, and small molecular weights were thus synthesized by positioning the aldehyde group in proximity to Cu(II) oxacyclen.

  6. Wss1 metalloprotease partners with Cdc48/Doa1 in processing genotoxic SUMO conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Balakirev, Maxim Y; Mullally, James E; Favier, Adrien; Assard, Nicole; Sulpice, Eric; Lindsey, David F; Rulina, Anastasia V; Gidrol, Xavier; Wilkinson, Keith D

    2015-01-01

    Sumoylation during genotoxic stress regulates the composition of DNA repair complexes. The yeast metalloprotease Wss1 clears chromatin-bound sumoylated proteins. Wss1 and its mammalian analog, DVC1/Spartan, belong to minigluzincins family of proteases. Wss1 proteolytic activity is regulated by a cysteine switch mechanism activated by chemical stress and/or DNA binding. Wss1 is required for cell survival following UV irradiation, the smt3-331 mutation and Camptothecin-induced formation of covalent topoisomerase 1 complexes (Top1cc). Wss1 forms a SUMO-specific ternary complex with the AAA ATPase Cdc48 and an adaptor, Doa1. Upon DNA damage Wss1/Cdc48/Doa1 is recruited to sumoylated targets and catalyzes SUMO chain extension through a newly recognized SUMO ligase activity. Activation of Wss1 results in metalloprotease self-cleavage and proteolysis of associated proteins. In cells lacking Tdp1, clearance of topoisomerase covalent complexes becomes SUMO and Wss1-dependent. Upon genotoxic stress, Wss1 is vacuolar, suggesting a link between genotoxic stress and autophagy involving the Doa1 adapter. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06763.001 PMID:26349035

  7. Purification and characterization of acidolysin, an acidic metalloprotease produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824.

    PubMed Central

    Croux, C; Paquet, V; Goma, G; Soucaille, P

    1990-01-01

    Acidolysin an extracellular protease produced by Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange chromatography with a recovery of 91%. The enzyme was a monomeric protein with a molecular weight of 44,000 as estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and an acidic isoelectric point of 3.3. Acidolysin was very sensitive to metal-chelating agents and phosphoramidon and was unaffected by sulfhydryl reagents. It was shown to be a calcium- and zinc-containing protease. It exhibited optimal activity against Azocoll at pH 5 and 45 degrees C. It was stable at low pH and heat labile above 50 degrees C. It exhibited specificity toward peptide bonds formed by the amino group of hydrophobic amino acids (isoleucine, leucine, and phenylalanine) and its NH2-terminal amino acid sequence showed a high degree of similarity with that of Bacillus subtilis neutral metalloprotease A. Acidolysin is the first phosphoramidon-sensitive, acidic zinc metalloprotease reported. Images PMID:2082818

  8. An oxidant- and organic solvent-resistant alkaline metalloprotease from Streptomyces olivochromogenes.

    PubMed

    Simkhada, Jaya Ram; Cho, Seung Sik; Park, Seong Ju; Mander, Poonam; Choi, Yun Hee; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Yoo, Jin Cheol

    2010-11-01

    Organic solvent- and detergent-resistant proteases are important from an industrial viewpoint. However, they have been less frequently reported and only few of them are from actinomycetes. A metalloprotease from Streptomyces olivochromogenes (SOMP) was purified by ion exchange with Poros HQ and gel filtration with Sepharose CL-6B. Apparent molecular mass of the enzyme was estimated to be 51 kDa by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and gelatin zymography. The activity was optimum at pH 7.5 and 50 degrees C and stable between pH 7.0 and 10.0. SOMP was stable below 45 degrees C and Ca(2+) increased its thermostability. Ca(2+) enhanced while Co(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Mn(2+), and Fe(2+) inhibited the activity. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and ethylene glycol-bis (beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid, but not phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, aprotinin, and pefabloc SC, significantly suppressed the activity, suggesting that it might be a metalloprotease. Importantly, it is highly resistant against various detergents, organic solvents, and oxidizing agents, and the activity is enhanced by H(2)O(2). The enzyme could be a novel protease based on its origin and peculiar biochemical properties. It may be useful in biotechnological applications especially for organic solvent-based enzymatic synthesis.

  9. TLR4-mediated immunomodulatory properties of the bacterial metalloprotease arazyme in preclinical tumor models.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Felipe V; Melo, Amanda C L; de Melo, Filipe M; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Silva, Priscila; Berzaghi, Rodrigo; Herbozo, Carolina C A; Coelho-Dos-Reis, Jordana; Scutti, Jorge A; Origassa, Clarice S T; Pereira, Rosana M; Juliano, Luis; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Carmona, Adriana K; Câmara, Niels O S; Tsuji, Moriya; Travassos, Luiz R; Rodrigues, Elaine G

    2016-07-01

    Despite the recent approval of new agents for metastatic melanoma, its treatment remains challenging. Moreover, few available immunotherapies induce a strong cellular immune response, and selection of the correct immunoadjuvant is crucial for overcoming this obstacle. Here, we studied the immunomodulatory properties of arazyme, a bacterial metalloprotease, which was previously shown to control metastasis in a murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 model. The antitumor activity of arazyme was independent of its proteolytic activity, since heat-inactivated protease showed comparable properties to the active enzyme; however, the effect was dependent on an intact immune system, as antitumor properties were lost in immunodeficient mice. The protective response was IFNγ-dependent, and CD8(+) T lymphocytes were the main effector antitumor population, although B and CD4(+) T lymphocytes were also induced. Macrophages and dendritic cells were involved in the induction of the antitumor response, as arazyme activation of these cells increased both the expression of surface activation markers and proinflammatory cytokine secretion through TLR4-MyD88-TRIF-dependent, but also MAPK-dependent pathways. Arazyme was also effective in the murine breast adenocarcinoma 4T1 model, reducing primary and metastatic tumor development, and prolonging survival. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterial metalloprotease interaction with TLR4 and subsequent receptor activation that promotes a proinflammatory and tumor protective response. Our results show that arazyme has immunomodulatory properties, and could be a promising novel alternative for metastatic melanoma treatment.

  10. TLR4-mediated immunomodulatory properties of the bacterial metalloprotease arazyme in preclinical tumor models

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe V.; Melo, Amanda C. L.; de Melo, Filipe M.; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Silva, Priscila; Berzaghi, Rodrigo; Herbozo, Carolina C. A.; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana; Scutti, Jorge A.; Origassa, Clarice S. T.; Pereira, Rosana M.; Juliano, Luis; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Carmona, Adriana K.; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Tsuji, Moriya; Travassos, Luiz R.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite the recent approval of new agents for metastatic melanoma, its treatment remains challenging. Moreover, few available immunotherapies induce a strong cellular immune response, and selection of the correct immunoadjuvant is crucial for overcoming this obstacle. Here, we studied the immunomodulatory properties of arazyme, a bacterial metalloprotease, which was previously shown to control metastasis in a murine melanoma B16F10-Nex2 model. The antitumor activity of arazyme was independent of its proteolytic activity, since heat-inactivated protease showed comparable properties to the active enzyme; however, the effect was dependent on an intact immune system, as antitumor properties were lost in immunodeficient mice. The protective response was IFNγ-dependent, and CD8+ T lymphocytes were the main effector antitumor population, although B and CD4+ T lymphocytes were also induced. Macrophages and dendritic cells were involved in the induction of the antitumor response, as arazyme activation of these cells increased both the expression of surface activation markers and proinflammatory cytokine secretion through TLR4-MyD88-TRIF-dependent, but also MAPK-dependent pathways. Arazyme was also effective in the murine breast adenocarcinoma 4T1 model, reducing primary and metastatic tumor development, and prolonging survival. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a bacterial metalloprotease interaction with TLR4 and subsequent receptor activation that promotes a proinflammatory and tumor protective response. Our results show that arazyme has immunomodulatory properties, and could be a promising novel alternative for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:27622031

  11. Expression and tissue distribution of astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM).

    PubMed

    Kanzawa, Nobuyuki; Tatewaki, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Ryousuke; Kunihisa, Ikuko; Iwahashi, Haruka; Nakamura, Kaori; Tsuchiya, Takahide

    2005-10-01

    Astacin metalloprotease family members function in a wide variety of biologic events, including cell differentiation and morphogenesis during embryonic development and adult tissue differentiation. We previously isolated and characterized an astacin-like squid metalloprotease (ALSM). To elucidate the embryonic expression of ALSM, we performed immunohistochemical analysis with specific antibodies and examined the expression profiles of ALSM isoforms by in situ hybridization analysis. Tissue distribution and expression were also examined in adult spear squid. mRNA expression of ALSM isoforms I and III was first detected in newly hatched squid and was restricted to the liver. No mRNA signals were detected in other tissues even in adult squids. At the protein level, both isoforms were prominent in the liver of embryos and later in digestive organs of adult squid. Both isoforms were also detected in muscle tissues, including mantle and tentacle muscle. Staining for ALSM III was also identified in the iris and in tissues near the eye in squid embryos. However, no reactive bands were detected by immunoblotting of adult squid eyes. Thus, ALSM is initially expressed at the late stage of embryogenesis in spear squid, and expression is restricted to the liver. Thereafter, ALSM isoforms function in various tissues in an isoform-dependent manner.

  12. Serine proteases and metalloproteases associated with pathogenesis but not host specificity in the Entomophthoralean fungus Zoophthora radicans.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Baldwin, D; Kindrachuk, C; Hegedus, D D

    2006-06-01

    The protease activity of a Zoophthora radicans strain that was highly infective toward Pieris brassicae (cabbage butterfly) larvae was compared with that of isogenic strains that were adapted to Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth) larvae through serial passage. All strains produced three distinct serine proteases ranging in size from 25 to 37 kDa; however, the original strain from P. brassicae also produced large amounts of an approximately 46 kDa metalloprotease. Subsequently, a cDNA encoding a 43 kDa (mature enzyme) zinc-dependent metalloprotease, ZrMEP1, was isolated from the original fungal strain and most likely corresponds to the 46 kDa protease observed with in-gel assays. ZrMEP1 possessed characteristics of both the fungalysin and thermolysin metalloprotease families found in some pulmonary and dermal pathogens. This is the first report of this type of metalloprotease from an entomo pathogenic fungus. A cDNA encoding a trypsin-like serine protease, ZrSP1, was also identified and was most similar to a serine protease from the plant pathogen Verticillium dahliae. In artificial media, ZrMEP1 and ZrSP1 were found to be differentially responsive to gelatin and catabolite repression in the fungal strains adapted to P. brassicae and P. xylostella, but their expression patterns within infected larvae were the same. It appears that while these proteases likely play a role in the infection process, they may not be major host specificity determinants.

  13. Sea urchin metalloproteases: a genomic survey of the BMP-1/tolloid-like, MMP and ADAM families.

    PubMed

    Angerer, Lynne; Hussain, Sofia; Wei, Zheng; Livingston, Brian T

    2006-12-01

    Analysis of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus genome has revealed approximately 240 metalloprotease genes, and they represent all 23 families expressed in vertebrates. EST/cDNA sequencing and microarray analysis show that nearly 70% are represented in embryo RNA. Among them are many metalloproteases with demonstrated developmental roles in other systems-BMP-1/TLD (tolloid) (astacins), MMPs (matrix metalloproteases) and the ADAMs (disintegrin/metalloproteases). The developmental functions of these kinds of metalloproteases include modifying the extracellular matrix, regulating signaling pathways or modulating cellular adhesive properties. The unexpectedly large number of BMP-1/TLD-like protease genes (23) results primarily from expansion of a set encoding an unusual domain conserved in structure and primary sequence only in nematode astacins. Such proteases may have interesting developmental functions because the expression patterns of several are highly regulated along the primary axis at times when cell differentiation and morphogenesis begin. The size of the sea urchin MMP family and the clustered arrangement of many of its members are similar to vertebrates, but phylogenetic analyses suggest that different ancestral genes were independently amplified in sea urchins and vertebrates. One expansion appears to be genes encoding MMPs that have putative transmembrane domains and may be membrane-tethered (MT). Interestingly, the genes encoding TIMPs, inhibitors of MMPs, have also been amplified and the 10 genes are tandemly arranged in a single cluster. In contrast, there are fewer ADAM and ADAMTS genes in sea urchins, but they represent all but one of the chordate-specific groups. The genome sequence now opens the door to experimental manipulations designed to understand how modulation of the extracellular environment affects development.

  14. MMP-25 Metalloprotease Regulates Innate Immune Response through NF-κB Signaling.

    PubMed

    Soria-Valles, Clara; Gutiérrez-Fernández, Ana; Osorio, Fernando G; Carrero, Dido; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Colado, Enrique; Fernández-García, M Soledad; Bonzon-Kulichenko, Elena; Vázquez, Jesús; Fueyo, Antonio; López-Otín, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) regulate innate immunity acting over proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other immune-related proteins. MMP-25 (membrane-type 6-MMP) is a membrane-bound enzyme predominantly expressed in leukocytes whose biological function has remained largely unknown. We have generated Mmp25-deficient mice to elucidate the in vivo function of this protease. These mutant mice are viable and fertile and do not show any spontaneous phenotype. However, Mmp25-null mice exhibit a defective innate immune response characterized by low sensitivity to bacterial LPS, hypergammaglobulinemia, and reduced secretion of proinflammatory molecules. Moreover, these immune defects can be tracked to a defective NF-κB activation observed in Mmp25-deficient leukocytes. Globally, our findings provide new mechanistic insights into innate immunity through the activity of MMP-25, suggesting that this proteinase could be a potential therapeutic target for immune-related diseases. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Massively parallel enzyme kinetics reveals the substrate recognition landscape of the metalloprotease ADAMTS13.

    PubMed

    Kretz, Colin A; Dai, Manhong; Soylemez, Onuralp; Yee, Andrew; Desch, Karl C; Siemieniak, David; Tomberg, Kärt; Kondrashov, Fyodor A; Meng, Fan; Ginsburg, David

    2015-07-28

    Proteases play important roles in many biologic processes and are key mediators of cancer, inflammation, and thrombosis. However, comprehensive and quantitative techniques to define the substrate specificity profile of proteases are lacking. The metalloprotease ADAMTS13 regulates blood coagulation by cleaving von Willebrand factor (VWF), reducing its procoagulant activity. A mutagenized substrate phage display library based on a 73-amino acid fragment of VWF was constructed, and the ADAMTS13-dependent change in library complexity was evaluated over reaction time points, using high-throughput sequencing. Reaction rate constants (kcat/KM) were calculated for nearly every possible single amino acid substitution within this fragment. This massively parallel enzyme kinetics analysis detailed the specificity of ADAMTS13 and demonstrated the critical importance of the P1-P1' substrate residues while defining exosite binding domains. These data provided empirical evidence for the propensity for epistasis within VWF and showed strong correlation to conservation across orthologs, highlighting evolutionary selective pressures for VWF.

  16. Comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin).

    PubMed

    Carson, Louise; Cathcart, George R; Scott, Christopher J; Hollenberg, Morley D; Walker, Brian; Ceri, Howard; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2011-10-01

    In this study we report for the first time the comprehensive inhibitor profiling of the Proteus mirabilis metalloprotease virulence factor ZapA (mirabilysin) using a 160 compound focused library of N-alpha mercaptoamide dipeptides, in order to map the S(1)(') and S(2)(') binding site preferences of this important enzyme. This study has revealed a preference for the aromatic residues tyrosine and tryptophan in P(1)(') and aliphatic residues in P(2)('). From this library, six compounds were identified which exhibited sub- to low-micromolar K(i) values. The most potent inactivator, SH-CO(2)-Y-V-NH(2) was capable of preventing ZapA-mediated hydrolysis of heat-denatured IgA, indicating that these inhibitors may be capable of protecting host proteins against ZapA during colonisation and infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlated structural kinetics and retarded solvent dynamics at the metalloprotease active site

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Moran; Born, Benjamin; Heyden, Matthias; Tworowski, Dmitry; Fields, Gregg B.; Sagi, Irit; Havenith, Martina

    2011-09-18

    Solvent dynamics can play a major role in enzyme activity, but obtaining an accurate, quantitative picture of solvent activity during catalysis is quite challenging. Here, we combine terahertz spectroscopy and X-ray absorption analyses to measure changes in the coupled water-protein motions during peptide hydrolysis by a zinc-dependent human metalloprotease. These changes were tightly correlated with rearrangements at the active site during the formation of productive enzyme-substrate intermediates and were different from those in an enzyme–inhibitor complex. Molecular dynamics simulations showed a steep gradient of fast-to-slow coupled protein-water motions around the protein, active site and substrate. Our results show that water retardation occurs before formation of the functional Michaelis complex. We propose that the observed gradient of coupled protein-water motions may assist enzyme-substrate interactions through water-polarizing mechanisms that are remotely mediated by the catalytic metal ion and the enzyme active site.

  18. Consequences and utility of the zinc-dependent metalloprotease activity of anthrax lethal toxin.

    PubMed

    Bromberg-White, Jennifer; Lee, Chih-Shia; Duesbery, Nicholas

    2010-05-01

    Anthrax is caused by the gram-positive bacterium Bacillus anthracis. The pathogenesis of this disease is dependent on the presence of two binary toxins, edema toxin (EdTx) and lethal toxin (LeTx). LeTx, the major virulence factor contributing to anthrax, contains the effector moiety lethal factor (LF), a zinc-dependent metalloprotease specific for targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases. This review will focus on the protease-specific activity and function of LF, and will include a discussion on the implications and consequences of this activity, both in terms of anthrax disease, and how this activity can be exploited to gain insight into other pathologic conditions.

  19. Growth factor and co-receptor release by structural regulation of substrate metalloprotease accessibility

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Liseth M.; Hartmann, Monika; Schubach, Salome; Ma, Junzhi; Herrlich, Peter; Herrlich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Release of cytokines, growth factors and other life-essential molecules from precursors by a-disintegrin-and-metalloproteases (ADAMs) is regulated with high substrate-specificity. We hypothesized that this is achieved by cleavage-regulatory intracellular-domain (ICD)-modifications of the precursors. We show here that cleavage-stimuli-induced specific ICD-modifications cause structural substrate changes that enhance ectodomain sensitivity of neuregulin-1 (NRG1; epidermal-growth-factor) or CD44 (receptor-tyrosine-kinase (RTK) co-receptor) to chymotrypsin/trypsin or soluble ADAM. This inside-out signal transfer required substrate homodimerization and was prevented by cleavage-inhibitory ICD-mutations. In chimeras, regulation could be conferred to a foreign ectodomain, suggesting a common higher-order structure. We predict that substrate-specific protease-accessibility-regulation controls release of numerous ADAM substrates. PMID:27876763

  20. JAMM: A Metalloprotease-like zinc site in the proteasome and signalosome

    SciTech Connect

    Ambroggio, X.I.; Rees, D.C.; Deshaies, R.J.

    2005-06-27

    The JAMM (JAB1/MPN/Mov34 metalloenzyme) motif in Rpn11 and Csn5 underlies isopeptidase activities intrinsic to the proteasome and signalosome, respectively. We show here that the archaebacterial protein AfJAMM possesses the key features of a zinc metalloprotease, yet with a distinct fold. The histidine and aspartic acid of the conserved EXnHS/THX7SXXD motif coordinate a zinc, whereas the glutamic acid hydrogen-bonds an aqua ligand. By analogy to the active site of thermolysin, we predict that the glutamic acid serves as an acid-base catalyst and the second serine stabilizes a tetrahedral intermediate. Mutagenesis of Csn5 confirms these residues are required for Nedd8 isopeptidase activity. The active site-like architecture specified by the JAMM motif motivates structure-based approaches to the study of JAMM domain proteins and the development of therapeutic proteasome and signalosome inhibitors.

  1. Inhibition of biosynthesis of metalloprotease of Aeromonas sobria by sodium chloride in the medium.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Eizo; Kobayashi, Hidetomo; Yamanaka, Hiroyasu; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish; Takeda, Yoshifumi; Arimoto, Sakae; Negishi, Tomoe; Okamoto, Keinosuke

    2011-01-01

    The present authors have previously shown that the serine protease activity of Aeromonas sobria is markedly decreased when A. sobria is cultured in medium containing 3.0% sodium chloride (NaCl, concentration almost equivalent to sea water salinity), and that this occurs because, although the synthesis of ASP is not disturbed by the salt in the medium, the maturation pathway of serine protease of A. sobria (ASP) does not proceed successfully in such a medium. In this study, the effect of salt in the medium on the production of metalloprotease by A. sobria (AMP) was examined. A. sobria produced AMP in the milieu when the bacteria were cultured in medium containing (NaCl) at a concentration of 0.5%. However, AMP was not produced when the bacteria were cultured in salty medium containing 1.5% or more NaCl. To examine how NaCl reduces the production of metalloprotease by A. sobria, the amount of amp mRNA in the cell was measured and it was found that this decreased in proportion to the concentration of NaCl in the medium. The mRNA of amp was not detected in cells cultured in medium containing 1.5% or more NaCl. This means that the transcription of amp is inhibited in salty condition. As described, NaCl in the medium disturbs the maturation pathway of ASP. The mode of action whereby NaCl suppresses AMP activity in A. sobria differs from the mechanism for suppressing ASP activity. © 2010 The Societies and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. CLCAs - a family of metalloproteases of intriguing phylogenetic distribution and with cases of substituted catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Pawłowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent metalloproteases with His-Glu-x-x-His (HExxH) active site motif, zincins, are a broad group of proteins involved in many metabolic and regulatory functions, and found in all forms of life. Human genome contains more than 100 genes encoding proteins with known zincin-like domains. A survey of all proteins containing the HExxH motif shows that approximately 52% of HExxH occurrences fall within known protein structural domains (as defined in the Pfam database). Domain families with majority of members possessing a conserved HExxH motif include, not surprisingly, many known and putative metalloproteases. Furthermore, several HExxH-containing protein domains thus identified can be confidently predicted to be putative peptidases of zincin fold. Thus, we predict zincin-like fold for eight uncharacterised Pfam families. Besides the domains with the HExxH motif strictly conserved, and those with sporadic occurrences, intermediate families are identified that contain some members with a conserved HExxH motif, but also many homologues with substitutions at the conserved positions. Such substitutions can be evolutionarily conserved and non-random, yet functional roles of these inactive zincins are not known. The CLCAs are a novel zincin-like protease family with many cases of substituted active sites. We show that this allegedly metazoan family has a number of bacterial and archaeal members. An extremely patchy phylogenetic distribution of CLCAs in prokaryotes and their conserved protein domain composition strongly suggests an evolutionary scenario of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from multicellular eukaryotes to bacteria, providing an example of eukaryote-derived xenologues in bacterial genomes. Additionally, in a protein family identified here as closely homologous to CLCA, the CLCA_X (CLCA-like) family, a number of proteins is found in phages and plasmids, supporting the HGT scenario.

  3. CLCAs - A Family of Metalloproteases of Intriguing Phylogenetic Distribution and with Cases of Substituted Catalytic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lenart, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Pawłowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent metalloproteases with His-Glu-x-x-His (HExxH) active site motif, zincins, are a broad group of proteins involved in many metabolic and regulatory functions, and found in all forms of life. Human genome contains more than 100 genes encoding proteins with known zincin-like domains. A survey of all proteins containing the HExxH motif shows that approximately 52% of HExxH occurrences fall within known protein structural domains (as defined in the Pfam database). Domain families with majority of members possessing a conserved HExxH motif include, not surprisingly, many known and putative metalloproteases. Furthermore, several HExxH-containing protein domains thus identified can be confidently predicted to be putative peptidases of zincin fold. Thus, we predict zincin-like fold for eight uncharacterised Pfam families. Besides the domains with the HExxH motif strictly conserved, and those with sporadic occurrences, intermediate families are identified that contain some members with a conserved HExxH motif, but also many homologues with substitutions at the conserved positions. Such substitutions can be evolutionarily conserved and non-random, yet functional roles of these inactive zincins are not known. The CLCAs are a novel zincin-like protease family with many cases of substituted active sites. We show that this allegedly metazoan family has a number of bacterial and archaeal members. An extremely patchy phylogenetic distribution of CLCAs in prokaryotes and their conserved protein domain composition strongly suggests an evolutionary scenario of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from multicellular eukaryotes to bacteria, providing an example of eukaryote-derived xenologues in bacterial genomes. Additionally, in a protein family identified here as closely homologous to CLCA, the CLCA_X (CLCA-like) family, a number of proteins is found in phages and plasmids, supporting the HGT scenario. PMID:23671590

  4. Domain structure and function of matrix metalloprotease 23 (MMP23): role in potassium channel trafficking.

    PubMed

    Galea, Charles A; Nguyen, Hai M; George Chandy, K; Smith, Brian J; Norton, Raymond S

    2014-04-01

    MMP23 is a member of the matrix metalloprotease family of zinc- and calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which are involved in a wide variety of cellular functions. Its catalytic domain displays a high degree of structural homology with those of other metalloproteases, but its atypical domain architecture suggests that it may possess unique functional properties. The N-terminal MMP23 pro-domain contains a type-II transmembrane domain that anchors the protein to the plasma membrane and lacks the cysteine-switch motif that is required to maintain other MMPs in a latent state during passage to the cell surface. Instead of the C-terminal hemopexin domain common to other MMPs, MMP23 contains a small toxin-like domain (TxD) and an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule (IgCAM) domain. The MMP23 pro-domain can trap Kv1.3 but not closely-related Kv1.2 channels in the endoplasmic reticulum, preventing their passage to the cell surface, while the TxD can bind to the channel pore and block the passage of potassium ions. The MMP23 C-terminal IgCAM domain displays some similarity to Ig-like C2-type domains found in IgCAMs of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which are known to mediate protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. MMP23 and Kv1.3 are co-expressed in a variety of tissues and together are implicated in diseases including cancer and inflammatory disorders. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanism of action of this unique member of the MMP family.

  5. Cytokines, matrix metalloproteases, angiogenic and growth factors in tears of normal subjects and vernal keratoconjunctivitis patients.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, A; Sathe, S; Bortolotti, M; Beaton, A; Sack, R

    2009-05-01

    To detect the presence of multiple mediators and growth factors in tears of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (VKC) patients with active disease using stationary phase antibody arrays. Tears were collected from 12 normal subjects (CT) and 24 active VKC patients. Tears were centrifuged and successively probed using three microwell plate arrays specific for: (i) cytokines: interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12, IL-13, interferon-gamma and tumour necrosis factor-alpha; (ii) growth factors: basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), platelet-derived growth factor, thrombopoietin, angiopoietin-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), keratocyte growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 and heparin-binding epithelial growth factor (HB-EGF) and (iii) matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-13, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2. Interleukin-8 signals were detected in all CT and highly detected in all VKC samples. The Th2-type cytokines, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 were detected only in tears of VKC patients. Signals for bFGF, HB-EGF, VEGF and HGF were detected in 41-87% of VKC samples and in few CT samples. Only TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were found in all normal and patient tear samples, whereas MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-10 were highly present in all VKC samples. Stationary phase antibody array methodology was useful for the screening of various cytokines, growth factors and MMPs in tears. These analyses identified in tears of VKC patients previously unreported factors including MMP-3 and MMP-10 and multiple proteases, growth factors and cytokines, which may all play an important role in the pathogenesis of conjunctival inflammation.

  6. The Metalloprotease Mpl Supports Listeria monocytogenes Dissemination through Resolution of Membrane Protrusions into Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Diego E.

    2016-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular pathogen that disseminates within the intestinal epithelium through acquisition of actin-based motility and formation of plasma membrane protrusions that project into adjacent cells. The resolution of membrane protrusions into vacuoles from which the pathogen escapes results in bacterial spread from cell to cell. This dissemination process relies on the mlp-actA-plcB operon, which encodes ActA, a bacterial nucleation-promoting factor that mediates actin-based motility, and PlcB, a phospholipase that mediates vacuole escape. Here we investigated the role of the metalloprotease Mpl in the dissemination process. In agreement with previous findings showing that Mpl is required for PlcB activation, infection of epithelial cells with the ΔplcB or Δmpl strains resulted in the formation of small infection foci. As expected, the ΔplcB strain displayed a strong defect in vacuole escape. However, the Δmpl strain showed an unexpected defect in the resolution of protrusions into vacuoles, in addition to the expected but mild defect in vacuole escape. The Δmpl strain displayed increased levels of ActA on the bacterial surface in protrusions. We mapped an Mpl-dependent processing site in ActA between amino acid residues 207 to 238. Similar to the Δmpl strain, the ΔactA207–238 strain displayed increased levels of ActA on the bacterial surface in protrusions. Although the ΔactA207–238 strain displayed wild-type actin-based motility, it formed small infection foci and failed to resolve protrusions into vacuoles. We propose that, in addition to its role in PlcB processing and vacuole escape, the metalloprotease Mpl is required for ActA processing and protrusion resolution. PMID:27068088

  7. The cell envelope-bound metalloprotease (camelysin) from Bacillus cereus is a possible pathogenic factor.

    PubMed

    Fricke, B; Drössler, K; Willhardt, I; Schierhorn, A; Menge, S; Rücknagel, P

    2001-09-28

    A novel membrane proteinase of the nosocomial important bacteria species Bacillus cereus (synonyms: camelysin, CCMP) was purified up to homogeneity as was shown by mass spectrometry in its amphiphilic form. Camelysin is a neutral metalloprotease with a molecular mass of 19 kDa. Its unique N-terminus Phe-Phe-Ser-Asp-Lys-Glu-Val-Ser-Asn-Asn-Thr-Phe-Ala-Ala-Gly-Thr-Leu-Asp-Leu-Thr-Leu-Asn-Pro-Lys-Thr-Leu-Val-Asp-(Ile-Lys-Asp)- was not detected in the protein data bases during BLAST searches, but in the partially sequenced genome of Bacillus anthracis, coding for an unknown protein. Cleavage sites of the membrane proteinase for the insulin A- and B-chains were determined by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing. Camelysin prefers cleavage sites in front of aliphatic and hydrophilic amino acid residues (-OH, -SO3H, amido group), avoiding bulky aromatic residues. The internally quenched fluorogenic substrates of the matrix metalloproteases 2 and 7 were cleaved with the highest efficiency at the Leu-decrease-Gly or Leu-decrease-Ala bond with the smaller residue in the P1' position. The protein specificity is broad--all various kinds of casein were cleaved as well as acid-soluble collagen, globin and ovalbumin; intact insulin was destroyed only to a low extent. Actin, collagen type I, fibrinogen, fibrin, alpha2-antiplasmin and alpha1-antitrypsin were cleaved. The protease formed SDS-stable complexes with Glu-plasminogen and antithrombin III, visible after SDS electrophoresis by gold staining and Western blot. The CCMP-plasminogen complex caused a partial activation of plasminogen to plasmin. Camelysin interacts with proteins of the blood coagulation cascade and could facilitate the penetration of fibrin clots and of the extracellular matrix during bacterial invasion.

  8. Characterization of a metalloprotease involved in Vibrio splendidus infection in the sea cucumber, Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Liang, Weikang; Zhang, Weiwei; Li, Chenghua

    2016-12-01

    Vibrio splendidus is an important aquatic pathogen that infects a broad range of hosts, leading to typical symptoms of "skin ulceration syndrome" in the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. However, there are few reports on the virulence factors and pathogenic mechanism of V. splendidus. In the present study, V. splendidus could survive in the coelomic fluid of A. japonicus but poorly internalized into the coelomocyte under the tested conditions. It was thus postulated that V. splendidus was pathogenic to A. japonicus, mainly due to its extracellular products. The main extracellular proteins of V. splendidus were detected using MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS, and a metalloprotease was identified. The gene encoding a metalloprotease belonging to the thermolysin family, named vsm, was cloned and characterized. Furthermore, the expression of vsm was growth dependent and the supernatant of V. splendidus also showed high protease activity. The vsm gene was conditionally expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). Enzyme activity analysis showed that the optimal temperature and pH for purified recombinant Vsm were approximately 40 °C and 7.0, respectively. Furthermore, Vsm was determined to be associated with the pathogenesis of V. splendidus due to the following aspects: (1) real-time reverse transcriptase PCR showed that expression of vsm was significantly up-regulated when V. splendidus was co-incubated with the coelomic fluid of A. japonicus; and (2) purified recombinant Vsm showed obvious cytotoxicity to the coelomocyte of A. japonicus. Our results indicated that Vsm is involved in the interaction between V. splendidus and A. japonicus and also contributed to the cytotoxic effects on the coelomocyte of A. japonicus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Features of Pro-σK Important for Cleavage by SpoIVFB, an Intramembrane Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kangming; Xiang, Xianling; Gu, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases regulate diverse processes by cleaving substrates within a transmembrane segment or near the membrane surface. Bacillus subtilis SpoIVFB is an intramembrane metalloprotease that cleaves Pro-σK during sporulation. To elucidate features of Pro-σK important for cleavage by SpoIVFB, coexpression of the two proteins in Escherichia coli was used along with cell fractionation. In the absence of SpoIVFB, a portion of the Pro-σK was peripherally membrane associated. This portion was not observed in the presence of SpoIVFB, suggesting that it serves as the substrate. Deletion of Pro-σK residues 2 to 8, addition of residues at its N terminus, or certain single-residue substitutions near the cleavage site impaired cleavage. Certain multiresidue substitutions near the cleavage site changed the position of cleavage, revealing preferences for a small residue preceding the cleavage site N-terminally (i.e., at the P1 position) and a hydrophobic residue at the second position following the cleavage site C-terminally (i.e., P2′). These features appear to be conserved among Pro-σK orthologs. SpoIVFB did not tolerate an aromatic residue at P1 or P2′ of Pro-σK. A Lys residue at P3′ of Pro-σK could not be replaced with Ala unless a Lys was provided farther C-terminally (e.g., at P9′). α-Helix-destabilizing residues near the cleavage site were not crucial for SpoIVFB to cleave Pro-σK. The preferences and tolerances of SpoIVFB are somewhat different from those of other intramembrane metalloproteases, perhaps reflecting differences in the interaction of the substrate with the membrane and the enzyme. PMID:23585539

  10. Linker regions and flexibility around the metalloprotease domain account for conformational activation of ADAMTS13

    PubMed Central

    Deforche, L.; Roose, E.; Vandenbulcke, A.; Vandeputte, N.; Feys, H.B.; Springer, T.A.; Mi, L.Z.; Muia, J.; Sadler, J.E.; Soejima, K.; Rottensteiner, H.; Deckmyn, H.; De Meyer, S.F.; Vanhoorelbeke, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, conformational activation of ADAMTS13 was identified. This mechanism showed the evolution from a condensed and inhibited conformation, in which the proximal MDTCS and distal T2-CUB2 domains are in close contact with each other, to an activated structure due to ding with the von Willebrand factor (VWF). Objectives Identification of cryptic epitope/exosite exposure after conformational activation and of sites of flexibility in ADAMTS13. Methods The activating effect of 25 anti-T2-CUB2 antibodies was studied in the FRETS-VWF73 and the vortex assay. Cryptic epitope/exosite exposure was determined in ELISA and VWF binding assay. The molecular basis for flexibility was hypothesized through RADAR analysis, tested in ELISA using deletion variants and visualized using electron microscopy. Results Eleven activating anti-ADAMTS13 antibodies, directed against the T5-CUB2 domains, were identified in the FRETS-VWF73 assay. RADAR analysis identified three linker regions in the distal domains. Interestingly, identification of an antibody recognizing a cryptic epitope in the metalloprotease domain confirmed the contribution of these linker regions to conformational activation of the enzyme. The proof of flexibility around both the T2 and metalloprotease domains by electron microscopy furthermore supported this contribution. In addition, cryptic epitope exposure was identified in the distal domains, as activating anti-T2-CUB2 antibodies increased the binding to folded VWF up to ~3-fold. Conclusion Conformational activation of ADAMTS13 leads to cryptic epitope/exosite exposure in both proximal and distal domains, subsequently inducing increased activity. Furthermore, three linker regions in the distal domains are responsible for flexibility and enable the interaction between the proximal and the T8-CUB2 domains. PMID:26391536

  11. Role of metalloproteases in retinal degeneration induced by violet and blue light.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Ramos, C; Vega, J A; del Valle, M E; Fernandez-Balbuena, A; Bonnin-Arias, C; Benitez-del Castillo, J M

    2010-01-01

    An essential role for metalloproteases (MMPs) has been described in blood vessel neoformation and the removal of cell debris. MMPs also play a key role in degenerative processes and in tumors. The participation of these enzymes in light-induced phototoxic processes is supported by both experimental and clinical data. Given that patients with age-related macular degeneration often show deposits, or drusen, these deposits could be the consequence of deficient MMP production by the pigment epithelium. To gain insight into the regulation of metalloproteases in the pathogenia of retinal degeneration induced by light. We examined the eyes of experimental rabbits exposed for 2 years to circadian cycles of white light, blue light and white light lacking short wavelengths. For the trial the animals had been implanted with a transparent intraocular lens (IOL) and a yellow AcrySof((R)) IOL, one in each eye. After sacrificing the animals, the retinal layer was dissected from the eye and processed for gene expression analyses in which we examined the behavior of MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-9. MMP-2 expression was unaffected by the light received and type of IOL. However, animals exposed to white light devoid of short wavelengths or those fitted with a yellow IOL showed 2.9- and 3.6-fold increases in MMP-3 expression, respectively compared to controls. MMP-9 expression levels were also 3.1 times higher following exposure to blue light and 4.6 times higher following exposure to white light lacking short wavelengths or 4.2 times higher in eyes implanted with a yellow IOL. Exposure to long periods of light irrespective of its characteristics leads to the increased expression of some MMPs. This alteration could indicate damage to the extracellular matrix and have detrimental effects on the retina.

  12. Expression profiling, gene silencing and transcriptional networking of metzincin metalloproteases in the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Annette-Christi; Nijhof, Ard M; Gaspar, Anabella R M; Neitz, Albert W H; Jongejan, Frans; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2012-05-25

    Tick proteins functioning in vital physiological processes such as blood meal uptake, digestion and reproduction are potential targets for anti-tick vaccines, since vaccination could inhibit these essential functions and ultimately affect tick survival. In this study we identified metzincin metalloproteases from Rhipicephalus microplus as potential vaccine candidates since they are implicated as essential to blood-cavity formation, bloodmeal digestion and reproduction in ixodid ticks. Eight transcripts encoding proteins that contain the characteristic metzincin zinc-binding motif HEXXHXXG/NXXH/D and a unique methionine containing "methionine-turn" were identified from native and in-house assembled R. microplus expressed sequence tag (EST) databases. These were representative of five reprolysin-like and three astacin-like metzincin metalloproteases. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis indicated that the reprolysins were most abundantly expressed in the salivary glands, whereas the astacins were most abundant in the midgut and ovaries. In vivo gene silencing was performed to assess a possible phenotype of these metalloproteases during adult female R. microplus blood feeding and reproduction. RNA interference (RNAi) against two of the reprolysins and one of the astacins significantly affected the average egg weight and oviposition rate. Evidently, this reverse genetic approach enabled the evaluation of the overall vital impact of tick proteins. Finally, integrated real time-PCR studies also revealed an extensive cross organ network between the R. microplus metzincin transcripts, supporting the use of a combinatorial metzincin-based anti- R. microplus vaccine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ikaros and its interacting partner CtBP target the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 to modulate pituitary cell function.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhongyi; Asa, Sylvia L; Ezzat, Shereen

    2017-01-05

    We have previously described the expression and up-regulation of the C-terminal Binding Protein (CtBP) in response to pituitary hypoxia. This co-repressor interacts with the hematopoietic factor Ikaros to target several components implicated in cellular growth and apoptotic pathways. To identify common transcriptional pituitary targets we performed promoter arrays using Ikaros and CtBP chromatin immunoprecipitated (ChIP) DNA from pituitary AtT20 cells. This approach yielded a finite list of gene targets common to both transcription factors. Of these, the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 emerged as a validated target. We show the ability of Ikaros to bind the ADAMTS10 promoter, influence its transfected activity, and induce endogenous gene expression. ADAMTS10 is expressed in primary pituitary cells and is down-regulated in Ikaros null mice. Further, knockdown of ADAMTS10 in AtT20 cells recapitulates the impact of Ikaros deficiency on POMC/ACTH hormone expression. These results uncover a novel role for the metalloprotease ADAMTS10 in the pituitary. Additionally, they position this metalloprotease as a potential functional integrator of the Ikaros-CtBP chromatin remodeling network.

  14. Molecular cloning and characterization of Ac-MTP-2, an astacin-like metalloprotease released by adult Ancylostoma caninum.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjun; Zhan, Bin; Liu, Yueyuan; Liu, Sen; Williamson, Angela; Goud, Gaddam; Loukas, Alex; Hotez, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Ac-MTP-2 is an astacin-like metalloprotease secreted by adult Ancylostoma caninum hookworms. Ac-mtp-2 cDNA was cloned by immunoscreening a cDNA library with antisera prepared against adult A. caninum excretory/secretory (ES) products. The full-length Ac-mtp-2 contains 850 bp cDNA encoding a 233 amino acid open reading frame (ORF) with 32% amino acid identity to Ce-NSP-4, a pharyngeal cell-derived secreted metalloprotease of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The predicted ORF contained a conserved Met-turn sequence (SXMHY), but only a partial zinc-binding signature sequence (GXXXEHXRXER instead of HEXXHXXGXXHEXXRXDR) found in other astacins. However, by both gelatin gel electrophoresis and azocasein digestion, the recombinant Ac-MTP-2 exhibited proteolytic activity that was inhibited by the zinc chelator 1,10-phenanthroline and Ac-TMP, a putative tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease that was previously shown to be a highly abundant component of adult A. caninum ES products. By RT-PCR, Western blot Ac-MTP-2 was found only expressed in adult hookworms and secreted in the adult ES products. Immunolocalization with antisera shows that Ac-MTP-2 is located to the esophageal glands (confirming its role as a secretory protein), as well as to the parasite uterus. It is hypothesized that Ac-MTP-2 functions in the extracorporeal digestion of the intestinal mucosal plug lodged in the buccal capsule of the adult parasite.

  15. Two Paralogous Tetraspanins TSP-12 and TSP-14 Function with the ADAM10 Metalloprotease SUP-17 to Promote BMP Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Herong

    2017-01-01

    The highly conserved bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway regulates many developmental and homeostatic processes. While the core components of the BMP pathway have been well studied, much research is needed for understanding the mechanisms involved in the precise spatiotemporal control of BMP signaling in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that two paralogous and evolutionarily conserved tetraspanins, TSP-12 and TSP-14, function redundantly to promote BMP signaling in C. elegans. We further show that the ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10) ortholog SUP-17 also functions to promote BMP signaling, and that TSP-12 can bind to and promote the cell surface localization of SUP-17. SUP-17/ADAM10 is known to be involved in the ligand-induced proteolytic processing of the Notch receptor. We have evidence that the function of SUP-17, and of TSP-12/TSP-14 in BMP signaling is independent of their roles in Notch signaling. Furthermore, presenilins, core components of the γ-secretase complex involved in processing Notch, do not appear to play a role in BMP signaling. These studies established a new role of the TSP-12/TSP-14/SUP-17 axis in regulating BMP signaling, in addition to their known function in the Notch signaling pathway. We also provide genetic evidence showing that a known BMP signaling modulator, UNC-40/neogenin/DCC, is one of the substrates of SUP-17/ADAM10 in the BMP signaling pathway. PMID:28068334

  16. Neurovirulent Murine Coronavirus JHM.SD Uses Cellular Zinc Metalloproteases for Virus Entry and Cell-Cell Fusion.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Judith M; Gallagher, Tom; Weiss, Susan R

    2017-04-15

    The coronavirus (CoV) S protein requires cleavage by host cell proteases to mediate virus-cell and cell-cell fusion. Many strains of the murine coronavirus mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) have distinct, S-dependent organ and tissue tropisms despite using a common receptor, suggesting that they employ different cellular proteases for fusion. In support of this hypothesis, we found that inhibition of endosomal acidification only modestly decreased entry, and overexpression of the cell surface protease TMPRSS2 greatly enhanced entry, of the highly neurovirulent MHV strain JHM.SD relative to their effects on the reference strain, A59. However, TMPRSS2 overexpression decreased MHV structural protein expression, release of infectious particles, and syncytium formation, and endogenous serine protease activity did not contribute greatly to infection. We therefore investigated the importance of other classes of cellular proteases and found that inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)- and a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-family zinc metalloproteases markedly decreased both entry and cell-cell fusion. Suppression of virus by metalloprotease inhibition varied among tested cell lines and MHV S proteins, suggesting a role for metalloprotease use in strain-dependent tropism. We conclude that zinc metalloproteases must be considered potential contributors to coronavirus fusion.IMPORTANCE The family Coronaviridae includes viruses that cause two emerging diseases of humans, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), as well as a number of important animal pathogens. Because coronaviruses depend on host protease-mediated cleavage of their S proteins for entry, a number of protease inhibitors have been proposed as antiviral agents. However, it is unclear which proteases mediate in vivo infection. For example, SARS-CoV infection of cultured cells depends on endosomal acid pH-dependent proteases rather than on the cell surface acid p

  17. The Metalloprotease Meprin β Is an Alternative β-Secretase of APP

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Pietrzik, Claus U.

    2017-01-01

    The membrane bound metalloprotease meprin β is important for collagen fibril assembly in connective tissue formation and for the detachment of the intestinal mucus layer for proper barrier function. Recent proteomic studies revealed dozens of putative new substrates of meprin β, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP). It was shown that APP is cleaved by meprin β in distinct ways, either at the β-secretase site resulting in increased levels of Aβ peptides, or at the N-terminus releasing 11 kDa, and 20 kDa peptide fragments. The latter event was discussed to be rather neuroprotective, whereas the ectodomain shedding of APP by meprin β reminiscent to BACE-1 is in line with the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease, promoting neurodegeneration. The N-terminal 11 kDa and 20 kDa peptide fragments represent physiological cleavage products, since they are found in human brains under different diseased or non-diseased states, whereas these fragments are completely missing in brains of meprin β knock-out animals. Meprin β is not only a sheddase of adhesion molecules, such as APP, but was additionally demonstrated to cleave within the prodomain of ADAM10. Activated ADAM10, the α-secretase of APP, is then able to shed meprin β from the cell surface thereby abolishing the β-secretase activity. All together meprin β seems to be a novel player in APP processing events, even influencing other enzymes involved in APP cleavage. PMID:28105004

  18. Reprolysin metalloproteases from Ixodes persulcatus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.

    PubMed

    Ali, Abid; Tirloni, Lucas; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Seixas, Adriana; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz Junior, Itabajara; Termignoni, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Metalloproteases (MPs) have been considered essential for blood feeding and other physiological functions in several hematophagous animals, including ticks. We report the characterization of MP sequences of three important ticks from Asia, Africa and America: Ixodes persulcatus (Ip-MPs), Rhipicephalus sanguineus (Rs-MPs) and R. microplus (BrRm-MPs). Amino acid sequence identity between R. microplus and R. sanguineus MPs ranged from 76 to 100 %, and identities among I. persulcatus, I. ricinus and I. scapularis MP sequences ranged from 88 to 97 %. This high sequence identity and typical functional motifs show that all sequences are MPs. The presence of a zinc binding site, a Met-turn and cysteine rich domain at the C-terminal region indicates that these proteins belong to the reproplysin family of MPs. Differences in amino acid sequences of BrRm-MP1, BrRm-MP2, BrRm-MP4 and BrRm-MP5 (from Porto Alegre strain ticks) were 6, 2, 7 and 5 %, respectively, when compared with sequences deposited in GenBank for the same genes from other R. microplus isolates. Analyses of MPs predicted that they have various highly antigenic regions. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed the presence of transcripts in salivary glands of partially and fully fed female ticks. None of these transcripts were observed in males (except BrRm-MP4) and eggs. These enzymes may be functional components required during tick feeding to manipulate host defenses and support tick hematophagy.

  19. The Metalloprotease Meprin β Is an Alternative β-Secretase of APP.

    PubMed

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-01-01

    The membrane bound metalloprotease meprin β is important for collagen fibril assembly in connective tissue formation and for the detachment of the intestinal mucus layer for proper barrier function. Recent proteomic studies revealed dozens of putative new substrates of meprin β, including the amyloid precursor protein (APP). It was shown that APP is cleaved by meprin β in distinct ways, either at the β-secretase site resulting in increased levels of Aβ peptides, or at the N-terminus releasing 11 kDa, and 20 kDa peptide fragments. The latter event was discussed to be rather neuroprotective, whereas the ectodomain shedding of APP by meprin β reminiscent to BACE-1 is in line with the amyloid hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease, promoting neurodegeneration. The N-terminal 11 kDa and 20 kDa peptide fragments represent physiological cleavage products, since they are found in human brains under different diseased or non-diseased states, whereas these fragments are completely missing in brains of meprin β knock-out animals. Meprin β is not only a sheddase of adhesion molecules, such as APP, but was additionally demonstrated to cleave within the prodomain of ADAM10. Activated ADAM10, the α-secretase of APP, is then able to shed meprin β from the cell surface thereby abolishing the β-secretase activity. All together meprin β seems to be a novel player in APP processing events, even influencing other enzymes involved in APP cleavage.

  20. Collagenolytic activity related to metalloproteases (and serine proteases) in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Adroher, Francisco Javier; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío

    2010-06-11

    Proteases play a vital role in both the life cycle of parasites and the parasite-host relationship and are considered important virulence factors. In the present study, the presence of proteases with collagenolytic activity was investigated in the fish nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum during in vitro development. Collagenolytic activity was found in all studied developmental stages of the nematode (third [L3] and fourth [L4] larval stages and adults). In L3, the activity was maximum at pH 6.5 and, in the other stages, at 7.0. Pepsin is known to favour in vitro development of the worm, but, in this study, collagenolytic activity was shown to be significantly greater when no pepsin was added to the culture medium (at pH 6.5, p = 0.011). At pH 7.0, most activity was observed in the immature adult, after the final moult, suggesting that the collagenolytic activity may be involved in remodelling of the cuticle and in sexual maturity. On the other hand, at pH 6.5, activity may be related to tissue migration by L3 within the host. Using specific inhibitors, it was demonstrated that most of the collagenolytic activity detected in all the developmental stages was due to metalloproteases (40 to 100%), although serine proteases were also detected in L4 and adults (10 to 30%).

  1. ORMDL3 is an inducible lung epithelial gene regulating metalloproteases, chemokines, OAS, and ATF6.

    PubMed

    Miller, Marina; Tam, Arvin B; Cho, Jae Youn; Doherty, Taylor A; Pham, Alexa; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Mueller, James L; Hoffman, Hal M; Suzukawa, Maho; Niwa, Maho; Broide, David H

    2012-10-09

    Orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3) has been strongly linked with asthma in genetic association studies, but its function in asthma is unknown. We demonstrate that in mice ORMDL3 is an allergen and cytokine (IL-4 or IL-13) inducible endoplasmic reticulum (ER) gene expressed predominantly in airway epithelial cells. Allergen challenge induces a 127-fold increase in ORMDL3 mRNA in bronchial epithelium in WT mice, with lesser 15-fold increases in ORMDL-2 and no changes in ORMDL-1. Studies of STAT-6-deficient mice demonstrated that ORMDL3 mRNA induction highly depends on STAT-6. Transfection of ORMDL3 in human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro induced expression of metalloproteases (MMP-9, ADAM-8), CC chemokines (CCL-20), CXC chemokines (IL-8, CXCL-10, CXCL-11), oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS) genes, and selectively activated activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), an unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway transcription factor. siRNA knockdown of ATF-6α in lung epithelial cells inhibited expression of SERCA2b, which has been implicated in airway remodeling in asthma. In addition, transfection of ORMDL3 in lung epithelial cells activated ATF6α and induced SERCA2b. These studies provide evidence of the inducible nature of ORMDL3 ER expression in particular in bronchial epithelial cells and suggest an ER UPR pathway through which ORMDL3 may be linked to asthma.

  2. Hyaluronic acid alkyl derivative: A novel inhibitor of metalloproteases and hyaluronidases.

    PubMed

    Pavan, Mauro; Galesso, Devis; Secchieri, Cynthia; Guarise, Cristian

    2016-03-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, one of the main features of osteoarthritis, is driven by at least two major classes of enzymes: matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and hyaluronidases. Among certain glycosaminoglycans, including natural and chemically cross-linked HAs, which are currently used as viscosupplements, the hyaluronic acid (HA) alkyl-amides (Hyadd) were here selected as the strongest MMP and hyaluronidase inhibitors. We used C. histolyticum collagenase (ChC) and bovine testicular hyaluronidase (BTH) as representative models of human MMPs and hyaluronidases, respectively. The role of the alkyl moiety was investigated using HA derivatives with varying alkyl lengths and degrees of derivatization. The selected compound was then screened against 10 different human MMPs in vitro, and the results were validated ex vivo in human synovial fluid. Hyadd-C16, identified as a lead compound, showed the highest inhibition potency against MMP13 and MMP8. The in vitro results were confirmed by the inhibition of human MMP13 (Ki=106.1 μM) and hyaluronidase-2 in the synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis. This study demonstrates the unique properties of Hyadd-C16, including its remarkable enzymatic inhibitory activity, which is conferred by the hydrophobic chain, and its high biocompatibility and water solubility of the HA backbone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ORMDL3 is an inducible lung epithelial gene regulating metalloproteases, chemokines, OAS, and ATF6

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Marina; Tam, Arvin B.; Cho, Jae Youn; Doherty, Taylor A.; Pham, Alexa; Khorram, Naseem; Rosenthal, Peter; Mueller, James L.; Hoffman, Hal M.; Suzukawa, Maho; Niwa, Maho; Broide, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Orosomucoid like 3 (ORMDL3) has been strongly linked with asthma in genetic association studies, but its function in asthma is unknown. We demonstrate that in mice ORMDL3 is an allergen and cytokine (IL-4 or IL-13) inducible endoplasmic reticulum (ER) gene expressed predominantly in airway epithelial cells. Allergen challenge induces a 127-fold increase in ORMDL3 mRNA in bronchial epithelium in WT mice, with lesser 15-fold increases in ORMDL-2 and no changes in ORMDL-1. Studies of STAT-6–deficient mice demonstrated that ORMDL3 mRNA induction highly depends on STAT-6. Transfection of ORMDL3 in human bronchial epithelial cells in vitro induced expression of metalloproteases (MMP-9, ADAM-8), CC chemokines (CCL-20), CXC chemokines (IL-8, CXCL-10, CXCL-11), oligoadenylate synthetases (OAS) genes, and selectively activated activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6), an unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway transcription factor. siRNA knockdown of ATF-6α in lung epithelial cells inhibited expression of SERCA2b, which has been implicated in airway remodeling in asthma. In addition, transfection of ORMDL3 in lung epithelial cells activated ATF6α and induced SERCA2b. These studies provide evidence of the inducible nature of ORMDL3 ER expression in particular in bronchial epithelial cells and suggest an ER UPR pathway through which ORMDL3 may be linked to asthma. PMID:23011799

  4. Catalytic Role of Thermostable Metalloproteases from Bacillus subtilis KT004404 as Dehairing and Destaining Agent.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Ramla; Ahmed, Maliha; Siddique, Aisha; Hasan, Fariha; Hameed, Abdul; Jamal, Asif

    2017-01-01

    Proteases with characteristic stabilities are considered attractive candidates for industrial catalysis. In the present study, a potent bacterial strain KT004404, an inhabitant of hydrothermal vents, was isolated and characterized for protease production. Initial screening indicated that this strain produced a hydrolytic zone of 30 mm 16S rRNA-based identification revealed that our isolate was a strain of Bacillus subtilis. Optimum reaction condition for maximum protease production was determined as 55 °C, pH 6, 1 % inoculum size and malt extract as primary growth substrate supplemented with 1 % dextrose. Yield of the enzyme was increased up to 7.53 folds with a specific activity of 55.125 U/mg after gel filtration chromatography. SDS-PAGE analysis confirmed the size of protease as 28.24 kDa. Purified enzyme retained its catalytic activity over a broad range of temperature (5 to 65 °C) and pH [5-8]. Addition of metal ions shown to have a stimulatory effect on catalytic properties while EDTA inhibited the efficiency of the enzyme confirming it as a metalloprotease. Protease exhibited excellent stability and activity in the presence of anionic surfactants, solvents, and detergents. The results of dehairing and destaining experiments suggested that the protease produced by B. subtilis KT004404 could be used in leather and textile industries with ecological benefits.

