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Sample records for metalloproteinase-7 promotes cellular

  1. Immunohistochemical Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 in Human Colorectal Adenomas Using Specified Automated Cellular Image Analysis System: A Clinicopathological Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Ban J.; Ali, Hussam H.; Hussein, Alaa G.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: To evaluate the immunohistochemical expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) in colorectal adenomas, and to correlate this expression with different clinicopathological parameters. Patients and Methods: The study was retrospectively designed. Thirty three paraffin blocks from patients with colorectal adenoma and 20 samples of non-tumerous colonic tissue taken as control group were included in the study. MMP-7 expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry method. The scoring of immunohistochemical staining was conducted utilizing a specified automated cellular image analysis system (Digimizer). Results: The frequency of positive immunohistochemical expression of MMP-7 was significantly higher in adenoma than control group (45.45% versus 10%) (P value < 0.001). Strong MMP-7 staining was mainly seen in adenoma cases (30.30%) in comparison with control (0%) the difference is significant (P < 0.001). The three digital parameters of MMP-7 immunohistochemical expression (Area (A), Number of objects (N), and intensity (I)) were significantly higher in adenoma than control. Mean (A and I) of MMP-7 showed a significant correlation with large sized adenoma (≥ 1cm) (P < 0.05), also a significant positive correlation of the three digital parameters (A, N, and I) of MMP-7 expression with villous configuration and severe dysplasia in colorectal adenoma had been identified (P < 0.05). Conclusion: MMP-7 plays an important role in the growth and malignant conversion of colorectal adenomas as it is more likely to be expressed in advanced colorectal adenomatous polyps with large size, severe dysplasia and villous histology. The use of automated cellular image analysis system (Digmizer) to quantify immunohistochemical staining yields more consistent assay results, converts semi-quantitative assay to a truly quantitative assay, and improves assay objectivity and reproducibility. PMID:23319034

  2. Active matrix metalloproteinase-7 is associated with invasion in buccal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hui-Ching; Su, Chih-Ying; Huang, Hsuang-Ying; Huang, Chao-Cheng; Chien, Chih-Yen; Du, Yung-Ying; Chuang, Jiin-Haur

    2008-12-01

    Protein microarrays have shown that matrix metalloproteinase-7 is upregulated in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, but its role in local tissue invasion is still uncertain. We investigated the expression of active matrix metalloproteinase-7, using tissue microarray, immunohistochemistry, and western blotting, in oral tissues from 24 patients with buccal squamous cell carcinoma, and correlated the findings with clinicopathological features. Normal buccal tissue samples from the same patients, obtained at sites at least 1 cm from tumor tissue, served as normal controls. Total matrix metalloproteinase-7 was detected on western blots in 9 of 15 (60%) tumor tissue samples and in 2 of 15 (13%) normal mucosal samples; this difference was significant (P=0.008). Moreover, the active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was expressed only in eight of the nine (89%) tumor samples that expressed matrix metalloproteinase-7, and in none of the normal tissue samples, regardless of the expression status of the pro-matrix metalloproteinase-7. Immunostaining of matrix metalloproteinase-7 was observed histologically in both tumor and nonneoplastic epithelium, but immunostaining of active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was present only in tumor nests. Expression of active matrix metalloproteinase-7 was associated with larger tumor size (P=0.022) and was significantly higher in buccal squamous cell carcinoma with adjacent skin or bone invasion (P=0.036). In conclusion, active matrix metalloproteinase-7 expression was associated with more aggressive buccal squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:18931651

  3. Proliferative effects of apical, but not basal, matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in polarized MDCK cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, Permila C.; McCawley, Lisa J.; Fingleton, Barbara; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M. . E-mail: lynn.matrisian@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-02-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is primarily expressed in glandular epithelium. Therefore, its mechanism of action may be influenced by its regulated vectorial release to either the apical and/or basolateral compartments, where it would act on its various substrates. To gain a better understanding of where MMP-7 is released in polarized epithelium, we have analyzed its pattern of secretion in polarized MDCK cells expressing stably transfected human MMP-7 (MDCK-MMP-7), and HCA-7 and Caco2 human colon cancer cell lines. In all cell lines, latent MMP-7 was secreted to both cellular compartments, but was 1.5- to 3-fold more abundant in the basolateral compartment as compared to the apical. However, studies in the MDCK system demonstrated that MMP-7 activity was 2-fold greater in the apical compartment of MDCK-MMP-7{sup HIGH}-polarized monolayers, which suggests the apical co-release of an MMP-7 activator. In functional assays, MMP-7 over-expression increased cell saturation density as a result of increased cell proliferation with no effect on apoptosis. Apical MMP-7 activity was shown to be responsible for the proliferative effect, which occurred, as demonstrated by media transfer experiments, through cleavage of an apical substrate and not through the generation of a soluble factor. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the importance of MMP-7 secretion in relation to its mechanism of action when expressed in a polarized epithelium.

  4. Transcriptional Activation of Lysosomal Exocytosis Promotes Cellular Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Diego L.; Fraldi, Alessandro; Bouche, Valentina; Annunziata, Fabio; Mansueto, Gelsomina; Spampanato, Carmine; Puri, Claudia; Pignata, Antonella; Martina, Jose A.; Sardiello, Marco; Palmieri, Michela; Polishchuk, Roman; Puertollano, Rosa; Ballabio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lysosomes are cellular organelles primarily involved in degradation and recycling processes. During lysosomal exocytosis, a Ca2+-regulated process, lysosomes are docked to the cell surface and fuse with the plasma membrane (PM), emptying their content outside the cell. This process has an important role in secretion and PM repair. Here we show that the transcription factor EB (TFEB) regulates lysosomal exocytosis. TFEB increases the pool of lysosomes in the proximity of the PM and promotes their fusion with PM by raising intracellular Ca2+ levels through the activation of the lysosomal Ca2+ channel MCOLN1. Induction of lysosomal exocytosis by TFEB overexpression rescued pathologic storage and restored normal cellular morphology both in vitro and in vivo in lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Our data indicate that lysosomal exocytosis may directly modulate cellular clearance and suggest an alternative therapeutic strategy for disorders associated with intracellular storage. PMID:21889421

  5. Stiff substrates increase YAP-signaling-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nukuda, A; Sasaki, C; Ishihara, S; Mizutani, T; Nakamura, K; Ayabe, T; Kawabata, K; Haga, H

    2015-01-01

    Abnormally stiff substrates have been shown to trigger cancer progression. However, the detailed molecular mechanisms underlying this trigger are not clear. In this study, we cultured T84 human colorectal cancer cells on plastic dishes to create a stiff substrate or on collagen-I gel to create a soft substrate. The stiff substrate enhanced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7), an indicator of poor prognosis. In addition, we used polyacrylamide gels (2, 67 and 126 kPa) so that the MMP-7 expression on the 126-kPa gel was higher compared with that on the 2-kPa gel. Next, we investigated whether yes-associated protein (YAP) affected the MMP-7 expression. YAP knockdown decreased MMP-7 expression. Treatment with inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) and integrin-α2 or integrin-β1 knockdown downregulated MMP-7 expression. Finally, we demonstrated that YAP, EGFR, integrin-α2β1 and MRLC produced a positive feedback loop that enhanced MMP-7 expression. These findings suggest that stiff substrates enhanced colorectal cancer cell viability by upregulating MMP-7 expression through a positive feedback loop. PMID:26344692

  6. Matrix metalloproteinase 7 restrains Helicobacter pylori-induced gastric inflammation and premalignant lesions in the stomach by altering macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Krakowiak, M S; Noto, J M; Piazuelo, M B; Hardbower, D M; Romero-Gallo, J; Delgado, A; Chaturvedi, R; Correa, P; Wilson, K T; Peek, R M

    2015-04-01

    Helicobacter pylori is the strongest risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Although the specific mechanisms by which this pathogen induces carcinogenesis have not been fully elucidated, high-expression interleukin (IL)-1β alleles are associated with increased gastric cancer risk among H. pylori-infected persons. In addition, loss of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) increases mucosal inflammation in mouse models of epithelial injury, and we have shown that gastric inflammation is increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice. In this report, we define mechanisms that underpin such responses and extend these results into a genetic model of MMP7 deficiency and gastric cancer. Wild-type (WT) or MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice were challenged with broth alone as an uninfected control or the H. pylori strain PMSS1. All H. pylori-challenged mice were successfully colonized. As expected, H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) C57BL/6 mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with uninfected or infected WT C57BL/6 animals. Loss of MMP7 resulted in M1 macrophage polarization within H. pylori-infected stomachs, as assessed by Luminex technology and immunohistochemistry, and macrophages isolated from infected MMP7-deficient mice expressed significantly higher levels of the M1 macrophage marker IL-1β compared with macrophages isolated from WT mice. To extend these findings into a model of gastric cancer, hypergastrinemic WT INS-GAS or MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice were challenged with H. pylori strain PMSS1. Consistent with findings in the C57BL/6 model, H. pylori-infected MMP7-deficient INS-GAS mice exhibited a significant increase in gastric inflammation compared with either uninfected or infected WT INS-GAS mice. In addition, the incidence of gastric hyperplasia and dysplasia was significantly increased in H. pylori-infected MMP7(-/-) INS-GAS mice compared with infected WT INS-GAS mice, and loss of MMP7 promoted M1 macrophage polarization. These

  7. Cellular transformation by radiation: induction, promotion, and inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, C.

    1981-01-01

    Radiation oncogenesis induced in utero in hamsters is expressed at a lower frequency than that induced in vitro. Quantitative studies carried out on hamster embryo cells indicate that neutrons are more effective in their carcinogenic potential than x-rays but also more toxic, that splitting the dose of x-rays at low doses leads to enhanced transformation, but that at high doses protracted radiation has a sparing effect. At all dose ranges survival was increased by protracting the radiation dose, thus suggesting that different repair processes must be involved for survival and transformation. In our qualitative studies, once cells are transformed by radiation, they exhibit a wide range of structural and functional phenotypic changes, some of which are membrane-associated and are expressed within days after induction. Our current studies on nutritional and hormonal influences on radiation transformation indicate the following: Pyrolysate products from broiled protein foods act in synergism with radiation to produce transformation, whereas vitamin A analogs are powerful, preventive agents. Retinoids inhibit both x-ray-induced transformation and its promotion by TPA; these modifications (enhancement by TPA, inhibition by retinoids) are not reflected in sister chromatid exchanges, but are reflected in the level of membrane associated enzymes Na/K ATPase. Whereas retinoids modify late events (expression, promotion), we find that thyroid hormone plays a crucial role in the early phases of radiation and chemically induced transformation. Our recent success in transforming human skin fibroblasts will enable quantitative and qualitative studies of radiation carcinogenesis in a system relevant to man.

  8. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  9. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Casado, Fanny L

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  10. Integrins alpha4 and alpha M, collagen1A1, and matrix metalloproteinase 7 are upregulated in acute Kawasaki disease vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reindel, Rebecca; Baker, Susan C.; Kim, Kwang-Youn; Rowley, Carol A.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Orenstein, Jan M.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Lingen, Mark W.; Rowley, Anne H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Kawasaki Disease (KD) can result in fatal coronary artery aneurysms especially in untreated patients. Our recent studies of KD vascular pathology revealed subacute/chronic vasculitis that began early in the illness with proliferation of smooth muscle cell derived-myofibroblasts in a complex extracellular matrix (ECM). We hypothesized that there is dysregulation of specific ECM and adhesion molecules in KD coronary arteries. Methods Gene expression profiling for ECM and adhesion molecules was performed on 6 acute KD and 8 control coronary arteries using a targeted real-time PCR array approach. Results Integrins alpha4 and alphaM (ITGA4, ITGAM), collagen 1A1 (COL1A1), and matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) were significantly upregulated in KD coronary arteries compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry with anti- ITGAM antibodies revealed expression on inflammatory cells within the coronary artery wall in KD patients but not controls. Conclusion Integrins ITGA4 and ITGAM are upregulated in KD vasculopathy, likely promoting inflammatory recruitment that stimulates smooth muscle cell transition to myofibroblasts and their proliferation. MMP-7 likely enhances myofibroblast proliferation and luminal lesion expansion, and overexpression of COL1A1 may lead to coronary artery stenosis. Identification of the molecular pathogenesis of KD vasculopathy may lead to the development of circulating biomarkers and to directed therapeutic interventions. PMID:23344661

  11. Cellular or viral protein binding to a cytomegalovirus promoter transcription initiation site: effects on transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Macias, M P; Huang, L; Lashmit, P E; Stinski, M F

    1996-01-01

    We have previously shown that the IE2 protein of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) represses its own synthesis by binding to the major immediate-early promoter (M. P. Macias and M. F. Stinski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 90:707-711, 1993). The binding of a viral protein (IE2) and a cellular protein in the region of the transcription start site was investigated by site-specific mutational analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The viral protein and the cellular protein require different but adjacent core DNA sequence elements for binding. In situ chemical footprinting analysis of DNA-protein interactions with purified CMV IE2 protein or HeLa cell nuclear extracts demonstrated binding sites that overlap the transcription start site. The IE2 protein footprint was between bp -15 and +2, relative to the transcription start site, and the cellular protein was between bp -16 and +7. The ability of the unknown human cellular protein of approximately 150 kDa to bind the CMV major immediate-early promoter correlates with an increase in the level of transcription efficiency. Mutations in the core DNA sequence element for cellular protein binding significantly reduced the level of in vitro transcription efficiency. Mutations upstream and downstream of the core sequence moderately reduced the transcription efficiency level. Negative autoregulation of the CMV promoter by the viral IE2 protein may involve both binding to the DNA template and interference with the function of a cellular protein that binds to the transcription start site and enhances transcription efficiency. PMID:8648697

  12. Progranulin (granulin/epithelin precursor) and its constituent granulin repeats repress transcription from cellular promoters

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Mainul; Mathews, Michael B.; Pe’ery, Tsafi

    2010-01-01

    Progranulin (also known as granulin/epithelin precursor, GEP) is composed of seven granulin/epithelin repeats (granulins) and functions both as a full-length protein and as individual granulins. It is a secretory protein but a substantial amount of GEP is found inside cells, some in complexes with positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). GEP and certain granulins interact with the cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb, and with its HIV-1 Tat co-factor, leading to repression of transcription from the HIV promoter. We show that GEP lacking the signal peptide (GEPspm) remains inside cells and, like wild-type GEP, interacts with cyclin T1 and Tat. GEPspm represses transcription from the HIV-1 promoter at the RNA level. Granulins that bind cyclin T1 are phosphorylated by P-TEFb in vivo and in vitro on serine residues. GEPspm and those granulins that interact with cyclin T1 also inhibit transcription from cellular cad and c-myc promoters, which are highly dependent on P-TEFb, but not from the PCNA promoter. In addition, GEPspm and granulins repress transcriptional activation by VP16 or c-Myc, proteins that bind and recruit P-TEFb to responsive promoters. These data suggest that intracellular GEP is a promoter-specific transcriptional repressor that modulates the function of cellular and viral transcription factors. PMID:20054825

  13. The Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Polymorphism Rs10895304 Is Associated With Increased Recurrence Risk in Patients With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jaboin, Jerry J.; Hwang, Misun; Lopater, Zachary; Chen Heidi; Ray, Geoffrey L.; Perez, Carmen; Cai Qiuyin; Wills, Marcia L.; Lu Bo

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether selected high-risk matrix metalloproteinase-7 single nucleotide polymorphisms influence clinicopathologic outcomes in patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred twelve prostate cancer patients treated with radical prostatectomy were evaluated with a median follow-up of 9.8 years. Genotyping was performed using hybridization with custom-designed allele-specific probes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms within the matrix metalloproteinase-7 gene were assessed with respect to age at diagnosis, margin status, extracapsular extension, lymph node involvement, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival in paraffin-embedded prostate tissue specimens from patients with early-stage prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. Results: Rs10895304 was the sole significant polymorphism. The A/G genotype of rs10895304 had a statistically significant association with recurrence-free survival in postprostatectomy patients (p = 0.0061, log-rank test). The frequency of the risk-reducing genotype (A/A) was 74%, whereas that of the risk-enhancing genotypes (A/G and G/G) were 20% and 6%, respectively. Multivariable Cox regression analyses detected a significant association between rs10895304 and recurrences after adjustment for known prognostic factors. The G allele of this polymorphism was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer recurrence (adjusted hazards ratio, 3.375; 95% confidence interval 1.567-7.269; p < 0.001). The other assayed polymorphisms were not significant, and no correlations were made to other clinical variables. Conclusions: The A/G genotype of rs10895304 is predictive of decreased recurrence-free survival in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Our data suggest that for this subset of patients, prostatectomy alone may not be adequate for local control. This is a novel and relevant marker that should be evaluated for improved risk stratification of patients who

  14. Upregulation of Cellular Bcl-2 by the KSHV Encoded RTA Promotes Virion Production

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jianming; Cai, Qiliang; Lu, Jie; Jha, Hem Chandra; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-01-01

    Apoptosis of virus infected cells can restrict or dampen full blown virus propagation and this can serve as a protective mechanism against virus infection. Consequently, viruses can also delay programmed cell death by enhancing the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Human Bcl-2 is expressed on the surface of the mitochondrial membrane and functions as the regulator of the delicate balance between cell survival and apoptosis. In this report, we showed that the replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by KSHV ORF 50, a key regulator for KSHV reactivation from latent to lytic infection, upregulates the mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2 in 293 cells, and TPA-induced KSHV-infected cells. Further analysis revealed that upregulation of the cellular Bcl-2 promoter by RTA is dose-dependent and acts through targeting of the CCN9GG motifs within the Bcl-2 promoter. The Bcl-2 P2 but not the P1 promoter is primarily responsive to RTA. The results of ChIP confirmed the direct interaction of RTA protein with the CCN9GG motifs. Knockdown of cellular Bcl-2 by lentivirus-delivered small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in increased cell apoptosis and decreased virion production in KSHV-infected cells. These findings provide an insight into another mechanism by which KSHV utilizes the intrinsic apoptosis signaling pathways for prolonging the survival of lytically infected host cells to allow for maximum production of virus progeny. PMID:21901143

  15. Cellular Energy Depletion Resets Whole-Body Energy by Promoting Coactivator Mediated Dietary Fuel Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Atul R.; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Saha, Pradip; Louet, Jean-Francois; Salazar, Christina; Song, Junghun; Jeong, Jaewook; Finegold, Milton; Viollet, Benoit; DeMayo, Franco; Chan, Lawrence; Moore, David D.; O'Malley, Bert W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary All organisms have devised strategies to counteract energy depletion in order to promote fitness for survival. We show here that cellular energy depletion puts into play a surprising strategy that leads to absorption of exogenous fuel for energy repletion. We found that the energy depletion sensing kinase AMPK, binds, phosphorylates, and activates the transcriptional coactivator SRC-2, which in a liver-specific manner, promotes absorption of dietary fat from the gut. Hepatocyte-specific deletion of SRC-2 results in intestinal fat malabsorption and attenuated entry of fat into the blood stream. This defect can be attributed to AMPK and SRC-2 mediated transcriptional regulation of hepatic bile-acid secretion into the gut, as it can be completely rescued by replenishing intestinal BA, or by genetically restoring the levels of hepatic Bile Salt Export Pump (BSEP). Our results position the hepatic AMPK-SRC-2 axis as an energy rheostat which upon cellular energy depletion resets whole-body energy by promoting absorption of dietary fuel. PMID:21195347

  16. The Drosophila Cyclin D–Cdk4 complex promotes cellular growth

    PubMed Central

    Datar, Sanjeev A.; Jacobs, Henning W.; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A.; Lehner, Christian F.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cyclin D–Cdk4 complexes have been characterized as growth factor-responsive cell cycle regulators. Their levels rise upon growth factor stimulation, and they can phosphorylate and thus neutralize Retinoblastoma (Rb) family proteins to promote an E2F-dependent transcriptional program and S-phase entry. Here we characterize the in vivo function of Drosophila Cyclin D (CycD). We find that Drosophila CycD–Cdk4 does not act as a direct G1/S-phase regulator, but instead promotes cellular growth (accumulation of mass). The cellular response to CycD–Cdk4-driven growth varied according to cell type. In undifferentiated proliferating wing imaginal cells, CycD–Cdk4 caused accelerated cell division (hyperplasia) without affecting cell cycle phasing or cell size. In endoreplicating salivary gland cells, CycD–Cdk4 caused excessive DNA replication and cell enlargement (hypertrophy). In differentiating eyes, CycD–Cdk4 caused cell enlargement (hypertrophy) in post-mitotic cells. Interaction tests with a Drosophila Rb homolog, RBF, indicate that CycD–Cdk4 can counteract the cell cycle suppressive effects of RBF, but that its growth promoting activity is mediated at least in part via other targets. PMID:10970848

  17. Chromatin remodeling of human subtelomeres and TERRA promoters upon cellular senescence: commonalities and differences between chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Peter E; Tobi, Elmar W; Balog, Judit; Schouten, Suzanne G; Kremer, Dennis; El Bouazzaoui, Fatiha; Henneman, Peter; Putter, Hein; Eline Slagboom, P; Heijmans, Bastiaan T; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2013-05-01

    Subtelomeres are patchworks of evolutionary conserved sequence blocks and harbor the transcriptional start sites for telomere repeat containing RNAs (TERRA). Recent studies suggest that the interplay between telomeres and subtelomeric chromatin is required for maintaining telomere function. To further characterize chromatin remodeling of subtelomeres in relation to telomere shortening and cellular senescence, we systematically quantified histone modifications and DNA methylation at the subtelomeres of chromosomes 7q and 11q in primary human WI-38 fibroblasts. Upon senescence, both subtelomeres were characterized by a decrease in markers of constitutive heterochromatin, suggesting relative chromatin relaxation. However, we did not find increased levels of markers of euchromatin or derepression of the 7q VIPR2 gene. The repressed state of the subtelomeres was maintained upon senescence, which could be attributed to a rise in levels of facultative heterochromatin markers at both subtelomeres. While senescence-induced subtelomeric chromatin remodeling was similar for both chromosomes, chromatin remodeling at TERRA promoters displayed chromosome-specific patterns. At the 7q TERRA promoter, chromatin structure was co-regulated with the more proximal subtelomere. In contrast, the 11q TERRA promoter, which was previously shown to be bound by CCCTC-binding factor CTCF, displayed lower levels of markers of constitutive heterochromatin that did not change upon senescence, whereas levels of markers of facultative heterochromatin decreased upon senescence. In line with the chromatin state data, transcription of 11q TERRA but not 7q TERRA was detected. Our study provides a detailed description of human subtelomeric chromatin dynamics and shows distinct regulation of the TERRA promoters of 7q and 11q upon cellular senescence.

  18. Does maggot therapy promote wound healing? The clinical and cellular evidence.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Y; Morgan, C

    2016-05-01

    The larvae of Lucillia sericata, or maggots of the green-bottle fly, are used worldwide to help debride chronic, necrotic and infected wounds. Whilst there is abundant clinical and scientific evidence to support the role of maggots for debriding and disinfecting wounds, not so much emphasis has been placed on their role in stimulating wound healing. However, there is accumulating evidence to suggest that maggots and their externalized secretions may also promote wound healing in stubborn, recalcitrant chronic ulcers. There are a growing number of clinical reports which support the observation that wounds which have been exposed to a course of maggot debridement therapy also show earlier healing and closure end-points. In addition, recent pre-clinical laboratory studies also indicate that maggot secretions can promote important cellular processes which explain this increased healing activity. Such processes include activation of fibroblast migration, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels) within the wound bed, and an enhanced production of growth factors within the wound environment. Thus, in this review, we summarize the clinical evidence which links maggots and improved wound healing, and we précis recent scientific studies which examine and identify the role of maggots, particularly individual components of maggot secretions, on specific cellular aspects of wound healing.

  19. Resveratrol attenuates renal injury and fibrosis by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β pathway on matrix metalloproteinase 7

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhou; Chen, Chen; Meng, Ting; Zhang, Wenzheng

    2015-01-01

    Renal injury has a strong relationship to the subsequent development of renal fibrosis. In developing renal fibrosis, tubular epithelial cells in the kidney underwent epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) was reported to reduce E-cadherin and induce EMT by up-regulation of β-catenin/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) signaling. In this research, we tried to evaluate the role of resveratrol (RSV) on EMT process in renal injury and fibrosis. Human tubular epithelial cell HK-2 cells were treated with aristolochic acid (AAs) and transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) to induce EMT with or without the administration of RSV. The inhibitory role of RSV on EMT in renal injury and fibrosis was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunofluorescence staining. The EMT repressing role of RSV was also evaluated in vivo by renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) models. The underlying mechanism was investigated by shRNA interfering MMP7 and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression. The results indicated that RSV reversed human kidney 2 (HK-2) cell EMT, renal I/R injury, and renal fibrosis. MMP7 inhibition was responsible for RSV-induced EMT repression. SIRT1 was up-regulated by RSV inhibited TGF-β pathway on MMP7 via deacetylating Smad4. In conclusion, RSV attenuated renal injury and fibrosis by inhibiting EMT process which was attributed to the fact that the up-regulated SIRT1 by RSV deacetylated Smad4 and inhibited MMP7 expression. PMID:26316584

  20. Resveratrol attenuates renal injury and fibrosis by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β pathway on matrix metalloproteinase 7.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhou; Chen, Chen; Meng, Ting; Zhang, Wenzheng; Zhou, Qiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Renal injury has a strong relationship to the subsequent development of renal fibrosis. In developing renal fibrosis, tubular epithelial cells in the kidney underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7) was reported to reduce E-cadherin and induce EMT by up-regulation of β-catenin/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 (LEF1) signaling. In this research, we tried to evaluate the role of resveratrol (RSV) on EMT process in renal injury and fibrosis. Human tubular epithelial cell HK-2 cells were treated with aristolochic acid (AAs) and transforming growth factor-β(TGF-β) to induce EMT with or without the administration of RSV. The inhibitory role of RSV on EMT in renal injury and fibrosis was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunofluorescence staining. The EMT repressing role of RSV was also evaluated in vivo by renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury and unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) models. The underlying mechanism was investigated by shRNA interfering MMP7 and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expression. The results indicated that RSV reversed human kidney 2 (HK-2) cell EMT, renal I/R injury, and renal fibrosis. MMP7 inhibition was responsible for RSV-induced EMT repression. SIRT1 was up-regulated by RSV inhibited TGF-β pathway on MMP7 via deacetylating Smad4. In conclusion, RSV attenuated renal injury and fibrosis by inhibiting EMT process which was attributed to the fact that the up-regulated SIRT1 by RSV deacetylated Smad4 and inhibited MMP7 expression.

  1. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 (-181A>G) Polymorphism with Risk of Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Kashmir Valley

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Manzoor A.; Sharma, Kiran L.; Zargar, Showket A.; Mittal, Balraj

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aim: Degradation of the basement membrane and extracellular matrix by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is believed to be an essential step in the complicated process of hematogenous metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7) is a small secreted proteolytic enzyme with a broad substrate specificity, and its expression has been shown to be associated with tumor invasion and metastasis for various cancers. Patients and Methods: To document the role of MMP-7 polymorphism in esophageal carcinogenesis, a case-control study was performed comprising 135 patients with esophageal cancer (EC) and 195 healthy controls. Genotyping was done by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Data were statistically analyzed using χ2 - test and logistic regression models. Results: Carriers for the MMP-7 (-181A>G) GG were associated with an increased risk for EC [odds ratio (OR = 2.17; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.21-3.92; P = 0.010; P-trend = 0.04]. Also, in a recessive model, our results showed that MMP-7 (-181A>G) GG allele conferred significantly higher risk for EC (OR =2.16; 95% CI = 1.31-3.54; P = 0.003). The high risk due to MMP-7 (-181GG) genotype was limited to squamous cell histology of EC (OR = 2.41; 95% CI = 1.27-4.56; P = 0.007). Although smoking (Hukka) and high consumption of salted tea are independent risk factors for EC, the interaction of MMP-7 (-181A>G) genotypes with these factors did not further modulate the risk of EC. Conclusions: In conclusion, our results show that MMP-7 (-181A>G) GG carriers are at a higher risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Kashmir valley. PMID:21912055

  2. Lentiviral gene therapy using cellular promoters cures type 1 Gaucher disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease.

  3. Promoter analysis of the membrane protein gp64 gene of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum.

    PubMed

    Takaoka, N; Fukuzawa, M; Saito, T; Sakaitani, T; Ochiai, H

    1999-10-28

    We cloned a genomic fragment of the membrane protein gp64 gene of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pallidum by inverse PCR. Primer extension analysis identified a major transcription start site 65 bp upstream of the translation start codon. The promoter region of the gp64 gene contains sequences homologous to a TATA box at position -47 to -37 and to an initiator (Inr, PyPyCAPyPyPyPy) at position -3 to +5 from the transcription start site. Successively truncated segments of the promoter were tested for their ability to drive expression of the beta-galactosidase reporter gene in transformed cells; also the difference in activity between growth conditions was compared. The results indicated that there are two positive vegetative regulatory elements extending between -187 and -62 bp from the transcription start site of the gp64 promoter; also their activity was two to three times higher in the cells grown with bacteria in shaken suspension than in the cells grown in an axenic medium. PMID:10542319

  4. Lentiviral gene therapy using cellular promoters cures type 1 Gaucher disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Maria; Doyle, Alexander; Olsson, Karin; Månsson, Jan-Eric; Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M; Ehinger, Mats; Rothe, Michael; Modlich, Ute; Schambach, Axel; Karlsson, Stefan

    2015-05-01

    Gaucher disease is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme glucosylceramidase. Due to the lack of a fully functional enzyme, there is progressive build-up of the lipid component glucosylceramide. Insufficient glucosylceramidase activity results in hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenias, and bone disease in patients. Gene therapy represents a future therapeutic option for patients unresponsive to enzyme replacement therapy and lacking a suitable bone marrow donor. By proof-of-principle experiments, we have previously demonstrated a reversal of symptoms in a murine disease model of type 1 Gaucher disease, using gammaretroviral vectors harboring strong viral promoters to drive glucosidase β-acid (GBA) gene expression. To investigate whether safer vectors can correct the enzyme deficiency, we utilized self-inactivating lentiviral vectors (SIN LVs) with the GBA gene under the control of human phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and CD68 promoter, respectively. Here, we report prevention of, as well as reversal of, manifest disease symptoms after lentiviral gene transfer. Glucosylceramidase activity above levels required for clearance of glucosylceramide from tissues resulted in reversal of splenomegaly, reduced Gaucher cell infiltration and a restoration of hematological parameters. These findings support the use of SIN-LVs with cellular promoters in future clinical gene therapy protocols for type 1 Gaucher disease. PMID:25655314

  5. Gelatin-Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogels with Tuned Stiffness to Counterbalance Cellular Forces and Promote Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Poveda-Reyes, Sara; Moulisova, Vladimira; Sanmartín-Masiá, Esther; Quintanilla-Sierra, Luis; Salmerón-Sánchez, Manuel; Ferrer, Gloria Gallego

    2016-09-01

    Cells interact mechanically with their environment, exerting mechanical forces that probe the extracellular matrix (ECM). The mechanical properties of the ECM determine cell behavior and control cell differentiation both in 2D and 3D environments. Gelatin (Gel) is a soft hydrogel into which cells can be embedded. This study shows significant 3D Gel shrinking due to the high traction cellular forces exerted by the cells on the matrix, which prevents cell differentiation. To modulate this process, Gel with hyaluronic acid (HA) has been combined in an injectable crosslinked hydrogel with controlled Gel-HA ratio. HA increases matrix stiffness. The addition of small amounts of HA leads to a significant reduction in hydrogel shrinking after cell encapsulation (C2C12 myoblasts). We show that hydrogel stiffness counterbalanced traction forces of cells and this was decisive in promoting cell differentiation and myotube formation of C2C12 encapsulated in the hybrid hydrogels.

  6. Muscle mitohormesis promotes cellular survival via serine/glycine pathway flux.

    PubMed

    Ost, Mario; Keipert, Susanne; van Schothorst, Evert M; Donner, Verena; van der Stelt, Inge; Kipp, Anna P; Petzke, Klaus-Jürgen; Jove, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Keijer, Jaap; Klaus, Susanne

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies on mouse and human skeletal muscle (SM) demonstrated the important link between mitochondrial function and the cellular metabolic adaptation. To identify key compensatory molecular mechanisms in response to chronic mitochondrial distress, we analyzed mice with ectopic SM respiratory uncoupling in uncoupling protein 1 transgenic (UCP1-TG) mice as model of muscle-specific compromised mitochondrial function. Here we describe a detailed metabolic reprogramming profile associated with mitochondrial perturbations in SM, triggering an increased protein turnover and amino acid metabolism with induced biosynthetic serine/1-carbon/glycine pathway and the longevity-promoting polyamine spermidine as well as the trans-sulfuration pathway. This is related to an induction of NADPH-generating pathways and glutathione metabolism as an adaptive mitohormetic response and defense against increased oxidative stress. Strikingly, consistent muscle retrograde signaling profiles were observed in acute stress states such as muscle cell starvation and lipid overload, muscle regeneration, and heart muscle inflammation, but not in response to exercise. We provide conclusive evidence for a key compensatory stress-signaling network that preserves cellular function, oxidative stress tolerance, and survival during conditions of increased SM mitochondrial distress, a metabolic reprogramming profile so far only demonstrated for cancer cells and heart muscle.

  7. Overexpression of the cellular DEK protein promotes epithelial transformation in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Mintz-Cole, Rachael A.; Morris, Teresa A.; Simpson, David S.; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A.; Currier, Mark A.; Cripe, Timothy P.; Grosveld, Gerard C.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2009-01-01

    High levels of expression of the human DEK gene have been correlated with numerous human malignancies. Intracellular DEK functions have been described in vitro and include DNA supercoiling, DNA replication, RNA splicing, and transcription. We have demonstrated DEK also suppresses cellular senescence, apoptosis and differentiation, thus promoting cell growth and survival in monolayer and organotypic epithelial raft models. Such functions are likely to contribute to cancer, but direct evidence to implicate DEK as an oncogene has remained elusive. Here we show that in line with an early role in tumorigenesis, murine papilloma formation in a classical chemical carcinogenesis model was reduced in DEK knockout mice. Additionally, HPV E6/E7, hRas and DEK cooperated in the transformation of keratinocytes in soft agar and xenograft establishment, thus also implicating DEK in tumor promotion at later stages. Finally, adenoviral DEK depletion via shRNA expression resulted in cell death in human tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, but did not significantly affect differentiated epithelial cells. Taken together, our data uncover oncogenic DEK activities as postulated from its frequent upregulation in human malignancies, and suggest that the targeted suppression of DEK may become a strategic approach to the treatment of cancer. PMID:19223548

  8. The DEK oncogene promotes cellular proliferation through paracrine Wnt signaling in Ron receptor positive breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Privette Vinnedge, Lisa M.; Benight, Nancy M.; Wagh, Purnima K.; Pease, Nicholas A.; Nashu, Madison A.; Serrano-Lopez, Juana; Adams, Allie K.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Waltz, Susan E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Disease progression and recurrence are major barriers to surviving breast cancer. Understanding the etiology of recurrent or metastatic breast cancer and underlying mechanisms is critical for the development of new treatments and improved survival. Here, we report that two commonly over-expressed breast cancer oncogenes, Ron and DEK, cooperate to promote advanced disease through multi-pronged effects on β-catenin signaling. The Ron receptor is commonly activated in breast cancers, and Ron over-expression in human disease stimulates β-catenin nuclear translocation and is an independent predictor of metastatic dissemination. Dek is a chromatin-associated oncogene whose expression has been linked to cancer through multiple mechanisms, including β-catenin activity. We demonstrate here that Dek is a downstream target of Ron receptor activation in murine and human models. The absence of Dek in the MMTV-Ron mouse model led to a significant delay in tumor development, characterized by decreased cell proliferation, diminished metastasis, and fewer cells expressing cancer stem cell markers. Dek complementation of cell lines established from this model was sufficient to promote cellular growth and invasion in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, Dek expression stimulated the production and secretion of Wnt ligands to sustain an autocrine/paracrine canonical β-catenin signaling loop. Finally, we show that Dek over-expression promotes tumorigenic phenotypes in immortalized human mammary epithelial MCF10A cells and, in the context of Ron receptor activation, correlates with disease recurrence and metastasis in patients. Overall, our studies demonstrate that DEK over-expression, due in part to Ron receptor activation, drives breast cancer progression through the induction of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24954505

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of ionizable groups involved in the catalytic mechanism of human matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7).

    PubMed

    Takeharu, Hitoshi; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2011-12-01

    Human matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) exhibits a broad bell-shaped pH-dependence with the acidic and alkaline pK(e) (pK(e1) and pK(e2)) values of about 4 and 10. In this study, we estimated the ionizable groups involved in its catalytic mechanism by thermodynamic analysis. pK(a) of side chains of L-Asp, L-Glu, L-His, L-Cys, L-Tyr, L-Lys, and L-Arg at 25-45°C were determined by the pH titration of amino-acid solutions, from which their enthalpy changes, ∆H°, of deprotonation were calculated. pK(e1) and pK(e2) of MMP-7 at 15-45°C were determined in the hydrolysis of (7-methoxycoumarin-4-yl)acetyl-L-Pro-L-Leu-Gly-L-Leu-[N(3)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropionyl]-L-Ala-L-Arg-NH(2), from which ∆H(o) for pK(e1) and pK(e2) was calculated. The ∆H(o) for pK(e1) (-20.6±6.1kJmol(-1)) was similar to that for L-Glu (-23.6±5.8kJmol(-1)), and the ∆H(o) for pK(e2) (89.9±4.0kJmol(-1)) was similar to those for L-Arg (87.6±5.5kJmol(-1)) and L-Lys (70.4±4.4kJmol(-1)). The mutation of the active-site residue Glu198 into Ala completely abolished the activity, suggesting that Glu198 is the ionizable group for pK(e1). On the other hand, no arginine or lysine residues are found in the active site of MMP-7. We proposed a possibility that a protein-bound water is the ionizable group for pK(e2).

  10. An Oncogenic Virus Promotes Cell Survival and Cellular Transformation by Suppressing Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; He, Meilan; Liang, Qiming; Lu, Chun; Feng, Pinghui; Jung, Jae U.; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis is essential for supporting the fast growth of a variety of cancers. However, its role in the survival of cancer cells under stress conditions is unclear. We have previously reported an efficient model of gammaherpesvirus Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-induced cellular transformation of rat primary mesenchymal stem cells. KSHV-transformed cells efficiently induce tumors in nude mice with pathological features reminiscent of Kaposi’s sarcoma tumors. Here, we report that KSHV promotes cell survival and cellular transformation by suppressing aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation under nutrient stress. Specifically, KSHV microRNAs and vFLIP suppress glycolysis by activating the NF-κB pathway to downregulate glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. While overexpression of the transporters rescues the glycolytic activity, it induces apoptosis and reduces colony formation efficiency in softagar under glucose deprivation. Mechanistically, GLUT1 and GLUT3 inhibit constitutive activation of the AKT and NF-κB pro-survival pathways. Strikingly, GLUT1 and GLUT3 are significantly downregulated in KSHV-infected cells in human KS tumors. Furthermore, we have detected reduced levels of aerobic glycolysis in several KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cell lines compared to a Burkitt’s lymphoma cell line BJAB, and KSHV infection of BJAB cells reduced aerobic glycolysis. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus regulates a key metabolic pathway to adapt to stress in tumor microenvironment, and illustrate the importance of fine-tuning the metabolic pathways for sustaining the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, particularly under stress conditions. PMID:27187079

  11. Polymeric biomaterials for nerve regeneration applications: From promoting cellular organization to the delivery of bioactive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Rivera, Roberto L.

    Thousands of new cases of injury to the central nervous system (CNS) occur each year in the USA and all over the world. However, despite recent advances, at present there is no cure for the resulting paraplegia or quadriplegia. This research is directed towards engineering biomaterial platforms to promote cellular organization at the surface of polymer scaffolds that will be conducive to proper regeneration of injured CNS. In addition, the formulation of a delivery system for neuroactive molecules using polymer-based materials will be evaluated to establish its potential to treat CNS disorders. Initial studies involved the chemical modification of an electrospun nonwoven matrix of nanofibers with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). Nanofibers alone up-regulated FGF-2, albeit to a lesser extent than nanofibers covalently modified with FGF-2. These results underscore the importance of both surface topography and growth factor presentation on cellular function. Moreover, that FGF-2 modified nanofibrillar scaffolds may demonstrate utility in tissue engineering applications for replacement and regeneration of damaged tissue following CNS injury or disease. Subsequent research efforts focused on a novel micropatterning technique called microscale plasma-initiated patterning (microPIP). This patterning method uses a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp to selectively protect regions of an underlying substrate from oxygen plasma treatment resulting in hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. FGF-2 and laminin-1 were applied to an electrospun polyamide nanofibrillar matrix following plasma treatment. In this work it, was possible to demonstrate that textured surfaces, such as nanofibrillar scaffolds, can be micropatterned to provide external chemical cues for cellular organization. Finally, a microsphere system capable of encapsulating proteins while minimizing the mechanisms of protein degradation and providing a controlled release was investigated. Microspheres were comprised of

  12. Estradiol-induced promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis in medaka: Relationship of foci of cellular alteration to neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, J.B.; Hinton, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    In some laboratory and field studies, female fish have higher prevalences of liver tumors than do males. The authors hypothesize gender and site-specific differences in prevalence are due to variable exposures of previously initiated fish to tumor modulating compounds. Estradiol, a growth promoter, increases incidences of hepatic tumors in carcinogen-treated rainbow trout and medaka (Oryzias latipes). Estradiol also increases incidences of hepatic foci of cellular alteration (FCA) in medaka. FCA are found in subadults of tumor-bearing feral populations. Lack of knowledge about the relationship of various phenotypes of FCA to eventual tumors, however, has prevented use of FCA as a biomarker. The authors examined fate and growth of liver FCA using a 2-step, initiation-promotion protocol. Three week old medaka were exposed to 200 ppm diethylnitrosamine (DEN) for 24 hr. and then fed 0.1 ppm 17-{beta}-estradiol (E2) continuously through sampling at weeks 4--26. Percent volume of FCA and morphometric characteristics of normal and focal hepatocytes, including numerical density and average hepatocyte volume were quantified using computer-assisted stereology. E2 increased percentage of liver occupied by DEN-initiated amphophilic, basophilic and eosinophilic FCA in both sexes. Focal parameters of young, DEN-initiated and estradiol-treated medaka were not reached until much later in fish given only DEN. Non-focal hepatocytes in estradiol-treated medaka were smaller and more numerous than in DEN-only counterparts. Morphometric analysis is quantitatively tracking the fate of specific phenotypes of FCA to determine their role in progression to cancer.

  13. Kinin Peptides Enhance Inflammatory and Oxidative Responses Promoting Apoptosis in a Parkinson's Disease Cellular Model

    PubMed Central

    Kozik, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Kinin peptides ubiquitously occur in nervous tissue and participate in inflammatory processes associated with distinct neurological disorders. These substances have also been demonstrated to promote the oxidative stress. On the other hand, the importance of oxidative stress and inflammation has been emphasized in disorders that involve the neurodegenerative processes such as Parkinson's disease (PD). A growing number of reports have demonstrated the increased expression of kinin receptors in neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, the effect of bradykinin and des-Arg10-kallidin, two representative kinin peptides, was analyzed with respect to inflammatory response and induction of oxidative stress in a PD cellular model, obtained after stimulation of differentiated SK-N-SH cells with a neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium. Kinin peptides caused an increased cytokine release and enhanced production of reactive oxygen species and NO by cells. These changes were accompanied by a loss of cell viability and a greater activation of caspases involved in apoptosis progression. Moreover, the neurotoxin and kinin peptides altered the dopamine receptor 2 expression. Kinin receptor expression was also changed by the neurotoxin. These results suggest a mediatory role of kinin peptides in the development of neurodegeneration and may offer new possibilities for its regulation by using specific antagonists of kinin receptors. PMID:27721576

  14. Mitochondrial oxidative stress caused by Sod2 deficiency promotes cellular senescence and aging phenotypes in the skin.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Michael C; Flynn, James M; Day, Nicholas U; Melov, Simon; Campisi, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence arrests the proliferation of mammalian cells at risk for neoplastic transformation, and is also associated with aging. However, the factors that cause cellular senescence during aging are unclear. Excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to cause cellular senescence in culture, and accumulated molecular damage due to mitochondrial ROS has long been thought to drive aging phenotypesin vivo. Here, we test the hypothesis that mitochondrial oxidative stress can promote cellular senescence in vivo and contribute to aging phenotypes in vivo, specifically in the skin. We show that the number of senescent cells, as well as impaired mitochondrial (complex II) activity increase in naturally aged mouse skin. Using a mouse model of genetic Sod2 deficiency, we show that failure to express this important mitochondrial anti-oxidant enzyme also impairs mitochondrial complex II activity, causes nuclear DNA damage, and induces cellular senescence but not apoptosis in the epidermis. Sod2 deficiency also reduced the number of cells and thickness of the epidermis, while increasing terminal differentiation. Our results support the idea that mitochondrial oxidative stress and cellular senescence contribute to aging skin phenotypes in vivo.

  15. PLAGL2 translocation and SP-C promoter activity-A cellular response of lung cells to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuhong; Yang, Meng-Chun; Weissler, Jonathan C.; Yang, Yih-Sheng . E-mail: Yih-Sheng.Yang@UTSouthwestern.edu

    2007-08-31

    Cobalt is a transition metal which can substitute for iron in the oxygen-sensitive protein and mimic hypoxia. Cobalt was known to be associated with the development of lung disease. In this study, when lung cells were exposed to hypoxia-induced by CoCl{sub 2} at a sub-lethal concentration (100 {mu}M), their thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression was greatly reduced. Under this condition, SP-B promoter activity was down-regulated, but SP-C promoter remained active. Therefore, we hypothesized that other factor(s) besides TTF-1 might contribute to the modulation of SP-C promoter in hypoxic lung cells. Pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 (PLAGL2), a previously identified TTF-1-independent activator of the SP-C promoter, was not down-regulated, nor increased, within those cells. Its cellular location was redistributed from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that nuclear PLAGL2 occupied and transactivated the endogenous SP-C promoter in lung cells. Thereby, through relocating and accumulating of PLAGL2 inside the nucleus, PLAGL2 interacted with its target genes for various cellular functions. These results further suggest that PLAGL2 is an oxidative stress responding regulator in lung cells.

  16. Human DMTF1β antagonizes DMTF1α regulation of the p14ARF Tumor Suppressor and Promotes Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tschan, Mario P.; Federzoni, Elena A.; Haimovici, Aladin; Britschgi, Christian; Moser, Bettina A.; Jin, Jing; Reddy, Venkateshwar A.; Sheeter, Dennis A.; Fischer, Kimberlee M.; Sun, Peiqing; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2015-01-01

    The human DMTF1 (DMP1) transcription factor, a DNA binding protein that interacts with cyclin D, is a positive regulator of the p14ARF (ARF) tumor suppressor. Our earlier studies have shown that three differentially spliced human DMP1 mRNAs, α, β and γ, arise from the human gene. We now show that DMP1α, β and γ isoforms differentially regulate ARF expression and promote distinct cellular functions. In contrast to DMP1α, DMP1β and γ did not activate the ARF promoter, whereas only β resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of DMP1α-induced transactivation of the ARF promoter. Ectopic expression of DMP1β reduced endogenous ARF mRNA levels in human fibroblasts. The DMP1β- and γ-isoforms share domains necessary for the inhibitory function of the β-isoform. That DMP1β may interact with DMP1α to antagonize its function was shown in DNA binding assays and in cells by the close proximity of DMP1α/β in the nucleus. Cells stably expressing DMP1β, as well as shRNA targeting all DMP1 isoforms, disrupted cellular growth arrest induced by serum deprivation or in PMA-derived macrophages in the presence or absence of cellular p53. DMP1 mRNA levels in acute myeloid leukemia samples, as compared to granulocytes, were reduced. Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia patient samples with all-trans retinoic acid promoted differentiation to granulocytes and restored DMP1 transcripts to normal granulocyte levels. Our findings imply that DMP1α- and β-ratios are tightly regulated in hematopoietic cells and DMP1β antagonizes DMP1α transcriptional regulation of ARF resulting in the alteration of cellular control with a gain in proliferation. PMID:26187004

  17. Temsirolimus promotes autophagic clearance of amyloid-β and provides protective effects in cellular and animal models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Teng; Yu, Jin-Tai; Zhu, Xi-Chen; Tan, Meng-Shan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Cao, Lei; Zhang, Qiao-Quan; Shi, Jian-Quan; Gao, Li; Qin, Hao; Zhang, Ying-Dong; Tan, Lan

    2014-03-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) within brain is a major pathogenic hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Emerging evidence suggests that autophagy, an important intracellular catabolic process, is involved in Aβ clearance. Here, we investigated whether temsirolimus, a newly developed compound approved by Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for renal cell carcinoma treatment, would promote autophagic clearance of Aβ and thus provide protective effects in cellular and animal models of AD. HEK293 cells expressing the Swedish mutant of APP695 (HEK293-APP695) were treated with vehicle or 100nM temsirolimus for 24h in the presence or absence of 3-methyladenine (5mM) or Atg5-siRNA, and intracellular Aβ levels as well as autophagy biomarkers were measured. Meanwhile, APP/PS1 mice received intraperitoneal injection of temsirolimus (20mg/kg) every 2 days for 60 days, and brain Aβ burden, autophagy biomarkers, cellular apoptosis in hippocampus, and spatial cognitive functions were assessed. Our results showed that temsirolimus enhanced Aβ clearance in HEK293-APP695 cells and in brain of APP/PS1 mice in an autophagy-dependent manner. Meanwhile, temsirolimus attenuated cellular apoptosis in hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice, which was accompanied by an improvement in spatial learning and memory abilities. In conclusion, our study provides the first evidence that temsirolimus promotes autophagic Aβ clearance and exerts protective effects in cellular and animal models of AD, suggesting that temsirolimus administration may represent a new therapeutic strategy for AD treatment. Meanwhile, these findings emphasize the notion that many therapeutic agents possess pleiotropic actions aside from their main applications. PMID:24602800

  18. Activation of hERG3 channel stimulates autophagy and promotes cellular senescence in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Haar, Lauren; Rao, Vidhya; Santha, Sreevidya; Lansu, Katherine; Rana, Basabi; Jones, Walter K.; Gentile, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a major factor in maintaining cellular homeostasis but very little is known about the role of these proteins in cancer biology. In this work we have discovered that, the Kv11.3 (hERG3) a plasma-membrane potassium channel plays a critical role in the regulation of autophagy in a cancer cell model. We have found that pharmacologic stimulation of the Kv11.3 channel with a small molecule activator, NS1643 induced autophagy via activation of an AMPK-dependent signaling pathway in melanoma cell line. In addition, we have found that NS1643 produced a strong inhibition of cell proliferation by activating a cellular senescence program. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy via siRNA targeting AMPK or treatment with hydroxychloroquine an autophagy inhibitor activates apoptosis in NS1643-treated cells. Thus, we propose that, Kv11.3 is a novel mediator of autophagy, autophagy can be a survival mechanism contributing to cellular senescence, and that use of a combinatorial pharmacologic approach of Kv11.3 activator with inhibitors of autophagy represents a novel therapeutic approach against melanoma. PMID:26942884

  19. RGS6 Suppresses Ras-induced Cellular Transformation by Facilitating Tip60-mediated Dnmt1 Degradation and Promoting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jie; Stewart, Adele; Maity, Biswanath; Hagen, Jussara; Fagan, Rebecca L.; Yang, Jianqi; Quelle, Dawn E.; Brenner, Charles; Fisher, Rory A.

    2014-01-01

    The RAS protooncogene plays a central role in regulation of cell proliferation, and point mutations leading to oncogenic activation of Ras occur in a large number of human cancers. Silencing of tumor suppressor genes by DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is essential for oncogenic cellular transformation by Ras, and Dnmt1 is over-expressed in numerous human cancers. Here we provide new evidence that the pleiotropic Regulator of G protein Signaling (RGS) family member RGS6 suppresses Ras-induced cellular transformation by facilitating Tip60-mediated degradation of Dmnt1 and promoting apoptosis. Employing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild type (WT) and RGS6−/− mice, we found that oncogenic Ras induced up-regulation of RGS6, which in turn blocked Ras-induced cellular transformation. RGS6 functions to suppress cellular transformation in response to oncogenic Ras by down regulating Dnmt1 protein expression leading to inhibition of Dnmt1-mediated anti-apoptotic activity. Further experiments showed that RGS6 functions as a scaffolding protein for both Dnmt1 and Tip60 and is required for Tip60-mediated acetylation of Dnmt1 and subsequent Dnmt1 ubiquitylation and degradation. The RGS domain of RGS6, known only for its GAP activity toward Gα subunits, was sufficient to mediate Tip60 association with RGS6. This work demonstrates a novel signaling action for RGS6 in negative regulation of oncogene-induced transformation and provides new insights into our understanding of the mechanisms underlying Ras-induced oncogenic transformation and regulation of Dnmt1 expression. Importantly, these findings identify RGS6 as an essential cellular defender against oncogenic stress and a potential therapeutic target for developing new cancer treatments. PMID:23995786

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus Promotes Survival of Infected Monocytes via a Distinct Temporal Regulation of Cellular Bcl-2 Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Collins-McMillen, Donna; Kim, Jung Heon; Nogalski, Maciej T.; Stevenson, Emily V.; Caskey, Joshua R.; Cieply, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monocytes play a key role in the hematogenous dissemination of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) to target organ systems. To infect monocytes and reprogram them to deliver infectious virus, HCMV must overcome biological obstacles, including the short life span of monocytes and their antiviral proapoptotic response to infection. We have shown that virally induced upregulation of cellular Mcl-1 promotes early survival of HCMV-infected monocytes, allowing cells to overcome an early apoptotic checkpoint at around 48 h postinfection (hpi). Here, we demonstrate an HCMV-dependent shift from Mcl-1 as the primary antiapoptotic player to the related protein, Bcl-2, later during infection. Bcl-2 was upregulated in HCMV-infected monocytes beginning at 48 hpi. Treatment with the Bcl-2 antagonist ABT-199 only reduced the prosurvival effects of HCMV in target monocytes beginning at 48 hpi, suggesting that Mcl-1 controls survival prior to 48 hpi, while Bcl-2 promotes survival after 48 hpi. Although Bcl-2 was upregulated following viral binding/signaling through cellular integrins (compared to Mcl-1, which is upregulated through binding/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]), it functioned similarly to Mcl-1, adopting the early role of Mcl-1 in preventing caspase-3 cleavage/activation. This distinct, HCMV-induced shift from Mcl-1 to Bcl-2 occurs in response to a cellular upregulation of proapoptotic Bax, as small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Bax reduced the upregulation of Bcl-2 in infected monocytes and rescued the cells from the apoptotic effects of Bcl-2 inhibition. Our data demonstrate a distinct survival strategy whereby HCMV induces a biphasic regulation of cellular Bcl-2 proteins to promote host cell survival, leading to viral dissemination and the establishment of persistent HCMV infection. IMPORTANCE Hematogenous dissemination of HCMV via infected monocytes is a crucial component of the viral survival strategy and is required for the

  1. Wnt5a Suppresses Epithelial Ovarian Cancer by Promoting Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Bitler, Benjamin G.; Nicodemus, Jasmine P.; Li, Hua; Cai, Qi; Wu, Hong; Hua, Xiang; Li, Tianyu; Birrer, Michael J.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Cairns, Paul; Zhang, Rugang

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains the most lethal gynecological malignancy in the US. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics for this disease. Cellular senescence is an important tumor suppression mechanism that has recently been suggested as a novel mechanism to target for developing cancer therapeutics. Wnt5a is a non-canonical Wnt ligand that plays a context-dependent role in human cancers. Here, we investigate the role of Wnt5a in regulating senescence of EOC cells. We demonstrate that Wnt5a is expressed at significantly lower levels in human EOC cell lines and in primary human EOCs (n = 130) compared with either normal ovarian surface epithelium (n = 31; p = 0.039) or fallopian tube epithelium (n = 28; p < 0.001). Notably, a lower level of Wnt5a expression correlates with tumor stage (p = 0.003) and predicts shorter overall survival in EOC patients (p = 0.003). Significantly, restoration of Wnt5a expression inhibits the proliferation of human EOC cells both in vitro and in vivo in an orthotopic EOC mouse model. Mechanistically, Wnt5a antagonizes canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling and induces cellular senescence by activating the histone repressor A (HIRA)/promyelocytic leukemia (PML) senescence pathway. In summary, we show that loss of Wnt5a predicts poor outcome in EOC patients and Wnt5a suppresses the growth of EOC cells by triggering cellular senescence. We suggest that strategies to drive senescence in EOC cells by reconstituting Wnt5a signaling may offer an effective new strategy for EOC therapy. PMID:21816908

  2. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S. S. S. N. Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. PMID:25132849

  3. IN-MACA-MCC: Integrated Multiple Attractor Cellular Automata with Modified Clonal Classifier for Human Protein Coding and Promoter Prediction.

    PubMed

    Pokkuluri, Kiran Sree; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu; Nedunuri, S S S N Usha Devi

    2014-01-01

    Protein coding and promoter region predictions are very important challenges of bioinformatics (Attwood and Teresa, 2000). The identification of these regions plays a crucial role in understanding the genes. Many novel computational and mathematical methods are introduced as well as existing methods that are getting refined for predicting both of the regions separately; still there is a scope for improvement. We propose a classifier that is built with MACA (multiple attractor cellular automata) and MCC (modified clonal classifier) to predict both regions with a single classifier. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with Fickett and Tung (1992) datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 54, 108, and 162. This classifier is trained and tested with MMCRI datasets for protein coding region prediction for DNA sequences of lengths 252 and 354. The proposed classifier is trained and tested with promoter sequences from DBTSS (Yamashita et al., 2006) dataset and nonpromoters from EID (Saxonov et al., 2000) and UTRdb (Pesole et al., 2002) datasets. The proposed model can predict both regions with an average accuracy of 90.5% for promoter and 89.6% for protein coding region predictions. The specificity and sensitivity values of promoter and protein coding region predictions are 0.89 and 0.92, respectively. PMID:25132849

  4. Simulated microgravity promotes cellular senescence via oxidant stress in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinghua; Zhang, Jifei; Bai, Shasha; Wang, Guangyou; Mu, Lili; Sun, Bo; Wang, Dandan; Kong, Qingfei; Liu, Yumei; Yao, Xiuhua; Xu, Ying; Li, Hulun

    2009-12-01

    Microgravity has a unique effect on biological organisms. Organs exposed to microgravity display cellular senescence, a change that resembles the aging process. To directly investigate the influence of simulated microgravity on neuronal original rat PC12 cells, we used a rotary cell culture system that simulates the microgravity environment on the earth. We found that simulated microgravity induced partial G1 phase arrest, upregulated senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal) activity, and activated both p53 and p16 protein pathways linked to cell senescence. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also increased. The activity of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and catalase (CAT), was all significantly increased at 12h after the microgravity onset, yet decreased at 96h. Furthermore, concomitant block of ROS by the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine significantly inhibited the microgravity-induced upregulation of SA-beta-gal activity. These results suggest that exposure to simulated microgravity induces cellular senescence in PC12 cells via an increased oxidant stress. PMID:19616052

  5. Activation of HSPA1A promoter by environmental pollutants: An early and rapid response to cellular damage.

    PubMed

    Xin, Lili; Wang, Jianshu; Fan, Guoqiang; Wu, Yanhu; Guo, Sifan

    2015-05-01

    We established the HepG2-luciferase cells containing a luciferase reporter gene regulated by human HSPA1A promoter. The screening of heat shock and three typical environmental toxicants revealed differences in their capacities to activate HSPA1A promoter in HepG2-luciferase cells. After heat shock, a progressive time-dependent increase in relative luciferase activity was detected peaking at 8h of recovery. Benzo[a]pyrene, formaldehyde and sodium bisulfite induced significant time-dependent elevation of relative luciferase activity, which were positively correlated with MDA concentration, Olive tail moment and micronuclei frequency. The significant increase in relative luciferase activity was already evident after 4h of benzo[a]pyrene, 1h of formaldehyde and sodium bisulfite exposure, when no increases in cellular damage were detected by other toxicity tests. Therefore, the HepG2-luciferase cells are useful model for examining the overall cellular responses to oxidative stress and genotoxic damage, and provide a reporter system for rapid and sensitive screening of environmental pollutants. PMID:25863329

  6. Non-genomic estrogen/estrogen receptor α promotes cellular malignancy of immature ovarian teratoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Ling-Yu; Chung, Wei-Min; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chen, Liang-Chi; Ma, Wen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    Malignant immature ovarian teratomas (IOTs) most often occur in women of reproductive age. It is unclear, however, what roles estrogenic signaling plays in the development of IOT. In this study, we examined whether estrogen receptors (ERα and β) promote the cellular malignancy of IOT. Estradiol (E2), PPT (propylpyrazole), and DPN (diarylpropionitrile) (ERα- and β-specific agonists, respectively), as well as ERα- or ERβ-specific short hairpin (sh)RNA were applied to PA-1 cells, a well-characterized IOT cell line. Cellular tumorigenic characteristics, for example, cell migration/invasion, expression of the cancer stem/progenitor cell marker CD133, and evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were examined. In PA-1 cells that expressed ERα and ERβ, we found that ERα promoted cell migration and invasion. We also found that E2/ERα signaling altered cell behavior through non-classical transactivation function. Our data show non-genomic E2/ERα activations of focal adhesion kinase-Ras homolog gene family member A (FAK-RhoA) and ERK governed cell mobility capacity. Moreover, E2/ERα signaling induces EMT and overexpression of CD133 through upregulation micro-RNA 21 (miR21; IOT stem/progenitor promoter), and ERK phosphorylations. Furthermore, E2/ERα signaling triggers a positive feedback regulatory loop within miR21 and ERK. At last, expression levels of ERα, CD133, and EMT markers in IOT tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that cytosolic ERα was co-expressed with CD133 and mesenchymal cell markers but not epithelial cell markers. In conclusion, estrogenic signals exert malignant transformation capacity of cancer cells, exclusively through non-genomic regulation in female germ cell tumors.

  7. Non-genomic estrogen/estrogen receptor α promotes cellular malignancy of immature ovarian teratoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hung, Yao-Ching; Chang, Wei-Chun; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Ying-Yi; Wu, Ling-Yu; Chung, Wei-Min; Lin, Tze-Yi; Chen, Liang-Chi; Ma, Wen-Lung

    2014-06-01

    Malignant immature ovarian teratomas (IOTs) most often occur in women of reproductive age. It is unclear, however, what roles estrogenic signaling plays in the development of IOT. In this study, we examined whether estrogen receptors (ERα and β) promote the cellular malignancy of IOT. Estradiol (E2), PPT (propylpyrazole), and DPN (diarylpropionitrile) (ERα- and β-specific agonists, respectively), as well as ERα- or ERβ-specific short hairpin (sh)RNA were applied to PA-1 cells, a well-characterized IOT cell line. Cellular tumorigenic characteristics, for example, cell migration/invasion, expression of the cancer stem/progenitor cell marker CD133, and evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were examined. In PA-1 cells that expressed ERα and ERβ, we found that ERα promoted cell migration and invasion. We also found that E2/ERα signaling altered cell behavior through non-classical transactivation function. Our data show non-genomic E2/ERα activations of focal adhesion kinase-Ras homolog gene family member A (FAK-RhoA) and ERK governed cell mobility capacity. Moreover, E2/ERα signaling induces EMT and overexpression of CD133 through upregulation micro-RNA 21 (miR21; IOT stem/progenitor promoter), and ERK phosphorylations. Furthermore, E2/ERα signaling triggers a positive feedback regulatory loop within miR21 and ERK. At last, expression levels of ERα, CD133, and EMT markers in IOT tissue samples were examined by immunohistochemistry. We found that cytosolic ERα was co-expressed with CD133 and mesenchymal cell markers but not epithelial cell markers. In conclusion, estrogenic signals exert malignant transformation capacity of cancer cells, exclusively through non-genomic regulation in female germ cell tumors. PMID:24142535

  8. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  9. A Loss in Cellular Protein Partners Promotes α-Synuclein Aggregation in Cells Resulting from Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanjian; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    There is a consensus that oxidative stress promotes neurodegeneration and may be linked to plaque formation. α-Synuclein is the main component of neurodegenerative plaques. We have found that α-synuclein binds strongly to the enzyme phospholipase Cβ1 (PLCβ1) in vitro and in cells affecting both its G protein activation and its degradation. Because PLCβ1 binds to α-synuclein in cells, we tested whether decreasing its level would promote α-synuclein aggregation and whether overproducing PLCβ1 would inhibit aggregation. By imaging fluorescent α-synuclein in living HEK293, PC12, and SK-H-SH cells, we find that α-synuclein aggregation is directly related to the level of PLCβ1. Importantly, we found that oxidative stress does not affect the cellular levels of α-synuclein but results in the down-regulation of PLCβ1 thereby promoting α-synuclein aggregation. A peptide that mimics part of the α-synuclein binding site to PLCβ prevents aggregation. Our studies indicate that PLCβ1 can reduce cell damage under oxidative stress and offers a potential site that might be exploited to prevent α-synuclein aggregation. PMID:23659438

  10. Tumor suppressor BTG1 promotes PRMT1-mediated ATF4 function in response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; van Emst, Liesbeth; Levers, Marloes; Palit, Sander A.L.; Rodenbach, Caroline; Poelmans, Geert; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently exposed to physiological stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient limitation. Escape from stress-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms used by malignant cells to survive unfavorable conditions. B-cell Translocation Gene 1 (BTG1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and recurrently mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Moreover, low BTG1 expression levels have been linked to poor outcome in several solid tumors. How loss of BTG1 function contributes to tumor progression is not well understood. Here, using Btg1 knockout mice, we demonstrate that loss of Btg1 provides a survival advantage to primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) under stress conditions. This pro-survival effect involves regulation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a key mediator of cellular stress responses. We show that BTG1 interacts with ATF4 and positively modulates its activity by recruiting the protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT1 to methylate ATF4 on arginine residue 239. We further extend these findings to B-cell progenitors, by showing that loss of Btg1 expression enhances stress adaptation of mouse bone marrow-derived B cell progenitors. In conclusion, we have identified the BTG1/PRMT1 complex as a new modifier of ATF4 mediated stress responses. PMID:26657730

  11. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016.

  12. Matricellular protein CCN1 promotes regression of liver fibrosis through induction of cellular senescence in hepatic myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki-Hyun; Chen, Chih-Chiun; Monzon, Ricardo I; Lau, Lester F

    2013-05-01

    Liver fibrosis occurs as a wound-healing response to chronic hepatic injuries irrespective of the underlying etiology and may progress to life-threatening cirrhosis. Here we show that CCN1, a matricellular protein of the CCN (CYR61/CTGF/NOV) family, is accumulated in hepatocytes of human cirrhotic livers. CCN1 is not required for liver development or regeneration, since these processes are normal in mice with hepatocyte-specific Ccn1 deletion. However, Ccn1 expression is upregulated upon liver injuries and functions to inhibit liver fibrogenesis induced by either carbon tetrachloride intoxication or bile duct ligation and promote fibrosis regression. CCN1 acts by triggering cellular senescence in activated hepatic stellate cells and portal fibroblasts by engaging integrin α6β1 to induce reactive oxygen species accumulation through the RAC1-NADPH oxidase 1 enzyme complex, whereupon the senescent cells express an antifibrosis genetic program. Mice with hepatocyte-specific Ccn1 deletion suffer exacerbated fibrosis with a concomitant deficit in cellular senescence, whereas overexpression of hepatic Ccn1 reduces liver fibrosis with enhanced senescence. Furthermore, tail vein delivery of purified CCN1 protein accelerates fibrosis regression in mice with established fibrosis. These findings reveal a novel integrin-dependent mechanism of fibrosis resolution in chronic liver injury and identify the CCN1 signaling pathway as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  13. MERTK Inhibition Induces Polyploidy and Promotes Cell Death and Cellular Senescence in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Sufit, Alexandra; Lee-Sherick, Alisa B.; DeRyckere, Deborah; Rupji, Manali; Dwivedi, Bhakti; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Pierce, Angela M.; Kowalski, Jeanne; Wang, Xiaodong; Frye, Stephen V.; Earp, H. Shelton

    2016-01-01

    Background MER receptor tyrosine kinase (MERTK) is expressed in a variety of malignancies, including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Our previous work demonstrated that inhibition of MERTK using RNA interference induced cell death and chemosensitivity in GBM cells, implicating MERTK as a potential therapeutic target. Here we investigate whether a novel MERTK-selective small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor, UNC2025, has similar anti-tumor effects in GBM cell lines. Methods Correlations between expression of GAS6, a MERTK ligand, and prognosis were determined using data from the TCGA database. GBM cell lines (A172, SF188, U251) were treated in vitro with increasing doses of UNC2025 (50-400nM). Cell count and viability were determined by trypan blue exclusion. Cell cycle profiles and induction of apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometric analysis after BrdU or Po-Pro-1/propidium iodide staining, respectively. Polyploidy was detected by propidium iodide staining and metaphase spread. Cellular senescence was determined by β-galactosidase staining and senescence-associated secretory cytokine analysis. Results Decreased overall survival significantly correlated with high levels of GAS6 expression in GBM, highlighting the importance of TAM kinase signaling in GBM tumorigenesis and/or therapy resistance and providing strong rationale for targeting these pathways in the clinic. All three GBM cell lines exhibited dose dependent reductions in cell number and colony formation (>90% at 200nM) after treatment with UNC2025. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase and development of polyploidy. After extended exposure, 60–80% of cells underwent apoptosis. The majority of surviving cells (65–95%) were senescent and did not recover after drug removal. Thus, UNC2025 mediates anti-tumor activity in GBM by multiple mechanisms. Conclusions The findings described here provide further evidence of oncogenic roles for MERTK in GBM, demonstrate the

  14. The putative tumor activator ARHGEF3 promotes nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell pathogenesis by inhibiting cellular apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lin; Lin, Huan-Xin; Chen, Jie-Wei; Liao, Yi-Ji; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Xie, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most prevalent forms of highly invasive malignancy in Southern China and Southeast Asia. The pathogenesis of NPC is a multistep process driven by the acquisition of numerous genetic abnormalities. We investigated the potential oncogenic role of the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor 3 gene, ARHGEF3, in NPC pathogenesis. Expression levels of ARHGEF3 were frequently up-regulated in NPC cell lines and tissues. In a large cohort of clinical NPC tissues high expression of ARHGEF3 was positively associated with an increased T status, distant metastasis, and a more advanced clinical stage (P < 0.05). Survival analysis revealed that ARHGEF3 expression was a significant and independent prognosis factor for NPC patients. In NPC cell lines, knockdown of ARHGEF3 was sufficient to inhibit cell growth, motility, and invasion in vitro, whereas ectopic overexpression of ARHGEF3 substantially enhanced NPC cells tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo. Depletion of ARHGEF3 in NPC cells dramatically promoted caspase-3 induced apoptosis and an anti-apoptosis factor, BIRC8, was identified as a critical downstream target of the ARHGEF3. Our findings suggest that increased expression of ARHGEF3 plays a critical oncogenic role in NPC pathogenesis by preventing cell apoptosis through the up-regulation of BIRC8, and ARHGEF3 might be employed as a novel prognostic marker and effective therapeutic target for human NPC. PMID:27028992

  15. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyanka L; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-08-23

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc-dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  16. Derepression of hTERT gene expression promotes escape from oncogene-induced cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyanka L.; Suram, Anitha; Mirani, Neena; Bischof, Oliver; Herbig, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is a critical tumor-suppressing mechanism that restrains cancer progression at premalignant stages, in part by causing telomere dysfunction. Currently it is unknown whether this proliferative arrest presents a stable and therefore irreversible barrier to cancer progression. Here we demonstrate that cells frequently escape OIS induced by oncogenic H-Ras and B-Raf, after a prolonged period in the senescence arrested state. Cells that had escaped senescence displayed high oncogene expression levels, retained functional DNA damage responses, and acquired chromatin changes that promoted c-Myc–dependent expression of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (hTERT). Telomerase was able to resolve existing telomeric DNA damage response foci and suppressed formation of new ones that were generated as a consequence of DNA replication stress and oncogenic signals. Inhibition of MAP kinase signaling, suppressing c-Myc expression, or inhibiting telomerase activity, caused telomere dysfunction and proliferative defects in cells that had escaped senescence, whereas ectopic expression of hTERT facilitated OIS escape. In human early neoplastic skin and breast tissue, hTERT expression was detected in cells that displayed features of senescence, suggesting that reactivation of telomerase expression in senescent cells is an early event during cancer progression in humans. Together, our data demonstrate that cells arrested in OIS retain the potential to escape senescence by mechanisms that involve derepression of hTERT expression. PMID:27503890

  17. Suppression in PHLPP2 induction by morin promotes Nrf2-regulated cellular defenses against oxidative injury to primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Krishna, Shagun; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances indicate a possible role of phytochemicals as modulatory factors in signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated PHLPP2-mediated suppression of Nrf2 responses during oxidant attack. The present study was designed to explore Nrf2-potentiating mechanism of morin, a flavonol, via its possible role in intervening PHLPP2-regulated Akt/GSK3β/Fyn kinase axis. Efficacy of morin was evaluated against oxidative stress-mediated damage to primary hepatocytes by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) and acetaminophen. The anti-cytotoxic effects of morin were found to be a consequence of fortification of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant defenses since morin failed to sustain activities of redox enzyme in Nrf2 silenced hepatocytes. Morin promoted Nrf2 stability and its nuclear retention by possibly modulating PHLPP2 activity which subdues cellular Nrf2 responses by activating Fyn kinase. Pull-down assay using morin-conjugated beads indicated the binding affinity of morin towards PHLPP2. Molecular docking also revealed the propensity of morin to occupy the active site of PHLPP2 enzyme. Thus, dietary phytochemical morin was observed to counteract oxidant-induced hepatocellular damage by promoting Nrf2-regulated transcriptional induction. The findings support the novel role of morin in potentiating Nrf2 responses by limiting PHLPP2 and hence Fyn kinase activation. Therefore, morin may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing Nrf2 responses. PMID:26513344

  18. Biomimetic hybrid porous scaffolds immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB promote cellularization and vascularization in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Murali, Ragothaman; Ponrasu, Thangavel; Cheirmadurai, Kalirajan; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy

    2016-02-01

    Development of hybrid scaffolds with synergistic combination of growth factor is a promising approach to promote early in vivo wound repair and tissue regeneration. Here, we show the rapid wound healing in Wistar albino rats using biomimetic collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum based hybrid porous scaffolds covalently immobilized with platelet derived growth factor-BB. The immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds not only enhance the total protein, collagen, hexosamine, and uronic acid contents in the granulation tissue but also provide stronger tissues. The wound closure analysis reveal that the complete epithelialization period is 15.4 ± 0.9 days for collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum-platelet derived growth factor hybrid scaffolds, whereas it is significantly higher for control, collagen, collagen- poly(dialdehyde) guar gum and povidine-iodine treated groups. Further, the histological evaluation shows that the immobilized platelet derived growth factor in the hybrid scaffolds induced a more robust cellular and vascular response in the implanted site. Hence, we demonstrate that the collagen-poly(dialdehyde) guar gum hybrid scaffolds loaded with platelet derived growth factor stimulates chemotactic effects in the implanted site to promote rapid tissue regeneration and wound repair without the assistance of antibacterial agents.

  19. Suppression in PHLPP2 induction by morin promotes Nrf2-regulated cellular defenses against oxidative injury to primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Fatima; Mathur, Alpana; Krishna, Shagun; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Kakkar, Poonam

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances indicate a possible role of phytochemicals as modulatory factors in signaling pathways. We have previously demonstrated PHLPP2-mediated suppression of Nrf2 responses during oxidant attack. The present study was designed to explore Nrf2-potentiating mechanism of morin, a flavonol, via its possible role in intervening PHLPP2-regulated Akt/GSK3β/Fyn kinase axis. Efficacy of morin was evaluated against oxidative stress-mediated damage to primary hepatocytes by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) and acetaminophen. The anti-cytotoxic effects of morin were found to be a consequence of fortification of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant defenses since morin failed to sustain activities of redox enzyme in Nrf2 silenced hepatocytes. Morin promoted Nrf2 stability and its nuclear retention by possibly modulating PHLPP2 activity which subdues cellular Nrf2 responses by activating Fyn kinase. Pull-down assay using morin-conjugated beads indicated the binding affinity of morin towards PHLPP2. Molecular docking also revealed the propensity of morin to occupy the active site of PHLPP2 enzyme. Thus, dietary phytochemical morin was observed to counteract oxidant-induced hepatocellular damage by promoting Nrf2-regulated transcriptional induction. The findings support the novel role of morin in potentiating Nrf2 responses by limiting PHLPP2 and hence Fyn kinase activation. Therefore, morin may be exploited in developing novel therapeutic strategy aimed at enhancing Nrf2 responses.

  20. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  1. Binding of cellular repressor protein or the IE2 protein to a cis-acting negative regulatory element upstream of a human cytomegalovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, L; Stinski, M F

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the human cytomegalovirus early UL4 promoter has upstream negative and positive cis-acting regulatory elements. In the absence of the upstream negative regulatory region, the positive element confers strong transcriptional activity. The positive element contains a CCAAT box dyad symmetry and binds the cellular transcription factor NF-Y. The effect of the negative regulatory element is negated by the viral IE2 protein (L. Huang, C.L. Malone, and M.F. Stinski, J. Virol. 68:2108, 1994). We investigated the binding of cellular or viral IE2 protein to the negative regulatory region. The major cis-acting negative regulatory element was located between -168 and -134 bp relative to the transcription start site. This element could be transferred to a heterologous promoter, and it functioned in either orientation. Mutational analysis demonstrated that a core DNA sequence in the cis-acting negative regulatory element, 5'-GTTTGGAATCGTT-3', was required for the binding of either a cellular repressor protein(s) or the viral IE2 protein. The cellular DNA binding activity was present in both nonpermissive HeLa and permissive human fibroblast cells but more abundant in HeLa cells. Binding of the cellular repressor protein to the upstream cis-acting negative regulatory element correlates with repression of transcription from the early UL4 promoter. Binding of the viral IE2 protein correlates with negation of the repressive effect. PMID:7494269

  2. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  3. A possibility of a protein-bound water molecule as the ionizable group responsible for pKe at the alkaline side in human matrix metalloproteinase 7 activity.

    PubMed

    Morishima, Aiko; Yasukawa, Kiyoshi; Inouye, Kuniyo

    2012-05-01

    Human matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP-7) activity exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profile with the acidic and alkaline pK(a) (pK(e1) and pK(e2)) values of about 4 and 10. The ionizable group for pK(e2) was assigned to Lys or Arg by thermodynamic analysis; however, no such residues are present in the active site. Hence, based on the crystal structure, we hypothesized that a water molecule bound to the main-chain nitrogen of Ala162 (W1) or the main-chain carbonyl oxygen of Pro217 (W2) is a candidate for the ionizable group for pK(e2) [Takeharu, H. et al. (2011) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1814, 1940-1946]. In this study, we inspected this hypothesis. In the hydrolysis of (7-methoxycoumarin-4-yl)acetyl-L-Pro-L-Leu-Gly-L-Leu-[N(3)-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)-L-2,3-diaminopropionyl]-L-Ala-L-Arg-NH(2), all 19 variants, in which one of all Lys and Arg residues was replaced by Ala, retained activity, indicating that neither Lys nor Arg is the ionizable group. pK(e2) values of A162S, A162V and A162G were 9.6 ± 0.1, 9.5 ± 0.1 and 10.4 ± 0.2, respectively, different from that of wild-type MMP-7 (WT) (9.9 ± 0.1) by 0.3-0.5 pH unit, and those of P217S, P217V and P217G were 10.1 ± 0.1, 9.8 ± 0.1 and 9.7 ± 0.1, respectively, different from that of WT by 0.1-0.2 pH unit. These results suggest a possibility of W1 or W2 as the ionizable group for pK(e2).

  4. Development of a novel fluorogenic proteolytic beacon for in vivo detection and imaging of tumour-associated matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, J Oliver; Fingleton, Barbara; Wells, K Sam; Piston, David W; Lynch, Conor C; Gautam, Shiva; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2004-02-01

    The present study describes the in vivo detection and imaging of tumour-associated MMP-7 (matrix metalloproteinase-7 or matrilysin) activity using a novel polymer-based fluorogenic substrate PB-M7VIS, which serves as a selective 'proteolytic beacon' (PB) for this metalloproteinase. PB-M7VIS is built on a PAMAM (polyamido amino) dendrimer core of 14.2 kDa, covalently coupled with an Fl (fluorescein)-labelled peptide Fl(AHX)RPLALWRS(AHX)C (where AHX stands for aminohexanoic acid) and with TMR (tetramethylrhodamine). PB-M7VIS is efficiently and selectively cleaved by MMP-7 with a k (cat)/ K (m) value of 1.9x10(5) M(-1).s(-1) as measured by the rate of increase in Fl fluorescence (up to 17-fold for the cleavage of an optimized PB-M7VIS) with minimal change in the TMR fluorescence. The K (m) value for PB-M7VIS is approx. 0.5 microM, which is approx. two orders of magnitude lower when compared with that for an analogous soluble peptide, indicating efficient interaction of MMP-7 with the synthetic polymeric substrate. With MMP-2 or -3, the k (cat)/ K (m) value for PB-M7VIS is approx. 56- or 13-fold lower respectively, when compared with MMP-7. In PB-M7VIS, Fl(AHX)RPLALWRS(AHX)C is a selective optical sensor of MMP-7 activity and TMR serves to detect both the uncleaved and cleaved reagents. Each of these can be visualized as subcutaneous fluorescent phantoms in a mouse and optically discriminated based on the ratio of green/red (Fl/TMR) fluorescence. The in vivo specificity of PB-M7VIS was tested in a mouse xenograft model. Intravenous administration of PB-M7VIS gave significantly enhanced Fl fluorescence from MMP-7-positive tumours, but not from control tumours ( P <0.0001), both originally derived from SW480 human colon cancer cells. Prior systemic treatment of the tumour-bearing mice with an MMP inhibitor BB-94 ([4-( N -hydroxyamino)-2 R -isobutyl-3 S -(thienylthiomethyl)-succinyl]-L-phenylalanine- N -methylamide), markedly decreased the Fl fluorescence over the MMP-7

  5. Cellular fibronectin 1 promotes VEGF-C expression, lymphangiogenesis and lymph node metastasis associated with human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Morita, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenji; Nakanishi, Masako; Omata, Tetsuji; Morita, Nobuo; Yura, Yoshiaki; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    Lymph node metastasis (LNM) is associated with poor survival in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Vascular endothelial growth factor-C (VEGF-C) is thought to be responsible for increased lymphangiogenesis and LNM. Understanding of the mechanism by which VEGF-C expression is regulated in OSCC is thus important to design logic therapeutic interventions. We showed that inoculation of the SAS human OSCC cells expressing the venus GFP (V-SAS cells) into the tongue in nude mice developed LNM. V-SAS cells in LNM were isolated by FACS and re-inoculated into the tongue. This procedure was repeated eight times, establishing V-SAS-LM8 cells. Differential metastasis PCR array between the parental V-SAS and V-SAS-LM8 was performed to identify a molecule responsible for lymphangiogenesis and LNM. Fibronectin 1 (FN1) expression was elevated in V-SAS-LM8 cells compared to V-SAS-cells. V-SAS-LM8 tongue tumor showed increased expression of FN1 and VEGF-C, and promoted lymphangiogenesis and LNM compared with V-SAS tumor. Further, phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a main downstream signaling molecule of FN1, was up-regulated, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was promoted in V-SAS-LM8 cells. Silencing of FN1 by shRNA in V-SAS-LM8 cells decreased FAK phosphorylation, VEGF-C expression and inhibited lymphangiogenesis and LNM. EMT was also reversed. The FAK phosphorylation inhibitor PF573228 also decreased VEGF-C expression and reversed EMT in V-SAS-LM8 cells. Finally, we detected intense FN1 expression in some clinical specimens obtained from OSCC patients with LNM. These results demonstrate that elevated expression of cellular FN1 and following activation of FAK lead to increased VEGF-C expression, lymphangiogenesis and LNM and promoted EMT in SAS human OSCC cells and suggest that FN1-phosphorylated FAK signaling cascade is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of LNM in OSCC. PMID:26319373

  6. Sirtuin 6 promotes transforming growth factor-β1/H2O2/HOCl-mediated enhancement of hepatocellular carcinoma cell tumorigenicity by suppressing cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin-Xia; Luo, Jing; Liu, Mei; Yan, Wei; Zhou, Zhen-Zhen; Xia, Yu-Jia; Tu, Wei; Li, Pei-Yuan; Feng, Zuo-Hua; Tian, De-An

    2015-05-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) can function as a tumor suppressor by suppressing aerobic glycolysis and apoptosis resistance. However, the negative effect of SIRT6 on cellular senescence implies that it may also have the potential to promote tumor development. Here we report that the upregulation of SIRT6 expression was required for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and H2O2/HOCl reactive oxygen species (ROS) to promote the tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Transforming growth factor-β1/H2O2/HOCl could upregulate SIRT6 expression in HCC cells by inducing the sustained activation of ERK and Smad pathways. Sirtuin 6 in turn abrogated the inducing effect of TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl on cellular senescence of HCC cells, and was required for the ERK pathway to efficiently suppress the expression of p16 and p21. Sirtuin 6 altered the effect of Smad and p38 MAPK pathways on cellular senescence, and contributed to the inhibitory effect of the ERK pathway on cellular senescence. However, SIRT6 was inefficient in antagonizing the promoting effect of TGF-β1/H2O2 HOCl on aerobic glycolysis and anoikis resistance. Intriguingly, if SIRT6 expression was inhibited, the promoting effect of TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl on aerobic glycolysis and anoikis resistance was not sufficient to enhance the tumorigenicity of HCC cells. Suppressing the upregulation of SIRT6 enabled TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl to induce cellular senescence, thereby abrogating the enhancement of HCC cell tumorigenicity by TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl. These results suggest that SIRT6 is required for TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl to enhance the tumorigenicity of HCC cells, and that targeting the ERK pathway to suppress the upregulation of SIRT6 might be a potential approach in comprehensive strategies for the therapy of HCC.

  7. Regulon and promoter analysis of the E. coli heat-shock factor, sigma32, reveals a multifaceted cellular response to heat stress.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Gen; Blankschien, Matthew; Herman, Christophe; Gross, Carol A; Rhodius, Virgil A

    2006-07-01

    The heat-shock response (HSR), a universal cellular response to heat, is crucial for cellular adaptation. In Escherichia coli, the HSR is mediated by the alternative sigma factor, sigma32. To determine its role, we used genome-wide expression analysis and promoter validation to identify genes directly regulated by sigma32 and screened ORF overexpression libraries to identify sigma32 inducers. We triple the number of genes validated to be transcribed by sigma32 and provide new insights into the cellular role of this response. Our work indicates that the response is propagated as the regulon encodes numerous global transcriptional regulators, reveals that sigma70 holoenzyme initiates from 12% of sigma32 promoters, which has important implications for global transcriptional wiring, and identifies a new role for the response in protein homeostasis, that of protecting complex proteins. Finally, this study suggests that the response protects the cell membrane and responds to its status: Fully 25% of sigma32 regulon members reside in the membrane and alter its functionality; moreover, a disproportionate fraction of overexpressed proteins that induce the response are membrane localized. The intimate connection of the response to the membrane rationalizes why a major regulator of the response resides in that cellular compartment.

  8. Viral Replication Protein Inhibits Cellular Cofilin Actin Depolymerization Factor to Regulate the Actin Network and Promote Viral Replicase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kovalev, Nikolay; de Castro Martín, Isabel Fernández; Barajas, Daniel; Risco, Cristina; Nagy, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses exploit host cells by co-opting host factors and lipids and escaping host antiviral responses. Previous genome-wide screens with Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) in the model host yeast have identified 18 cellular genes that are part of the actin network. In this paper, we show that the p33 viral replication factor interacts with the cellular cofilin (Cof1p), which is an actin depolymerization factor. Using temperature-sensitive (ts) Cof1p or actin (Act1p) mutants at a semi-permissive temperature, we find an increased level of TBSV RNA accumulation in yeast cells and elevated in vitro activity of the tombusvirus replicase. We show that the large p33 containing replication organelle-like structures are located in the close vicinity of actin patches in yeast cells or around actin cable hubs in infected plant cells. Therefore, the actin filaments could be involved in VRC assembly and the formation of large viral replication compartments containing many individual VRCs. Moreover, we show that the actin network affects the recruitment of viral and cellular components, including oxysterol binding proteins and VAP proteins to form membrane contact sites for efficient transfer of sterols to the sites of replication. Altogether, the emerging picture is that TBSV, via direct interaction between the p33 replication protein and Cof1p, controls cofilin activities to obstruct the dynamic actin network that leads to efficient subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. In summary, the discovery that TBSV interacts with cellular cofilin and blocks the severing of existing filaments and the formation of new actin filaments in infected cells opens a new window to unravel the way by which viruses could subvert/co-opt cellular proteins and lipids. By regulating the functions of cofilin and the actin network, which are central nodes in cellular pathways, viruses could gain supremacy in subversion of cellular factors for pro-viral functions. PMID:26863541

  9. Transcriptional activation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL38 promoter conferred by the cis-acting downstream activation sequence is mediated by a cellular transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Guzowski, J F; Singh, J; Wagner, E K

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 strict late (gamma) UL38 promoter contains three cis-acting transcriptional elements: a TATA box, a specific initiator element, and the downstream activation sequence (DAS). DAS is located between positions +20 and +33 within the 5' untranslated leader region and strongly influences transcript levels during productive infection. In this communication, we further characterize DAS and investigate its mechanism of action. DAS function has a strict spacing requirement, and DAS contains an essential 6-bp core element. A similarly positioned element from the gamma gC gene (UL44) has partial DAS function within the UL38 promoter context, and the promoter controlling expression of the gamma US11 transcript contains an identically located element with functional and sequence similarity to UL38 DAS. These data suggest that downstream elements are a common feature of many HSV gamma promoters. Results with recombinant viruses containing modifications of the TATA box or initiator element of the UL38 promoter suggest that DAS functions to increase transcription initiation and not the efficiency of transcription elongation. In vitro transcription assays using uninfected HeLa nuclear extracts show that, as in productive infection with recombinant viruses, the deletion of DAS from the UL38 promoter dramatically decreases RNA expression. Finally, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments show that DAS DNA forms a specific, stable complex with a cellular protein (the DAS-binding factor) of approximately 35 kDa. These data strongly suggest that the interaction of cellular DAS-binding factor with DAS is required for efficient expression of UL38 and other HSV late genes. Images PMID:7966567

  10. Cellular transcription factor Oct-1 interacts with the Epstein-Barr virus BRLF1 protein to promote disruption of viral latency.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Amanda R; Kwek, Swee Sen; Hagemeier, Stacy R; Wille, Coral K; Kenney, Shannon C

    2011-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is an essential part of the viral life cycle, but the cellular factors that promote viral reactivation are not well defined. In this report, we demonstrate that the cellular transcription factor Oct-1 cooperates with the EBV immediate-early protein BRLF1 (R, Rta) to induce lytic viral reactivation. We show that cotransfected Oct-1 enhances the ability of BRLF1 to activate lytic gene expression in 293 cells stably infected with a BRLF1-defective EBV mutant (BRLF1-stop) and that Oct-1 increases BRLF1-mediated activation of lytic EBV promoters in reporter gene assays. We find that Oct-1 interacts directly with BRLF1 in vitro and that a mutant BRLF1 protein (the M140A mutant) attenuated for the ability to interact with Oct-1 in vitro is also resistant to Oct-1-mediated transcriptional enhancement in 293 BRLF1-stop cells. Furthermore, we show that cotransfected Oct-1 augments BRLF1 binding to a variety of lytic EBV promoters in chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays (including the BZLF1, BMRF1, and SM promoters) and that BRLF1 tethers Oct-1 to lytic EBV promoters. In addition, we demonstrate that an Oct-1 mutant defective in DNA binding (the S335D mutant) still retains the ability to enhance BRLF1 transcriptional effects. Finally, we show that knockdown of endogenous Oct-1 expression reduces the level of constitutive lytic EBV gene expression in both EBV-positive B-cell and EBV-positive epithelial cell lines. These results suggest that Oct-1 acts as a positive regulator of EBV lytic gene expression and that this effect is at least partially mediated through its interaction with the viral protein BRLF1. PMID:21697476

  11. SGK1 inhibits cellular apoptosis and promotes proliferation via the MEK/ERK/p53 pathway in colitis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jian-An; Xu, Gui-Fang; Yan, Li-Jun; Zeng, Wei-Wen; Ji, Qian-Qian; Wu, Jin-Dao; Tang, Qi-Yun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of serum-and-glucocorticoid-inducible-kinase-1 (SGK1) in colitis and its potential pathological mechanisms. METHODS: SGK1 expression in mucosal biopsies from patients with active Crohn’s disease (CD) and normal controls was detected by immunohistochemistry. We established an acute colitis model in mice induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonicacid, and demonstrated the presence of colitis using the disease activity index, the histologic activity index and hematoxylin and eosin staining. The cellular events and potential mechanisms were implemented with small interference RNA and an inhibitor of signaling molecule (i.e., U0126) in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). The interaction between SGK1 and the signaling molecule was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation. RESULTS: SGK1 expression was significantly increased in the inflamed epithelia of patients with active CD and TNBS-induced colitis model (0.58 ± 0.055 vs 0.85 ± 0.06, P < 0.01). At the cellular level, silencing of SGK1 by small interference RNA (siSGK1) significantly inhibited the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 (MEK1) and the downstream molecule extracellular signal regulated protein kinase (ERK) 1/2, which induced the upregulation of p53 and Bcl-2-associated X protein, mediating the subsequent cellular apoptosis and proliferation in IECs. Cells treated with MEK1 inhibitor (i.e., U0126) before siSGK1 transfection showed a reversal of the siSGK1-induced cellular apoptosis. CONCLUSION: Our data suggested that SGK1 may protect IECs in colitis from tumor necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis partly by triggering MEK/ERK activation. PMID:26034353

  12. No Effect of the Transforming Growth Factor {beta}1 Promoter Polymorphism C-509T on TGFB1 Gene Expression, Protein Secretion, or Cellular Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Reuther, Sebastian; Metzke, Elisabeth; Bonin, Michael; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Raabe, Annette

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To study whether the promoter polymorphism (C-509T) affects transforming growth factor {beta}1 gene (TGFB1) expression, protein secretion, and/or cellular radiosensitivity for both human lymphocytes and fibroblasts. Methods and Materials: Experiments were performed with lymphocytes taken either from 124 breast cancer patients or 59 pairs of normal monozygotic twins. We used 15 normal human primary fibroblast strains as controls. The C-509T genotype was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism or TaqMan single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping assay. The cellular radiosensitivity of lymphocytes was measured by G0/1 assay and that of fibroblasts by colony assay. The amount of extracellular TGFB1 protein was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and TGFB1 expression was assessed via microarray analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: The C-509T genotype was found not to be associated with cellular radiosensitivity, neither for lymphocytes (breast cancer patients, P=.811; healthy donors, P=.181) nor for fibroblasts (P=.589). Both TGFB1 expression and TGFB1 protein secretion showed considerable variation, which, however, did not depend on the C-509T genotype (protein secretion: P=.879; gene expression: lymphocytes, P=.134, fibroblasts, P=.605). There was also no general correlation between TGFB1 expression and cellular radiosensitivity (lymphocytes, P=.632; fibroblasts, P=.573). Conclusion: Our data indicate that any association between the SNP C-509T of TGFB1 and risk of normal tissue toxicity cannot be ascribed to a functional consequence of this SNP, either on the level of gene expression, protein secretion, or cellular radiosensitivity.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase 3 promotes cellular anti-dengue virus response via interaction with transcription factor NFκB in cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Xiangyang; Pan, Wen; Feng, Tingting; Shi, Xiaohong; Dai, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV), the causative agent of human Dengue hemorrhagic fever, is a mosquito-borne virus of immense global health importance. Characterization of cellular factors promoting or inhibiting DENV infection is important for understanding the mechanism of DENV infection. In this report, MMP3 (stromelysin-1), a secretory endopeptidase that degrades extracellular matrices, has been shown promoting cellular antiviral response against DENV infection. Quantitative RT-PCR and Western Blot showed that the expression of MMP3 was upregulated in DENV-infected RAW264.7 cells. The intracellular viral loads were significantly higher in MMP3 silenced cells compared with controls. The expression level of selective anti-viral cytokines were decreased in MMP3 siRNA treated cells, and the transcription factor activity of NFκB was significantly impaired upon MMP3 silencing during DENV infection. Further, we found that MMP3 moved to cell nucleus upon DENV infection and colocalized with NFκB P65 in nucleus. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis suggested that MMP3 directly interacted with NFκB in nucleus during DENV infection and the C-terminal hemopexin-like domain of MMP3 was required for the interaction. This study suggested a novel role of MMP3 in nucleus during viral infection and provided new evidence for MMPs in immunomodulation.