  5. Mapping orphan proteases by proteomics: meprin metalloproteases deciphered as potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Broder, Claudia; Prox, Johannes; Koudelka, Tomas; Tholey, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    The protease web is a synonym for highly regulated molecular networks comprising enzymes, substrates, inhibitors, and other regulatory proteins. Latest high-throughput methods provided huge data sets, revealing an amazing complexity of proteolytic systems important for health and disease. Based on our previous studies, we discuss major problems and questions that have to be solved to gain precise insight into the regulation of the protease web and its impact on pathophysiological conditions. The goal is a combination of different proteomic approaches that help to investigate specific protease function at a glance. Exemplarily, the characterization of the metalloproteases meprin α and meprin β by proteomic identification of cleavage sites and terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates demonstrates the power of MS-based techniques. Meprins are rather orphan proteases and could not be assigned to precise biological functions until recently. Proteomics helped to identify meprin α and meprin β being important for collagen assembly and deposition in skin, which makes them potential therapeutic targets in fibrotic conditions. Additionally, identification of the cleavage site specificity provides the basis for the development of activity-based probes and small compound inhibitors, important for the regulation of meprin activity and subsequent treatment of associated diseases. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. The C-terminal domain promotes the hemorrhagic damage caused by Vibrio vulnificus metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, S; Kawata, K; Tomochika, K; Shinoda, S; Yamamoto, S

    2001-12-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, an opportunistic human pathogen, produces a 45-kDa zinc metalloprotease (V. vulnificus protease; VVP) as an important virulence determinant. VVP injected intradermally into the dorsal skin causes the hemorrhagic damage through specific degradation of type IV collage in the vascular basement membrane. The N-terminal 35-kDa polypeptide (VVP-N), the catalytic domain, also evoked the hemorrhagic skin reaction within minutes. However, the hemorrhagic activity of VVP-N was one-third of that of VVP. Besides, the proteolytic activity of VVP-N toward the reconstituted basement membrane or type IV collagen was found to be about 50 % of VVP. VVP-N, like VVP, was quickly inactivated by an equimolar amount of alpha(2)-macroglobulin, a broad-spectrum plasma protease inhibitor. These findings indicate that the C-terminal 10-kDa polypeptide, the substrate-binding domain mediating the effective binding to protein substrates, functions to augment the hemorrhagic reaction of VVP.

  7. A highly conserved metalloprotease effector enhances virulence in the maize anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum graminicola.

    PubMed

    Sanz-Martín, José M; Pacheco-Arjona, José Ramón; Bello-Rico, Víctor; Vargas, Walter A; Monod, Michel; Díaz-Mínguez, José M; Thon, Michael R; Sukno, Serenella A

    2016-09-01

    Colletotrichum graminicola causes maize anthracnose, an agronomically important disease with a worldwide distribution. We have identified a fungalysin metalloprotease (Cgfl) with a role in virulence. Transcriptional profiling experiments and live cell imaging show that Cgfl is specifically expressed during the biotrophic stage of infection. To determine whether Cgfl has a role in virulence, we obtained null mutants lacking Cgfl and performed pathogenicity and live microscopy assays. The appressorium morphology of the null mutants is normal, but they exhibit delayed development during the infection process on maize leaves and roots, showing that Cgfl has a role in virulence. In vitro chitinase activity assays of leaves infected with wild-type and null mutant strains show that, in the absence of Cgfl, maize leaves exhibit increased chitinase activity. Phylogenetic analyses show that Cgfl is highly conserved in fungi. Similarity searches, phylogenetic analysis and transcriptional profiling show that C. graminicola encodes two LysM domain-containing homologues of Ecp6, suggesting that this fungus employs both Cgfl-mediated and LysM protein-mediated strategies to control chitin signalling. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) is a central regulator of murine liver tissue homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Köhn-Gaone, Julia; Chalupsky, Karel; Lüllmann-Rauch, Renate; Barikbin, Roja; Bergmann, Juri; Wöhner, Birte; Zbodakova, Olga; Leuschner, Ivo; Martin, Gregor; Tiegs, Gisa; Rose-John, Stefan; Sedlacek, Radislav; Tirnitz-Parker, Janina E.E.; Saftig, Paul; Schmidt-Arras, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 exerts essential roles during organ development and tissue integrity in different organs, mainly through activation of the Notch pathway. However, only little is known about its implication in liver tissue physiology. Here we show that in contrast to its role in other tissues, ADAM10 is dispensable for the Notch2-dependent biliary tree formation. However, we demonstrate that expression of bile acid transporters is dependent on ADAM10. Consequently, mice deficient for Adam10 in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes and liver progenitor cells develop spontaneous hepatocyte necrosis and concomitant liver fibrosis. We furthermore observed a strongly augmented ductular reaction in 15-week old ADAM10Δhep/Δch mice and demonstrate that c-Met dependent liver progenitor cell activation is enhanced. Additionally, liver progenitor cells are primed to hepatocyte differentiation in the absence of ADAM10. These findings show that ADAM10 is a novel central node controlling liver tissue homeostasis. Highlights: Loss of ADAM10 in murine liver results in hepatocyte necrosis and concomitant liver fibrosis. ADAM10 directly regulates expression of bile acid transporters but is dispensable for Notch2-dependent formation of the biliary system. Activation of liver progenitor cells is enhanced through increased c-Met signalling, in the absence of ADAM10. Differentiation of liver progenitor cells to hepatocytes is augmented in the absence of ADAM10. PMID:26942887

  9. Meprin Metalloproteases Generate Biologically Active Soluble Interleukin-6 Receptor to Induce Trans-Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Philipp; Boll, Inga; Rothaug, Michelle; Schumacher, Neele; Schmidt, Frederike; Wichert, Rielana; Schneppenheim, Janna; Lokau, Juliane; Pickhinke, Ute; Koudelka, Tomas; Tholey, Andreas; Rabe, Björn; Scheller, Jürgen; Lucius, Ralph; Garbers, Christoph; Rose-John, Stefan; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Soluble Interleukin-6 receptor (sIL-6R) mediated trans-signaling is an important pro-inflammatory stimulus associated with pathological conditions, such as arthritis, neurodegeneration and inflammatory bowel disease. The sIL-6R is generated proteolytically from its membrane bound form and A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 and 17 were shown to perform ectodomain shedding of the receptor in vitro and in vivo. However, under certain conditions not all sIL-6R could be assigned to ADAM10/17 activity. Here, we demonstrate that the IL-6R is a shedding substrate of soluble meprin α and membrane bound meprin β, resulting in bioactive sIL-6R that is capable of inducing IL-6 trans-signaling. We determined cleavage within the N-terminal part of the IL-6R stalk region, distinct from the cleavage site reported for ADAM10/17. Interestingly, meprin β can be shed from the cell surface by ADAM10/17 and the observation that soluble meprin β is not capable of shedding the IL-6R suggests a regulatory mechanism towards trans-signaling. Additionally, we observed a significant negative correlation of meprin β expression and IL-6R levels on human granulocytes, providing evidence for in vivo function of this proteolytic interaction. PMID:28276471

  10. SPRTN is a mammalian DNA-binding metalloprotease that resolves DNA-protein crosslinks

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Mosqueda, Jaime; Maddi, Karthik; Prgomet, Stefan; Kalayil, Sissy; Marinovic-Terzic, Ivana; Terzic, Janos; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome is a segmental progeroid syndrome resulting from mutations in the SPRTN gene. Cells derived from patients with SPRTN mutations elicit genomic instability and people afflicted with this syndrome developed hepatocellular carcinoma. Here we describe the molecular mechanism by which SPRTN contributes to genome stability and normal cellular homeostasis. We show that SPRTN is a DNA-dependent mammalian protease required for resolving cytotoxic DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs)— a function that had only been attributed to the metalloprotease Wss1 in budding yeast. We provide genetic evidence that SPRTN and Wss1 function distinctly in vivo to resolve DPCs. Upon DNA and ubiquitin binding, SPRTN can elicit proteolytic activity; cleaving DPC substrates and itself. SPRTN null cells or cells derived from patients with Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome are impaired in the resolution of covalent DPCs in vivo. Collectively, SPRTN is a mammalian protease required for resolving DNA-protein crosslinks in vivo whose function is compromised in Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome patients. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21491.001 PMID:27852435

  11. Particulate matter (PM₁₀) induces metalloprotease activity and invasion in airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Chirino, Yolanda I; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Osornio-Vargas, Álvaro Román; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Rosas, Irma; García-Cuellar, Claudia María

    2015-09-17

    Airborne particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤ 10 μm (PM10) is a risk factor for the development of lung diseases and cancer. The aim of this work was to identify alterations in airway epithelial (A549) cells induced by PM10 that could explain how subtoxic exposure (10 μg/cm(2)) promotes a more aggressive in vitro phenotype. Our results showed that cells exposed to PM10 from an industrial zone (IZ) and an urban commercial zone (CZ) induced an increase in protease activity and invasiveness; however, the cell mechanism is different, as only PM10 from CZ up-regulated the activity of metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 and disrupted E-cadherin/β-catenin expression after 48 h of exposure. These in vitro findings are relevant in terms of the mechanism action of PM10 in lung epithelial cells, which could be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of some human illness associated with highly polluted cities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural basis for the autoprocessing of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiang; Wang, Jue; Yu, Da-Qi; Bian, Fei; Xie, Bin-Bin; Chen, Xiu-Lan; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Lai, Lu-Hua; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Wu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Thermolysin-like proteases (TLPs), a large group of zinc metalloproteases, are synthesized as inactive precursors. TLPs with a long propeptide (∼200 residues) undergo maturation following autoprocessing through an elusive molecular mechanism. We report the first two crystal structures for the autoprocessed complexes of a typical TLP, MCP-02. In the autoprocessed complex, Ala205 shifts upward by 33 Å from the previously covalently linked residue, His204, indicating that, following autocleavage of the peptide bond between His204 and Ala205, a large conformational change from the zymogen to the autoprocessed complex occurs. The eight N-terminal residues (residues Ala205-Gly212) of the catalytic domain form a new β-strand, nestling into two other β-strands. Simultaneously, the apparent Tm of the autoprocessed complex increases 20 °C compared to that of the zymogen. The stepwise degradation of the propeptide begins with two sequential cuttings at Ser49-Val50 and Gly57-Leu58, which lead to the disassembly of the propeptide and the formation of mature MCP-02. Our findings give new insights into the molecular mechanism of TLP maturation. PMID:20876133

  13. A functional and structural study of the major metalloprotease secreted by the pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Daniel; Russi, Silvia; Vendrell, Josep; Monod, Michel; Pallarès, Irantzu

    2013-10-01

    Fungalysins are secreted fungal peptidases with the ability to degrade the extracellular matrix proteins elastin and collagen and are thought to act as virulence factors in diseases caused by fungi. Fungalysins constitute a unique family among zinc-dependent peptidases that bears low sequence similarity to known bacterial peptidases of the thermolysin family. The crystal structure of the archetype of the fungalysin family, Aspergillus fumigatus metalloprotease (AfuMep), has been obtained for the first time. The 1.8 Å resolution structure of AfuMep corresponds to that of an autoproteolyzed proenzyme with separate polypeptide chains corresponding to the N-terminal prodomain in a binary complex with the C-terminal zinc-bound catalytic domain. The prodomain consists of a tandem of cystatin-like folds whose C-terminal end is buried into the active-site cleft of the catalytic domain. The catalytic domain harbouring the key catalytic zinc ion and its ligands, two histidines and one glutamic acid, undergoes a conspicuous rearrangement of its N-terminal end during maturation. One key positively charged amino-acid residue and the C-terminal disulfide bridge appear to contribute to its structural-functional properties. Thus, structural, biophysical and biochemical analysis were combined to provide a deeper comprehension of the underlying properties of A. fumigatus fungalysin, serving as a framework for the as yet poorly known metallopeptidases from pathogenic fungi.

  14. Critical role of the disintegrin metalloprotease ADAM17 for intestinal inflammation and regeneration in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chalaris, Athena; Adam, Nina; Sina, Christian; Rosenstiel, Philip; Lehmann-Koch, Judith; Schirmacher, Peter; Hartmann, Dieter; Cichy, Joanna; Gavrilova, Olga; Schreiber, Stefan; Jostock, Thomas; Matthews, Vance; Häsler, Robert; Becker, Christoph; Neurath, Markus F.; Reiß, Karina; Saftig, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The protease a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) 17 cleaves tumor necrosis factor (TNF), L-selectin, and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) ligands from the plasma membrane. ADAM17 is expressed in most tissues and is up-regulated during inflammation and cancer. ADAM17-deficient mice are not viable. Conditional ADAM17 knockout models demonstrated proinflammatory activities of ADAM17 in septic shock via shedding of TNF. We used a novel gene targeting strategy to generate mice with dramatically reduced ADAM17 levels in all tissues. The resulting mice called ADAM17ex/ex were viable, showed compromised shedding of ADAM17 substrates from the cell surface, and developed eye, heart, and skin defects as a consequence of impaired EGF-R signaling caused by failure of shedding of EGF-R ligands. Unexpectedly, although the intestine of unchallenged homozygous ADAM17ex/ex mice was normal, ADAM17ex/ex mice showed substantially increased susceptibility to inflammation in dextran sulfate sodium colitis. This was a result of impaired shedding of EGF-R ligands resulting in failure to phosphorylate STAT3 via the EGF-R and, consequently, in defective regeneration of epithelial cells and breakdown of the intestinal barrier. Besides regulating the systemic availability of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF, our results demonstrate that ADAM17 is needed for vital regenerative activities during the immune response. Thus, our mouse model will help investigate ADAM17 as a potential drug target. PMID:20603312

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0198c, a putative matrix metalloprotease is involved in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Muttucumaru, D G Niranjala; Smith, Debbie A; McMinn, Elizabeth J; Reese, Valerie; Coler, Rhea N; Parish, Tanya

    2011-03-01

    We are interested in the role of proteases in the biology of the global human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We have focused on a putative matrix metalloprotease, Rv0198c. In order to investigate its role we constructed an unmarked chromosomal deletion of the gene and analysed the phenotype of the resulting mutant. No differences in growth in axenic culture were seen and there was no measurable change in overall protease activity in cell-free extracts. Transcriptome analysis revealed a small number of changes in gene expression in aerobic growth, with Rv2488c and Rv1971 being over 40-fold up-regulated and qor (Rv1454c) being 20-fold down-regulated; in addition, changes were seen in members of the heat shock regulon. Virulence assays demonstrated that the mutant was able to replicate in human macrophage-like cells (THP-1 cell line) to a comparable degree with the wild-type. However, the mutant was hyper-virulent in the SCID and C57BL/6 mouse models. Our data suggest that Rv0198c plays a role during infection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Metabolism of AGEs – Bacterial AGEs Are Degraded by Metallo-Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Or, Ifat; Katz, Chen; Ron, Eliora Z.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) are the final products of non-enzymatic protein glycation that results in loss of protein structure and function. We have previously shown that in E. coli AGEs are continually formed as high-molecular weight protein complexes. Moreover, we showed that AGEs are removed from the cells by an active, ATP-dependent secretion and that these secreted molecules have low molecular weight. Taken together, these results indicate that E. coli contains a fraction of low molecular weight AGEs, in addition to the high-molecular weight AGEs. Here we show that the low-molecular weight AGEs originate from high-molecular weight AGEs by proteolytic degradation. Results of in-vitro and in vivo experiments indicated that this degradation is carried out not by the major ATP-dependent proteases that are responsible for the main part of bacterial protein quality control but by an alternative metal-dependent proteolysis. This proteolytic reaction is essential for the further secretion of AGEs from the cells. As the biochemical reactions involving AGEs are not yet understood, the implication of a metalloprotease in breakdown of high molecular weight AGEs and their secretion constitutes an important step in the understanding of AGEs metabolism. PMID:24130678

  17. Squaric Acid-Based Peptidic Inhibitors of Matrix Metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Onaran, M. Burak; Comeau, Anthony B.; Seto, Christopher T.

    2008-01-01

    A series of squaric acid-peptide conjugates were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of MMP-1. The cyclobut-3-enedione core was substituted at the 3-position with several functional groups, such as -N(alkyl)OH, -NHOH and –OH, that are designed to bind to the zinc atom in the active site of the metalloprotease. The 4-position of the cyclobut-3-enedione was derivatized with mono- or dipeptides that are designed to bind in the S1′ and S2′ subsites of the enzyme, and position the metal chelating group appropriately in the active site for binding to zinc. Positional scanning revealed that -N(Me)OH provided the highest level of inhibition among the chelating groups that were tested, and Leu-Tle-NHMe was the preferred amino acid sequence. A combination of these groups yielded an inhibitor with an IC50 value of 95 μM. For one inhibitor, conversion of one of the carbonyl groups on the cyclobut-3-enedione core to a thiocarbonyl group resulted in a 18-fold increase in potency, and yielded a compound with an IC50 value of 15 μM. PMID:16356002

  18. Co-distribution of cysteine cathepsins and matrix metalloproteases in human dentin.

    PubMed

    Scaffa, Polliana Mendes Candia; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Vidal, Cristina de Mattos Pimenta; Curci, Rosa; Apolonio, Fabianni; Gobbi, Pietro; Pashley, David; Tjäderhane, Leo; Tersariol, Ivarne Luis Dos Santos; Nascimento, Fábio Dupart; Carrilho, Marcela Rocha

    2017-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that cysteine cathepsins (CTs) along with matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) may work in conjunction in the proteolysis of mature dentin matrix. The aim of this study was to verify simultaneously the distribution and presence of cathepsins B (CT-B) and K (CT-K) in partially demineralized dentin; and further to evaluate the activity of CTs and MMPs in the same tissue. The distribution of CT-B and CT-K in sound human dentin was assessed by immunohistochemistry. A double-immunolabeling technique was used to identify, at once, the occurrence of those enzymes in dentin. Activities of CTs and MMPs in dentin extracts were evaluated spectrofluorometrically. In addition, in situ gelatinolytic activity of dentin was assayed by zymography. The results revealed the distribution of CT-B and CT-K along the dentin organic matrix and also indicated co-occurrence of MMPs and CTs in that tissue. The enzyme kinetics studies showed proteolytic activity in dentin extracts for both classes of proteases. Furthermore, it was observed that, at least for sound human dentin matrices, the activity of MMPs seems to be predominant over the CTs one. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel matrix metalloprotease-like enzyme (karilysin) of the periodontal pathogen Tannerella forsythia ATCC 43037.

    PubMed

    Karim, Abdulkarim Y; Kulczycka, Magdalena; Kantyka, Tomasz; Dubin, Grzegorz; Jabaiah, Abeer; Daugherty, Patrick S; Thogersen, Ida B; Enghild, Jan J; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Potempa, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Proteases of Tannerella forsythia, a pathogen associated with periodontal disease, are implicated as virulence factors. Here, we characterized a matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-like enzyme of T. forsythia referred to as karilysin. Full-length (without a signal peptide) recombinant karilysin (49.9 kDa) processed itself into the mature 18-kDa enzyme through sequential autoproteolytic cleavage at both N- and C-terminal profragments. The first cleavage at the Asn14-Tyr15 peptide bond generated the fully active enzyme (47.9 kDa) and subsequent truncations at the C-terminus did not affect proteolytic activity. Mutation of Tyr15 to Ala generated a prokarilysin variant that processed itself into the final 18-kDa form with greatly reduced kinetics. Inactive prokarilysin with the mutated catalytic Glu residue (E136A) was processed by active karilysin at the same sites as the active enzymes. Karilysin proteolytic activity and autoprocessing were inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline and EDTA. Calcium ions were found to be important for both the activity and thermal stability of karilysin. Using CLiPS technology, the specificity of karilysin was found to be similar to that of MMPs with preference for Leu/Tyr/Met at P1' and Pro/Ala at P3. This specificity and the ability to degrade elastin, fibrinogen and fibronectin may contribute to the pathogenicity of periodontitis.

  20. Targeting a Single Function of the Multifunctional Matrix Metalloprotease MT1-MMP

    PubMed Central

    Ingvarsen, Signe; Porse, Astrid; Erpicum, Charlotte; Maertens, Ludovic; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Melander, Maria C.; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Noel, Agnès; Holmbeck, Kenn; Engelholm, Lars H.; Behrendt, Niels

    2013-01-01

    The group of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) is responsible for multiple processes of extracellular matrix remodeling in the healthy body but also for matrix and tissue destruction during cancer invasion and metastasis. The understanding of the contributions from each individual MMP, both in healthy and pathological events, has been complicated by the lack of specific inhibitors and the fact that some of the potent MMPs are multifunctional enzymes. These factors have also hampered the setup of therapeutic strategies targeting MMP activity. A tempting target is the membrane-associated MT1-MMP, which has well-documented importance in matrix degradation but which takes part in more than one pathway in this regard. In this report, we describe the selective targeting of a single function of this enzyme by means of a specific monoclonal antibody against MT1-MMP, raised in an MT1-MMP knock-out mouse. The antibody blocks the enzyme ability to activate proMMP-2 without interfering with the collagenolytic function or the general proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP. Using this antibody, we have shown that the MT1-MMP-catalyzed activation of proMMP-2 is involved in the outgrowth of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells in a collagen matrix in vitro, as well as in lymphatic vessel sprouting assayed ex vivo. This is the first example of the complete inactivation of a single function of a multifunctional MMP and the use of this strategy to pursue its role. PMID:23413031

  1. Targeting a single function of the multifunctional matrix metalloprotease MT1-MMP: impact on lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ingvarsen, Signe; Porse, Astrid; Erpicum, Charlotte; Maertens, Ludovic; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Madsen, Daniel H; Melander, Maria C; Gårdsvoll, Henrik; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla; Noel, Agnès; Holmbeck, Kenn; Engelholm, Lars H; Behrendt, Niels

    2013-04-12

    The group of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) is responsible for multiple processes of extracellular matrix remodeling in the healthy body but also for matrix and tissue destruction during cancer invasion and metastasis. The understanding of the contributions from each individual MMP, both in healthy and pathological events, has been complicated by the lack of specific inhibitors and the fact that some of the potent MMPs are multifunctional enzymes. These factors have also hampered the setup of therapeutic strategies targeting MMP activity. A tempting target is the membrane-associated MT1-MMP, which has well-documented importance in matrix degradation but which takes part in more than one pathway in this regard. In this report, we describe the selective targeting of a single function of this enzyme by means of a specific monoclonal antibody against MT1-MMP, raised in an MT1-MMP knock-out mouse. The antibody blocks the enzyme ability to activate proMMP-2 without interfering with the collagenolytic function or the general proteolytic activity of MT1-MMP. Using this antibody, we have shown that the MT1-MMP-catalyzed activation of proMMP-2 is involved in the outgrowth of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells in a collagen matrix in vitro, as well as in lymphatic vessel sprouting assayed ex vivo. This is the first example of the complete inactivation of a single function of a multifunctional MMP and the use of this strategy to pursue its role.

  2. Detection of Intracellular ADAMTS13, a Secreted Zinc-metalloprotease, via Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    S., Geetha; Allen, Courtni E.; Hunt, Ryan; Plum, Elizabeth; Garfield, Susan; Friedman, Scott L.; Soejima, Kenji; Sauna, Zuben E.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2009-01-01

    Background ADAMTS13 is a secreted metalloprotease that cleaves von Willebrand Factor multimers and maintains proper homeostasis. A severe deficiency in ADAMTS13 triggers a disorder known as thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). At present, ADAMTS13 expression levels are determined by immunoblotting. Methods We established a flow cytometry methodology to detect intracellular ADAMTS13 in liver and kidney cells using a polyclonal antibody, BL154G, and several monoclonal antibodies previously used to detect ADAMTS13 by immunoblotting. Results were validated using confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and an activity assay (FRETS-VWF73). Results We show that labeling ADAMTS13 with specific antibodies and detection by flow cytometry yields results that are comparable to previously established methods for ADAMTS13 detection. Specifically, we compared the endogenous expression levels of ADAMTS13 in various liver cell lines using flow cytometry and obtained results that parallel immunoblot analysis. Knock-down of ADAMTS13 expression via targeted siRNA resulted in significantly reduced median signal, displaying the sensitivity of this detection method. A further analysis of reliability and specificity was achieved through plasmid DNA and transfection reagent dose response studies. Conclusions The flow cytometry method described here is useful in determining the expression of both endogenous and recombinant forms of intracellular ADAMTS13. Flow cytometry is a convenient, efficient and cost effective way to measure the expression levels of ADAMTS13. PMID:19526483

  3. New roles for OMA1 metalloprotease: From mitochondrial proteostasis to metabolic homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Quirós, Pedro M; Ramsay, Andrew J; López-Otín, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    The mitochondrial quality control system is essential for the preservation and regulation of mitochondrial function. This system is formed by a complex machinery that controls and maintains protein function and regulates mitochondrial morphology through a coordinated system of continual fusion and fission events. Impairments in the mitochondrial quality control system through either mutation or deficiency in any of its components, can lead to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the physiological consequences of these deficiencies remain unknown in most cases. Here, we briefly review the role of the OPA1-OMA1 system in mitochondrial biology, and summarize our recent report on the generation and phenotypic characterization of a model deficient in OMA1, an ATP-independent mitochondrial metalloprotease that participates in mitochondrial quality control. Interestingly, Oma1-deficient mice display an obesity phenotype, characterized by hepatic steatosis, decrease in energy expenditure and defective thermogenic regulation. In addition, our study has provided in vivo evidence of OMA1 function as a mitochondrial quality control protease, inactivating OPA1 under stress conditions and inhibiting mitochondrial fusion. Further, we have demonstrated the essential role of the OMA1-OPA1 system for brown adipose function and how this system regulates metabolic homeostasis in mice.

  4. [Zinc-dependent metalloprotease 1 promotes apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages].

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; He, Yonglin; Zhang, Jiming; Fang, Chencheng

    2015-12-01

    To construct the eukaryotic expression vector of zinc-dependent metalloprotease 1 (zmp1) gene from Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and investigate its impact on the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages. Zmp1 gene was amplified from the genome of BCG by PCR. The zmp1 gene fragment was inserted into multiple cloning sites of pEGFP-N1 to construct the eukaryotic expression vector pEGFP-N1-zmp1. The constructed pEGFP-N1-zmp1 was transfected into RAW264.7 cells by Lipofectamine(TM) 2000. The expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The zmp1 mRNA was detected by quantitative real-time PCR (qR-PCR). The effect of Zmp1 protein on the apoptosis of RAW264.7 macrophages was detected by flow cytometry (FCM). With zmp1 gene amplified by PCR, we successfully constructed the recombinant vector pEGFP-N1-zmp1 as demonstrated by restriction enzyme analysis and sequencing. GFP was seen in RAW264.7 cells 24 hours after transfected with the recombinant plasmid. As qRT-PCR showed, the expression level of zmp1 mRNA was up-regulated. The early apoptotic rate increased 48 hours after transfection. The increased expression of Zmp1 in RAW264.7 cells promotes the apoptosis of RAW264.7 cells.

  5. A cold-active extracellular metalloprotease from Pedobacter cryoconitis--production and properties.

    PubMed

    Margesin, Rosa; Dieplinger, Hans; Hofmann, Johann; Sarg, Bettina; Lindner, Herbert

    2005-05-01

    An extracellular protease from Pedobacter cryoconitis, isolated from alpine cryoconite on glacier ice, was purified and characterized. Despite high cell densities at a temperature range of 1-25 degrees C, the optimum temperature for protease production was 15 degrees C. Maximum enzyme production was achieved when the strain was grown in a pH-neutral medium containing soybean meal, wheat flour and citrate over 72 h. The 27-kDa enzyme was a metalloprotease (sensitive to EDTA, EGTA and phenanthroline) and showed maximal activity towards azocasein at 40 degrees C and pH 8. The protease was stable for 60 min at 20-30 degrees C, lost 50% of activity after 30 min at 40 degrees C, and was inactivated at 50 degrees C, but was resistant to repeated freezing and thawing. Calcium ions had no protective effect against thermal denaturation. More than 80% of the maximum activity were retained at a pH in the range of 7-10. No activity loss was detected after 1 h at pH 7-9 and 20 degrees C, nor after 1 h of incubation with 3 M urea or 0.1% perborate.

  6. Cloning, sequencing and expression of the gene encoding the extracellular metalloprotease of Aeromonas caviae.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, K; Toma, C; Honma, Y

    2000-01-01

    A gene (apk) encoding the extracellular protease of Aeromonas caviae Ae6 has been cloned and sequenced. For cloning the gene, the DNA genomic library was screened using skim milk LB agar. One clone harboring plasmid pKK3 was selected for sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the 3.5 kb region of pKK3 revealed a single open reading frame (ORF) of 1,785 bp encoding 595 amino acids. The deduced polypeptide contained a putative 16-amino acid signal peptide followed by a large propeptide. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of purified recombinant protein (APK) was consistent with the DNA sequence. This result suggested a mature protein of 412 amino acids with a molecular mass of 44 kDa. However, the molecular mass of purified recombinant APK revealed 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, suggesting that further processing at the C-terminal region took place. The 2 motifs of zinc binding sites deduced are highly conserved in the APK as well as in other zinc metalloproteases including Vibrio proteolyticus neutral protease, Emp V from Vibrio vulnificus, HA/P from Vibrio cholerae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase. Proteolytic activity was inhibited by EDTA, Zincov, 1,10-phenanthroline and tetraethylenepentamine while unaffected by the other inhibitors tested. The protease showed maximum activity at pH 7.0 and was inactivated by heating at 80 C for 15 min. These results together suggest that APK belongs to the thermolysin family of metalloendopeptidases.

  7. Structure of the N-terminal domain of the metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Edwin, Aaron; Persson, Cecilia; Mayzel, Maxim; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Öhman, Anders; Karlsson, B Göran; Sauer-Eriksson, A Elisabeth

    2015-12-01

    The metalloprotease PrtV from Vibrio cholerae serves an important function for the ability of bacteria to invade the mammalian host cell. The protein belongs to the family of M6 proteases, with a characteristic zinc ion in the catalytic active site. PrtV constitutes a 918 amino acids (102 kDa) multidomain pre-pro-protein that undergoes several N- and C-terminal modifications to form a catalytically active protease. We report here the NMR structure of the PrtV N-terminal domain (residues 23-103) that contains two short α-helices in a coiled coil motif. The helices are held together by a cluster of hydrophobic residues. Approximately 30 residues at the C-terminal end, which were predicted to form a third helical structure, are disordered. These residues are highly conserved within the genus Vibrio, which suggests that they might be functionally important. © 2015 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  8. Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin(HA)/protease: an extracellular metalloprotease with multiple pathogenic activities

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Jorge A.; Silva, Anisia J.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae of serogroup O1 and O139, the etiological agent of the diarrheal disease cholera, expresses the extracellular Zn-dependent metalloprotease hemagglutinin (HA)/protease also reported as vibriolysin. This enzyme is also produced by non-O1/O139 (non-cholera) strains that cause mild, sporadic illness (i.e. gastroenteritis, wound or ear infections). Orthologs of HA/protease are present in other members of the Vibrionaceae family pathogenic to humans and fish. HA/protease belongs to the M4 neutral peptidase family and displays significant amino acid sequence homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase (LasB) and Bacillus thermoproteolyticus thermolysin. It exhibits a broad range of potentially pathogenic activities in cell culture and animal models. These activities range from the covalent modification of other toxins, the degradation of the protective mucus barrier and disruption of intestinal tight junctions. Here we review (i) the structure and regulation of HA/protease expression, (ii) its interaction with other toxins and the intestinal mucosa and (iii) discuss the possible role(s) of HA/protease in the pathogenesis of cholera. PMID:26952544

  9. The metalloprotease ADAM12 regulates the effector function of human Th17 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Angela X; El Hed, Aimee; Mercer, Frances; Kozhaya, Lina; Unutmaz, Derya

    2013-01-01

    A key modulator of immune homeostasis, TGFβ has an important role in the differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and IL-17-secreting T cells (Th17). How TGFβ regulates these functionally opposing T cell subsets is not well understood. We determined that an ADAM family metalloprotease called ADAM12 is specifically and highly expressed in both Tregs and CCR6+ Th17 cells. ADAM12 is induced in vitro upon differentiation of naïve T cells to Th17 cells or IL-17-secreting Tregs. Remarkably, silencing ADAM12 expression in CCR6+ memory T cells enhances the production of Th17 cytokines, similar to suppressing TGFβ signaling. Further, ADAM12 knockdown in naïve human T cells polarized towards Th17/Treg cells, or ectopically expressing RORC, greatly enhances IL-17-secreting cell differentiation, more potently then inhibiting TGFβ signals. Together, our findings reveal a novel regulatory role for ADAM12 in Th17 cell differentiation or function and may have implications in regulating their aberrant responses during immune pathologies.

  10. Metalloprotease-disintegrin ADAM12 expression is regulated by Notch signaling via microRNA-29.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Solomon, Emilia; Duhachek Muggy, Sara; Sun, Danqiong; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2011-06-17

    Metalloprotease-disintegrin ADAM12 is overexpressed and frequently mutated in breast cancer. We report here that ADAM12 expression in cultured mammalian cells is up-regulated by Notch signals. Expression of a constitutively active form of Notch1 in murine fibroblasts, myoblasts, or mammary epithelial cells or activation of the endogenous Notch signaling by co-culture with ligand-expressing cells increases ADAM12 protein and mRNA levels. Up-regulation of ADAM12 expression by Notch requires new transcription, is activated in a CSL-dependent manner, and is abolished upon inhibition of IκB kinase. Expression of a constitutively active Notch1 in NIH3T3 cells increases the stability of Adam12 mRNA. We further show that the microRNA-29 family, which has a predicted conserved site in the 3'-untranslated region of mouse Adam12, plays a critical role in mediating the stimulatory effect of Notch on ADAM12 expression. In human cells, Notch up-regulates the expression of the long form, but not the short form, of ADAM12 containing a divergent 3'-untranslated mRNA region. These studies uncover a novel paradigm in Notch signaling and establish Adam12 as a Notch-related gene.

  11. Cell-surface metalloprotease ADAM12 is internalized by a clathrin- and Grb2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Stautz, Dorte; Leyme, Anthony; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Albrechtsen, Reidar; van Deurs, Bo; Wewer, Ulla; Kveiborg, Marie

    2012-11-01

    ADAM12 (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 12), a member of the ADAMs family of transmembrane proteins, is involved in ectodomain shedding, cell-adhesion and signaling, with important implications in cancer. Therefore, mechanisms that regulate the levels and activity of ADAM12 at the cell-surface are possibly crucial in these contexts. We here investigated internalization and subsequent recycling or degradation of ADAM12 as a potentially important regulatory mechanism. Our results show that ADAM12 is constitutively internalized primarily via the clathrin-dependent pathway and is subsequently detected in both early and recycling endosomes. The protease activity of ADAM12 does not influence this internalization mechanism. Analysis of essential elements for internalization established that proline-rich regions in the cytoplasmic domain of ADAM12, previously shown to interact with Src-homology 3 domains, were necessary for proper internalization. These sites in the ADAM12 cytoplasmic domain interacted with the adaptor protein growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2) and knockdown of Grb2 markedly reduced ADAM12 internalization. These studies establish that internalization is indeed a mechanism that regulates ADAM cell surface levels and show that ADAM12 internalization involves the clathrin-dependent pathway and Grb2.

  12. Mechanism and Regulation of DNA-Protein Crosslink Repair by the DNA-Dependent Metalloprotease SPRTN

    DOE PAGES

    Stingele, Julian; Bellelli, Roberto; Alte, Ferdinand; ...

    2016-10-27

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are toxic DNA lesions that interfere with essential chromatin transactions, such as replication and transcription. Little was known about DPC-specific repair mechanisms until the recent identification of a DPC-processing protease in yeast. The existence of a DPC protease in higher eukaryotes is inferred from data in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, but its identity remains elusive. Here we identify the metalloprotease SPRTN as the DPC protease acting in metazoans. Loss of SPRTN results in failure to repair DPCs and hypersensitivity to DPC-inducing agents. SPRTN accomplishes DPC processing through a unique DNA-induced protease activity, which is controlled bymore » several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms. Cellular, biochemical, and structural studies define a DNA switch triggering its protease activity, a ubiquitin switch controlling SPRTN chromatin accessibility, and regulatory autocatalytic cleavage. Our data also provide a molecular explanation on how SPRTN deficiency causes the premature aging and cancer predisposition disorder Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome.« less

  13. Mechanism and Regulation of DNA-Protein Crosslink Repair by the DNA-Dependent Metalloprotease SPRTN

    SciTech Connect

    Stingele, Julian; Bellelli, Roberto; Alte, Ferdinand; Hewitt, Graeme; Sarek, Grzegorz; Maslen, Sarah L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Borg, Annabel; Kjær, Svend; Tainer, John A.; Skehel, J. Mark; Groll, Michael; Boulton, Simon J.

    2016-10-27

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) are toxic DNA lesions that interfere with essential chromatin transactions, such as replication and transcription. Little was known about DPC-specific repair mechanisms until the recent identification of a DPC-processing protease in yeast. The existence of a DPC protease in higher eukaryotes is inferred from data in Xenopus laevis egg extracts, but its identity remains elusive. Here we identify the metalloprotease SPRTN as the DPC protease acting in metazoans. Loss of SPRTN results in failure to repair DPCs and hypersensitivity to DPC-inducing agents. SPRTN accomplishes DPC processing through a unique DNA-induced protease activity, which is controlled by several sophisticated regulatory mechanisms. Cellular, biochemical, and structural studies define a DNA switch triggering its protease activity, a ubiquitin switch controlling SPRTN chromatin accessibility, and regulatory autocatalytic cleavage. Our data also provide a molecular explanation on how SPRTN deficiency causes the premature aging and cancer predisposition disorder Ruijs-Aalfs syndrome.

  14. A Metalloprotease Secreted by the Insect Pathogen Photorhabdus luminescens Induces Melanization▿

    PubMed Central

    Held, Kiara G.; LaRock, Christopher N.; D'Argenio, David A.; Berg, Celeste A.; Collins, Carleen M.

    2007-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens is a gram-negative insect pathogen that enters the hemocoel of infected hosts and produces a number of secreted proteins that promote colonization and subsequent death of the insect. In initial studies to determine the exact role of individual secreted proteins in insect pathogenesis, concentrated culture supernatants from various P. luminescens strains were injected into the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta. Culture supernatants from P. luminescens TT01, the genome-sequenced strain, stimulated a rapid melanization reaction in M. sexta. Comparison of the profiles of secreted proteins from the various Photorhabdus strains revealed a single protein of approximately 37 kDa that was significantly overrepresented in the TT01 culture supernatant. This protein was purified by DEAE ion-exchange and Superdex 75 gel filtration chromatography and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis as the product of the TT01 gene plu1382 (NCBI accession number NC_005126); we refer to it here as PrtS. PrtS is a member of the M4 metalloprotease family. Injection of PrtS into larvae of M. sexta and Galleria mellonella and into adult Drosophila melanogaster and D. melanogaster melanization mutants (Bc) confirmed that the purified protein induced the melanization reaction. The prtS gene was transcribed by P. luminescens injected into M. sexta before death of the insect, suggesting that the protein was produced during infection. The exact function of this protease during infection is not clear. The bacteria might survive inside the insect despite the melanization process, or it might be that the bacterium is specifically activating melanization in an attempt to circumvent this innate immune response. PMID:17933944

  15. Plasmatic ADAMTS-13 metalloprotease and von Willebrand factor in children with cyanotic congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Soares, R.P.S.; Bydlowski, S.P.; Nascimento, N.M.; Thomaz, A.M.; Bastos, E.N.M.; Lopes, A.A.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in plasma von Willebrand factor concentration (VWF:Ag) and ADAMTS-13 activity (the metalloprotease that cleaves VWF physiologically) have been reported in several cardiovascular disorders with prognostic implications. We therefore determined the level of these proteins in the plasma of children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) undergoing surgical treatment. Forty-eight children were enrolled (age 0.83 to 7.58 years). Measurements were performed at baseline and 48 h after surgery. ELISA, collagen-binding assays and Western blotting were used to estimate antigenic and biological activities, and proteolysis of VWF multimers. Preoperatively, VWF:Ag and ADAMTS-13 activity were decreased (65 and 71% of normal levels considered as 113 (105-129) U/dL and 91 ± 24% respectively, P < 0.003) and correlated (r = 0.39, P = 0.0064). High molecular weight VWF multimers were not related, suggesting an interaction of VWF with cell membranes, followed by proteolytic cleavage. A low preoperative ADAMTS-13 activity, a longer activated partial thromboplastin time and the need for cardiopulmonary bypass correlated with postoperative bleeding (P < 0.05). Postoperatively, ADAMTS-13 activity increased but less extensively than VWF:Ag (respectively, 2.23 and 2.83 times baseline, P < 0.0001), resulting in an increased VWF:Ag/ADAMTS-13 activity ratio (1.20 to 1.54, respectively, pre- and postoperative median values, P = 0.0029). ADAMTS-13 consumption was further confirmed by decreased ADAMTS-13 antigenic concentration (0.91 ± 0.30 to 0.70 ± 0.25 µg/mL, P < 0.0001) and persistent proteolysis of VWF multimers. We conclude that, in pediatric CCHD, changes in circulating ADAMTS-13 suggest enzyme consumption, associated with abnormal structure and function of VWF. PMID:23558858

  16. Invasion of the Central Nervous System by Cryptococcus neoformans Requires a Secreted Fungal Metalloprotease

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Kiem; Tham, Rick; Uhrig, John P.; Thompson, George R.; Na Pombejra, Sarisa; Jamklang, Mantana; Bautos, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cryptococcus spp. cause life-threatening fungal infection of the central nervous system (CNS), predominantly in patients with a compromised immune system. Why Cryptococcus neoformans has this remarkable tropism for the CNS is not clear. Recent research on cerebral pathogenesis of C. neoformans revealed a predominantly transcellular migration of cryptococci across the brain endothelium; however, the identities of key fungal virulence factors that function specifically to invade the CNS remain unresolved. Here we found that a novel, secreted metalloprotease (Mpr1) that we identified in the extracellular proteome of C. neoformans (CnMpr1) is required for establishing fungal disease in the CNS. Mpr1 belongs to a poorly characterized M36 class of fungalysins that are expressed in only some fungal species. A strain of C. neoformans lacking the gene encoding Mpr1 (mpr1Δ) failed to breach the endothelium in an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier (BBB). A mammalian host infected with the mpr1Δ null strain demonstrated significant improvement in survival due to a reduced brain fungal burden and lacked the brain pathology commonly associated with cryptococcal disease. The in vivo studies further indicate that Mpr1 is not required for fungal dissemination and Mpr1 likely targets the brain endothelium specifically. Remarkably, the sole expression of CnMPR1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae resulted in a robust migration of yeast cells across the brain endothelium, demonstrating Mpr1’s specific activity in breaching the BBB and suggesting that Mpr1 may function independently of the hyaluronic acid-CD44 pathway. This distinct role for Mpr1 may develop into innovative treatment options and facilitate a brain-specific drug delivery platform. PMID:24895304

  17. Neprilysins: an evolutionarily conserved family of metalloproteases that play important roles in reproduction in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sitnik, Jessica L; Francis, Carmen; Hens, Korneel; Huybrechts, Roger; Wolfner, Mariana F; Callaerts, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Members of the M13 class of metalloproteases have been implicated in diseases and in reproductive fitness. Nevertheless, their physiological role remains poorly understood. To obtain a tractable model with which to analyze this protein family's function, we characterized the gene family in Drosophila melanogaster and focused on reproductive phenotypes. The D. melanogaster genome contains 24 M13 class protease homologs, some of which are orthologs of human proteases, including neprilysin. Many are expressed in the reproductive tracts of either sex. Using RNAi we individually targeted the five Nep genes most closely related to vertebrate neprilysin, Nep1-5, to investigate their roles in reproduction. A reduction in Nep1, Nep2, or Nep4 expression in females reduced egg laying. Nep1 and Nep2 are required in the CNS and the spermathecae for wild-type fecundity. Females that are null for Nep2 also show defects as hosts of sperm competition as well as an increased rate of depletion for stored sperm. Furthermore, eggs laid by Nep2 mutant females are fertilized normally, but arrest early in embryonic development. In the male, only Nep1 was required to induce normal patterns of female egg laying. Reduction in the expression of Nep2-5 in the male did not cause any dramatic effects on reproductive fitness, which suggests that these genes are either nonessential for male fertility or perform redundant functions. Our results suggest that, consistent with the functions of neprilysins in mammals, these proteins are also required for reproduction in Drosophila, opening up this model system for further functional analysis of this protein class and their substrates.

  18. Xenopus ADAM 13 is a metalloprotease required for cranial neural crest-cell migration.

    PubMed

    Alfandari, D; Cousin, H; Gaultier, A; Smith, K; White, J M; Darribère, T; DeSimone, D W

    2001-06-26

    Cranial neural-crest (CNC) cells originate from the lateral edge of the anterior neuroepithelium and migrate to form parts of the peripheral nervous system, muscles, cartilage, and bones of the face. Neural crest-cell migration involves the loss of adhesion from the surrounding neuroepithelium and a corresponding increase in cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) present in migratory pathways. While proteolytic activity is likely to contribute to the regulation of neural crest-cell adhesion and migration, the role of a neural crest-specific protease in these processes has yet to be demonstrated. We previously showed that CNC cells express ADAM 13, a cell surface metalloprotease/disintegrin. Proteins of this family are known to act in cell-cell adhesion and as sheddases. ADAMs have also been proposed to degrade the ECM, but this has not yet been shown in a physiological context. Using a tissue transplantation technique, we show that Xenopus CNC cells overexpressing wild-type ADAM 13 migrate along the same hyoid, branchial, and mandibular pathways used by normal CNC cells. In contrast, CNC cell grafts that express protease-defective ADAM 13 fail to migrate along the hyoid and branchial pathways. In addition, ectopic expression of wild-type ADAM 13 results in a gain-of-function phenotype in embryos, namely the abnormal positioning of trunk neural-crest cells. We further show that explanted embryonic tissues expressing wild-type, but not protease-defective, ADAM 13 display decreased cell-matrix adhesion. Purified ADAM 13 can cleave fibronectin, and tissue culture cells that express wild-type, but not protease-defective, ADAM 13 can remodel a fibronectin substrate. Our findings support the hypothesis that the protease activity of ADAM 13 plays a critical role in neural crest-cell migration along defined pathways. We propose that the ADAM 13-dependent modification of ECM and/or other guidance molecules is a key step in the directed migration of the CNC.

  19. Complex Formed between Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB and Its Substrate, Pro-σK*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Halder, Sabyasachi; Kerr, Richard A.; Parrell, Daniel; Ruotolo, Brandon; Kroos, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) are conserved from bacteria to humans and control many important signaling pathways, but little is known about how IMMPs interact with their substrates. SpoIVFB is an IMMP that cleaves Pro-σK during Bacillus subtilis endospore formation. When catalytically inactive SpoIVFB was coexpressed with C-terminally truncated Pro-σK(1–126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) in Escherichia coli, the substrate dramatically improved solubilization of the enzyme from membranes with mild detergents. Both the Pro(1–20) and σK(21–126) parts contributed to improving SpoIVFB solubilization from membranes, but only the σK part was needed to form a stable complex with SpoIVFB in a pulldown assay. The last 10 residues of SpoIVFB were required for improved solubilization from membranes by Pro-σK(1–126) and for normal interaction with the substrate. The inactive SpoIVFB·Pro-σK(1–126)-His6 complex was stable during affinity purification and gel filtration chromatography. Disulfide cross-linking of the purified complex indicated that it resembled the complex formed in vivo. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry analysis resulted in an observed mass consistent with a 4:2 SpoIVFB·Pro-σK(1–126)-His6 complex. Stepwise photobleaching of SpoIVFB fused to a fluorescent protein supported the notion that the enzyme is tetrameric during B. subtilis sporulation. The results provide the first evidence that an IMMP acts as a tetramer, give new insights into how SpoIVFB interacts with its substrate, and lay the foundation for further biochemical analysis of the enzyme·substrate complex and future structural studies. PMID:26953342

  20. Purification and characterization of a new neutral metalloprotease from marine Exiguobacterium sp. SWJS2.

    PubMed

    Lei, Fenfen; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Haifeng; Tang, Xuelu; Zhao, Mouming

    2016-01-01

    Among the protease-producing bacterial strains isolated from deep-sea sediments, SWJS2 was finally selected and identified as genus Exiguobacterium. Plackett-Burman and orthogonal array designs were applied to optimize the fermentation conditions, and the results are as follows: Glucose 5g, yeast extract 15g, glycerin 2g and CaCl2 ⋅2H2 O 0.5 g dissolved in 1 L artificial seawater; temperature 25 °C, original pH 7, inoculum rate 2%, seed age 12 H, loading volume 25 mL (250-mL Erlenmeyer flask), shaking speed 150 rpm, and fermentation time 44 H. The protease activity production was improved from about 80 to 660 U/mL under the optimized parameters. The protease was purified fourfold with specificity activity of 30,654.1 U/mg protein and a total yield of 16.2%. The protease exhibited the maximum activity at 40-45 °C and pH 7. Moreover, the enzyme activity was found to be inhibited by Cu(2+) , Ba(2+) , Cd(2+) , Hg(2+) , and Al(3+) at 5 mM, whereas it can be increased by Mg(2+) , Mn(2+) , and Ca(2+) at 0.5-5 mM. The enzyme was totally inactivated by 1 or 5 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid but not by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, tyrpsin inhibitor from Glycine max (STI), benzamidine, 5,5'-dithio-bis-(2-nitro benzoic acid), or pepstatin A, suggesting that it belonged to metalloprotease. © 2015 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Role in proinflammatory response of YghJ, a secreted metalloprotease from neonatal septicemic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Tapader, Rima; Bose, Dipro; Basu, Pallabi; Mondal, Moumita; Mondal, Ayan; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar; Dutta, Pujarini; Basu, Sulagna; Bhadra, Rupak K; Pal, Amit

    2016-11-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the invasion of microbial pathogens into blood stream and is associated with a systemic inflammatory response with production and release of a wide range of inflammatory mediators. The increased serum levels of cytokines were found to correlate with the severity and mortality in course of sepsis. There have been no reports on the role of microbial proteases in stimulation of proinflammatory response in neonatal sepsis. We have identified YghJ, a secreted metalloprotease from a neonatal septicemic Escherichia coli (NSEC) isolate. The protease was partially purified from culture supernatant by successive anion and gel filtration chromatography. MS/MS peptide sequencing of the protease showed homology with YghJ. YghJ was cloned, expressed and purified in pBAD TOPO expression vector. YghJ was found to be proteolytically active against Methoxysuccinyl Ala-Ala-Pro-Met-p-nitroanilide oligopeptide substrate, but not against casein and gelatin. YghJ showed optimal activity at pH 7-8 and at temperatures 37-40°C. YghJ showed clear changes in cellular morphologies of Int407, HT-29 and HEK293 cells. YghJ stimulated the secretion of cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α in murine macrophages (RAW 264.7) and IL-8 from human intestinal epithelial cells (HT-29). YghJ also down-regulated the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10. YghJ is present in both septicemic (78%) and fecal E. coli isolates (54%). However, expression and secretion of YghJ is significantly higher among the septicemic (89%) than the fecal isolates (33%). This is the first study to show the role of a microbial protease, YghJ in triggering proinflammatory response in NSEC.

  2. Identification, cloning, expression and functional characterization of an astacin-like metalloprotease toxin from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom

    PubMed Central

    da Silveira, Rafael B.; Wille, Ana C. M.; Chaim, Olga M.; Appel, Marcia H.; Silva, Dilza T.; Franco, Célia R. C.; Toma, Leny; Mangili, Oldemir C.; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl P.; Nader, Helena B.; Veiga, Silvio S.

    2007-01-01

    Injuries caused by brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) are associated with dermonecrotic lesions with gravitational spreading and systemic manifestations. The venom has a complex composition containing many different toxins, of which metalloproteases have been described in many different species of this genus. These toxins may degrade extracellular matrix constituents acting as a spreading factor. By using a cDNA library from an Loxosceles intermedia venom gland, we cloned and expressed a 900 bp cDNA, which encoded a signal peptide and a propeptide, which corresponded to a 30 kDa metalloprotease, now named LALP (Loxosceles astacin-like protease). Recombinant LALP was refolded and used to produce a polyclonal antiserum, which showed cross-reactivity with a 29 kDa native venom protein. CD analysis provided evidence that the recombinant LALP toxin was folded correctly, was still in a native conformation and had not aggregated. LALP addition to endothelial cell cultures resulted in de-adhesion of the cells, and also in the degradation of fibronectin and fibrinogen (this could be inhibited by the presence of the bivalent chelator 1,10-phenanthroline) and of gelatin in vitro. Sequence comparison (nucleotide and deduced amino acid), phylogenetic analysis and analysis of the functional recombinant toxin revealed that LALP is related in both structure and function to the astacin family of metalloproteases. This suggests that an astacin-like toxin is present in a animal venom secretion and indicates that recombinant LALP will be a useful tool for future structural and functional studies on venom and the astacin family. PMID:17535156

  3. Identification, cloning, expression and functional characterization of an astacin-like metalloprotease toxin from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    da Silveira, Rafael B; Wille, Ana C M; Chaim, Olga M; Appel, Marcia H; Silva, Dilza T; Franco, Célia R C; Toma, Leny; Mangili, Oldemir C; Gremski, Waldemiro; Dietrich, Carl P; Nader, Helena B; Veiga, Silvio S

    2007-09-01

    Injuries caused by brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) are associated with dermonecrotic lesions with gravitational spreading and systemic manifestations. The venom has a complex composition containing many different toxins, of which metalloproteases have been described in many different species of this genus. These toxins may degrade extracellular matrix constituents acting as a spreading factor. By using a cDNA library from an Loxosceles intermedia venom gland, we cloned and expressed a 900 bp cDNA, which encoded a signal peptide and a propeptide, which corresponded to a 30 kDa metalloprotease, now named LALP (Loxosceles astacin-like protease). Recombinant LALP was refolded and used to produce a polyclonal antiserum, which showed cross-reactivity with a 29 kDa native venom protein. CD analysis provided evidence that the recombinant LALP toxin was folded correctly, was still in a native conformation and had not aggregated. LALP addition to endothelial cell cultures resulted in de-adhesion of the cells, and also in the degradation of fibronectin and fibrinogen (this could be inhibited by the presence of the bivalent chelator 1,10-phenanthroline) and of gelatin in vitro. Sequence comparison (nucleotide and deduced amino acid), phylogenetic analysis and analysis of the functional recombinant toxin revealed that LALP is related in both structure and function to the astacin family of metalloproteases. This suggests that an astacin-like toxin is present in a animal venom secretion and indicates that recombinant LALP will be a useful tool for future structural and functional studies on venom and the astacin family.

  4. Modulation of CD163 expression by metalloprotease ADAM17 regulates porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus entry.