  14. Membrane Surface-Associated Helices Promote Lipid Interactions and Cellular Uptake of Human Calcitonin-Derived Cell Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Herbig, Michael E.; Weller, Kathrin; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G.; Merkle, Hans P.; Zerbe, Oliver

    2005-01-01

    hCT(9-32) is a human calcitonin (hCT)-derived cell-penetrating peptide that has been shown to translocate the plasma membrane of mammalian cells. It has been suggested as a cellular carrier for drugs, green fluorescent protein, and plasmid DNA. Because of its temperature-dependent cellular translocation resulting in punctuated cytoplasmatic distribution, its uptake is likely to follow an endocytic pathway. To gain insight into the molecular orientation of hCT(9-32) when interacting with lipid models, and to learn more about its mode of action, various biophysical techniques from liposome partitioning to high-resolution NMR spectroscopy were utilized. Moreover, to establish the role of individual residues for the topology of its association with the lipid membrane, two mutants of hCT(9-32), i.e., W30-hCT(9-32) and A23-hCT(9-32), were also investigated. Although unstructured in aqueous solution, hCT(9-32) adopted two short helical stretches when bound to dodecylphosphocholine micelles, extending from Thr10 to Asn17 and from Gln24 to Val29. A23-hCT(9-32), in which the helix-breaking Pro23 was replaced by Ala, displayed a continuous α-helix extending from residue 12 to 26. Probing with the spin label 5-doxylstearate revealed that association with dodecylphosphocholine micelles was such that the helix engaged in parallel orientation to the micelle surface. Moreover, the Gly to Trp exchange in W30-hCT(9-32) resulted in a more stable anchoring of the C-terminal segment close to the interface, as reflected by a twofold increase in the partition coefficient in liposomes. Interestingly, tighter binding to model membranes was associated with an increase in the in vitro uptake in human cervix epithelial andenocarcinoma cell line cells. Liposome leakage studies excluded pore formation, and the punctuated fluorescence pattern of internalized peptide indicated vesicular localization and, in conclusion, strongly suggested an endocytic pathway of translocation. PMID:16183886

  15. The Cellular Generation and a New Risk Environment: Implications for Texting-Based Sexual Health Promotion Interventions among Minority Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    George, Sheba; Phillips, Robert; McDavitt, Bryce; Adams, Wallis; Mutchler, Matt G.

    2012-01-01

    African American and Latino young men who have sex with men (YMSM) are at the forefront of the U.S. HIV epidemic. As members of the “cellular generation,” these youth are very likely to use text messaging; yet, relatively little research has explored use of text messaging as a tool for sexual health promotion, particularly among racial ethnic minorities who are also sexual minorities. We report on the results of ten focus groups conducted among African American and Latino YMSM, aged 18–25, regarding their current texting practices and the feasibility/acceptability of text messaging as a means of conducting sexual health promotion. Our analyses revealed four main themes around their texting behaviors, texting preferences, perceived advantages/disadvantages of texting, and the “etiquette” of texting. We consider implications of these findings for the development of texting-based sexual health promotion interventions, particularly in conjunction with other existing interventions operating in a new risk environment. PMID:23304294

  16. Cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein, a transcriptional enhancer of c-Myc, promotes the formation of parallel G-quadruplexes.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Mariana; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2010-06-15

    G-rich sequences that contain stretches of tandem guanines can form four-stranded, intramolecular stable DNA structures called G-quadruplexes (termed G4s). Regulation of the equilibrium between single-stranded and G4 DNA in promoter regions is essential for control of gene expression in the cell. G4s are highly stable structures; however, their folding kinetics are slow under physiological conditions. CNBP (cellular nucleic-acid-binding protein) is a nucleic acid chaperone that binds the G4-forming G-rich sequence located within the NHE (nuclease hypersensitivity element) III of the c-Myc proto-oncogene promoter. Several reports have demonstrated that CNBP enhances the transcription of c-Myc in vitro and in vivo; however, none of these reports have assessed the molecular mechanisms responsible for this control. In the present study, by means of Taq polymerase stop assays, electrophoretic mobility-shift assays and CD spectroscopy, we show that CNBP promotes the formation of parallel G4s to the detriment of anti-parallel G4s, and its nucleic acid chaperone activity is required for this effect. These findings are the first to implicate CNBP as a G4-folding modulator and, furthermore, assign CNBP a novel mode-of-action during c-Myc transcriptional regulation.

  17. Functional characterization of calliphorid cell death genes and cellularization gene promoters for controlling gene expression and cell viability in early embryos.

    PubMed

    Edman, R M; Linger, R J; Belikoff, E J; Li, F; Sze, S-H; Tarone, A M; Scott, M J

    2015-02-01

    The New World screwworm fly, Cochliomyia hominivorax, and the Australian sheep blow fly, Lucilia cuprina, are major pests of livestock. The sterile insect technique was used to eradicate C. hominivorax from North and Central America. This involved area-wide releases of male and female flies that had been sterilized by radiation. Genetic systems have been developed for making 'male-only' strains that would improve the efficiency of genetic control of insect pests. One system involves induction of female lethality in embryos through activation of a pro-apoptotic gene by the tetracycline-dependent transactivator. Sex-specific expression is achieved using an intron from the transformer gene, which we previously isolated from several calliphorids. In the present study, we report the isolation of the promoters from the C. hominivorax slam and Lucilia sericata bnk cellularization genes and show that these promoters can drive expression of a GFP reporter gene in early embryos of transgenic L. cuprina. Additionally, we report the isolation of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic hid and rpr genes, identify conserved motifs in the encoded proteins and determine the relative expression of these genes at different stages of development. We show that widespread expression of the L. sericata pro-apoptotic genes was lethal in Drosophila melanogaster. The isolated gene promoters and pro-apoptotic genes could potentially be used to build transgenic embryonic sexing strains of calliphorid livestock pests.

  18. Recombinant murine IL-12 promotes a protective Th1/cellular response in Mongolian gerbils infected with Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Flores-García, Aurelio; Velarde-Félix, Jesús Salvador; Garibaldi-Becerra, Vicente; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Torres-Bugarín, Olivia; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Ruíz-Bernés, Salvador; Ochoa-Ramírez, Luis Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Sporotrichosis is a cutaneous fungal infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. It is known to be mainly contained by Th1 responses. As IL-12 is crucial for Th1 response, we investigated if treatment with recombinant murine IL-12 (rmIL-12) promoted Th1 immunity and/or clinical improvement in an experimental sporotrichosis gerbil model. Gerbils were inoculated with S. schenckii in the footpad and treated with rmIL-12. Seven days post infection there was a significant increase in macrophage phagocytosis and oxidative burst, and in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction in rmIL-12 treated gerbils, as well as a ∼10-fold increase of serum IFN-gamma and a decrease of IL-4 and IL-10. Moreover, rmIL-12 substantially decreased (∼70%) S. schenckii burden in liver and spleen and improved the clinical outcome preventing footpad ulcer and tail nodules observed in untreated gerbils. Our study demonstrates that rmIL-12 promotes Th1 immune response against S. schenckii favouring its clearance and preventing clinical symptoms.

  19. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses.

  20. The Vaccine Adjuvant Chitosan Promotes Cellular Immunity via DNA Sensor cGAS-STING-Dependent Induction of Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Elizabeth C; Jin, Lei; Mori, Andres; Muñoz-Wolf, Natalia; Oleszycka, Ewa; Moran, Hannah B T; Mansouri, Samira; McEntee, Craig P; Lambe, Eimear; Agger, Else Marie; Andersen, Peter; Cunningham, Colm; Hertzog, Paul; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Bowie, Andrew G; Lavelle, Ed C

    2016-03-15

    The cationic polysaccharide chitosan is an attractive candidate adjuvant capable of driving potent cell-mediated immunity, but the mechanism by which it acts is not clear. We show that chitosan promotes dendritic cell maturation by inducing type I interferons (IFNs) and enhances antigen-specific T helper 1 (Th1) responses in a type I IFN receptor-dependent manner. The induction of type I IFNs, IFN-stimulated genes and dendritic cell maturation by chitosan required the cytoplasmic DNA sensor cGAS and STING, implicating this pathway in dendritic cell activation. Additionally, this process was dependent on mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and the presence of cytoplasmic DNA. Chitosan-mediated enhancement of antigen specific Th1 and immunoglobulin G2c responses following vaccination was dependent on both cGAS and STING. These findings demonstrate that a cationic polymer can engage the STING-cGAS pathway to trigger innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:26944200

  1. Down-regulation of Dicer1 promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Youshan; Wu, Dong; Fei, Chengming; Guo, Juan; Gu, Shuncheng; Zhu, Yang; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Zheng; Wu, Lingyun; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2015-02-01

    Although it has been reported that mesenchymal stromal cells are unable to provide sufficient hematopoietic support in myelodysplastic syndrome, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we found that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome displayed a significant increase in senescence, as evidenced by their decreased proliferative capacity, flattened morphology and increased expression of SA-β-gal and p21. Senescent mesenchymal stromal cells from patients had decreased differentiation potential and decreased stem cell support capacity. Gene knockdown of Dicer1, which was down-regulated in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients, induced senescence. The differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities were significantly inhibited by Dicer1 knockdown. Overexpression of Dicer1 in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients reversed cellular senescence and enhanced stem cell properties. Furthermore, we identified reduced expression in the microRNA-17 family (miR-17-5p, miR-20a/b, miR-106a/b and miR-93) as a potential factor responsible for increased p21 expression, a key senescence mediator, in Dicer1 knockdown cells. Moreover, we found that miR-93 and miR-20a expression levels were significantly reduced in mesenchymal stromal cells from patients and miR-93/miR-20a gain of function resulted in a decrease of cellular senescence. Collectively, the results of our study show that mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome are prone to senescence and that Dicer1 down-regulation promotes cellular senescence and decreases the differentiation and stem cell-supporting capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells. Dicer1 down-regulation seems to contribute to the insufficient hematopoietic support capacities of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.

  2. NaDC3 Induces Premature Cellular Senescence by Promoting Transport of Krebs Cycle Intermediates, Increasing NADH, and Exacerbating Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Du, Xuan; Fu, Bo; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter 3 (NaDC3) is a key metabolism-regulating membrane protein responsible for transport of Krebs cycle intermediates. NaDC3 is upregulated as organs age, but knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which NaDC3 modulates mammalian aging is limited. In this study, we showed that NaDC3 overexpression accelerated cellular senescence in young human diploid cells (MRC-5 and WI-38) and primary renal tubular cells, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and increased expression of senescent biomarkers, senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and carbonyl were significantly enhanced, and activities of respiratory complexes I and III and ATP level were significantly decreased in NaDC3-infected cells. Stressful premature senescent phenotypes induced by NaDC3 were markedly ameliorated via treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and Tempol. High expression of NaDC3 caused a prominent increase in intracellular levels of Krebs cycle intermediates and NADH. Exogenous NADH and NAD(+) may aggravate and attenuate the aging phenotypes induced by NaDC3, respectively. These results suggest that NaDC3 can induce premature cellular senescence by promoting the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates, increasing generation of NADH and reactive oxygen species and leading to oxidative damage. Our results clarify the aging signaling pathway regulated by NaDC3. PMID:25384549

  3. NaDC3 Induces Premature Cellular Senescence by Promoting Transport of Krebs Cycle Intermediates, Increasing NADH, and Exacerbating Oxidative Damage.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuxiang; Bai, Xue-Yuan; Du, Xuan; Fu, Bo; Chen, Xiangmei

    2016-01-01

    High-affinity sodium-dependent dicarboxylate cotransporter 3 (NaDC3) is a key metabolism-regulating membrane protein responsible for transport of Krebs cycle intermediates. NaDC3 is upregulated as organs age, but knowledge regarding the underlying mechanisms by which NaDC3 modulates mammalian aging is limited. In this study, we showed that NaDC3 overexpression accelerated cellular senescence in young human diploid cells (MRC-5 and WI-38) and primary renal tubular cells, leading to cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and increased expression of senescent biomarkers, senescence-associated β-galactosidase and p16. Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, malondialdehyde, and carbonyl were significantly enhanced, and activities of respiratory complexes I and III and ATP level were significantly decreased in NaDC3-infected cells. Stressful premature senescent phenotypes induced by NaDC3 were markedly ameliorated via treatment with the antioxidants Tiron and Tempol. High expression of NaDC3 caused a prominent increase in intracellular levels of Krebs cycle intermediates and NADH. Exogenous NADH and NAD(+) may aggravate and attenuate the aging phenotypes induced by NaDC3, respectively. These results suggest that NaDC3 can induce premature cellular senescence by promoting the transport of Krebs cycle intermediates, increasing generation of NADH and reactive oxygen species and leading to oxidative damage. Our results clarify the aging signaling pathway regulated by NaDC3.

  4. A single dose of inactivated hepatitis A vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cellular response similar to that induced by a natural infection.

    PubMed

    Melgaço, Juliana Gil; Morgado, Lucas Nóbrega; Santiago, Marta Almeida; Oliveira, Jaqueline Mendes de; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Hasselmann, Bárbara; Cruz, Oswaldo Gonçalves; Pinto, Marcelo Alves; Vitral, Claudia Lamarca

    2015-07-31

    Based on current studies on the effects of single dose vaccines on antibody production, Latin American countries have adopted a single dose vaccine program. However, no data are available on the activation of cellular response to a single dose of hepatitis A. Our study investigated the functional reactivity of the memory cell phenotype after hepatitis A virus (HAV) stimulation through administration of the first or second dose of HAV vaccine and compared the response to that of a baseline group to an initial natural infection. Proliferation assays showed that the first vaccine dose induced HAV-specific cellular response; this response was similar to that induced by a second dose or an initial natural infection. Thus, from the first dose to the second dose, increase in the frequencies of classical memory B cells, TCD8 cells, and central memory TCD4 and TCD8 cells were observed. Regarding cytokine production, increased IL-6, IL-10, TNF, and IFNγ levels were observed after vaccination. Our findings suggest that a single dose of HAV vaccine promotes HAV-specific memory cell response similar to that induced by a natural infection. The HAV-specific T cell immunity induced by primary vaccination persisted independently of the protective plasma antibody level. In addition, our results suggest that a single dose immunization system could serve as an alternative strategy for the prevention of hepatitis A in developing countries.

  5. The expression of S100P increases and promotes cellular proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin in endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Luyan; Chen, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongye; Huang, Jiaming; Jin, Wenyan; Yao, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence suggesting that S100P has a significant role in cancer, and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer and normal endometrium tissues was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we reduced the expression of S100P in HEC-1A and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines by siRNA transfection. Based on the reduced S100P mRNA expression, we measured the effects of S100P on cellular proliferation by the cell-counting kit-8. Nuclear β-catenin protein level was detected by western blotting. Cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA expression regulated by β-catenin was detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We found that the expression of S100P mRNA and protein increased in endometrial cancer tissues compared with the normal endometrium. Local S100P expression progressively increased from pathologic differenciation grade 1 to 3. After reducing the S100P expression, the cellular proliferation ability, nuclear β-catenin protein level, cyclin D1 and c-myc mRNA levels reduced. It indicated that S100P could promote cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin. The expression of S100P mRNA and protein in endometrial cancer significantly increased and is associated with pathologic differenciation grade. S100P may promote endometrial cell proliferation by increasing nuclear translocation of β-catenin.

  6. Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) promotes cellular angiogenesis and migration in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Liu, Yu-Huei; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2016-04-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is abundant in hepatocytes and known to be involved in lipid metabolism. Overexpression of L-FABP has been reported in various cancers; however, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated L-FABP and its association with vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) in 90 HCC patients. We found that L-FABP was highly expressed in their HCC tissues, and that this expression was positively correlated with that of VEGF-A. Additionally, L-FABP significantly promoted tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. We also assessed the mechanisms of L-FABP activity in tumorigenesis; L-FABP was found to associate with VEGFR2 on membrane rafts and subsequently activate the Akt/mTOR/P70S6K/4EBP1 and Src/FAK/cdc42 pathways, which resulted in up-regulation of VEGF-A accompanied by an increase in both angiogenic potential and migration activity. Our results thus suggest that L-FABP could be a potential target for HCC chemotherapy. PMID:26919097

  7. Engineering a Biocompatible Scaffold with Either Micrometre or Nanometre Scale Surface Topography for Promoting Protein Adsorption and Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Le, Xuan; Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Ali, Nurshahidah; Berry, Cassandra M.; Fawcett, Derek

    2013-01-01

    Surface topographical features on biomaterials, both at the submicrometre and nanometre scales, are known to influence the physicochemical interactions between biological processes involving proteins and cells. The nanometre-structured surface features tend to resemble the extracellular matrix, the natural environment in which cells live, communicate, and work together. It is believed that by engineering a well-defined nanometre scale surface topography, it should be possible to induce appropriate surface signals that can be used to manipulate cell function in a similar manner to the extracellular matrix. Therefore, there is a need to investigate, understand, and ultimately have the ability to produce tailor-made nanometre scale surface topographies with suitable surface chemistry to promote favourable biological interactions similar to those of the extracellular matrix. Recent advances in nanoscience and nanotechnology have produced many new nanomaterials and numerous manufacturing techniques that have the potential to significantly improve several fields such as biological sensing, cell culture technology, surgical implants, and medical devices. For these fields to progress, there is a definite need to develop a detailed understanding of the interaction between biological systems and fabricated surface structures at both the micrometre and nanometre scales. PMID:23533416

  8. Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) promotes cellular angiogenesis and migration in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Liu, Yu-Huei; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is abundant in hepatocytes and known to be involved in lipid metabolism. Overexpression of L-FABP has been reported in various cancers; however, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated L-FABP and its association with vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) in 90 HCC patients. We found that L-FABP was highly expressed in their HCC tissues, and that this expression was positively correlated with that of VEGF-A. Additionally, L-FABP significantly promoted tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. We also assessed the mechanisms of L-FABP activity in tumorigenesis; L-FABP was found to associate with VEGFR2 on membrane rafts and subsequently activate the Akt/mTOR/P70S6K/4EBP1 and Src/FAK/cdc42 pathways, which resulted in up-regulation of VEGF-A accompanied by an increase in both angiogenic potential and migration activity. Our results thus suggest that L-FABP could be a potential target for HCC chemotherapy. PMID:26919097

  9. Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) promotes cellular angiogenesis and migration in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chung-Yu; Liu, Yu-Huei; Lin, Hsuan-Yuan; Lu, Shao-Chun; Lin, Jung-Yaw

    2016-04-01

    Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is abundant in hepatocytes and known to be involved in lipid metabolism. Overexpression of L-FABP has been reported in various cancers; however, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains unclear. In this study, we investigated L-FABP and its association with vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) in 90 HCC patients. We found that L-FABP was highly expressed in their HCC tissues, and that this expression was positively correlated with that of VEGF-A. Additionally, L-FABP significantly promoted tumor growth and metastasis in a xenograft mouse model. We also assessed the mechanisms of L-FABP activity in tumorigenesis; L-FABP was found to associate with VEGFR2 on membrane rafts and subsequently activate the Akt/mTOR/P70S6K/4EBP1 and Src/FAK/cdc42 pathways, which resulted in up-regulation of VEGF-A accompanied by an increase in both angiogenic potential and migration activity. Our results thus suggest that L-FABP could be a potential target for HCC chemotherapy.

  10. Cellular Protein WDR11 Interacts with Specific Herpes Simplex Virus Proteins at the trans-Golgi Network To Promote Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Kathryne E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has recently been proposed that the herpes simplex virus (HSV) protein ICP0 has cytoplasmic roles in blocking antiviral signaling and in promoting viral replication in addition to its well-known proteasome-dependent functions in the nucleus. However, the mechanisms through which it produces these effects remain unclear. While investigating this further, we identified a novel cytoplasmic interaction between ICP0 and the poorly characterized cellular protein WDR11. During an HSV infection, WDR11 undergoes a dramatic change in localization at late times in the viral replication cycle, moving from defined perinuclear structures to a dispersed cytoplasmic distribution. While this relocation was not observed during infection with viruses other than HSV-1 and correlated with efficient HSV-1 replication, the redistribution was found to occur independently of ICP0 expression, instead requiring viral late gene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that WDR11 is localized to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), where it interacts specifically with some, but not all, HSV virion components, in addition to ICP0. Knockdown of WDR11 in cultured human cells resulted in a modest but consistent decrease in yields of both wild-type and ICP0-null viruses, in the supernatant and cell-associated fractions, without affecting viral gene expression. Although further study is required, we propose that WDR11 participates in viral assembly and/or secondary envelopment. IMPORTANCE While the TGN has been proposed to be the major site of HSV-1 secondary envelopment, this process is incompletely understood, and in particular, the role of cellular TGN components in this pathway is unknown. Additionally, little is known about the cellular functions of WDR11, although the disruption of this protein has been implicated in multiple human diseases. Therefore, our finding that WDR11 is a TGN-resident protein that interacts with specific viral proteins to enhance viral yields improves both

  11. Increased cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein expression promotes protrusion extension and enhances migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Liao, Ching-Fong; Deng, Win-Ping; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Hsieh, Cheng-I; Tung, Jai-Nien; Chen, Ching-Shyang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Li, Li-Tzu; Lin, Chuang-Yu; Hsu, Chung-Huei; Jiang, Ming-Chung

    2010-10-15

    Microtubules are part of cell structures that play a role in regulating the migration of cancer cells. The cellular apoptosis susceptibility (CSE1L/CAS) protein is a microtubule-associated protein that is highly expressed in cancer. We report here that CSE1L regulates the association of {alpha}-tubulin with {beta}-tubulin and promotes the migration of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. CSE1L was associated with {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin in GST (glutathione S-transferase) pull-down and immunoprecipitation assays. CSE1L-GFP (green fluorescence protein) fusion protein experiments showed that the N-terminal of CSE1L interacted with microtubules. Increased CSE1L expression resulted in decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin, increased {alpha}-tubulin and {beta}-tubulin association, and enhanced assembly of microtubules. Cell protrusions or pseudopodia are temporary extensions of the plasma membrane and are implicated in cancer cell migration and invasion. Increased CSE1L expression increased the extension of MCF-7 cell protrusions. In vitro migration assay showed that enhanced CSE1L expression increased the migration of MCF-7 cells. Our results indicate that CSE1L plays a role in regulating the extension of cell protrusions and promotes the migration of cancer cells.

  12. Defensins act as potent adjuvants that promote cellular and humoral immune responses in mice to a lymphoma idiotype and carrier antigens.

    PubMed

    Tani, K; Murphy, W J; Chertov, O; Salcedo, R; Koh, C Y; Utsunomiya, I; Funakoshi, S; Asai, O; Herrmann, S H; Wang, J M; Kwak, L W; Oppenheim, J J

    2000-05-01

    Defensins released by neutrophils are able to kill a broad spectrum of microbes. They also induce leukocyte migration in vitro and elicit inflammatory leukocyte responses at s.c. injection sites in mice. In vitro experiments showed that human defensins enhanced concanavalin A-stimulated murine spleen cell proliferation and IFN-gamma production. This led us to examine the effects of human defensins on specific immune responses in vivo. BALB/c mice were immunized with 50 microg of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide and administered with defensins in aqueous solution. Intraperitoneal administration of defensins significantly increased the production of KLH-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgG2b antibodies 14 days after immunization. In vitro splenic KLH-specific proliferative responses were higher in mice treated with KLH and defensins than in those treated with KLH alone. Increased IFN-gamma and, to a lesser extent, IL-4 production were also detected in the supernatants of ex vivoKLH-activated spleen cells from mice treated with defensins. Finally, defensins significantly enhanced the antibody response to a syngeneic tumor antigen, lymphoma Ig idiotype and also augmented resistance to tumor challenge. These results indicate that defensins act as potent immune adjuvants by inducing the production of lymphokines, which promote T cell-dependent cellular immunity and antigen-specific Ig production. Thus, defensins appear to function as neutrophil-derived signals that promote adaptive immune responses. PMID:10784615

  13. LANA Binds to Multiple Active Viral and Cellular Promoters and Associates with the H3K4Methyltransferase hSET1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C.; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Renne, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  14. LANA binds to multiple active viral and cellular promoters and associates with the H3K4methyltransferase hSET1 complex.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Turner, Peter C; Jain, Vaibhav; McIntyre, Lauren M; Renne, Rolf

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a γ-herpesvirus associated with KS and two lymphoproliferative diseases. Recent studies characterized epigenetic modification of KSHV episomes during latency and determined that latency-associated genes are associated with H3K4me3 while most lytic genes are associated with the silencing mark H3K27me3. Since the latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) (i) is expressed very early after de novo infection, (ii) interacts with transcriptional regulators and chromatin remodelers, and (iii) regulates the LANA and RTA promoters, we hypothesized that LANA may contribute to the establishment of latency through epigenetic control. We performed a detailed ChIP-seq analysis in cells of lymphoid and endothelial origin and compared H3K4me3, H3K27me3, polII, and LANA occupancy. On viral episomes LANA binding was detected at numerous lytic and latent promoters, which were transactivated by LANA using reporter assays. LANA binding was highly enriched at H3K4me3 peaks and this co-occupancy was also detected on many host gene promoters. Bioinformatic analysis of enriched LANA binding sites in combination with biochemical binding studies revealed three distinct binding patterns. A small subset of LANA binding sites showed sequence homology to the characterized LBS1/2 sequence in the viral terminal repeat. A large number of sites contained a novel LANA binding motif (TCCAT)3 which was confirmed by gel shift analysis. Third, some viral and cellular promoters did not contain LANA binding sites and are likely enriched through protein/protein interaction. LANA was associated with H3K4me3 marks and in PEL cells 86% of all LANA bound promoters were transcriptionally active, leading to the hypothesis that LANA interacts with the machinery that methylates H3K4. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated LANA association with endogenous hSET1 complexes in both lymphoid and endothelial cells suggesting that LANA may contribute to the epigenetic

  15. GCK-MODY diabetes as a protein misfolding disease: the mutation R275C promotes protein misfolding, self-association and cellular degradation.

    PubMed

    Negahdar, Maria; Aukrust, Ingvild; Molnes, Janne; Solheim, Marie H; Johansson, Bente B; Sagen, Jørn V; Dahl-Jørgensen, Knut; Kulkarni, Rohit N; Søvik, Oddmund; Flatmark, Torgeir; Njølstad, Pål R; Bjørkhaug, Lise

    2014-01-25

    GCK-MODY, dominantly inherited mild hyperglycemia, is associated with more than 600 mutations in the glucokinase gene. Different molecular mechanisms have been shown to explain GCK-MODY. Here, we report a Pakistani family harboring the glucokinase mutation c.823C>T (p.R275C). The recombinant and in cellulo expressed mutant pancreatic enzyme revealed slightly increased enzyme activity (kcat) and normal affinity for α-D-glucose, and resistance to limited proteolysis by trypsin comparable with wild-type. When stably expressed in HEK293 cells and MIN6 β-cells (at different levels), the mutant protein appeared misfolded and unstable with a propensity to form dimers and aggregates. Its degradation rate was increased, involving the lysosomal and proteasomal quality control systems. On mutation, a hydrogen bond between the R275 side-chain and the carbonyl oxygen of D267 is broken, destabilizing the F260-L271 loop structure and the protein. This promotes the formation of dimers/aggregates and suggests that an increased cellular degradation is the molecular mechanism by which R275C causes GCK-MODY.

  16. Leishmania Induces Survival, Proliferation and Elevated Cellular dNTP Levels in Human Monocytes Promoting Acceleration of HIV Co-Infection

    PubMed Central

    Daddacha, Waaqo; Overstreet, Michael G.; Lazarski, Chris A.; Fowell, Deborah J.; Kim, Baek

    2012-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a parasitic disease that is widely prevalent in many tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Infection with Leishmania has been recognized to induce a striking acceleration of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) infection in coinfected individuals through as yet incompletely understood mechanisms. Cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage are the predominant cell types coinfected by both pathogens. Monocytes and macrophages contain extremely low levels of deoxynucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs) due to their lack of cell cycling and S phase, where dNTP biosynthesis is specifically activated. Lentiviruses, such as HIV-1, are unique among retroviruses in their ability to replicate in these non-dividing cells due, at least in part, to their highly efficient reverse transcriptase (RT). Nonetheless, viral replication progresses more efficiently in the setting of higher intracellular dNTP concentrations related to enhanced enzyme kinetics of the viral RT. In the present study, in vitro infection of CD14+ peripheral blood-derived human monocytes with Leishmania major was found to induce differentiation, marked elevation of cellular p53R2 ribonucleotide reductase subunit and R2 subunit expression. The R2 subunit is restricted to the S phase of the cell cycle. Our dNTP assay demonstrated significant elevation of intracellular monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) dNTP concentrations in Leishmania-infected cell populations as compared to control cells. Infection of Leishmania-maturated MDMs with a pseudotyped GFP expressing HIV-1 resulted in increased numbers of GFP+ cells in the Leishmania-maturated MDMs as compared to control cells. Interestingly, a sub-population of Leishmania-maturated MDMs was found to have re-entered the cell cycle, as demonstrated by BrdU labeling. In conclusion, Leishmania infection of primary human monocytes promotes the induction of an S phase environment and elevated dNTP levels with notable elevation of HIV-1 expression

  17. A Mechanism to Enhance Cellular Responsivity to Hormone Action: Krüppel-Like Factor 9 Promotes Thyroid Hormone Receptor-β Autoinduction During Postembryonic Brain Development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Knoedler, Joseph R; Denver, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) receptor (TR)-β (trb) is induced by TH (autoinduced) in Xenopus tadpoles during metamorphosis. We previously showed that Krüppel-like factor 9 (Klf9) is rapidly induced by TH in the tadpole brain, associates in chromatin with the trb upstream region in a developmental stage and TH-dependent manner, and forced expression of Klf9 in the Xenopus laevis cell line XTC-2 accelerates and enhances trb autoinduction. Here we investigated whether Klf9 can promote trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo. Using electroporation-mediated gene transfer, we transfected plasmids into premetamorphic tadpole brain to express wild-type or mutant forms of Klf9. Forced expression of Klf9 increased baseline trb mRNA levels in thyroid-intact but not in goitrogen-treated tadpoles, supporting that Klf9 enhances liganded TR action. As in XTC-2 cells, forced expression of Klf9 enhanced trb autoinduction in tadpole brain in vivo and also increased TH-dependent induction of the TR target genes klf9 and thbzip. Consistent with our previous mutagenesis experiments conducted in XTC-2 cells, the actions of Klf9 in vivo required an intact N-terminal region but not a functional DNA binding domain. Forced expression of TRβ in tadpole brain by electroporation-mediated gene transfer increased baseline and TH-induced TR target gene transcription, supporting a role for trb autoinduction during metamorphosis. Our findings support that Klf9 acts as an accessory transcription factor for TR at the trb locus during tadpole metamorphosis, enhancing trb autoinduction and transcription of other TR target genes, which increases cellular responsivity to further TH action on developmental gene regulation programs.

  18. The cellular ataxia telangiectasia-mutated kinase promotes epstein-barr virus lytic reactivation in response to multiple different types of lytic reactivation-inducing stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hagemeier, Stacy R; Barlow, Elizabeth A; Meng, Qiao; Kenney, Shannon C

    2012-12-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent-to-lytic switch is mediated by the viral proteins BZLF1 (Z), BRLF1 (R), and BRRF1 (Na). Since we previously showed that DNA-damaging agents (including chemotherapy and irradiation) can induce EBV lytic reactivation and recently demonstrated that wild-type p53 contributes to lytic reactivation, we investigated the role of the ATM kinase during EBV reactivation. ATM phosphorylates and activates p53, as well as numerous other substrates involved in the cellular DNA damage response. Using an ATM inhibitor (KU55933), we found that ATM activity is required for efficient induction of EBV lytic gene expression by a variety of different stimuli, including a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) cytokine, a demethylating agent (5-azacytidine), B cell receptor engagement with anti-IgG antibody, hydrogen peroxide, and the proteosome inhibitor bortezomib. In EBV-infected AGS (gastric) cells, knockdown of ATM, or p53, expression inhibits EBV reactivation. Conversely, treatment of these cells with nutlin-3 (which activates p53 and ATM) robustly induces lytic reactivation in a p53- and ATM-dependent manner. The ability of the EBV R and Na proteins to induce lytic reactivation in EBV-infected AGS cells is ATM dependent. However, overexpression of Z induces lytic gene expression in the presence or absence of ATM activity. Our results suggest that ATM enhances Z promoter activity in the context of the intact EBV genome and that p53 contributes to the ATM effect. Nevertheless, since we found that ATM inhibitors also reduce lytic reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells that have no p53, additional ATM substrates must also contribute to the ATM effect.

  19. E2F1-Mediated FOS Induction in Arsenic Trioxide–Induced Cellular Transformation: Effects of Global H3K9 Hypoacetylation and Promoter-Specific Hyperacetylation in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Sunniyat; Housein, Zjwan; Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Mayán, Maria Dolores; Boobis, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Aberrant histone acetylation has been observed in carcinogenesis and cellular transformation associated with arsenic exposure; however, the molecular mechanisms and cellular outcomes of such changes are poorly understood. Objective: We investigated the impact of tolerated and toxic arsenic trioxide (As2O3) exposure in human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) and urothelial (UROtsa) cells to characterize the alterations in histone acetylation and gene expression as well as the implications for cellular transformation. Methods: Tolerated and toxic exposures of As2O3 were identified by measurement of cell death, mitochondrial function, cellular proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. Histone extraction, the MNase sensitivity assay, and immunoblotting were used to assess global histone acetylation levels, and gene promoter-specific interactions were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results: Tolerated and toxic dosages, respectively, were defined as 0.5 μM and 2.5 μM As2O3 in HEK293T cells and 1 μM and 5 μM As2O3 in UROtsa cells. Global hypoacetylation of H3K9 at 72 hr was observed in UROtsa cells following tolerated and toxic exposure. In both cell lines, tolerated exposure alone led to H3K9 hyperacetylation and E2F1 binding at the FOS promoter, which remained elevated after 72 hr, contrary to global H3K9 hypoacetylation. Thus, promoter-specific H3K9 acetylation is a better predictor of cellular transformation than are global histone acetylation patterns. Tolerated exposure resulted in an increased expression of the proto-oncogenes FOS and JUN in both cell lines at 72 hr. Conclusion: Global H3K9 hypoacetylation and promoter-specific hyperacetylation facilitate E2F1-mediated FOS induction in As2O3-induced cellular transformation. Citation: Rahman S, Housein Z, Dabrowska A, Mayán MD, Boobis AR, Hajji N. 2015. E2F1-mediated FOS induction in arsenic trioxide–induced cellular

  20. A non-BRICHOS SFTPC mutant (SP-CI73T) linked to interstitial lung disease promotes a late block in macroautophagy disrupting cellular proteostasis and mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Arie; Guttentag, Susan H; Deterding, Robin; Funkhouser, William K; Goralski, Jennifer L; Chatterjee, Shampa; Mulugeta, Surafel; Beers, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of threonine for isoleucine at codon 73 (I73T) in the human surfactant protein C (hSP-C) gene (SFTPC) accounts for a significant portion of SFTPC mutations associated with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Cell lines stably expressing tagged primary translation product of SP-C isoforms were generated to test the hypothesis that deposition of hSP-C(I73T) within the endosomal system promotes disruption of a key cellular quality control pathway, macroautophagy. By fluorescence microscopy, wild-type hSP-C (hSP-C(WT)) colocalized with exogenously expressed human ATP binding cassette class A3 (hABCA3), an indicator of normal trafficking to lysosomal-related organelles. In contrast, hSP-C(I73T) was dissociated from hABCA3 but colocalized to the plasma membrane as well as the endosomal network. Cells expressing hSP-C(I73T) exhibited increases in size and number of cytosolic green fluorescent protein/microtubule-associated protein 1 light-chain 3 (LC3) vesicles, some of which colabeled with red fluorescent protein from the gene dsRed/hSP-C(I73T). By transmission electron microscopy, hSP-C(I73T) cells contained abnormally large autophagic vacuoles containing organellar and proteinaceous debris, which phenocopied ultrastructural changes in alveolar type 2 cells in a lung biopsy from a SFTPC I73T patient. Biochemically, hSP-C(I73T) cells exhibited increased expression of Atg8/LC3, SQSTM1/p62, and Rab7, consistent with a distal block in autophagic vacuole maturation, confirmed by flux studies using bafilomycin A1 and rapamycin. Functionally, hSP-C(I73T) cells showed an impaired degradative capacity for an aggregation-prone huntingtin-1 reporter substrate. The disruption of autophagy-dependent proteostasis was accompanied by increases in mitochondria biomass and parkin expression coupled with a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. We conclude that hSP-C(I73T) induces an acquired block in macroautophagy-dependent proteostasis and mitophagy, which could contribute

  1. SM22{alpha}-induced activation of p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma pathway promotes cellular senescence caused by a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation and doxorubicin in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tae Rim; Lee, Hee Min; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Kug Chan; Paik, Sang Gi; Cho, Eun Wie; Kim, In Gyu

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells leads cells to a growth arrest state, and the treatment of a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation or doxorubicin promotes cellular senescence. {yields} SM22{alpha} overexpression elevates p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but there are no effects on p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. {yields} SM22{alpha}-induced MT-1G activates p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which promotes cellular senescence by damaging agents. -- Abstract: Smooth muscle protein 22-alpha (SM22{alpha}) is known as a transformation- and shape change-sensitive actin cross-linking protein found in smooth muscle tissue and fibroblasts; however, its functional role remains uncertain. We reported previously that SM22{alpha} overexpression confers resistance against anti-cancer drugs or radiation via induction of metallothionein (MT) isozymes in HepG2 cells. In this study, we demonstrate that SM22{alpha} overexpression leads cells to a growth arrest state and promotes cellular senescence caused by treatment with a subclinical dose of {gamma}-radiation (0.05 and 0.1 Gy) or doxorubicin (0.01 and 0.05 {mu}g/ml), compared to control cells. Senescence growth arrest is known to be controlled by p53 phosphorylation/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} induction or p16{sup INK4a}/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) activation. SM22{alpha} overexpression in HepG2 cells elevated p16{sup INK4a} followed by pRB activation, but did not activate the p53/p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} pathway. Moreover, MT-1G, which is induced by SM22{alpha} overexpression, was involved in the activation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway, which led to a growth arrest state and promoted cellular senescence caused by damaging agents. Our findings provide the first demonstration that SM22{alpha} modulates cellular senescence caused by damaging agents via regulation of the p16{sup INK4a}/pRB pathway in HepG2 cells and that these effects of SM22{alpha} are partially mediated by MT-1G.

  2. Transactivation of a cellular promoter by the NS1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice through a putative hormone-responsive element.

    PubMed Central

    Vanacker, J M; Corbau, R; Adelmant, G; Perros, M; Laudet, V; Rommelaere, J

    1996-01-01

    The promoter of the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (c-erbA-1) is activated by the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of parvovirus minute virus of mice (prototype strain [MVMp]) in ras-transformed FREJ4 cells that are permissive for lytic MVMp replication. This stimulation may be related to the sensitivity of host cells to MVMp, as it does not take place in parental FR3T3 cells, which are resistant to the parvovirus killing effect. The analysis of a series of deletion and point mutants of the c-erbA-1 promoter led to the identification of an upstream region that is necessary for NS1-driven transactivation. This sequence harbors a putative hormone-responsive element and is sufficient to render a minimal promoter NS1 inducible in FREJ4 but not in FR3T3 cells, and it is involved in distinct interactions with proteins from the respective cell lines. The NS1-responsive element of the c-erbA-1 promoter bears no homology with sequences that were previously reported to be necessary for NS1 DNA binding and transactivation. Altogether, our data point to a novel, cell-specific mechanism of promoter activation by NS1. PMID:8642664

  3. Homotypic clustering of OsMYB4 binding site motifs in promoters of the rice genome and cellular-level implications on sheath blight disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Pooja, Singh; Sweta, Kumari; Mohanapriya, A; Sudandiradoss, C; Siva, Ramamoorthy; Gothandam, Kodiveri M; Babu, Subramanian

    2015-05-01

    The promoter regions (1 kb upstream sequences) of 45,836 annotated genes of rice were analyzed for the presence of OsMYB4 binding sites using a Perl program algorithm. Based on the homotypic clustering concept, 113 promoters were found to have more than 4 binding site motifs. Among the downstream genes of these promoters, five genes which are known to have a role in disease resistance were selected and the binding capacity of OsMYB4 protein in the promoter regions was analyzed by docking studies. Expression level of these genes was analyzed by RT-PCR in Rhizoctonia solani infected rice seedlings. Upon pathogen challenge, higher expression of aminotransferase, ankyrin and WRKY 12 genes was observed corresponding to higher expression of Osmyb4. Over-expression of Osmyb4 cDNA in rice leaf tissues by agro-infection failed to result in similar over-expression of aminotransferase, ankyrin and WRKY 12 as expected. Although the role of OsMYB4 in sheath blight resistance was found to be definitive based on our initial results, artificial over-expression of this TF was observed to be insufficient in regulating the disease resistance related genes.

  4. The Drosophila FHOD1-like formin Knittrig acts through Rok to promote stress fiber formation and directed macrophage migration during the cellular immune response.

    PubMed

    Lammel, Uwe; Bechtold, Meike; Risse, Benjamin; Berh, Dimitri; Fleige, Astrid; Bunse, Ingrid; Jiang, Xiaoyi; Klämbt, Christian; Bogdan, Sven

    2014-03-01

    A tight spatiotemporal control of actin polymerization is important for many cellular processes that shape cells into a multicellular organism. The formation of unbranched F-actin is induced by several members of the formin family. Drosophila encodes six formin genes, representing six of the seven known mammalian subclasses. Knittrig, the Drosophila homolog of mammalian FHOD1, is specifically expressed in the developing central nervous system midline glia, the trachea, the wing and in macrophages. knittrig mutants exhibit mild tracheal defects but survive until late pupal stages and mainly die as pharate adult flies. knittrig mutant macrophages are smaller and show reduced cell spreading and cell migration in in vivo wounding experiments. Rescue experiments further demonstrate a cell-autonomous function of Knittrig in regulating actin dynamics and cell migration. Knittrig localizes at the rear of migrating macrophages in vivo, suggesting a cellular requirement of Knittrig in the retraction of the trailing edge. Supporting this notion, we found that Knittrig is a target of the Rho-dependent kinase Rok. Co-expression with Rok or expression of an activated form of Knittrig induces actin stress fibers in macrophages and in epithelial tissues. Thus, we propose a model in which Rok-induced phosphorylation of residues within the basic region mediates the activation of Knittrig in controlling macrophage migration. PMID:24553290

  5. Inhibition of autophagy and glycolysis by nitric oxide during hypoxia-reoxygenation impairs cellular bioenergetics and promotes cell death in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Benavides, Gloria A; Liang, Qiuli; Dodson, Matthew; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Zhang, Jianhua

    2013-12-01

    Excessive nitric oxide (NO) production is known to damage mitochondrial proteins and the autophagy repair pathway and so can potentially contribute to neurotoxicity. Accordingly, we hypothesized that protection against protein damage from reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under conditions of low oxygen by the autophagy pathway in neurons would be impaired by NO and enhance bioenergetic dysfunction. Rat primary cortical neurons had the same basal cellular respiration in hypoxia as in normoxia, whereas NO-exposed cells exhibited a gradual decrease in mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia. Upon reoxygenation, the respiration in NO-treated cells did not recover to prehypoxic levels. Hypoxia-reoxygenation in the presence of NO was associated with inhibition of autophagy, and the inability to recover during reoxygenation was exacerbated by an inhibitor of autophagy, 3-methyladenine. The effects of hypoxia could be recapitulated by inhibiting glycolytic flux under normoxic conditions. Under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions NO exposure induced immediate stimulation of glycolysis, but prolonged NO exposure, associated with irreversible inhibition of mitochondrial respiration in hypoxia, inhibited glycolysis. Importantly, we found that NO inhibited basal respiration under normoxic conditions only when glucose was absent from the medium or glycolysis was inhibited by 2-deoxy-d-glucose, revealing a novel NO-dependent mechanism for the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration that is modulated by glycolysis. Taken together these data suggest an oxygen-dependent interaction between mitochondrial respiration, glycolysis, and autophagy in protecting neuronal cells exposed to NO. Importantly, they indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction is intimately linked to a failure of glycolytic flux induced by exposure to NO. In addition, these studies provide new insights into the understanding of how autophagy and NO may play interactive roles in neuroinflammation-induced cellular

  6. Overexpression of EB1 in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) may promote cellular growth by activating beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Zhou, Xiaobo; Zhu, Hongxia; Liu, Shuang; Zhou, Cuiqi; Zhang, Guo; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Quan, Lanping; Bai, Jinfeng; Zhan, Qimin; Xu, Ningzhi

    2005-10-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) has a multifactorial etiology involving environmental and/or genetic factors. End-binding protein 1 (EB1), which was cloned as an interacting partner of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor protein, was previously found overexpressed in ESCC. However, the precise role of EB1 in the development of this malignancy has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we analysed freshly resected ESCC specimens and demonstrated that EB1 was overexpressed in approximately 63% of tumor samples compared to matched normal tissue. We report that overexpression of EB1 in the ESCC line EC9706 significantly promotes cell growth, whereas suppression of EB1 protein level by RNA interference significantly inhibited growth of esophageal tumor cells. In addition, EB1 overexpression induced nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin and promoted the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF). These effects were partially or completely abolished by coexpression of APC or DeltaN TCF4, respectively. Also, we found that EB1 affected the interaction between beta-catenin and APC. Furthermore, EB1 overexpression was correlated with cytoplasmic/nuclear accumulation of beta-catenin in primary human ESCC. Taken together, these results support the novel hypothesis that EB1 overexpression may play a role in the development of ESCC by affecting APC function and activating the beta-catenin/TCF pathway.