    PubMed

    Guo, Longjun; Niu, Junwei; Yu, Haidong; Gu, Weihong; Li, Ren; Luo, Xiaolei; Huang, Mingming; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li; Wang, Yue

    2014-09-01

    As a consequence of their effects on ectodomain shedding, members of the A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family have been implicated in the control of various cellular processes. Although ADAM family members are also involved in cancer, inflammation, and other pathologies, it is unclear whether they affect porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of ADAM17 enhances PRRSV entry in Marc-145 and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). We also demonstrate that the inhibition of ADAM17 upregulates membrane CD163 expression, a putative PRRSV receptor that is exogenously expressed in BHK-21 and endogenously expressed in Marc-145 and PAMs. Furthermore, overexpression of ADAM17 induced downregulation of CD163 expression and a reduction in PRRSV infection, whereas ablation of ADAM17 expression using specific small interfering RNA resulted in upregulation of CD163 expression with a corresponding increase in PRRSV infection. These ADAM17-mediated effects were confirmed with PRRSV nonpermissive BHK-21 cells transfected with CD163 cDNA. Overall, these findings indicate that ADAM17 downregulates CD163 expression and hinders PRRSV entry. Hence, downregulation of ADAM17 particular substrates may be an additional component of the anti-infection defenses. ADAM17 is one of the important membrane-associated metalloproteases that mediate various cellular events, as well as inflammation, cancer, and other pathologies. Here, we investigate for the first time the role of the metalloprotease ADAM17 in PRRSV infection. By using inhibitor and genetic modification methods, we demonstrate that ADAM17 negatively regulate PRRSV entry by regulating its substrate(s). More specifically, ADAM 17 mediates the downregulation of the PRRSV cellular receptor CD163. The reduction in CD163 expression represents another component of the anti-infection response initiated by ADAM17. Copyright © 2014, American Society

  5. Modulation of CD163 Expression by Metalloprotease ADAM17 Regulates Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Longjun; Niu, Junwei; Yu, Haidong; Gu, Weihong; Li, Ren; Luo, Xiaolei; Huang, Mingming; Tian, Zhijun; Feng, Li

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT As a consequence of their effects on ectodomain shedding, members of the A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) family have been implicated in the control of various cellular processes. Although ADAM family members are also involved in cancer, inflammation, and other pathologies, it is unclear whether they affect porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of ADAM17 enhances PRRSV entry in Marc-145 and porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). We also demonstrate that the inhibition of ADAM17 upregulates membrane CD163 expression, a putative PRRSV receptor that is exogenously expressed in BHK-21 and endogenously expressed in Marc-145 and PAMs. Furthermore, overexpression of ADAM17 induced downregulation of CD163 expression and a reduction in PRRSV infection, whereas ablation of ADAM17 expression using specific small interfering RNA resulted in upregulation of CD163 expression with a corresponding increase in PRRSV infection. These ADAM17-mediated effects were confirmed with PRRSV nonpermissive BHK-21 cells transfected with CD163 cDNA. Overall, these findings indicate that ADAM17 downregulates CD163 expression and hinders PRRSV entry. Hence, downregulation of ADAM17 particular substrates may be an additional component of the anti-infection defenses. IMPORTANCE ADAM17 is one of the important membrane-associated metalloproteases that mediate various cellular events, as well as inflammation, cancer, and other pathologies. Here, we investigate for the first time the role of the metalloprotease ADAM17 in PRRSV infection. By using inhibitor and genetic modification methods, we demonstrate that ADAM17 negatively regulate PRRSV entry by regulating its substrate(s). More specifically, ADAM 17 mediates the downregulation of the PRRSV cellular receptor CD163. The reduction in CD163 expression represents another component of the anti-infection response initiated by ADAM17. PMID:24965453

  6. Cloning of a salivary gland metalloprotease and characterization of gelatinase and fibrin(ogen)lytic activities in the saliva of the Lyme Disease tick vector Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Mather, Thomas N.; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2010-01-01

    The full-length sequence of tick salivary gland cDNA coding for a protein similar to metalloproteases (MP) of the reprolysin family is reported. The Ixodes scapularis MP is a 488 aminoacid (aa) protein containing pre- and pro-enzyme domains, the zinc-binding motif HExxHxxGxxH common to metalloproteases and a cysteine-rich region. In addition, the predicted amino-terminal sequences of I. scapularis MPs were found by Edman degradation of PVDF-transferred SDS/PAGE-separated tick saliva proteins, indicating these putative enzymes are secreted. Furthermore, saliva has a metal-dependent proteolytic activity towards gelatin, fibrin(ogen) and fibronectin, but not collagen or laminin. Accordingly, I. scapularis saliva has a rather specific metalloprotease similar to the hemorrhagic proteases of snake venoms. This is the first description of such activity in tick saliva and its role in tick feeding and Borrelia transmission are discussed. PMID:12767911

  7. Purification and characterisation of κ-casein specific milk-clotting metalloprotease from Termitomyces clypeatus MTCC 5091.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Rajib; Banik, Samudra Prosad; Khowala, Suman

    2015-04-15

    Milk-clotting enzymes are valued as chymosin-like protease substitutes for cheese making industries. An extracellular metalloprotease (AcPs) with high milk-clotting activity was purified from edible mushroom Termitomyces clypeatus and characterised. AcPs was preferentially active towards κ-casein, analysed by Urea-PAGE and LC-ESI-MS, whereas the degradation of α and β-casein components by AcPs proceeded slowly justifying its suitability for cheese making. RP-HPLC peptide profiling revealed that the AcPs activity on milk casein was similar to that of a commercial milk coagulant. The enzyme exhibited pH and temperature optima at 5.0 and 45 °C, respectively and showed a pI value of 4.6. One- and two dimensional zymographies revealed a single polypeptide band with proteolytic signal. The MALDI-TOF/MS followed by peptide mass fingerprinting revealed homology with a predicted protein of Populus trichocarpa. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a metalloprotease from T. clypeatus, and the results indicate that this enzyme can be considered as a potential substitute for chymosin in cheese manufacturing.

  8. The substrate degradome of meprin metalloproteases reveals an unexpected proteolytic link between meprin β and ADAM10.

    PubMed

    Jefferson, Tamara; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Bellac, Caroline; Metz, Verena V; Broder, Claudia; Hedrich, Jana; Ohler, Anke; Maier, Wladislaw; Magdolen, Viktor; Sterchi, Erwin; Bond, Judith S; Jayakumar, Arumugam; Traupe, Heiko; Chalaris, Athena; Rose-John, Stefan; Pietrzik, Claus U; Postina, Rolf; Overall, Christopher M; Becker-Pauly, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The in vivo roles of meprin metalloproteases in pathophysiological conditions remain elusive. Substrates define protease roles. Therefore, to identify natural substrates for human meprin α and β we employed TAILS (terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates), a proteomics approach that enriches for N-terminal peptides of proteins and cleavage fragments. Of the 151 new extracellular substrates we identified, it was notable that ADAM10 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease domain-containing protein 10)-the constitutive α-secretase-is activated by meprin β through cleavage of the propeptide. To validate this cleavage event, we expressed recombinant proADAM10 and after preincubation with meprin β, this resulted in significantly elevated ADAM10 activity. Cellular expression in murine primary fibroblasts confirmed activation. Other novel substrates including extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors and inhibitors were validated by western analyses and enzyme activity assays with Edman sequencing confirming the exact cleavage sites identified by TAILS. Cleavages in vivo were confirmed by comparing wild-type and meprin(-/-) mice. Our finding of cystatin C, elafin and fetuin-A as substrates and natural inhibitors for meprins reveal new mechanisms in the regulation of protease activity important for understanding pathophysiological processes.

  9. Identification of a chitinase-modifying protein from Fusarium verticillioides: truncation of a host resistance protein by a fungalysin metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Todd A; Wicklow, Donald T; Price, Neil P J

    2011-10-14

    Chitinase-modifying proteins (cmps) are proteases secreted by fungal pathogens that truncate the plant class IV chitinases ChitA and ChitB during maize ear rot. cmp activity has been characterized for Bipolaris zeicola and Stenocarpella maydis, but the identities of the proteases are not known. Here, we report that cmps are secreted by multiple species from the genus Fusarium, that cmp from Fusarium verticillioides (Fv-cmp) is a fungalysin metalloprotease, and that it cleaves within a sequence that is conserved in class IV chitinases. Protein extracts from Fusarium cultures were found to truncate ChitA and ChitB in vitro. Based on this activity, Fv-cmp was purified from F. verticillioides. N-terminal sequencing of truncated ChitA and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis of reaction products showed that Fv-cmp is an endoprotease that cleaves a peptide bond on the C-terminal side of the lectin domain. The N-terminal sequence of purified Fv-cmp was determined and compared with a set of predicted proteins, resulting in its identification as a zinc metalloprotease of the fungalysin family. Recombinant Fv-cmp also truncated ChitA, confirming its identity, but had reduced activity, suggesting that the recombinant protease did not mature efficiently from its propeptide-containing precursor. This is the first report of a fungalysin that targets a nonstructural host protein and the first to implicate this class of virulence-related proteases in plant disease.

  10. Systematic substrate identification indicates a central role for the metalloprotease ADAM10 in axon targeting and synapse function

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio Vittorio; Schusser, Benjamin; Dreymueller, Daniela; Wetzel, Sebastian; Schepers, Ute; Herber, Julia; Ludwig, Andreas; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Montag, Dirk; Müller, Ulrike; Schweizer, Michaela; Saftig, Paul; Bräse, Stefan; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F

    2016-01-01

    Metzincin metalloproteases have major roles in intercellular communication by modulating the function of membrane proteins. One of the proteases is the a-disintegrin-and-metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) which acts as alpha-secretase of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid precursor protein. ADAM10 is also required for neuronal network functions in murine brain, but neuronal ADAM10 substrates are only partly known. With a proteomic analysis of Adam10-deficient neurons we identified 91, mostly novel ADAM10 substrate candidates, making ADAM10 a major protease for membrane proteins in the nervous system. Several novel substrates, including the neuronal cell adhesion protein NrCAM, are involved in brain development. Indeed, we detected mistargeted axons in the olfactory bulb of conditional ADAM10-/- mice, which correlate with reduced cleavage of NrCAM, NCAM and other ADAM10 substrates. In summary, the novel ADAM10 substrates provide a molecular basis for neuronal network dysfunctions in conditional ADAM10-/- mice and demonstrate a fundamental function of ADAM10 in the brain. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12748.001 PMID:26802628

  11. Analysis of matrix metallo-proteases and the plasminogen system in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, Cecilia E; Iulita, M Florencia; Eyjolfsdottir, Helga; Hjorth, Erik; Schultzberg, Marianne; Eriksdotter, Maria; Cuello, A Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The expression of matrix metallo-proteases (MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-9), plasminogen and their regulators (TIMP-1, tissue plasminogen activator and neuroserpin) was investigated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) subjects, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and Alzheimer's disease (AD) cases. ELISA analysis revealed a significant increase in MMP-3 protein levels in CSF from AD subjects, compared to age-matched SCI and MCI cases. No significant differences in MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein levels were detected between the three groups. MMP-7 was undetectable in all three groups. MCI individuals exhibited increased levels of the metallo-protease inhibitor TIMP-1 in CSF as well as higher plasminogen and neuroserpin expression, compared to SCI subjects. Levels of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) were significantly reduced in AD CSF. Correlation analysis revealed a significant positive association between MMP-3, p-tau, and total-tau levels. Conversely, there was a significant negative correlation between this protease and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. tPA positively correlated with amyloid-β levels in CSF and with MMSE scores. Our results suggest that MMP-3 and tPA, in combination with current amyloid-β and tau biomarkers, may have potential as surrogate indicators of an ongoing AD pathology.

  12. Ancylostoma caninum MTP-1, an astacin-like metalloprotease secreted by infective hookworm larvae, is involved in tissue migration.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Angela L; Lustigman, Sara; Oksov, Yelena; Deumic, Vehid; Plieskatt, Jordan; Mendez, Susana; Zhan, Bin; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Hotez, Peter J; Loukas, Alex

    2006-02-01

    Infective larvae (L3) of nematodes secrete macromolecules that are critical to infection and establishment of the parasite in the host. The dog hookworm Ancylostoma caninum secretes an astacin-like metalloprotease, Ac-MTP-1, upon activation in vitro with host serum. Recombinant Ac-MTP-1 was expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system as a secreted protein and was purified from culture medium by two separate methods, cation-exchange fast-performance liquid chromatography and gelatin-affinity chromatography. Recombinant MTP-1 was catalytically active and digested a range of native and denatured connective tissue substrates, including gelatin, collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. A dog was immunized with recombinant Ac-MTP-1 formulated with AS03 adjuvant, and the antiserum was used to immunolocalize the anatomic sites of expression within A. caninum L3 to secretory granules in the glandular esophagus and the channels that connect the esophagus to the L3 surface and to the cuticle. Antiserum inhibited the ability of recombinant MTP-1 to digest collagen by 85% and inhibited larval migration through tissue in vitro by 70 to 75%, in contrast to just 5 to 10% inhibition obtained with preimmunization serum. The metalloprotease inhibitors EDTA and 1,10-phenanthroline also reduced the penetration of L3 through skin in vitro by 43 to 61%. The data strongly suggest that Ac-MTP-1 is critical for the invasion process of hookworm larvae, and moreover, that antibodies against the enzyme can neutralize its function and inhibit migration.

  13. Tumor necrosis factor-α alters integrins and metalloprotease ADAM12 levels and signaling in differentiating myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, K; Tokarska, J; Grabiec, K; Gajewska, M; Milewska, M; Błaszczyk, M

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is important in the regulation of myogenesis. We hypothesized that tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) modifies ECM during differentiation of mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Exogenous TNF-α (1 ng/ml) stimulated myoblast fusion on the 3rd day (by 160% vs control) but not on the 5th day of myogenesis. The level of integrin α5 was significantly augmented by TNF-α during 5 day-differentiation; however, integrin β1 was higher than control only on the 3rd day of cytokine treatment. Both the abundance of integrin α5 bound to actin and the level of integrin β1 complexed with integrin α5 increased in the presence of TNF-α, especially on the 3rd day of differentiation. Similarly, the stimulatory effects of TNF-α on integrin α3, metalloprotease ADAM12 and kinases related to integrins, FAK and ILK, were limited to the 3rd day of differentiation. We concluded that TNF-α-induced changes in ECM components in differentiating myogenic cells, i.e. i) increased expression of integrin α5, β1, α3, and metalloprotease ADAM12, ii) enhanced formation of α5β1 integrin receptors and interaction of integrin α5-cytoskeleton, and iii) increased expression of kinases associated with integrin signaling, FAK and ILK, were temporarily associated with the onset of myocyte fusion.

  14. Vesicle-associated Membrane Protein (VAMP) Cleavage by a New Metalloprotease from the Brazilian Scorpion Tityus serrulatus*

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Paul L.; Fletcher, Maryann D.; Weninger, Keith; Anderson, Trevor E.; Martin, Brian M.

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence that venom from the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and a purified fraction selectively cleave essential SNARE proteins within exocrine pancreatic tissue. Western blotting for vesicle-associated membrane protein type v-SNARE proteins (or synaptobrevins) reveals characteristic alterations to venom-treated excised pancreatic lobules in vitro. Immunocytochemistry by electron microscopy confirms both the SNARE identity as VAMP2 and the proteolysis of VAMP2 as a marked decrease in secondary antibody-conjugated colloidal gold particles that are predominantly associated with mature zymogen granules. Studies with recombinant SNARE proteins were used to determine the specific cleavage site in VAMP2 and the susceptibility of VAMP8 (endobrevin). The VAMP2 cleavage site is between the transmembrane anchor and the SNARE motif that assembles into the ternary SNARE complex. Inclusion of divalent chelating agents (EDTA) with fraction ν, an otherwise active purified component from venom, eliminates SNARE proteolysis, suggesting the active protein is a metalloprotease. The unique cleavages of VAMP2 and VAMP8 may be linked to pancreatitis that develops following scorpion envenomation as both of these v-SNARE proteins are associated with zymogen granule membranes in pancreatic acinar cells. We have isolated antarease, a metalloprotease from fraction ν that cleaves VAMP2, and report its amino acid sequence. PMID:20026600

  15. The astacin metalloprotease moulting enzyme NAS-36 is required for normal cuticle ecdysis in free-living and parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Stepek, Gillian; McCormack, Gillian; Birnie, Andrew J; Page, Antony P

    2011-02-01

    Nematodes represent one of the most abundant and species-rich groups of animals on the planet, with parasitic species causing chronic, debilitating infections in both livestock and humans worldwide. The prevalence and success of the nematodes is a direct consequence of the exceptionally protective properties of their cuticle. The synthesis of this cuticle is a complex multi-step process, which is repeated 4 times from hatchling to adult and has been investigated in detail in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. This process is known as moulting and involves numerous enzymes in the synthesis and degradation of the collagenous matrix. The nas-36 and nas-37 genes in C. elegans encode functionally conserved enzymes of the astacin metalloprotease family which, when mutated, result in a phenotype associated with the late-stage moulting defects, namely the inability to remove the preceding cuticle. Extensive genome searches in the gastrointestinal nematode of sheep, Haemonchus contortus, and in the filarial nematode of humans, Brugia malayi, identified NAS-36 but not NAS-37 homologues. Significantly, the nas-36 gene from B. malayi could successfully complement the moult defects associated with C. elegans nas-36, nas-37 and nas-36/nas-37 double mutants, suggesting a conserved function for NAS-36 between these diverse nematode species. This conservation between species was further indicated when the recombinant enzymes demonstrated a similar range of inhibitable metalloprotease activities.

  16. Unusual life cycle and impact on microfibril assembly of ADAMTS17, a secreted metalloprotease mutated in genetic eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Hubmacher, Dirk; Schneider, Michael; Berardinelli, Steven J.; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Willard, Belinda; Reinhardt, Dieter P.; Haltiwanger, Robert S.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2017-01-01

    Secreted metalloproteases have diverse roles in the formation, remodeling, and the destruction of extracellular matrix. Recessive mutations in the secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS17 cause ectopia lentis and short stature in humans with Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome and primary open angle glaucoma and ectopia lentis in dogs. Little is known about this protease or its connection to fibrillin microfibrils, whose major component, fibrillin-1, is genetically associated with ectopia lentis and alterations in height. Fibrillin microfibrils form the ocular zonule and are present in the drainage apparatus of the eye. We show that recombinant ADAMTS17 has unique characteristics and an unusual life cycle. It undergoes rapid autocatalytic processing in trans after its secretion from cells. Secretion of ADAMTS17 requires O-fucosylation and its autocatalytic activity does not depend on propeptide processing by furin. ADAMTS17 binds recombinant fibrillin-2 but not fibrillin-1 and does not cleave either. It colocalizes to fibrillin-1 containing microfibrils in cultured fibroblasts and suppresses fibrillin-2 (FBN2) incorporation in microfibrils, in part by transcriptional downregulation of Fbn2 mRNA expression. RNA in situ hybridization detected Adamts17 expression in specific structures in the eye, skeleton and other organs, where it may regulate the fibrillin isoform composition of microfibrils. PMID:28176809

  17. Clitoria ternatea flower petals: Effect on TNFR1 neutralization via downregulation of synovial matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Rana; Sultana, Sahin; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-08-19

    Clitoria ternatea Linn. (C. ternatea) is a traditionally used herb in arthritis, and its anti-arthritic activity has been attributed to polyphenols (e.g. quercetins) from its flower petal. The present study was designed to investigate whether C. ternatea or quercetin-3ß-D-glucoside (QG) support the antibody mediated TNFα-receptor 1 (TNFR1) neutralization to ameliorate arthritis in mice. Development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in male Swiss mice (20-22g, 3-4 weeks of age) was followed by estimation of synovial polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) accumulation (in terms of myeloperoxidase activity), synovial and systemic release of cytokines, chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), biochemical estimation of synovial free radical generation and antioxidant status, as well as immunoblot assessment of synovial TNFR1, toll-like receptor 2(TLR2), cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression; and zymographic analysis of synovial matrix-metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) activity. CIA was induced from day 2 post-secondary immunizations as evidenced from arthritic scores and joint swelling in parallel to increased inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in synovial joints. Long term supplementation with extract from Clitoria ternatea flower petals CTE (50mg/kg) and QG (2.5mg/kg) upto 24 days post booster immunization augmented anti-arthritic potential of TNFR1 neutralization with anti-TNFR1 antibody (10μg per mice) in terms of reduced MPO activity, decrease in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/ reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production in parallel to significant (p<0.05) reduction in TNFR1, TLR2, iNOS, COX-2 and MMP-2 expression. CTE and QG possess potential anti-arthritic activity which targets synovial MMP-2 in arthritic joints and TNFR1 targeting followed by CTE or QG treatment might become a combinatorial approach in future therapeutic research in

  18. Solution structure and dynamics of C-terminal regulatory domain of Vibrio vulnificus extracellular metalloprotease

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, Ji-Hye; Kim, Heeyoun; Park, Jung Eun; Lee, Jung Sup; Lee, Weontae

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined solution structures of vEP C-terminal regulatory domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 has a compact {beta}-barrel structure with eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solution structure of vEP C-ter100 shares its molecular topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Residues in the {beta}3 region of vEP C-ter100 might be important in putative ligand/receptor binding. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron ion. -- Abstract: An extracellular metalloprotease (vEP) secreted by Vibrio vulnificus ATCC29307 is a 45-kDa proteolytic enzyme that has prothrombin activation and fibrinolytic activities during bacterial infection. The action of vEP could result in clotting that could serve to protect the bacteria from the host defense machinery. Very recently, we showed that the C-terminal propeptide (C-ter100), which is unique to vEP, is involved in regulation of vEP activity. To understand the structural basis of this function of vEP C-ter100, we have determined the solution structure and backbone dynamics using multidimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The solution structure shows that vEP C-ter100 is composed of eight anti-parallel {beta}-strands with a unique fold that has a compact {beta}-barrel formation which stabilized by hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding networks. Protein dynamics shows that the overall structure, including loops, is very rigid and stabilized. By structural database analysis, we found that vEP C-ter100 shares its topology with that of the collagen-binding domain of collagenase, despite low sequence homology between the two domains. Fluorescence assay reveals that vEP C-ter100 interacts strongly with iron (Fe{sup 3+}). These findings suggest that vEP protease might recruit substrate molecules, such as collagen, by binding at C-ter100 and that vEP participates

  19. Hampered cumulus expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes by excessive presence of alpha2 -macroglobulin is likely mediated via inhibition of zinc-dependent metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, Ruth; Beek, Josine; Maes, Dominiek; Bijttebier, Jo; Van Steendam, Katleen; Nauwynck, Hans; Van Soom, Ann

    2017-09-01

    In vitro maturation (IVM) in serum causes hampered expansion of porcine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) due to excessive alpha2 -macroglobulin (A2M). This study investigated two hypotheses that could explain the effect of A2M: (i) binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to A2M, followed by its decreased availability; and (ii) inhibition of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. Cumulus expansion was evaluated based on the diameter of the COCs, the proportion of COCs participating in a floating cloud and the proportion of COCs with loss of cumulus cells. The first hypothesis of decreased EGF availability was tested by increasing the EGF concentration (20 and 50 ng/mL vs. 10 ng/mL), but was not confirmed because cumulus expansion did not improve. To verify the second hypothesis of inhibited zinc-dependent metalloproteases, the effect of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases-3 (TIMP-3) on cumulus expansion during IVM with and without A2M was investigated. To immuno-neutralize A2M, serum was pre-incubated with A2M antibodies. Impaired cumulus expansion because of TIMP-3 could only be observed during IVM in 10% of serum with A2M antibodies. No effect of TIMP-3 was observed in medium without A2M antibodies. These results indicate that A2M and TIMP-3 share a common target, a zinc-dependent metalloprotease. Future research is directed toward the identification of the protease involved. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  20. Activation of kinin B1 receptor increases the release of metalloproteases-2 and -9 from both estrogen-sensitive and -insensitive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfeld, Pamela; Conejeros, Ivan; Pavicic, Maria F; Matus, Carola E; Gonzalez, Carlos B; Quest, Andrew F G; Bhoola, Kanti D; Poblete, Maria T; Burgos, Rafael A; Figueroa, Carlos D

    2011-02-01

    The kinin B(1) receptor (B(1)R) agonist Lys-des[Arg(9)]-bradykinin (LDBK) increases proliferation of estrogen-sensitive breast cancer cells by a process involving activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and downstream signaling via the ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Here, we investigated whether B(1)R stimulation induced release of the extracellular matrix metalloproteases MMP-2 and MMP-9 via ERK-dependent pathway in both estrogen-sensitive MCF-7 and -insensitive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Cells were stimulated with 1-100nM of the B(1)R agonist for variable time-points. Western blotting and gelatin zymography were used to evaluate the presence of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the extracellular medium. Stimulation of B(1)R with as little as 1 nM LDBK induced the accumulation of these metalloproteases in the medium within 5-30min of stimulation. In parallel, immunocytochemistry revealed that metalloprotease levels in the breast cancer cells declined after stimulation. This effect was blocked either by pre-treating the cells with a B(1)R antagonist or by transfecting with B(1)R-specific siRNA. Activation of the ERK1/2 pathway and EGFR transactivation was required for release of metalloproteases because both the MEK1 inhibitor, PD98059, and AG1478, an inhibitor of the EGFR-tyrosine kinase activity, blocked this event. The importance of EGFR-dependent signaling was additionally confirmed since transfection of cells with the dominant negative EGFR mutant HERCD533 blocked the release of metalloproteases. Thus, activation of B(1)R is likely to enhance breast cancer cells invasiveness by releasing enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix and thereby favor metastasis.

  1. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Cillero-Pastor, Berta; Rego-Pérez, Ignacio; Oreiro, Natividad; Fernandez-Lopez, Carlos; Blanco, Francisco J

    2013-08-09

    Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the MRC dysfunction had an

  2. Mitochondrial respiratory chain dysfunction modulates metalloproteases -1, -3 and -13 in human normal chondrocytes in culture

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mitochondrion has an important role in the osteoarthritis (OA) pathology. We have previously demonstrated that the alteration of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) contributes to the inflammatory response of the chondrocyte. However its implication in the process of cartilage destruction is not well understood yet. In this study we have investigated the relationship between the MRC dysfunction and the regulation of metalloproteases (MMPs) in human normal chondrocytes in culture. Methods Human normal chondrocytes were isolated from human knees obtained form autopsies of donors without previous history of rheumatic disease. Rotenone, 3-Nitropropionic acid (NPA), Antimycin A (AA), Sodium azide and Oligomycin were used to inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial complexes I, II, III, IV and V respectively. The mRNA expression of MMPs -1, -3 and -13 was studied by real time PCR. The intracellular presence of MMP proteins was evaluated by western blot. The liberation of these proteins to the extracellular media was evaluated by ELISA. The presence of proteoglycans in tissue was performed with tolouidin blue and safranin/fast green. Immunohistochemistry was used for evaluating MMPs on tissue. Results Firstly, cells were treated with the inhibitors of the MRC for 24 hours and mRNA expression was evaluated. An up regulation of MMP-1 and -3 mRNA levels was observed after the treatment with Oligomycin 5 and 100 μg/ml (inhibitor of the complex V) for 24 hours. MMP-13 mRNA expression was reduced after the incubation with AA 20 and 60 μg/ml (inhibitor of complex III) and Oligomycin. Results were validated at protein level observing an increase in the intracellular levels of MMP-1 and -3 after Oligomycin 25 μg/ml stimulation [(15.20±8.46 and 4.59±1.83 vs. basal=1, respectively (n=4; *P<0.05)]. However, AA and Oligomycin reduced the intracellular levels of the MMP-13 protein (0.70±0.16 and 0.3±0.24, respectively vs. basal=1). In order to know whether the

  3. The Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian regulates the cleavage of the roundabout receptor to control axon repulsion at the midline

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Hope A.; Labrador, Juan-Pablo; Chance, Rebecca K.; Bashaw, Greg J.

    2010-01-01

    Slits and their Roundabout (Robo) receptors mediate repulsive axon guidance at the Drosophila ventral midline and in the vertebrate spinal cord. Slit is cleaved to produce fragments with distinct signaling properties. In a screen for genes involved in Slit-Robo repulsion, we have identified the Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian (Kuz). Kuz does not regulate midline repulsion through cleavage of Slit, nor is Slit cleavage essential for repulsion. Instead, Kuz acts in neurons to regulate repulsion and Kuz can cleave the Robo extracellular domain in Drosophila cells. Genetic rescue experiments using an uncleavable form of Robo show that this receptor does not maintain normal repellent activity. Finally, Kuz activity is required for Robo to recruit its downstream signaling partner, Son of sevenless (Sos). These observations support the model that Kuz-directed cleavage is important for Robo receptor activation. PMID:20570941

  4. The Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian regulates the cleavage of the roundabout receptor to control axon repulsion at the midline.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Hope A; Labrador, Juan-Pablo; Chance, Rebecca K; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-07-01

    Slits and their Roundabout (Robo) receptors mediate repulsive axon guidance at the Drosophila ventral midline and in the vertebrate spinal cord. Slit is cleaved to produce fragments with distinct signaling properties. In a screen for genes involved in Slit-Robo repulsion, we have identified the Adam family metalloprotease Kuzbanian (Kuz). Kuz does not regulate midline repulsion through cleavage of Slit, nor is Slit cleavage essential for repulsion. Instead, Kuz acts in neurons to regulate repulsion and Kuz can cleave the Robo extracellular domain in Drosophila cells. Genetic rescue experiments using an uncleavable form of Robo show that this receptor does not maintain normal repellent activity. Finally, Kuz activity is required for Robo to recruit its downstream signaling partner, Son of sevenless (Sos). These observations support the model that Kuz-directed cleavage is important for Robo receptor activation.

  5. A Disintegrin-like and Metalloprotease (Reprolysin-type) with Thrombospondin Type 1 Motif (ADAMTS) Superfamily: Functions and Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Suneel S.

    2009-01-01

    Together with seven ADAMTS-like proteins, the 19 mammalian ADAMTS proteases constitute a superfamily. ADAMTS proteases are secreted zinc metalloproteases whose hallmark is an ancillary domain containing one or more thrombospondin type 1 repeats. ADAMTS-like proteins resemble ADAMTS ancillary domains and lack proteolytic activity. Vertebrate expansion of the superfamily reflects emergence of new substrates, duplication of proteolytic activities in new contexts, and cooperative functions of the duplicated genes. ADAMTS proteases are involved in maturation of procollagen and von Willebrand factor, as well as in extracellular matrix proteolysis relating to morphogenesis, angiogenesis, ovulation, cancer, and arthritis. New insights into ADAMTS mechanisms indicate significant regulatory roles for ADAMTS ancillary domains, propeptide processing, and glycosylation. ADAMTS-like proteins appear to have regulatory roles in the extracellular matrix. PMID:19734141

  6. Induction of matrix metalloprotease-1 gene expression by retinoic acid in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Z von; Riecken, E-O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G. 13-cis RA results in a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 protein concentration. These stimulatory effects were paralleled by a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 mRNA steady-state concentrations. Nuclear run-on analysis revealed that the increase of MMP-1 mRNA was partially due to an increase of MMP-1 gene transcription. In addition, 13-cis RA treatment results in an increase of MMP-1 mRNA stability. These data demonstrate that RA stimulates MMP-1 gene expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362099

  7. Differential metalloprotease content and activity of three Loxosceles spider venoms revealed using two-dimensional electrophoresis approaches.

    PubMed

    Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Bednaski, Aline Viana; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    Loxosceles bites have been associated with characteristic dermonecrotic lesions with gravitational spreading and systemic manifestations. Venom primarily comprises peptides and protein molecules (5-40 kDa) with multiple biological activities. Although poorly studied, metalloproteases have been identified in venoms of several Loxosceles species, presenting proteolytic effects on extracellular matrix components. The characterization of an Astacin-like protease (LALP) in Loxosceles intermedia venom was the first report of an Astacin family member as a component of animal venom. Recently, these proteases were described as a gene family in L. intermedia, Loxosceles laeta and Loxosceles gaucho. Herein, the whole venom complexity of these three Loxosceles species was analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE). Subproteomes of LALPs were explored through 2DE immunostaining using anti-LALP1 antibodies and 2DE gelatin zymogram. Proteins presented molecular masses ranging from 24 to 29 kDa and the majority of these molecules had basic or neutral isoelectric points (6.89-9.93). Likewise, the measurement of gelatinolytic effects of Loxosceles venom using fluorescein-gelatin showed that the three venoms have distinct proteolytic activities. The metalloprotease fibrinogenolytic activities were also evaluated. All venoms showed fibrinogenolytic activity with different proteolytic effects on Aα and Bβ chains of fibrinogen. The results reported herein suggest that the LALP family is larger than indicated in previously published data and that the complex profile of the gelatinolytic activity reflects their relevance in loxoscelism. Furthermore, our investigation implicates the brown spider venom as a source of Astacin-like proteases for use in loxoscelism studies, cell biology research and biotechnological applications.

  8. The Murine Goblet Cell Protein mCLCA3 Is a Zinc-Dependent Metalloprotease with Autoproteolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bothe, Melanie K.; Mundhenk, Lars; Kaup, Matthias; Weise, Christoph; Gruber, Achim D.

    2011-01-01

    Several members of the CLCA family of proteins, originally named chloride channels, calcium-activated, have been shown to modulate chloride conductance in various cell types via an unknown mechanism. Moreover, the human (h) hCLCA1 is thought to modulate the severity of disease in asthma and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. All CLCA proteins are post-translationally cleaved into two subunits, and recently, a conserved HEXXH zinc-binding amino acid motif has been identified, suggesting a role for CLCA proteins as metalloproteases. Here, we have characterized the cleavage and autoproteolytic activity of the murine model protein mCLCA3, which represents the murine orthologue of human hCLCA1. Using crude membrane fractions from transfected HEK293 cells, we demonstrate that mCLCA3 cleavage is zinc-dependent and exclusively inhibited by cation-chelating metalloprotease inhibitors. Cellular transport and secretion were not affected in response to a cleavage defect that was introduced by the insertion of an E157Q mutation within the HEXXH motif of mCLCA3. Interspecies conservation of these key results was further confirmed with the porcine (p) orthologue of hCLCA1 and mCLCA3, pCLCA1. Importantly, the mCLCA3E157Q mutant was cleaved after co-transfection with the wild-type mCLCA3 in HEK293 cells, suggesting that an intermolecular autoproteolytic event takes place. Edman degradation and MALDI-TOF-MS of the protein fragments identified a single cleavage site in mCLCA3 between amino acids 695 and 696. The data strongly suggest that secreted CLCA proteins have zinc-dependent autoproteolytic activity and that they may cleave additional proteins. PMID:22080371

  9. Disintegrin Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 Regulates Endothelial Permeability and T Cell Transmigration by Proteolysis of Vascular Endothelial Cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Beate; Pruessmeyer, Jessica; Maretzky, Thorsten; Ludwig, Andreas; Blobel, Carl P.; Saftig, Paul; Reiss, Karina

    2009-01-01

    Vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin is the major adhesion molecule of endothelial adherens junctions. It plays an essential role in controlling endothelial permeability, vascular integrity, leukocyte transmigration, and angiogenesis. Elevated levels of soluble VE-cadherin are associated with diseases like coronary atherosclerosis. Previous data showed that the extracellular domain of VE-cadherin is released by an unknown metalloprotease activity during apoptosis. In this study, we used gain of function analyses, inhibitor studies and RNA interference experiments to analyze the proteolytic release of VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We found that VE-cadherin is specifically cleaved by the disintegrin and metalloprotease ADAM10 in its ectodomain releasing a soluble fragment and generating a carboxyterminal membrane bound stub, which is a substrate for a subsequent γ-secretase cleavage. This ADAM10-mediated proteolysis could be induced by Ca2+-influx and staurosporine treatment, indicating that ADAM10-mediated VE-cadherin cleavage contributes to the dissolution of adherens junctions during endothelial cell activation and apoptosis, respectively. In contrast, protein kinase C activation or inhibition did not modulate VE-cadherin processing. Increased ADAM10 expression was functionally associated with an increase in endothelial permeability. Remarkably, our data indicate that ADAM10 activity also contributes to the thrombin-induced decrease of endothelial cell-cell adhesion. Moreover, knockdown of ADAM10 in HUVECs as well as in T cells by small interfering RNA impaired T cell transmigration. Taken together our data identify ADAM10 as a novel regulator of vascular permeability and demonstrate a hitherto unknown function of ADAM10 in the regulation of VE-cadherin-dependent endothelial cell functions and leukocyte transendothelial migration. PMID:18420943

  10. TspanC8 Tetraspanins and A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) Interact via Their Extracellular Regions

    PubMed Central

    Noy, Peter J.; Yang, Jing; Reyat, Jasmeet S.; Matthews, Alexandra L.; Charlton, Alice E.; Furmston, Joanna; Rogers, David A.; Rainger, G. Ed; Tomlinson, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane metalloprotease that cleaves the extracellular regions from its transmembrane substrates. ADAM10 is essential for embryonic development and is implicated in cancer, Alzheimer, and inflammatory diseases. The tetraspanins are a superfamily of 33 four-transmembrane proteins in mammals, of which the TspanC8 subgroup (Tspan5, 10, 14, 15, 17, and 33) promote ADAM10 intracellular trafficking and enzymatic maturation. However, the interaction between TspanC8s and ADAM10 has only been demonstrated in overexpression systems and the interaction mechanism remains undefined. To address these issues, an antibody was developed to Tspan14, which was used to show co-immunoprecipitation of Tspan14 with ADAM10 in primary human cells. Chimeric Tspan14 constructs demonstrated that the large extracellular loop of Tspan14 mediated its co-immunoprecipitation with ADAM10, and promoted ADAM10 maturation and trafficking to the cell surface. Chimeric ADAM10 constructs showed that membrane-proximal stalk, cysteine-rich, and disintegrin domains of ADAM10 mediated its co-immunoprecipitation with Tspan14 and other TspanC8s. This TspanC8-interacting region was required for ADAM10 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. Truncated ADAM10 constructs revealed differential TspanC8 binding requirements for the stalk, cysteine-rich, and disintegrin domains. Moreover, Tspan15was the only TspanC8 to promote cleavage of the ADAM10 substrate N-cadherin, whereas Tspan14 was unique in reducing cleavage of the platelet collagen receptor GPVI. These findings suggest that ADAM10 may adopt distinct conformations in complex with different TspanC8s, which could impact on substrate selectivity. Furthermore, this study identifies regions of TspanC8s and ADAM10 for potential interaction-disrupting therapeutic targeting. PMID:26668317

  11. Heightened cleavage of Axl receptor tyrosine kinase by ADAM metalloproteases may contribute to disease pathogenesis in SLE

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Jacob J.; Du, Yong; Vanarsa, Kamala; Mayeux, Jessica; Li, Li; Mutwally, Azza; Arriens, Cristina; Min, Soyoun; Hutcheson, Jack; Davis, Laurie S.; Chong, Benjamin F.; Satterthwaite, Anne B.; Wu, Tianfu; Mohan, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by antibody-mediated chronic inflammation in the kidney, lung, skin, and other organs to cause inflammation and damage. Several inflammatory pathways are dysregulated in SLE, and understanding these pathways may improve diagnosis and treatment. In one such pathway, Axl tyrosine kinase receptor responds to Gas6 ligand to block inflammation in leukocytes. A soluble form of the Axl receptor ectodomain (sAxl) is elevated in serum from patients with SLE and lupus-prone mice. We hypothesized that sAxl in SLE serum originates from the surface of leukocytes and that the loss of leukocyte Axl contributes to the disease. We determined that macrophages and B cells are a source of sAxl in SLE and in lupus-prone mice. Shedding of the Axl ectodomain from the leukocytes of lupus-prone mice is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases ADAM10 and TACE (ADAM17). Loss of Axl from lupus-prone macrophages renders them unresponsive to Gas6-induced anti-inflammatory signaling in vitro. This phenotype is rescued by combined ADAM10/TACE inhibition. Mice with Axl-deficient macrophages develop worse disease than controls when challenged with anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) sera in an induced model of nephritis. ADAM10 and TACE also mediate human SLE PBMC Axl cleavage. Collectively, these studies indicate that increased metalloprotease-mediated cleavage of leukocyte Axl may contribute to end organ disease in lupus. They further suggest dual ADAM10/TACE inhibition as a potential therapeutic modality in SLE. PMID:27237127

  12. PKC/ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Is Attenuated by Leishmania Zinc-Metalloprotease during Infection.

    PubMed

    Shio, Marina Tiemi; Christian, Jan Gregor; Jung, Jee Yong; Chang, Kwang-Poo; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania genus infect and survive within macrophages by inhibiting several microbicidal molecules, such as nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, various species of Leishmania have been reported to inhibit or reduce the production of IL-1β both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism whereby Leishmania parasites are able to affect IL-1β production and secretion by macrophages is still not fully understood. Dependent on the stimulus at hand, the maturation of IL-1β is facilitated by different inflammasome complexes. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been shown to be of pivotal importance in the detection of danger molecules such as inorganic crystals like asbestos, silica and malarial hemozoin, (HZ) as well as infectious agents. In the present work, we investigated whether Leishmania parasites modulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Using PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells, we demonstrate that Leishmania infection effectively inhibits macrophage IL-1β production upon stimulation. In this context, the expression and activity of the metalloprotease GP63 - a critical virulence factor expressed by all infectious Leishmania species - is a prerequisite for a Leishmania-mediated reduction of IL-1β secretion. Accordingly, L. mexicana, purified GP63 and GP63-containing exosomes, caused the inhibition of macrophage IL-1β production. Leishmania-dependent suppression of IL-1β secretion is accompanied by an inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that has previously been shown to be associated with NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The observed loss of ROS production was due to an impaired PKC-mediated protein phosphorylation. Furthermore, ROS-independent inflammasome activation was inhibited, possibly due to an observed GP63-dependent cleavage of inflammasome and inflammasome-related proteins. Collectively for the first time, we herein provide evidence that the protozoan parasite Leishmania, through its surface

  13. PKC/ROS-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation Is Attenuated by Leishmania Zinc-Metalloprotease during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jee Yong; Chang, Kwang-Poo; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Parasites of the Leishmania genus infect and survive within macrophages by inhibiting several microbicidal molecules, such as nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, various species of Leishmania have been reported to inhibit or reduce the production of IL-1β both in vitro and in vivo. However, the mechanism whereby Leishmania parasites are able to affect IL-1β production and secretion by macrophages is still not fully understood. Dependent on the stimulus at hand, the maturation of IL-1β is facilitated by different inflammasome complexes. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been shown to be of pivotal importance in the detection of danger molecules such as inorganic crystals like asbestos, silica and malarial hemozoin, (HZ) as well as infectious agents. In the present work, we investigated whether Leishmania parasites modulate NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Using PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells, we demonstrate that Leishmania infection effectively inhibits macrophage IL-1β production upon stimulation. In this context, the expression and activity of the metalloprotease GP63 - a critical virulence factor expressed by all infectious Leishmania species - is a prerequisite for a Leishmania-mediated reduction of IL-1β secretion. Accordingly, L. mexicana, purified GP63 and GP63-containing exosomes, caused the inhibition of macrophage IL-1β production. Leishmania-dependent suppression of IL-1β secretion is accompanied by an inhibition of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that has previously been shown to be associated with NLRP3 inflammasome activation. The observed loss of ROS production was due to an impaired PKC-mediated protein phosphorylation. Furthermore, ROS-independent inflammasome activation was inhibited, possibly due to an observed GP63-dependent cleavage of inflammasome and inflammasome-related proteins. Collectively for the first time, we herein provide evidence that the protozoan parasite Leishmania, through its surface

  14. ADAMTS9 Is a Cell-Autonomously Acting, Anti-Angiogenic Metalloprotease Expressed by Microvascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Bon-Hun; Coe, David M.; Dixon, Laura J.; Somerville, Robert P.T.; Nelson, Courtney M.; Wang, Lauren W.; Young, Mary Elizabeth; Lindner, Daniel J.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotease ADAMTS9 participates in melanoblast development and is a tumor suppressor in esophageal and nasopharyngeal cancer. ADAMTS9 null mice die before gastrulation, but, ADAMTS9+/− mice were initially thought to be normal. However, when congenic with the C57Bl/6 strain, 80% of ADAMTS9+/− mice developed spontaneous corneal neovascularization. β-Galactosidase staining enabled by a lacZ cassette targeted to the ADAMTS9 locus showed that capillary endothelial cells (ECs) in embryonic and adult tissues and in capillaries growing into heterotopic tumors expressed ADAMTS9. Heterotopic B.16-F10 melanomas elicited greater vascular induction in ADAMTS9+/− mice than in wild-type littermates, suggesting a potential inhibitory role in tumor angiogenesis. Treatment of cultured human microvascular ECs with ADAMTS9 small-interfering RNA resulted in enhanced filopodial extension, decreased cell adhesion, increased cell migration, and enhanced formation of tube-like structures on Matrigel. Conversely, overexpression of catalytically active, but not inactive, ADAMTS9 in ECs led to fewer tube-like structures, demonstrating that the proteolytic activity of ADAMTS9 was essential. However, unlike the related metalloprotease ADAMTS1, which exerts anti-angiogenic effects by cleavage of thrombospondins and sequestration of vascular endothelial growth factor165, ADAMTS9 neither cleaved thrombospondins 1 and 2, nor bound vascular endothelial growth factor165. Taken together, these data identify ADAMTS9 as a novel, constitutive, endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that operates cell-autonomously in ECs via molecular mechanisms that are distinct from those used by ADAMTS1. PMID:20093484

  15. Characterization of the Zinc-Containing Metalloprotease Encoded by zpx and Development of a Species-Specific Detection Method for Enterobacter sakazakii▿

    PubMed Central

    Kothary, M. H.; McCardell, B. A.; Frazar, C. D.; Deer, D.; Tall, B. D.

    2007-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii causes a severe form of neonatal meningitis that occurs as sporadic cases as well as outbreaks. The disease has been epidemiologically associated with consumption of reconstituted, dried infant formulas. Very little information is available regarding pathogenicity of the organism and production of virulence factors. Clinical and environmental strains were screened for production of factors which have activity against Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in tissue culture. Polymyxin B lysate and sonicate preparations but not culture supernatants from the strains caused “rounding” of CHO cells. Subsequent studies showed that the CHO cell-rounding factor is a proteolytic enzyme that has activity against azocasein. The cell-bound protease was isolated by using a combination of polymyxin B lysis, followed by sonication of cells harvested from tryptone broth. The protease was purified to homogeneity by sequential ammonium sulfate precipitation, gel filtration chromatography with Sephadex G-100, hydrophobic interaction chromatography with phenyl-Sepharose CL-4B, and a second gel filtration with Sephadex G-100. In addition to activity against azocasein, the purified protease also exhibits activity against azocoll and insoluble casein but not elastin. The protease has a molecular weight of 38,000 and an isoelectric point of 4.4. It is heat labile and for maximal activity against azocasein has an optimum temperature of 37°C and a pH range of 5 to 7. Proteolytic activity is inhibited by ortho-phenanthroline and Zincov but is not affected by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, N-ethylmaleimide, and trypsin inhibitors, which demonstrates that the protease is a zinc-containing metalloprotease. The metalloprotease does not hemagglutinate chicken or sheep erythrocytes. Twenty-three to 27 of the first 42 N-terminal amino acid residues of the metalloprotease are identical to proteases produced by Serratia proteamaculans, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Anabaena

  16. Involvement of caspases and transmembrane metalloproteases in sulphur mustard-induced microvesication in adult human skin in organ culture: directions for therapy.

    PubMed

    Mol, Marijke A E; van den Berg, Roland M; Benschop, Henk P

    2009-04-05

    While skin is a major target for sulphur mustard (HD), a therapy to limit HD-induced vesication is currently not available. Since it is supposed that apoptotic cell death and proteolytic digestion of extracellular matrix proteins by metalloproteases are initiating factors for blister formation, we have explored whether inhibition of these processes could prevent HD-induced epidermal-dermal separation using adult human skin in organ culture. Involvement of the caspase and the metalloprotease families was confirmed by the observation that their respective broad spectrum inhibitors, Z-VAD-fmk and GM6001, each suppressed HD-induced microvesication. The lowest effective concentrations were 10 and 100microM, respectively. Using specific inhibitors for caspase-8 (> or =10microM) and caspase-9 (> or =10microM) we learned that HD-induced apoptosis is initiated by the death receptor pathway as well as by the mitochondrial pathway. Remarkably, blocking caspase-8 activity resulted in morphologically better conserved cells than blocking caspase-9 activity. We zoomed in on the role of metalloproteases in HD-induced microvesication by testing the effects of two inhibitors: dec-RVKR-cmk and TAPI-2. Dec-RVKR-cmk is an inhibitor of furin, which activates transmembrane enzymes of the 'a disintegrin and metalloproteinase' (ADAM)-family as well as the membrane-type metalloproteases (MTx-MMP). TAPI-2 specifically inhibits TNFalpha-converting enzyme (TACE/ADAM17), which is involved in pericellular proteolysis. Both inhibitors prevented microvesication at concentrations of > or =500 and > or =20microM, respectively. This confirms that ADAMs and MT-MMPs play a role in HD-induced epidermal-dermal separation, with a particular role for TACE/ADAM17. Since TACE is involved not only in degradation of cell-matrix adhesion structures, but also in ectodomain shedding of ligands for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and in release of TNFalpha, these results imply TACE-mediated pathways as a

  17. MicroRNA expression in response to murine myocardial infarction: miR-21 regulates fibroblast metalloprotease-2 via phosphatase and tensin homologue

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Hussain, Syed-Rehan A.; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Azad, Ali; Rink, Cameron; Gnyawali, Surya; Shilo, Shani; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    Aims MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by either degradation or translational repression of a target mRNA. Encoded in the genome of most eukaryotes, miRNAs have been proposed to regulate specifically up to 90% of human genes through a process known as miRNA-guided RNA silencing. For the first time, we sought to test how myocardial ischaemia–reperfusion (IR) changes miR expression. Methods and results Following 2 and 7 h of IR or sham operation, myocardial tissue was collected and subjected to miRNA expression profiling and quantification using a Bioarray system that screens for human-, mice-, rat-, and Ambi-miR. Data mining and differential analyses resulted in 13 miRs that were up-regulated on day 2, 9 miRs that were up-regulated on day 7, and 6 miRs that were down-regulated on day 7 post-IR. Results randomly selected from expression profiling were validated using real-time PCR. Tissue elements laser-captured from the infarct site showed marked induction of miR-21. In situ hybridization studies using locked nucleic acid miR-21-specific probe identified that IR-inducible miR-21 was specifically localized in the infarct region of the IR heart. Immunohistochemistry data show that cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) are the major cell type in the infarct zone. Studies with isolated CFs demonstrated that phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a direct target of miR-21. Modulation of miR-21 regulated expression of matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) via a PTEN pathway. Finally, we noted a marked decrease in PTEN expression in the infarct zone. This decrease was associated with increased MMP-2 expression in the infarct area. Conclusion This work constitutes the first report describing changes in miR expression in response to IR in the mouse heart, showing that miR-21 regulates MMP-2 expression in CFs of the infarct zone via a PTEN pathway. PMID:19147652

  18. IL-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase-13 is activated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease-28-regulated proliferation of human osteoblast-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ozeki, Nobuaki; Kawai, Rie; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Hiyama, Taiki; Kinoshita, Katsue; Hase, Naoko; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Ayami; Mogi, Makio; Nakamura, Hiroshi

    2014-04-15

    We reported previously that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 accelerates bone remodeling in oral periradicular lesions, and indicated a potentially unique role for MMP-13 in wound healing and regeneration of alveolar bone. The ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family is a set of multifunctional cell surface and secreted glycoproteins, of which ADAM-28 has been localized in bone and bone-like tissues. In this study, we show that interleukin (IL)-1β induces the expression of MMP-13 and ADAM-28 in homogeneous α7 integrin-positive human skeletal muscle stem cell (α7{sup +}hSMSC)-derived osteoblast-like (α7{sup +}hSMSC-OB) cells, and promotes proliferation while inhibiting apoptosis in these cells. At higher concentrations, however, IL-1β failed to induce the expression of these genes and caused an increase in apoptosis. We further employed ADAM-28 small interfering RNA (siRNA) to investigate whether IL-1β-induced MMP-13 expression is linked to this IL-1β-mediated changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis. Silencing ADAM-28 expression potently suppressed IL-1β-induced MMP-13 expression and activity, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in α7{sup +}hSMSC-OB cells. In contrast, MMP-13 siRNA had no effect on ADAM-28 expression, suggesting ADAM-28 regulates MMP-13. Exogenous MMP-13 induced α7{sup +}hSMSC-OB cell proliferation and could rescue ADAM-28 siRNA-induced apoptosis, and we found that proMMP-13 is partially cleaved into its active form by ADAM-28 in vitro. Overall, our results suggest that IL-1β-induced MMP-13 expression and changes in cell proliferation and apoptosis in α7{sup +}hSMSC-OB cells are regulated by ADAM-28. - Highlights: • IL-1β induces the MMP-13 and ADAM-28 expression in human osteoblast-like cells. • IL-1β-induced MMP-13 expression increases proliferation and decreased apoptosis. • MMP-13 expression induced by IL-1β is regulated by ADAM-28. • proMMP-13 appears to be cleaved into its active form via

  19. Expression and immunological cross-reactivity of LALP3, a novel astacin-like metalloprotease from brown spider (Loxosceles intermedia) venom.

    PubMed

    Morgon, Adriano M; Belisario-Ferrari, Matheus R; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Meissner, Gabriel O; Vuitika, Larissa; Marin, Brenda; Tashima, Alexandre K; Gremski, Luiza H; Gremski, Waldemiro; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio S; Chaim, Olga M

    2016-01-01

    Loxosceles spiders' venom comprises a complex mixture of biologically active toxins, mostly consisting of low molecular mass components (2-40 kDa). Amongst, isoforms of astacin-like metalloproteases were identified through transcriptome and proteome analyses. Only LALP1 (Loxosceles Astacin-Like protease 1) has been characterized. Herein, we characterized LALP3 as a novel recombinant astacin-like metalloprotease isoform from Loxosceles intermedia venom. LALP3 cDNA was cloned in pET-SUMO vector, and its soluble heterologous expression was performed using a SUMO tag added to LALP3 to achieve solubility in Escherichia coli SHuffle T7 Express LysY cells, which express the disulfide bond isomerase DsbC. Protein purification was conducted by Ni-NTA Agarose resin and assayed for purity by SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Immunoblotting analyses were performed with specific antibodies recognizing LALP1 and whole venom. Western blotting showed linear epitopes from recombinant LALP3 that cross-reacted with LALP1, and dot blotting revealed conformational epitopes with native venom astacins. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the recombinant expressed protein is an astacin-like metalloprotease from L. intermedia venom. Furthermore, molecular modeling of LALP3 revealed that this isoform contains the zinc binding and Met-turn motifs, forming the active site, as has been observed in astacins. These data confirmed that LALP3, which was successfully obtained by heterologous expression using a prokaryote system, is a new astacin-like metalloprotease isoform present in L. intermedia venom. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  20. The InhA2 Metalloprotease of Bacillus thuringiensis Strain 407 Is Required for Pathogenicity in Insects Infected via the Oral Route

    PubMed Central

    Fedhila, Sinda; Nel, Patricia; Lereclus, Didier

    2002-01-01

    The entomopathogenic bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis is known to secrete a zinc metalloprotease (InhA) that specifically cleaves antibacterial peptides produced by insect hosts. We identified a second copy of the inhA gene, named inhA2, in B. thuringiensis strain 407 Cry−. The inhA2 gene encodes a putative polypeptide showing 66.2% overall identity with the InhA protein and harboring the zinc-binding domain (HEXXH), which is characteristic of the zinc-requiring metalloproteases. We used a transcriptional inhA2′-lacZ fusion to show that inhA2 expression is induced at the onset of the stationary phase and is overexpressed in a Spo0A minus background. The presence of a reverse Spo0A box in the promoter region of inhA2 suggests that Spo0A directly regulates the transcription of inhA2. To determine the role of the InhA and InhA2 metalloproteases in pathogenesis, we used allelic exchange to isolate single and double mutant strains for the two genes. Spores and vegetative cells of the mutant strains were as virulent as those of the parental strain in immunized Bombyx mori larvae infected by the intrahemocoelic route. Exponential phase cells of all the strains displayed the same in vitro potential for colonizing the vaccinated hemocoel. We investigated the synergistic effect of the mutant strain spores on the toxicity of Cry1C proteins against Galleria mellonella larvae infected via the oral pathway. The spores of ΔinhA2 mutant strain were ineffective in providing synergism whereas those of the ΔinhA mutant strain were not. These results indicate that the B. thuringiensis InhA2 zinc metalloprotease has a vital role in virulence when the host is infected via the oral route. PMID:12029046

  1. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand release by substrate-specific a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) involves different protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes depending on the stimulus.

    PubMed

    Dang, Michelle; Dubbin, Karen; D'Aiello, Antonio; Hartmann, Monika; Lodish, Harvey; Herrlich, Andreas

    2011-05-20

    The dysregulation of EGF family ligand cleavage has severe consequences for the developing as well as the adult organism. Therefore, their production is highly regulated. The limiting step is the ectodomain cleavage of membrane-bound precursors by one of several a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) metalloproteases, and understanding the regulation of cleavage is an important goal of current research. We have previously reported that in mouse lung epithelial cells, the pro-EGF ligands TGFα, neuregulin 1β (NRG), and heparin-binding EGF are differentially cleaved depending on the cleavage stimulus (Herrlich, A., Klinman, E., Fu, J., Sadegh, C., and Lodish, H. (2008) FASEB J.). In this study in mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack different ADAMs, we show that induced cleavage of EGF ligands can involve the same substrate-specific metalloprotease but does require different stimulus-dependent signaling pathways. Cleavage was stimulated by phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a mimic of diacylglycerol and PKC activator), hypertonic stress, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced G protein-coupled receptor activation, or by ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium release. Although ADAMs showed substrate preference (ADAM17, TGFα and heparin-binding EGF; and ADAM9, NRG), substrate cleavage differed substantially with the stimulus, and cleavage of the same substrate depended on the presence of different, sometimes multiple, PKC isoforms. For instance, classical PKC was required for TPA-induced but not hypertonic stress-induced cleavage of all EGF family ligands. Inhibition of PKCζ enhanced NRG release upon TPA stimulation, but it blocked NRG release in response to hypertonic stress. Our results suggest a model in which substantial regulation of ectodomain cleavage occurs not only on the metalloprotease level but also on the level of the substrate or of a third protein.