  7. Acidity-promoted cellular uptake and drug release mediated by amine-functionalized block polycarbonates prepared via one-shot ring-opening copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Fen; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Chu, Yan-Feng; Feng, Jun; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2014-04-01

    This paper reports a drug nanovehicle self-assembled from an amine-functionalized block copolymer poly(6,14-dimethyl-1,3,9,11-tetraoxa-6,14-diaza-cyclohexadecane-2,10-dione)-block-poly(1,3-dioxepan-2-one) (PADMC-b-PTeMC), which is prepared by controlable ring-opening block copolymerization attractively in a "one-shot feeding" pathway. The copolymers display high cell-biocompatibility with no apparent cytotoxicities detected in 293T and HeLa cells. Due to their amphiphilic nature, PADMC-b-PTeMC copolymers can self-assemble into nanosized micelles capable of loading anticancer drugs such as camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX). In particular, the outer PADMC shell endows the PADMC-b-PTeMC nanomicelles with pH-dependent control over the micellar morphology, cell uptake efficiency, and the drug release pattern. Confocal inspection reveals the remarkably enhanced cellular internalization of drug loaded micelles by cancerous HeLa cells at relatively lower pH 5.8 simulating the mildly acid microenvironment in tumors. Along with the acidity-triggered volume expansion of micelles, an accelerated CPT release in vitro occurs. The obtained results adumbrate the possibility of completely biodegradable PADMC-b-PTeMC as pH-sensitive drug carriers for tumor chemotherapy.

  8. The zebrafish maternal-effect gene cellular atoll encodes the centriolar component sas-6 and defects in its paternal function promote whole genome duplication

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Taijiro; Ge, Xiaoyan; Pelegri, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Summary A female-sterile zebrafish maternal-effect mutation in cellular atoll (cea) results in defects in the initiation of cell division starting at the second cell division cycle. This phenomenon is caused by defects in centrosome duplication, which in turn affect the formation of a bipolar spindle. We show that cea encodes the centriolar coiled coil protein Sas-6, and that zebrafish Cea/Sas-6 protein localizes to centrosomes. cea also has a genetic paternal contribution, which when mutated results in an arrested first cell division followed by normal cleavage. Our data supports the idea that, in zebrafish, paternally-inherited centrosomes are required for the first cell division while maternally-derived factors are required for centrosomal duplication and cell divisions in subsequent cell cycles. DNA synthesis ensues in the absence of centrosome duplication, and the one-cycle delay in the first cell division caused by cea mutant sperm leads to whole genome duplication. We discuss the potential implications of these findings with regards to the origin of polyploidization in animal species. In addition, the uncoupling of developmental time and cell division count caused by the cea mutation suggests the presence of a time window, normally corresponding to the first two cell cycles, which is permissive for germ plasm recruitment. PMID:17950723

  9. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qipeng; Guo, Xirui; Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-03-29

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α-/- cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  10. p85α promotes nucleolin transcription and subsequently enhances EGFR mRNA stability and EGF-induced malignant cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jiayan; Zhang, Liping; Jin, Honglei; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Chuanshu

    2016-01-01

    p85α is a regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) that is a key lipid enzyme for generating phosphatidylinositol 3, 4, 5-trisphosphate, and subsequently activates signaling that ultimately regulates cell cycle progression, cell growth, cytoskeletal changes, and cell migration. In addition to form a complex with the p110 catalytic subunit, p85α also exists as a monomeric form due to that there is a greater abundance of p85α than p110 in many cell types. Our previous studies have demonstrated that monomeric p85α exerts a pro-apoptotic role in UV response through induction of TNF-α gene expression in PI3K-independent manner. In current studies, we identified a novel biological function of p85α as a positive regulator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and cell malignant transformation via nucleolin-dependent mechanism. Our results showed that p85α was crucial for EGFR and nucleolin expression and subsequently resulted in an increase of malignant cellular transformation by using both specific knockdown and deletion of p85α in its normal expressed cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that p85α upregulated EGFR protein expression mainly through stabilizing its mRNA, whereas nucleolin (NCL) was able to bind to egfr mRNA and increase its mRNA stability. Consistently, overexpression of NCL in p85α−/− cells restored EGFR mRNA stabilization, protein expression and cell malignant transformation. Moreover, we discovered that p85α upregulated NCL gene transcription via enhancing C-Jun activation. Collectively, our studies demonstrate a novel function of p85α as a positive regulator of EGFR mRNA stability and cell malignant transformation, providing a significant insight into the understanding of biomedical nature of p85α protein in mammalian cells and further supporting that p85α might be a potential target for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:26918608

  11. Nck adaptors, besides promoting N-WASP mediated actin-nucleation activity at pedestals, influence the cellular levels of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir effector.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Pelegrin, Elvira; Kenny, Brendan; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) binding to human intestinal cells triggers the formation of disease-associated actin rich structures called pedestals. The latter process requires the delivery, via a Type 3 secretion system, of the translocated Intimin receptor (Tir) protein into the host plasma membrane where binding of a host kinase-modified form to the bacterial surface protein Intimin triggers pedestal formation. Tir-Intimin interaction recruits the Nck adaptor to a Tir tyrosine phosphorylated residue where it activates neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP); initiating the major pathway to actin polymerization mediated by the actin-related protein (Arp) 2/3 complex. Previous studies with Nck-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) identified a key role for Nck in pedestal formation, presumed to reflect a lack of N-WASP activation. Here, we show the defect relates to reduced amounts of Tir within Nck-deficient cells. Indeed, Tir delivery and, thus, pedestal formation defects were much greater for MEFs than HeLa (human epithelial) cells. Crucially, the levels of two other effectors (EspB/EspF) within Nck-deficient MEFs were not reduced unlike that of Map (Mitochondrial associated protein) which, like Tir, requires CesT chaperone function for efficient delivery. Interestingly, drugs blocking various host protein degradation pathways failed to increase Tir cellular levels unlike an inhibitor of deacetylase activity (Trichostatin A; TSA). Treatments with TSA resulted in significant recovery of Tir levels, potentiation of actin polymerization and improvement in bacterial attachment to cells. Our findings have important implications for the current model of Tir-mediated actin polymerization and opens new lines of research in this area. PMID:25482634

  12. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3A promotes cellular proliferation by repression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1.

    PubMed

    Tursiella, Melissa L; Bowman, Emily R; Wanzeck, Keith C; Throm, Robert E; Liao, Jason; Zhu, Junjia; Sample, Clare E

    2014-10-01

    Latent infection by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is highly associated with the endemic form of Burkitt lymphoma (eBL), which typically limits expression of EBV proteins to EBNA-1 (Latency I). Interestingly, a subset of eBLs maintain a variant program of EBV latency - Wp-restricted latency (Wp-R) - that includes expression of the EBNA-3 proteins (3A, 3B and 3C), in addition to EBNA-1. In xenograft assays, Wp-R BL cell lines were notably more tumorigenic than their counterparts that maintain Latency I, suggesting that the additional latency-associated proteins expressed in Wp-R influence cell proliferation and/or survival. Here, we evaluated the contribution of EBNA-3A. Consistent with the enhanced tumorigenic potential of Wp-R BLs, knockdown of EBNA-3A expression resulted in abrupt cell-cycle arrest in G0/G1 that was concomitant with conversion of retinoblastoma protein (Rb) to its hypophosphorylated state, followed by a loss of Rb protein. Comparable results were seen in EBV-immortalized B lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), consistent with the previous observation that EBNA-3A is essential for sustained growth of these cells. In agreement with the known ability of EBNA-3A and EBNA-3C to cooperatively repress p14(ARF) and p16(INK4a) expression, knockdown of EBNA-3A in LCLs resulted in rapid elevation of p14(ARF) and p16I(NK4a). By contrast, p16(INK4a) was not detectably expressed in Wp-R BL and the low-level expression of p14(ARF) was unchanged by EBNA-3A knockdown. Amongst other G1/S regulatory proteins, only p21(WAF1/CIP1), a potent inducer of G1 arrest, was upregulated following knockdown of EBNA-3A in Wp-R BL Sal cells and LCLs, coincident with hypophosphorylation and destabilization of Rb and growth arrest. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(WAF1/CIP1) expression in Wp-R BL correlated with an increase in cellular proliferation. This novel function of EBNA-3A is distinct from the functions previously described that are shared with EBNA-3C, and likely contributes to the

  13. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian . E-mail: qizt53@hotmail.com

    2005-04-15

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells.

  14. Raf activation by Ras and promotion of cellular metastasis require phosphorylation of prohibitin in the raft domain of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Chiu, C-F; Ho, M-Y; Peng, J-M; Hung, S-W; Lee, W-H; Liang, C-M; Liang, S-M

    2013-02-01

    Prohibitin (PHB) is indispensable for Ras-induced Raf-1 activation, cell migration and growth; however, the exact role of PHB in the molecular pathogenesis of cancer metastasis remains largely unexamined. Here, we found a positive correlation between plasma membrane-associated PHB and the clinical stages of cancer. The level of PHB phosphorylated at threonine 258 (T258) and tyrosine 259 (Y259) in human cancer-cell membranes correlated with the invasiveness of cancer cells. Overexpression of phosphorylated PHB (phospho-PHB) in the lipid-raft domain of the cell membrane enhanced cell migration/invasion through PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK activation. It also enhanced epithelial-mesenchymal transition, matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and invasiveness of cancer cells in vitro. Immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that phospho-PHB associated with Raf-1, Akt and Ras in the membrane and was essential for the activation of Raf-1 signaling by Ras. Mice implanted with cancer cells stably overexpressing PHB in the plasma membrane showed enlarged cervical tumors, enhanced metastasis and shorter survival time compared with mice implanted with cancer cells without PHB overexpression. Dephosphorylation of PHB at T258 by site-directed mutagenesis diminished the in vitro and in vivo effects of PHB. These results suggest that increase in phospho-PHB T258 in the raft domain of the plasma membrane has a role in the Ras-driven activation of PI3K/Akt and Raf-1/ERK-signaling cascades and results in the promotion of cancer metastasis.

  15. S100B-p53 disengagement by pentamidine promotes apoptosis and inhibits cellular migration via aquaporin-4 and metalloproteinase-2 inhibition in C6 glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    CAPOCCIA, ELENA; CIRILLO, CARLA; MARCHETTO, ANNALISA; TIBERI, SAMANTA; SAWIKR, YOUSSEF; PESCE, MARCELLA; D'ALESSANDRO, ALESSANDRA; SCUDERI, CATERINA; SARNELLI, GIOVANNI; CUOMO, ROSARIO; STEARDO, LUCA; ESPOSITO, GIUSEPPE

    2015-01-01

    S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B) is highly expressed in glioma cells and promotes cancer cell survival via inhibition of the p53 protein. In melanoma cells, this S100B-p53 interaction is known to be inhibited by pentamidine isethionate, an antiprotozoal agent. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pentamidine on rat C6 glioma cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in vitro. The change in C6 cell proliferation following treatment with pentamidine was determined by performing a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide-formazan assay. Significant dose-dependent decreases in proliferation were observed at pentamidine concentrations of 0.05 µM (58.5±5%; P<0.05), 0.5 µM (40.6±7%; P<0.01) and 5 µM (13±4%; P<0.001) compared with the control (100% viability). Furthermore, treatment with 0.05, 0.5 and 5 µM pentamidine was associated with a significant increase in apoptosis versus the untreated cells, as determined by DNA fragmentation assays, immunofluorescence analysis of C6 chromatin using Hoechst staining, and immunoblot analysis of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (100%, P<0.05; 453%, P<0.01; and 1000%, P<0.001, respectively) and Bcl-2 (-60%, P<0.001; −80.13%, P<0.001; −95%, P<0.001, respectively). In addition, the administration of 0.05, 0.5 and 5 µM pentamidine significantly upregulated the protein expression levels of p53 (681±87.5%, P<0.05; 1244±94.3%, P<0.01; and 2244±111%, P<0.001, respectively), and significantly downregulated the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (42±2.3%, P<0.05; 71±2.5%, P<0.01; and 95.8±3.3%, P<0.001, respectively) and aquaporin 4 (38±2.5%, P<0.05; 69±2.6%, P<0.01; and 88±3.0%, P<0.001, respectively), compared with the untreated cells. The wound healing assay demonstrated that cell migration was significantly impaired by treatment with 0.05, 0.5 and 5 µM pentamidine compared with untreated cells (88±4.2%, P<0.05; 64±2%, P<0.01; and 42

  16. Inhibition of Lon blocks cell proliferation, enhances chemosensitivity by promoting apoptosis and decreases cellular bioenergetics of bladder cancer: potential roles of Lon as a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in baldder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongzhang; Lan, Linhua; Huang, Kate; Wang, Rongrong; Xu, Cuicui; Shi, Yang; Wu, Xiaoyi; Wu, Zhi; Zhang, Jiliang; Chen, Lin; Wang, Lu; Yu, Xiaomin; Zhu, Haibo; Lu, Bin

    2014-11-30

    ATP-dependent Lon protease within mitochondrial matrix contributes to the degradation of abnormal proteins. The oxidative or hypoxic stress which represents the stress phenotype of cancer leads to up-regulation of Lon. However, the role of Lon in bladder cancer remains undefined. Here, we found that Lon expression in bladder cancer tissues was significantly higher than those in noncancerous tissues; down-regulation of Lon in bladder cancer cells significantly blocked cancer cell proliferation via suppression c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation due to decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents by promoting apoptosis. We further found that Lon down-regulation in bladder cancer cells decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using extracellular flux analyzer. The tissue microarray (TMA) results showed that high expression of Lon was related to the T and TNM stage, as well as histological grade of bladder cancer patients. We also demonstrated that Lon was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of bladder cancer. Taken together, our data suggest that Lon could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target for treatment of bladder cancer, as well as for prediction of the effectiveness of chemotherapy.

  17. Molecular and cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2006-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion, and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins, and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  18. Molecular and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  19. Cellular: Toward personal communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    The cellular industry is one of the fastest growing segment of the telecommunications industry. With an estimated penetration rate of 20 percent in the near future, cellular is becoming an ubiquitous telecommunications service in the U.S. In this paper we will examine the major advancements in the cellular industry: customer equipment, cellular networks, engineering tools, customer support, and nationwide seamless service.

  20. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  1. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  2. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  3. The cellular memory disc of reprogrammed cells.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2013-04-01

    The crucial facts underlying the low efficiency of cellular reprogramming are poorly understood. Cellular reprogramming occurs in nuclear transfer, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) formation, cell fusion, and lineage-switching experiments. Despite these advances, there are three fundamental problems to be addressed: (1) the majority of cells cannot be reprogrammed, (2) the efficiency of reprogramming cells is usually low, and (3) the reprogrammed cells developed from a patient's own cells activate immune responses. These shortcomings present major obstacles for using reprogramming approaches in customised cell therapy. In this Perspective, the author synthesises past and present observations in the field of cellular reprogramming to propose a theoretical picture of the cellular memory disc. The current hypothesis is that all cells undergo an endogenous and exogenous holographic memorisation such that parts of the cellular memory dramatically decrease the efficiency of reprogramming cells, act like a barrier against reprogramming in the majority of cells, and activate immune responses. Accordingly, the focus of this review is mainly to describe the cellular memory disc (CMD). Based on the present theory, cellular memory includes three parts: a reprogramming-resistance memory (RRM), a switch-promoting memory (SPM) and a culture-induced memory (CIM). The cellular memory arises genetically, epigenetically and non-genetically and affects cellular behaviours. [corrected].

  4. Overview of cellular CDMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, William C. Y.

    1991-05-01

    A general description of code division multiple access (CDMA) is presented. This overview of CDMA highlights the potential of increasing capacity in future cellular communications. The author describes the mobile radio environment and its impact on narrowband and wideband propagation. The advantage of having CDMA in cellular systems is discussed, and the concept of radio capacity in cellular is introduced. The power control schemes in CDMA are analyzed in detail.

  5. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  6. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  7. [Main Cellular Redox Couples].

    PubMed

    Bilan, D S; Shokhina, A G; Lukyanov, S A; Belousov, V V

    2015-01-01

    Most of the living cells maintain the continuous flow of electrons, which provides them by energy. Many of the compounds are presented in a cell at the same time in the oxidized and reduced states, forming the active redox couples. Some of the redox couples, such as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH, oxidized/reduced glutathione (GSSG/GSH), are universal, as they participate in adjusting of many cellular reactions. Ratios of the oxidized and reduced forms of these compounds are important cellular redox parameters. Modern research approaches allow setting the new functions of the main redox couples in the complex organization of cellular processes. The following information is about the main cellular redox couples and their participation in various biological processes.

  8. Nanostructured cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, P; Taylor, M D R; Brust, M

    2002-12-01

    Au nanocrystals spin-coated onto silicon from toluene form cellular networks. A quantitative statistical crystallography analysis shows that intercellular correlations drive the networks far from statistical equilibrium. Spin-coating from hexane does not produce cellular structure, yet a strong correlation is retained in the positions of nanocrystal aggregates. Mechanisms based on Marangoni convection alone cannot account for the variety of patterns observed, and we argue that spinodal decomposition plays an important role in foam formation.

  9. Cellular aging and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hornsby, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Aging is manifest in a variety of changes over time, including changes at the cellular level. Cellular aging acts primarily as a tumor suppressor mechanism, but also may enhance cancer development under certain circumstances. One important process of cellular aging is oncogene-induced senescence, which acts as an important anti-cancer mechanism. Cellular senescence resulting from damage caused by activated oncogenes prevents the growth or potentially neoplastic cells. Moreover, cells that have entered senescence appear to be targets for elimination by the innnate immune system. In another aspect of cellular aging, the absence of telomerase activity in normal tissues results in such cells lacking a telomere maintenance mechanism. One consequence is that in aging there is an increase in cells with shortened telomeres. In the presence of active oncogenes that cause expansion of a neoplastic clone, shortening of telomeres leading to telomere dysfunction prevents the indefinite expansion of the clone because the cells enter crisis. Crisis results from fusions and other defects caused by dysfunctional telomeres and is a terminal state of the neoplastic clone. In this way the absence of telomerase in human cells, while one cause of cellular aging, also acts as an anti-cancer mechanism. PMID:20705476

  10. A Death-associated Protein Kinase (DAPK)-interacting Protein, DIP-1, Is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase That Promotes Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis and Regulates the Cellular Levels of DAPK*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yijun; Blue, Emily K.; Dixon, Shelley; Shao, Zhili; Gallagher, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a multi-domain Ser/Thr protein kinase with an important role in apoptosis regulation. In these studies we have identified a DAPK-interacting protein called DIP-1, which is a novel multi-RING finger protein. The RING finger motifs of DIP-1 have E3 ligase activity that can auto-ubiquitinate DIP-1 in vitro. In vivo, DIP-1 is detected as a polyubiquitinated protein, suggesting that the intracellular levels of DIP-1 are regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Transient expression of DIP-1 in HeLa cells antagonizes the anti-apoptotic function of DAPK to promote a caspase-dependent apoptosis. These studies also demonstrate that DAPK is an in vitro and in vivo target for ubiquitination by DIP-1, thereby providing a mechanism by which DAPK activities can be regulated through proteasomal degradation. PMID:12351649

  11. Lipid accumulation stimulates the cap-independent translation of SREBP-1a mRNA by promoting hnRNP A1 binding to its 5'-UTR in a cellular model of hepatic steatosis.

    PubMed

    Siculella, Luisa; Tocci, Romina; Rochira, Alessio; Testini, Mariangela; Gnoni, Antonio; Damiano, Fabrizio

    2016-05-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a chronic disease characterized by accumulation of lipid droplets in hepatocytes. Enhanced release of non-esterified fatty acids from adipose tissue accounts for a remarkable fraction of accumulated lipids. However, the de novo lipogenesis (DNL) is also implicated in the etiology of the NAFLD. Sterol Regulatory Element-Binding Protein-1 (SREBP-1) is a transcription factor modulating the expression of several lipogenic enzymes. In the present study, in order to investigate the effect of lipid droplet accumulation on DNL, we used a cellular model of steatosis represented by HepG2 cells cultured in a medium supplemented with free oleic and palmitic fatty acids (FFAs). We report that FFA supplementation induces the expression of genes coding for enzymes involved in the DNL as well as for the transcription factor SREBP-1a. The SREBP-1a mRNA translation, dependent on an internal ribosome entry site (IRES), and the SREBP-1a proteolytic cleavage are activated by FFAs. Furthermore, FFA treatment enhances the expression and the nucleus-cytosolic shuttling of hnRNP A1, a trans-activating factor of SREBP-1a IRES. The binding of hnRNP A1 to the SREBP-1a IRES is also increased upon FFA supplementation. The relocation of hnRNP A1 and the consequent increase of SREBP-1a translation are dependent on the p38 MAPK signal pathway, which is activated by FFAs. By RNA interference approach, we demonstrate that hnRNP A1 is implicated in the FFA-induced expression of SREBP-1a and of its target genes as well as in the lipid accumulation in cells. PMID:26869449

  12. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kistler, H. Corby; Broz, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors shared with the most essential processes of the cell (e.g., amino acids, acetyl CoA, NADPH), enzymes for secondary metabolite synthesis are compartmentalized at conserved subcellular sites that position pathway enzymes to use these common biochemical precursors. Co-compartmentalization of secondary metabolism pathway enzymes also may function to channel precursors, promote pathway efficiency and sequester pathway intermediates and products from the rest of the cell. In this review we discuss the compartmentalization of three well-studied fungal secondary metabolite biosynthetic pathways for penicillin G, aflatoxin and deoxynivalenol, and summarize evidence used to infer subcellular localization. We also discuss how these metabolites potentially are trafficked within the cell and may be exported. PMID:25709603

  13. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  14. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  15. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well. PMID:27695375

  16. Epigenetics and Cellular Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenyi; Wang, Fengzhong; Yu, Zhongsheng; Xin, Fengjiao

    2016-01-01

    Living eukaryotic systems evolve delicate cellular mechanisms for responding to various environmental signals. Among them, epigenetic machinery (DNA methylation, histone modifications, microRNAs, etc.) is the hub in transducing external stimuli into transcriptional response. Emerging evidence reveals the concept that epigenetic signatures are essential for the proper maintenance of cellular metabolism. On the other hand, the metabolite, a main environmental input, can also influence the processing of epigenetic memory. Here, we summarize the recent research progress in the epigenetic regulation of cellular metabolism and discuss how the dysfunction of epigenetic machineries influences the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes and obesity; then, we focus on discussing the notion that manipulating metabolites, the fuel of cell metabolism, can function as a strategy for interfering epigenetic machinery and its related disease progression as well.

  17. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  18. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  19. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  20. Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    PubMed Central

    Agapie, Alexandru; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case—connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders—the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  1. Cellular therapy in tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Parida, Shreemanta K; Madansein, Rajhmun; Singh, Nalini; Padayatchi, Nesri; Master, Iqbal; Naidu, Kantharuben; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Cellular therapy now offer promise of potential adjunct therapeutic options for treatment of drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). We review here the role of Mesenchymal stromal cells, (MSCs), as well as other immune effector cells in the therapy of infectious diseases with a focus on TB. MSCs represent a population of tissue-resident non-hematopoietic adult progenitor cells which home into injured tissues increase the proliferative potential of broncho-alveolar stem cells and restore lung epithelium. MSCs have been shown to be immune-modulatory and anti-inflammatory mediated via cell-cell contacts as well as soluble factors. We discuss the functional profile of MSCs and their potential use for adjunct cellular therapy of multi-drug resistant TB, with the aim of limiting tissue damage, and to convert unproductive inflammatory responses into effective anti-pathogen directed immune responses. Adjunct cellular therapy could potentially offer salvage therapy options for patients with drug-resistant TB, increase clinically relevant anti-M.tuberculosis directed immune responses and possibly shorten the duration of anti-TB therapy. PMID:25809753

  2. [Archives of "comprehensive approach on asbestos-related diseases" supported by the "special coordination funds for promoting science and technology (H18-1-3-3-1)"-- overview of group research project, care and specimen registration, cellular characteristics of mesothelioma and immunological effects of asbestos].

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Takemi; Nakano, Takashi; Hasegawa, Seiki; Okada, Morihito; Tsujimura, Tohru; Sekido, Yoshitaka; Toyokuni, Shinya; Nishimoto, Hiroshi; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Kumagai, Naoko; Maeda, Megumi; Nishimura, Yasumitsu

    2011-05-01

    The research project entitled "Comprehensive approach on asbestos-related diseases" supported by the "Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology (H18-1-3-3-1)" began in 2006 and was completed at the end of the Japanese fiscal year of 2010. This project included four parts; (1) malignant mesothelioma (MM) cases and specimen registration, (2) development of procedures for the early diagnosis of MM, (3) commencement of clinical investigations including multimodal approaches, and (4) basic research comprising three components; (i) cellular and molecular characterization of mesothelioma cells, (ii) immunological effects of asbestos, and (iii) elucidation of asbestos-induced carcinogenesis using animal models. In this special issue of the Japanese Journal of Hygiene, we briefly introduce the achievements of our project. The second and third parts and the third component of the fourth part are described in other manuscripts written by Professors Fukuoka, Hasegawa, and Toyokuni. In this manuscript, we introduce a brief summary of the first part "MM cases and specimen registration", the first component of the fourth part "Cellular and molecular characterization of mesothelioma cells" and the second component of the fourth part "Immunological effects of asbestos". In addition, a previous special issue presented by the Study Group of Fibrous and Particulate Substances (SGFPS) (chaired by Professor Otsuki, Kawasaki Medical School, Japan) for the Japanese Society of Hygiene and published in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine Volume 13, 2008, included reviews of the aforementioned first component of the fourth part of the project. Taken together, our project led medical investigations regarding asbestos and MM progress and contributed towards the care and examination of patients with asbestos-related diseases during these five years. Further investigations are required to facilitate the development of preventive measures and the cure of asbestos

  3. Studies on the Contribution of Human Cytomegalovirus UL21a and UL97 to Viral Growth and Inactivation of the Anaphase-Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C) E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Reveal a Unique Cellular Mechanism for Downmodulation of the APC/C Subunits APC1, APC4, and APC5

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) deregulates the cell cycle by several means, including inactivation of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Viral proteins UL97 and UL21a, respectively, affect the APC/C by phosphorylation of APC/C coactivator Cdh1 and by inducing the degradation of subunits APC4 and APC5, which along with APC1 form the APC/C platform subcomplex. The aim of this study was to further characterize the mechanism of APC/C inactivation and define the relative contributions of UL21a and UL97 to APC/C substrate accumulation and to viral growth. We show that in uninfected cells, UL21a but not UL97 can disrupt APC/C function, leading to the accumulation of substrates. We find that UL21a is necessary and sufficient to induce the degradation of APC1, in addition to the previously reported APC4 and APC5. We also demonstrate that there is a previously unreported cellular mechanism for a specific decrease in the levels of all three platform subunits, APC1, APC4, and APC5, upon the depletion of any one of these subunits or of subunit APC8. Finally, we show that at a low multiplicity of infection, either UL97 or UL21a can partially complement a growth-defective mutant virus lacking both UL21a and UL97, with significantly greater benefit afforded by the expression of both proteins. This double mutant also can be partially rescued by inactivation of the APC/C using small interfering RNAs against specific subunits. These results further our understanding of HCMV's interaction with the cell cycle machinery and reveal a new cellular pattern of APC/C subunit downmodulation. IMPORTANCE HCMV lytic infection subverts the host cell cycle machinery in multiple ways. A major effect is inactivation of the APC/C, which plays a central role in the control of cell cycle progression. This study provides further insight into the mechanism of inactivation. We discovered that the APC1 subunit, which along with APC4 and APC5 form the platform

  4. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  5. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  6. Modelling mammalian cellular quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Guang

    2014-01-01

    Cellular quiescence is a reversible non-proliferating state. The reactivation of ‘sleep-like’ quiescent cells (e.g. fibroblasts, lymphocytes and stem cells) into proliferation is crucial for tissue repair and regeneration and a key to the growth, development and health of higher multicellular organisms, such as mammals. Quiescence has been a primarily phenotypic description (i.e. non-permanent cell cycle arrest) and poorly studied. However, contrary to the earlier thinking that quiescence is simply a passive and dormant state lacking proliferating activities, recent studies have revealed that cellular quiescence is actively maintained in the cell and that it corresponds to a collection of heterogeneous states. Recent modelling and experimental work have suggested that an Rb-E2F bistable switch plays a pivotal role in controlling the quiescence–proliferation balance and the heterogeneous quiescent states. Other quiescence regulatory activities may crosstalk with and impinge upon the Rb-E2F bistable switch, forming a gene network that controls the cells’ quiescent states and their dynamic transitions to proliferation in response to noisy environmental signals. Elucidating the dynamic control mechanisms underlying quiescence may lead to novel therapeutic strategies that re-establish normal quiescent states, in a variety of hyper- and hypo-proliferative diseases, including cancer and ageing. PMID:24904737

  7. A role for Phospholipase D in Drosophila embryonic cellularization

    PubMed Central

    LaLonde, Mary; Janssens, Hilde; Yun, Suyong; Crosby, Juan; Redina, Olga; Olive, Virginie; Altshuller, Yelena M; Choi, Seok-Yong; Du, Guangwei; Gergen, J Peter; Frohman, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Background Cellularization of the Drosophila embryo is an unusually synchronous form of cytokinesis in which polarized membrane extension proceeds in part through incorporation of new membrane via fusion of apically-translocated Golgi-derived vesicles. Results We describe here involvement of the signaling enzyme Phospholipase D (Pld) in regulation of this developmental step. Functional analysis using gene targeting revealed that cellularization is hindered by the loss of Pld, resulting frequently in early embryonic developmental arrest. Mechanistically, chronic Pld deficiency causes abnormal Golgi structure and secretory vesicle trafficking. Conclusion Our results suggest that Pld functions to promote trafficking of Golgi-derived fusion-competent vesicles during cellularization. PMID:17156430

  8. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  9. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  10. Cellular bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Welsh, David K; Noguchi, Takako

    2012-08-01

    Bioluminescence imaging of live cells has recently been recognized as an important alternative to fluorescence imaging. Fluorescent probes are much brighter than bioluminescent probes (luciferase enzymes) and, therefore, provide much better spatial and temporal resolution and much better contrast for delineating cell structure. However, with bioluminescence imaging there is virtually no background or toxicity. As a result, bioluminescence can be superior to fluorescence for detecting and quantifying molecules and their interactions in living cells, particularly in long-term studies. Structurally diverse luciferases from beetle and marine species have been used for a wide variety of applications, including tracking cells in vivo, detecting protein-protein interactions, measuring levels of calcium and other signaling molecules, detecting protease activity, and reporting circadian clock gene expression. Such applications can be optimized by the use of brighter and variously colored luciferases, brighter microscope optics, and ultrasensitive, low-noise cameras. This article presents a review of how bioluminescence differs from fluorescence, its applications to cellular imaging, and available probes, optics, and detectors. It also gives practical suggestions for optimal bioluminescence imaging of single cells.

  11. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  12. Cellular energy metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, M.

    1991-06-01

    Studies have been carried out on adenylate kinase which is an important enzyme in determining the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. An efficient method has been developed to clone mutant adenylate kinase genes in E. coli. Site-specific mutagenesis of the wild type gene also has been used to obtain forms of adenylate kinase with altered amino acids. The wild type and mutant forms of adenylate kinase have been overexpressed and large quantities were readily isolated. The kinetic and fluorescence properties of the different forms of adenylate kinase were characterized. This has led to a new model for the location of the AMP and ATP bindings sites on the enzyme and a proposal for the mechanism of substrate inhibition. Crystals of the wild type enzyme were obtained that diffract to at least 2.3 {angstrom} resolution. Experiments were also initiated to determine the function of adenylate kinase in vivo. In one set of experiments, E. coli strains with mutations in adenylate kinase showed large changes in cellular nucleotides after reaching the stationary phase in a low phosphate medium. This was caused by selective proteolytic degradation of the mutant adenylate kinase caused by phosphate starvation.

  13. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  14. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  15. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  16. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  17. 47 CFR 22.909 - Cellular markets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.909 Cellular markets. Cellular markets are standard geographic areas used by the FCC for administrative convenience in the licensing of cellular systems. Cellular markets... Services Information, Cellular MSA/RSA Markets and Counties”, dated January 24, 1992, DA 92-109, 7 FCC...

  18. Cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, I-Ju

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation mainly focuses on the investigation of the cellular membrane trafficking of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. We are interested in the study of endocytosis and exocytosis behaviors of mesoporous silica nanoparticles with desired surface functionality. The relationship between mesoporous silica nanoparticles and membrane trafficking of cells, either cancerous cells or normal cells was examined. Since mesoporous silica nanoparticles were applied in many drug delivery cases, the endocytotic efficiency of mesoporous silica nanoparticles needs to be investigated in more details in order to design the cellular drug delivery system in the controlled way. It is well known that cells can engulf some molecules outside of the cells through a receptor-ligand associated endocytosis. We are interested to determine if those biomolecules binding to cell surface receptors can be utilized on mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to improve the uptake efficiency or govern the mechanism of endocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles. Arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) is a small peptide recognized by cell integrin receptors and it was reported that avidin internalization was highly promoted by tumor lectin. Both RGD and avidin were linked to the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials to investigate the effect of receptor-associated biomolecule on cellular endocytosis efficiency. The effect of ligand types, ligand conformation and ligand density were discussed in Chapter 2 and 3. Furthermore, the exocytosis of mesoporous silica nanoparticles is very attractive for biological applications. The cellular protein sequestration study of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was examined for further information of the intracellular pathway of endocytosed mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials. The surface functionality of mesoporous silica nanoparticle materials demonstrated selectivity among the materials and cancer and normal cell lines. We aimed to determine

  19. Cellular iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ponka, P

    1999-03-01

    Iron is essential for oxidation-reduction catalysis and bioenergetics, but unless appropriately shielded, iron plays a key role in the formation of toxic oxygen radicals that can attack all biological molecules. Hence, specialized molecules for the acquisition, transport (transferrin), and storage (ferritin) of iron in a soluble nontoxic form have evolved. Delivery of iron to most cells, probably including those of the kidney, occurs following the binding of transferrin to transferrin receptors on the cell membrane. The transferrin-receptor complexes are then internalized by endocytosis, and iron is released from transferrin by a process involving endosomal acidification. Cellular iron storage and uptake are coordinately regulated post-transcriptionally by cytoplasmic factors, iron-regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP-1 and IRP-2). Under conditions of limited iron supply, IRP binding to iron-responsive elements (present in 5' untranslated region of ferritin mRNA and 3' untranslated region of transferrin receptor mRNA) blocks ferritin mRNA translation and stabilizes transferrin receptor mRNA. The opposite scenario develops when iron in the transit pool is plentiful. Moreover, IRP activities/levels can be affected by various forms of "oxidative stress" and nitric oxide. The kidney also requires iron for metabolic processes, and it is likely that iron deficiency or excess can cause disturbed function of kidney cells. Transferrin receptors are not evenly distributed throughout the kidney, and there is a cortical-to-medullary gradient in heme biosynthesis, with greatest activity in the cortex and least in the medulla. This suggests that there are unique iron/heme metabolism features in some kidney cells, but the specific aspects of iron and heme metabolism in the kidney are yet to be explained.

  20. Primary intranodal cellular angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Hes, Ondrej; Hora, Milan; Sima, Radek; Michal, Michal

    2005-01-01

    Angiolipoma is a distinct, benign soft tissue tumor that most commonly occurs in young males as multiple small, subcutaneous, tender to painful nodules with predilection for the forearms. We report a case of angiolipoma that developed within a lymph node. The patient was a 67-year-old man who underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy with diagnostic pelvic lymphadenectomy because of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The prostate and 3 lymph nodes located in the obturator fossa were removed. On gross examination, the cut surface of 1 of the lymph nodes revealed an 8 x 5 mm, ovoid, sharply demarcated, nonencapsulated, gray lesion being suspicious for adenocarcinoma metastasis. Microscopically, the major portion of the lymph node was replaced by mature metaplastic adipose tissue. The angiolipoma was seen as a well-demarcated, nonencapsulated lesion composed of numerous small blood vessels lined by monomorphous flattened or spindled endothelial cells. Many vascular lumina were filled with fibrin thrombi. There were scanty mature adipocytes. Focally, areas with increased cellularity and a suggestion of solid growth of the endothelial cells were seen. Lymph nodes are known to be a rare primary site of various tumors usually occurring in other organs. The knowledge of these tumors is important in order not to interpret them as metastatic lesions. The most recognized examples are pigmented nevi, palisading myofibroblastoma, various benign epithelial inclusions, serous cystic tumors of borderline malignancy, and hyperplastic mesothelial inclusions. As we present in this report, angiolipoma is another neoplasm whose primary occurrence in the lymph node should not be misinterpreted as a metastatic tumor or malignant vascular tumor.

  1. MSAT and cellular hybrid networking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowsky, Patrick W., II

    1993-01-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation is developing both the Communications Ground Segment and the Series 1000 Mobile Phone for American Mobile Satellite Corporation's (AMSC's) Mobile Satellite (MSAT) system. The success of the voice services portion of this system depends, to some extent, upon the interoperability of the cellular network and the satellite communication circuit switched communication channels. This paper will describe the set of user-selectable cellular interoperable modes (cellular first/satellite second, etc.) provided by the Mobile Phone and described how they are implemented with the ground segment. Topics including roaming registration and cellular-to-satellite 'seamless' call handoff will be discussed, along with the relevant Interim Standard IS-41 Revision B Cellular Radiotelecommunications Intersystem Operations and IOS-553 Mobile Station - Land Station Compatibility Specification.

  2. Cellular noise and information transmission.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Andre; Nemenman, Ilya

    2014-08-01

    The technological revolution in biological research, and in particular the use of molecular fluorescent labels, has allowed investigation of heterogeneity of cellular responses to stimuli on the single cell level. Computational, theoretical, and synthetic biology advances have allowed predicting and manipulating this heterogeneity with an exquisite precision previously reserved only for physical sciences. Functionally, this cell-to-cell variability can compromise cellular responses to environmental signals, and it can also enlarge the repertoire of possible cellular responses and hence increase the adaptive nature of cellular behaviors. And yet quantification of the functional importance of this response heterogeneity remained elusive. Recently the mathematical language of information theory has been proposed to address this problem. This opinion reviews the recent advances and discusses the broader implications of using information-theoretic tools to characterize heterogeneity of cellular behaviors.

  3. Cellular systems biology profiling applied to cellular models of disease.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, Kenneth A; Premkumar, Daniel R; Strock, Christopher J; Johnston, Patricia; Taylor, Lansing

    2009-11-01

    Building cellular models of disease based on the approach of Cellular Systems Biology (CSB) has the potential to improve the process of creating drugs as part of the continuum from early drug discovery through drug development and clinical trials and diagnostics. This paper focuses on the application of CSB to early drug discovery. We discuss the integration of protein-protein interaction biosensors with other multiplexed, functional biomarkers as an example in using CSB to optimize the identification of quality lead series compounds.

  4. [Cellular adaptation and cancerogenesis].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Silpigni, A; Tomasello, R; Picone, G S; La Torre, I; Aragona, M

    1998-06-01

    The paper describes the main adaptive mechanisms involved in the carcinogenic process. As a result of the action of carcinogenic agents (physical, chemical, biological), and in relation to the functional status of the affected cells, a number of systems are triggered off: detoxification and conjugation systems, the metabolisation of the said agents, DNA repairing enzymes, increased shock proteins (HSP), the induction of clonal proliferation. All these systems are valuable to the survival of the body and the species and culminate in the apoptosis of damaged cells as the last attempt at adaptation of a social kind for the good of the body. When these compensation mechanisms prove ineffective, imprecise or are exceeded by cell adaptive capacity, the resulting structural and functional alterations trigger off (induction) a very long process which often lasts between one and two thirds of the body's life, in various stages, multistep and multifactorial: this neoplastic transformation leads to a purposeless, egoistic, anarchic proliferation of cells which wish to survive at all costs, even to the detriment of the body of which they form part. Following the exhaustion of cell adaptive defences, there is an accumulation of additional genetic alterations (promotion and progression), the cells become manifestly neoplastic and continue their egoistic adaptation, according to the laws of natural selection: the cells which survive are those which adapt best to the hostile environment of the host's body, which are unaffected by proliferation control mechanisms (contact inhibition, differentiation factors, apoptosis, etc.), which make the best of the growth factors present in their microenvironment, which accomplish the so-called decathlon of the metastatization process, namely acquiring new capacities which can overcome the basal membrane, invade tissues to which they are attracted and continue to proliferate. Manifestly neoplastic cells become not self at a later stage

  5. A Course in Cellular Bioengineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    1989-01-01

    Gives an overview of a course in chemical engineering entitled "Cellular Bioengineering," dealing with how chemical engineering principles can be applied to molecular cell biology. Topics used are listed and some key references are discussed. Listed are 85 references. (YP)

  6. Cellular compartmentalization of secondary metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungal secondary metabolism is often considered apart from the essential housekeeping functions of the cell. However, there are clear links between fundamental cellular metabolism and the biochemical pathways leading to secondary metabolite synthesis. Besides utilizing key biochemical precursors sh...

  7. Computational classification of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutner, Klaus

    2012-08-01

    We discuss attempts at the classification of cellular automata, in particular with a view towards decidability. We will see that a large variety of properties relating to the short-term evolution of configurations are decidable in principle, but questions relating to the long-term evolution are typically undecidable. Even in the decidable case, computational hardness poses a major obstacle for the automatic analysis of cellular automata.

  8. Cellular receptors and HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Tscherne, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    After attachment to specific receptors on the surfaces of target cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles are thought to be internalized to endosomes, where low pH induces fusion between the viral and cellular membranes, delivering the HCV genome into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe methods to study the early events in HCV infection; the interactions with cellular receptors and the mechanism of entry.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research. PMID:27557541

  10. Mathematical Modeling of Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Nikolaus; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolism basically consists of the conversion of chemical compounds taken up from the extracellular environment into energy (conserved in energy-rich bonds of organic phosphates) and a wide array of organic molecules serving as catalysts (enzymes), information carriers (nucleic acids), and building blocks for cellular structures such as membranes or ribosomes. Metabolic modeling aims at the construction of mathematical representations of the cellular metabolism that can be used to calculate the concentration of cellular molecules and the rates of their mutual chemical interconversion in response to varying external conditions as, for example, hormonal stimuli or supply of essential nutrients. Based on such calculations, it is possible to quantify complex cellular functions as cellular growth, detoxification of drugs and xenobiotic compounds or synthesis of exported molecules. Depending on the specific questions to metabolism addressed, the methodological expertise of the researcher, and available experimental information, different conceptual frameworks have been established, allowing the usage of computational methods to condense experimental information from various layers of organization into (self-) consistent models. Here, we briefly outline the main conceptual frameworks that are currently exploited in metabolism research.

  11. From cellular doses to average lung dose.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, W; Winkler-Heil, R

    2015-11-01

    Sensitive basal and secretory cells receive a wide range of doses in human bronchial and bronchiolar airways. Variations of cellular doses arise from the location of target cells in the bronchial epithelium of a given airway and the asymmetry and variability of airway dimensions of the lung among airways in a given airway generation and among bronchial and bronchiolar airway generations. To derive a single value for the average lung dose which can be related to epidemiologically observed lung cancer risk, appropriate weighting scenarios have to be applied. Potential biological weighting parameters are the relative frequency of target cells, the number of progenitor cells, the contribution of dose enhancement at airway bifurcations, the promotional effect of cigarette smoking and, finally, the application of appropriate regional apportionment factors. Depending on the choice of weighting parameters, detriment-weighted average lung doses can vary by a factor of up to 4 for given radon progeny exposure conditions.

  12. Enhanced Viral Replication by Cellular Replicative Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Ae; Seong, Rak-Kyun

    2016-01-01

    Cellular replicative senescence is a major contributing factor to aging and to the development and progression of aging-associated diseases. In this study, we sought to determine viral replication efficiency of influenza virus (IFV) and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) infection in senescent cells. Primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBE) or human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) were allowed to undergo numbers of passages to induce replicative senescence. Induction of replicative senescence in cells was validated by positive senescence-associated β-galactosidase staining. Increased susceptibility to both IFV and VZV infection was observed in senescent HBE and HDF cells, respectively, resulting in higher numbers of plaque formation, along with the upregulation of major viral antigen expression than that in the non-senescent cells. Interestingly, mRNA fold induction level of virus-induced type I interferon (IFN) was attenuated by senescence, whereas IFN-mediated antiviral effect remained robust and potent in virus-infected senescent cells. Additionally, we show that a longevity-promoting gene, sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), has antiviral role against influenza virus infection. In conclusion, our data indicate that enhanced viral replication by cellular senescence could be due to senescence-mediated reduction of virus-induced type I IFN expression. PMID:27799874

  13. Continuum representations of cellular solids

    SciTech Connect

    Neilsen, M.K.

    1993-09-01

    Cellular materials consist of interconnected struts or plates which form cells. The struts or plates are constructed from a variety of metals, polymers, ceramics and wood products. Cellular materials are often used in impact limiters for shipping containers to protect the contents from accidental impact events. These materials exhibit a variety of complex behavior when subjected to crushing loads. This research focuses on the development of continuum representations of cellular solids that can be used in the finite element analysis of shipping container accidents. A significant portion of this work is the development of a new methodology to relate localized deformations to appropriate constitutive descriptions. This methodology provides the insight needed to select constitutive descriptions for cellular solids that capture the localized deformations that are observed experimentally. Constitutive relations are developed for two different cellular materials, aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. These constitutive relations are based on plasticity and continuum damage theories. Plasticity is used to describe the permanent deformation exhibited by both aluminum honeycomb and polyurethane foam. Continuum damage is needed to capture the change in elastic parameters due to cracking of the polyurethane cell wall materials. The new constitutive description of polyurethane foam is implemented in both static and dynamic finite element codes, and analytical and numerical predictions are compared with available experimental data.

  14. The origins of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-07-01

    All life on earth can be naturally classified into cellular life forms and virus-like selfish elements, the latter being fully dependent on the former for their reproduction. Cells are reproducers that not only replicate their genome but also reproduce the cellular organization that depends on semipermeable, energy-transforming membranes and cannot be recovered from the genome alone, under the famous dictum of Rudolf Virchow, Omnis cellula e cellula. In contrast, simple selfish elements are replicators that can complete their life cycles within the host cell starting from genomic RNA or DNA alone. The origin of the cellular organization is the central and perhaps the hardest problem of evolutionary biology. I argue that the origin of cells can be understood only in conjunction with the origin and evolution of selfish genetic elements. A scenario of precellular evolution is presented that involves cohesion of the genomes of the emerging cellular life forms from primordial pools of small genetic elements that eventually segregated into hosts and parasites. I further present a model of the coevolution of primordial membranes and membrane proteins, discuss protocellular and non-cellular models of early evolution, and examine the habitats on the primordial earth that could have been conducive to precellular evolution and the origin of cells.

  15. Fracture mechanics of cellular glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwissler, J. G.; Adams, M. A.

    1981-01-01

    The fracture mechanics of cellular glasses (for the structural substrate of mirrored glass for solr concentrator reflecting panels) are discussed. Commercial and developmental cellular glasses were tested and analyzed using standard testing techniques and models developed from linear fracture mechanics. Two models describing the fracture behavior of these materials were developed. Slow crack growth behavior in cellular glass was found to be more complex than that encountered in dense glasses or ceramics. The crack velocity was found to be strongly dependent upon water vapor transport to the tip of the moving crack. The existence of a static fatigue limit was not conclusively established, however, it is speculated that slow crack growth behavior in Region 1 may be slower, by orders of magnitude, than that found in dense glasses.

  16. Cellular-based preemption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron D. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cellular-based preemption system that uses existing cellular infrastructure to transmit preemption related data to allow safe passage of emergency vehicles through one or more intersections. A cellular unit in an emergency vehicle is used to generate position reports that are transmitted to the one or more intersections during an emergency response. Based on this position data, the one or more intersections calculate an estimated time of arrival (ETA) of the emergency vehicle, and transmit preemption commands to traffic signals at the intersections based on the calculated ETA. Additional techniques may be used for refining the position reports, ETA calculations, and the like. Such techniques include, without limitation, statistical preemption, map-matching, dead-reckoning, augmented navigation, and/or preemption optimization techniques, all of which are described in further detail in the above-referenced patent applications.

  17. Torsins Are Essential Regulators of Cellular Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grillet, Micheline; Dominguez Gonzalez, Beatriz; Sicart, Adria; Pöttler, Maria; Cascalho, Ana; Billion, Karolien; Hernandez Diaz, Sergio; Swerts, Jef; Naismith, Teresa V; Gounko, Natalia V; Verstreken, Patrik; Hanson, Phyllis I; Goodchild, Rose E

    2016-08-01

    Torsins are developmentally essential AAA+ proteins, and mutation of human torsinA causes the neurological disease DYT1 dystonia. They localize in the ER membranes, but their cellular function remains unclear. We now show that dTorsin is required in Drosophila adipose tissue, where it suppresses triglyceride levels, promotes cell growth, and elevates membrane lipid content. We also see that human torsinA at the inner nuclear membrane is associated with membrane expansion and elevated cellular lipid content. Furthermore, the key lipid metabolizing enzyme, lipin, is mislocalized in dTorsin-KO cells, and dTorsin increases levels of the lipin substrate, phosphatidate, and reduces the product, diacylglycerol. Finally, genetic suppression of dLipin rescues dTorsin-KO defects, including adipose cell size, animal growth, and survival. These findings identify that torsins are essential regulators of cellular lipid metabolism and implicate disturbed lipid biology in childhood-onset DYT1 dystonia. PMID:27453503

  18. Cellular therapy in bone-tendon interface regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Rothrauff, Benjamin B; Tuan, Rocky S

    2014-01-01

    The intrasynovial bone-tendon interface is a gradual transition from soft tissue to bone, with two intervening zones of uncalcified and calcified fibrocartilage. Following injury, the native anatomy is not restored, resulting in inferior mechanical properties and an increased risk of re-injury. Recent in vivo studies provide evidence of improved healing when surgical repair of the bone-tendon interface is augmented with cells capable of undergoing chondrogenesis. In particular, cellular therapy in bone-tendon healing can promote fibrocartilage formation and associated improvements in mechanical properties. Despite these promising results in animal models, cellular therapy in human patients remains largely unexplored. This review highlights the development and structure-function relationship of normal bone-tendon insertions. The natural healing response to injury is discussed, with subsequent review of recent research on cellular approaches for improved healing. Finally, opportunities for translating in vivo findings into clinical practice are identified. PMID:24326955

  19. Cellular automaton for chimera states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    A minimalistic model for chimera states is presented. The model is a cellular automaton (CA) which depends on only one adjustable parameter, the range of the nonlocal coupling, and is built from elementary cellular automata and the majority (voting) rule. This suggests the universality of chimera-like behavior from a new point of view: Already simple CA rules based on the majority rule exhibit this behavior. After a short transient, we find chimera states for arbitrary initial conditions, the system spontaneously splitting into stable domains separated by static boundaries, some synchronously oscillating and the others incoherent. When the coupling range is local, nontrivial coherent structures with different periodicities are formed.

  20. Adaptive stochastic cellular automata: Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, S.; Lee, Y. C.; Jones, R. D.; Barnes, C. W.; Flake, G. W.; O'Rourke, M. K.; Lee, K.; Chen, H. H.; Sun, G. Z.; Zhang, Y. Q.; Chen, D.; Giles, C. L.

    1990-09-01

    The stochastic learning cellular automata model has been applied to the problem of controlling unstable systems. Two example unstable systems studied are controlled by an adaptive stochastic cellular automata algorithm with an adaptive critic. The reinforcement learning algorithm and the architecture of the stochastic CA controller are presented. Learning to balance a single pole is discussed in detail. Balancing an inverted double pendulum highlights the power of the stochastic CA approach. The stochastic CA model is compared to conventional adaptive control and artificial neural network approaches.

  1. Synthetic biology in cellular immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Wong, Wilson W.

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of genetically engineered T cells with cancer-targeting receptors has shown tremendous promise for eradicating tumors in clinical trials. This form of cellular immunotherapy presents a unique opportunity to incorporate advanced systems and synthetic biology approaches to create cancer therapeutics with novel functions. Here, we first review the development of synthetic receptors, switches, and circuits to control the location, duration, and strength of T cell activity against tumors. In addition, we discuss the cellular engineering and genome editing of host cells (or the chassis) to improve the efficacy of cell-based cancer therapeutics, and to reduce the time and cost of manufacturing. PMID:26088008

  2. Cellular senescence in aging primates.

    PubMed

    Herbig, Utz; Ferreira, Mark; Condel, Laura; Carey, Dee; Sedivy, John M

    2006-03-01

    The aging of organisms is characterized by a gradual functional decline of all organ systems. Mammalian somatic cells in culture display a limited proliferative life span, at the end of which they undergo an irreversible cell cycle arrest known as replicative senescence. Whether cellular senescence contributes to organismal aging has been controversial. We investigated telomere dysfunction, a recently discovered biomarker of cellular senescence, and found that the number of senescent fibroblasts increases exponentially in the skin of aging baboons, reaching >15% of all cells in very old individuals. In addition, the same cells contain activated ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase and heterochromatinized nuclei, confirming their senescent status. PMID:16456035

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-7 facilitates immune access to the CNS in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Buhler, Lillian A; Samara, Ramsey; Guzman, Esther; Wilson, Carole L; Krizanac-Bengez, Liljana; Janigro, Damir; Ethell, Douglas W

    2009-01-01

    Background Metalloproteinase inhibitors can protect mice against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) has been implicated, but it is not clear if other MMPs are also involved, including matrilysin/MMP-7 – an enzyme capable of cleaving proteins that are essential for blood brain barrier integrity and immune suppression. Results Here we report that MMP-7-deficient (mmp7-/-) mice on the C57Bl/6 background are resistant to EAE induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Brain sections from MOG-primed mmp7-/-mice did not show signs of immune cell infiltration of the CNS, but MOG-primed wild-type mice showed extensive vascular cuffing and mononuclear cell infiltration 15 days after vaccination. At the peak of EAE wild-type mice had MMP-7 immuno-reactive cells in vascular cuffs that also expressed the macrophage markers Iba-1 and Gr-1, as well as tomato lectin. MOG-specific proliferation of splenocytes, lymphocytes, CD4+ and CD8+ cells were reduced in cells isolated from MOG-primed mmp7-/- mice, compared with MOG-primed wild-type mice. However, the adoptive transfer of splenocytes and lymphocytes from MOG-primed mmp7-/- mice induced EAE in naïve wild-type recipients, but not naïve mmp7-/- recipients. Finally, we found that recombinant MMP-7 increased permeability between endothelial cells in an in vitro blood-brain barrier model. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MMP-7 may facilitate immune cell access or re-stimulation in perivascular areas, which are critical events in EAE and multiple sclerosis, and provide a new therapeutic target to treat this disorder. PMID:19267908

  4. Matrix Metalloproteinase 7 Is Associated with Symptomatic Lesions and Adverse Events in Patients with Carotid Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Azhar; Aukrust, Pål; Russell, David; Krohg-Sørensen, Kirsten; Almås, Trine; Bundgaard, Dorte; Bjerkeli, Vigdis; Sagen, Ellen Lund; Michelsen, Annika E.; Dahl, Tuva B.; Holm, Sverre; Ueland, Thor

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a major cause of cerebrovascular disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play an important role in matrix degradation within the atherosclerotic lesion leading to plaque destabilization and ischemic stroke. We hypothesized that MMP-7 could be involved in this process. Methods Plasma levels of MMP-7 were measured in 182 consecutive patients with moderate (50–69%) or severe (≥70%) internal carotid artery stenosis, and in 23 healthy controls. The mRNA levels of MMP-7 were measured in atherosclerotic carotid plaques with different symptomatology, and based on its localization to macrophages, the in vitro regulation of MMP-7 in primary monocytes was examined. Results Our major findings were (i) Patients with carotid atherosclerosis had markedly increased plasma levels of MMP-7 compared to healthy controls, with particularly high levels in patients with recent symptoms (i.e., within the last 2 months). (ii) A similar pattern was found within carotid plaques with markedly higher mRNA levels of MMP-7 than in non-atherosclerotic vessels. Particularly high protein levels of MMP-7 levels were found in those with the most recent symptoms. (iii) Immunhistochemistry showed that MMP-7 was localized to macrophages, and in vitro studies in primary monocytes showed that the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α in combination with hypoxia and oxidized LDL markedly increased MMP-7 expression. (iv) During the follow-up of patients with carotid atherosclerosis, high plasma levels of MMP-7 were independently associated with total mortality. Conclusion Our findings suggest that MMP-7 could contribute to plaque instability in carotid atherosclerosis, potentially involving macrophage-related mechanisms. PMID:24400123

  5. Optical imaging of matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in vivo using a proteolytic nanobeacon

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Randy L.; VanSaun, Michael N.; McIntyre, Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular proteolytic enzymes involved in tumor progression. We present the in vivo detection and quantitation of MMP7 activity using a specific near-infrared polymer-based proteolytic beacon, PB-M7NIR. PB-M7NIR is a pegylated polyamidoamine PAMAM-Generation 4 dendrimer core covalently coupled to a Cy5.5 labeled peptide representing a selective substrate that monitors MMP7 activity (S, sensor), and AF750 as an internal reference to monitor relative substrate concentration (R, reference). In vivo imaging of tumors expressing MMP7 had a median S/R ratio 2.2-fold higher than a bilateral control tumor. Ex-vivo imaging of intestines of multiple intestinal neoplasia (APCMin) mice injected systemically with PB-M7NIR revealed a 6-fold increase in S/R in the adenomas of APCMin mice compared to control intestinal tissue or adenomas from MMP7-null Min mice. PB-M7NIR detected tumor sizes as small as 0.01cm2, and S/R was independent of tumor size. Histological sectioning of xenograft tumors localized the proteolytic signal to the extracellular matrix; MMP7-overexpressing tumors displayed an approximately 300-fold enhancement in S/R compared to non-expressing tumor cells. In APCMin adenomas, the proteolytic signal co-localized with the endogenously-expressed MMP7 protein with S/R ratios approximately 6-fold greater than that of normal intestinal epithelium. PB-M7NIR provides a useful reagent for the in vivo and ex-vivo quantitation and localization of MMP-selective proteolytic activity. PMID:19123982

  6. STAT3 Knockdown Reduces Pancreatic Cancer Cell Invasiveness and Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Expression in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ke jian; Wu, Wei dong; Jiang, Tao; Cao, Jun; Feng, Zhen zhong; Qiu, Zheng jun

    2011-01-01

    Aims Transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) plays an important role in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of STAT3 knockdown in nude mouse xenografts of pancreatic cancer cells and underlying gene expression. Methods A STAT3 shRNA lentiviral vector was constructed and infected into SW1990 cells. qRT-PCR and western immunoblot were performed to detect gene expression. Nude mouse xenograft assays were used to assess changes in phenotypes of these stable cells in vivo. HE staining was utilized to evaluate tumor cell invasion and immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze gene expression. Results STAT3 shRNA successfully silenced expression of STAT3 mRNA and protein in SW1990 cells compared to control cells. Growth rate of the STAT3-silenced tumor cells in nude mice was significantly reduced compared to in the control vector tumors and parental cells-generated tumors. Tumor invasion into the vessel and muscle were also suppressed in the STAT3-silenced tumors compared to controls. Collagen IV expression was complete and continuous surrounding the tumors of STAT3-silenced SW1990 cells, whereas collagen IV expression was incomplete and discontinuous surrounding the control tumors. Moreover, microvessel density was significantly lower in STAT3-silenced tumors than parental or control tumors of SW1990 cells. In addition, MMP-7 expression was reduced in STAT3-silenced tumors compared to parental SW1990 xenografts and controls. In contrast, expression of IL-1β and IgT7α was not altered. Conclusion These data clearly demonstrate that STAT3 plays an important role in regulation of tumor growth, invasion, and angiogenesis, which could be act by reducing MMP-7 expression in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:21991388

  7. Optical imaging of matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity in vivo using a proteolytic nanobeacon.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Randy L; VanSaun, Michael N; McIntyre, J Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular proteolytic enzymes involved in tumor progression. We present the in vivo detection and quantitation of MMP7 activity using a specific near-infrared polymer-based proteolytic beacon, PB-M7NIR. PB-M7NIR is a pegylated polyamidoamine PAMAM-Generation 4 dendrimer core covalently coupled to a Cy5.5-labeled peptide representing a selective substrate that monitors MMP7 activity (sensor) and AF750 as an internal reference to monitor relative substrate concentration (reference). In vivo imaging of tumors expressing MMP7 had a median sensor to reference ratio 2.2-fold higher than a that of a bilateral control tumor. Ex vivo imaging of intestines of multiple intestinal neoplasia (APC Min) mice injected systemically with PB-M7NIR revealed a sixfold increase in the sensor to reference ratio in the adenomas of APC Min mice compared with control intestinal tissue or adenomas from MMP7-null Min mice. PB-M7NIR detected tumor sizes as small as 0.01 cm2, and the sensor to reference ratio was independent of tumor size. Histologic sectioning of xenograft tumors localized the proteolytic signal to the extracellular matrix; MMP7-overexpressing tumors displayed an approximately 300-fold enhancement in the sensor to reference ratio compared with nonexpressing tumor cells. In APC Min adenomas, the proteolytic signal colocalized with the endogenously expressed MMP7 protein, with sensor to reference ratios approximately sixfold greater than that of normal intestinal epithelium. PB-M7NIR provides a useful reagent for the in vivo and ex vivo quantitation and localization of MMP-selective proteolytic activity.

  8. Context-dependent effects of cellular senescence in cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Lecot, Pacome; Alimirah, Fatouma; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Wiley, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an established tumour-suppressive mechanism that prevents the proliferation of premalignant cells. However, several lines of evidence show that senescent cells, which often persist in vivo, can also promote tumour progression in addition to other age-related pathologies via the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Moreover, new insights suggest the SASP can facilitate tissue repair. Here, we review the beneficial and detrimental roles of senescent cells, highlighting conditions under which the senescence response does and does not promote pathology, particularly cancer. By better understanding the context-dependent effects of cellular senescence, it may be feasible to limit its detrimental properties while preserving its beneficial effects, and develop novel therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat cancer and possibly other age-associated diseases. PMID:27140310

  9. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  10. Cellular manufacturing for clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jonathan; Klassen, Henry; Bauer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Rapid progress has been made in the development of novel cell-based approaches for the potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. As a result, one must consider carefully the conditions under which these therapeutics are manufactured if they are to be used in clinical studies or, ultimately, be approved as licensed cellular therapeutics. Here, we describe the principles behind the manufacturing of clinical-grade cellular products, as well as potential methods for large-scale expansion and processing according to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) standards sets by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Standards for personnel, materials, procedures, and facilities required for such manufacturing processes are reviewed. We also discuss current and future scale-up methods for the manufacturing of large doses of cellular therapeutics under GMP conditions and compare the use of conventional culture methods such as tissue culture flasks and multi-layered cell factories with novel systems such as closed system hollow-fiber bioreactors. Incorporation of these novel bioreactor systems into GMP facilities may enable us to provide adequate cell numbers for multi-center clinical trials and paves the way for development of cellular therapeutics with the potential to treat very large numbers of patients.

  11. Cellular Automata and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The use of cellular automata to analyze several pre-Socratic hypotheses about the evolution of the physical world is discussed. These hypotheses combine characteristics of both rigorous and metaphoric language. Since the computer demands explicit instructions for each step in the evolution of the automaton, such models can reveal conceptual…

  12. Mitochondrial effectors of cellular senescence: beyond the free radical theory of aging

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Dorian V; Wiley, Christopher D; Velarde, Michael C

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a process that results from a variety of stresses, leading to a state of irreversible growth arrest. Senescent cells accumulate during aging and have been implicated in promoting a variety of age-related diseases. Mitochondrial stress is an effective inducer of cellular senescence, but the mechanisms by which mitochondria regulate permanent cell growth arrest are largely unexplored. Here, we review some of the mitochondrial signaling pathways that participate in establishing cellular senescence. We discuss the role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dynamics (fission and fusion), the electron transport chain (ETC), bioenergetic balance, redox state, metabolic signature, and calcium homeostasis in controlling cellular growth arrest. We emphasize that multiple mitochondrial signaling pathways, besides mitochondrial ROS, can induce cellular senescence. Together, these pathways provide a broader perspective for studying the contribution of mitochondrial stress to aging, linking mitochondrial dysfunction and aging through the process of cellular senescence. PMID:25399755

  13. Alcohol consumption promotes diethylnitrosamine-induced hepatocarcinogenesis in male mice through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Kelly E.; Hennings, Leah; Sharma, Neha; Lai, Keith; Cleves, Mario A.; Wynne, Rebecca A.; Badger, Thomas M.; Ronis, Martin J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Although alcohol effects within the liver have been extensively studied, the complex mechanisms by which alcohol causes liver cancer are not well understood. It has been suggested that ethanol (EtOH) metabolism promotes tumor growth by increasing hepatocyte proliferation. In this study, we developed a mouse model of tumor promotion by chronic EtOH consumption in which EtOH feeding began 46 days post-injection of the chemical carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN) and continued for 16 weeks. With a final EtOH concentration of 28% of total calories, we observed a significant increase in the total number of preneoplastic foci and liver tumors per mouse in the EtOH+DEN group compared to corresponding pair-fed (PF)+DEN and chow+DEN control groups. We also observed a 4-fold increase in hepatocyte proliferation (p<0.05) and increased cytoplasmic staining of active-β-catenin in non-tumor liver sections from EtOH+DEN mice compared to PF+DEN controls. In a rat model of alcohol-induced liver disease, we found increased hepatocyte proliferation (p<0.05); depletion of retinol and retinoic acid stores (p<0.05); increased expression of cytosolic and nuclear expression of β-catenin (p<0.05) and phosphorylated-glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (p-GSK3β, p<0.05; significant up-regulation in Wnt7a mRNA expression; and increased expression of several β-catenin targets, including, glutamine synthetase (GS), cyclin D1, Wnt1 inducible signaling pathway protein (WISP1), and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7), p<0.05. These data suggest that chronic EtOH consumption activates the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways to increase hepatocyte proliferation, thus promoting tumorigenesis following an initiating insult to the liver. PMID:24778325

  14. PROMOTING RESILIENCE.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Eric; Barker, Gillian; Lindo, Zoë; Dieleman, Catherine; Dussault, Antoine C

    2015-06-01

    Broadening contingents of ecologists and environmental scientists have recently begun to promote ecological resilience both as a conceptual framework and as a practical goal. As some critics have noted, this growing interest has brought with it a multiplication of notions of ecological resilience. This paper reviews how and why the notion of ecological resilience has been adopted, used, and defended in ecology since its introduction by C. S. Holling in 1973. We highlight the many faces of ecological resilience, but unlike other reviewers who see these as disunified and confused, we interpret ecological resilience as an evolving, multidimensional, theoretical concept unified by its role in guiding practical response to ecological and environmental challenges. This perspective informs a review of some of the factors often recognized as favoring resilience (structural and response diversity, functional redundancy, modularity, and spatial heterogeneity); we show how the roles and relationships of these factors can be clarified by considering them in the theoretical framework of Complex Adaptive Systems (CASs).

  15. Cellular solidification of transparent monotectics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaulker, W. F.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding how liquid phase particles are engulfed or pushed during freezing of a monotectic is addressed. The additional complication is that the solid-liquid interface is nonplanar due to constitutional undercooling. Some evidence of particle pushing where the particles are the liquid phase of the montectic was already observed. Cellular freezing of the succinonitrile-glycerol system also occurred. Only a few compositions were tested at that time. The starting materials were not especially pure so that cellular interface observed was likely due to the presence of unkown impurities, the major portion of which was water. Topics addressed include: the effort of modeling the particle pushing process using the computer, establishing an apparatus for the determination of phase diagrams, and the measurement of the temperature gradients with a specimen which will solidify on the temperature gradient microscope stage.

  16. Optofluidic Detection for Cellular Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Oh, Bo-Ram; Patra, Bishnubrata; Pan, Chi-Chun; Qiu, Teng; Paul, K. Chu; Zhang, Wenjun; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the output of processes and molecular interactions within a single cell is highly critical to the advancement of accurate disease screening and personalized medicine. Optical detection is one of the most broadly adapted measurement methods in biological and clinical assays and serves cellular phenotyping. Recently, microfluidics has obtained increasing attention due to several advantages, such as small sample and reagent volumes, very high throughput, and accurate flow control in the spatial and temporal domains. Optofluidics, which is the attempt to integrate optics with microfluidic, shows great promise to enable on-chip phenotypic measurements with high precision, sensitivity, specificity, and simplicity. This paper reviews the most recent developments of optofluidic technologies for cellular phenotyping optical detection. PMID:22854915

  17. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  18. Hox Targets and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are a group of genes that specify structures along the anteroposterior axis in bilaterians. Although in many cases they do so by modifying a homologous structure with a different (or no) Hox input, there are also examples of Hox genes constructing new organs with no homology in other regions of the body. Hox genes determine structures though the regulation of targets implementing cellular functions and by coordinating cell behavior. The genetic organization to construct or modify a certain organ involves both a genetic cascade through intermediate transcription factors and a direct regulation of targets carrying out cellular functions. In this review I discuss new data from genome-wide techniques, as well as previous genetic and developmental information, to describe some examples of Hox regulation of different cell functions. I also discuss the organization of genetic cascades leading to the development of new organs, mainly using Drosophila melanogaster as the model to analyze Hox function. PMID:24490109

  19. A novel biomarker ARMc8 promotes the malignant progression of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guiyang; Yang, Dalei; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Xiupeng; Xu, Hongtao; Miao, Yuan; Wang, Enhua; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy worldwide, and the survival rates have remained low in spite of medical advancements. More research is dedicated to the identification of novel biomarkers for this deadly disease. The association between ARMc8 and ovarian cancer remained unraveled. In this study, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine ARMc8 expression in 247 cases of ovarian cancer, 19 cases of borderline ovarian tumors, 41 cases of benign ovarian tumors, and 9 cases of normal ovarian tissues. It was shown that ARMc8 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of tumor cells, and its expression was up-regulated in the ovarian cancer (61.9%) and the borderline ovarian tumor tissues (57.9%), in comparison with the benign ovarian tumors (12.2%; P < .05) and the normal ovarian tissues (11.1%; P < .05). In ovarian cancer, ARMc8 expression was closely related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages (P = .002), histology grade (P < .001), lymph node metastasis (P = .008), and poor prognosis (P < .001). Univariate and multivariate Cox analyses revealed that ARMc8 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ovarian cancer (P = .039 and P = .005). In addition, ARMc8 could promote the invasion and migration of ovarian cancer cells. Overexpressing ARMc8 enhanced the invasion and metastasis capacity of ARMc8-low Cavo-3 cells (P < .001), whereas interfering ARMc8 significantly reduced cell invasion and metastasis in ARMc8-high SK-OV-3 cells (P < .001). Furthermore, ARMc8 could up-regulate matrix metalloproteinase-7 and snail and down-regulate α-catenin, p120ctn, and E-cadherin. Collectively, ARMc8 may enhance the invasion and metastasis of ovarian cancer cells and likely to become a potential therapeutic target for ovarian cancer. PMID:26232863

  20. Xtoys: Cellular automata on xwindows

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    1995-08-15

    Xtoys is a collection of xwindow programs for demonstrating simulations of various statistical models. Included are xising, for the two dimensional Ising model, xpotts, for the q-state Potts model, xautomalab, for a fairly general class of totalistic cellular automata, xsand, for the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfield model of self organized criticality, and xfires, a simple forest fire simulation. The programs should compile on any machine supporting xwindows.

  1. Rapid detection of biothreat agents based on cellular machinery.

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Todd W.; Gantt, Richard W.

    2004-12-01

    This research addresses rapid and sensitive identification of biological agents in a complex background. We attempted to devise a method by which the specificity of the cellular transcriptional machinery could be used to detect and identify bacterial bio-terror agents in a background of other organisms. Bacterial cells contain RNA polymerases and transcription factors that transcribe genes into mRNA for translation into proteins. RNA polymerases in conjunction with transcription factors recognize regulatory elements (promoters) upstream of the gene. These promoters are, in many cases, recognized by the polymerase and transcription factor combinations of one species only. We have engineered a plasmid, for Escherichia coli, containing the virA promoter from the target species Shigella flexneri. This promoter was fused to a reporter gene Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In theory the indicator strain (carrying the plasmid) is mixed with the target strain and the two are lysed. The cellular machinery from both cells mixes and the GFP is produced. This report details the results of testing this system.

  2. Cellular Functions of Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria V.; Belkin, Alexey M.

    2013-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2 or tissue transglutaminase) is a highly complex multifunctional protein that acts as transglutaminase, GTPase/ATPase, protein disulfide isomerase, and protein kinase. Moreover, TG2 has many well-documented nonenzymatic functions that are based on its noncovalent interactions with multiple cellular proteins. A vast array of biochemical activities of TG2 accounts for its involvement in a variety of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, growth, survival, apoptosis, differentiation, and extracellular matrix organization. In turn, the impact of TG2 on these processes implicates this protein in various physiological responses and pathological states, contributing to wound healing, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, vascular remodeling, tumor growth and metastasis, and tissue fibrosis. TG2 is ubiquitously expressed and is particularly abundant in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, monocytes/macrophages, and smooth muscle cells. The protein is localized in multiple cellular compartments, including the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, endolysosomes, plasma membrane, and cell surface and extracellular matrix, where Ca2+, nucleotides, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, membrane lipids, and distinct protein–protein interactions in the local microenvironment jointly regulate its activities. In this review, we discuss the complex biochemical activities and molecular interactions of TG2 in the context of diverse subcellular compartments and evaluate its wide ranging and cell type-specific biological functions and their regulation. PMID:22364871

  3. Asplatin enhances drug efficacy by altering the cellular response.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qinqin; Shi, Hongdong; Wang, Hongxia; Wang, Jun; Liu, Yangzhong

    2016-07-13

    Aspirin, a widely used anti-inflammatory drug, has been shown to be effective for the prevention and remission of cancers (Science, 2012, 337(21) 1471-1473). Asplatin, a Pt(iv) prodrug of cisplatin with the ligation of aspirin (c,c,t-[PtCl2(NH3)2(OH)(aspirin)]), demonstrates significantly higher cytotoxicity than cisplatin towards tumor cells and almost fully overcomes the drug resistance of cisplatin resistant cells. In this work, we have studied the molecular mechanism of asplatin by investigating the cellular response to this compound in order to understand the prominent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of cancer cells. The apoptosis analyses and the related gene expression measurements show that aspirin released from asplatin significantly modulates the cellular response to the platinum agent. Asplatin promotes the apoptosis via the BCL-2 associated mitochondrial pathway. The down-regulation of BCL-2 along with the up-regulation of BAX and BAK enhances the mitochondrial outer membrane permeability, resulting in the cytochrome c release from mitochondria into the cytosol. This event promotes the apoptosis by activation of caspase processing. Consequently, the ligation of aspirin significantly enhances the drug efficacy of the platinum complex in the low micromolar range. The alteration of the cellular response is probably responsible for the circumvention of the cisplatin resistance by asplatin. These results provide an insight into the mechanism of asplatin and provide information for designing new classic platinum drugs. PMID:27125788

  4. Universal map for cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2012-08-01

    A universal map is derived for all deterministic 1D cellular automata (CAs) containing no freely adjustable parameters and valid for any alphabet size and any neighborhood range (including non-symmetrical neighborhoods). The map can be extended to an arbitrary number of dimensions and topologies and to arbitrary order in time. Specific CA maps for the famous Conway's Game of Life and Wolfram's 256 elementary CAs are given. An induction method for CAs, based in the universal map, allows mathematical expressions for the orbits of a wide variety of elementary CAs to be systematically derived.

  5. Quantum Dots as Cellular Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Gu, Weiwei; Larabell, Carolyn

    2004-09-16

    Robust and bright light emitters, semiconductor nanocrystals[quantum dots (QDs)] have been adopted as a new class of fluorescent labels. Six years after the first experiments of their uses in biological applications, there have been dramatic improvements in understanding surface chemistry, biocompatibility, and targeting specificity. Many studies have shown the great potential of using quantum dots as new probes in vitro and in vivo. This review summarizes the recent advances of quantum dot usage at the cellular level, including immunolabeling, cell tracking, in situ hybridization, FRET, in vivo imaging, and other related technologies. Limitations and potential future uses of quantum dot probes are also discussed.

  6. Symmetry analysis of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Morales, V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of B-calculus [V. García-Morales, Phys. Lett. A 376 (2012) 2645] a universal map for deterministic cellular automata (CAs) has been derived. The latter is shown here to be invariant upon certain transformations (global complementation, reflection and shift). When constructing CA rules in terms of rules of lower range a new symmetry, “invariance under construction” is uncovered. Modular arithmetic is also reformulated within B-calculus and a new symmetry of certain totalistic CA rules, which calculate the Pascal simplices modulo an integer number p, is then also uncovered.

  7. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  8. Local unitary quantum cellular automata

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Cheung, Donny

    2007-09-15

    In this paper we present a quantization of cellular automata. Our formalism is based on a lattice of qudits and an update rule consisting of local unitary operators that commute with their own lattice translations. One purpose of this model is to act as a theoretical model of quantum computation, similar to the quantum circuit model. It is also shown to be an appropriate abstraction for space-homogeneous quantum phenomena, such as quantum lattice gases, spin chains, and others. Some results that show the benefits of basing the model on local unitary operators are shown: universality, strong connections to the circuit model, simple implementation on quantum hardware, and a wealth of applications.

  9. Cellular biosensors for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Durick, K; Negulescu, P

    2001-09-01

    Recent advances in cell biology, fluorescent probe chemistry, miniaturization and automation have allowed the use of mammalian cells in a variety of medical and industrial applications. Here we describe the generation of cell-based biosensors, engineered to optically report specific biological activity. Cellular biosensors are comprised of living cells and can be used in various applications, including screening chemical libraries for drug discovery and environmental sensing. Panels of biosensors may also be useful for elucidating the function of novel genes. Here we describe two examples of the construction and use of engineered cell lines as biosensors for drug discovery.

  10. Protein accounting in the cellular economy.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Laslop, Nora; Mankin, Alexander S

    2014-04-24

    Knowing the copy number of cellular proteins is critical for understanding cell physiology. By being able to measure the absolute synthesis rates of the majority of cellular proteins, Li et al. gain insights into key aspects of translation regulation and fundamental principles of cellular strategies to adjust protein synthesis according to the functional needs.

  11. Zeno's paradox in quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grössing, Gerhard; Zeilinger, Anton

    1991-07-01

    The effect of Zeno's paradox in quantum theory is demonstrated with the aid of quantum mechanical cellular automata. It is shown that the degree of non-unitarity of the cellular automaton evolution and the frequency of consecutive measurements of cellular automaton states are operationally indistinguishable.

  12. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications. PMID:27689136

  13. Endothelial Cellular Responses to Biodegradable Metal Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable zinc (Zn) metals, a new generation of biomaterials, have attracted much attention due to their excellent biodegradability, bioabsorbability, and adaptability to tissue regeneration. Compared with magnesium (Mg) and iron (Fe), Zn exhibits better corrosion and mechanical behaviors in orthopedic and stent applications. After implantation, Zn containing material will slowly degrade, and Zn ions (Zn2+) will be released to the surrounding tissue. For stent applications, the local Zn2+concentration near endothelial tissue/cells could be high. However, it is unclear how endothelia will respond to such high concentrations of Zn2+, which is pivotal to vascular remodeling and regeneration. Here, we evaluated the short-term cellular behaviors of primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCECs) exposed to a concentration gradient (0−140 μM) of extracellular Zn2+. Zn2+ had an interesting biphasic effect on cell viability, proliferation, spreading, and migration. Generally, low concentrations of Zn2+ promoted viability, proliferation, adhesion, and migration, while high concentrations of Zn2+ had opposite effects. For gene expression profiles, the most affected functional genes were related to cell adhesion, cell injury, cell growth, angiogenesis, inflammation, vessel tone, and coagulation. These results provide helpful information and guidance for Zn-based alloy design as well as the controlled release of Zn2+in stent and other related medical applications.

  14. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    PubMed

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  15. Micromechanics of cellularized biopolymer networks

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher A. R.; Cibula, Matthew; Feng, Jingchen; Krnacik, Emma A.; McIntyre, David H.; Levine, Herbert; Sun, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Collagen gels are widely used in experiments on cell mechanics because they mimic the extracellular matrix in physiological conditions. Collagen gels are often characterized by their bulk rheology; however, variations in the collagen fiber microstructure and cell adhesion forces cause the mechanical properties to be inhomogeneous at the cellular scale. We study the mechanics of type I collagen on the scale of tens to hundreds of microns by using holographic optical tweezers to apply pN forces to microparticles embedded in the collagen fiber network. We find that in response to optical forces, particle displacements are inhomogeneous, anisotropic, and asymmetric. Gels prepared at 21 °C and 37 °C show qualitative difference in their micromechanical characteristics. We also demonstrate that contracting cells remodel the micromechanics of their surrounding extracellular matrix in a strain- and distance-dependent manner. To further understand the micromechanics of cellularized extracellular matrix, we have constructed a computational model which reproduces the main experiment findings. PMID:26324923

  16. Cellular uptake of metallated cobalamins.

    PubMed

    Tran, Mai Thanh Quynh; Stürup, Stefan; Lambert, Ian Henry; Gammelgaard, Bente; Furger, Evelyne; Alberto, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Cellular uptake of vitamin B12-cisplatin conjugates was estimated via detection of their metal constituents (Co, Pt, and Re) by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Vitamin B12 (cyano-cob(iii)alamin) and aquo-cob(iii)alamin [Cbl-OH2](+), which differ in the β-axial ligands (CN(-) and H2O, respectively), were included as control samples. The results indicated that B12 derivatives delivered cisplatin to both cellular cytosol and nuclei with an efficiency of one third compared to the uptake of free cisplatin cis-[Pt(II)Cl2(NH3)2]. In addition, uptake of charged B12 derivatives including [Cbl-OH2](+), [{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), [{Re}-{Co}-CN-{cis-PtCl(NH3)2}](+), and [{Co}-CN-{trans-Pt(Cyt)(NH3)2}](2+) (Cyt = cytarabin) was high compared to neutral B12, which implied the existence of an additional internalization pathway for charged B12 vitamin analogs. The affinities of the charged B12 derivatives to the B12 transporters HC, IF and TC were similar to that of native vitamin B12. PMID:26739575

  17. Cellular Therapy for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Psaltis, Peter J; Schwarz, Nisha; Toledo-Flores, Deborah; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy and heart failure (HF) is underpinned by complex changes at subcellular, cellular and extracellular levels in the ventricular myocardium. For all of the gains that conventional treatments for HF have brought to mortality and morbidity, they do not adequately address the loss of cardiomyocyte numbers in the remodeling ventricle. Originally conceived to address this problem, cellular transplantation for HF has already gone through several stages of evolution over the past two decades. Various cell types and delivery routes have been implemented to positive effect in preclinical models of ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathy, with pleiotropic benefits observed in terms of myocardial remodeling, systolic and diastolic performance, perfusion, fibrosis, inflammation, metabolism and electrophysiology. To a large extent, these salubrious effects are now attributed to the indirect, paracrine capacity of transplanted stem cells to facilitate endogenous cardiac repair processes. Promising results have also followed in early phase human studies, although these have been relatively modest and somewhat inconsistent. This review details the preclinical and clinical evidence currently available regarding the use of pluripotent stem cells and adult-derived progenitor cells for cardiomyopathy and HF. It outlines the important lessons that have been learned to this point in time, and balances the promise of this exciting field against the key challenges and questions that still need to be addressed at all levels of research, to ensure that cell therapy realizes its full potential by adding to the armamentarium of HF management. PMID:27280304

  18. Direct cellular delivery of human proteasomes to delay tau aggregation.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong Hoon; Na, Hee-Kyung; Choi, Won Hoon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Kim, Yun Kyung; Won, Cheolhee; Lee, Seung-Han; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kuret, Jeff; Min, Dal-Hee; Lee, Min Jae

    2014-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the primary machinery that degrades ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, including many proteotoxic proteins implicated in neurodegeneraton. It has been suggested that the elevation of proteasomal activity is tolerable to cells and may be beneficial to prevent the accumulation of protein aggregates. Here we show that purified proteasomes can be directly transported into cells through mesoporous silica nanoparticle-mediated endocytosis. Proteasomes that are loaded onto nanoparticles through non-covalent interactions between polyhistidine tags and nickel ions fully retain their proteolytic activity. Cells treated with exogenous proteasomes are more efficient in degrading overexpressed human tau than endogenous proteasomal substrates, resulting in decreased levels of tau aggregates. Moreover, exogenous proteasome delivery significantly promotes cell survival against proteotoxic stress caused by tau and reactive oxygen species. These data demonstrate that increasing cellular proteasome activity through the direct delivery of purified proteasomes may be an effective strategy for reducing cellular levels of proteotoxic proteins. PMID:25476420

  19. Gold-Tipped Elastomeric Pillars for Cellular Mechanotransduction.

    PubMed

    Ghassemi, S; Rossier, O; Sheetz, M P; Wind, S J; Hone, J

    2009-11-01

    We describe a technique for the fabrication of arrays of elastomeric pillars whose top surfaces are treated with selective chemical functionalization to promote cellular adhesion in cellular force transduction experiments. The technique involves the creation of a rigid mold consisting of arrays of circular holes into which a thin layer of Au is deposited while the top surface of the mold and the sidewalls of the holes are protected by a sacrificial layer of Cr. When an elastomer is formed in the mold, the Au adheres to the tops of the molded pillars. This can then be selectively functionalized with a protein that induces cell adhesion, while the rest of the surface is treated with a repellent substance. An additional benefit is that the tops of the pillars can be fluorescently labeled for improved accuracy in force transduction measurements. PMID:20526428

  20. Prooxidant states and tumor promotion

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, P.A.

    1985-01-25

    There is convincing evidence that cellular prooxidant states--that is, increased concentrations of active oxygen and organic peroxides and radicals--can promote initiated cells to neoplastic growth. Prooxidant states can be caused by different classes of agents, including hyperbaric oxygen, radiation, xenobiotic metabolites and Fenton-type reagents, modulators of the cytochrome P-450 electron-transport chain, peroxisome proliferators, inhibitors of the antioxidant defense, and membrane-active agents. Many of these agents are promoters or complete carcinogens. They cause chromosomal damage by indirect action, but the role of this damage in carcinogenesis remains unclear. Prooxidant states can be prevented or suppressed by the enzymes of the cellular antioxidant defense and low molecular weight scavenger molecules, and many antioxidants are antipromoters and anticarcinogens. Finally, prooxidant states may modulate the expression of a family of prooxidant genes, which are related to cell growth and differentiation, by inducing alterations in DNA structure or by epigenetic mechanisms, for example, by polyadenosine diphosphate-ribosylation of chromosomal proteins.

  1. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  2. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science.

  3. Thermomechanical characterisation of cellular rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, H.; Scheffer, T.; Diebels, S.

    2016-09-01

    This contribution discusses an experimental possibility to characterise a cellular rubber in terms of the influence of multiaxiality, rate dependency under environmental temperature and its behaviour under hydrostatic pressure. In this context, a mixed open and closed cell rubber based on an ethylene propylene diene monomer is investigated exemplarily. The present article intends to give a general idea of the characterisation method and the considerable effects of this special type of material. The main focus lies on the experimental procedure and the used testing devices in combination with the analysis methods such as true three-dimensional digital image correlation. The structural compressibility is taken into account by an approach for a material model using the Theory of Porous Media with additional temperature dependence.

  4. Cellular Delivery of RNA Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Parlea, Lorena; Puri, Anu; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Bindewald, Eckart; Zakrevsky, Paul; Satterwhite, Emily; Joseph, Kenya; Afonin, Kirill A; Shapiro, Bruce A

    2016-09-12

    RNA nanostructures can be programmed to exhibit defined sizes, shapes and stoichiometries from naturally occurring or de novo designed RNA motifs. These constructs can be used as scaffolds to attach functional moieties, such as ligand binding motifs or gene expression regulators, for nanobiology applications. This review is focused on four areas of importance to RNA nanotechnology: the types of RNAs of particular interest for nanobiology, the assembly of RNA nanoconstructs, the challenges of cellular delivery of RNAs in vivo, and the delivery carriers that aid in the matter. The available strategies for the design of nucleic acid nanostructures, as well as for formulation of their carriers, make RNA nanotechnology an important tool in both basic research and applied biomedical science. PMID:27509068

  5. Fundamental Limits to Cellular Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Becker, Nils B.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this receptor input noise as much as possible. These networks, however, are also intrinsically stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, which is the timescale over which fluctuations in the state of the receptor, arising from the stochastic receptor-ligand binding, decay. We then describe how downstream signaling pathways integrate these receptor-state fluctuations, and how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time set by the downstream network, together impose a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor input noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes (groups) of resources—receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy—and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade

  6. REGULATION OF CELLULAR ANTIBODY SYNTHESIS

    PubMed Central

    Möller, Göran

    1968-01-01

    Transfer of spleen cells from mice immunized against sheep red blood cells (SRBC) into irradiated (600 R) nonimmune, syngeneic mice in the presence of antigen resulted in excessive cellular 7S production 7 days later. The number of 7S plaque-forming cells usually exceeded 106 per spleen and the mean proportion varied between 1 and 70%. In occasional animals all spleen cells were producing antibodies to SRBC. Serum antibody synthesis was also excessively increased, the titers in agglutination after 2-ME treatment and in hemolysis varying between 215 and 225. The generation time of the 7S PFC was found to be 9.6 hr in the secondary hosts. It seemed possible that the excessive production of 7S PFC and antibodies in the irradiated nonimmune recipients was caused by the absence of feedback inhibition of the immune response by antibody, a mechanism which would normally function to restrict antibody synthesis. This conclusion was strengthened by the demonstration that transfer of antigen-stimulated immune cells into actively or passively immunized irradiated recipients resulted in a marked suppression of cellular 7S synthesis. Serial transfers of antigen-stimulated immune cell populations in irradiated hosts resulted in an equally high number of 7S PFC during the first four transfer generations. However, after the fifth to seventh transfer generation the number of 7S PFC rapidly declined and disappeared within one to three passages. Serum antibodies and 7S PFC declined in parallel during the last transfer generations. Further passages of antigen-stimulated spleen cells lacking 7S PFC did not lead to reappearance of PFC. Thus, antigen-sensitive cells have a limited lifespan and/or multiplication capacity. From the hypothesis that the 7S PFC developed by division from antigen-sensitive precursors it was calculated that 38–40 divisions occurred, Thus, one antigen-sensitive precursor has the potential to give rise to 1012 7S PFC. PMID:5635380

  7. Assemblages: Functional units formed by cellular phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The partitioning of intracellular space beyond membrane-bound organelles can be achieved with collections of proteins that are multivalent or contain low-complexity, intrinsically disordered regions. These proteins can undergo a physical phase change to form functional granules or other entities within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm that collectively we term “assemblage.” Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play an important role in forming a subset of cellular assemblages by promoting phase separation. Recent work points to an involvement of assemblages in disease states, indicating that intrinsic disorder and phase transitions should be considered in the development of therapeutics. PMID:25179628

  8. PIFs: pivotal components in a cellular signaling hub

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Quail, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    A small subset of basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors called PIFs [phytochrome (phy)-interacting factors] act to repress seed germination, promote seedling skotomorphogenesis and promote shade-avoidance through regulated expression of over a thousand genes. Light-activated phy molecules directly reverse these activities by inducing rapid degradation of the PIF proteins. Here, we review recent advances in dissecting this signaling pathway and examine emerging evidence that indicates that other pathways also converge to regulate PIF activity, including the gibberellin pathway, the circadian clock and high temperature. The PIFs thus have broader roles than previously appreciated, functioning as a cellular signaling hub that integrates multiple signals to orchestrate regulation of the transcriptional network that drives multiple facets of downstream morphogenesis. The relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this spectrum of regulatory functions ranges from quantitatively redundant to qualitatively distinct. PMID:20833098

  9. Survey of cellular radiosensitivity parameters.

    PubMed

    Katz, R; Zachariah, R; Cucinotta, F A; Zhang, C

    1994-12-01

    A model of the formation of particle tracks in emulsion has been extended through the use of biological target theory to formulate a theory of the response of biological cells and molecules of biological importance to irradiation with energetic heavy ions. For this purpose the response to gamma rays is represented by the single-hit, multitarget model with parameters m and D0, while additional parameters kappa (or a0) and sigma 0 are required to represent the size of internal cellular targets and the effective cross-sectional area of the cell nucleus, respectively, for heavy-ion bombardments. For one-or-more-hit detectors, only the first three of these parameters are required and m = 1. For cells m is typically 2 or more. The model is developed from the concept that response to secondary electrons follows the same functional form for gamma rays and for the gamma rays surrounding an ion's path. Originally applied to dry enzymes and viruses in 1967, the model of the one-hit detector has been extended to emulsions, to other physical and chemical detectors, to single- and double-strand breaks in DNA in EO buffer and to three E. coli strains. The two-hit response has been observed for "track core" effects in radiation chemistry, for supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters and for desensitized nuclear emulsions, where hit numbers up to 6 have been observed. In its extension to biological cells, additional concepts are required relating to the character of the track, namely the grain-count and track-width regimes, and to the ability of multitarget systems to acquire damage from intertrack delta rays (called gamma kill) as well as from intratrack delta rays (called ion kill). The model has been applied to some 40 sets of radiobiological data obtained from gamma, track-segment heavy-ion and neutron irradiations. Here we elaborate on the meaning of these concepts, tabulate the cellular parameters, and display their systematic behavior and the relationships among them

  10. Optical cellular processor architecture. 1: Principles.

    PubMed

    Taboury, J; Wang, J M; Chavel, P; Devos, F; Garda, P

    1988-05-01

    General characteristics and advantages of 2-D optical cellular processors are listed and discussed, with reference to the concepts of cellular automata, symbolic substitution, and neural nets. The role of optical interconnections and of quasilinear processing combining linear array operations and pointwise nonlinearities is highlighted. An architecture for optical implementation of cellular automata is introduced; it features high density 3-D optical shift-invariant interconnections and programmability of the interconnection pattern through adequate use of holographic connectors.

  11. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  12. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  13. Signal processing in cellular clocks.

    PubMed

    Forger, Daniel B

    2011-03-15

    Many biochemical events within a cell need to be timed properly to occur at specific times of day, after other events have happened within the cell or in response to environmental signals. The cellular biochemical feedback loops that time these events have already received much recent attention in the experimental and modeling communities. Here, we show how ideas from signal processing can be applied to understand the function of these clocks. Consider two signals from the network s(t) and r(t), either two variables of a model or two experimentally measured time courses. We show how s(t) can be decomposed into two parts, the first being a function of r(t), and the second the derivative of a function of r(t). Geometric principles are then derived that can be used to understand when oscillations appear in biochemical feedback loops, the period of these oscillations, and their time course. Specific examples of this theory are provided that show how certain networks are prone or not prone to oscillate, how individual biochemical processes affect the period, and how oscillations in one chemical species can be deduced from oscillations in other parts of the network.