  2. Increased cerebral matrix metalloprotease-9 activity is associated with compromised recovery in the diabetic db/db mouse following a stroke.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Willing, Lisa B; Patel, Shyama D; Baskerville, Karen A; Simpson, Ian A

    2011-12-01

    Diabetes is a major risk factor of stroke and is associated with increased frequency of stroke and a poorer prognosis for recovery. In earlier studies we have utilized type 2 diabetic mouse models of stroke and demonstrated that diabetic db/db and ob/ob mice experience larger infarct volumes and impaired recovery associated with greater infiltration of macrophage following hypoxic-ischemic (H/I) insult than their heterozygous non-diabetic db/+ and ob/+ littermates. To obtain a better understanding of the pathogenesis of the impaired recovery, we have investigated the role of matrix metalloproteases and their endogenous inhibitors in the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) following H/I. Diabetic db/db mice showed a significant and more rapid increase in matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 mRNA, protein and gelatinolytic activity compared with db/+, which resulted in an increased degradation of occludin and collagen IV and subsequently, an increased BBB permeability and greater infiltration of neutrophils into the infarct area. The expression of the MMPs, especially in the db/+ mice, is preceded by an elevated expression of their endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases (TIMPs) 1, 2, and 3, whereas in the db/db mice, a lower expression of the TIMPs is associated with greater MMP 3 and 9 expression. These results suggest that an imbalance in the MMPs/TIMPs cascade in the diabetic mouse, particularly MMP-9, results in a greater neutrophil invasion, a compromised BBB and consequently a greater insult.

  3. The role of serine- and metalloproteases in Nasonia vitripennis venom in cell death related processes towards a Spodoptera frugiperda Sf21 cell line.

    PubMed

    Formesyn, Ellen M; Heyninck, Karen; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2013-08-01

    Proteases are predominant venom components of the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis. Two protease families, serine proteases and metalloproteases were examined for their possible cytotoxic functions in the Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf21) cell line using protease inhibitors that inactivate one or both protease families. Viability assays on adherent cells indicated that both protease families are among the main cytotoxic compounds of N. vitripennis venom. However, viability assays and flow cytometry performed on suspension cells 24h after envenomation revealed that inactivation of metalloproteases did not improve cell survival. These results indicate that both protease families may have tissue specific functions. Time course experiments indicate that serine proteases of N. vitripennis venom are responsible for inducing apoptosis in the Sf21 cell line. However, other venom compounds could also be involved in this process and different cell death pathways may take over when a specific type of cell death is inhibited. During parasitation of their natural hosts, both protease families may possibly function in immune related processes and tissue destruction, enabling venom distribution. Overall, this study provides important insights into the functions of serine and metalloproteases in the venom of N. vitripennis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metalloprotease-mediated tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, the ligand of the natural killer cell-activating receptor NKp30.

    PubMed

    Schlecker, Eva; Fiegler, Nathalie; Arnold, Annette; Altevogt, Peter; Rose-John, Stefan; Moldenhauer, Gerhard; Sucker, Antje; Paschen, Annette; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Textor, Sonja; Cerwenka, Adelheid

    2014-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are potent immune effector cells capable of mediating antitumor responses. Thus, during immunoediting, tumor cell populations evolve strategies to escape NK-cell-mediated recognition. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of immune escape involving tumor cell shedding of B7-H6, a ligand for the activating receptor NKp30 that mediates NK-cell binding and NK-cell-mediated killing. Tumor cells from different cancer entities released B7-H6 by ectodomain shedding mediated by the cell surface proteases "a disintegrin and metalloproteases" (ADAM)-10 and ADAM-17, as demonstrated through the use of pharmacologic inhibitors or siRNA-mediated gene attenuation. Inhibiting this proteolytic shedding process increased the levels of B7-H6 expressed on the surface of tumor cells, enhancing NKp30-mediated activation of NK cells. Notably, we documented elevated levels of soluble B7-H6 levels in blood sera obtained from a subset of patients with malignant melanoma, compared with healthy control individuals, along with evidence of elevated B7-H6 expression in melanoma specimens in situ. Taken together, our results illustrated a novel mechanism of immune escape in which tumor cells impede NK-mediated recognition by metalloprotease-mediated shedding of B7-H6. One implication of our findings is that therapeutic inhibition of specific metalloproteases may help support NK-cell-based cancer therapy.

  5. Matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact portion of those tendons.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Alessandro; Cesari, Eugenio; Garofalo, Raffaele; Gigante, Antonio; Conti, Marco; Markopoulos, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon, more than 1 cm lateral to the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior margin of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon, used as control. The collagenases, the stromelysins, and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease arrays were analyzed blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA in each specimen. Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a rotator cuff tear, but not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There were significantly increased levels of MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and the subscapularis (control specimens). The levels of specific matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact tendons. These changes extended medially to the site of tendon tear, and to other tendons.

  6. Matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact portion of those tendons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Alessandro; Cesari, Eugenio; Garofalo, Raffaele; Gigante, Antonio; Conti, Marco; Markopoulos, Nikolaos; Maffulli, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Summary We evaluated whether matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are involved in extracellular matrix remodelling and degradation of chronic rotator cuff tears. Tendon samples were harvested from 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic repair of a rotator cuff tear. Supraspinatus specimens were harvested en bloc from the arthroscopically intact middle portion of the tendon, more than 1 cm lateral to the torn edge, from the lateral edge of the tear, and from the superior margin of the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon, used as control. The collagenases, the stromelysins, and the tissue inhibitors of metalloprotease arrays were analyzed blindly by multiplex sandwich ELISA in each specimen. Histological evidence of tendinopathy was present in all patients with a rotator cuff tear, but not in the macroscopically intact subscapularis tendon. There were significantly increased levels of MMP 1, MMP 2, MMP 3, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in all specimens examined, including the macroscopically intact portion of the supraspinatus tendon and the subscapularis (control specimens). The levels of specific matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors are altered in torn rotator cuff tendons, but also in the macroscopically and histologically intact tendons. These changes extended medially to the site of tendon tear, and to other tendons. PMID:24367772

  7. The NTR module: domains of netrins, secreted frizzled related proteins, and type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer protein are homologous with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases.

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, L.; Patthy, L.

    1999-01-01

    Using homology search, structure prediction, and structural characterization methods we show that the C-terminal domains of (1) netrins, (2) complement proteins C3, C4, C5, (3) secreted frizzled-related proteins, and (4) type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer proteins (PCOLCEs) are homologous with the N-terminal domains of (5) tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The proteins harboring this netrin module (NTR module) fulfill diverse biological roles ranging from axon guidance, regulation of Wnt signaling, to the control of the activity of metalloproteases. With the exception of TIMPs, it is not known at present what role the NTR modules play in these processes. In view of the fact that the NTR modules of TIMPs are involved in the inhibition of matrixin-type metalloproteases and that the NTR module of PCOLCEs is involved in the control of the activity of the astacin-type metalloprotease BMP1, it seems possible that interaction with metzincins could be a shared property of NTR modules and could be critical for the biological roles of the host proteins. PMID:10452607

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Metalloproteases with a Novel Domain Structure by Construction and Screening of Metagenomic Libraries▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Waschkowitz, Tanja; Rockstroh, Stephanie; Daniel, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    Small-insert metagenomic libraries from four samples were constructed by a topoisomerase-based and a T4 DNA ligase-based approach. Direct comparison of both approaches revealed that application of the topoisomerase-based method resulted in a higher number of insert-containing clones per μg of environmental DNA used for cloning and a larger average insert size. Subsequently, the constructed libraries were partially screened for the presence of genes conferring proteolytic activity. The function-driven screen was based on the ability of the library-containing Escherichia coli clones to form halos on skim milk-containing agar plates. The screening of 80,000 E. coli clones yielded four positive clones. Two of the plasmids (pTW2 and pTW3) recovered from positive clones conferred strong proteolytic activity and were studied further. Analysis of the entire insert sequences of pTW2 (28,113 bp) and pTW3 (19,956 bp) suggested that the DNA fragments were derived from members of the genus Xanthomonas. Each of the plasmids harbored one gene (2,589 bp) encoding a metalloprotease (mprA, pTW2; mprB, pTW3). Sequence and biochemical analyses revealed that MprA and MprB are similar extracellular proteases belonging to the M4 family of metallopeptidases (thermolysin-like family). Both enzymes possessed a unique modular structure and consisted of four regions: the signal sequence, the N-terminal proregion, the protease region, and the C-terminal extension. The architecture of the latter region, which was characterized by the presence of two prepeptidase C-terminal domains and one proprotein convertase P domain, is novel for bacterial metalloproteases. Studies with derivatives of MprA and MprB revealed that the C-terminal extension is not essential for protease activity. The optimum pH and temperature of both proteases were 8.0 and 65°C, respectively, when casein was used as substrate. PMID:19218412

  9. Roles of the signal peptide and mature domains in the secretion and maturation of the neutral metalloprotease from Streptomyces cacaoi.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S C; Su, M H; Lee, Y H

    1997-01-01

    The neutral metalloprotease (Npr) of Streptomyces cacaoi is synthesized as a prepro-Npr precursor form consisting of a secretory signal peptide, a propeptide and the mature metalloprotease. The maturation of Npr occurs extracellularly via an autoproteolytic processing of the secreted pro-Npr. The integrity of the propeptide is essential for the formation of mature active Npr but not for its secretion [Chang, Chang and Lee (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 3548-3554]. In this study we investigated whether the secretion and maturation of Npr require the integrity of its signal peptide region and mature protease domain. Five signal peptide mutants were generated, including the substitution mutations at the positively charged region (mutant IR6LE), the central hydrophobic region (mutants GI19EL and G19N), the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage region (mutant P30L) and at the residues adjacent to the signal peptidase cleavage site (mutant YA33SM). All these lesions delayed the export of Npr to the growth medium and also resulted in a 2-10-fold decrease in Npr export. The most severe effect was noted in mutants GI19EL and P30L. When these signal peptide mutations were fused separately with the propeptide lacking the Npr mature domain, the secretory defect on the propeptide was also observed, and this impairment was again more severely expressed in mutants GI19EL and P30L. Thus the Npr signal peptide seems to have more constraints on the hydrophobic core region and at the proline residue within the boundary of the hydrophobic core-cleavage site. Deletion mutations within the C-terminal mature protease domain that left its active site intact still blocked the proteolytic processing of mutant precursor forms of pro-Npr, although their secretions were unaffected. These results, together with our previous findings, strongly suggest that the signal peptide of Npr plays a pivotal role in the secretion of both Npr and the propeptide, but not in the maturation of Npr. On the

  10. Relationship between metalloprotease expression in tumour and stromal cells and aggressive behaviour in prostate carcinoma: Simultaneous high-throughput study of multiple metalloproteases and their inhibitors using tissue array analysis of radical prostatectomy samples.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Gomez, Jesus; Escaf, Safwan; Gonzalez, Luis-Ovidio; Suarez, Aurelio; Gonzalez-Reyes, Salome; González, Jose; Miranda, Oscar; Vizoso, Francisco

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to detect a potential association between clinicopathological factors of prostate cancer aggressiveness and the expression of matrix metalloproteases and their inhibitors in tumour and stromal cells. A tissue array technique and immunochemistry with specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-1, 2, 7, 9, 11, 13, 14, and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs)-1, 2 and 3 were used to analyse the surgical specimens of 133 patients treated by radical prostatectomy. For each antibody preparation, the cellular location of immunoreactivity was determined. The expression of MMP-2 was negatively associated with high tumour grade. With regard to stromal fibroblasts, TIMP-3 expression was positively associated with histological grade. MMP-7 expression was negatively associated with pretreatment serum levels of PSA, whereas MMP-13 was positively associated with higher levels of the antigen. TIMP-2 expression by mononuclear inflammatory cells correlated significantly and negatively with tumour grade. The expression of TIMP-3 by fibroblasts was associated with a higher Gleason score. An increased expression of MMP-13 by fibroblasts was associated with a greater preoperative level of PSA. In contrast, MMP-2 expression by tumour as well as TIMP-2 expression by peritumoral inflammatory cells was associated with less aggressive prostate carcinoma characteristics.

  11. Structural Basis of Proline-Proline Peptide Bond Specificity of the Metalloprotease Zmp1 Implicated in Motility of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schacherl, Magdalena; Pichlo, Christian; Neundorf, Ines; Baumann, Ulrich

    2015-09-01

    Clostridium difficile is a pathogenic bacterium causing gastrointestinal diseases from mild diarrhea to toxic megacolon. In common with other pathogenic bacteria, C. difficile secretes proteins involved in adhesion, colonization, and dissemination. The recently identified Zmp1 is an extracellular metalloprotease showing a unique specificity for Pro-Pro peptide bonds. The endogenous substrates of Zmp1 are two surface proteins implicated in adhesion of C. difficile to surface proteins of human cells. Thus, Zmp1 is believed to be involved in the regulation of the adhesion-motility balance of C. difficile. Here, we report crystal structures of Zmp1 from C. difficile in its unbound and peptide-bound forms. The structure analysis revealed a fold similar to Bacillus anthracis lethal factor. Crystal structures in the open and closed conformation of the S-loop shed light on the mode of binding of the substrate, and reveal important residues for substrate recognition and the strict specificity of Zmp1 for Pro-Pro peptide bonds.

  12. A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 and 17 promote self-renewal of brain tumor sphere forming cells.

    PubMed

    Bulstrode, Harry; Jones, Louise M; Siney, Elodie J; Sampson, Jessica M; Ludwig, Andreas; Gray, William P; Willaime-Morawek, Sandrine

    2012-12-29

    It has been proposed that gliomas contain a subpopulation of 'Brain Tumor Stem Cells' (BTSCs), which demonstrate resistance to conventional therapies. A potential component of the environment governing the behavior of these BTSCs is a class of transmembrane proteins with structural and signaling functions, the A-Disintegrin And Metalloproteases (ADAMs). In this study we confirm overexpression of ADAM10 and 17 in human glioma tissue compared to human controls, and especially in tumor sphere cultures thought to enrich for BTSCs. Inhibition of ADAM10/17 function impairs the growth of tumor spheres with evidence of depletion of the sphere forming cell population. This results from a combination of reduced proliferation, cell death and a switch of sphere-forming cells away from symmetric self-renewal division towards neuronal differentiation. A developing appreciation of the role of ADAMs in BTSC promises insights into pathophysiology and potential therapeutic avenues in this intractable group of tumors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of SH3 Domain Proteins Interacting with the Cytoplasmic Tail of the A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10)

    PubMed Central

    Ebsen, Henriette; Lettau, Marcus; Kabelitz, Dieter; Janssen, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    The a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) play a pivotal role in the control of development, adhesion, migration, inflammation and cancer. Although numerous substrates of ADAM10 have been identified, the regulation of its surface expression and proteolytic activity is still poorly defined. One current hypothesis is that both processes are in part modulated by protein-protein interactions mediated by the intracellular portion of the protease. For related proteases, especially proline-rich regions serving as docking sites for Src homology domain 3 (SH3) domain-containing proteins proved to be important for mediating regulatory interactions. In order to identify ADAM10-binding SH3 domain proteins, we screened the All SH3 Domain Phager library comprising 305 human SH3 domains using a GST fusion protein with the intracellular region of human ADAM10 as a bait for selection. Of a total of 291 analyzed phage clones, we found 38 SH3 domains that were precipitated with the ADAM10-derived fusion protein but not with GST. We verified the binding to the cytosolic portion of ADAM10 for several candidates by co-immunoprecipitation and/or pull down analyses. Intriguingly, several of the identified proteins have been implicated in regulating surface appearance and/or proteolytic activity of related ADAMs. Thus, it seems likely that they also play a role in ADAM10 biology. PMID:25036101

  14. Novel mode of action of plant defense peptides - hevein-like antimicrobial peptides from wheat inhibit fungal metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Slavokhotova, Anna A; Naumann, Todd A; Price, Neil P J; Rogozhin, Eugene A; Andreev, Yaroslav A; Vassilevski, Alexander A; Odintsova, Tatyana I

    2014-10-01

    The multilayered plant immune system relies on rapid recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns followed by activation of defense-related genes, resulting in the reinforcement of plant cell walls and the production of antimicrobial compounds. To suppress plant defense, fungi secrete effectors, including a recently discovered Zn-metalloproteinase from Fusarium verticillioides, named fungalysin Fv-cmp. This proteinase cleaves class IV chitinases, which are plant defense proteins that bind and degrade chitin of fungal cell walls. In this study, we investigated plant responses to such pathogen invasion, and discovered novel inhibitors of fungalysin. We produced several recombinant hevein-like antimicrobial peptides named wheat antimicrobial peptides (WAMPs) containing different amino acids (Ala, Lys, Glu, and Asn) at the nonconserved position 34. An additional Ser at the site of fungalysin proteolysis makes the peptides resistant to the protease. Moreover, an equal molar concentration of WAMP-1b or WAMP-2 to chitinase was sufficient to block the fungalysin activity, keeping the chitinase intact. Thus, WAMPs represent novel protease inhibitors that are active against fungal metalloproteases. According to in vitro antifungal assays WAMPs directly inhibited hyphal elongation, suggesting that fungalysin plays an important role in fungal development. A novel molecular mechanism of dynamic interplay between host defense molecules and fungal virulence factors is suggested. © 2014 FEBS.

  15. MicroRNA-145 Targets the Metalloprotease ADAM17 and Is Suppressed in Renal Cell Carcinoma Patients1

    PubMed Central

    Doberstein, Kai; Steinmeyer, Nico; Hartmetz, Ann-Kathrin; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Mittelbronn, Michel; Harter, Patrick N; Juengel, Eva; Blaheta, Roman; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Gutwein, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease that is overexpressed in many cancer types, including renal cancers. However, the regulatory mechanisms of ADAM17 in cancer development and progression are poorly understood. In the present work, we provide evidence using overexpression and inhibition of microRNA 145 (miR-145) that miR-145 negatively regulates ADAM17 expression. Furthermore, we show that ADAM17 negatively regulates miR-145 through tumor necrosis factor-α, resulting in a reciprocal negative feedback loop. In this study, the expression of ADAM17 and miR-145 correlated negatively in renal cancer tumor tissues and cell lines, suggesting an important regulatory mechanism. Additionally, we showed that the regulation of ADAM17 is partly involved in the effects of miR-145 on proliferation and migration, whereas no involvement in chemosensitivity was observed. Importantly, in the healthy kidney, miR-145 was detected in different cell types including tubular cells, which are considered the origin of renal cancer. In renal cancer cell lines, miR-145 expression was strongly suppressed by methylation. In summary, miR-145 is downregulated in renal cancer patients, which leads to the up-regulation of ADAM17 in renal cancer. Importantly, miR-145 and ADAM17 are regulated in a reciprocal negative feedback loop. PMID:23441135

  16. Molecular pathology of brain matrix metalloproteases, claudin5, and aquaporins in forensic autopsy cases with special regard to methamphetamine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Michiue, Tomomi; Zhu, Bao-Li; Guan, Da-Wei; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug of abuse and toxic to the brain. Recent studies indicated that besides direct damage to dopamine and 5-HT terminals, neurotoxicity of METH may also result from its ability to modify the structure of blood-brain barrier (BBB). The present study investigated the postmortem brain mRNA and immunohistochemical expressions of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), claudin5 (CLDN5), and aquaporins (AQPs) in forensic autopsy cases of carbon monoxide (n = 14), METH (n = 21), and phenobarbital (n = 17) intoxication, compared with mechanical asphyxia (n = 15), brain injury (n = 11), non-brain injury (n = 21), and sharp instrument injury (n = 15) cases. Relative mRNA quantification using Taqman real-time PCR assay demonstrated higher expression of AQP4 and MMP9, lower expression of CLDN5 in METH intoxication cases and lower expression of MMP2 in phenobarbital intoxication cases. Immunostaining results showed substantial interindividual variations in each group, showing no evident differences in distribution or intensity among all the causes of death. These findings suggest that METH may increase BBB permeability by altering CLDN5 and MMP9, and the self-protective system maybe activated to eliminate accumulating water from the extracellular space of the brain by up-regulating AQP4. Systematic analysis of gene expressions using real-time PCR may be a useful procedure in forensic death investigation.

  17. Cyclosporin A Impairs the Secretion and Activity of ADAMTS13 (A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease with Thrombospondin Type 1 Repeat)*

    PubMed Central

    Hershko, Klilah; Simhadri, Vijaya L.; Blaisdell, Adam; Hunt, Ryan C.; Newell, Jordan; Tseng, Sandra C.; Hershko, Alon Y.; Choi, Jae Won; Sauna, Zuben E.; Wu, Andrew; Bram, Richard J.; Komar, Anton A.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2012-01-01

    The protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 repeat) cleaves multimers of von Willebrand factor, thus regulating platelet aggregation. ADAMTS13 deficiency leads to the fatal disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). It has been observed that cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment, particularly in transplant patients, may sometimes be linked to the development of TTP. Until now, the reason for such a link was unclear. Here we provide evidence demonstrating that cyclophilin B (CypB) activity plays an important role in the secretion of active ADAMTS13. We found that CsA, an inhibitor of CypB, reduces the secretion of ADAMTS13 and leads to conformational changes in the protein resulting in diminished ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity. A direct, functional interaction between CypB (which possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) and chaperone functions) and ADAMTS13 is demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and siRNA knockdown of CypB. Finally, CypB knock-out mice were found to have reduced ADAMTS13 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that cyclophilin-mediated activity is an important factor affecting secretion and activity of ADAMTS13. The large number of proline residues in ADAMTS13 is consistent with the important role of cis-trans isomerization in the proper folding of this protein. These results altogether provide a novel mechanistic explanation for CsA-induced TTP in transplant patients. PMID:23144461

  18. Cyclosporin A impairs the secretion and activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 repeat).

    PubMed

    Hershko, Klilah; Simhadri, Vijaya L; Blaisdell, Adam; Hunt, Ryan C; Newell, Jordan; Tseng, Sandra C; Hershko, Alon Y; Choi, Jae Won; Sauna, Zuben E; Wu, Andrew; Bram, Richard J; Komar, Anton A; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2012-12-28

    The protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 repeat) cleaves multimers of von Willebrand factor, thus regulating platelet aggregation. ADAMTS13 deficiency leads to the fatal disorder thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP). It has been observed that cyclosporin A (CsA) treatment, particularly in transplant patients, may sometimes be linked to the development of TTP. Until now, the reason for such a link was unclear. Here we provide evidence demonstrating that cyclophilin B (CypB) activity plays an important role in the secretion of active ADAMTS13. We found that CsA, an inhibitor of CypB, reduces the secretion of ADAMTS13 and leads to conformational changes in the protein resulting in diminished ADAMTS13 proteolytic activity. A direct, functional interaction between CypB (which possesses peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) and chaperone functions) and ADAMTS13 is demonstrated using immunoprecipitation and siRNA knockdown of CypB. Finally, CypB knock-out mice were found to have reduced ADAMTS13 levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that cyclophilin-mediated activity is an important factor affecting secretion and activity of ADAMTS13. The large number of proline residues in ADAMTS13 is consistent with the important role of cis-trans isomerization in the proper folding of this protein. These results altogether provide a novel mechanistic explanation for CsA-induced TTP in transplant patients.

  19. NK cell CD16 surface expression and function is regulated by a disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17).

    PubMed

    Romee, Rizwan; Foley, Bree; Lenvik, Todd; Wang, Yue; Zhang, Bin; Ankarlo, Dave; Luo, Xianghua; Cooley, Sarah; Verneris, Mike; Walcheck, Bruce; Miller, Jeffrey

    2013-05-02

    The Fc receptor CD16 is present on essentially all CD56(dim) peripheral blood natural killer (NK) cells. Upon recognition of antibody-coated cells it delivers a potent signal to NK cells, which eliminate targets through direct killing and cytokine production. Here we investigated the regulation of CD16 surface expression after NK cell activation. Cytokine activation and target cell stimulation led to marked decreases in CD16 expression. Activation of CD56(dim) NK cells by cross-linking CD16 with antibodies resulted in a loss of CD16 and CD62L, which correlated with increased interferon-γ production. A disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM17) is shown to be expressed by NK cells, and its selective inhibition abrogated CD16 and CD62L shedding, and led to enhanced interferon-γ production, especially when triggering was delivered through CD16. Fc-induced production of cytokines by NK cells exposed to rituximab-coated B cell targets was also enhanced by ADAM17 inhibition. This supports an important role for targeting ADAM17 to prevent CD16 shedding and improve the efficacy of therapeutic antibodies. Our findings demonstrate that over-activation of ADAM17 in NK cells may be detrimental to their effector functions by down-regulating surface expression of CD16 and CD62L.

  20. A Novel Secreted Metalloprotease (CD2830) from Clostridium difficile Cleaves Specific Proline Sequences in LPXTG Cell Surface Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hensbergen, Paul J.; Klychnikov, Oleg I.; Bakker, Dennis; van Winden, Vincent J. C.; Ras, Nienke; Kemp, Arjan C.; Cordfunke, Robert A.; Dragan, Irina; Deelder, André M.; Kuijper, Ed J.; Corver, Jeroen; Drijfhout, Jan W.; van Leeuwen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial secreted proteins constitute a biologically important subset of proteins involved in key processes related to infection such as adhesion, colonization, and dissemination. Bacterial extracellular proteases, in particular, have attracted considerable attention, as they have been shown to be indispensable for bacterial virulence. Here, we analyzed the extracellular subproteome of Clostridium difficile and identified a hypothetical protein, CD2830, as a novel secreted metalloprotease. Following the identification of a CD2830 cleavage site in human HSP90β, a series of synthetic peptide substrates was used to identify the favorable CD2830 cleavage motif. This motif was characterized by a high prevalence of proline residues. Intriguingly, CD2830 has a preference for cleaving Pro–Pro bonds, unique among all hitherto described proteases. Strikingly, within the C. difficile proteome two putative adhesion molecules, CD2831 and CD3246, were identified that contain multiple CD2830 cleavage sites (13 in total). We subsequently found that CD2830 efficiently cleaves CD2831 between two prolines at all predicted cleavage sites. Moreover, native CD2830, secreted by live cells, cleaves endogenous CD2831 and CD3246. These findings highlight CD2830 as a highly specific endoproteinase with a preference for proline residues surrounding the scissile bond. Moreover, the efficient cleavage of two putative surface adhesion proteins points to a possible role of CD2830 in the regulation of C. difficile adhesion. PMID:24623589

  1. Construction of a Vibrio splendidus mutant lacking the metalloprotease gene vsm by use of a novel counterselectable suicide vector.

    PubMed

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Binesse, Johan; Saulnier, Denis; Mazel, Didier

    2007-02-01

    Vibrio splendidus is a dominant culturable Vibrio in seawater, and strains related to this species are also associated with mortality in a variety of marine animals. The determinants encoding the pathogenic properties of these strains are still poorly understood; however, the recent sequencing of the genome of V. splendidus LGP32, an oyster pathogen, provides an opportunity to decipher the basis of the virulence properties by disruption of candidate genes. We developed a novel suicide vector based on the pir-dependent R6K replicative origin, which potentially can be transferred by RP4-based conjugation to any Vibrio strain and which also carries the plasmid F toxin ccdB gene under control of the PBAD promoter. We demonstrated that this genetic system allows efficient counterselection of integrated plasmids in the presence of arabinose in both V. splendidus and Vibrio cholerae and thus permits efficient markerless allelic replacement in these species. We used this technique to construct several mutants of V. splendidus LGP32, including a derivative with a secreted metalloprotease gene, vsm, deleted. We found that this gene is essential for LGP32 extracellular product toxicity when the extracellular products are injected into oysters but is not necessary for virulence of bacteria in the oyster infection model when bacteria are injected.

  2. Construction of a Vibrio splendidus Mutant Lacking the Metalloprotease Gene vsm by Use of a Novel Counterselectable Suicide Vector▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Le Roux, Frédérique; Binesse, Johan; Saulnier, Denis; Mazel, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Vibrio splendidus is a dominant culturable Vibrio in seawater, and strains related to this species are also associated with mortality in a variety of marine animals. The determinants encoding the pathogenic properties of these strains are still poorly understood; however, the recent sequencing of the genome of V. splendidus LGP32, an oyster pathogen, provides an opportunity to decipher the basis of the virulence properties by disruption of candidate genes. We developed a novel suicide vector based on the pir-dependent R6K replicative origin, which potentially can be transferred by RP4-based conjugation to any Vibrio strain and which also carries the plasmid F toxin ccdB gene under control of the PBAD promoter. We demonstrated that this genetic system allows efficient counterselection of integrated plasmids in the presence of arabinose in both V. splendidus and Vibrio cholerae and thus permits efficient markerless allelic replacement in these species. We used this technique to construct several mutants of V. splendidus LGP32, including a derivative with a secreted metalloprotease gene, vsm, deleted. We found that this gene is essential for LGP32 extracellular product toxicity when the extracellular products are injected into oysters but is not necessary for virulence of bacteria in the oyster infection model when bacteria are injected. PMID:17122399

  3. The Apoptogenic Toxin AIP56 Is a Metalloprotease A-B Toxin that Cleaves NF-κb P65

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela S.; Pereira, Liliana M. G.; Moreira, Ana R.; Ferreira-da-Silva, Frederico; Brito, Rui M.; Faria, Tiago Q.; Zornetta, Irene; Montecucco, Cesare; Oliveira, Pedro; Azevedo, Jorge E.; Pereira, Pedro J. B.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; do Vale, Ana; dos Santos, Nuno M. S.

    2013-01-01

    AIP56 (apoptosis-inducing protein of 56 kDa) is a major virulence factor of Photobacterium damselae piscicida (Phdp), a Gram-negative pathogen that causes septicemic infections, which are among the most threatening diseases in mariculture. The toxin triggers apoptosis of host macrophages and neutrophils through a process that, in vivo, culminates with secondary necrosis of the apoptotic cells contributing to the necrotic lesions observed in the diseased animals. Here, we show that AIP56 is a NF-κB p65-cleaving zinc-metalloprotease whose catalytic activity is required for the apoptogenic effect. Most of the bacterial effectors known to target NF-κB are type III secreted effectors. In contrast, we demonstrate that AIP56 is an A-B toxin capable of acting at distance, without requiring contact of the bacteria with the target cell. We also show that the N-terminal domain cleaves NF-κB at the Cys39-Glu40 peptide bond and that the C-terminal domain is involved in binding and internalization into the cytosol. PMID:23468618

  4. (99m)Tc-MAG3-aptamer for imaging human tumors associated with high level of matrix metalloprotease-9.

    PubMed

    Da Rocha Gomes, Sonia; Miguel, Julie; Azéma, Laurent; Eimer, Sandrine; Ries, Colette; Dausse, Eric; Loiseau, Hugues; Allard, Michèle; Toulmé, Jean-Jacques

    2012-11-21

    The human matrix metalloprotease 9 (hMMP-9) is involved in many physiological processes such as tissue remodeling. Its overexpression in tumors promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. It is a relevant marker of malignant tumors. We selected an RNA aptamer containing 2'-fluoro, pyrimidine ribonucleosides, that exhibits a strong affinity for hMMP-9 (K(d) = 20 nM) and that discriminates other human MMPs: no binding was detected to either hMMP-2 or -7. Investigating the binding properties of different MMP-9 aptamer variants by surface plasmon resonance allowed the determination of recognition elements. As a result, a truncated aptamer, 36 nucleotides long, was made fully resistant to nuclease following the substitution of every purine ribonucleoside residue by 2'-O-methyl analogues and was conjugated to S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine for imaging purposes. The resulting modified aptamer retained the binding properties of the originally selected sequence. Following (99m)Tc labeling, this aptamer was used for ex vivo imaging slices of human brain tumors. We were able to specifically detect the presence of hMMP-9 in such tissues.

  5. Purification and properties of cold-active metalloprotease from Curtobacterium luteum and effect of culture conditions on production.

    PubMed

    Kuddus, Mohammed; Ramteke, Pramod W

    2008-12-01

    Curtobacterium luteum, a gram-positive psychrotrophic bacterium, secreting an extracellular protease was isolated from the soil of Gangotri glacier, Western Himalaya. The maximum enzyme production was achieved when isolate was grown in a pH-neutral medium containing skim milk at 15 degrees C over 120 hour. The metal ions such as Zn2+ and Cr2+ enhanced enzyme production. The specific activity of purified enzyme was 8090 u/mg after 34.1 fold purification. The 115 kD enzyme was a metalloprotease (activity inhibited by EDTA and EGTA) and showed maximum activity at 20 degrres C and pH 7. The enzyme was active over a broad pH range and retained 84% of its original activity between pH 6-8. There was no loss in enzyme activity when exposed for 3 hours at 4 degrees C-20 degrees C. However, lost 65% of activity at 30 degrees C, and was almost inactivated at 50 dgrees C, but was resistant to repeated freezing and thawing. The enzyme activity was stimulated by manganese ions; however, it was inactivated by copper ions.

  6. The Role of SnoN in Transforming Growth Factor β1-induced Expression of Metalloprotease-Disintegrin ADAM12*

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Emilia; Li, Hui; Duhachek Muggy, Sara; Syta, Emilia; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Increased expression of metalloprotease-disintegrin ADAM12 is a hallmark of several pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and certain inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system or the muscoskeletal system. We show that transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) is a potent inducer of ADAM12 mRNA and protein in mouse fibroblasts and in mouse and human mammary epithelial cells. Induction of ADAM12 is detected within 2 h of treatment with TGFβ1, is Smad2/Smad3-dependent, and is a result of derepression of the Adam12 gene. SnoN, a negative regulator of the TGFβ signaling pathway, is a master regulator of ADAM12 expression in response to TGFβ1 stimulation. Overexpression of SnoN in NIH3T3 cells reduces the magnitude of ADAM12 induction by TGFβ1 treatment. Down-regulation of SnoN expression by short hairpin RNA enhances TGFβ1-induced expression of ADAM12. In a panel of TGFβ1-responsive cancer cell lines with high expression of SnoN, induction of ADAM12 by TGFβ1 is significantly impaired, suggesting that the endogenous SnoN plays a role in regulating ADAM12 expression in response to TGFβ1. Identification of SnoN as a repressor of the ADAM12 gene should contribute to advances in the studies on the role of ADAM12 in tumor progression and in the development of other pathologies. PMID:20457602

  7. Simple pseudo-dipeptides with a P2' glutamate: a novel inhibitor family of matrix metalloproteases and other metzincins.

    PubMed

    Devel, Laurent; Beau, Fabrice; Amoura, Mehdi; Vera, Laura; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyne; Garcia, Sandra; Czarny, Bertrand; Stura, Enrico A; Dive, Vincent

    2012-08-03

    A series of pseudo-peptides with general formula X-l-Glu-NH(2) (with X corresponding to an acyl moiety with a long aryl-alkyl side chain) have been synthesized, evaluated as inhibitors of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), and found to display remarkable nanomolar affinity. The loss in potency associated with a substitution of the P(2)' l-glutamate by a l-glutamine corroborates the importance of a carboxylate at this position. The binding mode of some of these inhibitors was characterized in solution and by x-ray crystallography in complex with various MMPs. The x-ray crystal structures reveal an unusual binding mode with the glutamate side chain chelating the active site zinc ion. Competition experiments between these inhibitors and acetohydroxamic acid, a small zinc-binding molecule, are in accord with the crystallographic results. One of these pseudo-dipeptides displays potency and selectivity toward MMP-12 similar to the best MMP-12 inhibitors reported to date. This novel family of pseudo peptides opens new opportunities to develop potent and selective inhibitors for several metzincins.

  8. Proteomic Analyses Reveal an Acidic Prime Side Specificity for the Astacin Metalloprotease Family Reflected by Physiological Substrates*

    PubMed Central

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Barré, Olivier; Schilling, Oliver; auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Ohler, Anke; Broder, Claudia; Schütte, André; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Stöcker, Walter; Overall, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Astacins are secreted and membrane-bound metalloproteases with clear associations to many important pathological and physiological processes. Yet with only a few substrates described their biological roles are enigmatic. Moreover, the lack of knowledge of astacin cleavage site specificities hampers assay and drug development. Using PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage site specificity) and TAILS (terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates) degradomics approaches >3000 cleavage sites were proteomically identified for five different astacins. Such broad coverage enables family-wide determination of specificities N- and C-terminal to the scissile peptide bond. Remarkably, meprin α, meprin β, and LAST_MAM proteases exhibit a strong preference for aspartate in the peptide (P)1′ position because of a conserved positively charged residue in the active cleft subsite (S)1′. This unparalleled specificity has not been found for other families of extracellular proteases. Interestingly, cleavage specificity is also strongly influenced by proline in P2′ or P3′ leading to a rare example of subsite cooperativity. This specificity characterizes the astacins as unique contributors to extracellular proteolysis that is corroborated by known cleavage sites in procollagen I+III, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)-A, IL (interleukin)-1β, and pro-kallikrein 7. Indeed, cleavage sites in VEGF-A and pro-kallikrein 7 identified by terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates matched those reported by Edman degradation. Moreover, the novel substrate FGF-19 was validated biochemically and shown to exhibit altered biological activity after meprin processing. PMID:21693781

  9. A metalloprotease from Xanthomonas campestris that specifically degrades proline/hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins of the plant extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Dow, J M; Davies, H A; Daniels, M J

    1998-11-01

    Culture supernatants of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris contain an enzymic activity capable of degrading gp120, a proline-rich glycoprotein associated with the extracellular matrix of the vascular bundles in petioles of turnip (Brassica campestris). This activity did not reside in any of the three previously characterized proteases of X. campestris pv. campestris that were identified by their action against the model substrate beta-casein. The novel enzyme was purified by ion-exchange and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The enzyme, which has no activity against beta-casein, is active against some plant glycoproteins of the hydroxyproline-rich class such as extensin from potato and tomato and gpS-3, a glycoprotein induced in B. campestris petioles by wounding. Other hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins, such as the solanaceous lectins, were not substrates however. Studies of the products released upon degradation of tomato extensin suggested that the degradative mechanism was proteolysis. Inhibitor studies suggested that the enzyme was a zinc-requiring metalloprotease. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins of the proline-rich and hydroxyproline-rich classes have been implicated in plant resistance to microbial attack, hence their degradation by X. campestris pv. campestris may have considerable significance for black rot pathogenesis.

  10. Detection of Endogenous Matrix Metalloprotease-12 Active Form with a Novel Broad Spectrum Activity-based Probe*

    PubMed Central

    Nury, Catherine; Bregant, Sarah; Czarny, Bertrand; Berthon, Fannely; Cassar-Lajeunesse, Evelyne; Dive, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) have attracted considerable attention as critical mediators of pathological tissue remodeling processes. However it remains an unresolved challenge to detect their active forms in biological samples. To prove the efficacy of a recently developed MMP activity-based probe, we examined the content in MMP active forms of bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALf) from male C57BL/6 mice exposed to ultrafine carbon black nanoparticles, a model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. This probe was shown to label proteins, mostly expressed in BALf of mice exposed to nanoparticles. Using competition assays with a selective MMP-12 inhibitor as well as MMP-12 knock-out mice, one of these proteins was identified as the active form of the catalytic domain of MMP-12. This new probe can detect the active form of MMP-12 down to a threshold of 1 fmol. Radioactive counting showed the concentration of the active form of MMP-12 to be around 1 fmol/μl in BALf from nanoparticle-treated mice. A less sensitive probe would therefore not have detected MMP-12. As the probe can detect other MMPs in the femtomolar range, it is a potentially powerful tool for monitoring the levels of MMP active forms in various diseases. PMID:23271741

  11. The role of SnoN in transforming growth factor beta1-induced expression of metalloprotease-disintegrin ADAM12.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Emilia; Li, Hui; Duhachek Muggy, Sara; Syta, Emilia; Zolkiewska, Anna

    2010-07-16

    Increased expression of metalloprotease-disintegrin ADAM12 is a hallmark of several pathological conditions, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and certain inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system or the muscoskeletal system. We show that transforming growth factor beta1 (TGFbeta1) is a potent inducer of ADAM12 mRNA and protein in mouse fibroblasts and in mouse and human mammary epithelial cells. Induction of ADAM12 is detected within 2 h of treatment with TGFbeta1, is Smad2/Smad3-dependent, and is a result of derepression of the Adam12 gene. SnoN, a negative regulator of the TGFbeta signaling pathway, is a master regulator of ADAM12 expression in response to TGFbeta1 stimulation. Overexpression of SnoN in NIH3T3 cells reduces the magnitude of ADAM12 induction by TGFbeta1 treatment. Down-regulation of SnoN expression by short hairpin RNA enhances TGFbeta1-induced expression of ADAM12. In a panel of TGFbeta1-responsive cancer cell lines with high expression of SnoN, induction of ADAM12 by TGFbeta1 is significantly impaired, suggesting that the endogenous SnoN plays a role in regulating ADAM12 expression in response to TGFbeta1. Identification of SnoN as a repressor of the ADAM12 gene should contribute to advances in the studies on the role of ADAM12 in tumor progression and in the development of other pathologies.

  12. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Increases Laminin, Integrin Subunits and Metalloprotease ADAM12 in Mouse Myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Grzelkowska-Kowalczyk, Katarzyna; Grabiec, Kamil; Tokarska, Justyna; Gajewska, Małgorzata; Błaszczyk, Maciej; Milewska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is considered a part of the myogenesis signaling mechanism. we hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) modifies ECM during differentiation of mouse C2C12 cells. The myogenic effect of IGF-I (30 nmol/l) was manifested by increased myogenin and myosin heavy chain (MyHC) levels as well as fusion index (2.6 times over control) on the 3rd day of differentiation. IGF-I markedly augmented laminin, but not fibronectin. Cellular contents of integrin α3, α5 and β1 during 3-day differentiation increased in the presence of IGF-I. Treatment with IGF-I increased the expression of the long form of metalloprotease ADAM12 (100 kDa) in myocytes. In conclusion: i) IGF-I caused an increase of laminin, integrin α3 and β1 in C2C12 myogenic cells that can be secondary to stimulation of myogenesis; ii) IGF-I augmented integrin α5 and ADAM12 levels, suggesting a role of this growth factor in determination of the pool of reserve cells during myogenesis.

  13. A highly conserved, inhibitable astacin metalloprotease from Teladorsagia circumcincta is required for cuticle formation and nematode development☆

    PubMed Central

    Stepek, Gillian; McCormack, Gillian; Winter, Alan D.; Page, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic nematodes cause chronic, debilitating infections in both livestock and humans worldwide, and many have developed multiple resistance to the currently available anthelmintics. The protective collagenous cuticle of these parasites is required for nematode survival and its synthesis has been studied extensively in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. The collagen synthesis pathway is a complex, multi-step process involving numerous key enzymes, including the astacin metalloproteases. Nematode astacinsare crucial for C. elegans development, having specific roles in hatching, moulting and cuticle synthesis. NAS-35 (also called DPY-31) is a homologue of a vertebrate procollagen C-proteinase and performs a central role in cuticle formation of C. elegans as its mutation causes temperature-sensitive lethality and cuticle defects. The characterisation of DPY-31 from the ovine gastrointestinal nematode Teladorsagia circumcincta and its ability to rescue the C. elegans mutant is described. Compounds with a hydroxamate functional group have previously been shown to be potent inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinases and were therefore examined for inhibitory activity against the T. circumcincta enzyme. Phenotypic screening against T. circumcincta, Haemonchus contortus and C. elegans larval stages identified compounds that caused body morphology phenotypes consistent with the inhibition of proteases involved in cuticle collagen synthesis. These compounds correspondingly inhibited the activity of recombinant T. circumcincta DPY-31, supporting the hypothesis that this enzyme may represent a potentially novel anthelmintic drug target. PMID:25736599

  14. Intracellular Cleavage of the Cx43 C-Terminal Domain by Matrix-Metalloproteases: A Novel Contributor to Inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    De Bock, Marijke; Wang, Nan; Decrock, Elke; Bultynck, Geert; Leybaert, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of tissue function is mediated by gap junctions (GJs) that enable direct cell-cell transfer of metabolic and electric signals. GJs are formed by connexin (Cx) proteins of which Cx43 is most widespread in the human body. Beyond its role in direct intercellular communication, Cx43 also forms nonjunctional hemichannels (HCs) in the plasma membrane that mediate the release of paracrine signaling molecules in the extracellular environment. Both HC and GJ channel function are regulated by protein-protein interactions and posttranslational modifications that predominantly take place in the C-terminal domain of Cx43. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a major group of zinc-dependent proteases, known to regulate not only extracellular matrix remodeling, but also processing of intracellular proteins. Together with Cx43 channels, both GJs and HCs, MMPs contribute to acute inflammation and a small number of studies reports on an MMP-Cx43 link. Here, we build further on these reports and present a novel hypothesis that describes proteolytic cleavage of the Cx43 C-terminal domain by MMPs and explores possibilities of how such cleavage events may affect Cx43 channel function. Finally, we set out how aberrant channel function resulting from cleavage can contribute to the acute inflammatory response during tissue injury. PMID:26424967

  15. The disintegrin/metalloprotease ADAM 10 is essential for Notch signalling but not for alpha-secretase activity in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dieter; de Strooper, Bart; Serneels, Lutgarde; Craessaerts, Katleen; Herreman, An; Annaert, Wim; Umans, Lieve; Lübke, Torben; Lena Illert, Anna; von Figura, Kurt; Saftig, Paul

    2002-10-01

    The metalloprotease ADAM 10 is an important APP alpha-secretase candidate, but in vivo proof of this is lacking. Furthermore, invertebrate models point towards a key role of the ADAM 10 orthologues Kuzbanian and sup-17 in Notch signalling. In the mouse, this function is, however, currently attributed to ADAM 17/TACE, while the role of ADAM 10 remains unknown. We have created ADAM 10-deficient mice. They die at day 9.5 of embryogenesis with multiple defects of the developing central nervous system, somites, and cardiovascular system. In situ hybridization revealed a reduced expression of the Notch target gene hes-5 in the neural tube and an increased expression of the Notch ligand dll-1, supporting an important role for ADAM 10 in Notch signalling in the vertebrates as well. Since the early lethality precluded the establishment of primary neuronal cultures, APPs alpha generation was analyzed in embryonic fibroblasts and found to be preserved in 15 out of 17 independently generated ADAM 10-deficient fibroblast cell lines, albeit at a quantitatively more variable level than in controls, whereas a severe reduction was found in only two cases. The variability was not due to differences in genetic background or to variable expression of the alternative alpha-secretase candidates ADAM 9 and ADAM 17. These results indicate, therefore, either a regulation between ADAMs on the post-translational level or that other, not yet known, proteases are able to compensate for ADAM 10 deficiency. Thus, the observed variability, together with recent reports on tissue-specific expression patterns of ADAMs 9, 10 and 17, points to the existence of tissue-specific 'teams' of different proteases exerting alpha-secretase activity.

  16. Role of plasma matrix-metalloproteases (MMPs) and their polymorphisms (SNPs) in sepsis development and outcome in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Guadalupe; Asensi, Víctor; Montes, A. Hugo; Collazos, Julio; Alvarez, Victoria; Carton, José A.; Taboada, Francisco; Valle-Garay, Eulalia

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue-inhibitors (TIMPs), modulated by different single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are critical in sepsis development. Ninety ICU severely septic and 91 ICU uninfected patients were prospectively studied. MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G), MMP-3 (−1612 5A/6A), MMP-8 (−799 C/T), MMP-9 (−1562 C/T), and MMP-13 (−77A/G) SNPs were genotyped. Plasma MMPs (-1, -2, -3, -8, -9, -10, -13) and TIMPs (-1,-2,-4) were measured. AA homozygotes and A allele carriers of MMP-13 (−77 A/G) and 1G2G carriers of the MMP-1 (−1607 1G/2G) SNPs frequencies were different between septic and uninfected patients (p < 0.05), as well as plasma MMP-3, -8, -9 -10 and TIMP-2 levels (p < 0.04). No differences in MMPs levels among MMP-13 or MMP-1 SNPs genotypes carriers were observed. The area under the ROC curve for MMP-8 in the diagnosis of sepsis was 0.87 (95% CI 0.82–0.92), and that of CRP was 0.98 (0.94–0.998), whereas the area of MMP-9 in the detection of non-septic state was 0.73 (0.65–0.80), p < 0.0001 for all curves. Sepsis associated with increased MMP-8 and decreased MMP-9 levels in multivariate analysis (p < 0.0002). We report for the first time an association between MMP-13 and MMP-1 SNPs and sepsis. An independent association of MMP-8 and MMP-9 levels with sepsis was also observed. PMID:24833564

  17. Wild-type amyloid beta 1-40 peptide induces vascular smooth muscle cell death independently from matrix metalloprotease activity.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Régis; Mateo, Véronique; Rouxel, Clotilde; Zaccarini, François; Glorian, Martine; Béréziat, Gilbert; Golubkov, Vladislav S; Limon, Isabelle

    2012-06-01

    Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is an important cause of intracerebral hemorrhages in the elderly, characterized by amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide accumulating in central nervous system blood vessels. Within the vessel walls, Aβ-peptide deposits [composed mainly of wild-type (WT) Aβ(1-40) peptide in sporadic forms] induce impaired adhesion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with their degeneration. This process often results in a loss of blood vessel wall integrity and ultimately translates into cerebral ischemia and microhemorrhages, both clinical features of CAA. In this study, we decipher the molecular mechanism of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-2 activation in WT-Aβ(1-40) -treated VSMC and provide evidence that MMP activity, although playing a critical role in cell detachment disrupting ECM components, is not involved in the WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced degeneration of VSMCs. Indeed, whereas this peptide clearly induced VSMC apoptosis, neither preventing MMP-2 activity nor hampering the expression of membrane type1-MMP, or preventing tissue inhibitors of MMPs-2 (TIMP-2) recruitment (two proteins evidenced here as involved in MMP-2 activation), reduced the number of dead cells. Even the use of broad-range MMP inhibitors (GM6001 and Batimastat) did not affect WT-Aβ(1-40) -induced cell apoptosis. Our results, in contrast to those obtained using the Aβ(1-40) Dutch variant suggesting a link between MMP-2 activity, VSMC mortality and degradation of specific matrix components, indicate that the ontogenesis of the Dutch familial and sporadic forms of CAAs is different. ECM degradation and VSMC degeneration would be tightly connected in the Dutch familial form while being two independent processes in sporadic forms of CAA.

  18. A Metalloprotease (MprIII) Involved in the Chitinolytic System of a Marine Bacterium, Alteromonas sp. Strain O-7

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Katsushiro; Nukui, Eiji; Hirose, Mariko; Nagai, Fumi; Sato, Takaji; Inamori, Yoshihiko; Tsujibo, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Alteromonas sp. strain O-7 secretes several proteins in addition to chitinolytic enzymes in response to chitin induction. In this paper, we report that one of these proteins, designated MprIII, is a metalloprotease involved in the chitin degradation system of the strain. The gene encoding MprIII was cloned in Escherichia coli. The open reading frame of mprIII encoded a protein of 1,225 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 137,016 Da. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of MprIII revealed that the enzyme consisted of four domains: the signal sequence, the N-terminal proregion, the protease region, and the C-terminal extension. The C-terminal extension (PkdDf) was characterized by four polycystic kidney disease domains and two domains of unknown function. Western and real-time quantitative PCR analyses demonstrated that mprIII was induced in the presence of insoluble polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. Native MprIII was purified to homogeneity from the culture supernatant of Alteromonas sp. strain O-7 and characterized. The molecular mass of mature MprIII was estimated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to be 115 kDa. The optimum pH and temperature of MprIII were 7.5 and 50°C, respectively, when gelatin was used as a substrate. Pretreatment of native chitin with MprIII significantly promoted chitinase activity. Furthermore, the combination of MprIII and a novel chitin-binding protease (AprIV) remarkably promoted the chitin hydrolysis efficiency of chitinase. PMID:12406750

  19. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Imaging and Biodistribution of Aptamers Targeting the Human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 in Melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Kryza, David; Debordeaux, Frédéric; Azéma, Laurent; Hassan, Aref; Paurelle, Olivier; Schulz, Jürgen; Savona-Baron, Catherine; Charignon, Elsa; Bonazza, Pauline; Taleb, Jacqueline; Fernandez, Philippe; Janier, Marc; Toulmé, Jean Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The human Matrix MetalloProtease-9 (hMMP-9) is overexpressed in tumors where it promotes the release of cancer cells thus contributing to tumor metastasis. We raised aptamers against hMMP-9, which constitutes a validated marker of malignant tumors, in order to design probes for imaging tumors in human beings. A chemically modified RNA aptamer (F3B), fully resistant to nucleases was previously described. This compound was subsequently used for the preparation of F3B-Cy5, F3B-S-acetylmercaptoacetyltriglycine (MAG) and F3B-DOTA. The binding properties of these derivatives were determined by surface plasmon resonance and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Optical fluorescence imaging confirmed the binding to hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma bearing mice. Quantitative biodistribution studies were performed at 30 min, 1h and 2 h post injection of 99mTc-MAG-aptamer and 111In-DOTA-F3B. 99mTc radiolabeled aptamer specifically detected hMMP-9 in A375 melanoma tumors but accumulation in digestive tract was very high. Following i.v. injection of 111In-DOTA-F3B, high level of radioactivity was observed in kidneys and bladder but digestive tract uptake was very limited. Tumor uptake was significantly (student t test, p<0.05) higher for 111In-DOTA-F3B with 2.0%ID/g than for the 111In-DOTA-control oligonucleotide (0.7%ID/g) with tumor to muscle ratio of 4.0. Such difference in tumor accumulation has been confirmed by ex vivo scintigraphic images performed at 1h post injection and by autoradiography, which revealed the overexpression of hMMP-9 in sections of human melanomas. These results demonstrate that F3B aptamer is of interest for detecting hMMP-9 in melanoma tumor. PMID:26901393

  20. Human and Murine Interleukin 23 Receptors Are Novel Substrates for A Disintegrin and Metalloproteases ADAM10 and ADAM17*

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Manuel; Schröder, Jutta; Monhasery, Niloufar; Ackfeld, Theresa; Hummel, Thorben M.; Rabe, Björn; Garbers, Christoph; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Floss, Doreen M.; Scheller, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    IL-23 (interleukin 23) regulates immune responses against pathogens and plays a major role in the differentiation and maintenance of TH17 cells and the development of autoimmune diseases and cancer. The IL-23 receptor (IL-23R) complex consists of the unique IL-23R and the common IL-12 receptor β1 (IL-12Rβ1). Differential splicing generates antagonistic soluble IL-23R (sIL-23R) variants, which might limit IL-23-mediated immune responses. Here, ectodomain shedding of human and murine IL-23R was identified as an alternative pathway for the generation of sIL-23R. Importantly, proteolytically released sIL-23R has IL-23 binding activity. Shedding of IL-23R was induced by stimulation with the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not by ionomycin. PMA-induced shedding was abrogated by an ADAM (A disintegrin and metalloprotease) 10 and 17 selective inhibitor, but not by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. ADAM17-deficient but not ADAM10-deficient HEK293 cells failed to shed IL-23R after PMA stimulation, demonstrating that ADAM17 but not ADAM10 cleaves the IL-23R. Constitutive shedding was, however, inhibited by an ADAM10 selective inhibitor. Using deletions and specific amino acid residue exchanges, we identified critical determinants of ectodomain shedding within the stalk region of the IL-23R. Finally, interaction studies identified domains 1 and 3 of the IL-23R as the main ADAM17 binding sites. In summary, we describe human and murine IL-23R as novel targets for protein ectodomain shedding by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:26961870

  1. Cross-talk between macrophages and smooth muscle cells impairs collagen and metalloprotease synthesis and promotes angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Butoi, E; Gan, A M; Tucureanu, M M; Stan, D; Macarie, R D; Constantinescu, C; Calin, M; Simionescu, M; Manduteanu, I

    2016-07-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis complicated by plaque disruption and thrombosis is a critical event in myocardial infarction and stroke, the major causes of cardiovascular death. In atherogenesis, macrophages (MAC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) are key actors; they synthesize matrix components and numerous factors involved in the process. Here, we design experiments to investigate whether SMC-MAC communication induces changes in ECM protein composition and/or neo-angiogenesis. Cell to cell communication was achieved using trans-well chambers, where SMCs were grown in the upper chamber and differentiated MAC in the bottom chamber for 24 or 72h. We found that cross-talk between MAC and SMC during co-culture: (i) significantly decreased the expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, III, elastin) in SMC; (ii) increased the expression and activity of metalloprotease MMP-9 and expression of collagenase MMP-1, in both MAC and SMC; (iii) augmented the secretion of soluble VEGF in the conditioned media of cell co-culture and VEGF gene expression in both cell types, compared with control cells. Moreover, the conditioned media collected from MAC-SMC co-culture promoted endothelial cell tube formation in Matrigel, signifying an increased angiogenic effect. In addition, the MAC-SMC communication led to an increase in inflammatory IL-1β and TLR-2, which could be responsible for cellular signaling. In conclusion, MAC-SMC communication affects factors and molecules that could alter ECM composition and neo-angiogenesis, features that could directly dictate the progression of atheroma towards the vulnerable plaque. Targeting the MAC-SMC cross-talk may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow-down or retard the plaque progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A Model for the Conformational Activation of the Structurally Quiescent Metalloprotease ADAMTS13 by Von Willebrand Factor.

    PubMed

    South, Kieron; Freitas, Marta O; Lane, David A

    2017-02-16

    Blood loss is prevented by the multi-domain glycoprotein von Willebrand factor (VWF), which binds exposed collagen at damaged vessels and captures platelets. VWF is regulated by the metalloprotease ADAMTS13, which, in turn, is conformationally activated by VWF. To delineate the structural requirements for VWF-mediated conformational activation of ADAMTS13, we performed binding and functional studies with a panel of truncated ADAMTS13 variants. We demonstrate that both the isolated CUB1 and CUB2 domains in ADAMTS13 bind to the spacer domain exosite of a truncated ADAMTS13 variant, MDTCS (KD of 135 ± 10.1 nM and 86.9 ± 9.0 nM, respectively). However, only the CUB1 domain inhibited proteolytic activity of MDTCS. Moreover, ADAMTS13∆CUB2, unlike ADAMTS13∆CUB1-2, exhibited activity similar to wild-type ADAMTS13 and could be activated by VWF D4-CK. The CUB2 domain is therefore not essential for maintaining the inactive conformation of ADAMTS13. Both CUB domains could bind to the VWF D4-CK domain fragment (KD of 53.7± 2.1 nM and 84.3 ± 2.0 nM, respectively). However, deletion of both CUB domains did not prevent VWF D4-CK binding, suggesting that competition for CUB-domain binding to the spacer domain is not the dominant mechanism behind the conformational activation. ADAMTS13∆TSP8-CUB2 could no longer bind to VWF D4-CK, and deletion of TSP8 abrogated ADAMTS13 conformational activation. These findings support an ADAMTS13-activation model in which VWF D4-CK engages the TSP8-CUB2 domains, inducing the conformational change that disrupts the CUB1-spacer domain interaction and thereby activates ADAMTS13.

  3. Apigenin attenuates acute myocardial infarction of rats via the inhibitions of matrix metalloprotease-9 and inflammatory reactions

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hong; Hao, Jie; Liu, Fan; Lu, Jingchao; Yang, Xiuchun

    2015-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the myocardial necrosis caused by coronary artery acute and persistent ischemia and hypoxia. Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) plays an important role in a series of process of occurrence and development of AMI. Inflammatory reaction plays the key role in all kinds of damage factors in AMI. Apigenin (API) has effectively restrained the activity of MMP-9, anti-inflammatory and hepatic fat oxidizing properties. API significantly improved AMI of rats through inhibiting MMP-9 and inflammatory reactions in a few recent studies. Our investigation detected the infarct size of AMI rats, casein kinase (CK), the MB isoenzyme of creatine kinase (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) activities in AMI rats were also analyzed with commercial kits. Additionally, Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels of whole bloods of AMI rats were also detected using commercial kits. Next, MMP-9 protein of cardiac in AMI rats was measured with gelatin zymography assays. Finally, caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities in AMI rats were analyzed with commercial kits. In the present study, our work indicated API might significantly reduce the infarction size of AMI rat. It was shown that the treatment of API could decrease the expression of MMP-9 level and reduce the activities of NF-κB, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in AMI rats. Next, API treatment could reduce caspase-3 and caspase-9 activities and decrease cellular apoptosis of AMI rats. Our findings concluded that API ameliorates acute myocardial infarction of rats via inhibiting MMP-9 and inflammatory reactions. PMID:26309539

  4. Degradation of circulating von Willebrand factor and its regulator ADAMTS13 implicates secreted Bacillus anthracis metalloproteases in anthrax consumptive coagulopathy.

    PubMed

    Chung, Myung-Chul; Popova, Taissia G; Jorgensen, Shelley C; Dong, Li; Chandhoke, Vikas; Bailey, Charles L; Popov, Serguei G

    2008-04-11

    Pathology data from the anthrax animal models show evidence of significant increases in vascular permeability coincident with hemostatic imbalances manifested by thrombocytopenia, transient leucopenia, and aggressive disseminated intravascular coagulation. In this study we hypothesized that anthrax infection modulates the activity of von Willebrand factor (VWF) and its endogenous regulator ADAMTS13, which play important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis, including interaction of endothelial cells with platelets. We previously demonstrated that purified anthrax neutral metalloproteases Npr599 and InhA are capable of cleaving a variety of host structural and regulatory proteins. Incubation of human plasma with these proteases at 37 degrees C in the presence of urea as a mild denaturant results in proteolysis of VWF. Also in these conditions, InhA directly cleaves plasma ADAMTS13 protein. Npr599 and InhA digest synthetic VWF substrate FRETS-VWF73. Amino acid sequencing of VWF fragments produced by InhA suggests that one of the cleavage sites of VWF is located at domain A2, the target domain of ADAMTS13. Proteolysis of VWF by InhA impairs its collagen binding activity (VWF:CBA) and ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation activity. In plasma from anthrax spore-challenged DBA/2 mice, VWF antigen levels increase up to 2-fold at day 3 post-infection with toxigenic Sterne 34F(2) strain, whereas VWF:CBA levels drop in a time-dependent manner, suggesting dysfunction of VWF instead of its quantitative deficiency. This conclusion is further supported by significant reduction in the amount of VWF circulating in blood in the ultra-large forms. In addition, Western blot analysis shows proteolytic depletion of ADAMTS13 from plasma of spore-challenged mice despite its increased expression in the liver. Our results suggest a new mechanism of anthrax coagulopathy affecting the levels and functional activities of both VWF and its natural regulator ADAMTS13. This mechanism may

  5. Increased matrix metalloprotease-3 gene expression in ruptured rotator cuff tendons is associated with postoperative tendon retear.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shibata, Hideaki; Yamada, Tetsu; Shirachi, Isao; Nakama, Kenjiro; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Nagata, Kensei

    2013-08-01

    The role of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) in ruptured rotator cuff tendons remains unknown. This study aimed to investigate the gene expression of MMPs in ruptured rotator cuff tendons and to compare their expression levels between patients with and without postoperative tendon retear. Twenty-four patients (a median age of 61 years: interquartile range, 55-66 years) with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were examined in this study. The marginal site of the ruptured tendon was harvested during surgery. The mRNA expression levels of collagen types I and III, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-13, tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 were analysed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Postoperative retear was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging at a minimum of 1 year following surgery. The mRNA expression levels of MMP-3 and TIMP-1 in ruptured rotator cuff tendons were significantly increased in patients with postoperative retear (n = 6), compared with patients without retear (n = 18) (P = 0.04). For collagens, MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-13, and TIMP-2, there were no significant differences in the mRNA expression levels in ruptured tendons between patients with and without retear. These results suggest that, in addition to up-regulation of TIMP-1 gene expression, increased MMP-3 gene expression in ruptured rotator cuff tendons is associated with postoperative tendon retear. Thus, drug therapy specifically targeting MMP-3 after rotator cuff repair should be considered in the future.

  6. Canonical transforming growth factor-β signaling regulates disintegrin metalloprotease expression in experimental renal fibrosis via miR-29.

    PubMed

    Ramdas, Vasudev; McBride, Martin; Denby, Laura; Baker, Andrew H

    2013-12-01

    Fibrosis pathophysiology is critically regulated by Smad 2- and Smad 3-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Disintegrin metalloproteases (Adam) can manipulate the signaling environment, however, the role and regulation of ADAMs in renal fibrosis remain unclear. TGF-β stimulation of renal cells results in a significant up-regulation of Adams 10, 17, 12, and 19. The selective Smad2/3 inhibitor SB 525334 reversed these TGF-β-induced changes. In vivo, using ureteral obstruction to model renal fibrosis, we observed increased Adams gene expression that was blocked by oral administration of SB 525334. Similar increases in Adam gene expression also occurred in preclinical models of hypertension-induced renal damage and glomerulonephritis. miRNAs are a recently discovered second level of regulation of gene expression. Analysis of 3' untranslated regions of Adam12 and Adam19 mRNAs showed multiple binding sites for miR-29a, miR-29b, and miR-29c. We show that miR-29 family expression is decreased after unilateral ureter obstruction and this significant decrease in miR-29 family expression was observed consistently in preclinical models of renal dysfunction and correlated with an increase in Adam12 and Adam19 expression. Exogenous overexpression of the miR-29 family blocked TGF-β-mediated up-regulation of Adam12 and Adam19 gene expression. This study shows that Adams are involved in renal fibrosis and are regulated by canonical TGF-β signaling and miR-29. Therefore, both Adams and the miR-29 family represent therapeutic targets for renal fibrosis. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Canonical Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling Regulates Disintegrin Metalloprotease Expression in Experimental Renal Fibrosis via miR-29

    PubMed Central

    Ramdas, Vasudev; McBride, Martin; Denby, Laura; Baker, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrosis pathophysiology is critically regulated by Smad 2– and Smad 3–mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Disintegrin metalloproteases (Adam) can manipulate the signaling environment, however, the role and regulation of ADAMs in renal fibrosis remain unclear. TGF-β stimulation of renal cells results in a significant up-regulation of Adams 10, 17, 12, and 19. The selective Smad2/3 inhibitor SB 525334 reversed these TGF-β–induced changes. In vivo, using ureteral obstruction to model renal fibrosis, we observed increased Adams gene expression that was blocked by oral administration of SB 525334. Similar increases in Adam gene expression also occurred in preclinical models of hypertension-induced renal damage and glomerulonephritis. miRNAs are a recently discovered second level of regulation of gene expression. Analysis of 3′ untranslated regions of Adam12 and Adam19 mRNAs showed multiple binding sites for miR-29a, miR-29b, and miR-29c. We show that miR-29 family expression is decreased after unilateral ureter obstruction and this significant decrease in miR-29 family expression was observed consistently in preclinical models of renal dysfunction and correlated with an increase in Adam12 and Adam19 expression. Exogenous overexpression of the miR-29 family blocked TGF-β–mediated up-regulation of Adam12 and Adam19 gene expression. This study shows that Adams are involved in renal fibrosis and are regulated by canonical TGF-β signaling and miR-29. Therefore, both Adams and the miR-29 family represent therapeutic targets for renal fibrosis. PMID:24103556

  8. The Disintegrin and Metalloprotease ADAM12 Is Associated with TGF-β-Induced Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Michaël; Leyme, Anthony; Le Cann, Fabienne; Bonnier, Dominique; Le Seyec, Jacques; Chesnel, Franck; Fattet, Laurent; Rimokh, Ruth; Baffet, Georges; Théret, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The increased expression of the Disintegrin and Metalloprotease ADAM12 has been associated with human cancers, however its role remain unclear. We have previously reported that ADAM12 expression is induced by the transforming growth factor, TGF-β and promotes TGF-β-dependent signaling through interaction with the type II receptor of TGF-β. Here we explore the implication of ADAM12 in TGF-β-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a key process in cancer progression. We show that ADAM12 expression is correlated with EMT markers in human breast cancer cell lines and biopsies. Using a non-malignant breast epithelial cell line (MCF10A), we demonstrate that TGF-β-induced EMT increases expression of the membrane-anchored ADAM12L long form. Importantly, ADAM12L overexpression in MCF10A is sufficient to induce loss of cell-cell contact, reorganization of actin cytoskeleton, up-regulation of EMT markers and chemoresistance. These effects are independent of the proteolytic activity but require the cytoplasmic tail and are specific of ADAM12L since overexpression of ADAM12S failed to induce similar changes. We further demonstrate that ADAM12L-dependent EMT is associated with increased phosphorylation of Smad3, Akt and ERK proteins. Conversely, inhibition of TGF-β receptors or ERK activities reverses ADAM12L-induced mesenchymal phenotype. Together our data demonstrate that ADAM12L is associated with EMT and contributes to TGF-β-dependent EMT by favoring both Smad-dependent and Smad-independent pathways.

  9. YghJ, the secreted metalloprotease of pathogenic E. coli induces hemorrhagic fluid accumulation in mouse ileal loop.

    PubMed

    Tapader, Rima; Bose, Dipro; Pal, Amit

    2017-04-01

    YghJ, also known as SslE (Secreted and surface associated lipoprotein) is a cell surface associated and secreted lipoprotein harbouring M60 metalloprotease domain. Though the gene is known to be conserved among both pathogenic and commensal Escherichia coli isolates, the expression and secretion of YghJ was found to be higher among diverse E. coli pathotypes. YghJ, secreted from intestinal pathogens such as enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) has been demonstrated to possess mucinase activity and hence facilitates colonization of these enteric pathogens to intestinal epithelial cells. Importantly, YghJ is also reported to be secreted from extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli isolates. In our previous study we have shown that YghJ, purified from a neonatal septicemic E. coli isolate could trigger induction of various proinflammatory cytokines in vitro. This led us to investigate the role of YghJ in causing in vivo tissue hemorrhage. In the present study, we validate the earlier in vitro finding and have showed that YghJ can cause extensive tissue damage in mouse ileum and is also able to induce significant fluid accumulation in a dose dependent manner in a mouse ileal loop (MIL) assay. Hence, our present study not only confirms the pathogenic potential of YghJ in sepsis pathophysiology but also indicates the enterotoxic ability of YghJ which makes it an important virulence determinant of intestinal pathogenic E. coli.

  10. Astacin-like metalloproteases are a gene family of toxins present in the venom of different species of the brown spider (genus Loxosceles).

    PubMed

    Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Gremski, Luiza H; Chaim, Olga M; da Silveira, Rafael B; Meissner, Gabriel O; Mangili, Oldemir C; Barbaro, Katia C; Gremski, Waldemiro; Veiga, Silvio S; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Brown spiders have a worldwide distribution, and their venom has a complex composition containing many different molecules. Herein, we report the existence of a family of astacin-like metalloprotease toxins in Loxosceles intermedia venom, as well as in the venom of different species of Loxosceles. Using a cDNA library from the L. intermedia venom gland, we cloned two novel cDNAs encoding astacin-like metalloprotease toxins, LALP2 and LALP3. Using an anti-serum against the previously described astacin-like toxin in L. intermedia venom (LALP1), we detected the presence of immunologically-related toxins in the venoms of L. intermedia, Loxosceles laeta, and Loxosceles gaucho. Zymographic experiments showed gelatinolytic activity of crude venoms of L. intermedia, L. laeta, and L. gaucho (which could be inhibited by the divalent metal chelator 1,10-phenanthroline) at electrophoretic mobilities identical to those reported for immunological cross-reactivity. Moreover, mRNAs extracted from L. laeta and L. gaucho venom glands were screened for astacin-like metalloproteases, and cDNAs obtained using LALP1-specific primers were sequenced, and their deduced amino acid sequences confirmed they were members of the astacin family with the family signatures (HEXXHXXGXXHE and MXY), LALP4 and LALP5, respectively. Sequence comparison of deduced amino acid sequences revealed that LALP2, LALP3, LALP4, and LALP5 are related to the astacin family. This study identified the existence of gene family of astacin-like toxins in the venoms of brown spiders and raises the possibility that these molecules are involved in the deleterious effects triggered by the venom. 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Metalloprotease cleavage of the N terminus of the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR37L1 reduces its constitutive activity.

    PubMed

    Coleman, James L J; Ngo, Tony; Schmidt, Johannes; Mrad, Nadine; Liew, Chu Kong; Jones, Nicole M; Graham, Robert M; Smith, Nicola J

    2016-04-12

    Little is known about the pharmacology or physiology of GPR37L1, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein)-coupled receptor that is abundant in the cerebellum. Mice deficient in this receptor exhibit precocious cerebellar development and hypertension. We showed that GPR37L1 coupled to the G protein Gα(s) when heterologously expressed in cultured cells in the absence of any added ligand, whereas a mutant receptor that lacked the amino terminus was inactive. Conversely, inhibition of ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteases) enhanced receptor activity, indicating that the presence of the amino terminus is necessary for GPR37L1 signaling. Metalloprotease-dependent processing of GPR37L1 was evident in rodent cerebellum, where we detected predominantly the cleaved, inactive form. However, comparison of the accumulation of cAMP (adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate) in response to phosphodiesterase inhibition in cerebellar slice preparations from wild-type and GPR37L1-null mice showed that some constitutive signaling remained in the wild-type mice. In reporter assays of Gα(s) or Gα(i) signaling, the synthetic, prosaposin-derived peptide prosaptide (TX14A) did not increase GPR37L1 activity. Our data indicate that GPR37L1 may be a constitutively active receptor, or perhaps its ligand is present under the conditions that we used for analysis, and that the activity of this receptor is instead controlled by signals that regulate metalloprotease activity in the tissue. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Molecular cloning and characterisation of in vitro immune response against astacin-like metalloprotease Ace-MTP-2 from Ancylostoma ceylanicum.

    PubMed

    Bąska, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marcin; Krzyżowska, Małgorzata; Długosz, Ewa; Zygner, Wojciech; Górski, Paweł; Wędrychowicz, Halina

    2013-04-01

    Ancylostoma ceylanicum belongs to the group of parasites commonly known as hookworms, blood-sucking nematodes which infect around 576 million people and hundreds of millions of animals. The interactions between these parasites and host immune systems are complicated and yet to be determined. Hookworm infections are usually long lasting and recurrent, due in part to their ability to synthesize macromolecules capable of modulating the host immune response. The interaction of parasite proteins with host immune systems has been proven, but so far there is no data describing the influence of astacin-like metalloproteases (expressed among different parasitic nematodes) on the human immune system. The cDNA encoding A. ceylanicum metalloprotease 2 (Ace-mtp-2) was cloned using RACE-PCR. Computational analysis was used to examine the immunogenicity and recombinant Ace-MTP-2 was used to investigate its influence on human THP-1 monocytes and macrophages. The Ace-mtp-2 gene encodes an astascin-like metalloprotease, with a theoretical molecular mass of 26.7 kDa. The protease has a putative signal peptide, 11 potential phosphorylation sites, and two disulfide bridges revealed by computational analysis. Maximal expression of Ace-mtp-2 by A. ceylanicum occurs in the adult stage of the parasite, and Western blot indicates the secretory nature of the protease. This suggests the protease is working at the host-parasite interface and would likely be exposed to the hosts immune response. Recombinant protein were expressed in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris. Recombinant Ace-MTP-2 amplified the in vitro release of TNFα and induced release of IFNγ by lipopolysaccharide activated THP-1 macrophages. The presence of Ace-MTP-2 in secretory products of the adult parasite and the induction of IFNγ release may suggest an important role for Ace-MTP-2 in host-parasite interactions since IFNγ is suggested to be responsible for the protective immune response against adult hookworms.

  13. Distinct roles of matrix metalloproteases in the early- and late-phase development of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Yasuhiko; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Wang, Xiaoying; Park, Jong-Yeon; Zhuang, Zhi-Ye; Tan, Ping-Heng; Gao, Yong-Jing; Roy, Kristine; Corfas, Gabriel; Lo, Eng H.; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2008-01-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain, triggered by multiple insults to the nervous system, is a clinical challenge because the underlying mechanisms of neuropathic pain development remain poorly understood 1-4. Most treatments do not differentiate between different phases of neuropathic pain pathophysiology and simply focus on blocking neurotransmission, producing transient pain relief. Here, we report that early and late phase neuropathic pain development after nerve injury require different matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). After spinal nerve ligation, MMP-9 shows a rapid and transient upregulation in injured DRG primary sensory neurons consistent with an early phase of neuropathic pain, whereas MMP-2 shows a delayed response in DRG satellite cells and spinal astrocytes consistent with a late phase of neuropathic pain. Local inhibition of MMP-9 via an intrathecal route inhibits the early phase of neuropathic pain, whereas inhibition of MMP-2 suppresses late phase of neuropathic pain. Further, intrathecal administration of MMP-9 or MMP-2 is sufficient to produce neuropathic pain symptoms. Following nerve injury, MMP-9 induces neuropathic pain through interleukin-1β cleavage and microglia activation at early times, whereas MMP-2 maintains neuropathic pain through interleukin-1β cleavage and astrocyte activation at later times. Inhibition of MMP may provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of neuropathic pain at different phases. PMID:18264108

  14. Matrix Metalloprotease 3 Exacerbates Hemorrhagic Transformation and Worsens Functional Outcomes in Hyperglycemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Sherif; Abdelsaid, Mohammed; El-Shafey, Sally; Johnson, Maribeth H.; Fagan, Susan C.; Ergul, Adviye

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Acute hyperglycemia worsens the clinical outcomes and exacerbates cerebral hemorrhage after stroke. The mediators of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in hyperglycemic stroke are not fully understood. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) plays a critical role in the tissue plasminogen activator induced HT. However, the role of MMP3 in exacerbating the HT and worsening the functional outcomes in hyperglycemic stroke remains unknown. Methods Control/normoglycemic and hyperglycemic (blood glucose: 140–200 mg/dl) male Wistar rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 90 minutes and either 24 h or 7 days reperfusion. MMP3 was inhibited pharmacologically (UK 356618, 15 mg/kg, IV at reperfusion) or knocked down in the brain by shRNA lentiviral particles (injected ICV). Neurovascular injury was assessed at 24 h and functional outcomes were assessed at 24 hours, day 3 and day 7. MMP3 activity was measured in brain homogenate and cerebral macrovessels. Localization of MMP3 within the neurovascular unit after hyperglycemic stroke was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. Results Hyperglycemia significantly increased MMP3 activity in the brain after stroke and this was associated with exacerbated HT and worsened functional outcomes. MMP3 inhibition significantly reduced HT and improved functional outcomes. Conclusion MMP3 plays a critical role in mediating cerebrovascular injury in hyperglycemic stroke. Our findings point out MMP3 as a potential therapeutic target in hyperglycemic stroke. PMID:26839355

  15. Expression of metalloprotease insulin-degrading enzyme (insulysin) in normal and malignant human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Yfanti, Christina; Mengele, Karin; Gkazepis, Apostolos; Weirich, Gregor; Giersig, Cecylia; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Tang, Wei-Jen; Rosner, Marsha; Schmitt, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Background Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE, insulysin, insulinase; EC 3.4.22.11), a thiol metalloendopeptidase, is involved in intracellular degradation of insulin, thereby inhibiting its translocation and accumulation to the nucleus. Recently, protein expression of IDE has been demonstrated in the epithelial ducts of normal breast and in breast cancer tissue (Radulescu et al., Int J Oncol 30:73; 2007). Materials and Methods Utilizing four different antibodies generated against different epitopes of the IDE molecule, we performed western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining on several normal human tissues, on a plethora of tumor cell lines of different tissue origin, and on malignant breast and ovarian tissue. Results Applying the four IDE-directed antibodies, we demonstrate IDE expression at the protein level, both by means of immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry, in all of the tumor cell lines analyzed. Besides, IDE protein expression was found in normal tissues of the kidney, liver, lung, brain, breast and skeletal muscle, as well as in breast and ovarian cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical visualization of IDE indicated cytoplasmic localization of IDE in all of the cell lines and tissues assessed. Conclusions We performed for the first time a wide-ranging survey on IDE protein expression in normal and malignant tissues and cells and thus extend knowledge about cellular and tissue distribution of IDE, an enzyme which so far has mainly been studied in connection with Alzheimer’s disease and diabetes but not in cancer. PMID:18813847

  16. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition

    PubMed Central

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  17. Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI)-Anchors and Metalloproteases: Their Roles in the Regulation of Exosome Composition and NKG2D-Mediated Immune Recognition.

    PubMed

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Campos-Silva, Carmen; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Communication within the immune system depends on the release of factors that can travel and transmit information at points distant from the cell that produced them. In general, immune cells use two key strategies that can occur either at the plasma membrane or in intracellular compartments to produce such factors, vesicle release and proteolytic cleavage. Release of soluble factors in exosomes, a subset of vesicles that originate from intracellular compartments, depends generally on biochemical and lipid environment features. This physical environment allows proteins to be recruited to membrane microdomains that will be later endocytosed and further released to the extracellular milieu. Cholesterol and sphingolipid rich domains (also known as lipid rafts or detergent-resistant membranes, DRMs) often contribute to exosomes and these membrane regions are rich in proteins modified with Glycosyl-Phosphatidyl-Inositol (GPI) and lipids. For this reason, many palmitoylated and GPI-anchored proteins are preferentially recruited to exosomes. In this review, we analyse the biochemical features involved in the release of NKG2D-ligands as an example of functionally related gene families encoding both transmembrane and GPI-anchored proteins that can be released either by proteolysis or in exosomes, and modulate the intensity of the immune response. The immune receptor NKG2D is present in all human Natural Killer and T cells and plays an important role in the first barrier of defense against tumor and infection. However, tumor cells can evade the immune system by releasing NKG2D-ligands to induce down-regulation of the receptor. Some NKG2D-ligands can be recruited to exosomes and potently modulate receptor expression and immune function, while others are more susceptible to metalloprotease cleavage and are shed as soluble molecules. Strikingly, metalloprotease inhibition is sufficient to drive the accumulation in exosomes of ligands otherwise released by metalloprotease

  18. Local Foods, Local Places

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Local Foods, Local Places technical assistance program protects human health and the environment, spurs revitalization, increases access to healthy foods, and creates economic opportunities by promoting local foods.

  19. RNA-seq-based metatranscriptomic and microscopic investigation reveals novel metalloproteases of Neobodo sp. as potential virulence factors for soft tunic syndrome in Halocynthia roretzi.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ho Bin; Kim, Young Kyu; Del Castillo, Carmelo S; Nho, Seong Won; Cha, In Seok; Park, Seong Bin; Ha, Mi Ae; Hikima, Jun-Ichi; Hong, Sung Jong; Aoki, Takashi; Jung, Tae Sung

    2012-01-01

    Bodonids and trypanosomatids are derived from a common ancestor with the bodonids being a more primitive lineage. The Neobodonida, one of the three clades of bodonids, can be free-living, commensal or parasitic. Despite the ecological and evolutionary significance of these organisms, however, many of their biological and pathological features are currently unknown. Here, we employed metatranscriptomics using RNA-seq technology combined with field-emission microscopy to reveal the virulence factors of a recently described genus of Neobodonida that is considered to be responsible for ascidian soft tunic syndrome (AsSTS), but whose pathogenesis is unclear. Our microscopic observation of infected tunic tissues suggested putative virulence factors, enabling us to extract novel candidate transcripts; these included cysteine proteases of the families C1 and C2, serine proteases of S51 and S9 families, and metalloproteases grouped into families M1, M3, M8, M14, M16, M17, M24, M41, and M49. Protease activity/inhibition assays and the estimation of expression levels within gene clusters allowed us to identify metalloprotease-like enzymes as potential virulence attributes for AsSTS. Furthermore, a multimarker-based phylogenetic analysis using 1,184 concatenated amino acid sequences clarified the order Neobodo sp. In sum, we herein used metatranscriptomics to elucidate the in situ expression profiles of uncharacterized putative transcripts of Neobodo sp., combined these results with microscopic observation to select candidate genes relevant to pathogenesis, and used empirical screening to define important virulence factors.

  20. Precipitation of Iron on the Surface of Leptospira interrogans Is Associated with Mutation of the Stress Response Metalloprotease HtpX

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Rebekah; Lo, Miranda; Khoo, Chenai; Zhang, Hailong; Boysen, Reinhard I.; Picardeau, Mathieu; Murray, Gerald L.; Bulach, Dieter M.

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of free metal ions in the environment can be detrimental to bacterial survival. However, bacteria utilize strategies, including the activation of stress response pathways and immobilizing chemical elements on their surface, to limit this toxicity. In this study, we characterized LA4131, the HtpX-like M48 metalloprotease from Leptospira interrogans, with a putative role in bacterial stress response and membrane homeostasis. Growth of the la4131 transposon mutant strain (L522) in 360 μM FeSO4 (10-fold the normal in vitro concentration) resulted in the production of an amorphous iron precipitate. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis of the strain demonstrated that precipitate production was associated with the generation and release of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from the leptospiral surface. Transcriptional studies indicated that inactivation of la4131 resulted in altered expression of a subset of metal toxicity and stress response genes. Combining these findings, this report describes OMV production in response to environmental stressors and associates OMV production with the in vitro activity of an HtpX-like metalloprotease. PMID:23709510

  1. Validation of ADAM10 metalloprotease as a Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxin functional receptor in Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata).

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arroyo, V M; García-Robles, I; Ochoa-Campuzano, C; Goig, G A; Zaitseva, E; Baaken, G; Martínez-Ramírez, A C; Rausell, C; Real, M D

    2017-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal crystal proteins (Cry proteins) are insecticidal pore-forming toxins that bind to specific receptor molecules on the brush border membrane of susceptible insect midgut cells to exert their toxic action. In the Colorado potato beetle (CPB), a coleopteran pest, we previously proposed that interaction of Cry3Aa toxin with a CPB ADAM10 metalloprotease is an essential part of the mode of action of this toxin. Here, we annotated the gene sequence encoding an ADAM10 metalloprotease protein (CPB-ADAM10) in the CPB genome sequencing project, and using RNA interference gene silencing we demonstrated that CPB-ADAM10 is a Cry3Aa toxin functional receptor in CPB. Cry3Aa toxicity was significantly lower in CPB-ADAM10 silenced larvae and in vitro toxin pore-forming ability was greatly diminished in lipid planar bilayers fused with CPB brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from CPB-ADAM10 silenced larvae. In accordance with our previous data that indicated this toxin was a substrate of ADAM10 in CPB, Cry3Aa toxin membrane-associated proteolysis was altered when CPB BBMVs lacked ADAM10. The functional validation of CPB-ADAM10 as a Cry3Aa toxin receptor in CPB expands the already recognized role of ADAM10 as a pathogenicity determinant of pore-forming toxins in humans to an invertebrate species. © 2016 The Royal Entomological Society.

  2. H-ras oncogene-transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single metalloprotease capable of degrading basement membrane collagen

    SciTech Connect

    Collier, I.E.; Wilhelm, S.M.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Seltzer, J.L.; Kronberger, A.; He, C.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1988-05-15

    H-ras transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (TBE-1) secrete a single major extracellular matrix metalloprotease which is not found in the normal parental cells. The enzyme is secreted in a latent form which can be activated to catalyze the cleavage of the basement membrane macromolecule type IV collagen. The substrates in their order of preference are: gelatin, type IV collagen, type V collagen, fibronectin, and type VII collagen; but the enzyme does not cleave the interstitial collagens or laminin. This protease is identical to gelatinase isolated from normal human skin explants, normal human skin fibroblasts, and SV40-transformed human lung fibroblasts. Based on this ability to initiate the degradation of type IV collagen in a pepsin-resistant portion of the molecule, it will be referred to as type IV collagenase. This enzyme is most likely the human analog of type IV collagenase detected in several rodent tumors. Type IV collagenase consists of three domains. Type IV collagenase represents the third member of a newly recognized gene family coding for secreted extracellular matrix metalloproteases, which includes interstitial fibroblast collagenase and stromelysin.

  3. Expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 3 is reduced in ischemic but not neuropathic ulcers from patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Menghini, R; Uccioli, L; Vainieri, E; Pecchioli, C; Casagrande, V; Stoehr, R; Cardellini, M; Porzio, O; Rizza, S; Federici, M

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot ulceration remains one of the most common and most serious consequences of diabetes. Persistently high levels of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) contribute to wound chronicity. Our aim was to assess the concentrations of MMPs and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in neuropathic and ischemic diabetic foot ulcers by analyzing biopsy samples. In this study, biopsies were taken from 35 diabetic foot ulcers of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients and distinguished in neuropathic (n = 14) or ischemic (n = 21). Zymography assay was utilized for the analysis of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity. TACE activity was evaluated by a specific fluorimetric assay. mRNA levels of MMPs as well as TIMPs were detected using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The activity of MMP9 and A Disintegrin and A MetalloProtease Domain 17/TNF-Alpha Converting Enzyme (ADAM17/TACE) was significantly increased in ischemic compared to neuropathic biopsies. No differences were detected between both groups for the mRNA levels of MMPs as well as of ADAMs. However, TIMP3 mRNA expression was decreased in ischemic samples. The combination of increased activity of MMP9 and ADAM17/TACE with decreased concentrations of TIMP-3 mRNA expression in ischemic diabetic foot ulcers compared to neuropathic samples suggests that the increased proteolytic environment may represent a causative factor in the ulcer progression. New treatment strategies for healing diabetic foot ulcers could be directed toward increasing levels of TIMP3.

  4. A Natural Bacterial-Derived Product, the Metalloprotease Arazyme, Inhibits Metastatic Murine Melanoma by Inducing MMP-8 Cross-Reactive Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe V.; Ferreira-Guimarães, Carla A.; Paschoalin, Thaysa; Scutti, Jorge A. B.; Melo, Filipe M.; Silva, Luis S.; Melo, Amanda C. L.; Silva, Priscila; Tiago, Manoela; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Juliano, Luiz; Juliano, Maria A.; Carmona, Adriana K.; Travassos, Luiz R.; Rodrigues, Elaine G.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence, high rates of mortality and few effective means of treatment of malignant melanoma, stimulate the search for new anti-tumor agents and therapeutic targets to control this deadly metastatic disease. In the present work the antitumor effect of arazyme, a natural bacterial-derived metalloprotease secreted by Serratia proteomaculans, was investigated. Arazyme significantly reduced the number of pulmonary metastatic nodules after intravenous inoculation of B16F10 melanoma cells in syngeneic mice. In vitro, the enzyme showed a dose-dependent cytostatic effect in human and murine tumor cells, and this effect was associated to the proteolytic activity of arazyme, reducing the CD44 expression at the cell surface, and also reducing in vitro adhesion and in vitro/in vivo invasion of these cells. Arazyme treatment or immunization induced the production of protease-specific IgG that cross-reacted with melanoma MMP-8. In vitro, this antibody was cytotoxic to tumor cells, an effect increased by complement. In vivo, arazyme-specific IgG inhibited melanoma lung metastasis. We suggest that the antitumor activity of arazyme in a preclinical model may be due to a direct cytostatic activity of the protease in combination with the elicited anti-protease antibody, which cross-reacts with MMP-8 produced by tumor cells. Our results show that the bacterial metalloprotease arazyme is a promising novel antitumor chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:24788523

  5. Aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1), an M1 metalloprotease of the apicomplexan parasite Eimeria tenella, participates in parasite development.

    PubMed

    Gras, Simon; Byzia, Anna; Gilbert, Florence B; McGowan, Sheena; Drag, Marcin; Silvestre, Anne; Niepceron, Alisson; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles; Brossier, Fabien

    2014-07-01

    Aminopeptidases N are metalloproteases of the M1 family that have been reported in numerous apicomplexan parasites, including Plasmodium, Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium, and Eimeria. While investigating the potency of aminopeptidases as therapeutic targets against coccidiosis, one of the most important avian diseases caused by the genus Eimeria, we identified and characterized Eimeria tenella aminopeptidase N1 (EtAPN1). Its inhibition by bestatin and amastatin, as well as its reactivation by divalent ions, is typical of zinc-dependent metalloproteases. EtAPN1 shared a similar sequence, three-dimensional structure, and substrate specificity and similar kinetic parameters with A-M1 from Plasmodium falciparum (PfA-M1), a validated target in the treatment of malaria. EtAPN1 is synthesized as a 120-kDa precursor and cleaved into 96-, 68-, and 38-kDa forms during sporulation. Further, immunolocalization assays revealed that, similar to PfA-M1, EtAPN1 is present during the intracellular life cycle stages in both the parasite cytoplasm and the parasite nucleus. The present results support the hypothesis of a conserved role between the two aminopeptidases, and we suggest that EtAPN1 might be a valuable target for anticoccidiosis drugs.

  6. Matrix metalloproteases and their tissue inhibitors in non-alcoholic liver fibrosis of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia; Suárez-Zarracina, Tomás; Montes, Angel-Hugo; Cartón, José A; Asensi, Víctor

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationships among diverse metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and non-alcoholic liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. METHODS Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MMPs, TNF-α and CCR5 genes, and serum levels of MMPs and TIMPs were determined in HIV-infected individuals with/out hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. A total of 158 patients were included, 57 of whom were HCV-coinfected. All patients drank < 50 g ethanol/day. Diverse SNPs (MMP-1 -1607 1G/2G, MMP-8 -799C/T, MMP-9 -1562 C/T, MMP-13 -77A/G, TNF-α -308 G/A, CCR5-∆32), and serum levels of MMPs (2, 3, 8, 9 and 10) and TIMPs (1, 2 and 4) were assessed. Liver fibrosis was determined by transient elastometry, although other non-invasive markers of fibrosis were also considered. Significant liver fibrosis (F ≥ 2) was defined by a transient elastometry value ≥ 7.1 kPa. RESULTS A total of 34 patients (21.5%) had liver fibrosis ≥ F2. MMP-2 and TIMP-2 serum levels were higher in patients with liver fibrosis ≥ F2 (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively) and correlated positively with transient elastometry values (P = 0.02 and P = 0.0009, respectively), whereas MMP-9 values were negatively correlated with transient elastometry measurements (P = 0.01). Multivariate analyses showed that high levels of MMP-2 (OR = 2.397; 95%CI: 1.191-4.827, P = 0.014) were independently associated with liver fibrosis ≥ F2 in the patients as a whole. MMP-2 (OR = 7.179; 95%CI: 1.210-42.581, P = 0.03) and male gender (OR = 10.040; 95%CI: 1.621-62.11, P = 0.013) were also independent predictors of fibrosis ≥ F2 in the HCV-infected subgroup. Likewise, MMP-2, TIMP-2 and MMP-9 were independently associated with transient elastometry values and other non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis. None of the six SNPs evaluated had any significant association with liver fibrosis ≥ F2. CONCLUSION Certain MMPs and TIMPs, particularly MMP-2, seems to be

  7. Matrix metalloproteases and their tissue inhibitors in non-alcoholic liver fibrosis of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Collazos, Julio; Valle-Garay, Eulalia; Suárez-Zarracina, Tomás; Montes, Angel-Hugo; Cartón, José A; Asensi, Víctor

    2017-05-12

    To investigate the relationships among diverse metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs) and non-alcoholic liver fibrosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MMPs, TNF-α and CCR5 genes, and serum levels of MMPs and TIMPs were determined in HIV-infected individuals with/out hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. A total of 158 patients were included, 57 of whom were HCV-coinfected. All patients drank < 50 g ethanol/day. Diverse SNPs (MMP-1 -1607 1G/2G, MMP-8 -799C/T, MMP-9 -1562 C/T, MMP-13 -77A/G, TNF-α -308 G/A, CCR5-∆32), and serum levels of MMPs (2, 3, 8, 9 and 10) and TIMPs (1, 2 and 4) were assessed. Liver fibrosis was determined by transient elastometry, although other non-invasive markers of fibrosis were also considered. Significant liver fibrosis (F ≥ 2) was defined by a transient elastometry value ≥ 7.1 kPa. A total of 34 patients (21.5%) had liver fibrosis ≥ F2. MMP-2 and TIMP-2 serum levels were higher in patients with liver fibrosis ≥ F2 (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively) and correlated positively with transient elastometry values (P = 0.02 and P = 0.0009, respectively), whereas MMP-9 values were negatively correlated with transient elastometry measurements (P = 0.01). Multivariate analyses showed that high levels of MMP-2 (OR = 2.397; 95%CI: 1.191-4.827, P = 0.014) were independently associated with liver fibrosis ≥ F2 in the patients as a whole. MMP-2 (OR = 7.179; 95%CI: 1.210-42.581, P = 0.03) and male gender (OR = 10.040; 95%CI: 1.621-62.11, P = 0.013) were also independent predictors of fibrosis ≥ F2 in the HCV-infected subgroup. Likewise, MMP-2, TIMP-2 and MMP-9 were independently associated with transient elastometry values and other non-invasive markers of liver fibrosis. None of the six SNPs evaluated had any significant association with liver fibrosis ≥ F2. Certain MMPs and TIMPs, particularly MMP-2, seems to be associated with non

  8. Doxycycline, a matrix metalloprotease inhibitor, reduces vascular remodeling and damage after cerebral ischemia in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Pires, Paulo W; Rogers, Curt T; McClain, Jonathon L; Garver, Hannah S; Fink, Gregory D; Dorrance, Anne M

    2011-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a family of zinc peptidases involved in extracellular matrix turnover. There is evidence that increased MMP activity is involved in remodeling of resistance vessels in chronic hypertension. Thus we hypothesized that inhibition of MMP activity with doxycycline (DOX) would attenuate vascular remodeling. Six-week-old male stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were treated with DOX (50 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) in the drinking water) for 6 wk. Untreated SHRSP were controls. Blood pressure was measured by telemetry during the last week. Middle cerebral artery (MCA) and mesenteric resistance artery (MRA) passive structures were assessed by pressure myography. MMP-2 expression in aortas was measured by Western blot. All results are means ± SE. DOX caused a small increase in mean arterial pressure (SHRSP, 154 ± 1; SHRSP + DOX, 159 ± 3 mmHg; P < 0.001). Active MMP-2 expression was reduced in aorta from SHRSP + DOX (0.21 ± 0.06 vs. 0.49 ± 0.13 arbitrary units; P < 0.05). In the MCA, at 80 mmHg, DOX treatment increased the lumen (273.2 ± 4.7 vs. 238.3 ± 6.3 μm; P < 0.05) and the outer diameter (321 ± 5.3 vs. 290 ± 7.6 μm; P < 0.05) and reduced the wall-to-lumen ratio (0.09 ± 0.002 vs. 0.11 ± 0.003; P < 0.05). Damage after transient cerebral ischemia (transient MCA occlusion) was reduced in SHRSP + DOX (20.7 ± 4 vs. 45.5 ± 5% of hemisphere infarcted; P < 0.05). In the MRA, at 90 mmHg DOX, reduced wall thickness (29 ± 1 vs. 22 ± 1 μm; P < 0.001) and wall-to-lumen ratio (0.08 ± 0.004 vs. 0.11 ± 0.008; P < 0.05) without changing lumen diameter. These results suggest that MMPs are involved in hypertensive vascular remodeling in both the peripheral and cerebral vasculature and that DOX reduced brain damage after cerebral ischemia.

  9. Abnormalities in the zinc-metalloprotease-BDNF axis may contribute to megalencephaly and cortical hyperconnectivity in young autism spectrum disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whereas aberrant brain connectivity is likely the core pathology of autism-spectrum disorder (ASD), studies do not agree as to whether hypo- or hyper-connectivity is the main underlying problem. Recent functional imaging studies have shown that, in most young ASD patients, cerebral cortical regions appear hyperconnected, and cortical thickness/brain size is increased. Collectively, these findings indicate that developing ASD brains may exist in an altered neurotrophic milieu. Consistently, some ASD patients, as well as some animal models of ASD, show increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, how BDNF is upregulated in ASD is unknown. To address this question, we propose the novel hypothesis that a putative zinc-metalloprotease-BDNF (ZMB) axis in the forebrain plays a pivotal role in the development of hyperconnectivity and megalencephaly in ASD. We have previously demonstrated that extracellular zinc at micromolar concentrations can rapidly increase BDNF levels and phosphorylate the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB via the activation of metalloproteases. The role of metalloproteases in ASD is still uncertain, but in fragile X syndrome, a monogenic disease with an autistic phenotype, the levels of MMP are increased. Early exposure to lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and other MMP activators such as organic mercurials also have been implicated in ASD pathogenesis. The resultant increases in BDNF levels at synapses, especially those involved in the zinc-containing, associative glutamatergic system may produce abnormal brain circuit development. Various genetic mutations that lead to ASD are also known to affect BDNF signaling: some down-regulate, and others up-regulate it. We hypothesize that, although both up- and down-regulation of BDNF may induce autism symptoms, only BDNF up-regulation is associated with the hyperconnectivity and large brain size observed in most young idiopathic ASD patients. To test this hypothesis, we propose to examine the

  10. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  11. Moojenactivase, a novel pro-coagulant PIIId metalloprotease isolated from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, activates coagulation factors II and X and induces tissue factor up-regulation in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Costa, Tassia R; Laure, Helen J; Espíndola, Milena S; Frantz, Fabiani G; Sorgi, Carlos A; Cintra, Adélia C O; Arantes, Eliane C; Faccioli, Lucia H; Rosa, José C; Sampaio, Suely V

    2016-05-01

    Coagulopathies following snakebite are triggered by pro-coagulant venom toxins, in which metalloproteases play a major role in envenomation-induced coagulation disorders by acting on coagulation cascade, platelet function and fibrinolysis. Considering this relevance, here we describe the isolation and biochemical characterization of moojenactivase (MooA), a metalloprotease from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, and investigate its involvement in hemostasis in vitro. MooA is a glycoprotein of 85,746.22 Da, member of the PIIId group of snake venom metalloproteases, composed of three linked disulfide-bonded chains: an N-glycosylated heavy chain, and two light chains. The venom protease induced human plasma clotting in vitro by activating on both blood coagulation factors II (prothrombin) and X, which in turn generated α-thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. Additionally, MooA induced expression of tissue factor (TF) on the membrane surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which led these cells to adopt pro-coagulant characteristics. MooA was also shown to be involved with production of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1, suggesting an association between MooA pro-inflammatory stimulation of PBMC and TF up-regulation. We also observed aggregation of washed platelets when in presence of MooA; however, the protease had no effect on fibrinolysis. Our findings show that MooA is a novel hemostatically active metalloprotease, which may lead to the development of coagulopathies during B. moojeni envenomation. Moreover, the metalloprotease may contribute to the development of new diagnostic tools and pharmacological approaches applied to hemostatic disorders.

  12. Low microvascular density at the tumor center is related to the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors and with the occurrence of distant metastasis in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Guinea, Oscar; Álvarez-Cofiño, Almudena; Eiró, Noemí; González, Luis O; del Casar, José M; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Lamelas, Maria L; Andicoechea, Alejandro; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the microvascular density (MVD) at the center of breast carcinomas, its relationship with the expression of metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs), and its connection with the distant metastasis rate. An immunohistochemical study of four MMPs and two TIMPs was performed on cancer specimens from 97 women with a histological confirmed diagnosis of early invasive breast cancer. Expressions of MMP-9 by cancerous cells, or MMP-11 and TIMP-2 by stromal cells, were all negative and significantly associated with MVD, whereas MMP-7 score values were positive and also significantly associated with MVD. However, positive expression of MMP-1 by mononuclear inflammatory cells was significantly associated with MVD. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant and inverse relationship between MVD and the occurrence of distant metastasis. Our data point out the clinical importance of low MVD at the tumor center as an independent prognostic factor of distant metastasis development in breast cancer.

  13. The Myxococcus xanthus Spore Cuticula Protein C Is a Fragment of FibA, an Extracellular Metalloprotease Produced Exclusively in Aggregated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bongsoo; Mann, Petra; Grover, Vidhi; Treuner-Lange, Anke; Kahnt, Jörg; Higgs, Penelope I.

    2011-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with a complex life cycle involving distinct cell fates, including production of environmentally resistant spores to withstand periods of nutrient limitation. Spores are surrounded by an apparently self-assembling cuticula containing at least Proteins S and C; the gene encoding Protein C is unknown. During analyses of cell heterogeneity in M. xanthus, we observed that Protein C accumulated exclusively in cells found in aggregates. Using mass spectrometry analysis of Protein C either isolated from spore cuticula or immunoprecipitated from aggregated cells, we demonstrate that Protein C is actually a proteolytic fragment of the previously identified but functionally elusive zinc metalloprotease, FibA. Subpopulation specific FibA accumulation is not due to transcriptional regulation suggesting post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms mediate its heterogeneous accumulation patterns. PMID:22174937

  14. Identification of two components of the Serratia marcescens metalloprotease transporter: protease SM secretion in Escherichia coli is TolC dependent.

    PubMed

    Létoffé, S; Ghigo, J M; Wandersman, C

    1993-11-01

    The Serratia marcescens metalloprotease (protease SM) belongs to a family of proteins secreted from gram-negative bacteria by a signal peptide-independent pathway which requires a specific transporter consisting of three proteins: two in the inner membrane and one in the outer membrane. The prtDSM and prtESM genes encoding the two S. marcescens inner membrane components were cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Their nucleotide sequence revealed high overall homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the Erwinia chrysanthemi protease secretion apparatus and lower, but still significant, homology with the two analogous inner membrane components of the E. coli hemolysin transporter. When expressed in E. coli, these two proteins, PrtDSM and PrtESM, allowed the secretion of protease SM only in the presence of TolC protein, the outer membrane component of the hemolysin transporter.

  15. Periodontal ligament cells under intermittent tensile stress regulate mRNA expression of osteoprotegerin and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease-1 and -2.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kiyomi; Uno, Keiji; Zhang, Gui Xia; Tamura, Masato

    2004-01-01

    We studied the mRNA expression of osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloprotease (TIMP)-1 and -2, and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1 and -2 by human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells under intermittent tensile stress using a Flexercell Strain Unit. Analysis by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction showed that mechanical force upregulated OPG mRNA. We also demonstrated that the protein concentration of OPG in conditioned medium increased upon loading with tensile stress, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TIMP-1 and -2 mRNA levels also increased, whereas levels of RANKL, MMP-1, and MMP-2 mRNA were barely affected. We further examined the effect of loading with tensile stress and addition of Salmonella abortus equi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the mRNA expression of PDL cells. The amount of OPG mRNA induced by mechanical strain was found to decrease with the addition of LPS to cultures. The induction of OPG mRNA expression by stretching was inhibited in the presence of indomethacin or genistein, whereas TIMP-1 mRNA expression induced by stretching was inhibited by the addition of cycloheximide, suggesting that tensile stress regulates cyclooxygenase activities, tyrosine phosphorylation, and de novo protein synthesis in PDL cells through the induction of OPG and TIMP-1 mRNA expression. These results provide evidence that the mechanical stimulus of stretching is responsible for the observed regulation of bone resorption and tissue degradation in PDL tissue.

  16. Locked Nucleic Acid Gapmers and Conjugates Potently Silence ADAM33, an Asthma-Associated Metalloprotease with Nuclear-Localized mRNA.

    PubMed

    Pendergraff, Hannah M; Krishnamurthy, Pranathi Meda; Debacker, Alexandre J; Moazami, Michael P; Sharma, Vivek K; Niitsoo, Liisa; Yu, Yong; Tan, Yen Nee; Haitchi, Hans Michael; Watts, Jonathan K

    2017-09-15

    Two mechanisms dominate the clinical pipeline for oligonucleotide-based gene silencing, namely, the antisense approach that recruits RNase H to cleave target RNA and the RNAi approach that recruits the RISC complex to cleave target RNA. Multiple chemical designs can be used to elicit each pathway. We compare the silencing of the asthma susceptibility gene ADAM33 in MRC-5 lung fibroblasts using four classes of gene silencing agents, two that use each mechanism: traditional duplex small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), single-stranded small interfering RNAs (ss-siRNAs), locked nucleic acid (LNA) gapmer antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs), and novel hexadecyloxypropyl conjugates of the ASOs. Of these designs, the gapmer ASOs emerged as lead compounds for silencing ADAM33 expression: several gapmer ASOs showed subnanomolar potency when transfected with cationic lipid and low micromolar potency with no toxicity when delivered gymnotically. The preferential susceptibility of ADAM33 mRNA to silencing by RNase H may be related to the high degree of nuclear retention observed for this mRNA. Dynamic light scattering data showed that the hexadecyloxypropyl ASO conjugates self-assemble into clusters. These conjugates showed reduced potency relative to unconjugated ASOs unless the lipophilic tail was conjugated to the ASO using a biocleavable linkage. Finally, based on the lead ASOs from (human) MRC-5 cells, we developed a series of homologous ASOs targeting mouse Adam33 with excellent activity. Our work confirms that ASO-based gene silencing of ADAM33 is a useful tool for asthma research and therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparison of the binding specificity of two bacterial metalloproteases, LasB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ZapA of Proteus mirabilis, using N-alpha mercaptoamide template-based inhibitor analogues.