  14. The origins of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Schrum, Jason P; Zhu, Ting F; Szostak, Jack W

    2010-09-01

    Understanding the origin of cellular life on Earth requires the discovery of plausible pathways for the transition from complex prebiotic chemistry to simple biology, defined as the emergence of chemical assemblies capable of Darwinian evolution. We have proposed that a simple primitive cell, or protocell, would consist of two key components: a protocell membrane that defines a spatially localized compartment, and an informational polymer that allows for the replication and inheritance of functional information. Recent studies of vesicles composed of fatty-acid membranes have shed considerable light on pathways for protocell growth and division, as well as means by which protocells could take up nutrients from their environment. Additional work with genetic polymers has provided insight into the potential for chemical genome replication and compatibility with membrane encapsulation. The integration of a dynamic fatty-acid compartment with robust, generalized genetic polymer replication would yield a laboratory model of a protocell with the potential for classical Darwinian biological evolution, and may help to evaluate potential pathways for the emergence of life on the early Earth. Here we discuss efforts to devise such an integrated protocell model.

  15. Perfluorinated alginate for cellular encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Gattás-Asfura, Kerim M; Fraker, Christopher A; Stabler, Cherie L

    2012-08-01

    Molecules of pentadecafluorooctanoyl chloride (PFC) were grafted onto alginate (Alg) using a linear poly(ethylene glycol) linker and amide bonds. The resulting Alg-PFC material was characterized by proton nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopies. The degree of PFC functionalization significantly influenced the physical and chemical properties of Alg-PFC, particularly when the resulting polymer was ionically crosslinked into hydrogels. Alg-PFC hydrogel beads fabricated via Ba(2+) crosslinking were found to match the permeability properties of control alginate beads, except upon swelling over time in culture media. When used to encapsulate MIN6 cells, a beta cell line, Alg-PFC beads demonstrated enhanced cell proliferation over alginate control beads. These results indicate that Alg-PFC hydrogels retain some of the PFC's biological-relevant benefits, such as enhancement of mass transport and bioinertness, to enhance cellular viability within alginate three-dimensional hydrogel environments. We envision these functionalized hydrogels to be particularly useful in the encapsulation of cells with a high metabolic demand, such as pancreatic islets.

  16. Reference materials for cellular therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bravery, Christopher A; French, Anna

    2014-09-01

    The development of cellular therapeutics (CTP) takes place over many years, and, where successful, the developer will anticipate the product to be in clinical use for decades. Successful demonstration of manufacturing and quality consistency is dependent on the use of complex analytical methods; thus, the risk of process and method drift over time is high. The use of reference materials (RM) is an established scientific principle and as such also a regulatory requirement. The various uses of RM in the context of CTP manufacturing and quality are discussed, along with why they are needed for living cell products and the analytical methods applied to them. Relatively few consensus RM exist that are suitable for even common methods used by CTP developers, such as flow cytometry. Others have also identified this need and made proposals; however, great care will be needed to ensure any consensus RM that result are fit for purpose. Such consensus RM probably will need to be applied to specific standardized methods, and the idea that a single RM can have wide applicability is challenged. Written standards, including standardized methods, together with appropriate measurement RM are probably the most appropriate way to define specific starting cell types. The characteristics of a specific CTP will to some degree deviate from those of the starting cells; consequently, a product RM remains the best solution where feasible. Each CTP developer must consider how and what types of RM should be used to ensure the reliability of their own analytical measurements.

  17. Surface modifications of silicon nitride for cellular biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Johan; Altankov, George; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Samitier, Josep; Planell, Josep A; Engel, Elisabeth

    2008-04-01

    Thin films of silicon nitride (Si3N4) can be used in several kinds of micro-sized biosensors as a material to monitor fine environmental changes related to the process of bone formation in vitro. We found however that Si3N4 does not provide optimal conditions for osseointegration as osteoblast-like MG-63 cells tend to detach from the surface when cultured over confluence. Therefore Si3N4 was modified with self-assembled monolayers bearing functional end groups of primary amine (NH2) and carboxyl (COOH) respectively. Both these modifications enhanced the interaction with confluent cell layers and thus improve osseointegration over Si3N4. Furthermore it was observed that the NH2 functionality increased the adsorption of fibronectin (FN), promoted cell proliferation, but delayed the differentiation. We also studied the fate of pre-adsorbed and secreted FN from cells to learn more about the impact of above functionalities for the development of provisional extracellular matrix on materials interface. Taken together our data supports that Si3N4 has low tissue integration but good cellular biocompatibility and thus is appropriate in cellular biosensor applications such as the ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). COOH and NH2 chemistries generally improve the interfacial tissue interaction with the sensor and they are therefore suitable substrates for monitoring cellular growth or matrix deposition using electrical impedance spectroscopy.

  18. SWI/SNF regulates the cellular response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Mudie, Sharon; van Uden, Patrick; Rocha, Sonia

    2009-02-13

    Hypoxia induces a variety of cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and autophagy. Most of these responses are mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha. To induce target genes, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha requires a chromatin environment conducive to allow binding to specific sequences. Here, we have studied the role of the chromatin-remodeling complex SWI/SNF in the cellular response to hypoxia. We find that SWI/SNF is required for several of the cellular responses induced by hypoxia. Surprisingly, hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha is a direct target of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. SWI/SNF components are found associated with the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha promoter and modulation of SWI/SNF levels results in pronounced changes in hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression and its ability to transactivate target genes. Furthermore, impairment of SWI/SNF function renders cells resistant to hypoxia-induced cell cycle arrest. These results reveal a previously uncharacterized dependence of hypoxia signaling on the SWI/SNF complex and demonstrate a new level of control over the hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha system.

  19. A comparative cellular and molecular biology of longevity database.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Jeffrey A; Liang, Ping; Luo, Xuemei; Page, Melissa M; Gallagher, Emily J; Christoff, Casey A; Robb, Ellen L

    2013-10-01

    Discovering key cellular and molecular traits that promote longevity is a major goal of aging and longevity research. One experimental strategy is to determine which traits have been selected during the evolution of longevity in naturally long-lived animal species. This comparative approach has been applied to lifespan research for nearly four decades, yielding hundreds of datasets describing aspects of cell and molecular biology hypothesized to relate to animal longevity. Here, we introduce a Comparative Cellular and Molecular Biology of Longevity Database, available at ( http://genomics.brocku.ca/ccmbl/ ), as a compendium of comparative cell and molecular data presented in the context of longevity. This open access database will facilitate the meta-analysis of amalgamated datasets using standardized maximum lifespan (MLSP) data (from AnAge). The first edition contains over 800 data records describing experimental measurements of cellular stress resistance, reactive oxygen species metabolism, membrane composition, protein homeostasis, and genome homeostasis as they relate to vertebrate species MLSP. The purpose of this review is to introduce the database and briefly demonstrate its use in the meta-analysis of combined datasets.

  20. Is cancer a disease of abnormal cellular metabolism?

    PubMed Central

    DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1920s, Otto Warburg observed that tumor cells consume a large amount of glucose, much more than normal cells, and convert most of it to lactic acid. This phenomenon, now known as the ‘Warburg effect,’ is the foundation of one of the earliest general concepts of cancer: that a fundamental disturbance of cellular metabolic activity is at the root of tumor formation and growth. In the ensuing decades, as it became apparent that abnormalities in chromosomes and eventually individual genes caused cancer, the ‘metabolic’ model of cancer lost a good deal of its appeal, even as emerging technologies were exploiting the Warburg effect clinically to detect tumors in vivo. We now know that tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes influence metabolism, and that mutations in these genes can promote a metabolic phenotype supporting cell growth and proliferation. Thus, these advances have unified aspects of the metabolic and genetic models of cancer, and have stimulated a renewed interest in the role of cellular metabolism in tumorigenesis. This review reappraises the notion that dysregulated cellular metabolism is a key feature of cancer, and discusses some metabolic issues that have escaped scrutiny over the years and now deserve closer attention. PMID:18941420

  1. Cellular toxicity of nicotinamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczyński, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. Nicotinamide derivatives are known as new family of uremic toxins. These uremic compounds play a role in an increased oxidative stress and disturbances in cellular repair processes by inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. New members of this family were discovered and described. Their toxic properties were a subject of recent studies. This study evaluated the concentration of 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-triphosphate (4PYTP) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-monophosphate (4PYMP) in erythrocytes of patients with chronic renal failure. Serum and red blood cells were collected from chronic renal failure patients on conservative treatment, those treated with hemodialysis, and at different times from those who underwent kidney transplantation. Healthy volunteers served as a control group. Nicotinamide metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry based on originally discovered and described method. Three novel compounds were described: 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside (4PYR), 4PYMP, and 4PYTP. 4PYR concentration was elevated in the serum, whereas 4PYMP and 4PYTP concentrations were augmented in erythrocytes of dialysis patients. Interestingly, concentrations of these compounds were less elevated during the treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). After successful kidney transplantation, concentrations of 4PYR and 4PYMP normalized according to the graft function, whereas that of 4PYTP was still elevated. During the incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of 4PYR, concentration of 4PYMP rose very rapidly while that of 4PYTP increased slowly. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4PYR, as a toxic compound, was actively absorbed by erythrocytes and metabolized to the 4PYMP and 4PYTP, which may interfere with function and life span of these cells. PMID:22200423

  2. Electrodynamic eigenmodes in cellular morphology.

    PubMed

    Cifra, M

    2012-09-01

    Eigenmodes of the spherical and ellipsoidal dielectric electromagnetic resonator have been analysed. The sizes and shape of the resonators have been chosen to represent the shape of the interphase and dividing animal cell. Electromagnetic modes that have shape exactly suitable for positioning of the sufficiently large organelles in cell (centrosome, nucleus) have been identified. We analysed direction and magnitude of dielectrophoretic force exerted on large organelles by electric field of the modes. We found that the TM(1m1) mode in spherical resonator acts by centripetal force which drags the large organelles which have higher permittivity than the cytosol to the center of the cell. TM-kind of mode in the ellipsoidal resonator acts by force on large polarizable organelles in a direction that corresponds to the movement of the centrosomes (also nucleus) observed during the cell division, i.e. to the foci of the ellipsoidal cell. Minimal required force (10(-16) N), gradient of squared electric field and corresponding energy (10(-16) J) of the mode have been calculated to have biological significance within the periods on the order of time required for cell division. Minimal required energy of the mode, in order to have biological significance, can be lower in the case of resonance of organelle with the field of the cellular resonator mode. In case of sufficient energy in the biologically relevant mode, electromagnetic field of the mode will act as a positioning or steering mechanism for centrosome and nucleus in the cell, thus contribute to the spatial and dynamical self-organization in biological systems. PMID:22750075

  3. Integrated segmentation of cellular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajemba, Peter; Al-Kofahi, Yousef; Scott, Richard; Donovan, Michael; Fernandez, Gerardo

    2011-03-01

    Automatic segmentation of cellular structures is an essential step in image cytology and histology. Despite substantial progress, better automation and improvements in accuracy and adaptability to novel applications are needed. In applications utilizing multi-channel immuno-fluorescence images, challenges include misclassification of epithelial and stromal nuclei, irregular nuclei and cytoplasm boundaries, and over and under-segmentation of clustered nuclei. Variations in image acquisition conditions and artifacts from nuclei and cytoplasm images often confound existing algorithms in practice. In this paper, we present a robust and accurate algorithm for jointly segmenting cell nuclei and cytoplasm using a combination of ideas to reduce the aforementioned problems. First, an adaptive process that includes top-hat filtering, Eigenvalues-of-Hessian blob detection and distance transforms is used to estimate the inverse illumination field and correct for intensity non-uniformity in the nuclei channel. Next, a minimum-error-thresholding based binarization process and seed-detection combining Laplacian-of-Gaussian filtering constrained by a distance-map-based scale selection is used to identify candidate seeds for nuclei segmentation. The initial segmentation using a local maximum clustering algorithm is refined using a minimum-error-thresholding technique. Final refinements include an artifact removal process specifically targeted at lumens and other problematic structures and a systemic decision process to reclassify nuclei objects near the cytoplasm boundary as epithelial or stromal. Segmentation results were evaluated using 48 realistic phantom images with known ground-truth. The overall segmentation accuracy exceeds 94%. The algorithm was further tested on 981 images of actual prostate cancer tissue. The artifact removal process worked in 90% of cases. The algorithm has now been deployed in a high-volume histology analysis application.

  4. From Cnn Dynamics to Cellular Wave Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roska, Tamas

    2013-01-01

    Embedded in a historical overview, the development of the Cellular Wave Computing paradigm is presented, starting from the standard CNN dynamics. The theoretical aspects, the physical implementation, the innovation process, as well as the biological relevance are discussed in details. Finally, the latest developments, the physical versus virtual cellular machines, as well as some open questions are presented.

  5. Dualband microstrip antennas for cellular telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnuk, Marian

    2004-04-01

    Intensive development of cellular personal communications system has been observed lately. Thus, protection of a man, and especially protection of his head against non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation generated by cellular telephones is becoming one of the most important problems. The results of elaborated microstrip antennas which have minimized radiation towards the user's head are presented in this paper.

  6. Cellular Manufacturing Internet Performance Support System

    SciTech Connect

    Bohley, M.C.; Schwartz, M.E.

    1998-03-04

    The objective of this project was to develop an Internet-based electronic performance support system (EPSS) for cellular manufacturing providing hardware/software specifications, process descriptions, estimated cost savings, manufacturing simulations, training information, and service resources for government and industry users of Cincinnati Milacron machine tools and products. AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies (ASFM and T) used expertise in the areas of Internet design and multimedia creation to develop a performance support system (PSS) for the Internet with assistance from CM's subject matter experts from engineering, manufacturing, and technical support. Reference information was both created and re-purposed from other existing formats, then made available on the Internet. On-line references on cellular manufacturing operations include: definitions of cells and cellular manufacturing; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing improves part throughput, resource utilization, part quality, and manufacturing flexibility; illustrations on how cellular manufacturing reduces labor and overhead costs; identification of critical factors driving decisions toward cellular manufacturing; a method for identifying process improvement areas using cellular manufacturing; a method for customizing the size of cells for a specific site; a simulation for making a part using cellular manufacturing technology; and a glossary of terms and concepts.

  7. Rice tissue-specific promoters and condition-dependent promoters for effective translational application.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hee-Jeong; Jung, Ki-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the most important staple food crops for more than half of the world's population. The demand is increasing for food security because of population growth and environmental challenges triggered by climate changes. This scenario has led to more interest in developing crops with greater productivity and sustainability. The process of genetic transformation, a major tool for crop improvement, utilizes promoters as one of its key elements. Those promoters are generally divided into three types: constitutive, spatiotemporal, and condition-dependent. Transcriptional control of a constitutive promoter often leads to reduced plant growth, due to a negative effect of accumulated molecules during cellular functions or energy consumption. To maximize the effect of a transgene on transgenic plants, it is better to use condition-dependent or tissue-specific promoters. However, until now, those types have not been as widely applied in crop biotechnology. In this review, we introduce and discuss four groups of tissue-specific promoters (50 promoters in total) and six groups of condition-dependent promoters (27 promoters). These promoters can be utilized to fine-tune desirable agronomic traits and develop crops with tolerance to various stresses, enhanced nutritional value, and advanced productivity. PMID:25882130

  8. Genome-wide analysis of alternative promoters of human genes using a custom promoter tiling array

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Gregory AC; Wu, Jiejun; Yan, Pearlly; Plass, Christoph; Huang, Tim HM; Davuluri, Ramana V

    2008-01-01

    Background Independent lines of evidence suggested that a large fraction of human genes possess multiple promoters driving gene expression from distinct transcription start sites. Understanding which promoter is employed in which cellular context is required to unravel gene regulatory networks within the cell. Results We have developed a custom microarray platform that tiles roughly 35,000 alternative putative promoters from nearly 7,000 genes in the human genome. To demonstrate the utility of this array platform, we have analyzed the patterns of promoter usage in 17β-estradiol (E2)-treated and untreated MCF7 cells and show widespread usage of alternative promoters. Most intriguingly, we show that the downstream promoter in E2-sensitive multiple promoter genes tends to be very close to the 3'-terminus of the gene, suggesting exotic mechanisms of expression regulation in these genes. Conclusion The usage of alternative promoters greatly multiplies the transcriptional complexity available within the human genome. The fact that many of these promoters are incapable of driving the synthesis of a meaningful protein-encoding transcript further complicates the story. PMID:18655706

  9. Association of MMP7 -181A→G Promoter Polymorphism with Gastric Cancer Risk: INFLUENCE OF NICOTINE IN DIFFERENTIAL ALLELE-SPECIFIC TRANSCRIPTION VIA INCREASED PHOSPHORYLATION OF cAMP-RESPONSE ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN (CREB).

    PubMed

    Kesh, Kousik; Subramanian, Lakshmi; Ghosh, Nillu; Gupta, Vinayak; Gupta, Arnab; Bhattacharya, Samir; Mahapatra, Nitish R; Swarnakar, Snehasikta

    2015-06-01

    Elevated expression of matrix metalloproteinase7 (MMP7) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in cancer invasion. The -181A→G (rs11568818) polymorphism in the MMP7 promoter modulates gene expression and possibly affects cancer progression. Here, we evaluated the impact of -181A→G polymorphism on MMP7 promoter activity and its association with gastric cancer risk in eastern Indian case-control cohorts (n = 520). The GG genotype as compared with the AA genotype was predisposed (p = 0.02; odds ratio = 1.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.1-3.3) to gastric cancer risk. Stratification analysis showed that tobacco addiction enhanced gastric cancer risk in GG subjects when compared with AA subjects (p = 0.03, odds ratio = 2.46, and 95% confidence interval = 1.07-5.68). Meta-analysis revealed that tobacco enhanced the risk for cancer more markedly in AG and GG carriers. Activity and expression of MMP7 were significantly higher in GG than in AA carriers. In support, MMP7 promoter-reporter assays showed greater transcriptional activity toward A to G transition under basal/nicotine-induced/cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) overexpressed conditions in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Moreover, nicotine (a major component of tobacco) treatment significantly up-regulated MMP7 expression due to enhanced CREB phosphorylation followed by its nuclear translocation in gastric adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments revealed higher binding of phosphorylated CREB with the -181G than the -181A allele. Altogether, specific binding of phosphorylated CREB to the G allele-carrying promoter enhances MMP7 gene expression that is further augmented by nicotine due to increased CREB phosphorylation and thereby increases the risk for gastric cancer.

  10. The mammary cellular hierarchy and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakes, Samantha R; Gallego-Ortega, David; Ormandy, Christopher J

    2014-11-01

    Advances in the study of hematopoietic cell maturation have paved the way to a deeper understanding the stem and progenitor cellular hierarchy in the mammary gland. The mammary epithelium, unlike the hematopoietic cellular hierarchy, sits in a complex niche where communication between epithelial cells and signals from the systemic hormonal milieu, as well as from extra-cellular matrix, influence cell fate decisions and contribute to tissue homeostasis. We review the discovery, definition and regulation of the mammary cellular hierarchy and we describe the development of the concepts that have guided our investigations. We outline recent advances in in vivo lineage tracing that is now challenging many of our assumptions regarding the behavior of mammary stem cells, and we show how understanding these cellular lineages has altered our view of breast cancer.

  11. The cellular story of dishevelleds

    PubMed Central

    Kafka, Anja; Bašić-Kinda, Sandra; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-01-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) proteins, three of which have been identified in humans, are highly conserved components of canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. These multifunctional proteins, originally discovered in the fruit fly, through their different domains mediate complex signal transduction: DIX (dishevelled, axin) and PDZ (postsynaptic density 95, discs large, zonula occludens-1) domains serve for canonical beta-catenin signaling, while PDZ and DEP (dishevelled, Egl-10, pleckstrin) domains serve for non-canonical signaling. In canonical or beta-catenin signaling, DVL forms large molecular supercomplexes at the plasma membrane consisting of Wnt-Fz-LRP5/6-DVL-AXIN. This promotes the disassembly of the beta-catenin destruction machinery, beta-catenin accumulation, and consequent activation of Wnt signaling. Therefore, DVLs are considered to be key regulators that rescue cytoplasmic beta-catenin from degradation. The potential medical importance of DVLs is in both human degenerative disease and cancer. The overexpression of DVL has been shown to potentiate the activation of Wnt signaling and it is now apparent that up-regulation of DVLs is involved in several types of cancer. PMID:25358879

  12. The cellular story of dishevelleds.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Anja; Bašić-Kinda, Sandra; Pećina-Šlaus, Nives

    2014-10-01

    Dishevelled (DVL) proteins, three of which have been identified in humans, are highly conserved components of canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. These multifunctional proteins, originally discovered in the fruit fly, through their different domains mediate complex signal transduction: DIX (dishevelled, axin) and PDZ (postsynaptic density 95, discs large, zonula occludens-1) domains serve for canonical beta-catenin signaling, while PDZ and DEP (dishevelled, Egl-10, pleckstrin) domains serve for non-canonical signaling. In canonical or beta-catenin signaling, DVL forms large molecular supercomplexes at the plasma membrane consisting of Wnt-Fz-LRP5/6-DVL-AXIN. This promotes the disassembly of the beta-catenin destruction machinery, beta-catenin accumulation, and consequent activation of Wnt signaling. Therefore, DVLs are considered to be key regulators that rescue cytoplasmic beta-catenin from degradation. The potential medical importance of DVLs is in both human degenerative disease and cancer. The overexpression of DVL has been shown to potentiate the activation of Wnt signaling and it is now apparent that up-regulation of DVLs is involved in several types of cancer.

  13. High-throughput functional comparison of promoter and enhancer activities.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thomas A; Jones, Richard D; Snavely, Andrew R; Pfenning, Andreas R; Kirchner, Rory; Hemberg, Martin; Gray, Jesse M

    2016-08-01

    Promoters initiate RNA synthesis, and enhancers stimulate promoter activity. Whether promoter and enhancer activities are encoded distinctly in DNA sequences is unknown. We measured the enhancer and promoter activities of thousands of DNA fragments transduced into mouse neurons. We focused on genomic loci bound by the neuronal activity-regulated coactivator CREBBP, and we measured enhancer and promoter activities both before and after neuronal activation. We find that the same sequences typically encode both enhancer and promoter activities. However, gene promoters generate more promoter activity than distal enhancers, despite generating similar enhancer activity. Surprisingly, the greater promoter activity of gene promoters is not due to conventional core promoter elements or splicing signals. Instead, we find that particular transcription factor binding motifs are intrinsically biased toward the generation of promoter activity, whereas others are not. Although the specific biases we observe may be dependent on experimental or cellular context, our results suggest that gene promoters are distinguished from distal enhancers by specific complements of transcriptional activators. PMID:27311442

  14. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  15. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  16. Substrate stiffness regulates cellular uptake of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Changjin; Butler, Peter J; Tong, Sheng; Muddana, Hari S; Bao, Gang; Zhang, Sulin

    2013-04-10

    Nanoparticle (NP)-bioconjugates hold great promise for more sensitive disease diagnosis and more effective anticancer drug delivery compared with existing approaches. A critical aspect in both applications is cellular internalization of NPs, which is influenced by NP properties and cell surface mechanics. Despite considerable progress in optimization of the NP-bioconjugates for improved targeting, the role of substrate stiffness on cellular uptake has not been investigated. Using polyacrylamide (PA) hydrogels as model substrates with tunable stiffness, we quantified the relationship between substrate stiffness and cellular uptake of fluorescent NPs by bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs). We found that a stiffer substrate results in a higher total cellular uptake on a per cell basis, but a lower uptake per unit membrane area. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of the cellular uptake behavior, we developed a thermodynamic model that predicts that membrane spreading area and cell membrane tension are two key factors controlling cellular uptake of NPs, both of which are modulated by substrate stiffness. Our experimental and modeling results not only open up new avenues for engineering NP-based cancer cell targets for more effective in vivo delivery but also contribute an example of how the physical environment dictates cellular behavior and function.

  17. Integrating mitochondrial translation into the cellular context.

    PubMed

    Richter-Dennerlein, Ricarda; Dennerlein, Sven; Rehling, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation system assemble with nuclear-encoded subunits into enzymatic complexes. Recent findings showed that mitochondrial translation is linked to other mitochondrial functions, as well as to cellular processes. The supply of mitochondrial-encoded proteins is coordinated by the coupling of mitochondrial protein synthesis with assembly of respiratory chain complexes. MicroRNAs imported from the cytoplasm into mitochondria were, surprisingly, found to act as regulators of mitochondrial translation. In turn, translation in mitochondria controls cellular proliferation, and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits contribute to the cytoplasmic stress response. Thus, translation in mitochondria is apparently integrated into cellular processes. PMID:26535422

  18. Cellular solidification in a monotectic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaukler, W. F.; Curreri, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Succinonitrile-glycerol, SN-G, transparent organic monotectic alloy is studied with particular attention to cellular growth. The phase diagram is determined, near the monotectic composition, with greater accuracy than previous studies. A solidification interface stability diagram is determined for planar growth. The planar-to-cellular transition is compared to predictions from the Burton, Primm, Schlichter theory. A new technique to determine the solute segregation by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is developed. Proposed models that involve the cellular interface for alignment of monotectic second-phase spheres or rods are compared with observations.

  19. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon–associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  20. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  1. Cellular neoplastic transformation induced by 916 MHz microwave radiation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Hao, Dongmei; Wang, Minglian; Zeng, Yi; Wu, Shuicai; Zeng, Yanjun

    2012-08-01

    There has been growing concern about the possibility of adverse health effects resulting from exposure to microwave radiations, such as those emitted by mobile phones. The purpose of this study was to investigate the cellular neoplastic transformation effects of electromagnetic fields. 916 MHz continuous microwave was employed in our study to simulate the electromagnetic radiation of mobile phone. NIH/3T3 cells were adopted in our experiment due to their sensitivity to carcinogen or cancer promoter in environment. They were divided randomly into one control group and three microwave groups. The three microwave groups were exposed to 916 MHz EMF for 2 h per day with power density of 10, 50, and 90 w/m(2), respectively, in which 10 w/m(2) was close to intensity near the antenna of mobile phone. The morphology and proliferation of NIH/3T3 cells were examined and furthermore soft agar culture and animal carcinogenesis assay were carried out to determine the neoplastic promotion. Our experiments showed NIH/3T3 cells changed in morphology and proliferation after 5-8 weeks exposure and formed clone in soft agar culture after another 3-4 weeks depending on the exposure intensity. In the animal carcinogenesis study, lumps developed on the back of SCID mice after being inoculated into exposed NIH/3T3 cells for more than 4 weeks. The results indicate that microwave radiation can promote neoplastic transformation of NIH/3T3cells.

  2. Eliminating hepatitis B by antagonizing cellular inhibitors of apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Gregor; Allison, Cody; Preston, Simon; Cooney, James; Toe, Jesse G.; Stutz, Michael D.; Ojaimi, Samar; Baschuk, Nikola; Nachbur, Ueli; Torresi, Joseph; Silke, John; Begley, C. Glenn; Pellegrini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    We have shown that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) impair clearance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection by preventing TNF-mediated killing/death of infected cells. A key question, with profound therapeutic implications, is whether this finding can be translated to the development of drugs that promote elimination of infected cells. Drug inhibitors of cIAPs were developed as cancer therapeutics to promote TNF-mediated tumor killing. These drugs are also known as Smac mimetics, because they mimic the action of the endogenous protein Smac/Diablo that antagonizes cIAP function. Here, we show using an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection that birinapant and other Smac mimetics are able to rapidly reduce serum HBV DNA and serum HBV surface antigen, and they promote the elimination of hepatocytes containing HBV core antigen. The efficacy of Smac mimetics in treating HBV infection is dependent on their chemistry, host CD4+ T cells, and TNF. Birinapant enhances the ability of entecavir, an antiviral nucleoside analog, to reduce viral DNA production in HBV-infected animals. These results indicate that birinapant and other Smac mimetics may have efficacy in treating HBV infection and perhaps, other intracellular infections. PMID:25902530

  3. Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160862.html Cellular Defect May Be Linked to Parkinson's: Study Abnormality might apply to all forms of ... that may be common to all forms of Parkinson's disease. The defect plays a major role in ...

  4. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  5. The Roles of Cellular Nanomechanics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yallapu, Murali M.; Katti, Kalpana S.; Katti, Dinesh R.; Mishra, Sanjay R.; Khan, Sheema; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2014-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of cells and tissues may be instrumental in increasing our understanding of cellular behavior and cellular manifestations of diseases such as cancer. Nanomechanical properties can offer clinical translation of therapies beyond what are currently employed. Nanomechanical properties, often measured by nanoindentation methods using atomic force microscopy, may identify morphological variations, cellular binding forces, and surface adhesion behaviors that efficiently differentiate normal cells and cancer cells. The aim of this review is to examine current research involving the general use of atomic force microscopy/nanoindentation in measuring cellular nanomechanics; various factors and instrumental conditions that influence the nanomechanical properties of cells; and implementation of nanoindentation methods to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells or tissues. Applying these fundamental nanomechanical properties to current discoveries in clinical treatment may result in greater efficiency in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, which ultimately can change the lives of patients. PMID:25137233

  6. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... limitations. The licensee of each cellular system is responsible for ensuring that its cellular system operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile service... cellular services, each cellular system may incorporate any technology that meets all applicable...

  7. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... limitations. The licensee of each cellular system is responsible for ensuring that its cellular system operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile service... cellular services, each cellular system may incorporate any technology that meets all applicable...

  8. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... limitations. The licensee of each cellular system is responsible for ensuring that its cellular system operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile service... cellular services, each cellular system may incorporate any technology that meets all applicable...

  9. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... limitations. The licensee of each cellular system is responsible for ensuring that its cellular system operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile service... cellular services, each cellular system may incorporate any technology that meets all applicable...

  10. Cellular automata to describe seismicity: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Abigail

    2013-12-01

    Cellular Automata have been used in the literature to describe seismicity. We first historically introduce Cellular Automata and provide some important definitions. Then we proceed to review the most important models, most of them being variations of the spring-block model proposed by Burridge and Knopoff, and describe the most important results obtained from them. We discuss the relation with criticality and also describe some models that try to reproduce real data.

  11. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-12-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  12. Cellular signalling: the role of the peroxisome.

    PubMed

    Masters, C J

    1996-03-01

    This article reviews the role of the peroxisome in cellular signalling, with particular emphasis on the unique contributions of this organelle to the complex regulatory inter-relationships of cellular processes within the mammalian organism. Among the topics covered are the close alignments between the signalling systems governing peroxisome proliferation and those of the steroid hormone/thyroid hormone/vitamin D nuclear-receptor superfamily; the regulation of the permeability of the peroxisomal membrane; the involvements of lysophosphatidic acid as an intra- and inter-cellular messenger; the special role of the phosphatidylcholine cycle and its derivative messengers in relation to peroxisomal metabolism; peroxisomal contributions to the regulation of oxygen free radical levels in tissues and the significance of these radicals as second messengers; the evidence of peroxisomal influences on inter-cellular signalling from metabolic turnover studies; modifications of the regulatory significance of fatty acids by the peroxisome; the commonalities in metabolic relationships between the peroxisome and other cellular organelles; and regulatory shuttles associated with peroxisomal function. It is concluded that the peroxisome displays several significant interconnections with the cellular-signalling apparatus, that it is capable of imprinting a characteristic influence on the regulatory network in the cell, and that the contributions of this organelle deserve greater consideration in future investigations of cell-signalling phenomena.

  13. Cellular reprogramming and hepatocellular carcinoma development

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yun-Wen; Nie, Yun-Zhong; Taniguchi, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and is also the leading cause of death worldwide. Studies have shown that cellular reprogramming contributes to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy resistance and the recurrence of cancers. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest findings in the area of cellular reprogramming in HCC. The aberrant expression of transcription factors OCT4, KLF4, SOX2, c-MYC, NANOG, and LIN28 have been also observed, and the expression of these transcription factors is associated with unfavorable clinical outcomes in HCC. Studies indicate that cellular reprogramming may play a critical role in the occurrence and recurrence of HCC. Recent reports have shown that DNA methylation, miRNAs, tumor microenvironment, and signaling pathways can induce the expression of stemness transcription factors, which leads to cellular reprogramming in HCC. Furthermore, studies indicate that therapies based on cellular reprogramming could revolutionize HCC treatment. Finally, a novel therapeutic concept is discussed: reprogramming control therapy. A potential reprogramming control therapy method could be developed based on the reprogramming demonstrated in HCC studies and applied at two opposing levels: differentiation and reprogramming. Our increasing understanding and control of cellular programming should facilitate the exploitation of this novel therapeutic concept and its application in clinical HCC treatment, which may represent a promising strategy in the future that is not restricted to liver cancer. PMID:24379607

  14. Recent Advances in Cellular Glycomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Fujitani, Naoki; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-01-01

    A large variety of glycans is intricately located on the cell surface, and the overall profile (the glycome, given the entire repertoire of glycoconjugate-associated sugars in cells and tissues) is believed to be crucial for the diverse roles of glycans, which are mediated by specific interactions that control cell-cell adhesion, immune response, microbial pathogenesis and other cellular events. The glycomic profile also reflects cellular alterations, such as development, differentiation and cancerous change. A glycoconjugate-based approach would therefore be expected to streamline discovery of novel cellular biomarkers. Development of such an approach has proven challenging, due to the technical difficulties associated with the analysis of various types of cellular glycomes; however, recent progress in the development of analytical methodologies and strategies has begun to clarify the cellular glycomics of various classes of glycoconjugates. This review focuses on recent advances in the technical aspects of cellular glycomic analyses of major classes of glycoconjugates, including N- and O-linked glycans, derived from glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycosphingolipids. Articles that unveil the glycomics of various biologically important cells, including embryonic and somatic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells and cancer cells, are discussed. PMID:24970165

  15. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Tourret, D; Debierre, J-M; Song, Y; Mota, F L; Bergeon, N; Guérin, R; Trivedi, R; Billia, B; Karma, A

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  16. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is

  17. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    DOE PAGES

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J. -M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guerin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-09-11

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in micro-gravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed for the first time to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 minutes. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelatedmore » at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (\\ie low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exist, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global

  18. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tourret, D.; Debierre, J.-M.; Song, Y.; Mota, F. L.; Bergeon, N.; Guérin, R.; Trivedi, R.; Billia, B.; Karma, A.

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  19. Oscillatory cellular patterns in three-dimensional directional solidification.

    PubMed

    Tourret, D; Debierre, J-M; Song, Y; Mota, F L; Bergeon, N; Guérin, R; Trivedi, R; Billia, B; Karma, A

    2015-10-01

    We present a phase-field study of oscillatory breathing modes observed during the solidification of three-dimensional cellular arrays in microgravity. Directional solidification experiments conducted onboard the International Space Station have allowed us to observe spatially extended homogeneous arrays of cells and dendrites while minimizing the amount of gravity-induced convection in the liquid. In situ observations of transparent alloys have revealed the existence, over a narrow range of control parameters, of oscillations in cellular arrays with a period ranging from about 25 to 125 min. Cellular patterns are spatially disordered, and the oscillations of individual cells are spatiotemporally uncorrelated at long distance. However, in regions displaying short-range spatial ordering, groups of cells can synchronize into oscillatory breathing modes. Quantitative phase-field simulations show that the oscillatory behavior of cells in this regime is linked to a stability limit of the spacing in hexagonal cellular array structures. For relatively high cellular front undercooling (i.e., low growth velocity or high thermal gradient), a gap appears in the otherwise continuous range of stable array spacings. Close to this gap, a sustained oscillatory regime appears with a period that compares quantitatively well with experiment. For control parameters where this gap exists, oscillations typically occur for spacings at the edge of the gap. However, after a change of growth conditions, oscillations can also occur for nearby values of control parameters where this gap just closes and a continuous range of spacings exists. In addition, sustained oscillations at to the opening of this stable gap exhibit a slow periodic modulation of the phase-shift among cells with a slower period of several hours. While long-range coherence of breathing modes can be achieved in simulations for a perfect spatial arrangement of cells as initial condition, global disorder is observed in both

  20. Developing a Promotional Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  1. Tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis: tumor/endothelial crosstalk and cellular/microenvironmental signaling mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Fausto Gueths; Nedel, Fernanda; Alves, Alessandro Menna; Nör, Jacques Eduardo; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves

    2013-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis are key features of tumor progression and metastasis. The role of tumor cells-derived factors in the promotion of associated angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis is much studied and, no doubt, very important for the understanding of cancer progression. This review aims to present and discuss the work done on the pro-angiogenic and lymphangiogenic cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment and the signaling pathways that regulate this cross talk. Such multifactor studies are critical for the development of future therapeutic approaches for cancer because they take into account the complexities of cellular interactions within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:23178150

  2. CANCELLED EMT and back again: does cellular plasticity fuelneoplasticprogressi on?

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, Eva A.; Veiseh, Mandana; Radisky, Derek C.; Bissell, MinaJ.

    2007-02-24

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a cellular transdifferentiation program that facilitates organ morphogenesis and tissue remodeling in physiological processes such as embryonic development and wound healing. However, a similar phenotypic conversion is also detected in fibrotic diseases and neoplasia, in which it is associated with disease progression. EMT in cancer epithelial cells often appears to be an incomplete and bi-directional process. Here we discuss the phenomenon of EMT as it pertains to tumor development, focusing on exceptions to the commonly held rule that EMT promotes invasion and metastasis. We also highlight the role of the Ras-controlled signaling mediators, ERK1, ERK2 and PI3-kinase, as microenvironmental responsive regulators of EMT.

  3. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  4. Neural and Cellular Mechanisms of Fear and Extinction Memory Formation

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Caitlin A.; Maren, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Over the course of natural history, countless animal species have evolved adaptive behavioral systems to cope with dangerous situations and promote survival. Emotional memories are central to these defense systems because they are rapidly acquired and prepare organisms for future threat. Unfortunately, the persistence and intrusion of memories of fearful experiences are quite common and can lead to pathogenic conditions, such as anxiety and phobias. Over the course of the last thirty years, neuroscientists and psychologists alike have attempted to understand the mechanisms by which the brain encodes and maintains these aversive memories. Of equal interest, though, is the neurobiology of extinction memory formation as this may shape current therapeutic techniques. Here we review the extant literature on the neurobiology of fear and extinction memory formation, with a strong focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these processes. PMID:22230704

  5. Cellular response to titanium discs coated with polyelectrolyte multilayer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Jing; Luo, Qiao-jie; Huang, Ying; Li, Xiao-dong

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) coatings on the biological behavior of titanium (Ti) substrates. Collagen type Ι/hyaluronic acid (Col/HA) and chitosan/hyaluronic acid (Chi/HA) multilayer PEM coatings were introduced onto Ti substrates using layer-by-layer assembly. Contact angle instruments and quartz crystal microbalance were used for film characterization. The results obtained showed that both Col/HA and Chi/HA surfaces had high hydrophilicity and promoted cell adhesion in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast and human gingival fibroblast cells. In addition, the synthesis of function-related proteins and gene expression levels in both MC3T3-E1 and fibroblast cells was higher for the Col/HA coating compared with the Chi/HA coating, indicating better cellular response to the Col/HA coating.

  6. Cellular Automata Generalized To An Inferential System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blower, David J.

    2007-11-01

    Stephen Wolfram popularized elementary one-dimensional cellular automata in his book, A New Kind of Science. Among many remarkable things, he proved that one of these cellular automata was a Universal Turing Machine. Such cellular automata can be interpreted in a different way by viewing them within the context of the formal manipulation rules from probability theory. Bayes's Theorem is the most famous of such formal rules. As a prelude, we recapitulate Jaynes's presentation of how probability theory generalizes classical logic using modus ponens as the canonical example. We emphasize the important conceptual standing of Boolean Algebra for the formal rules of probability manipulation and give an alternative demonstration augmenting and complementing Jaynes's derivation. We show the complementary roles played in arguments of this kind by Bayes's Theorem and joint probability tables. A good explanation for all of this is afforded by the expansion of any particular logic function via the disjunctive normal form (DNF). The DNF expansion is a useful heuristic emphasized in this exposition because such expansions point out where relevant 0s should be placed in the joint probability tables for logic functions involving any number of variables. It then becomes a straightforward exercise to rely on Boolean Algebra, Bayes's Theorem, and joint probability tables in extrapolating to Wolfram's cellular automata. Cellular automata are seen as purely deductive systems, just like classical logic, which probability theory is then able to generalize. Thus, any uncertainties which we might like to introduce into the discussion about cellular automata are handled with ease via the familiar inferential path. Most importantly, the difficult problem of predicting what cellular automata will do in the far future is treated like any inferential prediction problem.

  7. Hemodynamic and cellular response feedback in calcific aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Gould, Sarah T; Srigunapalan, Suthan; Simmons, Craig A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-07-01

    This review highlights aspects of calcific aortic valve disease that encompass the entire range of aortic valve disease progression from initial cellular changes to aortic valve sclerosis and stenosis, which can be initiated by changes in blood flow (hemodynamics) and pressure across the aortic valve. Appropriate hemodynamics is important for normal valve function and maintenance, but pathological blood velocities and pressure can have profound consequences at the macroscopic to microscopic scales. At the macroscopic scale, hemodynamic forces impart shear stresses on the surface of the valve leaflets and cause deformation of the leaflet tissue. As discussed in this review, these macroscale forces are transduced to the microscale, where they influence the functions of the valvular endothelial cells that line the leaflet surface and the valvular interstitial cells that populate the valve extracellular matrix. For example, pathological changes in blood flow-induced shear stress can cause dysfunction, impairing their homeostatic functions, and pathological stretching of valve tissue caused by elevated transvalvular pressure can activate valvular interstitial cells and latent paracrine signaling cytokines (eg, transforming growth factor-β1) to promote maladaptive tissue remodeling. Collectively, these coordinated and complex interactions adversely impact bulk valve tissue properties, feeding back to further deteriorate valve function and propagate valve cell pathological responses. Here, we review the role of hemodynamic forces in calcific aortic valve disease initiation and progression, with focus on cellular responses and how they feed back to exacerbate aortic valve dysfunction.

  8. Antioxidant responses and cellular adjustments to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Diez, Cristina; Miguel, Verónica; Mennerich, Daniela; Kietzmann, Thomas; Sánchez-Pérez, Patricia; Cadenas, Susana; Lamas, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Redox biological reactions are now accepted to bear the Janus faceted feature of promoting both physiological signaling responses and pathophysiological cues. Endogenous antioxidant molecules participate in both scenarios. This review focuses on the role of crucial cellular nucleophiles, such as glutathione, and their capacity to interact with oxidants and to establish networks with other critical enzymes such as peroxiredoxins. We discuss the importance of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway as an example of a transcriptional antioxidant response and we summarize transcriptional routes related to redox activation. As examples of pathophysiological cellular and tissular settings where antioxidant responses are major players we highlight endoplasmic reticulum stress and ischemia reperfusion. Topologically confined redox-mediated post-translational modifications of thiols are considered important molecular mechanisms mediating many antioxidant responses, whereas redox-sensitive microRNAs have emerged as key players in the posttranscriptional regulation of redox-mediated gene expression. Understanding such mechanisms may provide the basis for antioxidant-based therapeutic interventions in redox-related diseases. PMID:26233704

  9. mTOR Regulates Cellular Iron Homeostasis through Tristetraprolin

    PubMed Central

    Bayeva, Marina; Khechaduri, Arineh; Puig, Sergi; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Patial, Sonika; Blackshear, Perry J.; Ardehali, Hossein

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron is an essential cofactor with unique redox properties. Iron regulatory proteins 1 and 2 (IRP1/2) have been established as important regulators of cellular iron homeostasis, but little is known about the role of other pathways in this process. Here we report that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates iron homeostasis by modulating transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) stability and altering cellular iron flux. Mechanistic studies identify tristetraprolin (TTP), a protein involved in anti-inflammatory response, as the downstream target of mTOR that binds to and enhances degradation of TfR1 mRNA. We also show that TTP is strongly induced by iron chelation, promotes downregulation of iron-requiring genes in both mammalian and yeast cells, and modulates survival in low-iron states. Taken together, our data uncover a link between metabolic, inflammatory, and iron regulatory pathways, and point towards the existence of a yeast-like TTP-mediated iron conservation program in mammals. PMID:23102618

  10. Integration of cellular bioenergetics with mitochondrial quality control and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Lancaster, Jack R.; Ballinger, Scott; Dell’Italia, Lou; Zhang, Jianhua; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    Bioenergetic dysfunction is emerging as a cornerstone for establishing a framework for understanding the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Recent advances in cellular bioenergetics have shown that many cells maintain a substantial bioenergetic reserve capacity, which is a prospective index of “healthy” mitochondrial populations. The bioenergetics of the cell are likely regulated by energy requirements and substrate availability. Additionally, the overall quality of the mitochondrial population and the relative abundance of mitochondria in cells and tissues also impinge on overall bioenergetic capacity and resistance to stress. Because mitochondria are susceptible to damage mediated by reactive oxygen/nitrogen and lipid species, maintaining a “healthy” population of mitochondria through quality control mechanisms appears to be essential for cell survival under conditions of pathological stress. Accumulating evidence suggest that mitophagy is particularly important for preventing amplification of initial oxidative insults, which otherwise would further impair the respiratory chain or promote mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The processes underlying the regulation of mitophagy depend on several factors including the integrity of mtDNA, electron transport chain activity, and the interaction and regulation of the autophagic machinery. The integration and interpretation of cellular bioenergetics in the context of mitochondrial quality control and genetics is the theme of this review. PMID:23092819

  11. Design of a bistable switch to control cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Chaves, Madalena

    2015-12-01

    Bistable switches are widely used in synthetic biology to trigger cellular functions in response to environmental signals. All bistable switches developed so far, however, control the expression of target genes without access to other layers of the cellular machinery. Here, we propose a bistable switch to control the rate at which cells take up a metabolite from the environment. An uptake switch provides a new interface to command metabolic activity from the extracellular space and has great potential as a building block in more complex circuits that coordinate pathway activity across cell cultures, allocate metabolic tasks among different strains or require cell-to-cell communication with metabolic signals. Inspired by uptake systems found in nature, we propose to couple metabolite import and utilization with a genetic circuit under feedback regulation. Using mathematical models and analysis, we determined the circuit architectures that produce bistability and obtained their design space for bistability in terms of experimentally tuneable parameters. We found an activation-repression architecture to be the most robust switch because it displays bistability for the largest range of design parameters and requires little fine-tuning of the promoters' response curves. Our analytic results are based on on-off approximations of promoter activity and are in excellent qualitative agreement with simulations of more realistic models. With further analysis and simulation, we established conditions to maximize the parameter design space and to produce bimodal phenotypes via hysteresis and cell-to-cell variability. Our results highlight how mathematical analysis can drive the discovery of new circuits for synthetic biology, as the proposed circuit has all the hallmarks of a toggle switch and stands as a promising design to control metabolic phenotypes across cell cultures. PMID:26674196

  12. Modulation of cellular responses on engineered polyurethane implants.

    PubMed

    Khandwekar, Anand; Rho, Cho K

    2012-09-01

    An in vivo rat cage implant system was used to study the effect of polyurethane surface chemistries on protein adsorption, macrophage adhesion, foreign-body giant cell formation (FBGCs), cellular apoptosis, and cytokine response. Polyurethanes with zwitterionic, anionic, and cationic chemistries were developed. The changes in the surface topography of the materials were determined using atomic force microscopy and the wettability by dynamic contact angle measurements. The in vitro protein adsorption studies revealed higher protein adsorption on cationic surfaces when compared with the base, while adsorption was significantly reduced on zwitterionic (**p < 0.01) and anionic (*p < 0.05) polyurethanes. Analysis of the exudates surrounding the materials revealed no differences between surfaces in the types or levels of cells present. Conversely, the proportion of adherent cells undergoing apoptosis, as determined by annexin V-FITC staining, increased significantly on anionic followed by zwitterionic surfaces (60 + 5.0 and 38 + 3.7%) when compared with the base. Additionally, zwitterionic and anionic substrates provided decreased rates of macrophage adhesion and fusion into FBGCs, whereas cationic surfaces promoted macrophage adhesion and FBGC formation. Visualization of the F-actin cytoskeleton by Alexa Fluor 488 phalloidin showed a significant delay in the cytoskeletal fusion response on zwitterionic and the anionic surfaces. The real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-10) and pro-wound healing cytokines (IL-4 and TGF-β) revealed differential cytokine responses. Cationic substrates that triggered stimulation of TNF-α and IL-4 were associated with more spread cells and higher FBGCs, whereas zwitterionic and anionic substrates that suppressed these cytokines levels were associated with less spread cells and few FBGCs. These studies have revealed that zwitterionic and anionic

  13. Characterizing heterogeneous cellular responses to perturbations.

    PubMed

    Slack, Michael D; Martinez, Elisabeth D; Wu, Lani F; Altschuler, Steven J

    2008-12-01

    Cellular populations have been widely observed to respond heterogeneously to perturbation. However, interpreting the observed heterogeneity is an extremely challenging problem because of the complexity of possible cellular phenotypes, the large dimension of potential perturbations, and the lack of methods for separating meaningful biological information from noise. Here, we develop an image-based approach to characterize cellular phenotypes based on patterns of signaling marker colocalization. Heterogeneous cellular populations are characterized as mixtures of phenotypically distinct subpopulations, and responses to perturbations are summarized succinctly as probabilistic redistributions of these mixtures. We apply our method to characterize the heterogeneous responses of cancer cells to a panel of drugs. We find that cells treated with drugs of (dis-)similar mechanism exhibit (dis-)similar patterns of heterogeneity. Despite the observed phenotypic diversity of cells observed within our data, low-complexity models of heterogeneity were sufficient to distinguish most classes of drug mechanism. Our approach offers a computational framework for assessing the complexity of cellular heterogeneity, investigating the degree to which perturbations induce redistributions of a limited, but nontrivial, repertoire of underlying states and revealing functional significance contained within distinct patterns of heterogeneous responses.