    PubMed

    Carson, Louise; Cathcart, George R; Ceri, Howard; Walker, Brian; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2012-06-01

    The metalloproteases ZapA of Proteus mirabilis and LasB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are known to be virulence factors their respective opportunistic bacterial pathogens, and are members of the structurally related serralysin and thermolysin families of bacterial metalloproteases respectively. Secreted at the site of infection, these proteases play a key role in the infection process, contributing to tissue destruction and processing of components of the host immune system. Inhibition of these virulence factors may therefore represent an antimicrobial strategy, attenuating the virulence of the infecting pathogen. Previously we have screened a library of N-alpha mercaptoamide dipeptide inhibitors against both ZapA and LasB, with the aim of mapping the S1' binding site of the enzymes, revealing both striking similarities and important differences in their binding preferences. Here we report the design, synthesis, and screening of several inhibitor analogues, based on two parent inhibitors from the original library. The results have allowed for further characterization of the ZapA and LasB active site binding pockets, and have highlighted the possibility for development of broad-spectrum bacterial protease inhibitors, effective against enzymes of the thermolysin and serralysin metalloprotease families. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Interaction between TNF and BmooMP-Alpha-I, a Zinc Metalloprotease Derived from Bothrops moojeni Snake Venom, Promotes Direct Proteolysis of This Cytokine: Molecular Modeling and Docking at a Glance

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Maraisa Cristina; Lopes Silva, Tamires; Silva, Murilo Vieira; Mota, Caroline Martins; Santiago, Fernanda Maria; Fonseca, Kelly Cortes; Oliveira, Fábio; Mineo, Tiago Wilson Patriarca; Mineo, José Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a major cytokine in inflammatory processes and its deregulation plays a pivotal role in several diseases. Here, we report that a zinc metalloprotease extracted from Bothrops moojeni venom (BmooMP-alpha-I) inhibits TNF directly by promoting its degradation. This inhibition was demonstrated by both in vitro and in vivo assays, using known TLR ligands. These findings are supported by molecular docking results, which reveal interaction between BmooMP-alpha-I and TNF. The major cluster of interaction between BmooMP-alpha-I and TNF was confirmed by the structural alignment presenting Ligand Root Mean Square Deviation LRMS = 1.05 Å and Interactive Root Mean Square Deviation IRMS = 1.01 Å, this result being compatible with an accurate complex. Additionally, we demonstrated that the effect of this metalloprotease on TNF is independent of cell cytotoxicity and it does not affect other TLR-triggered cytokines, such as IL-12. Together, these results indicate that this zinc metalloprotease is a potential tool to be further investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders involving TNF deregulation. PMID:27447669

  19. Downstream processing, characterization, and structure-function relationship of solvent-, detergent-, psychro-, thermo-, alkalistable metalloprotease from metal-, solvent-tolerant psychrotrophic Pseudomonas putida SKG-1 isolate.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Tripathi, Vinayak Ram; Garg, Satyendra Kumar; Khare, Sunil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The purification and characterization of psychro-thermoalkalistable protease from psychrotrophic Pseudomonas putida isolate is being reported for the first time. A ~53 kDa protease was purified 21.4-folds with 57.2% recovery by ultrafiltration and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Kinetic analyses revealed the K(m) and V(max) to be 1.169 mg mL(-1) and 0.833 mg mL(-1) min(-1) , respectively. The k(cat) value of 3.05 × 10(2) s(-1) indicated high affinity and catalytic efficiency toward casein. The protease was most active at pH 9.5 and 40°C, with 100% stability in pH and temperature range of 6.0-11.0 and 10-40°C, respectively. Presence of Zn(2+) increased the thermostability of protease (at 70°C) by 433%. Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline were inhibitory, whereas phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), p-chloro mercuric benzoate (PCMB), and β-mercaptoethanol were ineffective, revealing the enzyme to be a metalloprotease. Zinc, calcium, iron, nickel, and copper at 1 mM increased the enzyme activity (102-134%). Complete reversion of enzyme inhibition (caused by Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid [EDTA]) by Zn(2+) affirmed this enzyme as zinc-dependent metalloprotease. At 0.1% concentration, Triton X-100 and Tween 80 slightly increased, while SDS and H(2) O(2) reduced the protease activity. In the presence of 0.1% commercial detergents, the enzyme was fairly stable (54-81%). In the presence of organic solvent, the protease was remarkably stable exhibiting 72-191% activities. In contrast, savinase exhibited good stability in the presence of hydrophilic solvents, while chymotrypsin showed elevated activities with benzene, toluene, and xylene only. Circular dichroism analysis revealed the protease as a β-rich protein, having large fraction (∼40%) of β-sheets. Presence of different environmental conditions altered the β-content, which accordingly affected the protease activity. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical

  20. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptors Mediate Metalloprotease-dependent Phosphorylation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor and ErbB3 in Human Salivary Gland Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ratchford, Ann M.; Baker, Olga J.; Camden, Jean M.; Rikka, Shivaji; Petris, Michael J.; Seye, Cheikh I.; Erb, Laurie; Weisman, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) has been shown to be up-regulated in a variety of tissues in response to stress or injury. Recent studies have suggested that P2Y2Rs may play a role in immune responses, wound healing, and tissue regeneration via their ability to activate multiple signaling pathways, including activation of growth factor receptors. Here, we demonstrate that in human salivary gland (HSG) cells, activation of the P2Y2R by its agonist induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2 via two distinct mechanisms, a rapid, protein kinase C-dependent pathway and a slower and prolonged, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-dependent pathway. The EGFR-dependent stimulation of UTP-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation in HSG cells is inhibited by the adamalysin inhibitor tumor necrosis factor-α protease inhibitor or by small interfering RNA that selectively silences ADAM10 and ADAM17 expression, suggesting that ADAM metalloproteases are required for P2Y2R-mediated activation of the EGFR. G protein-coupled receptors have been shown to promote proteolytic release of EGFR ligands; however, neutralizing antibodies to known ligands of the EGFR did not inhibit UTP-induced EGFR phosphorylation. Immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that UTP causes association of the EGFR with another member of the EGF receptor family, ErbB3. Furthermore, stimulation of HSG cells with UTP induced phosphorylation of ErbB3, and silencing of ErbB3 expression inhibited UTP-induced phosphorylation of both ErbB3 and EGFR. UTP-induced phosphorylation of ErbB3 and EGFR was also inhibited by silencing the expression of the ErbB3 ligand neuregulin 1 (NRG1). These results suggest that P2Y2R activation in salivary gland cells promotes the formation of EGFR/ErbB3 heterodimers and metalloprotease-dependent neuregulin 1 release, resulting in the activation of both EGFR and ErbB3. PMID:20064929

  1. EphrinA/EphA-induced ectodomain shedding of neural cell adhesion molecule regulates growth cone repulsion through ADAM10 metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Brennaman, Leann H; Moss, Marcia L; Maness, Patricia F

    2014-01-01

    EphrinA/EphA-dependent axon repulsion is crucial for synaptic targeting in developing neurons but downstream molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here, it is shown that ephrinA5/EphA3 triggers proteolysis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) by the metalloprotease a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)10 to promote growth cone collapse in neurons from mouse neocortex. EphrinA5 induced ADAM10 activity to promote ectodomain shedding of polysialic acid-NCAM in cortical neuron cultures, releasing a ~ 250 kDa soluble fragment consisting of most of its extracellular region. NCAM shedding was dependent on ADAM10 and EphA3 kinase activity as shown in HEK293T cells transfected with dominant negative ADAM10 and kinase-inactive EphA3 (K653R) mutants. Purified ADAM10 cleaved NCAM at a sequence within the E-F loop of the second fibronectin type III domain (Leu(671) -Lys(672) /Ser(673) -Leu(674) ) identified by mass spectrometry. Mutations of NCAM within the ADAM10 cleavage sequence prevented EphA3-induced shedding of NCAM in HEK293T cells. EphrinA5-induced growth cone collapse was dependent on ADAM10 activity, was inhibited in cortical cultures from NCAM null mice, and was rescued by WT but not ADAM10 cleavage site mutants of NCAM. Regulated proteolysis of NCAM through the ephrin5/EphA3/ADAM10 mechanism likely impacts synapse development, and may lead to excess NCAM shedding when disrupted, as implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. PSA-NCAM and ephrinA/EphA3 coordinately regulate inhibitory synapse development. Here, we have found that ephrinA5 stimulates EphA3 kinase and ADAM10 activity to promote PSA-NCAM cleavage at a site in its second FNIII repeat, which regulates ephrinA5-induced growth cone collapse in GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons. These findings identify a new regulatory mechanism which may contribute to inhibitory connectivity.

  2. A 24-kDa cloned zinc metalloprotease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, C; Montañez, C; Tenorio, V; Reyes-Esparza, J; Durán, M J; Negrete, E; Guerrero, A; de la Garza, M

    2000-01-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. Figure 4. Figure 6. Figure 7. PMID:10805246

  3. Expression of the Matrix Metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and Tissue Inhibitor 3 as Potential Molecular Markers in Advanced Human Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    Background. During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. Objective. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. Methods. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (CT) values, as very high (CT ≤ 25), high (CT = 26–30), moderate (CT = 31–35), low (CT = 36–39), or not detected (CT = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. Results. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. Conclusions. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC. PMID:24669030

  4. An extracellular serine protease produced by Vibrio vulnificus NCIMB 2137, a metalloprotease-gene negative strain isolated from a diseased eel.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Shin-Ichi; Wang, Jiyou; Katoh, Keizo; Senoh, Mitsutoshi; Mizuno, Tamaki; Maehara, Yoko

    2012-04-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a ubiquitous estuarine microorganism but causes fatal systemic infections in immunocompromised humans, cultured eels or shrimps. An extracellular metalloprotease VVP/VvpE has been reported to be a potential virulence factor of the bacterium; however, a few strains isolated from a diseased eel or shrimp were recently found to produce a serine protease termed VvsA, but not VVP/VvpE. In the present study, we found that these strains had lost the 80 kb genomic region including the gene encoding VVP/VvpE. We also purified VvsA from the culture supernatant through ammonium sulfate fractionation, gel filtration and ion-exchange column chromatography, and the enzyme was demonstrated to be a chymotrypsin-like protease, as well as those from some vibrios. The gene vvsA was shown to constitute an operon with a downstream gene vvsB, and several Vibrio species were found to have orthologues of vvsAB. These findings indicate that the genes vvp/vvpE and vvsAB might be mobile genetic elements.

  5. Single particle tracking of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-1 repeats) molecules on endothelial von Willebrand factor strings.

    PubMed

    De Ceunynck, Karen; Rocha, Susana; De Meyer, Simon F; Sadler, J Evan; Uji-i, Hiroshi; Deckmyn, Hans; Hofkens, Johan; Vanhoorelbeke, Karen

    2014-03-28

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) strings are removed from the endothelial surface by ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type-1 repeats)-mediated proteolysis. To visualize how single ADAMTS13 molecules bind to these long strings, we built a customized single molecule fluorescence microscope and developed single particle tracking software. Extensive analysis of over 6,000 single inactive ADAMTS13(E225Q) enzymes demonstrated that 20% of these molecules could be detected in at least two consecutive 60-ms frames and followed two types of trajectories. ADAMTS13(E225Q) molecules either decelerated in the vicinity of VWF strings, whereas sometimes making brief contact with the VWF string before disappearing again, or readily bound to the VWF strings and this for 120 ms or longer. These interactions were observed at several sites along the strings. Control experiments using an IgG protein revealed that only the second type of trajectory reflected a specific interaction of ADAMTS13 with the VWF string. In conclusion, we developed a dedicated single molecule fluorescence microscope for detecting single ADAMTS13 molecules (nm scale) on their long, flow-stretched VWF substrates (μm scale) anchored on living cells. Comprehensive analysis of all detected enzymes showed a random interaction mechanism for ADAMTS13 with many available binding sites on the VWF strings.

  6. Relationship between morphological features and kinetic patterns of enhancement of the dynamic breast magnetic resonance imaging and tumor expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors in invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cuadriello, Estela Fernández; Fernández-Guinea, Óscar; Eiró, Noemí; González, Luis O; Junquera, Sara; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2016-10-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) expression and their inhibitors (TIMPs) play an important role in tumor physiopathology, so we investigated the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) and MMPs/TIMPs expression by breast carcinomas. MRI parameters of 64 breast carcinomas were investigated. An immunohistochemical study was also performed in these cases using tissue microarrays and specific antibodies against MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-11, MMP-13, MMP-14, TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and TIMP-3. Tumors with spiculated margins had a high global (score) values of MMP-1 or MMP-7, and high expression of TIMP-3 by tumor cells. Heterogeneous tumors had a higher score values of MMP-1, MMP-13, TIMP-2 or TIMP-3, and frequent expression of TIMP-3 by tumor cells. Tumors showing fast enhancement, had higher score values of MMP-1 or MMP-11. Associations between washout curve (type III) and MMP-1, MMP-11, MMP-13 and TIMP-1 expression by tumor cells, were found. MRI features may predict in some grade the expressions of MMPs/TIMPs in breast tumors, which might to contribute to a better biological characterization of breast cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors by tumor and stromal cells in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and their relationship with microinvasive events.

    PubMed

    González, L O; González-Reyes, S; Junquera, S; Marín, L; González, L; Del Casar, J M; González, J M; Vizoso, Francisco

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We used inmunohistochemistry to compare the expression of MMPs and TIMPs in tumor or stromal cells for 50 pure DCIS and 12 DCIS with microinvasive foci. Score values for collagenase-1 (MMP-1), membrane type 1 MMP (MMP-14), and TIMP-1, were significantly higher in pure DCIS than in DCIS with microinvasive foci, whereas stromalysin-3 (MMP-11) expression was significantly higher in DCIS with microinvasive foci. Both fibroblasts and mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) surrounding pure DCIS showed more frequently expression of MMP-1, MMP-14, and TIMP-3, whereas MMP-11 expression was more frequent in MICs of microinvasive tumors. MICs of microinvasive foci more frequently showed the expression of gelatinase A (MMP-2), MMP-11, collagenase-3 (MMP-13), and TIMP-1, than MICs surrounding pure DCIS; whereas peri-ductal MICs and fibroblasts from pure DCIS expressed TIMP-3 more commonly than these cells at microinvasive foci. There are significant differences in the expression of MMPs and TIMPs, so in tumor cells and stromal cells, between pure DCIS and DCIS with microinvasive foci. Therefore, these staining patterns might display potential applications as biological markers, such as in evaluating microinvasion in resection specimens of breast tumors.

  8. A Phage Display Selected 7-mer Peptide Inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia Metalloprotease-Like Enzyme Karilysin can be Truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro

    PubMed Central

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin. PMID:23119051

  9. A phage display selected 7-mer peptide inhibitor of the Tannerella forsythia metalloprotease-like enzyme Karilysin can be truncated to Ser-Trp-Phe-Pro.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Sørensen, Grete; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Potempa, Jan; Riise, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Tannerella forsythia is a gram-negative bacteria, which is strongly associated with the development of periodontal disease. Karilysin is a newly identified metalloprotease-like enzyme, that is secreted from T. forsythia. Karilysin modulates the host immune response and is therefore considered a likely drug target. In this study peptides were selected towards the catalytic domain from Karilysin (Kly18) by phage display. The peptides were linear with low micromolar binding affinities. The two best binders (peptide14 and peptide15), shared the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG. A peptide15 fusion with Maltose Binding protein (MBP) was produced with peptide15 fused to the N-terminus of MBP. The peptide15-MBP was expressed in E. coli and the purified fusion-protein was used to verify Kly18 specific binding. Chemically synthesised peptide15 (SWFPLRSGGG) could inhibit the enzymatic activity of both Kly18 and intact Karilysin (Kly48). Furthermore, peptide15 could slow down the autoprocessing of intact Kly48 to Kly18. The WFP motif was important for inhibition and a truncation study further demonstrated that the N-terminal serine was also essential for Kly18 inhibition. The SWFP peptide had a Ki value in the low micromolar range, which was similar to the intact peptide15. In conclusion SWFP is the first reported inhibitor of Karilysin and can be used as a valuable tool in structure-function studies of Karilysin.

  10. Structural and Functional Characterization of Mature Forms of Metalloprotease E495 from Arctic Sea-Ice Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM495

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiu-Lan; Xie, Bin-Bin; Zhang, Xi-Ying; Yu, Yong; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    E495 is the most abundant protease secreted by the Arctic sea-ice bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM495. As a thermolysin family metalloprotease, E495 was found to have multiple active forms in the culture of strain SM495. E495-M (containing only the catalytic domain) and E495-M-C1 (containing the catalytic domain and one PPC domain) were two stable mature forms, and E495-M-C1-C2 (containing the catalytic domain and two PPC domains) might be an intermediate. Compared to E495-M, E495-M-C1 had similar affinity and catalytic efficiency to oligopeptides, but higher affinity and catalytic efficiency to proteins. The PPC domains from E495 were expressed as GST-fused proteins. Both of the recombinant PPC domains were shown to have binding ability to proteins C-phycocyanin and casein, and domain PPC1 had higher affinity to C-phycocyanin than domain PPC2. These results indicated that the domain PPC1 in E495-M-C1 could be helpful in binding protein substrate, and therefore, improving the catalytic efficiency. Site-directed mutagenesis on the PPC domains showed that the conserved polar and aromatic residues, D26, D28, Y30, Y/W65, in the PPC domains played key roles in protein binding. Our study may shed light on the mechanism of organic nitrogen degradation in the Arctic sea ice. PMID:22523598

  11. Linking Temporal Changes in Bacterial Community Structures with the Detection and Phylogenetic Analysis of Neutral Metalloprotease Genes in the Sediments of a Hypereutrophic Lake

    PubMed Central

    Tsuboi, Shun; Yamamura, Shigeki; Imai, Akio; Satou, Takayuki; Iwasaki, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    We investigated spatial and temporal variations in bacterial community structures as well as the presence of three functional proteolytic enzyme genes in the sediments of a hypereutrophic freshwater lake in order to acquire an insight into dynamic links between bacterial community structures and proteolytic functions. Bacterial communities determined from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries markedly changed bimonthly, rather than vertically in the sediment cores. The phylum Firmicutes dominated in the 4–6 cm deep sediment layer sample after August in 2007, and this correlated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations (p < 0.01). The Firmicutes clones were mostly composed of the genus Bacillus. npr genes encoding neutral metalloprotease, an extracellular protease gene, were detected after the phylum Firmicutes became dominant. The deduced Npr protein sequences from the retrieved npr genes also showed that most of the Npr sequences used in this study were closely related to those of the genus Bacillus, with similarities ranging from 61% to 100%. Synchronous temporal occurrences of the 16S rRNA gene and Npr sequences, both from the genus Bacillus, were positively associated with increases in interstitial ammonium concentrations, which may imply that proteolysis by Npr from the genus Bacillus may contribute to the marked increases observed in ammonium concentrations in the sediments. Our results suggest that sedimentary bacteria may play an important role in the biogeochemical nitrogen cycle of freshwater lakes. PMID:25130992

  12. Expression of the matrix metalloproteases 2, 14, 24, and 25 and tissue inhibitor 3 as potential molecular markers in advanced human gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    de la Peña, Sol; Sampieri, Clara Luz; Ochoa-Lara, Mariana; León-Córdoba, Kenneth; Remes-Troche, José María

    2014-01-01

    During progression of gastric cancer (GC), degradation of the extracellular matrix is mediated by the matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMPs): changes in the expression of these have been related to unfavorable prognosis in GC. To analyze the expression of certain MMPs and TIMPs in chronic superficial gastritis (SG) and GC. The expression of MMPs and TIMPs was determined using qRT-PCR; the expression was classified, using threshold cycle (C(T)) values, as very high (C(T) ≤ 25), high (C(T) = 26-30), moderate (C(T) = 31-35), low (C(T) = 36-39), or not detected (C(T) = 40). Strength of association was estimated between the proteins, which were detected by Western blot, and the risk of developing GC. We found a high expression of MMP1, MMP2, MMP14, TIMP1, and TIMP3; moderate one of MMP9 and MMP25, and low one of MMP13 and MMP24 in both tissues. In absolute mRNA levels, significant differences were found in expression of MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25, which are overexpressed in GC compared with SG. The presence of the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 was associated with the risk of developing GC. We consider that MMP2, MMP24, and MMP25 and the proteins MMP-14 and TIMP-3 could be candidates for prognostic molecular markers in GC.

  13. A 24-kDa cloned zinc metalloprotease from Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is common to all serotypes and cleaves actin in vitro.

    PubMed

    García-Cuéllar, C; Montañez, C; Tenorio, V; Reyes-Esparza, J; Durán, M J; Negrete, E; Guerrero, A; de la Garza, M

    2000-04-01

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae causes pleuropneumonia in swine. This bacterium secretes proteases that degrade porcine hemoglobin and IgA in vitro. To further characterize A. pleuropneumoniae proteases, we constructed a genomic library expressed in Escherichia coli DH5alpha, and selected a clone that showed proteolytic activity. The recombinant plasmid carries an 800-base pair A. pleuropneumoniae gene sequence that.codes for a 24-kDa polypeptide. A 350-base pair PstI fragment from the sequence hybridized at high stringency with DNA from 12 serotypes of A. pleuropneumoniae, but not with DNA from Actinobacillus suis, Haemophilus parasuis, Pasteurella haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida A or D, or E. coli DH5alpha, thus showing specificity for A. pleuropneumoniae. The expressed polypeptide was recognized as an antigen by convalescent-phase pig sera. Furthermore, a polyclonal antiserum developed against the purified polypeptide recognized an A. pleuropneumoniae oligomeric protein in both crude-extract and cell-free culture media. This recombinant polypeptide cleaved azocoll, gelatin, and actin. Inhibition of the proteolytic activity by diethylpyrocarbonate suggests that this polypeptide is a zinc metalloprotease.

  14. Expression of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus matrix metalloprotease enhances Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus virulence and can partially substitute for viral cathepsin

    PubMed Central

    Ishimwe, Egide; Hodgson, Jeffrey J.; Passarelli, A. Lorena

    2015-01-01

    The Cydia pomonella granulovirus open reading frame 46 (CpGV-ORF46) contains predicted domains found in matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. We showed that CpGV-MMP was active in vitro. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) expressing CpGV-ORF46 replicated similarly to a control virus lacking CpGV-ORF46 in cultured cells. The effects of AcMNPV expressing CpGV-MMP on virus infection in cultured cells and Trichoplusia ni larvae in the presence or absence of other viral degradative enzymes, cathepsin and chitinase, were evaluated. In the absence of cathepsin and chitinase or cathepsin alone, larval time of death was significantly delayed. This delay was compensated by the expression of CpGV-MMP. CpGV-MMP was also able to promote larvae melanization in the absence of cathepsin and chitinase. In addition, CpGV-MMP partially substituted for cathepsin in larvae liquefaction when chitinase, which is usually retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, was engineered to be secreted. PMID:25795312

  15. Altered Chloroplast Development and Delayed Fruit Ripening Caused by Mutations in a Zinc Metalloprotease at the lutescent2 Locus of Tomato1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Cornelius S.; Aldridge, Georgina M.; Herzog, Gal; Ma, Qian; McQuinn, Ryan P.; Hirschberg, Joseph; Giovannoni, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloroplast is the site of photosynthesis in higher plants but also functions as the center of synthesis for primary and specialized metabolites including amino acids, fatty acids, starch, and diverse isoprenoids. Mutants that disrupt aspects of chloroplast function represent valuable tools for defining structural and biochemical regulation of the chloroplast and its interplay with whole-plant structure and function. The lutescent1 (l1) and l2 mutants of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) possess a range of chlorophyll-deficient phenotypes including reduced rates of chlorophyll synthesis during deetiolation and enhanced rates of chlorophyll loss in leaves and fruits as they age, particularly in response to high-light stress and darkness. In addition, the onset of fruit ripening is delayed in lutescent mutants by approximately 1 week although once ripening is initiated they ripen at a normal rate and accumulation of carotenoids is not impaired. The l2 locus was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 10 and positional cloning revealed the existence of a premature stop codon in a chloroplast-targeted zinc metalloprotease of the M50 family that is homologous to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) gene ETHYLENE-DEPENDENT GRAVITROPISM DEFICIENT AND YELLOW-GREEN1. Screening of tomato germplasm identified two additional l2 mutant alleles. This study suggests a role for the chloroplast in mediating the onset of fruit ripening in tomato and indicates that chromoplast development in fruit does not depend on functional chloroplasts. PMID:22623517

  16. Caulobacter crescentus Synthesizes an S-Layer-Editing Metalloprotease Possessing a Domain Sharing Sequence Similarity with Its Paracrystalline S-Layer Protein

    PubMed Central

    Umelo-Njaka, Elizabeth; Bingle, Wade H.; Borchani, Faten; Le, Khai D.; Awram, Peter; Blake, Theo; Nomellini, John F.; Smit, John

    2002-01-01

    Strains of Caulobacter crescentus elaborate an S-layer, a two-dimensional protein latticework which covers the cell surface. The S-layer protein (RsaA) is secreted by a type I mechanism (relying on a C-terminal signal) and is unusual among type I secreted proteins because high levels of protein are produced continuously. In efforts to adapt the S-layer for display of foreign peptides and proteins, we noted a proteolytic activity that affected S-layer monomers with foreign inserts. The cleavage was precise, resulting in fragments with an unambiguous N-terminal sequence. We developed an assay to screen for loss of this activity (i.e., presentation of foreign peptides without degradation), using transposon and traditional mutagenesis. A metalloprotease gene designated sap (S-layer-associated protease) was identified which could complement the protease-negative mutants. The N-terminal half of Sap possessed significant similarity to other type I secreted proteases (e.g., alkaline protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa), including the characteristic RTX repeat sequences, but the C-terminal half which normally includes the type I secretion signal exhibited no such similarity. Instead, there was a region of significant similarity to the N-terminal region of RsaA. We hypothesize that Sap evolved by combining the catalytic portion of a type I secreted protease with an S-layer-like protein, perhaps to associate with nascent S-layer monomers to “scan” for modifications. PMID:11976300

  17. IFAP Syndrome Is Caused by Deficiency in MBTPS2, an Intramembrane Zinc Metalloprotease Essential for Cholesterol Homeostasis and ER Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Oeffner, Frank; Fischer, Gayle; Happle, Rudolf; König, Arne; Betz, Regina C.; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Neidel, Ulrike; del Carmen Boente, María; Redler, Silke; Romero-Gomez, Javier; Salhi, Aïcha; Vera-Casaño, Ángel; Weirich, Christian; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Ichthyosis follicularis with atrichia and photophobia (IFAP syndrome) is a rare X-linked, oculocutaneous human disorder. Here, we assign the IFAP locus to the 5.4 Mb region between DXS989 and DXS8019 on Xp22.11-p22.13 and provide evidence that missense mutations exchanging highly conserved amino acids of membrane-bound transcription factor protease, site 2 (MBTPS2) are associated with this phenotype. MBTPS2, a membrane-embedded zinc metalloprotease, activates signaling proteins involved in sterol control of transcription and ER stress response. Wild-type MBTPS2 was able to complement the protease deficiency in Chinese hamster M19 cells as shown by induction of an SRE-regulated reporter gene in transient transfection experiments and by growth of stably transfected cells in media devoid of cholesterol and lipids. These functions were impaired in five mutations as detected in unrelated patients. The degree of diminished activity correlated with clinical severity as noted in male patients. Our findings indicate that the phenotypic expression of IFAP syndrome is quantitatively related to a reduced function of a key cellular regulatory system affecting cholesterol homeostasis and ability to cope with ER stress. PMID:19361614

  18. The metalloprotease SepA governs processing of accumulation-associated protein and shapes intercellular adhesive surface properties in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Paharik, Alexandra E; Kotasinska, Marta; Both, Anna; Hoang, Tra-My N; Büttner, Henning; Roy, Paroma; Fey, Paul D; Horswill, Alexander R; Rohde, Holger

    2017-03-01

    The otherwise harmless skin inhabitant Staphylococcus epidermidis is a major cause of healthcare-associated medical device infections. The species' selective pathogenic potential depends on its production of surface adherent biofilms. The Cell wall-anchored protein Aap promotes biofilm formation in S. epidermidis, independently from the polysaccharide intercellular adhesin PIA. Aap requires proteolytic cleavage to act as an intercellular adhesin. Whether and which staphylococcal proteases account for Aap processing is yet unknown. Here, evidence is provided that in PIA-negative S. epidermidis 1457Δica, the metalloprotease SepA is required for Aap-dependent S. epidermidis biofilm formation in static and dynamic biofilm models. qRT-PCR and protease activity assays demonstrated that under standard growth conditions, sepA is repressed by the global regulator SarA. Inactivation of sarA increased SepA production, and in turn augmented biofilm formation. Genetic and biochemical analyses demonstrated that SepA-related induction of biofilm accumulation resulted from enhanced Aap processing. Studies using recombinant proteins demonstrated that SepA is able to cleave the A domain of Aap at residue 335 and between the A and B domains at residue 601. This study identifies the mechanism behind Aap-mediated biofilm maturation, and also demonstrates a novel role for a secreted staphylococcal protease as a requirement for the development of a biofilm. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Metalloprotease-mediated cleavage of PlexinD1 and its sequestration to actin rods in the motoneuron disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

    PubMed

    Rademacher, Sebastian; Verheijen, Bert M; Hensel, Niko; Peters, Miriam; Bora, Gamze; Brandes, Gudrun; Vieira de Sá, Renata; Heidrich, Natascha; Fischer, Silke; Brinkmann, Hella; van der Pol, W Ludo; Wirth, Brunhilde; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Claus, Peter

    2017-10-15

    Cytoskeletal rearrangement during axon growth is mediated by guidance receptors and their ligands which act either as repellent, attractant or both. Regulation of the actin cytoskeleton is disturbed in Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting mainly motoneurons, but receptor-ligand interactions leading to the dysregulation causing SMA are poorly understood. In this study, we analysed the role of the guidance receptor PlexinD1 in SMA pathogenesis. We showed that PlexinD1 is cleaved by metalloproteases in SMA and that this cleavage switches its function from an attractant to repellent. Moreover, we found that the PlexinD1 cleavage product binds to actin rods, pathological aggregate-like structures which had so far been described for age-related neurodegenerative diseases. Our data suggest a novel disease mechanism for SMA involving formation of actin rods as a molecular sink for a cleaved PlexinD1 fragment leading to dysregulation of receptor signaling. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Comparative analysis and clinical value of the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors by intratumour stromal mononuclear inflammatory cells and those at the invasive front of breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    González, Luis O; González-Reyes, Salomé; Marín, Laura; González, Lucía; González, José M; Lamelas, Maria L; Merino, Antonio M; Rodríguez, Elena; Pidal, Iván; del Casar, José M; Andicoechea, Alejandro; Vizoso, Francisco

    2010-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs) play an essential role in the degradation of stromal connective tissue and basement membrane components. The aim of this study was to determine whether the dynamic analysis of these components can help to predict tumour aggressiveness. An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against MMPs -1, -2, -7, -9, -11, -13 and -14 and TIMPs -1, -2 and -3. More than 5000 determinations on cancer specimens from 124 patients with invasive breast cancer were performed on the tumour centre core as well as on the invasive front. Immunostaining for MMPs/TIMPs on mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) was evaluated. To identify specific groups of tumours with distinct expression profiles, data obtained from both MICs populations were analysed by unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. When compared with MICs at the invasive front, intratumour MICs more frequently showed expression of MMP-7 and -1 and TIMP-3, but less frequently expression of MMP-9 and -11 and TIMP-2. Our data led us to consider the need of further studies in order to identify subsets of MICs and other protein elements of the microenvironment as attractive targets for new therapeutic strategies against cancer. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  1. Self-cleavage of Human CLCA1 Protein by a Novel Internal Metalloprotease Domain Controls Calcium-activated Chloride Channel Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T.; Scheaffer, Suzanne M.; Roswit, William T.; Alevy, Yael G.; Patel, Anand C.; Heier, Richard F.; Romero, Arthur G.; Nichols, Colin G.; Holtzman, Michael J.; Brett, Tom J.

    2012-01-01

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface. PMID:23112050

  2. Self-cleavage of human CLCA1 protein by a novel internal metalloprotease domain controls calcium-activated chloride channel activation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Zeynep; Sala-Rabanal, Monica; Randolph, David T; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Roswit, William T; Alevy, Yael G; Patel, Anand C; Heier, Richard F; Romero, Arthur G; Nichols, Colin G; Holtzman, Michael J; Brett, Tom J

    2012-12-07

    The chloride channel calcium-activated (CLCA) family are secreted proteins that regulate both chloride transport and mucin expression, thus controlling the production of mucus in respiratory and other systems. Accordingly, human CLCA1 is a critical mediator of hypersecretory lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cystic fibrosis, that manifest mucus obstruction. Despite relevance to homeostasis and disease, the mechanism of CLCA1 function remains largely undefined. We address this void by showing that CLCA proteins contain a consensus proteolytic cleavage site recognized by a novel zincin metalloprotease domain located within the N terminus of CLCA itself. CLCA1 mutations that inhibit self-cleavage prevent activation of calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC)-mediated chloride transport. CaCC activation requires cleavage to unmask the N-terminal fragment of CLCA1, which can independently gate CaCCs. Gating of CaCCs mediated by CLCA1 does not appear to involve proteolytic cleavage of the channel because a mutant N-terminal fragment deficient in proteolytic activity is able to induce currents comparable with that of the native fragment. These data provide both a mechanistic basis for CLCA1 self-cleavage and a novel mechanism for regulation of chloride channel activity specific to the mucosal interface.

  3. The extracellular metalloprotease AdamTS-A anchors neural lineages in place within and preserves the architecture of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Skeath, James B; Wilson, Beth A; Romero, Selena E; Snee, Mark J; Zhu, Yi; Lacin, Haluk

    2017-09-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell migration and sculpts organ shape. AdamTS proteins are extracellular metalloproteases known to modify ECM proteins and promote cell migration, but demonstrated roles for AdamTS proteins in regulating CNS structure and ensuring cell lineages remain fixed in place have not been uncovered. Using forward genetic approaches in Drosophila, we find that reduction of AdamTS-A function induces both the mass exodus of neural lineages out of the CNS and drastic perturbations to CNS structure. Expressed and active in surface glia, AdamTS-A acts in parallel to perlecan and in opposition to viking/collagen IV and βPS-integrin to keep CNS lineages rooted in place and to preserve the structural integrity of the CNS. viking/collagen IV and βPS-integrin are known to promote tissue stiffness and oppose the function of perlecan, which reduces tissue stiffness. Our work supports a model in which AdamTS-A anchors cells in place and preserves CNS architecture by reducing tissue stiffness. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Analysis of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype A Metalloprotease Inhibitors: Analogs of a Chemotype for Therapeutic Development in the Context of a Three-Zone Pharmacophore

    PubMed Central

    Burnett, James C.; Li, Bing; Pai, Ramdas; Cardinale, Steven C.; Butler, Michelle M.; Peet, Norton P.; Moir, Donald; Bavari, Sina; Bowlin, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), and in particular serotype A, are the most poisonous of known biological substances, and are responsible for the flaccid paralysis of the disease state botulism. Because of the extreme toxicity of these enzymes, BoNTs are considered highest priority biothreat agents. To counter BoNT serotype A (BoNT/A) poisoning, the discovery and development of small molecule, drug-like inhibitors as post-intoxication therapeutic agents has been/is being pursued. Specifically, we are focusing on inhibitors of the BoNT/A light chain (LC) (ie, a metalloprotease) subunit, since such compounds can enter neurons and provide post-intoxication protection of the enzyme target substrate. To aid/facilitate this drug development effort, a pharmacophore for inhibition of the BoNT/A LC subunit was previously developed, and is continually being refined via the incorporation of novel and diverse inhibitor chemotypes. Here, we describe several analogs of a promising therapeutic chemotype in the context of the pharmacophore for BoNT/A LC inhibition. Specifically, we describe: 1) the pharmacophoric ‘fits’ of the analogs and how these ‘fits’ rationalize the in vitro inhibitory potencies of the analogs and 2) pharmacophore refinement via the inclusion of new components from the most potent of the presented analogs. PMID:21103387

  5. Efficiency of first-trimester uterine artery Doppler, a-disintegrin and metalloprotease 12, pregnancy-associated plasma protein a, and maternal characteristics in the prediction of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Goetzinger, Katherine R; Zhong, Yan; Cahill, Alison G; Odibo, Linda; Macones, George A; Odibo, Anthony O

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the efficiency of first-trimester uterine artery Doppler, A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12), pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A), and maternal characteristics in the prediction of preeclampsia. We conducted a prospective cohort study of patients presenting for first-trimester aneuploidy screening between 11 and 14 weeks' gestation. Maternal serum ADAM12 and PAPP-A levels were measured by an immunoassay, and mean uterine artery Doppler pulsatility indices were calculated. Outcomes of interest included preeclampsia, early preeclampsia (defined as requiring delivery at <34 weeks' gestation), and gestational hypertension. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the prediction of preeclampsia using ADAM12 multiples of the median (MoM), PAPP-A MoM, and uterine artery Doppler pulsatility index MoM, either individually or in combination. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves were used to compare the screening efficiency of the models using nonparametric U statistics. Among 578 patients with complete outcome data, there were 54 cases of preeclampsia (9.3%) and 13 cases of early preeclampsia (2.2%). Median ADAM12 levels were significantly lower in patients who developed preeclampsia compared to those who did not (0.81 versus 1.01 MoM; P = .04). For a fixed false-positive rate of 10%, ADAM12, PAPP-A, and uterine artery Doppler parameters in combination with maternal characteristics identified 50%, 48%, and 52% of patients who developed preeclampsia, respectively. Combining these first-trimester parameters did not improve the predictive efficiency of the models. First-trimester ADAM12, PAPP-A, and uterine artery Doppler characteristics are not sufficiently predictive of preeclampsia. Combinations of these parameters do not further improve their screening efficiency.

  6. TH1/TH2 cytokine profile, metalloprotease-9 activity and hormonal status in pregnant rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    MUÑOZ-VALLE, J F; VÁZQUEZ-DEL MERCADO, M; GARCÍA-IGLESIAS, T; OROZCO-BAROCIO, G; BERNARD-MEDINA, G; MARTÍNEZ-BONILLA, G; BASTIDAS-RAMÍREZ, B E; NAVARRO, A D; BUENO, M; MARTÍNEZ-LÓPEZ, E; BEST-AGUILERA, C R; KAMACHI, M; ARMENDÁRIZ-BORUNDA, J

    2003-01-01

    During the course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), several immune and neuroendocrine changes associated with pregnancy may exert positive (amelioration) or negative (exacerbation) effects on the clinical outcome. In order to shed light on the mechanisms underlying these responses, we performed a prospective longitudinal study in RA and SLE pregnant women, including healthy pregnant women as a control group. Cytokine messenger RNA (mRNA) expression assessed by quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), cytokine levels and lymphocyte proliferation responses (LPR) following phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation of PBMC, plasma metalloprotease-9 activity (MMP-9) and hormonal status during pregnancy were determined. TNFa was the most abundant cytokine mRNA expressed in PBMC in all groups studied (healthy pregnant women, RA and SLE pregnant patients). However, a general TH2 response reflected by high IL-10 levels was found in RA, as well as SLE, patients. A significant change in IFN-γ was observed in RA patients but only during the first trimester of pregnancy. This compared with a major TH1 response in healthy pregnant women. Interestingly, our study showed a homogeneous hormonal pattern in RA and SLE patients. Although decreased cortisol levels were observed in all patients studied, this is possibly related to the remission of disease activity status brought about by steroid treatment before and during pregnancy. In summary, we suggest that complex immune and hormonal networks are involved in pregnancy and that rheumatic diseases are very dynamic immune processes that cannot be described with a clear-cut cytokine profile. Furthermore, the observations in this study may reflect treatment-related immune effects more than those associated with disease. PMID:12562402

  7. Adamts5, the gene encoding a proteoglycan-degrading metalloprotease, is expressed by specific cell lineages during mouse embryonic development and in adult tissues

    PubMed Central

    McCulloch, Daniel R.; Le Goff, Carine; Bhatt, Sumantha; Dixon, Laura J.; Sandy, John D.; Apte, Suneel S.

    2009-01-01

    The secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS5 is implicated in destruction of the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan in arthritis, but its physiological functions are unknown. Its expression profile during embryogenesis and in adult tissues is therefore of considerable interest. β-galactosidase (β-gal) histochemistry, enabled by a LacZ cassette inserted in the Adamts5 locus, and validated by in situ hybridization with an Adamts5 cRNA probe and ADAMTS5 immunohistochemistry, was used to profile Adamts5 expression during mouse embryogenesis and in adult mouse tissues. Embryonic expression was scarce prior to 11.5 days of gestation (E11.5) and noted only in the floor plate of the developing brain at E9.5. After E 11.5 there was continued expression in brain, especially in the choroid plexus, peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia, cranial nerve ganglia, spinal and cranial nerves, and neural plexuses of the gut. In addition to nerves, developing limbs have Adamts5 expression in skeletal muscle (from E13.5), tendons (from E16.5), and inter-digital mesenchyme of the developing autopod (E13.5–15.5). In adult tissues, there is constitutive Adamts5 expression in arterial smooth muscle cells, mesothelium lining the peritoneal, pericardial and pleural cavities, smooth muscle cells in bronchii and pancreatic ducts, glomerular mesangial cells in the kidney, dorsal root ganglia, and in Schwann cells of the peripheral and autonomic nervous system. Expression of Adamts5 during neuromuscular development and in smooth muscle cells coincides with the broadly distributed proteoglycan versican, an ADAMTS5 substrate. These observations suggest the major contexts in which developmental and physiological roles could be sought for this protease. PMID:19250981

  8. Effects of chondroitin and glucosamine sulfate in a dietary bar formulation on inflammation, interleukin-1beta, matrix metalloprotease-9, and cartilage damage in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chou, May M; Vergnolle, Nathalie; McDougall, Jason J; Wallace, John L; Marty, Stephanie; Teskey, Val; Buret, Andre G

    2005-04-01

    This study examined the effects of chondroitin sulfate (CS) alone and CS plus glucosamine sulfate (GS) in a dietary bar formulation on inflammatory parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis and on the synthesis of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9). Following 25 days pretreatment with dietary bars containing either CS alone, CS plus GS, or neither CS nor GS, rats were either sham injected or injected with Freund's complete adjuvant into the tail vein. Rats were fed their respective bars for another 17 days after inoculation. Parameters of disease examined included clinical score (combination of joint temperature, edema, hyperalgesia, and standing and walking limb function), incidence of disease, levels of IL-1beta in the serum and paw joints, levels of MMP-9 in the paw joints, paw joint histology, and joint cartilage thickness. Treatment with CS plus GS, but not CS alone, significantly reduced clinical scores, incidences of disease, joint temperatures, and joint and serum IL-1beta levels. Treatment with CS alone and CS plus GS inhibited the production of edema and prevented raised levels of joint MMP-9 associated with arthritis. Similarly, CS alone and CS plus GS treatment also prevented the development of cartilage damage associated with arthritis. Combination CS plus GS treatment in a dietary bar formulation ameliorates clinical, inflammatory, and histologic parameters of adjuvant-induced arthritis. The benefits of CS and GS in combination are more pronounced than those of CS alone. The reduction of arthritic disease by CS plus GS is associated with a reduction of IL-1beta and MMP-9 synthesis.

  9. Critical role of matrix metalloprotease-9 in chronic high fat diet-induced cerebral vascular remodelling and increase of ischaemic brain injury in mice†

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jiao; Zhang, Junfeng; Feng, Chenzhuo; Xiong, Lize; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2014-01-01

    Aims About one-third of American adults and 20% of teenagers are obese. Obesity and its associated metabolic disturbances including hyperlipidaemia are risk factors for cardiovascular diseases including stroke. They can worsen neurological outcome after stroke. We determined whether obesity and hyperlipidaemia could induce cerebral vascular remodelling via matrix metalloproteases (MMP) and whether this remodelling affected neurological outcome after brain ischaemia. Methods and results Six-week-old male CD1, C57BL/6J, and MMP-9−/− mice were fed regular diet (RD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 10 weeks. They were subjected to vascular casting or a 90 min middle cerebral arterial occlusion (MCAO). Mice on HFD were heavier and had higher blood glucose and lipid levels than those on RD. HFD-fed CD1 and C57BL/6J mice had an increased cerebral vascular tortuosity index and decreased inner diameters of the middle cerebral arterial root. HFD increased microvessel density in CD1 mouse cerebral cortex. After MCAO, CD1 and C57BL/6J mice on HFD had a bigger infarct volume, more severe brain oedema and blood–brain barrier damage, higher haemorrhagic transformation rate, greater haemorrhagic volume, and worse neurological function. HFD increased MMP-9 activity in the ischaemic and non-ischaemic brain tissues. Although HFD increased the body weights, blood glucose, and lipid levels in the MMP-9−/− mice on a C57BL/6J genetic background, the HFD-induced cerebral vascular remodelling and worsening of neurological outcome did not occur in these mice. Conclusion HFD induces cerebral vascular remodelling and worsens neurological outcome after transient focal brain ischaemia. MMP-9 activation plays a critical role in these HFD effects. PMID:24935427

  10. A Disintegrin and Metalloprotease (ADAM) 10 and ADAM17 Are Major Sheddases of T Cell Immunoglobulin and Mucin Domain 3 (Tim-3)*

    PubMed Central

    Möller-Hackbarth, Katja; Dewitz, Christin; Schweigert, Olga; Trad, Ahmad; Garbers, Christoph; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 3 (Tim-3) dampens the response of CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells via induction of cell death and/or T cell exhaustion and enhances the ability of macrophages to clear pathogens via binding to galectin 9. Here we provide evidence that human Tim-3 is a target of A disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM)-mediated ectodomain shedding resulting in a soluble form of Tim-3. We identified ADAM10 and ADAM17 as major sheddases of Tim-3 as shown by ADAM-specific inhibitors and the ADAM10 pro-domain in HEK293 cells and ADAM10/ADAM17-deficient murine embryonic fibroblasts. PMA-induced shedding of Tim-3 was abrogated by deletion of amino acids Glu181–Asp190 of the stalk region and Tim-3 lacking the intracellular domain was not efficiently cleaved after PMA stimulation. Surprisingly, a single lysine residue within the intracellular domain rescues shedding of Tim-3. Shedding of endogenous Tim-3 was found in primary human CD14+ monocytes after PMA and ionomycin stimulation. Importantly, the recently described down-regulation of Tim-3 from Toll-like receptor-activated CD14+ monocytes was caused by ADAM10- and ADAM17-mediated shedding. Inhibition of Tim-3 shedding from lipopolysaccharide-induced monocytes did not influence lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα and IL-6 but increases IL-12 expression. In summary, we describe Tim-3 as novel target for ADAM-mediated ectodomain shedding and suggest a role of Tim-3 shedding in TLR-mediated immune responses of CD14+ monocytes. PMID:24121505

  11. Evidence for Cleavage of the Metalloprotease Vsm from Vibrio splendidus Strain JZ6 by an M20 Peptidase (PepT-like Protein) at Low Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Qiu, Limei; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Metalloprotease Vsm is a major extracellular virulence factor of Vibrio splendidus. The toxicity of Vsm from V. splendidus strain JZ6 has been characterized, and production of this virulence factor proved to be temperature-regulated. The present study provides evidence that two forms (JZE1 and JZE2) of Vsm protein exist in extracellular products (ECPs) of strain JZ6, and a significant conversion of these two forms was detected by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analyses of samples obtained from cells grown at 4, 10, 16, 20, 24, and 28°C. Mass spectroscopy confirmed that JZE1 was composed only of the peptidase_M4 domain of Vsm, and JZE2 contained both the PepSY domain and the peptidase_M4 domain. An M20 peptidase T-like protein (PepTL) was screened from the transcriptome data of strain JZ6, which was considered as a crucial molecule to produce the active Vsm (JZE1) by cleavage of the propeptide. Similar to that of Vsm, PepTL mRNA accumulation was highest at 4°C (836.82-fold of that at 28°C), decreased with increasing of temperature and reached its lowest level at 28°C. Deletion of the gene encoding the PepTL resulted in a mutant strain that did not produce the JZE1 cleavage product. The peptidase activity of PepTL recombinant protein (rPepTL) was confirmed by cleaving the Vsm in ECPs with an in vitro degradation reaction. These results demonstrate that PepTL participates in activating Vsm in strain JZ6 by proteolytic cleavage at low temperature. PMID:27826294

  12. Matrix Metalloprotease 3 Activity Supports Hippocampal EPSP-to-Spike Plasticity Following Patterned Neuronal Activity via the Regulation of NMDAR Function and Calcium Flux.

    PubMed

    Brzdąk, Patrycja; Włodarczyk, Jakub; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W; Wójtowicz, Tomasz

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) comprise a family of endopeptidases that are involved in remodeling the extracellular matrix and play a critical role in learning and memory. At least 24 different MMP subtypes have been identified in the human brain, but less is known about the subtype-specific actions of MMP on neuronal plasticity. The long-term potentiation (LTP) of excitatory synaptic transmission and scaling of dendritic and somatic neuronal excitability are considered substrates of memory storage. We previously found that MMP-3 and MMP-2/9 may be differentially involved in shaping the induction and expression of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)-to-spike (E-S) potentiation in hippocampal brain slices. MMP-3 and MMP-2/9 proteolysis was previously shown to affect the integrity or mobility of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in vitro. However, the functional outcome of such MMP-NMDAR interactions remains largely unknown. The present study investigated the role of these MMP subtypes in E-S plasticity and NMDAR function in mouse hippocampal acute brain slices. The temporal requirement for MMP-3/NMDAR activity in E-S potentiation within the CA1 field largely overlapped, and MMP-3 but not MMP-2/9 activity was crucial for the gain-of-function of NMDARs following LTP induction. Functional changes in E-S plasticity following MMP-3 inhibition largely correlated with the expression of cFos protein, a marker of activity-related gene transcription. Recombinant MMP-3 promoted a gain in NMDAR-mediated field potentials and somatodendritic Ca(2+) waves. These results suggest that long-term hippocampal E-S potentiation requires transient MMP-3 activity that promotes NMDAR-mediated postsynaptic Ca(2+) entry that is vital for the activation of downstream signaling cascades and gene transcription.

  13. Acute morphine activates satellite glial cells and up-regulates IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia in mice via matrix metalloprotease-9

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Activation of spinal cord glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes has been shown to regulate chronic opioid-induced antinociceptive tolerance and hyperalgesia, due to spinal up-regulation of the proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) has been implicated in IL-1β activation in neuropathic pain. However, it is unclear whether acute opioid treatment can activate glial cells in the peripheral nervous system. We examined acute morphine-induced activation of satellite glial cells (SGCs) and up-regulation of IL-1β in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs), and further investigated the involvement of MMP-9 in these opioid-induced peripheral changes. Results Subcutaneous morphine injection (10 mg/kg) induced robust peripheral glial responses, as evidenced by increased GFAP expression in DRGs but not in spinal cords. The acute morphine-induced GFAP expression is transient, peaking at 2 h and declining after 3 h. Acute morphine treatment also increased IL-1β immunoreactivity in SGCs and IL-1β activation in DRGs. MMP-9 and GFAP are expressed in DRG neurons and SGCs, respectively. Confocal analysis revealed a close proximity of MMP-9 and GFAP immunostaining. Importantly, morphine-induced DRG up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation was abolished after Mmp9 deletion or naloxone pre-treatment. Finally, intrathecal injections of IL-1β-selective siRNA not only reduced DRG IL-1β expression but also prolonged acute morphine-induced analgesia. Conclusions Acute morphine induces opioid receptors- and MMP-9-dependent up-regulation of GFAP expression and IL-1β activation in SGCs of DRGs. MMP-9 could mask and shorten morphine analgesia via peripheral neuron-glial interactions. Targeting peripheral glial activation might prolong acute opioid analgesia. PMID:22439811

  14. Evidence for Cleavage of the Metalloprotease Vsm from Vibrio splendidus Strain JZ6 by an M20 Peptidase (PepT-like Protein) at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Qiu, Limei; Cheng, Qi; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    Metalloprotease Vsm is a major extracellular virulence factor of Vibrio splendidus. The toxicity of Vsm from V. splendidus strain JZ6 has been characterized, and production of this virulence factor proved to be temperature-regulated. The present study provides evidence that two forms (JZE1 and JZE2) of Vsm protein exist in extracellular products (ECPs) of strain JZ6, and a significant conversion of these two forms was detected by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting analyses of samples obtained from cells grown at 4, 10, 16, 20, 24, and 28°C. Mass spectroscopy confirmed that JZE1 was composed only of the peptidase_M4 domain of Vsm, and JZE2 contained both the PepSY domain and the peptidase_M4 domain. An M20 peptidase T-like protein (PepTL) was screened from the transcriptome data of strain JZ6, which was considered as a crucial molecule to produce the active Vsm (JZE1) by cleavage of the propeptide. Similar to that of Vsm, PepTL mRNA accumulation was highest at 4°C (836.82-fold of that at 28°C), decreased with increasing of temperature and reached its lowest level at 28°C. Deletion of the gene encoding the PepTL resulted in a mutant strain that did not produce the JZE1 cleavage product. The peptidase activity of PepTL recombinant protein (rPepTL) was confirmed by cleaving the Vsm in ECPs with an in vitro degradation reaction. These results demonstrate that PepTL participates in activating Vsm in strain JZ6 by proteolytic cleavage at low temperature.

  15. Characterization of a metalloprotease from ovine chromaffin granules which cleaves a proenkephalin fragment (BAM12P) at a single arginine residue.

    PubMed Central

    Tezapsidis, N; Parish, D C

    1994-01-01

    A metalloprotease has been identified in ovine chromaffin granules which cleaves the proenkephalin fragment BAM12P to produce adrenorphin-Gly. This cleavage occurs at a single arginine residue and is an intermediate step in the production of the opiate adrenorphin in vivo. The identity of the product was confirmed by reverse-phase and ion-exchange chromatography. The adrenorphin-Gly-generating enzyme (AGE) was determined by chromatofocusing to have a pI value of 5.2 and bound strongly to a metal-chelate affinity column. After purification by gel-filtration and ion-exchange chromatography AGE was free of contaminating activities, as cleavage of radiolabelled BAM12P generated a single product as judged by reverse-phase and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme has a molecular mass of approx. 45 kDa and a pH optimum of 8.6 in Mops, Taps and Hepes buffers, but was inhibited by phosphate buffers. It was inhibited by micromolar concentrations of copper and zinc ions, but not by millimolar concentrations of calcium or manganese ions. The addition of BAM22P, dynorphin 1-13 or dynorphin 1-8 to the incubation mixture inhibited the cleavage of radiolabelled BAM12P. The cleavage was also inhibited by the presence of catecholamines at concentrations similar to those found within the chromaffin granule. This may explain the known effect of reserpine on chromaffin cells of reducing catecholamine levels and simultaneously increasing adrenorphin levels. It may also indicate a function for AGE and adrenorphin as reporters of intragranular conditions. Images Figure 1 PMID:8043007

  16. Residues in Conserved Loops of Intramembrane Metalloprotease SpoIVFB Interact with Residues near the Cleavage Site in Pro-σK

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Luethy, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Intramembrane metalloproteases (IMMPs) control critical biological processes by cleaving membrane-associated proteins within a transmembrane segment or at a site near the membrane surface. Phylogenetic analysis divides IMMPs into four groups. SpoIVFB is a group III IMMP that regulates Bacillus subtilis endospore formation by cleaving Pro-σK and releasing the active sigma factor from a membrane. To elucidate the enzyme-substrate interaction, single-cysteine versions of catalytically inactive SpoIVFB and C-terminally truncated Pro-σK(1-126) (which can be cleaved by active SpoIVFB) were coexpressed in Escherichia coli, and proximity was tested by disulfide cross-linking in vivo. As expected, the results provided evidence that catalytic residue Glu-44 of SpoIVFB is near the cleavage site in the substrate. Also near the cleavage site were two residues of SpoIVFB in predicted conserved loops; Pro-135 in a short loop and Val-70 in a longer loop. Pro-135 corresponds to Pro-399 of RseP, a group I IMMP, and Pro-399 was reported previously to interact with substrate near the cleavage site, suggesting a conserved interaction across IMMP subfamilies. Val-70 follows a newly recognized conserved motif, PXGG (X is a large hydrophobic residue), which is in a hydrophobic region predicted to be a membrane reentrant loop. Following the hydrophobic region is a negatively charged region that is conserved in IMMPs of groups I and III. At least two residues with a negatively charged side chain are required in this region for activity of SpoIVFB. The region exhibits other features in IMMPs of groups II and IV. Its possible roles, as well as that of the short loop, are discussed. New insights into IMMP-substrate interaction build toward understanding how IMMPs function and may facilitate manipulation of their activity. PMID:23995631

  17. Caveolin-1-dependent activation of the metalloprotease TACE/ADAM17 by TGF-β in hepatocytes requires activation of Src and the NADPH oxidase NOX1.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Càceres, Joaquim; Mainez, Jèssica; Mayoral, Rafael; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Egea, Gustavo; Fabregat, Isabel

    2016-04-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) plays a dual role in hepatocytes, inducing both pro- and anti-apoptotic responses, the balance between which decides cell fate. Survival signals are mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, which is activated by TGF-β. We have previously shown that caveolin-1 (CAV1) is required for activation of the metalloprotease tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α-converting enzyme/a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (TACE/ADAM17), and hence transactivation of the EGFR pathway. The specific mechanism by which TACE/ADAM17 is activated has not yet been determined. Here we show that TGF-β induces phosphorylation of sarcoma kinase (Src) in hepatocytes, a process that is impaired in Cav1(-/-) hepatocytes, coincident with a decrease in phosphorylated Src in detergent-resistant membrane fractions. TGF-β-induced activation of TACE/ADAM17 and EGFR phosphorylation were blocked using the Src inhibitor PP2. Cav1(+/+) hepatocytes showed early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by TGF-β, which was not seen in Cav1(-/-) cells. Production of ROS was inhibited by both the NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) inhibitor STK301831 and NOX1 knock-down, which also impaired TACE/ADAM17 activation and thus EGFR phosphorylation. Finally, neither STK301831 nor NOX1 silencing impaired Src phosphorylation, but PP2 blocked early ROS production, showing that Src is involved in NOX1 activation. As expected, inhibition of Src or NOX1 increased TGF-β-induced cell death in Cav1(+/+) cells. In conclusion, CAV1 is required for TGF-β-mediated activation of TACE/ADAM17 through a mechanism that involves phosphorylation of Src and NOX1-mediated ROS production.

  18. The hookworm tissue inhibitor of metalloproteases (Ac-TMP-1) modifies dendritic cell function and induces generation of CD4 and CD8 suppressor T cells.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar, Carmen; Wu, Wenhui; Mendez, Susana

    2009-05-19

    Hookworm infection is a major cause of disease burden for humans. Recent studies have described hookworm-related immunosuppression in endemic populations and animal models. A Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteases (Ac-TMP-1) has been identified as one of the most abundant proteins released by the adult parasite. We investigated the effect of recombinant Ac-TMP-1 on dendritic cell (DC) and T cell function. Splenic T cells from C57BL/6 mice injected with Ac-TMP-1 showed reduced proliferation to restimulation with anti CD3 or bystander antigens such as OVA. Incubation of bone marrow-derived DCs with Ac-TMP-1 decreased MHC Class I and, especially, Class II expression but increased CD86 and IL-10 expression. Co-incubation of splenic T cells with DCs pulsed with Ac-TMP-1 induced their differentiation into CD4+ and, particularly, CD8+ CD25+Foxp3+ T cells that expressed IL-10. These cells were able to suppress proliferation of naïve and activated CD4+ T cells by TGF-Beta-dependent (CD4+ suppressors) or independent (CD8+ suppressors) mechanisms. Priming of DCs with non-hookworm antigens, such as OVA, did not result in the generation of suppressor T cells. These data indicate that Ac-TMP-1 initiates the development of a regulatory response through modifications in DC function and generation of suppressor T cells. This is the first report to propose a role of suppressor CD8+ T cells in gastrointestinal helminthic infections.

  19. Adamts5, the gene encoding a proteoglycan-degrading metalloprotease, is expressed by specific cell lineages during mouse embryonic development and in adult tissues.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Daniel R; Le Goff, Carine; Bhatt, Sumantha; Dixon, Laura J; Sandy, John D; Apte, Suneel S

    2009-06-01

    The secreted metalloprotease ADAMTS5 is implicated in destruction of the cartilage proteoglycan aggrecan in arthritis, but its physiological functions are unknown. Its expression profile during embryogenesis and in adult tissues is therefore of considerable interest. beta-Galactosidase (beta-gal) histochemistry, enabled by a LacZ cassette inserted in the Adamts5 locus, and validated by in situ hybridization with an Adamts5 cRNA probe and ADAMTS5 immunohistochemistry, was used to profile Adamts5 expression during mouse embryogenesis and in adult mouse tissues. Embryonic expression was scarce prior to 11.5 days of gestation (E11.5) and noted only in the floor plate of the developing brain at E 9.5. After E11.5 there was continued expression in brain, especially in the choroid plexus, peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglia, cranial nerve ganglia, spinal and cranial nerves, and neural plexuses of the gut. In addition to nerves, developing limbs have Adamts5 expression in skeletal muscle (from E13.5), tendons (from E16.5), and inter-digital mesenchyme of the developing autopod (E13.5-15.5). In adult tissues, there is constitutive Adamts5 expression in arterial smooth muscle cells, mesothelium lining the peritoneal, pericardial and pleural cavities, smooth muscle cells in bronchi and pancreatic ducts, glomerular mesangial cells in the kidney, dorsal root ganglia, and in Schwann cells of the peripheral and autonomic nervous system. Expression of Adamts5 during neuromuscular development and in smooth muscle cells coincides with the broadly distributed proteoglycan versican, an ADAMTS5 substrate. These observations suggest the major contexts in which developmental and physiological roles could be sought for this protease.

  20. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA coding for Astacus embryonic astacin, a member of the astacin family of metalloproteases from the crayfish Astacus astacus.

    PubMed

    Geier, G; Zwilling, R

    1998-05-01

    The astacin family of zinc endopeptidases was named after the digestive enzyme astacin isolated from the crayfish Astacus astacus. Employing a reverse transcription/PCR strategy with degenerate oligonucleotide primers specific for two signature seqences of the astacin family, we have isolated a 1602-bp cDNA from embryos of developing A. astacus eggs, which was designated Astacus embryonic astacin (AEA). This cDNA was found to code for an astacin-like protease domain which accounts for the N-terminal half of the predicted protein. The C-terminal half mainly consists of two complement subcomponent C1r/C1s/embryonic sea urchin protein Uegf/bone morphogenetic protein 1 (CUB) domains. The metalloprotease domain displays an amino acid sequence identity of 42% with astacin. A higher sequence similarity was found to astacin family members that act as hatching enzymes in different species, e.g. chorioallantoic membrane protein 1 (CAM-1; from quail) and Xenopus hatching enzyme (formerly UVS.2), both of which show 54% identity, and high and low choriolytic enzymes (HCE and LCE) from the teleost Oryzias latipes (52% and 48% identity, respectively). A relationship to astacin-like hatching enzymes is further supported by a phylogenetic analysis of the protease domains. Expression of AEA mRNA in developing embryos was found to be restricted to unhatched juveniles (larvae) during the last 8 days before hatching. AEA transcripts could not be detected in various tissues of adult animals or in eggs and embryos from an earlier developmental stage. AEA expression starts about 8 days prior to hatching, followed by a strong (18-fold) induction with a maximum at day 4 before hatching. Newly hatched juveniles were found not to express the AEA mRNA.

  1. Active Matrix Metalloprotease-9 Is Associated with the Collagen Capsule Surrounding the Madurella mycetomatis Grain in Mycetoma

    PubMed Central

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Kloezen, Wendy; Fahal, Ahmed H.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Madurella mycetomatis is the main causative organism of eumycetoma, a persistent, progressive granulomatous infection. After subcutaneous inoculation M. mycetomatis organizes itself in grains inside a granuloma with excessive collagen accumulation surrounding it. This could be contributing to treatment failure towards currently used antifungal agents. Due to their pivotal role in tissue remodelling, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) might be involved in this process. Local MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry while absolute serum levels of these enzymes were determined in mycetoma patients and healthy controls by performing ELISAs. The presence of active MMP was determined by gelatin zymography. We found that both MMP-2 and MMP-9 are expressed in the mycetoma lesion, but the absolute MMP-2, -9, and TIMP-1 serum levels did not significantly differ between patients and controls. However, active MMP-9 was found in sera of 36% of M. mycetomatis infected subjects, whereas this active form was absent in sera of controls (P<0.0001). MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 polymorphisms in mycetoma patients and healthy controls were determined through PCR-RFLP or sequencing. A higher T allele frequency in TIMP-1 (+372) SNP was observed in male M. mycetomatis mycetoma patients compared to controls. The presence of active MMP-9 in mycetoma patients suggest that MMP-9 is activated or synthesized by inflammatory cells upon M. mycetomatis infection. Inhibiting MMP-9 activity with doxycycline could prevent collagen accumulation in mycetoma, which in its turn might make the fungus more accessible to antifungal agents. PMID:24675764

  2. Active matrix metalloprotease-9 is associated with the collagen capsule surrounding the Madurella mycetomatis grain in mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Geneugelijk, Kirsten; Kloezen, Wendy; Fahal, Ahmed H; van de Sande, Wendy W J

    2014-03-01

    Madurella mycetomatis is the main causative organism of eumycetoma, a persistent, progressive granulomatous infection. After subcutaneous inoculation M. mycetomatis organizes itself in grains inside a granuloma with excessive collagen accumulation surrounding it. This could be contributing to treatment failure towards currently used antifungal agents. Due to their pivotal role in tissue remodelling, matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) and 9 (MMP-9) or tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP) might be involved in this process. Local MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry while absolute serum levels of these enzymes were determined in mycetoma patients and healthy controls by performing ELISAs. The presence of active MMP was determined by gelatin zymography. We found that both MMP-2 and MMP-9 are expressed in the mycetoma lesion, but the absolute MMP-2, -9, and TIMP-1 serum levels did not significantly differ between patients and controls. However, active MMP-9 was found in sera of 36% of M. mycetomatis infected subjects, whereas this active form was absent in sera of controls (P<0.0001). MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 polymorphisms in mycetoma patients and healthy controls were determined through PCR-RFLP or sequencing. A higher T allele frequency in TIMP-1 (+372) SNP was observed in male M. mycetomatis mycetoma patients compared to controls. The presence of active MMP-9 in mycetoma patients suggest that MMP-9 is activated or synthesized by inflammatory cells upon M. mycetomatis infection. Inhibiting MMP-9 activity with doxycycline could prevent collagen accumulation in mycetoma, which in its turn might make the fungus more accessible to antifungal agents.

  3. A phenotype from tumor stroma based on the expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors, associated with prognosis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eiró, Noemí; Fernandez-Garcia, Belen; Vázquez, Julio; del Casar, José M; González, Luis O; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to evaluate the impact of the phenotype of both mononuclear inflammatory cells (MICs) and cancer-associated fibroblast (CAFs) in early breast cancer patients, specifically assessed as to their expression of MMP/TIMP relative to their position within the tumor (i.e., localization at the tumor center or invasive front) and the occurrence of distant metastases.. An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue arrays and specific antibodies against matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)−1, −2, −7, −9, −11, −13 and −14, tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP)−1, −2 and −3, both at tumor center and at invasive front, in 107 patients with primary ductal invasive breast tumors. Data were analyzed by unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. Our results indicated that MMP-11 expression by MICs, and TIMP-2 expression by CAFs at either the tumor center or the invasive front, were the most potent independent prognostic factors for predicting the clinical outcome of patients. Using the unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis, we found well-defined clusters of cases identifying subgroups of tumors showing a high molecular profile of MMPs/TIMPs expression by stromal cells (CAFs and MICs), both at the tumor center and at the invasive front, which were strongly associated with a higher prevalence of distant metastasis. In addition, we found combinations of these clusters defining subpopulations of breast carcinomas differing widely in their clinical outcome. The results presented here identify biologic markers useful to categorize patients into different subgroups based on their tumor stroma, which may contribute to improved understanding of the prognosis of breast cancer patients. PMID:26140253

  4. Transcription factor KLF6 upregulates expression of metalloprotease MMP14 and subsequent release of soluble endoglin during vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; Blanco, Francisco J; Roqué, Mercè; Friedman, Scott L; Suzuki, Toru; Botella, Luisa M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    After endothelial injury, the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) translocates into the cell nucleus to regulate a variety of target genes involved in angiogenesis, vascular repair and remodeling, including components of the membrane transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) receptor complex such as endoglin and activin receptor-like kinase 1. The membrane metalloproteinase 14 (MMP14 or MT1-MMP) targets endoglin to release soluble endoglin and is involved in vascular inflammation and endothelial tubulogenesis. However, little is known about the regulation of MMP14 expression during vascular wounding. In vitro denudation of monolayers of human endothelial cell monolayers leads to an increase in the KLF6 gene transcriptional rate, followed by an upregulation of MMP14 and release of soluble endoglin. Concomitant with this process, MMP14 co-localizes with endoglin in the sprouting endothelial cells surrounding the wound border. MMP14 expression at mRNA and protein levels is increased by ectopic KLF6 and downregulated by KLF6 suppression in cultured endothelial cells. Moreover, after wire-induced endothelial denudation, Klf6 (+/-) mice show lower levels of MMP14 in their vasculature compared with their wild-type siblings. Ectopic cellular expression of KLF6 results in an increased transcription rate of MMP14, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays show that KLF6 interacts with MMP14 promoter in ECs, this interaction being enhanced during wound healing. Furthermore, KLF6 markedly increases the transcriptional activity of different reporter constructs of MMP14 gene promoter. These results suggest that KLF6 regulates MMP14 transcription and is a critical player of the gene expression network triggered during endothelial repair.

  5. The binding effectiveness of anti-r-disintegrin polyclonal antibodies against disintegrins and PII and PIII metalloproteases: An immunological survey of type A, B and A+B venoms from Mohave rattlesnakes.

    PubMed

    Cantú, Esteban; Mallela, Sahiti; Nyguen, Matthew; Báez, Raúl; Parra, Victoria; Johnson, Rachel; Wilson, Kyle; Suntravat, Montamas; Lucena, Sara; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Sánchez, Elda E

    2017-01-01

    Snake venoms are known to have different venom compositions and toxicity, but differences can also be found within populations of the same species contributing to the complexity of treatment of envenomated victims. One of the first well-documented intraspecies venom variations comes from the Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus). Initially, three types of venoms were described; type A venom is the most toxic as a result of ~45% Mojave toxin in the venom composition, type B lacks the Mojave toxin but contains over 50% of snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs). Also, type A+B venom contains a combination of Mojave toxin and SVMP. The use of an anti-disintegrin antibody in a simple Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) can be used to identify the difference between the venoms of the type A, B, and A+B Mohave rattlesnakes. This study implements the use of an anti-recombinant disintegrin polyclonal antibody (ARDPA) for the detection of disintegrins and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteases) in individual crude snake venoms of Mohave rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) of varying geographical locations. After correlation with Western blots, coagulation activity and LD50 data, it was determined that the antibody allows for a quick and cost-efficient identification of venom types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The binding effectiveness of anti-r-disintegrin polyclonal antibodies against disintegrins and PII and PIII metalloproteases: An immunological survey of type A, B and A + B venoms from Mohave rattlesnakes

    PubMed Central

    Cantú, Esteban; Mallela, Sahiti; Nyguen, Matthew; Báez, Raúl; Parra, Victoria; Johnson, Rachel; Wilson, Kyle; Suntravat, Montamas; Lucena, Sara; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Sánchez, Elda E.

    2016-01-01

    Snake venoms are known to have different venom compositions and toxicity, but differences can also be found within populations of the same species contributing to the complexity of treatment of envenomated victims. One of the first well-documented intraspecies venom variations comes from the Mohave rattlesnake (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus). Initially, three types of venoms were described; type A venom is the most toxic as a result of ~45% Mojave toxin in the venom composition, type B lacks the Mojave toxin but contains over 50% of snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs). Also, type A + B venom contains a combination of Mojave toxin and SVMP. The use of an anti-disintegrin antibody in a simple Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) can be used to identify the difference between the venoms of the type A, B, and A+B Mohave rattlesnakes. This study implements the use of an anti-recombinant disintegrin polyclonal antibody (ARDPA) for the detection of disintegrins and ADAMs (a disintegrin and metalloproteases) in individual crude snake venoms of Mohave rattlesnakes (Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus) of varying geographical locations. After correlation with Western blots, coagulation activity and LD50 data, it was determined that the antibody allows for a quick and cost-efficient identification of venom types. PMID:27989783

  7. Psychrobacter proteolyticus sp. nov., a psychrotrophic, halotolerant bacterium isolated from the Antarctic krill Euphausia superba Dana, excreting a cold-adapted metalloprotease.

    PubMed

    Denner, E B; Mark, B; Busse, H J; Turkiewicz, M; Lubitz, W

    2001-04-01

    An Antarctic marine bacterium (strain 116) excreting an extracellular cold-adapted metalloprotease was subjected to a detailed polyphasic taxonomic investigation. Strain 116 was previously isolated from the stomach of a specimen of the Antarctic krill Euphasia superba Dana and tentatively characterized as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116. The 16S rDNA sequence analysis showed that the strain is in fact related to species of the genus Psychrobacter, next to Psychrobacter glacincola (97.4% similarity). Sequence similarities between strain 116 and other Psychrobacter species ranged from 96.9% (with P. urativorans) to 95.4% (with P. immobilis). Key phenotypic characteristics as well as chemotaxonomic features of the bacterium were congruent with the description of the genus Psychrobacter i.e. cells were strictly aerobic, strongly oxidase-positive, psychrotrophic, halotolerant, gram-negative non-motile coccobacilli, with ubiquinone-8 as the main respiratory lipoquinone and 18:1 cis 9, 16:1 cis and 17:1 (omega8c being the predominant cellular fatty acids. The G+C content of the DNA was 43.6 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization studies showed that the relatedness between strain 116 and Psychrobacter glacinola is only 62.2%. Further differences were apparent in whole-cell SDS-PAGE protein pattern, cellular fatty acid profile and in a number of physiological and biochemical characteristics as well as in enzymatic activities. Tolerance to 5% bile salts, nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, acid production from carbohydrates, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, C4 esterase, C14 lipase and valine arylamidase were found to differentiate strain 116 from Psychrobacter glacincola. On the basis of this phenotypic and molecular evidences, strain 116, previously known as Sphingomonas paucimobilis 116, was recognized as a new species of the genus Psychrobacter for which the name Psychrobacter proteolyticus is proposed. Strain 116 has been deposited in the Collection de l'Institut Pasteur

  8. Isolation, characterization and molecular three-dimensional structural predictions of metalloprotease from a phytopathogenic fungus, Alternaria solani (Ell. and Mart.) Sor.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Murugesan; Chandrasekar, Raman; Chun, Se-Chul; Sathiyabama, Muthukrishnan

    2016-08-01

    The present study aims at isolation, identification, characterization and prediction of three-dimensional molecular architecture of a proteolytic enzyme from the early blight pathogen, Alternaria solani which are hypothesized to be a marker of phytopathogenicity. Maximum enzyme production by A. solani was observed in Czapex's Dox broth amended with 2% (w/v) casein than other inducer amendments. Results indicate that the enzyme remained highly active in a pH range of 7.0-10.0 and a temperature range of 45-50°C. The enzyme was strongly inhibited by EDTA, whereas phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and monovalent cations (Na(+), K(+)) had little effect. Metal ions such as MgSO4, CaCl2, KCl at 10 mM concentration showed a stimulatory effect (>85%) on protease activity. Matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time of flight/mass spectrometry analysis of partially purified enzyme revealed the presence of protease belonging to a keratinolytic protein (metalloprotease) of exopeptidase nature. Putative A. solani keratinolytic enzyme (AsK) is made up of 216 amino acid residues with molecular weight (MW) 24.5 kDa, having a molecular formula of C1094H1704N290O342S4. Ramachandran plot analysis of the protein residues falling into the most favored secondary structures was observed at 84.2%. The major protein structural blocks, 2-β-sheets, and 9-α-helices have a greater tendency to be conserved during the evolutionary process than do mere sequences of amino acids. Besides, AsK, model prediction showed the presence of a Zinc atom at helix regions (Helix 3, 6, 7: His(57), His(130), His(169), and Cys(123)). Thus, it can be concluded that the major proteinases of AsK are divalent cation-requiring metalloproteinases and make them potential targets of protease inhibitors designing. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Androgen receptor expresion in breast cancer: Relationship with clinicopathological characteristics of the tumors, prognosis, and expression of metalloproteases and their inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Luis O; Corte, Maria D; Vazquez, Julio; Junquera, Sara; Sanchez, Rosario; Alvarez, Ana C; Rodriguez, Juan C; Lamelas, Maria L; Vizoso, Francisco J

    2008-01-01

    Background In the present study we analyze, in patients with breast cancer, the tumor expression of androgen receptors (AR), its relationship with clinicopathological characteristics and with the expression of several matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) and their inhibitors (TIMPs), as well as with prognosis. Methods An immunohistochemical study was performed using tissue microarrays and specific antibodies against AR, MMPs -1, -2, -7, -9, -11, -13, -14, and TIMPs -1, -2 and -3. More than 2,800 determinations on tumor specimens from 111 patients with primary invasive ductal carcinoma of the breast (52 with axillary lymph node metastases and 59 without them) and controls were performed. Staining results were categorized using a score based on the intensity of the staining and a specific software program calculated the percentage of immunostained cells automatically. Results A total of 83 cases (74.8%) showed a positive immunostaining for AR, but with a wide variation in the staining score values. There were no significant associations between the total immunostaining scores for AR and any clinicopathological parameters. However, score values for MMP-1, -7 and -13, were significantly higher in AR-positive tumors than in AR-negative tumors. Likewise, when we considered the cellular type expressing each factor, we found that AR-positive tumors had a higher percentage of cases positive for MMP-1, -7, -11, and TIMP-2 in their malignant cells, as well as for MMP-1 in intratumoral fibroblasts. On the other hand, multivariate analysis demonstrated that patients with AR-positive tumors have a significant longer overall survival than those with AR-negative breast carcinomas (p = 0.03). Conclusion Our results confirm that AR are commonly expressed in breast cancer, and are correlated with the expression of some MMPs and TIMP-2. Although we found a specific value of AR expression to be a prognostic indicator in breast cancer, the functional role of AR in these neoplasms is still

  10. The Proteasomal Rpn11 Metalloprotease Suppresses Tombusvirus RNA Recombination and Promotes Viral Replication via Facilitating Assembly of the Viral Replicase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Prasanth, K. Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a “matchmaker” that brings the viral p92pol replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. IMPORTANCE RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA

  11. Semaphorin7A Promotion of Tumoral Growth and Metastasis in Human Oral Cancer by Regulation of G1 Cell Cycle and Matrix Metalloproteases: Possible Contribution to Tumoral Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Tomoaki; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Ogawara, Katsunori; Miyamoto, Isao; Saito, Kengo; Iyoda, Manabu; Suzuki, Takane; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Background Semaphorins (SEMAs) consist of a large family of secreted and membrane-anchored proteins that are important in neuronal pathfinding and axon guidance in selected areas of the developing nervous system. Of them, SEMA7A has been reported to have a chemotactic activity in neurogenesis and to be an immunomodulator; however, little is known about the relevance of SEMA7A in the behaviors of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Methods We evaluated SEMA7A expression in OSCC-derived cell lines and primary OSCC samples using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and semiquantitative immunohistochemistry (sq-IHC). In addition, SEMA7A knockdown cells (shSEMA7A cells) were used for functional experiments, including cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and migration assays. We also analyzed the clinical correlation between SEMA7A status and clinical behaviors in patients with OSCC. Results SEMA7A mRNA and protein were up-regulated significantly (P<0.05) in OSCC-derived cell lines compared with human normal oral keratinocytes. The shSEMA7A cells showed decreased cellular growth by cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase, resulting from up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (p21Cip1 and p27Kip1) and down-regulation of cyclins (cyclin D1, cyclin E) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6); and decreased invasiveness and migration activities by reduced secretion of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) (MMP-2, proMMP-2, pro-MMP-9), and expression of membrane type 1- MMP (MT1-MMP). We also found inactivation of the extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 and AKT pathways, an upstream molecule of cell-cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and reduced secretion of MMPs in shSEMA7A cells. sq-IHC showed that SEMA7A expression in the primary OSCCs was significantly (P = 0.001) greater than that in normal counterparts and was correlated with primary tumoral size (P = 0.0254) and regional lymph node metastasis (P = 0.0002). Conclusion Our

  12. New approach for separating Bacillus subtilis metalloprotease and alpha-amylase by affinity chromatography and for purifying neutral protease by hydrophobic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lauer, I; Bonnewitz, B; Meunier, A; Beverini, M

    2000-01-14

    Proteases are commonly used in the biscuit and cracker industry as processing aids. They cause moderate hydrolysis of gluten proteins and improve dough rheology to better control product texture and crunchiness. Commercial bacterial proteases are derived from Bacillus fermentation broth. As filtration and ultrafiltration are carried out as the only recovery steps, these preparations contain also alpha-amylase and beta-glucanase as the main side activities. The aim of this study is to purify and characterize the Bacillus subtilis metalloprotease from a commercial preparation, in order to study separately the impact of the protease activity with regards to its functionality on biscuit properties. Purification was achieved by means of affinity chromatography on Cibacron Blue and HIC as a polishing step. Affinity appeared to be the most appropriate matrix for large scale purification while ion exchange chromatography was inefficient in terms of recovery yields. The crude product was first loaded on a Hi Trap Blue column (34 microm, Pharmacia Biotech); elution was carried out with a gradient of NaCl in the presence of 1 mM ZnCl2. This step was only efficient in the presence of Zn cations, because this salt promoted both protease stabilization resulting in high recovery yields and also complexation of amylase units into dimers resulting in amylase retention on the column and a better separation of the 3 activities. Beta-glucanase was mostly non retained on the column and a part was coeluted with the protease. This protease fraction was then loaded on a Resource Phe column (15 microm, Pharmacia Biotech) in a last step of polishing. Elution was carried out with a linear gradient of 100-0% ammonium sulfate 1.3 M; protease was eluted at the beginning of the gradient and well separated from amylase and glucanase trace impurities. The homogeneity of the purified protease was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, which showed that its MW was about 38. pH and temperature optima were also

  13. Occurrence and evolution of the paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species.

    PubMed

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. The paralogous zinc metalloproteases IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD have been identified as crucial for virulence of the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae. This study maps the presence of the corresponding genes and enzyme activities in S

  14. Local Publications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Yvonne; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Annotates 30 local government publications that describe local community efforts to improve policing; find alternative ways of dealing with violence; attract businesses; preserve neighborhoods and buildings; provide open space; and improve employment opportunities. Several publications' statistics were based on 1990 census data. (KRN)

  15. Local gravitomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahid-Saless, Bahman

    1990-10-01

    In a simple two-body system, the gravitomagnetic components of the metric in the local quasi-inertial frame of one of the bodies is calculated. The local geometry in this frame which is freely falling along the geodesic but is directionally fixed with respect to distant stars is primarily defined by the gravitomagnetic components of the local metric. This metric serves to track down the various contributions from the local and distant source and thus provides further insight to the nature of gravitomagnetism. As a result it is shown that in the quasi-inertial frame geodetic precession is a gravitomagnetic phenomenon. Furthermore a connection between local gravitomagnetic effects and Einstein's principle of equivalence is established.

  16. The proteasomal Rpn11 metalloprotease suppresses tombusvirus RNA recombination and promotes viral replication via facilitating assembly of the viral replicase complex.

    PubMed

    Prasanth, K Reddisiva; Barajas, Daniel; Nagy, Peter D

    2015-03-01

    RNA viruses co-opt a large number of cellular proteins that affect virus replication and, in some cases, viral genetic recombination. RNA recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Tombusviruses and a yeast model host are used to identify cellular factors affecting RNA virus replication and RNA recombination. In this study, we have examined the role of the conserved Rpn11p metalloprotease subunit of the proteasome, which couples deubiquitination and degradation of proteasome substrates, in tombusvirus replication and recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and plants. Depletion or mutations of Rpn11p lead to the rapid formation of viral RNA recombinants in combination with reduced levels of viral RNA replication in yeast or in vitro based on cell extracts. Rpn11p interacts with the viral replication proteins and is recruited to the viral replicase complex (VRC). Analysis of the multifunctional Rpn11p has revealed that the primary role of Rpn11p is to act as a "matchmaker" that brings the viral p92(pol) replication protein and the DDX3-like Ded1p/RH20 DEAD box helicases into VRCs. Overexpression of Ded1p can complement the defect observed in rpn11 mutant yeast by reducing TBSV recombination. This suggests that Rpn11p can suppress tombusvirus recombination via facilitating the recruitment of the cellular Ded1p helicase, which is a strong suppressor of viral recombination, into VRCs. Overall, this work demonstrates that the co-opted Rpn11p, which is involved in the assembly of the functional proteasome, also functions in the proper assembly of the tombusvirus VRCs. RNA viruses evolve rapidly due to genetic changes based on mutations and RNA recombination. Viral genetic recombination helps viruses in an evolutionary arms race with the host's antiviral responses and facilitates adaptation of viruses to new hosts. Cellular factors affect viral RNA recombination, although the role

  17. Spatial localization of bacteria controls coagulation of human blood by 'quorum acting'.

    PubMed

    Kastrup, Christian J; Boedicker, James Q; Pomerantsev, Andrei P; Moayeri, Mahtab; Bian, Yao; Pompano, Rebecca R; Kline, Timothy R; Sylvestre, Patricia; Shen, Feng; Leppla, Stephen H; Tang, Wei-Jen; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-12-01

    Blood coagulation often accompanies bacterial infections and sepsis and is generally accepted as a consequence of immune responses. Though many bacterial species can directly activate individual coagulation factors, they have not been shown to directly initiate the coagulation cascade that precedes clot formation. Here we demonstrated, using microfluidics and surface patterning, that the spatial localization of bacteria substantially affects coagulation of human and mouse blood and plasma. Bacillus cereus and Bacillus anthracis, the anthrax-causing pathogen, directly initiated coagulation of blood in minutes when bacterial cells were clustered. Coagulation of human blood by B. anthracis required secreted zinc metalloprotease InhA1, which activated prothrombin and factor X directly (not via factor XII or tissue factor pathways). We refer to this mechanism as 'quorum acting' to distinguish it from quorum sensing--it does not require a change in gene expression, it can be rapid and it can be independent of bacterium-to-bacterium communication.

  18. Occurrence and Evolution of the Paralogous Zinc Metalloproteases IgA1 Protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Related Commensal Species

    PubMed Central

    Bek-Thomsen, Malene; Poulsen, Knud; Kilian, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The distribution, genome location, and evolution of the four paralogous zinc metalloproteases, IgA1 protease, ZmpB, ZmpC, and ZmpD, in Streptococcus pneumoniae and related commensal species were studied by in silico analysis of whole genomes and by activity screening of 154 representatives of 20 species. ZmpB was ubiquitous in the Mitis and Salivarius groups of the genus Streptococcus and in the genera Gemella and Granulicatella, with the exception of a fragmented gene in Streptococcus thermophilus, the only species with a nonhuman habitat. IgA1 protease activity was observed in all members of S. pneumoniae, S. pseudopneumoniae, S. oralis, S. sanguinis, and Gemella haemolysans, was variably present in S. mitis and S. infantis, and absent in S. gordonii, S. parasanguinis, S. cristatus, S. oligofermentans, S. australis, S. peroris, and S. suis. Phylogenetic analysis of 297 zmp sequences and representative housekeeping genes provided evidence for an unprecedented selection for genetic diversification of the iga, zmpB, and zmpD genes in S. pneumoniae and evidence of very frequent intraspecies transfer of entire genes and combination of genes. Presumably due to their adaptation to a commensal lifestyle, largely unaffected by adaptive mucosal immune factors, the corresponding genes in commensal streptococci have remained conserved. The widespread distribution and significant sequence diversity indicate an ancient origin of the zinc metalloproteases predating the emergence of the humanoid species. zmpB, which appears to be the ancestral gene, subsequently duplicated and successfully diversified into distinct functions, is likely to serve an important but yet unknown housekeeping function associated with the human host. PMID:23033471

  19. Stromal matrix metalloprotease-13 knockout alters Collagen I structure at the tumor-host interface and increases lung metastasis of C57BL/6 syngeneic E0771 mammary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Perry, Seth W; Schueckler, Jill M; Burke, Kathleen; Arcuri, Giuseppe L; Brown, Edward B

    2013-09-05

    Matrix metalloproteases and collagen are key participants in breast cancer, but their precise roles in cancer etiology and progression remain unclear. MMP13 helps regulate collagen structure and has been ascribed largely harmful roles in cancer, but some studies demonstrate that MMP13 may also protect against tumor pathology. Other studies indicate that collagen's organizational patterns at the breast tumor-host interface influence metastatic potential. Therefore we investigated how MMP13 modulates collagen I, a principal collagen subtype in breast tissue, and affects tumor pathology and metastasis in a mouse model of breast cancer. Tumors were implanted into murine mammary tissues, and their growth analyzed in Wildtype and MMP13 KO mice. Following extraction, tumors were analyzed for collagen I levels and collagen I macro- and micro-structural properties at the tumor-host boundary using immunocytochemistry and two-photon and second harmonic generation microscopy. Lungs were analyzed for metastases counts, to correlate collagen I changes with a clinically significant functional parameter. Statistical analyses were performed by t-test, analysis of variance, or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney tests as appropriate. We found that genetic ablation of host stromal MMP13 led to: 1. Increased mammary tumor collagen I content, 2. Marked changes in collagen I spatial organization, and 3. Altered collagen I microstructure at the tumor-host boundary, as well as 4. Increased metastasis from the primary mammary tumor to lungs. These results implicate host MMP13 as a key regulator of collagen I structure and metastasis in mammary tumors, thus making it an attractive potential therapeutic target by which we might alter metastatic potential, one of the chief determinants of clinical outcome in breast cancer. In addition to identifying stromal MMP13 is an important regulator of the tumor microenvironment and metastasis, these results also suggest that stromal MMP13 may protect against breast

  20. The Kell protein of the common K2 phenotype is a catalytically active metalloprotease, whereas the rare Kell K1 antigen is inactive. Identification of novel substrates for the Kell protein.

    PubMed

    Clapéron, Audrey; Rose, Christiane; Gane, Pierre; Collec, Emmanuel; Bertrand, Olivier; Ouimet, Tanja

    2005-06-03

    The Kell blood group is a highly polymorphic system containing over 20 different antigens borne by the protein Kell, a 93-kDa type II glycoprotein that displays high sequence homology with members of the M13 family of zinc-dependent metalloproteases whose prototypical member is neprilysin. Kell K1 is an antigen expressed in 9% of the Caucasian population, characterized by a point mutation (T193M) of the Kell K2 antigen, and located within a putative N-glycosylation consensus sequence. Recently, a recombinant, non-physiological, soluble form of Kell was shown to cleave Big ET-3 to produce the mature vasoconstrictive peptide. To better characterize the enzymatic activity of the Kell protein and the possible differences introduced by antigenic point mutations affecting post-translational processing, the membrane-bound forms of the Kell K1 and Kell K2 antigens were expressed either in K562 cells, an erythroid cell line, or in HEK293 cells, a non-erythroid system, and their pharmacological profiles and enzymatic specificities toward synthetic and natural peptides were evaluated. Results presented herein reveal that the two antigens possess considerable differences in their enzymatic activities, although not in their trafficking pattern. Indeed, although both antigens are expressed at the cell surface, Kell K1 protein is shown to be inactive, whereas the Kell K2 antigen binds neprilysin inhibitory compounds such as phosphoramidon and thiorphan with high affinity, cleaves the precursors of the endothelin peptides, and inactivates members of the tachykinin family with enzymatic properties resembling those of other members of the M13 family of metalloproteases to which it belongs.

  1. Localized Scleroderma

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of scleroderma which affects internal organs, called systemic sclerosis or, often incorrectly stated, as systemic scleroderma. Localized ... condition and to explain how it differs from systemic sclerosis, which is quite different and affects internal organs ...

  2. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Laxer, Ronald M; Zulian, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    Localized scleroderma, also known as morphoea, has a variety of clinical manifestations that can include systemic involvement. Early recognition, diagnosis and treatment may improve the long-term outcome. A large multicentre study coordinated by the Pediatric Rheumatology European Society has yielded important information on the epidemiology and clinical manifestations of juvenile localized scleroderma, especially as it pertains to systemic manifestations. Previous results using methotrexate and corticosteroids have been confirmed. Studies on phototherapy have also demonstrated efficacy. A new immunomodulator, imiquimod, has shown promise in an initial case series. Studies over the past year highlight the wide range of extracutaneous manifestations and different forms of localized scleroderma and suggest that treatment may be beneficial.

  3. Local Acausality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    A fair amount of recent scholarship has been concerned with correcting a supposedly wrong, but wide-spread, assessment of the consequences of the empirical falsification of Bell-type inequalities. In particular, it has been claimed that Bell-type inequalities follow from "locality tout court" without additional assumptions such as "realism" or "hidden variables". However, this line of reasoning conflates restrictions on the spatio-temporal relation between causes and their effects ("locality") and the assumption of a cause for every event ("causality"). It thus fails to recognize a substantial restriction of the class of theories that is falsified through Bell-type inequalities.

  4. Local Color.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Association of Classroom Teachers.

    Twenty-four local projects which are intended to serve as sources of ideas for professional group action are described in this pamphlet. The projects are reported within the framework of four areas of improving teaching. Under "professional development" projects are portrayed concerning the use of student tutors and the improvement of…

  5. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Kreuter, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Localized scleroderma (also called morphea) is a term encompassing a spectrum of sclerotic autoimmune diseases that primarily affect the skin, but also might involve underlying structures such as the fat, fascia, muscle, and bones. Its exact pathogenesis is still unknown, but several trigger factors in genetically predisposed individuals might initially lead to an immunologically triggered release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, resulting in a profound dysregulation of the connective tissue metabolism and ultimately to induction of fibrosis. To date, there are no specific serological markers available for localized scleroderma. Within the last years, several validated clinical scores have been introduced as potential outcome measures for the disease. Given the rarity of localized scleroderma, only few evidence-based therapeutical treatment options exist. So far, the most robust data is available for ultraviolet A1 phototherapy in disease that is restricted to the skin, and methotrexate alone or in combination with systemic corticosteroids in more severe disease that additionally affects extracutaneous structures. This practical review summarizes relevant information on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical subtypes and classifications, differential diagnoses, clinical scores and outcome measures, and current treatment strategies of localized scleroderma. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Local Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uehling, Barbara

    1996-01-01

    As critics complain about higher education's shortcomings, trustees may need to communicate their institution's economic, cultural, and intellectual contributions to the local community. The most obvious and easily understood benefit is purchasing power, but it also contributes to small business growth, individual quality of life, the social,…

  7. Local Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, M.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Not long after EDWIN HUBBLE established that galaxies are `island universes' similar to our home galaxy, the MILKY WAY, he realized that a few of these external galaxies are considerably closer to us than any others. In 1936 he first coined the term `Local Group' in his famous book The Realm of the Nebulae to identify our nearest galactic neighbors. More than 60 yr later, the galaxies of the Loca...

  8. Localized scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Tuffanelli, D L

    1998-03-01

    Localized scleroderma can be divided into three main subtypes: morphea, linear scleroderma, and generalized morphea. Plaque morphea usually has a good prognosis. Variants of morphea, including guttate morphea and atrophoderma of Pasini and Pierini, are seen. Linear scleroderma, whether involving an extremity or the face, is often associated with serological abnormalities. Cosmetic and functional prognosis may be poor. Therapy is usually ineffective. Generalized morphea may be difficult to differentiate from systemic scleroderma. However, progression to systemic scleroderma is uncommon.

  9. Synergistic Action of a Metalloprotease and a Serine Protease from Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici Cleaves Chitin-Binding Tomato Chitinases, Reduces Their Antifungal Activity, and Enhances Fungal Virulence.

    PubMed

    Jashni, Mansoor Karimi; Dols, Ivo H M; Iida, Yuichiro; Boeren, Sjef; Beenen, Henriek G; Mehrabi, Rahim; Collemare, Jérôme; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2015-09-01

    As part of their defense strategy against fungal pathogens, plants secrete chitinases that degrade chitin, the major structural component of fungal cell walls. Some fungi are not sensitive to plant chitinases because they secrete chitin-binding effector proteins that protect their cell wall against these enzymes. However, it is not known how fungal pathogens that lack chitin-binding effectors overcome this plant defense barrier. Here, we investigated the ability of fungal tomato pathogens to cleave chitin-binding domain (CBD)-containing chitinases and its effect on fungal virulence. Four tomato CBD chitinases were produced in Pichia pastoris and were incubated with secreted proteins isolated from seven fungal tomato pathogens. Of these, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici, Verticillium dahliae, and Botrytis cinerea were able to cleave the extracellular tomato chitinases SlChi1 and SlChi13. Cleavage by F. oxysporum removed the CBD from the N-terminus, shown by mass spectrometry, and significantly reduced the chitinase and antifungal activity of both chitinases. Both secreted metalloprotease FoMep1 and serine protease FoSep1 were responsible for this cleavage. Double deletion mutants of FoMep1 and FoSep1 of F. oxysporum lacked chitinase cleavage activity on SlChi1 and SlChi13 and showed reduced virulence on tomato. These results demonstrate the importance of plant chitinase cleavage in fungal virulence.

  10. Rehydrate locally.

    PubMed

    Djokoto, E

    1997-11-01

    In 1991, in the northern region of Ghana, during the cholera epidemic, 10 rural health centers replied to a questionnaire regarding cholera case referrals. The results were as follows: 6 centers referred serious cases to hospitals, 2 did not receive patients because of fear of infection, and 2 received all patients. Although no patients admitted to the rural health centers died, many of the referred patients did. Of 14 cases referred to a hospital, 3 died in transit, 4 died at the hospital, and 7 survived. Deaths might be prevented if patients were treated promptly and locally with oral rehydration solutions based on cereals and rice; these are easy to prepare, superior to, and more available than standard oral rehydration salts (ORS). One mother walked 5 miles to a rural health post with her sick baby on her back, only to find that the dehydrated child had died on the way. During the 1991 cholera epidemic in Ghana, the author treated several patients in their homes; all recovered. Prompt and frequent rehydration in the home is the best treatment for diarrhea and cholera.

  11. Localized excitations from localized unitary operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaramakrishnan, Allic

    2017-06-01

    Localized unitary operators are basic probes of locality and causality in quantum systems: localized unitary operators create localized excitations in entangled states. Working with an explicit form, we explore properties of these operators in quantum mechanics and quantum field theory. We show that, unlike unitary operators, local non-unitary operators generically create non-local excitations. We present a local picture for quantum systems in which localized experimentalists can only act through localized Hamiltonian deformations, and therefore localized unitary operators. We demonstrate that localized unitary operators model certain quantum quenches exactly. We show how the Reeh-Schlieder theorem follows intuitively from basic properties of entanglement, non-unitary operators, and the local picture. We show that a recent quasi-particle picture for excited-state entanglement entropy in conformal field theories is not universal for all local operators. We prove a causality relation for entanglement entropy and connect our results to the AdS/CFT correspondence.

  12. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    , in response to Griffiths' challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has described is flawed.

  13. Local Foods, Local Places Summary Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These summary reports describe Local Foods, Local Places projects in communities across the country, including farmers markets, cooperatives, community gardens, and other food-related enterprises that can boost local economies and drive revitalization.

  14. Quantum Locality?

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry

    2011-11-10

    vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question. It is show here in detail why the precise statement of this theorem justifies the specified application of CQT. It is also shown, in response to his challenge, why a putative proof of locality that he has proposed is not valid.

  15. Comparative analysis of local effects caused by Bothrops alternatus and Bothrops moojeni snake venoms: enzymatic contributions and inflammatory modulations.

    PubMed

    Mamede, Carla Cristine Neves; de Sousa, Bruna Barbosa; Pereira, Déborah Fernanda da Cunha; Matias, Mariana Santos; de Queiroz, Mayara Ribeiro; de Morais, Nadia Cristina Gomes; Vieira, Sâmela Alves Pereira Batista; Stanziola, Leonilda; de Oliveira, Fábio

    2016-07-01

    Bothropic envenomation is characterised by severe local damage caused by the toxic action of venom components and aggravated by induced inflammation. In this comparative study, the local inflammatory effects caused by the venoms of Bothrops alternatus and Bothrops moojeni, two snakes of epidemiological importance in Brazil, were investigated. The toxic action of venom components induced by bothropic venom was also characterised. Herein, the oedema, hyperalgesia and myotoxicity induced by bothropic venom were monitored for various lengths of time after venom injection in experimental animals. The intensity of the local effects caused by B. moojeni venom is considerably more potent than B. alternatus venom. Our results also indicate that metalloproteases and phospholipases A2 have a central role in the local damage induced by bothropic venoms, but serine proteases also contribute to the effects of these venoms. Furthermore, we observed that specific anti-inflammatory drugs were able to considerably reduce the oedema, the pain and the muscle damage caused by both venoms. The inflammatory reaction induced by B. moojeni venom is mediated by eicosanoid action, histamine and nitric oxide, with significant participation of bradykinin on the hyperalgesic and myotoxic effects of this venom. These mediators also participate to inflammation caused by B. alternatus venom. However, the inefficient anti-inflammatory effects of some local modulation suggest that histamine, leukotrienes and nitric oxide have little role in the oedema or myotoxicity caused by B. alternatus venom. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cold adaptation of zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family from deep sea and arctic sea ice bacteria revealed by catalytic and structural properties and molecular dynamics: new insights into relationship between conformational flexibility and hydrogen bonding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bin-Bin; Bian, Fei; Chen, Xiu-Lan; He, Hai-Lun; Guo, Jun; Gao, Xiang; Zeng, Yin-Xin; Chen, Bo; Zhou, Bai-Cheng; Zhang, Yu-Zhong

    2009-04-03

    Increased conformational flexibility is the prevailing explanation for the high catalytic efficiency of cold-adapted enzymes at low temperatures. However, less is known about the structural determinants of flexibility. We reported two novel cold-adapted zinc metalloproteases in the thermolysin family, vibriolysin MCP-02 from a deep sea bacterium and vibriolysin E495 from an Arctic sea ice bacterium, and compared them with their mesophilic homolog, pseudolysin from a terrestrial bacterium. Their catalytic efficiencies, k(cat)/K(m) (10-40 degrees C), followed the order pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495 with a ratio of approximately 1:2:4. MCP-02 and E495 have the same optimal temperature (T(opt), 57 degrees C, 5 degrees C lower than pseudolysin) and apparent melting temperature (T(m) = 64 degrees C, approximately 10 degrees C lower than pseudolysin). Structural analysis showed that the slightly lower stabilities resulted from a decrease in the number of salt bridges. Fluorescence quenching experiments and molecular dynamics simulations showed that the flexibilities of the proteins were pseudolysin < MCP-02 < E495, suggesting that optimization of flexibility is a strategy for cold adaptation. Molecular dynamics results showed that the ordinal increase in flexibility from pseudolysin to MCP-02 and E495, especially the increase from MCP-02 to E495, mainly resulted from the decrease of hydrogen-bond stability in the dynamic structure, which was due to the increase in asparagine, serine, and threonine residues. Finally, a model for the cold adaptation of MCP-02 and E495 was proposed. This is the first report of the optimization of hydrogen-bonding dynamics as a strategy for cold adaptation and provides new insights into the structural basis underlying conformational flexibility.

  17. The alpha and beta subunits of the metalloprotease meprin are expressed in separate layers of human epidermis, revealing different functions in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Höwel, Markus; Walker, Tatjana; Vlad, Annica; Aufenvenne, Karin; Oji, Vinzenz; Lottaz, Daniel; Sterchi, Erwin E; Debela, Mekdes; Magdolen, Viktor; Traupe, Heiko; Stöcker, Walter

    2007-05-01

    The zinc endopeptidase meprin (EC 3.4.24.18) is expressed in brush border membranes of intestine and kidney tubules, intestinal leukocytes, and certain cancer cells, suggesting a role in epithelial differentiation and cell migration. Here we show by RT-PCR and immunoblotting that meprin is also expressed in human skin. As visualized by immunohistochemistry, the two meprin subunits are localized in separate cell layers of the human epidermis. Meprin alpha is expressed in the stratum basale, whereas meprin beta is found in cells of the stratum granulosum just beneath the stratum corneum. In hyperproliferative epidermis such as in psoriasis vulgaris, meprin alpha showed a marked shift of expression from the basal to the uppermost layers of the epidermis. The expression patterns suggest distinct functions for the two subunits in skin. This assumption is supported by diverse effects of recombinant meprin alpha and beta on human adult low-calcium high-temperature keratinocytes. Here, beta induced a dramatic change in cell morphology and reduced the cell number, indicating a function in terminal differentiation, whereas meprin alpha did not affect cell viability, and may play a role in basal keratinocyte proliferation.

  18. cDNA sequence and chromosomal localization of human enterokinase, the proteolytic activator of trypsinogen.

    PubMed

    Kitamoto, Y; Veile, R A; Donis-Keller, H; Sadler, J E

    1995-04-11

    Enterokinase is a serine protease of the duodenal brush border membrane that cleaves trypsinogen and produces active trypsin, thereby leading to the activation of many pancreatic digestive enzymes. Overlapping cDNA clones that encode the complete human enterokinase amino acid sequence were isolated from a human intestine cDNA library. Starting from the first ATG codon, the composite 3696 nt cDNA sequence contains an open reading frame of 3057 nt that encodes a 784 amino acid heavy chain followed by a 235 amino acid light chain; the two chains are linked by at least one disulfide bond. The heavy chain contains a potential N-terminal myristoylation site, a potential signal anchor sequence near the amino terminus, and six structural motifs that are found in otherwise unrelated proteins. These domains resemble motifs of the LDL receptor (two copies), complement component Clr (two copies), the metalloprotease meprin (one copy), and the macrophage scavenger receptor (one copy). The enterokinase light chain is homologous to the trypsin-like serine proteinases. These structural features are conserved among human, bovine, and porcine enterokinase. By Northern blotting, a 4.4 kb enterokinase mRNA was detected only in small intestine. The enterokinase gene was localized to human chromosome 21q21 by fluorescence in situ hybridization.

  19. Extracellular engagement of ADAM12 induces clusters of invadopodia with localized ectodomain shedding activity.

    PubMed

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Stautz, Dorte; Sanjay, Archana; Kveiborg, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-01-15

    Invadopodia are dynamic actin structures at the cell surface that degrade extracellular matrix and act as sites of signal transduction. The biogenesis of invadopodia, including the mechanisms regulating their formation, composition, and turnover is not entirely understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibody ligation of ADAM12, a transmembrane disintegrin and metalloprotease, resulted in the rapid accumulation of invadopodia with extracellular matrix-degrading capacity in epithelial cells expressing the αvβ3 integrin and active c-Src kinase. The induction of invadopodia clusters required an intact c-Src interaction site in the ADAM12 cytoplasmic domain, but was independent of the catalytic activity of ADAM12. Caveolin-1 and transmembrane protease MMP14/MT1-MMP were both present in the ADAM12-induced clusters of invadopodia, and cholesterol depletion prevented their formation, suggesting that lipid-raft microdomains are involved in the process. Importantly, our data demonstrate that ADAM12-mediated ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands can occur within these invadopodia. Such localized growth factor signalling offers an interesting novel biological concept highly relevant to the properties of carcinoma cells, which often show upregulated ADAM12 and β3 integrin expression, together with high levels of c-Src kinase activity.

  20. Roles of metalloproteases in metastatic niche.

    PubMed

    Rucci, N; Sanità, P; Angelucci, A

    2011-11-01

    Metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a cluster of at least 23 enzymes belonging to the more wide family of endopeptidases called Metzincins, whose structure is characterized by the presence of a zinc ion at the catalytic site. Although the general view of MMPs as physiologic scissors involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation and tissue remodeling is still valid, additional functions have recently emerged, including the ability to cleave non ECM molecules such as growth factors, cytokines and chemokines from their membrane-anchored proforms. These functions are utilized by tumor cells and are fundamental in the determination of tumor progression and invasion. The effect of MMPs activity in cancer progression has been traditionally associated with the acquisition by tumor cells of an invasive phenotype, an indispensable requisite for the metastatic spreading of cancer cells. In addition to the traditional view, a new role for MMPs in creating a favourable microenvironment has been proposed, so that MMPs are not only involved in cell invasion, but also in signaling pathways that control cell growth, inflammation, or angiogenesis. Finally, recent evidence suggest a role of MMPs in the so called "pre-metastatic niche" that is the hypothesis of an early distant modification of the premetastatic site by primary cancer cells. This new hypothesis is changing our traditional view about MMPs and provides important insights into the effective time window for the therapeutic use of MMP inhibitors. In this review we provide the main available data about the ability of MMPs in creating a suitable microenvironment for tumor growth in metastatic sites and we indicate the implication of these data on the potential use of MMP inhibitors in the metastatic therapy.

  1. Metalloproteases of the Inner Mitochondrial Membrane.

    PubMed

    Levytskyy, Roman M; Bohovych, Iryna; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2017-09-12

    The inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) is among the most protein-rich cellular compartments. The metastable IM subproteome where the concentration of proteins is approaching oversaturation creates a challenging protein folding environment with a high probability of protein malfunction or aggregation. Failure to maintain protein homeostasis in such a setting can impair the functional integrity of the mitochondria and drive clinical manifestations. The IM is equipped with a series of highly conserved, proteolytic complexes dedicated to the maintenance of normal protein homeostasis within this mitochondrial subcompartment. Particularly important is a group of membrane-anchored metallopeptidases commonly known as m-AAA and i-AAA proteases, and the ATP-independent Oma1 protease. Herein, we will summarize the current biochemical knowledge of these proteolytic machines and discuss recent advances in our understanding of mechanistic aspects of their functioning.

  2. Local perturbations perturb—exponentially–locally

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. Schütz, M.

    2015-06-15

    We elaborate on the principle that for gapped quantum spin systems with local interaction, “local perturbations [in the Hamiltonian] perturb locally [the groundstate].” This principle was established by Bachmann et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 309, 835–871 (2012)], relying on the “spectral flow technique” or “quasi-adiabatic continuation” [M. B. Hastings, Phys. Rev. B 69, 104431 (2004)] to obtain locality estimates with sub-exponential decay in the distance to the spatial support of the perturbation. We use ideas of Hamza et al. [J. Math. Phys. 50, 095213 (2009)] to obtain similarly a transformation between gapped eigenvectors and their perturbations that is local with exponential decay. This allows to improve locality bounds on the effect of perturbations on the low lying states in certain gapped models with a unique “bulk ground state” or “topological quantum order.” We also give some estimate on the exponential decay of correlations in models with impurities where some relevant correlations decay faster than one would naively infer from the global gap of the system, as one also expects in disordered systems with a localized groundstate.

  3. Aging in Sweden: local variation, local control.

    PubMed

    Davey, Adam; Malmberg, Bo; Sundström, Gerdt

    2014-08-01

    Aging in Sweden has been uniquely shaped by its history-most notably the long tradition of locally controlled services for older adults. We considered how local variations and local control shape the experience of aging in Sweden and organized the paper into 3 sections. First, we examine aging in Sweden along demography, economy, and housing. Next, we trace the origins and development of the Swedish welfare state to consider formal supports (service provision) and informal supports (caregiving and receipt of care). Finally, we direct researchers to additional data resources for understanding aging in Sweden in greater depth. Sweden was one of the first countries to experience rapid population aging. Quality of life for a majority of older Swedes is high. Local control permits a flexible and adaptive set of services and programs, where emphasis is placed on improving the quality and targeting of services that have already reached a plateau as a function of population and expenditures.

  4. Time to Go Local!

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Time to Go Local! Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... MedlinePlus.gov health topic pages, you will find "Go Local" links that take you to information about ...

  5. Temporal Non-locality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filk, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    In this article I investigate several possibilities to define the concept of "temporal non-locality" within the standard framework of quantum theory. In particular, I analyze the notions of "temporally non-local states", "temporally non-local events" and "temporally non-local observables". The idea of temporally non-local events is already inherent in the standard formalism of quantum mechanics, and Basil Hiley recently defined an operator in order to measure the degree of such a temporal non-locality. The concept of temporally non-local states enters as soon as "clock-representing states" are introduced in the context of special and general relativity. It is discussed in which way temporally non-local measurements may find an interesting application for experiments which test temporal versions of Bell inequalities.

  6. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  7. Stochastic Local Distinguishability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Roy, Anirban; Walgate, Jonathan

    2007-03-01

    We pose the question, ``when is globally available information is also locally available?'', formally as the problem of local state discrimination, and show that the deep qualitative link between local distinguishability and entanglement lies at the level of stochastic rather than deterministic local protocols. We restrict our attention to sets of mutually orthogonal pure quantum states. We define a set of states |ψi> as beingstochastically locally distinguishable if and only if there is a LOCC protocol whereby the parties can conclusively identify a member of the set with some nonzero probability. If a set is stochastically locally distinguishable, then the complete global information is potentially locally available. If not, the physical information encoded by the system can never be completely locally exposed. Our results are proved true for all orthogonal quantum states regardless of their dimensionality or multipartiality. First, we prove that entanglement is a necessary property of any system whose total global information can never be locally accessed. Second, entangled states that form part of an orthogonal basis can never be locally singled out. Completely entangled bases are, always stochastically locally indistinguishable. Third, we prove that any set of three orthogonal states, is stochastically locally distinguishable.

  8. Exponential Localization of Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialynicki-Birula, Iwo

    1998-06-01

    It is shown that photons can be localized in space with an exponential falloff of the energy density and photodetection rates. The limits of localization are determined by the fundamental Paley-Wiener theorem. A direct mathematical connection between the spatial localization of photons and the decay in time of quantum mechanical systems is established.

  9. Learning from Software Localization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, She-Sen

    2003-01-01

    Localization is the process of adapting a product to meet the language, cultural and other requirements of a specific target environment or market. This article describes ways in which software localization impacts upon curriculum, and discusses what students will learn from software localization. (AEF)

  10. Learning from Software Localization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, She-Sen

    2003-01-01

    Localization is the process of adapting a product to meet the language, cultural and other requirements of a specific target environment or market. This article describes ways in which software localization impacts upon curriculum, and discusses what students will learn from software localization. (AEF)

  11. Experiments with program locality.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spirn, J. R.; Denning, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Attempt to validate experimentally several intrinsic models for the concept of program locality. The models considered are a two-parameter simple locality model, a simple least recently used stack model, and an independent reference model. The first two models appear to produce good approximations to real world behavior, while the independent reference model, because of its static concept of locality, does very poorly. The working set is shown to be a good estimator of the simple two-parameters model's locality, provided that the locality does not change too rapidly. The working set exactly measures the locality in the case of the least recently used stack model and is thus nearly optimal for programs whose behavior can be closely approximated by this model.

  12. [Local anaesthesia in ruminants].

    PubMed

    Nuss, Karl; Schwarz, Andrea; Ringer, Simone

    2017-06-20

    The use of local anaesthesia in ruminants allows many surgical procedures to be conducted free of pain, efficiently and inexpensively in the field. Local anaesthesia combined with sedation and immobilisation of the animal can replace general anaesthesia for many procedures (e. g. castration, claw amputation). The level of difficulty differs among various local anaesthetic techniques: local infiltration of tissue or anaesthesia of the cornual nerve are easily performed, whereas local anaesthesia of the eye, regional anaesthesia in limbs or anaesthesia for umbilical surgery are more difficult to carry out. This article presents an illustrated overview of the most common local anaesthetic procedures in cattle as well as in small ruminants and serves as a practical guide for veterinarians in the field. In principle, these techniques can likewise be applied in other ruminants or artiodactyls.

  13. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  14. Local anaesthetics: 10 essentials.