  14. Driving mechanisms of passive and active transport across cellular membranes as the mechanisms of cell metabolism and development as well as the mechanisms of cellular distance reactions on hormonal expression and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Ponisovskiy, M R

    2011-01-01

    The article presents mechanisms of cell metabolism, cell development, cell activity, and maintenance of cellular stability. The literature is reviewed from the point of view of these concepts. The balance between anabolic and catabolic processes induces chemical potentials in the extracellular and intracellular media. The chemical potentials of these media are defined as the driving forces of both passive and active transport of substances across cellular membranes. The driving forces of substance transport across cellular membranes as in cellular metabolism and in immune responses and hormonal expressions are considered in the biochemical and biophysical models, reflecting the mechanisms for maintenance of stability of the internal medium and internal energy of an organism. The interactions of passive transport and active transport of substances across cellular walls promote cell proliferation, as well as the mechanism of cellular capacitors, promoting remote reactions across distance for hormonal expression and immune responses. The offered concept of cellular capacitors has given the possibility to explain the mechanism of remote responses of cells to new situations, resulting in the appearance of additional agents. The biophysical model develops an explanation of some cellular functions: cellular membrane action have been identified with capacitor action, based on the similarity of the structures and as well as on similarity of biophysical properties of electric data that confirm the action of the compound-specific interactions of cells within an organism, promoting hormonal expressions and immune responses to stabilize the thermodynamic system of an organism. Comparison of a cellular membrane action to a capacitor has given the possibility for the explanations of exocytosis and endocytosis mechanisms, internalization of the receptor-ligand complex, selection as a receptor reaction to a ligand by immune responses or hormonal effects, reflecting cellular

  15. [Cellular immunity in protein-caloric malnutrition].

    PubMed

    Khadraoui, S; Lopez, V; Hamza, B; Smith, N J

    1977-02-01

    In order to have a clearer idea on the relationship between infectious diseases and malnutrition, cellular immunity is studied in 3 to 18 months old malnourished and healthy infants. Nutritional status is evaluated by the food intake the anthropologic measurements and some biological parameters like transferrin. Cellular immunity is investigated by skin tests to tuberculin, monilia, P.H.A. and DNCB. Absolute number of peripheral lymphocytes and percentage of T cells are studied too. The results show that there is a cellular immunity deficiency: frequent non-response to antigens, weak sensitization to DNCB. Some patients have a low percentage of spontaneous rosettes. The transferrin titering is useful to appreciate the nutritional status and the iron therapy opportunity, the prognostic and the immunitary possibilities.

  16. Crack propagation in bamboo's hierarchical cellular structure.

    PubMed

    Habibi, Meisam K; Lu, Yang

    2014-07-07

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well.

  17. Pelvic Retroperitoneal Cellular Leiomyoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tantitamit, Tanitra; Hamontri, Suttha; Rangsiratanakul, Likit; Suksamarnwong, Maysita

    2015-10-01

    Leiomyomas are common benign gynecological tumors and usually arise in the uterus. The retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, one of the unusual manifestations, is a rare tumor. Diagnosis and treatment are challenges. We report a case of 65-year-old women presented with an asymptomatic mass beneath the right posterior vaginal mucosa. CT imaging revealed heterogeneous mass 6 cm in the pelvic cavity abutted lower segment of uterus, cervix, and vagina. The provisional diagnosis was subserosal cervical leiomyoma. She underwent exploratory laparotomy. Intra-operative, a normal size uterus was found separately from retroperitoneal pelvic mass at the level of internal os. Histological report confirmed cellular leiomyoma later Total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingoophorectomy and completely excision of tumor were achieved with good outcome. Our patient represents the rare case of retroperitoneal cellular leiomyoma, which is hardly identified from internal examination and preoperative imaging. Surgical removal is essential for pathological diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26817226

  18. Parametric study of double cellular detonation structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasainov, B.; Virot, F.; Presles, H.-N.; Desbordes, D.

    2013-05-01

    A parametric numerical study is performed of a detonation cellular structure in a model gaseous explosive mixture whose decomposition occurs in two successive exothermic reaction steps with markedly different characteristic times. Kinetic and energetic parameters of both reactions are varied in a wide range in the case of one-dimensional steady and two-dimensional (2D) quasi-steady self-supported detonations. The range of governing parameters of both exothermic steps is defined where a "marked" double cellular structure exists. It is shown that the two-level cellular structure is completely governed by the kinetic parameters and the local overdrive ratio of the detonation front propagating inside large cells. Furthermore, since it is quite cumbersome to use detailed chemical kinetics in unsteady 2D case, the proposed work should help to identify the mixtures and the domain of their equivalence ratio where double detonation structure could be observed.

  19. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles inhibit cellular respiration.

    PubMed

    Tao, Zhimin; Morrow, Matthew P; Asefa, Tewodros; Sharma, Krishna K; Duncan, Cole; Anan, Abhishek; Penefsky, Harvey S; Goodisman, Jerry; Souid, Abdul-Kader

    2008-05-01

    We studied the effect of two types of mesoporous silica nanoparticles, MCM-41 and SBA-15, on mitochondrial O 2 consumption (respiration) in HL-60 (myeloid) cells, Jurkat (lymphoid) cells, and isolated mitochondria. SBA-15 inhibited cellular respiration at 25-500 microg/mL; the inhibition was concentration-dependent and time-dependent. The cellular ATP profile paralleled that of respiration. MCM-41 had no noticeable effect on respiration rate. In cells depleted of metabolic fuels, 50 microg/mL SBA-15 delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration by 12 min and 200 microg/mL SBA-15 by 34 min; MCM-41 also delayed the onset of glucose-supported respiration. Neither SBA-15 nor MCM-41 affected cellular glutathione. Both nanoparticles inhibited respiration of isolated mitochondria and submitochondrial particles.

  20. Infrared image enhancement using Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Han, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lian-fa

    2016-05-01

    Image enhancement is a crucial technique for infrared images. The clear image details are important for improving the quality of infrared images in computer vision. In this paper, we propose a new enhancement method based on two priors via Cellular Automata. First, we directly learn the gradient distribution prior from the images via Cellular Automata. Second, considering the importance of image details, we propose a new gradient distribution error to encode the structure information via Cellular Automata. Finally, an iterative method is applied to remap the original image based on two priors, further improving the quality of enhanced image. Our method is simple in implementation, easy to understand, extensible to accommodate other vision tasks, and produces more accurate results. Experiments show that the proposed method performs better than other methods using qualitative and quantitative measures.

  1. Coordination of autophagy with other cellular activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Qin, Zheng-hong

    2013-01-01

    The cell biological phenomenon of autophagy has attracted increasing attention in recent years, partly as a consequence of the discovery of key components of its cellular machinery. Autophagy plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular functions. Autophagy has its own regulatory mechanisms, but this process is not isolated. Autophagy is coordinated with other cellular activities to maintain cell homeostasis. Autophagy is critical for a range of human physiological processes. The multifunctional roles of autophagy are explained by its ability to interact with several key components of various cell pathways. In this review, we focus on the coordination between autophagy and other physiological processes, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), energy homeostasis, aging, programmed cell death, the immune responses, microbial invasion and inflammation. The insights gained from investigating autophagic networks should increase our understanding of their roles in human diseases and their potential as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23474706

  2. KDM5 Interacts with Foxo to Modulate Cellular Levels of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingyin; Greer, Christina; Secombe, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Increased cellular levels of oxidative stress are implicated in a large number of human diseases. Here we describe the transcription co-factor KDM5 (also known as Lid) as a new critical regulator of cellular redox state. Moreover, this occurs through a novel KDM5 activity whereby it alters the ability of the transcription factor Foxo to bind to DNA. Our microarray analyses of kdm5 mutants revealed a striking enrichment for genes required to regulate cellular levels of oxidative stress. Consistent with this, loss of kdm5 results in increased sensitivity to treatment with oxidizers, elevated levels of oxidized proteins, and increased mutation load. KDM5 activates oxidative stress resistance genes by interacting with Foxo to facilitate its recruitment to KDM5-Foxo co-regulated genes. Significantly, this occurs independently of KDM5's well-characterized demethylase activity. Instead, KDM5 interacts with the lysine deacetylase HDAC4 to promote Foxo deacetylation, which affects Foxo DNA binding. PMID:25329053

  3. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Leijnse, Hidde

    2016-04-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of microwave links in such a network. We present a rainfall retrieval algorithm, which is employed to obtain rainfall maps from microwave links in a cellular communication network. We compare these rainfall maps to gauge-adjusted radar rainfall maps. The microwave link data set, as well as the developed code, a package in the open source scripting language "R", are freely available at GitHub (https://github.com/overeem11/RAINLINK). The purpose of this presentation is to promote rainfall mapping utilizing microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  4. Odd-skipped related 2 is epigenetically regulated in cellular quiescence

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-06-11

    Cellular behavior and development are extensively altered during the transition from cell cycle into quiescence, though the mechanism involved in establishing and maintaining quiescence is largely unknown. We found that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) was up-regulated during cellular quiescence by serum starvation as well as culturing to confluence. To investigate the regulatory mechanism of Osr2 under these conditions, we characterized the mouse Osr2 promoter. CpG islands in the flanking region of the transcription start site were predominantly methylated in exponentially growing cells, resulting in silencing of Osr2 expression. In addition, CpG demethylation in quiescence caused activation of Osr2 expression, while acetylation of the H3 and H4 histones during quiescence also led to an increase in Osr2 expression. These results suggest that epigenetically regulated Osr2 plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation.

  5. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki . E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr

    2007-05-18

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

  6. Cellular Stress Response to Engineered Nanoparticles: Effect of Size, Surface Coating, and Cellular Uptake

    EPA Science Inventory

    CELLULAR STRESS RESPONSE TO ENGINEERED NANOPARTICLES: EFFECT OF SIZE, SURFACE COATING, AND CELLULAR UPTAKE RY Prasad 1, JK McGee2, MG Killius1 D Ackerman2, CF Blackman2 DM DeMarini2 , SO Simmons2 1 Student Services Contractor, US EPA, RTP, NC 2 US EPA, RTP, NC The num...

  7. Krüppel-like factor 4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral immune response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-Wei; Lian, Huan; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing; Li, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Viral infection triggers activation of the transcription factors NF-κB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce the expression of type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. In this report, we identified Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) as a negative regulator of virus-triggered signaling. Overexpression of KLF4 inhibited virus-induced activation of ISRE and IFN-β promoter in various types of cells, while knockdown of KLF4 potentiated viral infection-triggered induction of IFNB1 and downstream genes and attenuated viral replication. In addition, KLF4 was found to be localized in the cytosol and nucleus, and viral infection promoted the translocation of KLF4 from cytosol to nucleus. Upon virus infection, KLF4 was bound to the promoter of IFNB gene and inhibited the recruitment of IRF3 to the IFNB promoter. Our study thus suggests that KLF4 negatively regulates cellular antiviral response. PMID:25531393

  8. Remote Energy Monitoring System via Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunoki, Shoji; Tamaki, Satoshi; Takada, May; Iwaki, Takashi

    Recently, improvement on power saving and cost efficiency by monitoring the operation status of various facilities over the network has gained attention. Wireless network, especially cellular network, has advantage in mobility, coverage, and scalability. On the other hand, it has disadvantage of low reliability, due to rapid changes in the available bandwidth. We propose a transmission control scheme based on data priority and instantaneous available bandwidth to realize a highly reliable remote monitoring system via cellular network. We have developed our proposed monitoring system and evaluated the effectiveness of our scheme, and proved it reduces the maximum transmission delay of sensor status to 1/10 compared to best effort transmission.

  9. Annealed and quenched inhomogeneous cellular automata (INCA)

    SciTech Connect

    Vichniac, G.Y.; Tamayo, P.; Hartman, H.

    1986-12-01

    A probabilistic one-dimensional cellular automaton model by Domany and Kinzel is mapped into an inhomogeneous cellular automaton with the Boolean functions XOR an AND as transition rules. Wolfram's classification is recovered by varying the frequency of these two simple rules and by quenching or annealing the inhomogeneity. In particular, ''class 4'' is related to critical behavior in directed percolation. Also, the critical slowing down of second-order phase transitions is related to a stochastic version of the classical ''halting problem'' of computation theory.

  10. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  11. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  12. Cellular Automata Simulation for Wealth Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching

    2009-08-01

    Wealth distribution of a country is a complicate system. A model, which is based on the Epstein & Axtell's "Sugars cape" model, is presented in Netlogo. The model considers the income, age, working opportunity and salary as control variables. There are still other variables should be considered while an artificial society is established. In this study, a more complicate cellular automata model for wealth distribution model is proposed. The effects of social welfare, tax, economical investment and inheritance are considered and simulated. According to the cellular automata simulation for wealth distribution, we will have a deep insight of financial policy of the government.

  13. Toxicology and cellular effect of manufactured nanomaterials

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanqing

    2014-07-22

    The increasing use of nanotechnology in consumer products and medical applications underlies the importance of understanding its potential toxic effects to people and the environment. Herein are described methods and assays to predict and evaluate the cellular effects of nanomaterial exposure. Exposing cells to nanomaterials at cytotoxic doses induces cell cycle arrest and increases apoptosis/necrosis, activates genes involved in cellular transport, metabolism, cell cycle regulation, and stress response. Certain nanomaterials induce genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response within skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, the described multiwall carbon nanoonions (MWCNOs) can be used as a therapeutic in the treatment of cancer due to its cytotoxicity.

  14. The cellular basis for animal regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Elly; Reddien, Peter W.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of animals to regenerate missing parts is a dramatic and poorly understood aspect of biology. The sources of new cells for these regenerative phenomena have been sought for decades. Recent advances involving cell fate tracking in complex tissues have shed new light on the cellular underpinnings of regeneration in Hydra, planarians, zebrafish, Xenopus, and Axolotl. Planarians accomplish regeneration with use of adult pluripotent stem cells, whereas several vertebrates utilize a collection of lineage-restricted progenitors from different tissues. Together, an array of cellular strategies—from pluripotent stem cells to tissue-specific stem cells and dedifferentiation—are utilized for regeneration. PMID:21763617

  15. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program. PMID:25707195

  16. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice. PMID:18372870

  17. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Buss, Paulo Marchiori; de Carvalho, Antonio Ivo

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of health promotion within the Brazilian health system is examined, including an assessment of the intersectoral and development policies that have influenced the process. Particular attention is paid to the legal characteristics of the Unified Health System. Human resources formation and research initiatives in health promotion are outlined, with a summary of the obstacles that need to be overcome in order to ensure the effective implementation of health promotion in the future. Up to the end of the 20th Century health promotion was not used as a term in the Brazilian public heath context. Health promoting activities were concentrated in the area of health education, although targeting the social determinants of health and the principle of intersectoral action were part of the rhetoric. The situation has changed during the last decade, with the publication of a national policy of health promotion, issued by the Ministry of Health and jointly implemented with the States and Municipals Health Secretaries. More recently there has been a re-emergence of the discourse on the social determinants of health and the formation of intersectoral public policies as the basis of a comprehensive health promotion. Health promotion infrastructure, particularly around human resources and financing, requires strengthening in order to ensure capacity and sustainability in health promotion practice.

  18. Association of Matrix Metalloproteinases -7, -8 and -9 and TIMP -1 with Disease Severity in Acute Pancreatitis. A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Eija; Lindström, Outi; Kuuliala, Krista; Kylänpää, Leena; Pettilä, Ville; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kuuliala, Antti; Hämäläinen, Mari; Moilanen, Eeva; Repo, Heikki; Hästbacka, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Several biomarkers for early detection of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) have been presented. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and their tissue inhibitors (TIMP) are released early in inflammation. We aimed to assess levels of MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 in acute pancreatitis (AP) and explore their ability to detect disease severity. Our second aim was to find an association between MMPs, TIMP and creatinine. Methods We collected plasma samples for MMP-7, -8, -9 and TIMP-1 analyses from 176 patients presenting within 96 h from onset of acute pancreatitis (AP) symptoms. We used samples from 32 control subjects as comparison. The revised Atlanta Classification was utilised to assess severity of disease. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and Spearman´s Rho-test were utilised for statistical calculations. Results Compared with controls, patients showed higher levels of all studied markers. MMP-8 was higher in moderately severe AP than in mild AP (p = 0.005) and MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 were higher in severe than in mild AP (p<0.001, p = 0.005 and p = 0.019). MMP-8 detected SAP with an AUC of 0.939 [95% CI 0.894–0.984], LR+ 9.03 [5.30–15.39]. MMP-8, -9 and TIMP-1 failed to discern moderately severe AP from SAP. MMP-7 was not different between patient groups. MMP-7 and TIMP-1 correlated weakly with creatinine (Rho = 0.221 and 0.243). MMP-8 might be a useful biomarker in early detection of SAP. PMID:27561093

  19. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by modulating matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Han, Yu Kyeong; Han, Jeong Yoon; Lee, Chang Geun

    2016-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is a conjugated form of UDCA that modulates several signaling pathways and acts as a chemical chaperone to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The present study showed that TUDCA reduced the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using an in vitro invasion assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that the reduced invasion following TUDCA treatment was associated with a decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and −13, which play important roles in invasion and metastasis. Inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs were used to show that the effect of TUDCA in the reduction of invasion appeared to be dependent on the protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway, a downstream ER stress signaling pathway. Thus, TUDCA is a candidate anti-metastatic agent to target the ER stress pathway.

  20. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid reduces the invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells by modulating matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 13

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ga-Young; Han, Yu Kyeong; Han, Jeong Yoon; Lee, Chang Geun

    2016-01-01

    Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA) is a conjugated form of UDCA that modulates several signaling pathways and acts as a chemical chaperone to relieve endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. The present study showed that TUDCA reduced the invasion of the MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cancer cell line under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using an in vitro invasion assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed that the reduced invasion following TUDCA treatment was associated with a decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-7 and −13, which play important roles in invasion and metastasis. Inhibitors and short hairpin RNAs were used to show that the effect of TUDCA in the reduction of invasion appeared to be dependent on the protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase pathway, a downstream ER stress signaling pathway. Thus, TUDCA is a candidate anti-metastatic agent to target the ER stress pathway. PMID:27602168

  1. FERM family proteins and their importance in cellular movements and wound healing (review).

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David C; Ye, Lin; Harding, Keith G; Jiang, Wen G

    2014-07-01

    Motility is a requirement for a number of biological processes, including embryonic development, neuronal development, immune responses, cancer progression and wound healing. Specific to wound healing is the migration of endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other key cellular players into the wound space. Aberrations in wound healing can result in either chronic wounds or abnormally healed wounds. The protein 4.1R, ezrin, radixin, moesin (FERM) superfamily consists of over 40 proteins all containing a three lobed N-terminal FERM domain which binds a variety of cell-membrane associated proteins and lipids. The C-terminal ends of these proteins typically contain an actin-binding domain (ABD). These proteins therefore mediate the linkage between the cell membrane and the actin cytoskeleton, and are involved in cellular movements and migration. Certain FERM proteins have been shown to promote cancer metastasis via this very mechanism. Herein we review the effects of a number of FERM proteins on wound healing and cancer. We show how these proteins typically aid wound healing through their effects on increasing cellular migration and movements, but also typically promote metastasis in cancer. We conclude that FERM proteins play important roles in cellular migration, with markedly different outcomes in the context of cancer and wound healing.

  2. Papillomavirus E2 Proteins and the Host Brd4 Protein Associate with Transcriptionally Active Cellular Chromatin▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Moon Kyoo; Kwon, Deukwoo; McBride, Alison A.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of papillomavirus E2 proteins with cellular Brd4 protein is important for transcriptional regulation of viral genes and partitioning of viral genomes. Bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1) E2 binds cellular chromatin in complex with Brd4 in both mitotic and interphase cells. To identify specific sites of E2 interaction on cellular chromatin, a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip analysis was carried out using human promoter sequences. Both E2 and Brd4 were found bound to most transcriptionally active promoters in C33A cells. These promoters were also bound by RNA polymerase II and were modified by histone H3 acetylation and K4 trimethylation, all indicators of active transcription. E2 binding strongly correlated with Brd4 and RNA polymerase II occupancy and H3K4me3 modification at all human promoters, indicating that E2 bound to active promoters. E2 binding did not correlate with the presence of consensus E2 binding sites in the promoters. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of E2-bound cellular genes were not significantly changed by E2 expression. Thus, the papillomavirus E2 proteins bind to transcriptionally active cellular genes but do not change their activity. We propose that this may be a way for the virus to ensure that the viral genome is retained in transcriptionally active regions of the nucleus to escape silencing. Therefore, E2-mediated tethering of viral genomes to host chromatin has multiple roles: to partition the viral genome to daughter cells, to ensure that the genomes are retained in the nucleus, and to make certain that the genomes are retained in functionally active nuclear domains. PMID:19129460

  3. 47 CFR 22.901 - Cellular service requirements and limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular service requirements and limitations... SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service § 22.901 Cellular service requirements and... operates in compliance with this section. (a) Each cellular system must provide either mobile...

  4. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders.

  5. Dynamical Systems Perspective of Wolfram's Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courbage, M.; Kamiński, B.

    2013-01-01

    Leon Chua, following Wolfram, devoted a big effort to understand deeply the wealth of complexity of the rules of all elementary one-dimensional cellular automata from the point of view of the nonlinear dynamicist. Here we complete this point of view by a dynamical system perspective, extending them to the limit of infinite number of sites.

  6. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  7. Autophagy Mediates Tumor Suppression via Cellular Senescence.

    PubMed

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Bravo-San Pedro, José Manuel; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy not only constitutes a robust barrier against malignant transformation at the cell-intrinsic level, but also contributes to the organismal control of potentially oncogenic cells. Recent data provide molecular insights into the mechanisms whereby oncogene hyperactivation induces autophagy to establish a permanent proliferative arrest commonly known as cellular senescence.

  8. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  9. A Quantum Relativistic Prisoner's Dilemma Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Carvalho, Márcio; Situ, Haozhen

    2016-06-01

    The effect of variable entangling on the dynamics of a spatial quantum relativistic formulation of the iterated prisoner's dilemma game is studied in this work. The game is played in the cellular automata manner, i.e., with local and synchronous interaction. The game is assessed in fair and unfair contests.

  10. A Quantum Relativistic Prisoner's Dilemma Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso-Sanz, Ramón; Carvalho, Márcio; Situ, Haozhen

    2016-10-01

    The effect of variable entangling on the dynamics of a spatial quantum relativistic formulation of the iterated prisoner's dilemma game is studied in this work. The game is played in the cellular automata manner, i.e., with local and synchronous interaction. The game is assessed in fair and unfair contests.

  11. Gravitational Effects on Cellular Flame Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunsky, C. M.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of the effect of gravity on the structure of downwardly propagating, cellular premixed propane-oxygen-nitrogen flames anchored on a water-cooled porous-plug burner. The flame is subjected to microgravity conditions in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, and flame characteristics are recorded on high-speed film. These are compared to flames at normal gravity conditions with the same equivalence ratio, dilution index, mixture flow rate, and ambient pressure. The results show that the cellular instability band, which is located in the rich mixture region, changes little under the absence of gravity. Lifted normal-gravity flames near the cellular/lifted limits, however, are observed to become cellular when gravity is reduced. Observations of a transient cell growth period following ignition point to heat loss as being an important mechanism in the overall flame stability, dominating the stabilizing effect of buoyancy for these downwardly-propagating burner-anchored flames. The pulsations that are observed in the plume and diffusion flame generated downstream of the premixed flame in the fuel rich cases disappear in microgravity, verifying that these fluctuations are gravity related.

  12. Cellular basis of memory for addiction.

    PubMed

    Nestler, Eric J

    2013-12-01

    DESPITE THE IMPORTANCE OF NUMEROUS PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS, AT ITS CORE, DRUG ADDICTION INVOLVES A BIOLOGICAL PROCESS: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of "cellular or molecular memory." Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of "behavioral memory," perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  13. High expression Zymomonas promoters

    DOEpatents

    Viitanen, Paul V.; Tao, Luan; Zhang, Yuying; Caimi, Perry G.; McCole, Laura : Zhang, Min; Chou, Yat-Chen; McCutchen, Carol M.; Franden, Mary Ann

    2011-08-02

    Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

  14. Health Promotion Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, Cheryl

    The Health Promotion Program began with establishment of a one-credit course in health promotion and wellness and the training of family practice residents at the Mountain Area Health Education Center to serve as lab leaders in the course. The course later became part of the university's general education requirements. In addition, a health…

  15. Minimizing Promotion Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, LuAnn W.; McGrath, Loraine

    1983-01-01

    Nursing administrators can minimize promotion trauma and its unnecessary cost by building awareness of the transition process, clarifying roles and expectations, and attending to the promoted employee's needs. This article will help nursing administrators develop a concept of manager care combined with programs for orientation of new managers,…

  16. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification.

  17. Differential epigenetic reprogramming in response to specific endocrine therapies promotes cholesterol biosynthesis and cellular invasion.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Van T M; Barozzi, Iros; Faronato, Monica; Lombardo, Ylenia; Steel, Jennifer H; Patel, Naina; Darbre, Philippa; Castellano, Leandro; Győrffy, Balázs; Woodley, Laura; Meira, Alba; Patten, Darren K; Vircillo, Valentina; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Ali, Simak; Frige, Gianmaria; Minucci, Saverio; Coombes, R Charles; Magnani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapies target the activation of the oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) via distinct mechanisms, but it is not clear whether breast cancer cells can adapt to treatment using drug-specific mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that resistance emerges via drug-specific epigenetic reprogramming. Resistant cells display a spectrum of phenotypical changes with invasive phenotypes evolving in lines resistant to the aromatase inhibitor (AI). Orthogonal genomics analysis of reprogrammed regulatory regions identifies individual drug-induced epigenetic states involving large topologically associating domains (TADs) and the activation of super-enhancers. AI-resistant cells activate endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis (CB) through stable epigenetic activation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, CB sparks the constitutive activation of oestrogen receptors alpha (ERα) in AI-resistant cells, partly via the biosynthesis of 27-hydroxycholesterol. By targeting CB using statins, ERα binding is reduced and cell invasion is prevented. Epigenomic-led stratification can predict resistance to AI in a subset of ERα-positive patients. PMID:26610607

  18. Differential epigenetic reprogramming in response to specific endocrine therapies promotes cholesterol biosynthesis and cellular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Van T. M.; Barozzi, Iros; Faronato, Monica; Lombardo, Ylenia; Steel, Jennifer H.; Patel, Naina; Darbre, Philippa; Castellano, Leandro; Győrffy, Balázs; Woodley, Laura; Meira, Alba; Patten, Darren K.; Vircillo, Valentina; Periyasamy, Manikandan; Ali, Simak; Frige, Gianmaria; Minucci, Saverio; Coombes, R. Charles; Magnani, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Endocrine therapies target the activation of the oestrogen receptor alpha (ERα) via distinct mechanisms, but it is not clear whether breast cancer cells can adapt to treatment using drug-specific mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that resistance emerges via drug-specific epigenetic reprogramming. Resistant cells display a spectrum of phenotypical changes with invasive phenotypes evolving in lines resistant to the aromatase inhibitor (AI). Orthogonal genomics analysis of reprogrammed regulatory regions identifies individual drug-induced epigenetic states involving large topologically associating domains (TADs) and the activation of super-enhancers. AI-resistant cells activate endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis (CB) through stable epigenetic activation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, CB sparks the constitutive activation of oestrogen receptors alpha (ERα) in AI-resistant cells, partly via the biosynthesis of 27-hydroxycholesterol. By targeting CB using statins, ERα binding is reduced and cell invasion is prevented. Epigenomic-led stratification can predict resistance to AI in a subset of ERα-positive patients. PMID:26610607

  19. Significance of novel bioinorganic anodic aluminum oxide nanoscaffolds for promoting cellular response

    PubMed Central

    Poinern, Gérrard Eddy Jai; Shackleton, Robert; Mamun, Shariful Islam; Fawcett, Derek

    2011-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a multidisciplinary field that can directly benefit from the many advancements in nanotechnology and nanoscience. This article reviews a novel biocompatible anodic aluminum oxide (AAO, alumina) membrane in terms of tissue engineering. Cells respond and interact with their natural environment, the extracellular matrix, and the landscape of the substrate. The interaction with the topographical features of the landscape occurs both in the micrometer and nanoscales. If all these parameters are favorable to the cell, the cell will respond in terms of adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The role of the substrate/scaffold is crucial in soliciting a favorable response from the cell. The size and type of surface feature can directly influence the response and behavior of the cell. In the case of using an AAO membrane, the surface features and porosity of the membrane can be dictated at the nanoscale during the manufacturing stage. This is achieved by using general laboratory equipment to perform a relatively straightforward electrochemical process. During this technique, changing the operational parameters of the process directly controls the nanoscale features produced. For example, the pore size, pore density, and, hence, density can be effectively controlled during the synthesis of the AAO membrane. In addition, being able to control the pore size and porosity of a biomaterial such as AAO significantly broadens its application in tissue engineering. PMID:24198483

  20. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  1. Apc restoration promotes cellular differentiation and reestablishes crypt homeostasis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Janelle; Tschaharganeh, Darjus F; van Es, Johan H; Clevers, Hans; Lowe, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    The Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) tumor suppressor is mutated in the vast majority of human colorectal cancers (CRC) and leads to deregulated Wnt signaling. To determine whether Apc disruption is required for tumor maintenance, we developed a mouse model of CRC whereby Apc can be conditionally suppressed using a doxycycline-regulated shRNA. Apc suppression produces adenomas in both the small intestine and colon that, in the presence of Kras and p53 mutations, can progress to invasive carcinoma. In established tumors, Apc restoration drives rapid and widespread tumor-cell differentiation and sustained regression without relapse. Tumor regression is accompanied by the re-establishment of normal crypt-villus homeostasis, such that once aberrantly proliferating cells reacquire self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capability. Our study reveals that CRC cells can revert to functioning normal cells given appropriate signals, and provide compelling in vivo validation of the Wnt pathway as a therapeutic target for treatment of CRC. PMID:26091037

  2. Klotho-Dependent Cellular Transport Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, M; Dërmaku-Sopjani, M

    2016-01-01

    Klotho is a transmembrane protein that in humans is encoded by the hKL gene. This protein is known to have aging suppressor effects and is predominantly expressed in the distal convoluted tubule of the kidney, parathyroid glands, and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in both full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form, which exerts numerous distinct functions. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it functions as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho is a multifunction protein present in the biological fluids including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid of mammals. Klotho deficiency leads to multiple organ failure accompanied by early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and early death, whereas overexpression of Klotho results in the opposite effects. Klotho, an enzyme and hormone, has been reported to participate in the regulation of cellular transport processes across the plasma membrane either indirectly through inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) formation or other mechanism, or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, cellular carriers, and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. Accordingly, Klotho protein serves as a powerful regulator of cellular transport across the plasma membrane. Importantly, Klotho-dependent cellular transport regulation implies stimulatory or inhibitory effects. Klotho has been shown to play a key role in the regulation of multiple calcium and potassium ion channels, and various cellular carriers including the Na(+)-coupled cotransporters such as NaPi-IIa, NaPi-IIb, EAAT3, and EAAT4, CreaT1 as well as Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. These regulations are parts of the antiaging function of Klotho, which will be discussing throughout this chapter. Clearly, further experimental efforts are required to investigate the effect of Klotho on other transport proteins and underlying molecular mechanisms by which Klotho

  3. Predicting cellular growth from gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Edoardo M; Huttenhower, Curtis; Gresham, David; Lu, Charles; Caudy, Amy A; Dunham, Maitreya J; Broach, James R; Botstein, David; Troyanskaya, Olga G

    2009-01-01

    Maintaining balanced growth in a changing environment is a fundamental systems-level challenge for cellular physiology, particularly in microorganisms. While the complete set of regulatory and functional pathways supporting growth and cellular proliferation are not yet known, portions of them are well understood. In particular, cellular proliferation is governed by mechanisms that are highly conserved from unicellular to multicellular organisms, and the disruption of these processes in metazoans is a major factor in the development of cancer. In this paper, we develop statistical methodology to identify quantitative aspects of the regulatory mechanisms underlying cellular proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that the expression levels of a small set of genes can be exploited to predict the instantaneous growth rate of any cellular culture with high accuracy. The predictions obtained in this fashion are robust to changing biological conditions, experimental methods, and technological platforms. The proposed model is also effective in predicting growth rates for the related yeast Saccharomyces bayanus and the highly diverged yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, suggesting that the underlying regulatory signature is conserved across a wide range of unicellular evolution. We investigate the biological significance of the gene expression signature that the predictions are based upon from multiple perspectives: by perturbing the regulatory network through the Ras/PKA pathway, observing strong upregulation of growth rate even in the absence of appropriate nutrients, and discovering putative transcription factor binding sites, observing enrichment in growth-correlated genes. More broadly, the proposed methodology enables biological insights about growth at an instantaneous time scale, inaccessible by direct experimental methods. Data and tools enabling others to apply our methods are available at http://function.princeton.edu/growthrate.

  4. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1.

    PubMed

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner. PMID:27383386

  5. Hyperglycemia Induces Cellular Hypoxia through Production of Mitochondrial ROS Followed by Suppression of Aquaporin-1

    PubMed Central

    Sada, Kiminori; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Kukidome, Daisuke; Yoshinaga, Tomoaki; Kajihara, Nobuhiro; Sonoda, Kazuhiro; Senokuchi, Takafumi; Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Matsumura, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    We previously proposed that hyperglycemia-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation is a key event in the development of diabetic complications. Interestingly, some common aspects exist between hyperglycemia and hypoxia-induced phenomena. Thus, hyperglycemia may induce cellular hypoxia, and this phenomenon may also be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. In endothelial cells (ECs), cellular hypoxia increased after incubation with high glucose (HG). A similar phenomenon was observed in glomeruli of diabetic mice. HG-induced cellular hypoxia was suppressed by mitochondria blockades or manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) overexpression, which is a specific SOD for mtROS. Overexpression of MnSOD also increased the expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1), a water and oxygen channel. AQP1 overexpression in ECs suppressed hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia, endothelin-1 and fibronectin overproduction, and apoptosis. Therefore, hyperglycemia-induced cellular hypoxia and mtROS generation may promote hyperglycemic damage in a coordinated manner. PMID:27383386

  6. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  7. Tuning Cellular Uptake of Molecular Probes by Rational Design of Their Assembly into Supramolecular Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Lock, Lye Lin; Reyes, Claudia D; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cui, Honggang

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular sensing of pathologically relevant biomolecules could provide essential information for accurate evaluation of disease staging and progression, yet the poor cellular uptake of water-soluble molecular probes limits their use as protease sensors. In other cases such as extracellular sensing, cellular uptake should be effectively inhibited. Self-assembly of molecular probes into supramolecular nanoprobes presents a potential strategy to alter their interaction mechanisms with cells to promote or reduce their cellular uptake. Here, we report on the design, synthesis, and assembly of peptide-based molecular beacons into supramolecular protease sensors of either spherical or filamentous shapes. We found that positively charged spherical nanobeacons demonstrate much higher cellular uptake efficiency than its monomeric form, thus making them most suitable for intracellular sensing of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Our results also suggest that assembly into filamentous nanobeacons significantly reduces their internalization by cancer cells, an important property that can be utilized for probing extracellular protease activities. These studies provide important guiding principles for rational design of supramolecular nanoprobes with tunable cellular uptake characteristics.

  8. Cellular auxin homeostasis under high temperature is regulated through a sorting NEXIN1-dependent endosomal trafficking pathway.

    PubMed

    Hanzawa, Taiki; Shibasaki, Kyohei; Numata, Takahiro; Kawamura, Yukio; Gaude, Thierry; Rahman, Abidur

    2013-09-01

    High-temperature-mediated adaptation in plant architecture is linked to the increased synthesis of the phytohormone auxin, which alters cellular auxin homeostasis. The auxin gradient, modulated by cellular auxin homeostasis, plays an important role in regulating the developmental fate of plant organs. Although the signaling mechanism that integrates auxin and high temperature is relatively well understood, the cellular auxin homeostasis mechanism under high temperature is largely unknown. Using the Arabidopsis thaliana root as a model, we demonstrate that under high temperature, roots counterbalance the elevated level of intracellular auxin by promoting shootward auxin efflux in a PIN-FORMED2 (PIN2)-dependent manner. Further analyses revealed that high temperature selectively promotes the retrieval of PIN2 from late endosomes and sorts them to the plasma membrane through an endosomal trafficking pathway dependent on SORTING NEXIN1. Our results demonstrate that recycling endosomal pathway plays an important role in facilitating plants adaptation to increased temperature.

  9. CREG1 promotes angiogenesis and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chenghui; Fang, Pu; Zhang, Huimin; Tao, Jie; Tian, Xiaoxiang; Li, Yang; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Mingyu; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Hong; Han, Yaling

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis has long been considered as an important strategy for ischemic injury. It has been reported that cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG1) promotes human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, migration, and protects endothelial cell (EC) from apoptosis. However, its potential effect on angiogenesis remains undefined. In the present study, we investigated the role and mechanisms of CREG1 in promoting angiogenesis. We found that adenovirus-transduced CREG1 expression in HUVECs increases EC tube formation in matrigel and promotes neovascularization in matrigel plugs grafted into wild type mice. In addition, adenoviral CREG1 expression enhances filopodia formation, which is accompanied by increased expression of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and activation of its downstream effector Cdc42. Hindlimb perfusion was significantly reduced after femoral artery ligation in CREG1 heterozygous knockout mice. Finally, adenoviral CREG1 was injected intramuscularly in gastrochemius and partially restores ischemic hindlimb perfusion. Our results demonstrated that CREG1 increases EC filopodia formation and vascular assembly via ILK-Cdc42 activation and promotes neovascularization, which might be a therapeutic target for ischemic injury. PMID:24896341

  10. 77 FR 47820 - Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... United States Patent and Trademark Office Invention Promoters/Promotion Firms Complaints ACTION: Proposed... concerning invention promoters and responses from the invention promoters to these complaints. An individual may submit a complaint concerning an invention promoter to the USPTO, which will forward the...

  11. CELLULAR FIBROUS DERMATOFIBROMA OF THE SOLE.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Schönlebe, J; Nowak, A

    2016-07-01

    Cellular fibrous dermatofibroma is a rare variant of dermatofibroma/histiocytoma. We present a 61 years old female with a slow-growing, firm tumor on the sole of her right foot. The tumor was removed by slow Mohs surgery within 2 cm negative margin. Histopathologic investigation revealed a nodular encapsulated tumor composed of spindle and some epithelioid cells in a storiform growth pattern. Minimal mitotic activity was reported, however without evidence of atypical mitoses. Tumor cells expressed CD10, focally smooth muscle antigen and desmin, but remained negative for S100 protein and CD34. The diagnosis of cellular fibrous dermatofibroma was confirmed. The defect was closed by full thickness skin graft. PMID:27661268

  12. Feedback control of unstable cellular solidification fronts.

    PubMed

    Pons, A J; Karma, A; Akamatsu, S; Newey, M; Pomerance, A; Singer, H; Losert, W

    2007-02-01

    We present a feedback control scheme to stabilize unstable cellular patterns during the directional solidification of a binary alloy. The scheme is based on local heating of cell tips which protrude ahead of the mean position of all tips in the array. The feasibility of this scheme is demonstrated using phase-field simulations and, experimentally, using a real-time image processing algorithm, to track cell tips, coupled with a movable laser spot array device to heat the tips locally. We demonstrate, both numerically and experimentally, that spacings well below the threshold for a period-doubling instability can be stabilized. As predicted by the numerical calculations, cellular arrays become stable with uniform spacing through the feedback control which is maintained with minimal heating.

  13. The Spatiotemporal Cellular Dynamics of Lung Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lelkes, E.; Headley, M.B.; Thornton, E.E.; Looney, M.R.; Krummel, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    The lung is a complex structure that is interdigitated with immune cells. Understanding the 4-dimensional process of normal and defective lung function and immunity has been a centuries-old problem. Challenges intrinsic to the lung have limited adequate microscopic evaluation of its cellular dynamics in real time, until recently. Because of emerging technologies, we now recognize alveolar-to-airway transport of inhaled antigen. We understand the nature of neutrophil entry during lung injury and are learning more about cellular interactions during inflammatory states. Insights are also accumulating in lung development and the metatastatic niche of the lung. Here we assess the developing technology of lung imaging, its merits for studies of pathophysiology and areas where further advances are needed. PMID:24974157

  14. Sound attenuation characteristics of cellular metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Satya Surya Srinivas

    The objectives of this work were to develop lightweight barrier and compact absorbing material systems for controlling low frequency noise (say below 2 kHz). The solutions explored fell into the broad category of segmented cellular materials in which local resonances are built-in attributes. The body of the work was divided into four parts. First, a cellular metamaterial concept for lightweight barrier materials was proposed, then, secondly, the concept was experimentally verified by testing application-scale designs in a diffuse sound field setup. In the remaining two parts of the work, the idea of shifting sound energy emporally and spatially was explored as a means of improving the performance of metamaterial-based barrier solutions and of compact sound absorbers, respectively. The high sound transmission loss (STL) metamaterials described to-date commonly require the introduction of relatively heavy resonating or constraining components which runs counter to the desire to create lightweight barrier solutions. It was proposed here that a cellular panel comprising a periodic arrangement of unit cells consisting of plates held in a grid-like frame, which itself is unsupported, can possess a high STL within a specified frequency range without an undue mass penalty. It was numerically demonstrated that such a cellular panel can yield enhanced STL if the unit cell mass is apportioned appropriately between the unit cell plate and the surrounding grid-like frame. The concept of planar cellular metamaterials was verified through diffuse field experiments on application-scale specimens by using intensity methods. Two cellular panel designs were tested and their behavior was compared with that of a reference limp panel. It was found that the predicted benefit of the cellular panels could be realized by increasing the mass contrast in the designs, and that the benefit was reduced with increasing diffuseness of the sound field. It was also found that the loss in performance

  15. A cellular glass substrate solar concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedard, R.; Bell, D.

    1980-01-01

    The design of a second generation point focusing solar concentration is discussed. The design is based on reflective gores fabricated of thin glass mirror bonded continuously to a contoured substrate of cellular glass. The concentrator aperture and structural stiffness was optimized for minimum concentrator cost given the performance requirement of delivering 56 kWth to a 22 cm diameter receiver aperture with a direct normal insolation of 845 watts sq m and an operating wind of 50 kmph. The reflective panel, support structure, drives, foundation and instrumentation and control subsystem designs, optimized for minimum cost, are summarized. The use of cellular glass as a reflective panel substrate material is shown to offer significant weight and cost advantages compared to existing technology materials.

  16. Quantum features of natural cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elze, Hans-Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Cellular automata can show well known features of quantum mechanics, such as a linear rule according to which they evolve and which resembles a discretized version of the Schrödinger equation. This includes corresponding conservation laws. The class of “natural” Hamiltonian cellular automata is based exclusively on integer-valued variables and couplings and their dynamics derives from an Action Principle. They can be mapped reversibly to continuum models by applying Sampling Theory. Thus, “deformed” quantum mechanical models with a finite discreteness scale l are obtained, which for l → 0 reproduce familiar continuum results. We have recently demonstrated that such automata can form “multipartite” systems consistently with the tensor product structures of nonrelativistic many-body quantum mechanics, while interacting and maintaining the linear evolution. Consequently, the Superposition Principle fully applies for such primitive discrete deterministic automata and their composites and can produce the essential quantum effects of interference and entanglement.

  17. Cellular microRNAs and Picornaviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of short, endogenous, and non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. The miRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses. Picornaviridae is a large family of RNA viruses, which includes a number of causative agents of many human and animal diseases viz., poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that replication of picornaviruses can be regulated by miRNAs and picornaviral infections can alter the expression of cellular miRNAs. Herein, we outline the intricate interactions between miRNAs and picornaviral infections. PMID:24921242

  18. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of AKI.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Anupam; Dong, Zheng; Harris, Raymond; Murray, Patrick; Parikh, Samir M; Rosner, Mitchell H; Kellum, John A; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    In this article, we review the current evidence for the cellular and molecular mechanisms of AKI, focusing on epithelial cell pathobiology and related cell-cell interactions, using ischemic AKI as a model. Highlighted are the clinical relevance of cellular and molecular targets that have been investigated in experimental models of ischemic AKI and how such models might be improved to optimize translation into successful clinical trials. In particular, development of more context-specific animal models with greater relevance to human AKI is urgently needed. Comorbidities that could alter patient susceptibility to AKI, such as underlying diabetes, aging, obesity, cancer, and CKD, should also be considered in developing these models. Finally, harmonization between academia and industry for more clinically relevant preclinical testing of potential therapeutic targets and better translational clinical trial design is also needed to achieve the goal of developing effective interventions for AKI. PMID:26860342

  19. WD40 proteins propel cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Stirnimann, Christian U; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Russell, Robert B; Müller, Christoph W

    2010-10-01

    Recent findings indicate that WD40 domains play central roles in biological processes by acting as hubs in cellular networks; however, they have been studied less intensely than other common domains, such as the kinase, PDZ or SH3 domains. As suggested by various interactome studies, they are among the most promiscuous interactors. Structural studies suggest that this property stems from their ability, as scaffolds, to interact with diverse proteins, peptides or nucleic acids using multiple surfaces or modes of interaction. A general scaffolding role is supported by the fact that no WD40 domain has been found with intrinsic enzymatic activity despite often being part of large molecular machines. We discuss the WD40 domain distributions in protein networks and structures of WD40-containing assemblies to demonstrate their versatility in mediating critical cellular functions.