    PubMed

    Lirk, Philipp; Picardi, Susanne; Hollmann, Markus W

    2014-11-01

    This review seeks to address 10 essential questions regarding the clinical use of local anaesthetics. Each local anaesthetic has distinctive physicochemical properties but with the same mode of action; they block voltage-gated sodium channels in the axon. Sodium channel block is brought about by a conformational change and the creation of a positive charge in the channel pore. Different local anaesthetics can reach the local anaesthetic binding site in the axon from the cytoplasmic compartment (classic hydrophilic pathway), or directly via its lipid membrane (hydrophobic pathway), or can enter via large-pore channels (alternative hydrophilic pathway). Beyond the nervous system, local anaesthetics exert beneficial effects on pain and can affect the inflammatory response and the haemostatic system. There are problems with the efficacy of local anaesthetics in the presence of local inflammation, and with significant intravascular toxicity, which can be fatal. But when preventive measures are taken, the incidence of cardiac arrest is low. Intralipid has been proposed to treat systemic local anaesthetic overdose and has been enthusiastically adopted worldwide, even though the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. Intralipid is an aid to the management of local anaesthetic toxicity rather than an antidote and meticulous conduct of regional anaesthesia remains paramount. All local anaesthetics are toxic, in a dose- and time-dependent manner, on virtually all tissues, including nerves and muscles. The question of whether local anaesthetics protect against perioperative tumour progression cannot be answered at this moment, and results from clinical (retrospective) studies are equivocal. Future areas of interest will be the design of new subtype-specific sodium channel blockers, but as we look forward, older local anaesthetics such as 2-chloroprocaine are being reintroduced into the clinical setting. Multimodal perineural analgesia and liposomal bupivacaine may

  15. Local Estuary Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information about Local Individual Estuary Programs including links to their NEP homepages, social media, Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plans, and state of the bay reports.

  16. Local serotonin mediates cyclic strain-induced phenotype transformation, matrix degradation, and glycosaminoglycan synthesis in cultured sheep mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Lacerda, Carla M R; Kisiday, John; Johnson, Brennan; Orton, E Christopher

    2012-05-15

    This study addressed the following questions: 1) Does cyclic tensile strain induce protein expression patterns consistent with myxomatous degeneration in mitral valves? 2) Does cyclic strain induce local serotonin synthesis in mitral valves? 3) Are cyclic strain-induced myxomatous protein expression patterns in mitral valves dependent on local serotonin? Cultured sheep mitral valve leaflets were subjected to 0, 10, 20, and 30% cyclic strain for 24 and 72 h. Protein levels of activated myofibroblast phenotype markers, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and nonmuscle embryonic myosin (SMemb); matrix catabolic enzymes, matrix metalloprotease (MMP) 1 and 13, and cathepsin K; and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content in mitral valves increased with increased cyclic strain. Serotonin was present in the serum-free media of cultured mitral valves and concentrations increased with cyclic strain. Expression of the serotonin synthetic enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) increased in strained mitral valves. Pharmacologic inhibition of the serotonin 2B/2C receptor or TPH1 diminished expression of phenotype markers (α-SMA and SMemb) and matrix catabolic enzyme (MMP1, MMP13, and cathepsin K) expression in 10- and 30%-strained mitral valves. These results provide first evidence that mitral valves synthesize serotonin locally. The results further demonstrate that tensile loading modulates local serotonin synthesis, expression of effector proteins associated with mitral valve degeneration, and GAG synthesis. Inhibition of serotonin diminishes strain-mediated protein expression patterns. These findings implicate serotonin and tensile loading in mitral degeneration, functionally link the pathogeneses of serotoninergic (carcinoid, drug-induced) and degenerative mitral valve disease, and have therapeutic implications.

  17. Local theory for Mott-Anderson localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Sudeshna; Terletska, Hanna; Moreno, Juana; Vidhyadhiraja, N. S.; Jarrell, Mark

    2016-12-01

    The paramagnetic metallic phase of the Anderson-Hubbard model (AHM) is investigated using a nonperturbative local moment approach within the framework of dynamical mean-field theory with a typical medium. Our focus is on the breakdown of the metallic phase near the metal-insulators transition as seen in the single-particle spectra, scattering rates, and the associated distribution of Kondo scales. We demonstrate the emergence of a universal, underlying low-energy scale, TKpeak. This lies close to the peak of the distribution of Kondo scales obtained within the metallic phase of the paramagnetic AHM. Spectral dynamics for energies ω ≲TKpeak display Fermi liquid universality crossing over to an incoherent universal dynamics for ω ≫TKpeak in the scaling regime. Such universal dynamics indicate that within a local theory the low to moderately low-energy physics is governed by an effective, disorder renormalized Kondo screening.

  18. Comparative localization of ADAMs 10 and 15 in human cerebral cortex normal aging, Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Bukowska, Alicja; Krell, Dieter; Bogerts, Bernhard; Ansorge, Siegfried; Lendeckel, Uwe

    2003-02-01

    Using immunohistochemical techniques we studied the light microscopic localization of ADAMs (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease) 10 and 15 in different neocortical areas of the human brain during normal aging, and also in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) and Down syndrome (DS). ADAM 10, a putative alpha-secretase involved in Notch signaling, was found in neurons of the perinatal cortex. During aging there is an increase in intraneuronal staining intensity and in the number of cortical nerve cells that contain the enzyme. Furthermore, in AD and DS brains ADAM 10 immunoreactivity was associated with diffuse and neuritic plaques. ADAM 15 was detected in perinatal cortical pyramidal cells; during aging there was also an increase in intracellular staining and the number of stained cells per volume (cell density). In AD brains ADAM 15 was seen in a few diffuse plaques. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant reduction of ADAM 10 but not ADAM 15 immunoreactive neurons in AD brains in comparison to controls. Our findings support the idea that ADAM 10 is involved in the pathophysiology of AD and DS. ADAM 15 might be linked to AD via interaction with integrin and/or src protein tyrosine kinases.

  19. Localization of Interference Fringes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, J. M.; Comastri, Silvia A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a proof for determining the localized fringes position arrived at when one considers the interference of two extended sources when one is able to observe fringes only at certain points in space. Shows how the localized fringes may be found in a device used to observe Newton's rings. (Author/CS)

  20. Doing Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohrn, Deborah Gore, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This theme issue contains articles about the importance of learning local history. The lead article includes historical information about three Iowa cities: Council Bluffs, Waterloo, and Jefferson. Other features in this issue are entitled: "Iowa Kids Talk,""Digging Into Local History,""Goldie's Top Ten News Stories";…

  1. Interaural Coherence and Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, Eric

    2006-10-01

    In a study of the relationship between interaural coherence and localization ability, two experiments were performed. Both made use of a 1/3 octave band of low frequency sound and a 1/3 octave band of high frequency sound. Stimuli with coherences ranging from 0.2 to 0.8 were created in three recording environments using a KEMAR and digitally altered to eliminate interaural level differences (ILD). The environments had short, medium, and long reverberation times. The coherences were measured and were accurate to one significant figure. Experiment 1 had two goals: to determine the relationship between interaural coherence and the ability to localize using interaural time differences (ITD) and to determine if localization ability was dependent only on coherence. The relationship between coherence and localization was tested in a headphone lateralization experiment in which psychometric functions were generated. The functions revealed a linear relationship, with the ability to localize high coherence sounds breaking down quickly at small ITD. Within standard error, ITD localization appeared to be dependent only on coherence. In Experiment 2, a 3-down 1-up staircase method was employed to determine how opposing ILDs affected ITD localization. When the task could be completed, the threshold values were linearly related, however, the ability broke down at large ILDs. Both experiments provide a linear description of interaural coherence and localization, with thresholds being sharp deviations from these trends.

  2. Local anesthesia: a review.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Sykes, P; Kubota, Y; Matsuura, H; Lipp, M

    1992-01-01

    Local anesthetics are the most widely administered drugs in dentistry. Significant advances have been made in past decades that have greatly increased both the safety and the efficacy of these important drugs. This paper reviews the history of local anesthesia, pharmacokinetics and clinical implications, techniques, complications, and future directions in the quest for more effective pain control in dentistry.

  3. Local Power: Tribe & Township.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matlala, Padi; Moloi, Dudley

    1995-01-01

    Examines the service infrastructure of a rural township in South Africa and the struggle to acquire services like water and electricity. Discusses the interaction of a system of transitional local councils and tribal authorities in the face of local government elections. (LZ)

  4. Local health traditions.

    PubMed

    Shankar, D

    1988-03-01

    A very systematic study made in Karjat, Maharasht (a tribal area in India) has found that in comparison with the official health care and primary health centers, the traditional health practices are far more comprehensive. However, although the local traditions are comprehensive in their 'scope', they nevertheless reveal several weaknesses when subjected to critical evaluation by the science of Ayurveda. For example, whereas some remedies are found to be sound, there are others that are incomplete, and some appear to be totally distorted. Similarly, the diagnostic abilities of local practitioners, while sound in some cases, are in several others found to be inadequate. As to the use of local herbs, whereas the local tradition has an amazing knowledge of local flora--the knowledge about properties of plants is in many cases incomplete. There are several reasons that may explain how and why these weaknesses have set in. 1st, the local traditions are 'oral' and in the natural course of things, oral traditions the world over have been found to decay over time. A 2nd, external, reason for the current decay of local traditions is the derision, neglect, and oppression they have suffered due to the intolerance of western scientific tradition. A 3rd reason for weaknesses in the local health stream is the breakdown of active links, during the last few centuries, with the mainstream science of Ayurveda.

  5. Localization of magnetic pills

    PubMed Central

    Laulicht, Bryan; Gidmark, Nicholas J.; Tripathi, Anubhav; Mathiowitz, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Numerous therapeutics demonstrate optimal absorption or activity at specific sites in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Yet, safe, effective pill retention within a desired region of the GI remains an elusive goal. We report a safe, effective method for localizing magnetic pills. To ensure safety and efficacy, we monitor and regulate attractive forces between a magnetic pill and an external magnet, while visualizing internal dose motion in real time using biplanar videofluoroscopy. Real-time monitoring yields direct visual confirmation of localization completely noninvasively, providing a platform for investigating the therapeutic benefits imparted by localized oral delivery of new and existing drugs. Additionally, we report the in vitro measurements and calculations that enabled prediction of successful magnetic localization in the rat small intestines for 12 h. The designed system for predicting and achieving successful magnetic localization can readily be applied to any area of the GI tract within any species, including humans. The described system represents a significant step forward in the ability to localize magnetic pills safely and effectively anywhere within the GI tract. What our magnetic pill localization strategy adds to the state of the art, if used as an oral drug delivery system, is the ability to monitor the force exerted by the pill on the tissue and to locate the magnetic pill within the test subject all in real time. This advance ensures both safety and efficacy of magnetic localization during the potential oral administration of any magnetic pill-based delivery system. PMID:21257903

  6. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation.

  7. Clustering by Local Gravitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Zhiwen; Chen, C L Philip; You, Jane; Gu, Tianlong; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Jun

    2017-05-02

    The objective of cluster analysis is to partition a set of data points into several groups based on a suitable distance measure. We first propose a model called local gravitation among data points. In this model, each data point is viewed as an object with mass, and associated with a local resultant force (LRF) generated by its neighbors. The motivation of this paper is that there exist distinct differences between the LRFs (including magnitudes and directions) of the data points close to the cluster centers and at the boundary of the clusters. To capture these differences efficiently, two new local measures named centrality and coordination are further investigated. Based on empirical observations, two new clustering methods called local gravitation clustering and communication with local agents are designed, and several test cases are conducted to verify their effectiveness. The experiments on synthetic data sets and real-world data sets indicate that both clustering approaches achieve good performance on most of the data sets.

  8. Local Solid Shape

    PubMed Central

    Koenderink, Jan; van Doorn, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Local solid shape applies to the surface curvature of small surface patches—essentially regions of approximately constant curvatures—of volumetric objects that are smooth volumetric regions in Euclidean 3-space. This should be distinguished from local shape in pictorial space. The difference is categorical. Although local solid shape has naturally been explored in haptics, results in vision are not forthcoming. We describe a simple experiment in which observers judge shape quality and magnitude of cinematographic presentations. Without prior training, observers readily use continuous shape index and Casorati curvature scales with reasonable resolution. PMID:27648217

  9. Local Governments Reimbursement Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In the event of a release (or threatened release) of hazardous substances, EPA may provide a safety net of up to $25,000 per incident to local governments for expenses related to the release and associated emergency response measures.

  10. Stereotype locally convex spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarov, S. S.

    2000-08-01

    We give complete proofs of some previously announced results in the theory of stereotype (that is, reflexive in the sense of Pontryagin duality) locally convex spaces. These spaces have important applications in topological algebra and functional analysis.

  11. Theme: Local Program Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Includes "Professional Propagation" (Camp); "Managing Human Resources with Local Program Success (LPS)" (Daley); "Profit Sharing with LPS" (Moses); "Partners for Success" (Mecey- Smith); "Achieving LPS by Collaborating with Partners, Allies and Volunteers" (Oglesby); LPS...Just What Agricultural…

  12. Local Anesthetic Microcapsules.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-15

    III Chemical Structure of Local Anesthetics 12 Table IV Processing Summary of Lidocaine Microencapsulation 15 Table V Lidocaine Microcapsule Size...Distribution 17 Table VI Processing Summary of Etidocaine Microencapsulation 18 Table VII Etidocaine Microcapsule Size Distribution 19 Table VIII Lidocaine...REPORT I PERIOD COVERED Annual Local Anesthetic Microcapsules 1 July 1980-30 March 1981 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 2106-1 7. AUTHOR() S

  13. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  14. Snake venom induced local toxicities: plant secondary metabolites as an auxiliary therapy.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Hemshekhar, M; Sunitha, K; Thushara, R M; Jnaneshwari, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2013-01-01

    Snakebite is a serious medical and socio-economic problem affecting the rural and agricultural laborers of tropical and sub-tropical region across the world leading to high morbidity and mortality. In most of the snakebite incidences, victims usually end up with permanent tissue damage and sequelae with high socioeconomic and psychological impacts. Although, mortality has been reduced markedly due to anti-venom regimen, it is associated with several limitations. Snake venom metalloprotease, hyaluronidase and myotoxic phospholipase A2 are the kingpins of tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation. Thus, inhibition of these enzymes is considered to be the rate limiting step in the management of snakebite. Unfortunately, tissue necrosis and extracellular matrix degradation persists even after the administration of anti-venom. At present, inhibitors from snake serum and plasma, several synthetic compounds and their analogs have been demonstrated to possess anti-snake venom activities, but the use of plant metabolites for this purpose has an added advantage of traditional knowledge and will make the treatment cheaper and more accessible to the affected population. Therefore, the clinical and research forums are highly oriented towards plant metabolites and interestingly, certain phytochemicals are implicated as the antibody elicitors against venom toxicity that can be exploited in designing effective anti-venoms. Based on these facts, we have made an effort to enlist plant based secondary metabolites with antiophidian abilities and their mechanism of action against locally acting enzymes/toxins in particular. The review also describes their functional groups responsible for therapeutic beneficial and certainly oblige in designing potent inhibitors against venom toxins.

  15. Monaural Sound Localization Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wightman, Frederic L.; Kistler, Doris J.

    1997-01-01

    Research reported during the past few decades has revealed the importance for human sound localization of the so-called 'monaural spectral cues.' These cues are the result of the direction-dependent filtering of incoming sound waves accomplished by the pinnae. One point of view about how these cues are extracted places great emphasis on the spectrum of the received sound at each ear individually. This leads to the suggestion that an effective way of studying the influence of these cues is to measure the ability of listeners to localize sounds when one of their ears is plugged. Numerous studies have appeared using this monaural localization paradigm. Three experiments are described here which are intended to clarify the results of the previous monaural localization studies and provide new data on how monaural spectral cues might be processed. Virtual sound sources are used in the experiments in order to manipulate and control the stimuli independently at the two ears. Two of the experiments deal with the consequences of the incomplete monauralization that may have contaminated previous work. The results suggest that even very low sound levels in the occluded ear provide access to interaural localization cues. The presence of these cues complicates the interpretation of the results of nominally monaural localization studies. The third experiment concerns the role of prior knowledge of the source spectrum, which is required if monaural cues are to be useful. The results of this last experiment demonstrate that extraction of monaural spectral cues can be severely disrupted by trial-to-trial fluctuations in the source spectrum. The general conclusion of the experiments is that, while monaural spectral cues are important, the monaural localization paradigm may not be the most appropriate way to study their role.

  16. Local relativistic exact decoupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Daoling; Reiher, Markus

    2012-06-01

    We present a systematic hierarchy of approximations for local exact decoupling of four-component quantum chemical Hamiltonians based on the Dirac equation. Our ansatz reaches beyond the trivial local approximation that is based on a unitary transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal part of the Hamiltonian. Systematically, off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix blocks can be subjected to a unitary transformation to yield relativistically corrected matrix elements. The full hierarchy is investigated with respect to the accuracy reached for the electronic energy and for selected molecular properties on a balanced test molecule set that comprises molecules with heavy elements in different bonding situations. Our atomic (local) assembly of the unitary exact-decoupling transformation—called local approximation to the unitary decoupling transformation (DLU)—provides an excellent local approximation for any relativistic exact-decoupling approach. Its order-N2 scaling can be further reduced to linear scaling by employing a neighboring-atomic-blocks approximation. Therefore, DLU is an efficient relativistic method well suited for relativistic calculations on large molecules. If a large molecule contains many light atoms (typically hydrogen atoms), the computational costs can be further reduced by employing a well-defined nonrelativistic approximation for these light atoms without significant loss of accuracy. We also demonstrate that the standard and straightforward transformation of only the atomic block-diagonal entries in the Hamiltonian—denoted diagonal local approximation to the Hamiltonian (DLH) in this paper—introduces an error that is on the order of the error of second-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (i.e., DKH2) when compared with exact-decoupling results. Hence, the local DLH approximation would be pointless in an exact-decoupling framework, but can be efficiently employed in combination with the fast to evaluate DKH2 Hamiltonian in order to speed up calculations

  17. Representing properties locally.

    PubMed

    Solomon, K O; Barsalou, L W

    2001-09-01

    Theories of knowledge such as feature lists, semantic networks, and localist neural nets typically use a single global symbol to represent a property that occurs in multiple concepts. Thus, a global symbol represents mane across HORSE, PONY, and LION. Alternatively, perceptual theories of knowledge, as well as distributed representational systems, assume that properties take different local forms in different concepts. Thus, different local forms of mane exist for HORSE, PONY, and LION, each capturing the specific form that mane takes in its respective concept. Three experiments used the property verification task to assess whether properties are represented globally or locally (e.g., Does a PONY have mane?). If a single global form represents a property, then verifying it in any concept should increase its accessibility and speed its verification later in any other concept. Verifying mane for PONY should benefit as much from having verified mane for LION earlier as from verifying mane for HORSE. If properties are represented locally, however, verifying a property should only benefit from verifying a similar form earlier. Verifying mane for PONY should only benefit from verifying mane for HORSE, not from verifying mane for LION. Findings from three experiments strongly supported local property representation and ruled out the interpretation that object similarity was responsible (e.g., the greater overall similarity between HORSE and PONY than between LION and PONY). The findings further suggest that property representation and verification are complicated phenomena, grounded in sensory-motor simulations.

  18. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) About Local Foods, Local Places

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Answers to frequently asked questions about EPA's Local Foods, Local Places planning assistance program to help communities revitalize downtowns, create economic opportunities, and improve access to healthy food by promoting local foods.

  19. Local Foods, Local Places 2016-2017 Application

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2016-2017 application for Local Foods, Local Places, technical assistance that helps communities use local foods to create walkable and economically vibrant districts, boost economic opportunities, and improve access to healthy foods.

  20. [Local treatment during angioplasty].

    PubMed

    Brasselet, C; Addad, F; Lemarchand, P; Lafont, A

    1999-11-01

    Intracoronary thrombosis and post-angioplasty complications (acute occlusion) are now controlled. Restenosis is the principal obstacle to transluminal coronary revascularisation. The conviction of the multifactorial and focal nature of the process leading to this excessive scarring is acquired. Constrictive remodelling is now established as the main mechanism of restenosis. Failure to prevent restenosis by systemic therapy has led several groups to experiment local treatment for this problem. The object of this article is to review the different systems of local treatment at the site of angioplasty. Even if some results are encouraging, there is no solution as yet to the problem of restenosis. Although local therapy is possible, the agent(s) of choice remain(s) to be defined.

  1. Gravitational Anderson localization.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Ira Z

    2013-01-04

    We present a higher dimensional model where gravity is bound to a brane due to Anderson localization. The extra dimensions are taken to be a disordered crystal of branes, with randomly distributed tensions of order the fundamental scale. Such geometries bind the graviton and thus allow for arbitrarily large extra dimensions even when the curvature is small. Thus this model is quite distinct from that of Randall and Sundrum where localization is a consequence of curvature effects in the bulk. The hierarchy problem can be solved by having the standard model brane live a distance away from the brane on which the graviton is localized. The statistical properties of the system are worked out and it is shown that the scenario leads to a continuum of four dimensional theories with differing strengths of gravitational interactions. We live on one particular brane whose gravitational constant is G(N).

  2. Practical Local Magnitude Calculation for Local Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunc, B.; Tunc, S.; Caka, D.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we developed a Matlab application (Ml_Calc) to calculate local magnitude (Ml) for small institudes which has just one or more seismic stations. Ml_Calc algorithm suitable for velocity or acceleration sensors' data obtained by Güralp Systems digitizers. The selected earthquake data can be transferred from SCREAM software to Ml_Calc online or offline. The Ml_Calc algorithm provides two types of solutions for distance, one of them is P-S time differences and the other one is epicentre of earthquake and station coordinates, if earthquake is known. During Ml calculation, instrument correction has been removed and converted to real displacement in milimeter. The obtained displacement data converted to Wood Anderson Seismometer output by using Z=[0;0]; P=[-6.28+4.71j; -6.28-4.71j]; A0=[2080]. Obtained maximum displacement amplitude (A) and distances (dist) used in formula (1) for distances less than 200km and formula (2) for more than 200km. Ml=log10(A)-(-1.118-0.0647*dist+0.00071*dist2-3.39E-6*dist3+5.71e-9*dist4) (1) Ml=log10(A)+(2.1173+0.0082*dist-0.0000059628*dist2) (2) Ml_Calc is a software that easy to implement, can be used for educational purpose and user friendly. Due to this characteristics, Ml_Calc software offered a practical solution to individual users to Ml calculation.

  3. [Psychiatry in local newspapers].

    PubMed

    Nowack, Nicolas; Tonn, Bianka; Unter Mitarbeit von Volker, Thomas; Oberste-Ufer, Ralf; Müller, Christin

    2011-04-01

    The media influences public opinion. Although it can provide objective information, it can also create prejudices. For the first time German local newspapers were examined with respect to HOW and HOW OFTEN they use psychiatric terminology. All newspapers of the East German Altmark were analyzed with respect to their usage of selected psychiatric terms for a period of one year. None of these newspapers could be described as tabloids or as predominantly sensation-seeking. For comparative purposes, our chosen methodology was similar to that of an earlier study of respected, German, internationally-read print media. In 14 % of the newspapers studied, at least one term of the predefined psychiatric vocabulary appeared. A negative context was common (45 %), but for the most part this was in crime-related articles supplied by press agencies. In contrast with reputable, German language newspapers with a nationwide or international audience, in purely local reports, a negative context was rare, and no alienating usage of preselected psychiatric terms was found. Local editorial teams seem to be closer to - and perhaps better informed about - regional psychiatric institutions. Hence, they can provide the public with more factual information. For this reason, anti-stigma mental health campaigns will likely be more effective when carried out using local media, as opposed to nationwide or even international media. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Robust and Secure Localization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-03

    attacker-chosen location to the nodes as they are deployed.  establish wormhole links and tunnel legitimate messages to distant locations in the...network which are beyond the radio range of the source nodes. The wormhole attack can potentially introduce significant localization error of any node

  5. Local Music in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewbank, Alison

    1986-01-01

    Discusses issues regarding the choice of many young musicians in England to reject their school music education as irrelevant to, and restrictive on, the music they wish to play; presents the general process of how local production works and what its cultural roots and reference points are. Cites specific references. (JD)

  6. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  7. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  8. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  9. Dynamic localized load balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Sergey I.; Heiner, Andreas P.

    2003-08-01

    Traditionally dynamic load balancing is applied in resource-reserved connection-oriented networks with a large degree of managed control. Load balancing in connectionless networks is rather rudimentary and is either static or requires network-wide load information. This paper presents a fully automated, traffic driven dynamic load balancing mechanism that uses local load information. The proposed mechanism is easily deployed in a multi-vendor environment in which only a subset of routers supports the function. The Dynamic Localized Load Balancing (DLLB) mechanism distributes traffic based on two sets of weights. The first set is fixed and is inverse proportional to the path cost, typically the sum of reciprocal bandwidths along the path. The second weight reflects the utilization of the link to the first next hop along the path, and is therefore variable. The ratio of static weights defines the ideal load distribution, the ratio of variable weights the node-local load distribution estimate. By minimizing the difference between variable and fixed ratios the traffic distribution, with the available node-local knowledge, is optimal. The above mechanism significantly increases throughput and decreases delay from a network-wide perspective. Optionally the variable weight can include load information of nodes downstream to prevent congestion on those nodes. The latter function further improves network performance, and is easily implemented on top of the standard OSPF signaling. The mechanism does not require many node resources and can be implemented on existing router platforms.

  10. Teaching Local History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Alan, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    This Social Science Docket theme issue focuses on teaching local history and included theme and non-themed articles, lesson plans, learning activities, and book, movie, and museum reviews designed for K-12 social studies teachers. Articles and materials in this issue are: "Editing Is Not Censorship" (Alan Singer); "Teachers Respond…

  11. Integrating Local Governmental Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centner, Terence J.

    1994-01-01

    Students who pursue business and professional careers in natural resources and life science (NRLS) will have a decided need for a basic understanding of local government topics that shape public policy. Suggests that a responsible curriculum in NRLS should provide students with opportunities to explore these issues, and discusses methods for…

  12. Tackling a Local Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Students studying water as a class project were concerned by levels of pollution at a nearby river and the local beach. They identified three environmental problems for research including sewage discharge, beach litter, and quality of swimming water. Research consisted of field trips which allowed for opportunities to improve skills in collecting…

  13. State and local governments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Virginia Space Grant Consortium approach to a close working relation to state and local governments is presented as a model for consideration. State government relations are especially important in that this is a primary resource in securing matching funds. Avenues for establishing these relationships are listed and discussed.

  14. Tackling a Local Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Martin

    1995-01-01

    Students studying water as a class project were concerned by levels of pollution at a nearby river and the local beach. They identified three environmental problems for research including sewage discharge, beach litter, and quality of swimming water. Research consisted of field trips which allowed for opportunities to improve skills in collecting…

  15. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasatir, Marilyn; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Four papers discuss LANs (local area networks) and library applications: (1) "Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers Standards..." (Charles D. Brown); (2) "Facilities Planning for LANs..." (Gail Persky); (3) "Growing up with the Alumni Library: LAN..." (Russell Buchanan); and (4) "Implementing a LAN...at the Health Sciences Library"…

  16. Global and Local Textuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, B. G.

    Coherence and cohesion are fundamental considerations of the composing process that help to define the global and local components of texuality. Global text coherence centers on those aspects of the familiar rhetorical situation. Coherence operates at the paragraph and essay levels, answering questions about focus, tone, mode, topic, and thesis.…

  17. Principle of relative locality

    SciTech Connect

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Freidel, Laurent; Smolin, Lee; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2011-10-15

    We propose a deepening of the relativity principle according to which the invariant arena for nonquantum physics is a phase space rather than spacetime. Descriptions of particles propagating and interacting in spacetimes are constructed by observers, but different observers, separated from each other by translations, construct different spacetime projections from the invariant phase space. Nonetheless, all observers agree that interactions are local in the spacetime coordinates constructed by observers local to them. This framework, in which absolute locality is replaced by relative locality, results from deforming energy-momentum space, just as the passage from absolute to relative simultaneity results from deforming the linear addition of velocities. Different aspects of energy-momentum space geometry, such as its curvature, torsion and nonmetricity, are reflected in different kinds of deformations of the energy-momentum conservation laws. These are in principle all measurable by appropriate experiments. We also discuss a natural set of physical hypotheses which singles out the cases of energy-momentum space with a metric compatible connection and constant curvature.

  18. RNA localization in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Buskila, Avi-ad Avraam; Kannaiah, Shanmugapriya; Amster-Choder, Orna

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important discoveries in the field of microbiology in the last two decades is that bacterial cells have intricate subcellular organization. This understanding has emerged mainly from the depiction of spatial and temporal organization of proteins in specific domains within bacterial cells, e.g., midcell, cell poles, membrane and periplasm. Because translation of bacterial RNA molecules was considered to be strictly coupled to their synthesis, they were not thought to specifically localize to regions outside the nucleoid. However, the increasing interest in RNAs, including non-coding RNAs, encouraged researchers to explore the spatial and temporal localization of RNAs in bacteria. The recent technological improvements in the field of fluorescence microscopy allowed subcellular imaging of RNAs even in the tiny bacterial cells. It has been reported by several groups, including ours that transcripts may specifically localize in such cells. Here we review what is known about localization of RNA and of the pathways that determine RNA fate in bacteria, and discuss the possible cues and mechanisms underlying these distribution patterns. PMID:25482897

  19. Local anesthetic update.

    PubMed Central

    MacKenzie, T. A.; Young, E. R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of new local anesthetics has not been an area of particularly active research for a number of years. However, as the use of regional anesthesia has expanded, additional anesthetic requirements and techniques have stimulated the search for newer drugs and ways of modifying existing ones. This article reviews some of the more recent developments in this field. PMID:8185087

  20. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Kenneth E.; Nielsen, Steven

    1991-01-01

    Discusses cabling that is needed in local area networks (LANs). Types of cables that may be selected are described, including twisted pair, coaxial cables (or ethernet), and fiber optics; network topologies, the manner in which the cables are laid out, are considered; and cable installation issues are discussed. (LRW)

  1. Global and Local Textuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, B. G.

    Coherence and cohesion are fundamental considerations of the composing process that help to define the global and local components of texuality. Global text coherence centers on those aspects of the familiar rhetorical situation. Coherence operates at the paragraph and essay levels, answering questions about focus, tone, mode, topic, and thesis.…

  2. Symbolic local information transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, K.; Haruna, T.

    2013-06-01

    Recently, the permutation-information theoretic approach has been used in a broad range of research fields. In particular, in the study of high-dimensional dynamical systems, it has been shown that this approach can be effective in characterizing global properties, including the complexity of their spatiotemporal dynamics. Here, we show that this approach can also be applied to reveal local spatiotemporal profiles of distributed computations existing at each spatiotemporal point in the system. J. T. Lizier et al. have recently introduced the concept of local information dynamics, which consists of information storage, transfer, and modification. This concept has been intensively studied with regard to cellular automata, and has provided quantitative evidence of several characteristic behaviors observed in the system. In this paper, by focusing on the local information transfer, we demonstrate that the application of the permutation-information theoretic approach, which introduces natural symbolization methods, makes the concept easily extendible to systems that have continuous states. We propose measures called symbolic local transfer entropies, and apply these measures to two test models, the coupled map lattice (CML) system and the Bak-Sneppen model (BS-model), to show their relevance to spatiotemporal systems that have continuous states. In the CML, we demonstrate that it can be successfully used as a spatiotemporal filter to stress a coherent structure buried in the system. In particular, we show that the approach can clearly stress out defect turbulences or Brownian motion of defects from the background, which gives quantitative evidence suggesting that these moving patterns are the information transfer substrate in the spatiotemporal system. We then show that these measures reveal qualitatively different properties from the conventional approach using the sliding window method, and are also robust against external noise. In the BS-model, we demonstrate that

  3. Local normal galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    In the near future, high energy (E greater than 20 MeV) gamma ray astronomy offers the promise of a new means of examining the closest galaxies. Two and possibly three local galaxies, the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and M31, should be visible to the high energy gamma ray telescope on the Gamma Ray Observatory, and the first should be seen by GAMMA-1. With the assumptions of adequate cosmic ray production and reasonable magnetic field strengths, both of which should likely be satisfied, specific predictions of the gamma ray emission can be made separating the concepts of the galactic and universal nature of cosmic rays. A study of the synchrotron radiation from the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) suggests that the cosmic ray density is similar to that in the local region of our galaxy, but not uniform. It is hoped the measurements will be able to verify this independent of assumptions about the magnetic fields in the LMC.

  4. Thermodynamics "beyond" local equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilar, Jose; Rubi, Miguel

    2002-03-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics has shown its applicability in a wide variety of different situations pertaining to fields such as physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. As successful as it is, however, its current formulation considers only systems close to equilibrium, those satisfying the so-called local equilibrium hypothesis. Here we show that diffusion processes that occur far away from equilibrium can be viewed as at local equilibrium in a space that includes all the relevant variables in addition to the spatial coordinate. In this way, nonequilibrium thermodynamics can be used and the difficulties and ambiguities associated with the lack of a thermodynamic description disappear. We analyze explicitly the inertial effects in diffusion and outline how the main ideas can be applied to other situations. [J.M.G. Vilar and J.M. Rubi, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 11081-11084 (2001)].

  5. Broadband local dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labardi, M.; Lucchesi, M.; Prevosto, D.; Capaccioli, S.

    2016-05-01

    A route to extend the measurement bandwidth of local dielectric spectroscopy up to the MHz range has been devised. The method is based on a slow amplitude modulation at a frequency Ω of the excitation field oscillating at a frequency ω and the coherent detection of the modulated average electric force or force gradient at Ω. The cantilever mechanical response does not affect the measurement if Ω is well below its resonant frequency; therefore, limitations on the excitation field frequency are strongly reduced. Demonstration on a thin poly(vinyl acetate) film is provided, showing its structural relaxation spectrum on the local scale up to 45 °C higher than glass temperature, and nanoscale resolution dielectric relaxation imaging near conductive nanowires embedded in the polymer matrix was obtained up to 5 MHz frequency, with no physical reason to hinder further bandwidth extension.

  6. Stable local oscillator module.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2007-11-01

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) multi-chip module (MCM). It is a follow-on report to SAND2006-6414, Stable Local Oscillator Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. This report describes the development of an MCM-based version of the complete StaLO, fabricated on an alumina thick film hybrid substrate.

  7. Localized and systemic scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Hawk, A; English, J C

    2001-03-01

    Scleroderma is a broad term encompassing both localized and systemic sclerosis. Localized scleroderma is a cutaneous limited fibrosis that manifests as plaque morphea, generalized morphea, linear scleroderma, and deep morphea. Systemic scleroderma (sclerosis) can manifest as either limited or diffuse disease. Limited systemic sclerosis is typically preceded by Raynaud's phenomenon, involves cutaneous sclerosis distal to the elbows, with gastrointestinal and pulmonary fibrosis, and anticentromere antibody positivity. Diffuse systemic scleroderma is characterized by simultaneous Raynaud's phenomenon, cutaneous skin involvement proximal to the elbow with gastrointestinal, pulmonary, renal and cardiac fibrosis, and positive serology for antitopoisomerase and anti-RNAP III antibodies. This article discusses the classification, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, treatment, and prognosis of the scleroderma.

  8. THz Local Oscillator Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran

    2004-01-01

    The last decade has seen a number of technological advancements that have now made it possible to implement fully solid state local oscillator chains up to 2 THz. These chains are composed of cascaded planar multiplier stages that are pumped with W-band high power sources. The high power W-band sources are achieved by power combining MMIC amplifiers and can provide in access of 150 mW with about 10% bandwidth. Planar diode technology has also enabled novel circuit topologies that can take advantage of the high input power and demonstrate significant efficiencies well into the THz range. Cascaded chains to 1.9 THz have now been demonstrated with enough output power to successfully pump hot-electron bolometer mixers in this frequency range. An overview of the current State-of-the-Art of the local oscillator technology will be presented along with highlighting future trends and challenges.

  9. The Local Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Helfer, H.L.

    2005-10-21

    The observations of the extended rotation curves of some galaxies provide important constraints upon the nature of the local dark matter present in the halos of these galaxies. Using these constraints, one can show that the halo dark matter cannot be some population of conventional astronomical objects and (most probably) cannot be a population of exotic non-interacting particles. We suggest that the halos can be regarded as large spatial fluctuations in a classic scalar field.

  10. Acoustics Local Area Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-31

    contract was to provide a shared computing i : resource - the acou tics local area network (ALAN) - to support ocean acoustic and related oceanographic...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION OF ABSTRACT OF REPORT: THIS PAGE OF ABSTRACT Unclassified I I ONRCtI COMPUTER V 10 11/94 STANDARD FORM 233 (REV 241) oo 0 90 " VLNV1LV HNO Og6OuLtOI, CT:tT 96/OT/0

  11. Local Anesthetic Microencapsulation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-04

    tollowing I.M. injection of microencapsulated lidocaine and etidocaine than following solution injections. Local toxicity of these microcapsule injections...Distribution 41 Table 12 Processing Summary of Lidocaine (Base) 43 Microencapsulation Table 13 Lidocaine (Base) Microcapsule Size 44 Distribution...Table 14 Processing Summary of Et’idocaine-HCl 45 Microencapsulation Table 15 Etidocaine-HCl Microcapsule Size 47 Distribution Table 16 Process Summary

  12. The local mass density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    An improved mass-luminosity relation for faint main-sequence stars derived from recently revised masses for some faint double stars is presented. The total local mass density is increased to nearly 0.2 solar masses per cu pc. This estimate is as large as the mass density required by Oort's (1965) dynamical analysis of stellar motions perpendicular to the galactic plane if the mass is concentrated in a narrow layer.

  13. Localized solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Hadi; Marconnet, Amy Marie; Chen, Gang; Ni, George Wei

    2016-10-04

    A localized heating structure, and method of forming same, for use in solar systems includes a thermally insulating layer having interconnected pores, a density of less than about 3000 kg/m.sup.3, and a hydrophilic surface, and an expanded carbon structure adjacent to the thermally insulating layer. The expanded carbon structure has a porosity of greater than about 80% and a hydrophilic surface.

  14. Enhanced local tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.; Ramm, Alexander G.

    1996-01-01

    Local tomography is enhanced to determine the location and value of a discontinuity between a first internal density of an object and a second density of a region within the object. A beam of radiation is directed in a predetermined pattern through the region of the object containing the discontinuity. Relative attenuation data of the beam is determined within the predetermined pattern having a first data component that includes attenuation data through the region. In a first method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, the relative attenuation data is inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA. to define the location S of the density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA. is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA.. In a second method for evaluating the value of the discontinuity, a gradient value for a mollified local tomography function .gradient..function..sub..LAMBDA..epsilon. (x.sub.ij) is determined along the discontinuity; and the value of the jump of the density across the discontinuity curve (or surface) S is estimated from the gradient values.

  15. Simulating the local Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorce, J. G.

    2016-12-01

    In the local Universe, cosmic structures can be observed down to very small scales, scales on which the standard cosmological model might fail. Such detailed observations have to be compared with simulations in order to verify the predictions of different cosmological models. However, the cosmic variance can obscure the tests. More precisely, comparisons on a one-to-one basis are feasible only with simulations that look like the local Universe. Constrained by observed positions and peculiar velocities of galaxies, the simulations presented here reproduce locally the three-dimensional distribution of matter. Within a sphere of radius 100 hMpc, the observed nearby Large and Small Scale Structure is simulated with an accuracy of a few megaparsecs. These simulations include our nearest cluster neighbor, Virgo, allowing a detailed study of its formation history. It follows that the Virgo cluster has had a quiet merging history within the last seven gigayears. In the near future, zoom-in hydrodynamical simulations of the later will permit deeper comparisons with observations.

  16. ADAM12 localizes with c-Src to actin-rich structures at the cell periphery and regulates Src kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Stautz, Dorte; Sanjay, Archana; Hansen, Matilde Thye; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Wewer, Ulla M; Kveiborg, Marie

    2010-01-01

    ADAM12 is an active metalloprotease playing an important role in tumour progression. Human ADAM12 exists in two splice variants: a long transmembrane form, ADAM12-L, and a secreted form, ADAM12-S. The subcellular localization of ADAM12-L is tightly regulated and involves intracellular interaction partners and signalling proteins. We demonstrate here a c-Src-dependent redistribution of ADAM12-L from perinuclear areas to actin-rich Src-positive structures at the cell periphery, and identified two separate c-Src binding sites in the cytoplasmic tail of ADAM12-L that interact with the SH3 domain of c-Src with different binding affinities. The association between ADAM12-L and c-Src is transient, but greatly stabilized when the c-Src kinase activity is disrupted. In agreement with this observation, kinase-active forms of c-Src induce ADAM12-L tyrosine phosphorylation. Interestingly, ADAM12-L was also found to enhance Src kinase activity in response to external signals, such as integrin engagement. Thus, we suggest that activated c-Src binds, phosphorylates, and redistributes ADAM12-L to specific sites at the cell periphery, which may in turn promote signalling mechanisms regulating cellular processes with importance in cancer.

  17. Observations of Local Seychelles Circulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    marine applications while providing context for larger scale NASCar efforts. A key objective for the project is to establish local capacity for ocean ...input for local scale numerical modeling. • Development of local ocean -observing capabilities including in situ and autonomous methods. • Development...along with interactions of larger scale ocean forcing with variations in local dynamics. APPROACH The physical oceanography of the

  18. Local Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Campo, Paloma; Salas, María; Blanca-López, Natalia; Rondón, Carmen

    2016-05-01

    This review focuses on local allergic rhinitis, a new phenotype of allergic rhinitis, commonly misdiagnosed as nonallergic rhinitis. It has gained attention over last decade and can affect patients from all countries, ethnic groups and ages, impairing their quality of life, and is frequently associated with conjunctivitis and asthma. Diagnosis is based on clinical history, the demonstration of a positive response to nasal allergen provocation test and/or the detection of nasal sIgE. A positive basophil activation test may support the diagnosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that allergen immunotherapy is an effective immune-modifying treatment, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis.

  19. The Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferlet, Roger

    Substantial progress in the field of the Local Interstellar Medium has been largely due to recent launches of space missions, mostly in the UV and X-ray domains, but also to ground-based observations, mainly in high resolution spectroscopy. However, a clear gap seems to remain between the wealth of new data and the theoretical understanding. This paper gives an overview of some observational aspects, with no attempt of completeness or doing justice to all the people involved in the field. As progress rarely evolves in straight paths, we can expect that our present picture of the solar system surroundings is not definitive.

  20. Local Group Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Delgado, David

    2013-11-01

    List of contributors; List of participants; Preface; Acknowledgments; Abbreviations; 1. The formation of the Milky Way in the CDM paradigm Ken Freeman; 2. Dark matter content and tidal effects in Local Group dwarf galaxies Steven R. Majewski; 3. Notes on the missing satellites problem James Bullock; 4. The Milky Way satellite galaxies Pavel Kroupa; 5. Stellar tidal streams Rodrigo Ibata; 6. Tutorial: the analysis of colour-magnitude diagrams David Valls-Gabaud; 7. Tutorial: modeling tidal streams using N-body simulations Jorge Peñarrubia.

  1. [Localized myositis with eosinophilia].

    PubMed

    Serratrice, G; Pellissier, J F; Lachard, A; Pouget, J; Lachard, J

    1985-03-02

    A 49-year old man developed myositis of the left masticatory muscles followed by myositis of the right supinator longus; these two lesions were histologically confirmed. Blood and bone marrow eosinophilia was present. Cure was obtained with systemic corticosteroids. Only one similar case was found in the literature. These cases differ from the various localized or focal forms of myositis as well as from eosinophilic polymyositis. Despite some similarities with masseteric myopathies in animals, no hypothesis can be formulated concerning the cause of the disease.

  2. Research fuels local economies

    SciTech Connect

    Bosisio, M. )

    1990-04-01

    Research from US DOA-Agricultural Research Service (ARS) has resulted in a number of new products, alternative crops, and an increase in planted acreage of crops due to pest control by pheromones. Superslurper, produced from cornstarch, was found to absorb 1400 times its weight in moisture. This material is being used in fuel filters to remove water in fuel tanks and pumps. There is a growing market for these filters; superslurpers also are used in body powders, diapers, absorbent soft goods, batteries, soil additives, and in medical and recreational coldpacks. Local economies have benefited as a direct result of ARS efforts.

  3. Acoustic sniper localization system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, Gervasio; Dhaliwal, Hardave; Martel, Philip O.

    1997-02-01

    Technologies for sniper localization have received increased attention in recent months as American forces have been deployed to various trouble spots around the world. Among the technologies considered for this task acoustics is a natural choice for various reasons. The acoustic signatures of gunshots are loud and distinctive, making them easy to detect even in high noise background environments. Acoustics provides a passive sensing technology with excellent range and non line of sight capabilities. Last but not least, an acoustic sniper location system can be built at a low cost with off the shelf components. Despite its many advantages, the performance of acoustic sensors can degrade under adverse propagation conditions. Localization accuracy, although good, is usually not accurate enough to pinpoint a sniper's location in some scenarios (for example which widow in a building or behind which tree in a grove). For these more demanding missions, the acoustic sensor can be used in conjunction with an infra red imaging system that detects the muzzle blast of the gun. The acoustic system can be used to cue the pointing system of the IR camera in the direction of the shot's source.

  4. Pattern Driven Stress Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croll, Andrew; Crosby, Alfred

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of patterns from isotropic initial states is a major driver of modern soft-matter research. This avenue of study is directed by the desire to understand the complex physics of the varied structures found in Nature, and by technological interest in functional materials that may be derived through biomimicry. In this work we show how a simple striped phase can respond with significant complexity to an appropriately chosen perturbation. In particular, we show how a buckled elastic plate transitions into a state of stress localization using a simple, self-assembled variation in surface topography. The collection of topographic boundaries act in concert to change the state from isotropic sinusoidal wrinkles, to sharp folds or creases separated by relatively flat regions. By varying the size of the imposed topographic pattern or the wavelength of the wrinkles, we construct a state diagram of the system. The localized state has implications for both biological systems, and for the control of non-linear pattern formation.

  5. Passive Acoustic Vessel Localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwal, Pasang Sherpa

    This thesis investigates the development of a low-cost passive acoustic system for localizing moving vessels to monitor areas where human activities such as fishing, snorkeling and poaching are restricted. The system uses several off-the-shelf sensors with unsynchronized clocks where the Time Difference of Arrival (TDOA) or time delay is extracted by cross-correlation of the signal between paired sensors. The cross-correlation function uses phase correlation or Phase Transform (PHAT) which whitens the cross-spectrum in order to de-emphasize dominant frequency components. Using the locations of pairs of sensors as foci, hyperbolic equations can be defined using the time delay between them. With three or more sensors, multiple hyperbolic functions can be calculated which intersect at a unique point: the boat's location. It is also found that increasing separation distances between sensors decreased the correlation between the signals. However larger separation distances have better localization capability than with small distances. Experimental results from the Columbia and Willamette Rivers are presented to demonstrate performance.

  6. Draining the Local Void

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzi, Luca; Tully, R. Brent; Shaya, Edward J.; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Karachentsev, Igor D.

    2017-01-01

    Two galaxies that lie deep within the Local Void provide a test of the expectation that voids expand. The modest ({M}B∼ -14) HI bearing dwarf galaxies ALFAZOAJ1952+1428 and KK246 have been imaged with Hubble Space Telescope in order to study the stellar populations and determine distances from the luminosities of stars at the tip of the red giant branch. The mixed age systems have respective distances of 8.39 Mpc and 6.95 Mpc and inferred line-of-sight peculiar velocities of ‑114 km s‑1 and ‑66 km s‑1 toward us and away from the void center. These motions compound on the Milky Way motion of ∼230 km s‑1 away from the void. The orbits of the two galaxies are reasonably constrained by a numerical action model encompassing an extensive region that embraces the Local Void. It is unambiguously confirmed that these two void galaxies are moving away from the void center at several hundred km s‑1.

  7. Generalized local emission tomography

    DOEpatents

    Katsevich, Alexander J.

    1998-01-01

    Emission tomography enables locations and values of internal isotope density distributions to be determined from radiation emitted from the whole object. In the method for locating the values of discontinuities, the intensities of radiation emitted from either the whole object or a region of the object containing the discontinuities are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the isotope density discontinuity. The asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) is determined in a neighborhood of S, and the value for the discontinuity is estimated from the asymptotic behavior of .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) knowing pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object. In the method for determining the location of the discontinuity, the intensities of radiation emitted from an object are inputted to a local tomography function .function..sub..LAMBDA..sup.(.PHI.) to define the location S of the density discontinuity and the location .GAMMA. of the attenuation coefficient discontinuity. Pointwise values of the attenuation coefficient within the object need not be known in this case.

  8. [Localized scleroderma (morphea)].

    PubMed

    Bono, Waafa; Dupin, Nicolas

    2006-12-01

    DEFINITION AND FREQUENCY: Localized scleroderma, also known as morphea, is a sclerotic condition limited to the skin. The specific clinical entity depends on the extent, linear disposition and depth of the lesions. Morphea is ten times more prevalent than systemic sclerosis, and its prognosis is generally good: superficial forms resolve within 3 years. In the absence of symptoms, examinations to detect systemic involvement are purposeless. Plaque morphea is the most frequent clinical presentation. Serious manifestations include extensive morphea that may involve the entire skin or linear forms, especially in children, where they may be severe, especially on the face. There are no immunological markers clearly associated with morphea and no causative agents have been implicated in its pathogenesis, although sclerodermiform dermatitis is reported to be associated with some drugs and toxic agents. There is no consensual treatment for morphea. Treatment should be decided according to severity and extent of lesions. Limited lesions may be treated with local steroids such as class IV corticosteroids. Systemic treatment (methotrexate) should be discussed in extensive and linear forms when there is a risk of functional or esthetic complications.

  9. Local dynamic mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Foschia, Raphael; Jobin, Marc; Hengsberger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    While new materials with tailored properties appear every day, the need of appropriate characterization tools is still an important concern. Analyses of thin films on thick substrate are often highly influenced by the substrate properties. A dynamical nanoindentation system has been designed and built through the integration of a nanoindenter head equipped with capacitive displacement sensing, scanning probe microscope with related XYZ scanning electronics and an additional transducer for sample actuation. Our Local-Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (L-DMA) setup allows for both, tip and sample modulation mode what somehow contrasts with commercially available systems. This issue allows for direct comparison between both techniques and therefore for consistent quantitative mechanical measurements. The system offers two distinctive measurement techniques, local mechanical spectroscopy and mechanical imaging modes. Bulk materials as well as thin films of ceramics and polymers have been used for testing and validating the setup. The instrument has been modeled in sample modulation mode and experimental results obtained for different materials were compared with simulation data.

  10. Locality and reality

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, Henry P.

    1980-10-01

    Einstein's principle that no signal travels faster than suggests that observations in one spacetime region should not depend on whether or not a radioactive decay is detected in a spacelike separated region. This locality property is incompatible with the predictions of quantum theory, and this incompatibility holds independently of the questions of realism, objective reality, and hidden variables. It holds both in the pragmatic quantum theory of Bohr and in realistic frameworks. It is shown here to hold in a completed realistic quantum theory that reconciles Einstein's demand for a description of reality itself with Bohr's contention that quantum theory is complete. This completed realistic quantum theory has no hidden variables, and no objective reality in which observable attributes can become definite independently of observers. The, theory is described in some detail, with particular attention to those aspects related to the question of locality. This completed realistic quantum theory is in principle more comprehensive than Bohr.' s pragmatic quantum theory because it is not limited in principle by the requirement that the observed system be physically separated from the observing one. Applications are discussed.

  11. Local Shape from Texture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenholtz, Ruth Ellen

    Human observers can judge the 3D shape and orientation of a surface from a number of different cues such as motion, binocular stereopsis, and texture. All of these cues are based on the information in two or more perspective views of the same surface in the scene. In structure from motion, the relative motion of the observer and the surface generates different views of the surface. In stereopsis, two eyes or cameras give slightly different views of the surface. One can think of shape from texture in this framework as well. Consider two textured patches of a surface in the scene. Even if the patches have the same texture pattern, in an image they will appear slightly different because of the slightly different orientation that they have with respect to the observer's eye or camera. Thus we effectively get multiple views in a single, monocular image. This framework suggests that we should treat the shape from texture problem as a two stage problem, as one would treat stereopsis or structure from motion: (1) Estimate the "texture distortion" from the image, and (2) Interpret the "texture distortion" to infer the shape and orientation of the surface. Here, measuring the "texture distortion" corresponds to finding the binocular disparity in stereopsis, or computing the optical flow in structure from motion. We assume that the texture has stationary second -order statistics on the surface in the scene. This assumption suggests that one measure the deviation from stationarity in the image, i.e., by estimating the local power spectrum and measuring its distortion from one part of the image to another. We model the texture distortion locally as an affine transformation between neighboring image patches. We demonstrate two related methods for measuring the local texture distortion. In the first of these methods, we use a differential method to find the affine transforms explicitly. The differential method bears strong resemblances to differential techniques for finding

  12. Local realism is dead, long live local realism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    Rebecca Holmes describes groundbreaking experiments that finally closed the long-standing loopholes in Bell tests, suggesting the end of the road for local realism. But could local realism yet live on?

  13. A Global Census of Fission Yeast Deubiquitinating Enzyme Localization and Interaction Networks Reveals Distinct Compartmentalization Profiles and Overlapping Functions in Endocytosis and Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Kouranti, Ilektra; McLean, Janel R.; Feoktistova, Anna; Liang, Ping; Johnson, Alyssa E.; Roberts-Galbraith, Rachel H.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitination and deubiquitination are reciprocal processes that tune protein stability, function, and/or localization. The removal of ubiquitin and remodeling of ubiquitin chains is catalyzed by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), which are cysteine proteases or metalloproteases. Although ubiquitination has been extensively studied for decades, the complexity of cellular roles for deubiquitinating enzymes has only recently been explored, and there are still several gaps in our understanding of when, where, and how these enzymes function to modulate the fate of polypeptides. To address these questions we performed a systematic analysis of the 20 Schizosaccharomyces pombe DUBs using confocal microscopy, proteomics, and enzymatic activity assays. Our results reveal that S. pombe DUBs are present in almost all cell compartments, and the majority are part of stable protein complexes essential for their function. Interestingly, DUB partners identified by our study include the homolog of a putative tumor suppressor gene not previously linked to the ubiquitin pathway, and two conserved tryptophan-aspartate (WD) repeat proteins that regulate Ubp9, a DUB that we show participates in endocytosis, actin dynamics, and cell polarity. In order to understand how DUB activity affects these processes we constructed multiple DUB mutants and find that a quintuple deletion of ubp4 ubp5 ubp9 ubp15 sst2/amsh displays severe growth, polarity, and endocytosis defects. This mutant allowed the identification of two common substrates for five cytoplasmic DUBs. Through these studies, a common regulatory theme emerged in which DUB localization and/or activity is modulated by interacting partners. Despite apparently distinct cytoplasmic localization patterns, several DUBs cooperate in regulating endocytosis and cell polarity. These studies provide a framework for dissecting DUB signaling pathways in S. pombe and may shed light on DUB functions in metazoans. PMID:20838651

  14. All Holdings Are Local: Archivists and Local Government Archives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell D.

    2004-01-01

    Archivists working in repositories that contain local government records play an integral role within the local community. Unlike their colleagues in state, regional, or national repositories, the local government archivist concentrates on a small geographic region and demonstrates knowledge of the politics, history, and socio-economics of the…

  15. THz Local Oscillator Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdi, Imran; Schlecht, Erich; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Siegel, Peter H.

    Most operational Submillimeter-wave radio telescopes, both space borne and ground based, employ local oscillator sources based on Gunn diodes followed by whisker contacted Schottky multipliers. Enough progress, however, has been made on a number of fronts to conclude that next generation of radio telescopes that become operational in the new Millennium will have a different local oscillator (LO) generation architecture. MMIC power amplifiers with impressive gain in the Ka- to-W band have enabled the use of microwave synthesizers which can then be actively multiplied to provide a frequency agile power source beyond 100 GHz. This medium power millimeter source can then be amplified to enable efficient pumping of follow-on balanced multiplier stages. Input power to the multipliers can be further enhanced by power combining to achieve close to half a Watt at W-band. An 800 GHz three-stage multiplier chain, implemented this way has demonstrated a peak output power of 1 mW. A second advance in LO generation lies in the Schottky diode varactor technology. Planar Schottky diode multipliers have now been demonstrated up to 1500 GHz and it can be assumed that most of the future multiplier chains will be based on these robust devices rather than the whisker contacted diode of the past. The ability to produce planar GaAs diode chips deep into the THz range, with submicron dimensions, has opened up a wide range of circuit design space which can be taken advantage of to improve efficiency, bandwidth, and power handling capability of the multipliers. A third breakthrough has been the demonstration of photonic based LO sources utilizing GaAs photomixers. These sources, though not yet implemented in robust space borne missions, offer a number of advantages over their electronic counterparts, including extremely broad tuning, fiber coupled components, and solid-state implementation. Another development, which holds some promise, is the use of micro-machining technology to implement

  16. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01

    This report gives a description of the development o