  20. SELF-ORGANIZED CRITICALITY AND CELLULAR AUTOMATA

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2007-01-01

    Cellular automata provide a fascinating class of dynamical systems based on very simple rules of evolution yet capable of displaying highly complex behavior. These include simplified models for many phenomena seen in nature. Among other things, they provide insight into self-organized criticality, wherein dissipative systems naturally drive themselves to a critical state with important phenomena occurring over a wide range of length and the scales. This article begins with an overview of self-organized criticality. This is followed by a discussion of a few examples of simple cellular automaton systems, some of which may exhibit critical behavior. Finally, some of the fascinating exact mathematical properties of the Bak-Tang-Wiesenfeld sand-pile model [1] are discussed.

  1. Molecular kinesis in cellular function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tiedge, H; Bloom, F E; Richter, D

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport and localization of cellular components are essential for the functional organization and plasticity of eukaryotic cells. Although the elucidation of protein transport mechanisms has made impressive progress in recent years, intracellular transport of RNA remains less well understood. The National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Molecular Kinesis in Cellular Function and Plasticity therefore was devised as an interdisciplinary platform for participants to discuss intracellular molecular transport from a variety of different perspectives. Topics covered at the meeting included RNA metabolism and transport, mechanisms of protein synthesis and localization, the formation of complex interactive protein ensembles, and the relevance of such mechanisms for activity-dependent regulation and synaptic plasticity in neurons. It was the overall objective of the colloquium to generate momentum and cohesion for the emerging research field of molecular kinesis.

  2. Laboratory constitutive characterization of cellular concrete.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Lee, Moo Yul; Bronowski, David R.

    2004-03-01

    To establish mechanical material properties of cellular concrete mixes, a series of quasi-static, compression and tension tests have been completed. This report summarizes the test methods, set-up, relevant observations, and results from the constitutive experimental efforts. Results from the uniaxial and triaxial compression tests established failure criteria for the cellular concrete in terms of stress invariants I{sub 1} and J{sub 2}. {radical}J{sub 2} (MPa) = 297.2 - 278.7 exp{sup -0.000455 I}{sub 1}{sup (MPa)} for the 90-pcf concrete {radical}J{sub 2} (MPa) = 211.4 - 204.2 exp {sup -0.000628 I}{sub 1}{sup (MPa)} for the 60-pcf concrete

  3. Animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia.

    PubMed

    Perdomini, Morgane; Hick, Aurore; Puccio, Hélène; Pook, Mark A

    2013-08-01

    The development and use of animal and cellular models of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) are essential requirements for the understanding of FRDA disease mechanisms and the investigation of potential FRDA therapeutic strategies. Although animal and cellular models of lower organisms have provided valuable information on certain aspects of FRDA disease and therapy, it is intuitive that the most useful models are those of mammals and mammalian cells, which are the closest in physiological terms to FRDA patients. To date, there have been considerable efforts put into the development of several different FRDA mouse models and relevant FRDA mouse and human cell line systems. We summarize the principal mammalian FRDA models, discuss the pros and cons of each system, and describe the ways in which such models have been used to address two of the fundamental, as yet unanswered, questions regarding FRDA. Namely, what is the exact pathophysiology of FRDA and what is the detailed genetic and epigenetic basis of FRDA?

  4. Cellular Structure Pattern in Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Dong, Lifang; Liu, Weibo; Gao, Xing; Wei, Lingyan

    2015-12-01

    We report the observation of a cellular structure pattern in a dielectric barrier discharge system. The evolution sequence and phase diagram of the pattern are given. It is firstly observed that the "cell nucleus" fire three or even more times at a fixed location at the rising edge of the applied voltage, and that the "cell walls" which have the same discharge times with the "cell nucleus" are ignited slightly after the "cell nucleus". By observing a series of frames recorded by a high speed video camera, it is found that the cellular structure pattern consists of volume discharges (VDs) and surface discharges (SDs) corresponding to the "cell nucleus" and "cell walls" respectively. That VDs and SDs are ignited in turn for several times in each half cycle of the applied voltage confirms the fact that VDs induce the SDs and SDs also affect the following VDs.

  5. Total cellular glycomics allows characterizing cells and streamlining the discovery process for cellular biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Fujitani, Naoki; Furukawa, Jun-ichi; Araki, Kayo; Fujioka, Tsuyoshi; Takegawa, Yasuhiro; Piao, Jinhua; Nishioka, Taiki; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nikaido, Toshio; Ito, Makoto; Nakamura, Yukio; Shinohara, Yasuro

    2013-01-01

    Although many of the frequently used pluripotency biomarkers are glycoconjugates, a glycoconjugate-based exploration of novel cellular biomarkers has proven difficult due to technical difficulties. This study reports a unique approach for the systematic overview of all major classes of oligosaccharides in the cellular glycome. The proposed method enabled mass spectrometry–based structurally intensive analyses, both qualitatively and quantitatively, of cellular N- and O-linked glycans derived from glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans, and glycosphingolipids, as well as free oligosaccharides of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), and various human cells derived from normal and carcinoma cells. Cellular total glycomes were found to be highly cell specific, demonstrating their utility as unique cellular descriptors. Structures of glycans of all classes specifically observed in hESCs and hiPSCs tended to be immature in general, suggesting the presence of stem cell–specific glycosylation spectra. The current analysis revealed the high similarity of the total cellular glycome between hESCs and hiPSCs, although it was suggested that hESCs are more homogeneous than hiPSCs from a glycomic standpoint. Notably, this study enabled a priori identification of known pluripotency biomarkers such as SSEA-3, -4, and -5 and Tra-1–60/81, as well as a panel of glycans specifically expressed by hESCs and hiPSCs. PMID:23345451

  6. Cellular lifespan and senescence: a complex balance between multiple cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, David; Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-07-01

    The study of cellular senescence and proliferative lifespan is becoming increasingly important because of the promises of autologous cell therapy, the need for model systems for tissue disease and the implication of senescent cell phenotypes in organismal disease states such as sarcopenia, diabetes and various cancers, among others. Here, we explain the concepts of proliferative cellular lifespan and cellular senescence, and we present factors that have been shown to mediate cellular lifespan positively or negatively. We review much recent literature and present potential molecular mechanisms by which lifespan mediation occurs, drawing from the fields of telomere biology, metabolism, NAD(+) and sirtuin biology, growth factor signaling and oxygen and antioxidants. We conclude that cellular lifespan and senescence are complex concepts that are governed by multiple independent and interdependent pathways, and that greater understanding of these pathways, their interactions and their convergence upon specific cellular phenotypes may lead to viable therapies for tissue regeneration and treatment of age-related pathologies, which are caused by or exacerbated by senescent cells in vivo.

  7. Cellular lifespan and senescence: a complex balance between multiple cellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Dolivo, David; Hernandez, Sarah; Dominko, Tanja

    2016-07-01

    The study of cellular senescence and proliferative lifespan is becoming increasingly important because of the promises of autologous cell therapy, the need for model systems for tissue disease and the implication of senescent cell phenotypes in organismal disease states such as sarcopenia, diabetes and various cancers, among others. Here, we explain the concepts of proliferative cellular lifespan and cellular senescence, and we present factors that have been shown to mediate cellular lifespan positively or negatively. We review much recent literature and present potential molecular mechanisms by which lifespan mediation occurs, drawing from the fields of telomere biology, metabolism, NAD(+) and sirtuin biology, growth factor signaling and oxygen and antioxidants. We conclude that cellular lifespan and senescence are complex concepts that are governed by multiple independent and interdependent pathways, and that greater understanding of these pathways, their interactions and their convergence upon specific cellular phenotypes may lead to viable therapies for tissue regeneration and treatment of age-related pathologies, which are caused by or exacerbated by senescent cells in vivo. PMID:27417120

  8. Cellular origin of cancer: dedifferentiation or stem cell maturation arrest?

    PubMed Central

    Sell, S

    1993-01-01

    Given the fundamental principle that cancer must arise from a cell that has the potential to divide, two major nonexclusive hypotheses of the cellular origin of cancer are that malignancy arises a) from stem cells due to maturation arrest or b) from dedifferentiation of mature cells that retain the ability to proliferate. The role of stem cells in carcinogenesis is clearly demonstrated in teratocarcinomas. The malignant stem cells of teratocarcinomas are derived from normal multipotent stem cells and have the potential to differentiate into normal benign mature tissue. A widely studied model supporting dedifferentiation has been the putative origin of hepatocarcinomas from "premalignant" foci and nodules induced in the rat liver by chemicals. However, the dedifferentiation concept for hepatocarcinogenesis is challenged by more recent interpretations indicating that hepatocellular carcinoma arises from maturation arrest caused by aberrant differentiation of determined stem cells. Either hypothesis is supported by the cellular changes that occur in the rodent liver after different hepatocarcinogenic regimens. The formation of foci and nodules from altered hepatocytes supports dedifferentiation; the proliferation of small oval cells with the potential to differentiate into either biliary ducts or hepatocytes supports arrested maturation of determined stem cells. It is now postulated that foci and nodular change reflect adaptive changes to the toxic effects of carcinogens and not "preneoplastic" stages to cancer. The stem cell model predicts that genotoxic chemicals induce mutations in the determined stem cell which may be expressed in its progeny. Proliferation of initiated cells is induced by promoting events which also allow additional mutations to occur. PMID:7516873

  9. Important cellular targets for antimicrobial photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Awad, Mariam M; Tovmasyan, Artak; Craik, James D; Batinic-Haberle, Ines; Benov, Ludmil T

    2016-09-01

    The persistent problem of antibiotic resistance has created a strong demand for new methods for therapy and disinfection. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) of microbes has demonstrated promising results for eradication of antibiotic-resistant strains. PDI is based on the use of a photosensitive compound (photosensitizer, PS), which upon illumination with visible light generates reactive species capable of damaging and killing microorganisms. Since photogenerated reactive species are short lived, damage is limited to close proximity of the PS. It is reasonable to expect that the larger the number of damaged targets is and the greater their variety is, the higher the efficiency of PDI is and the lower the chances for development of resistance are. Exact molecular mechanisms and specific targets whose damage is essential for microbial inactivation have not been unequivocally established. Two main cellular components, DNA and plasma membrane, are regarded as the most important PDI targets. Using Zn porphyrin-based PSs and Escherichia coli as a model Gram-negative microorganism, we demonstrate that efficient photoinactivation of bacteria can be achieved without detectable DNA modification. Among the cellular components which are modified early during illumination and constitute key PDI targets are cytosolic enzymes, membrane-bound protein complexes, and the plasma membrane. As a result, membrane barrier function is lost, and energy and reducing equivalent production is disrupted, which in turn compromises cell defense mechanisms, thus augmenting the photoinduced oxidative injury. In conclusion, high PDI antimicrobial effectiveness does not necessarily require impairment of a specific critical cellular component and can be achieved by inducing damage to multiple cellular targets. PMID:27221289

  10. Cellular immune findings in Lyme disease.

    PubMed Central

    Sigal, L. H.; Moffat, C. M.; Steere, A. C.; Dwyer, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1981 through 1983, we did the first testing of cellular immunity in Lyme disease. Active established Lyme disease was often associated with lymphopenia, less spontaneous suppressor cell activity than normal, and a heightened response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin and Lyme spirochetal antigens. Thus, a major feature of the immune response during active disease seems to be a lessening of suppression, but it is not yet known whether this response plays a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. PMID:6240164

  11. Simplified cellular automaton model for city traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.M.; Nagel, K. |

    1998-08-01

    We systematically investigate the effect of blockage sites in a cellular automaton model for traffic flow. Different scheduling schemes for the blockage sites are considered. None of them returns a linear relationship between the fraction of {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} time and the throughput. We use this information for a fast implementation of a simulation of traffic in Dallas. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. A statistical algorithm for assessing cellular alignment.

    PubMed

    Nectow, Alexander R; Gil, Eun Seok; Kaplan, David L; Kilmer, Misha E

    2013-03-01

    Current statistical techniques for analyzing cellular alignment data in the fields of biomaterials and tissue engineering are limited because of heuristic and less quantitative approaches. For example, generally a cutoff degree limit (commonly 20 degrees) is arbitrarily defined within which cells are considered "aligned." The effectiveness of a patterned biomaterial in guiding the alignment of cells, such as neurons, is often critical to predict relationships between the biomaterial design and biological outcomes, both in vitro and in vivo. This becomes particularly important in the case of peripheral neurons, which require precise axon guidance to obtain successful regenerative outcomes. To address this issue, we have developed a protocol for processing cellular alignment data sets, which implicitly determines an "angle of alignment." This was accomplished as follows: cells "aligning" with an underlying, anisotropic scaffold display uniformly distributed angles up to a cutoff point determined by how effective the biomaterial is in aligning cells. Therefore, this fact was then used to determine where an alignment angle data set diverges from a uniform distribution. This was accomplished by measuring the spacing between the collected, increasingly ordered angles and analyzing their underlying distributions using a normalized cumulative periodogram criterion. The proposed protocol offers a novel way to implicitly define cellular alignment, with respect to various anisotropic biomaterials. This method may also offer an alternative to assess cellular alignment, which could offer improved predictive measures related to biological outcomes. Furthermore, the approach described can be used for a broad range of cell types grown on 2D surfaces, but would not be applicable to 3D scaffold systems in the present format.

  13. Cellular fatty acid composition of Haemophilus equigenitalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, C; Miyagawa, E; Mitani, K; Nakazawa, M; Isayama, Y

    1982-01-01

    The cellular fatty acid composition of eight Haemophilus equigenitalis strains was determined by gas-liquid chromatography. All strains showed a grossly similar pattern characterized by large amounts of 18:1 and 16:0. The amounts of 16:1, 18:2, 18:0, 3-OH 14:0, 3-OH 16:0, and 3-OH 18:1 were relatively small. PMID:7096556

  14. Inferring cellular networks – a review

    PubMed Central

    Markowetz, Florian; Spang, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of computational and statistical methods to reconstruct cellular networks. Although this area of research is vast and fast developing, we show that most currently used methods can be organized by a few key concepts. The first part of the review deals with conditional independence models including Gaussian graphical models and Bayesian networks. The second part discusses probabilistic and graph-based methods for data from experimental interventions and perturbations. PMID:17903286

  15. Cellular automata model for citrus variegated chlorosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. L.; Ceotto, G.; Alves, S. G.; Bufon, C. C. B.; Silva, J. M.; Laranjeira, F. F.

    2000-11-01

    A cellular automata model is proposed to analyze the progress of citrus variegated chlorosis epidemics in São Paulo orange plantations. In this model epidemiological and environmental features, such as motility of sharpshooter vectors that perform Lévy flights, level of plant hydric and nutritional stress, and seasonal climatic effects, are included. The observed epidemic data were quantitatively reproduced by the proposed model on varying the parameters controlling vector motility, plant stress, and initial population of diseased plants.

  16. Cellular automata model for citrus variegated chlorosis.

    PubMed

    Martins, M L; Ceotto, G; Alves, S G; Bufon, C C; Silva, J M; Laranjeira, F F

    2000-11-01

    A cellular automata model is proposed to analyze the progress of citrus variegated chlorosis epidemics in São Paulo orange plantations. In this model epidemiological and environmental features, such as motility of sharpshooter vectors that perform Lévy flights, level of plant hydric and nutritional stress, and seasonal climatic effects, are included. The observed epidemic data were quantitatively reproduced by the proposed model on varying the parameters controlling vector motility, plant stress, and initial population of diseased plants. PMID:11102058

  17. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  18. GARDENS OF EDEN OF ELEMENTARY CELLULAR AUTOMATA.

    SciTech Connect

    Barrett, C. L.; Chen, W. Y. C.; Reidys, C. M.

    2001-01-01

    Using de Bruijn graphs, we give a characterization of elementary cellular automata on the linear lattice that do not have any Gardens of Eden. It turns out that one can easily recoginze a CA that does not have any Gardens of Eden by looking at its de Bruijn graph. We also present a sufficient condition for the set of words accepted by a CA not to constitute a finite-complement language.

  19. Cellular basis of memory for addiction

    PubMed Central

    Nestler, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of numerous psychosocial factors, at its core, drug addiction involves a biological process: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. Here, we review the types of molecular and cellular adaptations that occur in specific brain regions to mediate addiction-associated behavioral abnormalities. These include alterations in gene expression achieved in part via epigenetic mechanisms, plasticity in the neurophysiological functioning of neurons and synapses, and associated plasticity in neuronal and synaptic morphology mediated in part by altered neurotrophic factor signaling. Each of these types of drug-induced modifications can be viewed as a form of “cellular or molecular memory.” Moreover, it is striking that most addiction-related forms of plasticity are very similar to the types of plasticity that have been associated with more classic forms of “behavioral memory,” perhaps reflecting the finite repertoire of adaptive mechanisms available to neurons when faced with environmental challenges. Finally, addiction-related molecular and cellular adaptations involve most of the same brain regions that mediate more classic forms of memory, consistent with the view that abnormal memories are important drivers of addiction syndromes. The goal of these studies which aim to explicate the molecular and cellular basis of drug addiction is to eventually develop biologically based diagnostic tests, as well as more effective treatments for addiction disorders. PMID:24459410

  20. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  1. [Health promotion. Concept development].

    PubMed

    Sito, A; Berkowska, M

    2000-01-01

    The development of health promotion in theory and practice is presented-from the Ottawa Charter in 1986, to the community based health promotion programmes, as the vision for the 21 Century. The historical mile stones in the process of change and the conceptualisation of health promotion are discussed with reference to the World WHO Conferences and documents from these conferences. These events and documents have been vital as guidelines for member countries, both for implementation of community based programmes, as well as for healthy public policy and for training, especially concerning evaluation. The paper also discusses the main trends in research; definitions of principal concepts are highlighted, concerning planning, implementation and evaluation of health promotion programmes.

  2. Promoting Your Web Site.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raeder, Aggi

    1997-01-01

    Discussion of ways to promote sites on the World Wide Web focuses on how search engines work and how they retrieve and identify sites. Appropriate Web links for submitting new sites and for Internet marketing are included. (LRW)

  3. Dissecting cellular biomechanics with a laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutson, M. Shane

    2011-10-01

    The biological tissues of a developing organism are built and reshaped by the mechanical behavior of individual cells. We probe the relevant cellular mechanics in vivo using laser-microsurgery -- both qualitatively, to assess whether removal of specific cells alters the dynamics of tissue reshaping, and quantitatively, to measure sub-cellular mechanical properties and stresses. I will detail two quantitative microsurgical measurements. The first uses a laser to drill a sub-cellular hole in a sheet of cells. The subsequent retraction of surrounding cells allows one to infer the local mechanical stress. The second uses a laser to isolate a single cell from the rest of a cell sheet. Isolation is accomplished on a microsecond time scale by holographically shaping a single laser pulse. The subsequent retraction (or expansion) of the isolated cell allows one to separate and quantify the effects of internal and external stresses in the determination of cell shape. I will discuss application of these techniques to the time-dependent biomechanics of epithelial tissues during early fruit fly embryogenesis -- specifically during the processes of germband retraction and dorsal closure.

  4. Targeting cellular metabolism to improve cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Butler, E B; Tan, M

    2013-03-07

    The metabolic properties of cancer cells diverge significantly from those of normal cells. Energy production in cancer cells is abnormally dependent on aerobic glycolysis. In addition to the dependency on glycolysis, cancer cells have other atypical metabolic characteristics such as increased fatty acid synthesis and increased rates of glutamine metabolism. Emerging evidence shows that many features characteristic to cancer cells, such as dysregulated Warburg-like glucose metabolism, fatty acid synthesis and glutaminolysis are linked to therapeutic resistance in cancer treatment. Therefore, targeting cellular metabolism may improve the response to cancer therapeutics and the combination of chemotherapeutic drugs with cellular metabolism inhibitors may represent a promising strategy to overcome drug resistance in cancer therapy. Recently, several review articles have summarized the anticancer targets in the metabolic pathways and metabolic inhibitor-induced cell death pathways, however, the dysregulated metabolism in therapeutic resistance, which is a highly clinical relevant area in cancer metabolism research, has not been specifically addressed. From this unique angle, this review article will discuss the relationship between dysregulated cellular metabolism and cancer drug resistance and how targeting of metabolic enzymes, such as glucose transporters, hexokinase, pyruvate kinase M2, lactate dehydrogenase A, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, fatty acid synthase and glutaminase can enhance the efficacy of common therapeutic agents or overcome resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy.

  5. Influence of electric field on cellular migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guido, Isabella; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    Cells have the ability to detect continuous current electric fields (EFs) and respond to them with a directed migratory movement. Dictyostelium discoideum (D.d.) cells, a key model organism for the study of eukaryotic chemotaxis, orient and migrate toward the cathode under the influence of an EF. The underlying sensing mechanism and whether it is shared by the chemotactic response pathway remains unknown. Whereas genes and proteins that mediate the electric sensing as well as that define the migration direction have been previously investigated in D.d. cells, a deeper knowledge about the cellular kinematic effects caused by the EF is still lacking. Here we show that besides triggering a directional bias the electric field influences the cellular kinematics by accelerating the movement of cells along their path. We found that the migratory velocity of the cells in an EF increases linearly with the exposure time. Through the analysis of the PI3K and Phg2 distribution in the cytosol and of the cellular adherence to the substrate we aim at elucidating whereas this speed up effect in the electric field is due to either a molecular signalling or the interaction with the substrate. This work is part of the MaxSynBio Consortium which is jointly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research of Germany and the Max Planck Society.

  6. Literature Review on Dynamic Cellular Manufacturing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouri Houshyar, A.; Leman, Z.; Pakzad Moghadam, H.; Ariffin, M. K. A. M.; Ismail, N.; Iranmanesh, H.

    2014-06-01

    In previous decades, manufacturers faced a lot of challenges because of globalization and high competition in markets. These problems arise from shortening product life cycle, rapid variation in demand of products, and also rapid changes in manufcaturing technologies. Nowadays most manufacturing companies expend considerable attention for improving flexibility and responsiveness in order to overcome these kinds of problems and also meet customer's needs. By considering the trend toward the shorter product life cycle, the manufacturing environment is towards manufacturing a wide variety of parts in small batches [1]. One of the major techniques which are applied for improving manufacturing competitiveness is Cellular Manufacturing System (CMS). CMS is type of manufacturing system which tries to combine flexibility of job shop and also productivity of flow shop. In addition, Dynamic cellular manufacturing system which considers different time periods for the manufacturing system becomes an important topic and attracts a lot of attention to itself. Therefore, this paper made attempt to have a brief review on this issue and focused on all published paper on this subject. Although, this topic gains a lot of attention to itself during these years, none of previous researchers focused on reviewing the literature of that which can be helpful and useful for other researchers who intend to do the research on this topic. Therefore, this paper is the first study which has focused and reviewed the literature of dynamic cellular manufacturing system.

  7. Cellular Senescence and Cancer Chemotherapy Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ryan R.; Nelson, Peter S.

    2012-01-01

    Innate or acquired resistance to cancer therapeutics remains an important area of biomedical investigation that has clear ramifications for improving cancer specific death rates. Importantly, clues to key resistance mechanisms may lie in the well-orchestrated and highly conserved cellular and systemic responses to injury and stress. Many anti-neoplastic therapies typically rely on DNA damage, which engages potent DNA damage response signaling pathways that culminate in apoptosis or growth arrest at checkpoints to allow for damage repair. However, an alternative cellular response, senescence, can also be initiated when challenged with these internal/external pressures and in ideal situations acts as a self-protecting mechanism. Senescence-induction therapies are an attractive concept in that they represent a normal, highly conserved and commonly-invoked tumor-suppressing response to overwhelming genotoxic stress or oncogene activation. Yet, such approaches should ensure that senescence by-pass or senescence re-emergence does not occur, as emergent cells appear to have highly drug resistant phenotypes. Further, cell non-autonomous senescence responses may contribute to therapy-resistance in certain circumstances. Here we provide an overview of mechanisms by which cellular senescence plausibly contributes to therapy resistance and concepts by which senescence responses can be influenced to improve cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:22365330

  8. Cellular and Molecular Basis of Liver Development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Donghun; Singh Monga, Satdarshan Pal

    2015-01-01

    Liver is a prime organ responsible for synthesis, metabolism, and detoxification. The organ is endodermal in origin and its development is regulated by temporal, complex, and finely balanced cellular and molecular interactions that dictate its origin, growth, and maturation. We discuss the relevance of endoderm patterning, which truly is the first step toward mapping of domains that will give rise to specific organs. Once foregut patterning is completed, certain cells within the foregut endoderm gain competence in the form of expression of certain transcription factors that allow them to respond to certain inductive signals. Hepatic specification is then a result of such inductive signals, which often emanate from the surrounding mesenchyme. During hepatic specification bipotential hepatic stem cells or hepatoblasts become apparent and undergo expansion, which results in a visible liver primordium during the stage of hepatic morphogenesis. Hepatoblasts next differentiate into either hepatocytes or cholangiocytes. The expansion and differentiation is regulated by cellular and molecular interactions between hepatoblasts and mesenchymal cells including sinusoidal endothelial cells, stellate cells, and also innate hematopoietic elements. Further maturation of hepatocytes and cholangiocytes continues during late hepatic development as a function of various growth factors. At this time, liver gains architectural novelty in the form of zonality and at cellular level acquires polarity. A comprehensive elucidation of such finely tuned developmental cues have been the basis of transdifferentiation of various types of stem cells to hepatocyte-like cells for purposes of understanding health and disease and for therapeutic applications. PMID:23720330

  9. How inositol pyrophosphates control cellular phosphate homeostasis?

    PubMed

    Saiardi, Adolfo

    2012-05-01

    Phosphorus in his phosphate PO(4)(3-) configuration is an essential constituent of all life forms. Phosphate diesters are at the core of nucleic acid structure, while phosphate monoester transmits information under the control of protein kinases and phosphatases. Due to these fundamental roles in biology it is not a surprise that phosphate cellular homeostasis is under tight control. Inositol pyrophosphates are organic molecules with the highest proportion of phosphate groups, and they are capable of regulating many biological processes, possibly by controlling energetic metabolism and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. Furthermore, inositol pyrophosphates influence inorganic polyphosphates (polyP) synthesis. The polymer polyP is solely constituted by phosphate groups and beside other known functions, it also plays a role in buffering cellular free phosphate [Pi] levels, an event that is ultimately necessary to generate ATP and inositol pyrophosphate. Although it is not yet clear how inositol pyrophosphates regulate cellular metabolism, understanding how inositol pyrophosphates influence phosphates homeostasis will help to clarify this important link. In this review I will describe the recent literature on this topic, with in the hope of inspiring further research in this fascinating area of biology.

  10. Pirin inhibits cellular senescence in melanocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-05-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  11. Cellular Hyperproliferation and Cancer as Evolutionary Variables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2012-01-01

    Technological advances in biology have begun to dramatically change the way we think about evolution, development, health and disease. The ability to sequence the genomes of many individuals within a population, and across multiple species, has opened the door to the possibility of answering some long-standing and perplexing questions about our own genetic heritage. One such question revolves around the nature of cellular hyperproliferation. This cellular behavior is used to effect wound healing in most animals, as well as, in some animals, the regeneration of lost body parts. Yet at the same time, cellular hyperproliferation is the fundamental pathological condition responsible for cancers in humans. Here, I will discuss why microevolution, macroevolution and developmental biology all have to be taken into consideration when interpreting studies of both normal and malignant hyperproliferation. I will also illustrate how a synthesis of evolutionary sciences and developmental biology through the study of diverse model organisms can inform our understanding of both health and disease. PMID:22975008

  12. Probing cellular behaviors through nanopatterned chitosan membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chung-Yao; Sung, Chun-Yen; Shuai, Hung-Hsun; Cheng, Chao-Min; Yeh, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    This paper describes a high-throughput method for developing physically modified chitosan membranes to probe the cellular behavior of MDCK epithelial cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts adhered onto these modified membranes. To prepare chitosan membranes with micro/nanoscaled features, we have demonstrated an easy-to-handle, facile approach that could be easily integrated with IC-based manufacturing processes with mass production potential. These physically modified chitosan membranes were observed by scanning electron microscopy to gain a better understanding of chitosan membrane surface morphology. After MDCK cells and HIG-82 fibroblasts were cultured on these modified chitosan membranes for various culture durations (i.e. 1, 2, 4, 12 and 24 h), they were investigated to decipher cellular behavior. We found that both cells preferred to adhere onto a flat surface rather than on a nanopatterned surface. However, most (> 80%) of the MDCK cells showed rounded morphology and would suspend in the cultured medium instead of adhering onto the planar surface of negatively nanopatterned chitosan membranes. This means different cell types (e.g. fibroblasts versus epithelia) showed distinct capabilities/preferences of adherence for materials of varying surface roughness. We also showed that chitosan membranes could be re-used at least nine times without significant contamination and would provide us consistency for probing cell-material interactions by permitting reuse of the same substrate. We believe these results would provide us better insight into cellular behavior, specifically, microscopic properties and characteristics of cells grown under unique, nanopatterned cell-interface conditions.

  13. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  14. Promoting Global Health

    PubMed Central

    Winker, Margaret A.; Ferris, Lorraine E.

    2015-01-01

    The Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of MCH and AIDS (IJMA) is a member of the World Association of Medical Editors (WAME). The Editorial Board of IJMA believes it is important that the statement on promoting global health and this accompanying editorial is brought to the attention of our readers. Medical journal editors have a social responsibility to promote global health by publishing, whenever possible, research that furthers health worldwide.

  15. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ivo de Carvalho, Antonio; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes

    2007-01-01

    Brazil, a Latin American country of continental proportions and contrasts, demographic inequalities, and social inequities, concomitantly faces the challenge of preventing and controlling infectious diseases, injuries, and non-communicable diseases. The loss of strength of the biomedical paradigm, the change in epidemiological profile, and the sociopolitical and cultural challenges of recent decades have fostered the emergence of new formulations about public health thinking and practice. Among them, are the paradigms of Brazilian Collective Health and Health Promotion. The former provides philosophical support for Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS). The aim of this article is to discuss the development of public health within the country's history, and to analyze and compare the theoretical assumptions of Health Promotion and Collective Health. We conclude that health promotion, based on the principles and values disseminated by the international Charters and concerned with social actors and social determinants of the health-disease process, has significant potential to promote the improvement of living and health conditions of the population. This frame of reference guided the formulation of the National Policy of Health Promotion within the Unified Health System, which was institutionalized by a ministerial decree. The importance and application of evaluating the effectiveness of health promotion processes and methodologies in Brazil have been guided by various frames of reference, which we clarify in this article through describing historical processes.

  16. Health promotion in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ivo de Carvalho, Antonio; Westphal, Marcia Faria; Pereira Lima, Vera Lucia Góes

    2007-01-01

    Brazil, a Latin American country of continental proportions and contrasts, demographic inequalities, and social inequities, concomitantly faces the challenge of preventing and controlling infectious diseases, injuries, and non-communicable diseases. The loss of strength of the biomedical paradigm, the change in epidemiological profile, and the sociopolitical and cultural challenges of recent decades have fostered the emergence of new formulations about public health thinking and practice. Among them, are the paradigms of Brazilian Collective Health and Health Promotion. The former provides philosophical support for Brazil's Unified Health System (SUS). The aim of this article is to discuss the development of public health within the country's history, and to analyze and compare the theoretical assumptions of Health Promotion and Collective Health. We conclude that health promotion, based on the principles and values disseminated by the international Charters and concerned with social actors and social determinants of the health-disease process, has significant potential to promote the improvement of living and health conditions of the population. This frame of reference guided the formulation of the National Policy of Health Promotion within the Unified Health System, which was institutionalized by a ministerial decree. The importance and application of evaluating the effectiveness of health promotion processes and methodologies in Brazil have been guided by various frames of reference, which we clarify in this article through describing historical processes. PMID:17596091

  17. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  18. KSHV Rta Promoter Specification and Viral Reactivation.

    PubMed

    Guito, Jonathan; Lukac, David M

    2012-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular pathogens whose biological success depends upon replication and packaging of viral genomes, and transmission of progeny viruses to new hosts. The biological success of herpesviruses is enhanced by their ability to reproduce their genomes without producing progeny viruses or killing the host cells, a process called latency. Latency permits a herpesvirus to remain undetected in its animal host for decades while maintaining the potential to reactivate, or switch, to a productive life cycle when host conditions are conducive to generating viral progeny. Direct interactions between many host and viral molecules are implicated in controlling herpesviral reactivation, suggesting complex biological networks that control the decision. One viral protein that is necessary and sufficient to switch latent Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) into the lytic infection cycle is called K-Rta. K-Rta is a transcriptional activator that specifies promoters by binding DNA directly and interacting with cellular proteins. Among these cellular proteins, binding of K-Rta to RBP-Jk is essential for viral reactivation. In contrast to the canonical model for Notch signaling, RBP-Jk is not uniformly and constitutively bound to the latent KSHV genome, but rather is recruited to DNA by interactions with K-Rta. Stimulation of RBP-Jk DNA binding requires high affinity binding of Rta to repetitive and palindromic "CANT DNA repeats" in promoters, and formation of ternary complexes with RBP-Jk. However, while K-Rta expression is necessary for initiating KSHV reactivation, K-Rta's role as the switch is inefficient. Many factors modulate K-Rta's function, suggesting that KSHV reactivation can be significantly regulated post-Rta expression and challenging the notion that herpesviral reactivation is bistable. This review analyzes rapidly evolving research on KSHV K-Rta to consider the role of K-Rta promoter specification in regulating the progression of KSHV

  19. CpG-island promoters drive transcription of human telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Nergadze, Solomon G.; Farnung, Benjamin O.; Wischnewski, Harry; Khoriauli, Lela; Vitelli, Valerio; Chawla, Raghav; Giulotto, Elena; Azzalin, Claus M.

    2009-01-01

    The longstanding dogma that telomeres, the heterochromatic extremities of linear eukaryotic chromosomes, are transcriptionally silent was overturned by the discovery that DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcribes telomeric DNA into telomeric repeat-containing RNA (TERRA). Here, we show that CpG dinucleotide-rich DNA islands, shared among multiple human chromosome ends, promote transcription of TERRA molecules. TERRA promoters sustain cellular expression of reporter genes, are located immediately upstream of TERRA transcription start sites, and are bound by active RNAPII in vivo. Finally, the identified promoter CpG dinucleotides are methylated in vivo, and cytosine methylation negatively regulates TERRA abundance. The existence of subtelomeric promoters, driving TERRA transcription from independent chromosome ends, supports the idea that TERRA exerts fundamental functions in the context of telomere biology. PMID:19850908

  20. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  1. AGCVIII Kinases: at the crossroads of cellular signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AGCVIII kinases regulate diverse developmental and cellular processes in plants. As putative mediators of secondary messengers, AGCVIII kinases potentially integrate developmental and environmental cues into specific cellular responses through substrate phosphorylation. Here we discuss the functiona...

  2. Ultrasmall integrin-targeted silica nanoparticles modulate signaling events and cellular processes in a concentration-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Benezra, Miriam; Phillips, Evan; Overholtzer, Michael; Zanzonico, Pat B; Tuominen, Esa; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S

    2015-04-01

    Cellular and molecular-level interactions of nanoparticles with biological systems are a rapidly evolving field requiring an improved understanding of endocytic trafficking as the principal driver and regulator of signaling events and cellular responses. An understanding of these processes is vital to nanomedicine applications. Studies investigating the complex interplay of these processes and their relationship to targeted nanoparticles exploiting endocytic pathways are notably lacking. It is known that integrins traffic through the endosomal pathway and participate in diverse roles controlling signal transduction, cell migration, and proliferation. Here, it is shown that ultrasmall, nontoxic, core-shell silica nanoparticles (C-dots), surface-functionalized with cRGDY peptides, modestly activate integrin-signaling pathways, in turn, promoting the enhancement of cellular functions. First, nanomolar concentrations, two orders of magnitude higher than clinical trial doses, internalize within αvβ3 integrin-expressing melanoma and endothelial cells, predominantly through an integrin receptor-dependent endocytic route. Second, integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and downstream signaling pathways occurs, in turn, upregulating phosphorylated protein expression levels and promoting concentration-dependent cellular migration and proliferative activity. Inhibiting FAK catalytic activity leads to decreased phosphorylation levels and cellular migration rates. These findings may inform the design of more effectively-targeted nanomedicines and provide insights into endocytic regulation of signal transduction.

  3. Surface topography and chemistry shape cellular behavior on wide band-gap semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lauren E; Collazo, Ramon; Hsu, Shu-Han; Latham, Nicole Pfiester; Manfra, Michael J; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2014-06-01

    The chemical stability and electrical properties of gallium nitride make it a promising material for the development of biocompatible electronics, a range of devices including biosensors as well as interfaces for probing and controlling cellular growth and signaling. To improve the interface formed between the probe material and the cell or biosystem, surface topography and chemistry can be applied to modify the ways in which the device interacts with its environment. PC12 cells are cultured on as-grown planar, unidirectionally polished, etched nanoporous and nanowire GaN surfaces with and without a physisorbed peptide sequence that promotes cell adhesion. While cells demonstrate preferential adhesion to roughened surfaces over as-grown flat surfaces, the topography of that roughness also influences the morphology of cellular adhesion and differentiation in neurotypic cells. Addition of the peptide sequence generally contributes further to cellular adhesion and promotes development of stereotypic long, thin neurite outgrowths over alternate morphologies. The dependence of cell behavior on both the topographic morphology and surface chemistry is thus demonstrated, providing further evidence for the importance of surface modification for modulating bio-inorganic interfaces.

  4. Cellular heterogeneity and live cell arrays.

    PubMed

    Walling, Maureen A; Shepard, Jason R E

    2011-07-01

    In the past decade, the tendency to move from a global, one-size-fits-all treatment philosophy to personalized medicine is based, in part, on the nuanced differences and sub-classifications of disease states. Our knowledge of these varied states stems from not only the ability to diagnose, classify, and perform experiments on cell populations as a whole, but also from new technologies that allow interrogation of cell populations at the individual cell level. Such departures from conventional thinking are driven by the recognition that clonal cell populations have numerous activities that manifest as significant levels of non-genetic heterogeneity. Clonal populations by definition originate from a single genetic origin so are regarded as having a high level of homogeneity as compared to genetically distinct cell populations. However, analysis at the single cell level has revealed a different phenomenon; cells and organisms require an inherent level of non-genetic heterogeneity to function properly, and in some cases, to survive. The growing understanding of this occurrence has lead to the development of methods to monitor, analyze, and better characterize the heterogeneity in cell populations. Following the trend of DNA- and protein microarrays, platforms capable of simultaneously monitoring each cell in a population have been developed. These cellular microarray platforms and other related formats allow for continuous monitoring of single live cells and simultaneously generate individual cell and average population data that are more descriptive and information-rich than traditional bulk methods. These technological advances have helped develop a better understanding of the intricacies associated with biological processes and afforded greater insight into complex biological systems. The associated instruments, techniques, and reagents now allow for highly multiplexed analyses, which enable multiple cellular activities, processes, or pathways to be monitored

  5. From Cellular Mechanotransduction to Biologically Inspired Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on a lecture I presented as the recipient of the 2009 Pritzker Distinguished Lecturer Award at the Biomedical Engineering Society annual meeting in October 2009. Here, I review more than thirty years of research from my laboratory, beginning with studies designed to test the theory that cells use tensegrity (tensional integrity) architecture to stabilize their shape and sense mechanical signals, which I believed to be critical for control of cell function and tissue development. Although I was trained as a cell biologist, I found that the tools I had at my disposal were insufficient to experimentally test these theories, and thus I ventured into engineering to find critical solutions. This path has been extremely fruitful as it has led to confirmation of the critical role that physical forces play in developmental control, as well as how cells sense and respond to mechanical signals at the molecular level through a process known as cellular mechanotransduction. Many of the predictions of the cellular tensegrity model relating to cell mechanical behaviors have been shown to be valid, and this vision of cell structure led to discovery of the central role that transmembrane adhesion receptors, such as integrins, and the cytoskeleton play in mechanosensing and mechanochemical conversion. In addition, these fundamental studies have led to significant unexpected technology fallout, including development of micromagnetic actuators for non-invasive control of cellular signaling, microfluidic systems as therapeutic extracorporeal devices for sepsis therapy, and new DNA-based nanobiotechnology approaches that permit construction of artificial tensegrities that mimic properties of living materials for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:20140519

  6. Applications of cellular fatty acid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, D F

    1991-01-01

    More than ever, new technology is having an impact on the tools of clinical microbiologists. The analysis of cellular fatty acids by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) has become markedly more practical with the advent of the fused-silica capillary column, computer-controlled chromatography and data analysis, simplified sample preparation, and a commercially available GLC system dedicated to microbiological applications. Experience with applications in diagnostic microbiology ranges from substantial success in work with mycobacteria, legionellae, and nonfermentative gram-negative bacilli to minimal involvement with fungi and other nonbacterial agents. GLC is a good alternative to other means for the identification of mycobacteria or legionellae because it is rapid, specific, and independent of other specialized testing, e.g., DNA hybridization. Nonfermenters show features in their cellular fatty acid content that are useful in identifying species and, in some cases, subspecies. Less frequently encountered nonfermenters, including those belonging to unclassified groups, can ideally be characterized by GLC. Information is just beginning to materialize on the usefulness of cellular fatty acids for the identification of gram-positive bacteria and anaerobes, despite the traditional role of GLC in detecting metabolic products as an aid to identification of anaerobes. When species identification of coagulase-negative staphylococci is called for, GLC may offer an alternative to biochemical testing. Methods for direct analysis of clinical material have been developed, but in practical and economic terms they are not yet ready for use in the clinical laboratory. Direct analysis holds promise for detecting markers of infection due to an uncultivable agent or in clinical specimens that presently require cultures and prolonged incubation to yield an etiologic agent. PMID:1747860

  7. [Growth promoting antimicrobials].

    PubMed

    Hoogkamp-Korstanje, J A

    1999-06-19

    The committee 'Growth promoting antimicrobials' of the Health Council of the Netherlands in 1998 advised immediate prohibition of all growth promoting antimicrobials related to human drugs and decrease of use of other growth promoting antimicrobials during the next three years in Europe. It is clear that frequent use of antibiotics is associated with development of resistance by selection in animals (and man), but it is not proven that this is an explanation of resistance in the human community. We know only little about the mechanisms and conditions of transfer of bacteria to man. Other questions raised are: what about the resulting possible increase of therapeutic application of antibiotics in animals, how to handle the increase of dung, nitrogen and phosphate in the environment and how farmers can survive with a decrease in income, sometimes by as much as 50%? Although many will feel sympathy for the report and its recommendations, implementing them will be difficult and possibly premature. PMID:10416481

  8. Imaging Cellular Architecture with X-rays

    PubMed Central

    Larabell, Carolyn A.; Nugent, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray imaging of biological samples is progressing rapidly. In this paper we review the progress to date in high resolution imaging of cellular architecture. In particular we survey the progress in soft X-ray tomography and argue that the field is coming of age and that important biological insights are starting to emerge. We then review the new ideas based on coherent diffraction. These methods are at a much earlier stage of development but, as they eliminate the need for X-ray optics, have the capacity to provide substantially better spatial resolution than zone plate based methods. PMID:20869868

  9. Enantioselective cellular uptake of chiral semiconductor nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynenko, I. V.; Kuznetsova, V. A.; Litvinov, I. K.; Orlova, A. O.; Maslov, V. G.; Fedorov, A. V.; Dubavik, A.; Purcell-Milton, F.; Gun'ko, Yu K.; Baranov, A. V.

    2016-02-01

    The influence of the chirality of semiconductor nanocrystals, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) capped with L- and D-cysteine, on the efficiency of their uptake by living Ehrlich Ascite carcinoma cells is studied by spectral- and time-resolved fluorescence microspectroscopy. We report an evident enantioselective process where cellular uptake of the L-Cys QDs is almost twice as effective as that of the D-Cys QDs. This finding paves the way for the creation of novel approaches to control the biological properties and behavior of nanomaterials in living cells.

  10. Adoptive Cellular Therapy (ACT) for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Jin, Hao; Wang, Jian; Sun, Qian; Yan, Cihui; Wei, Feng; Ren, Xiubao

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) with various lymphocytes or antigen-presenting cells is one stone in the pillar of cancer immunotherapy, which relies on the tumor-specific T cell. The transfusion of bulk T-cell population into patients is an effective treatment for regression of cancer. In this chapter, we summarize the development of various strategies in ACT for cancer immunotherapy and discuss some of the latest progress and obstacles in technical, safety, and even regulatory aspects to translate these technologies to the clinic. ACT is becoming a potentially powerful approach to cancer treatment. Further experiments and clinical trials are needed to optimize this strategy.

  11. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  12. Cellular convection in the atmosphere of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, R. D., II; Schubert, Gerald

    1992-01-01

    Among the most intriguing feature of the atmosphere of Venus is the presence of cellular structures near and downwind of the subpolar point. It has been suggested that the structures are atmospheric convection cells, but their breadth and thinness would pose a severe challenge to the dynamics of convection. It is proposed here that strongly penetrative convection into the stable regions above and below the neutrally stable cloud layer coupled with penetrative convection from the surface increases the vertical dimensions of the cells, thereby helping to explain their large horizontal extent.

  13. Cellular automata modeling of pedestrian's crossing dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Wang, Hui; Li, Ping

    2004-07-01

    Cellular automata modeling techniques and the characteristics of mixed traffic flow were used to derive the 2-dimensional model presented here for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics. A conception of "stop point" is introduced to deal with traffic obstacles and resolve conflicts among pedestrians or between pedestrians and the other vehicles on the crosswalk. The model can be easily extended, is very efficient for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics, can be integrated into traffic simulation software, and has been proved feasible by simulation experiments.

  14. Propagation Mechanism of Cylindrical Cellular Detonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wen-Hu; Wang, Cheng; Ning, Jian-Guo

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of cylindrical cellular detonation with different instabilities. The numerical results show that with decreasing initial temperature, detonation becomes more unstable and the cells of the cylindrical detonation tend to be irregular. For stable detonation, a divergence of cylindrical detonation cells is formed eventually due to detonation instability resulting from a curved detonation front. For mildly unstable detonation, local overdriven detonation occurs. The detonation cell diverges and its size decreases. For highly unstable detonation, locally driven detonation is more obvious and the front is highly wrinkled. As a result, the diverging cylindrical detonation cell becomes highly irregular.

  15. Cellular and physical mechanisms of branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2014-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is the developmental program that builds the ramified epithelial trees of various organs, including the airways of the lung, the collecting ducts of the kidney, and the ducts of the mammary and salivary glands. Even though the final geometries of epithelial trees are distinct, the molecular signaling pathways that control branching morphogenesis appear to be conserved across organs and species. However, despite this molecular homology, recent advances in cell lineage analysis and real-time imaging have uncovered surprising differences in the mechanisms that build these diverse tissues. Here, we review these studies and discuss the cellular and physical mechanisms that can contribute to branching morphogenesis. PMID:25005470

  16. 47 CFR 32.5003 - Cellular mobile revenue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cellular mobile revenue. 32.5003 Section 32... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions For Revenue Accounts § 32.5003 Cellular mobile revenue. This account shall include message revenue derived from cellular...

  17. Feasibility investigation of a cellularly organized data processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minnick, R. C.; Jump, J. R.; Arnold, R. G.; Beirne, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    The application of cellular arrays to NASA missions was studied. Cellular arrays are iterative logical and memory structures which can be programmed to accomplish a wide variety of logical tasks. Used in long-duration space missions, spare cellular arrays can be remotely programmed to replace faulty logical subsystems as the need arises.

  18. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism.

  19. Long-distance communication by specialized cellular projections during pigment pattern development and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Dae Seok; Bain, Emily J; Patterson, Larissa B; Grout, Megan E; Parichy, David M

    2015-01-01

    Changes in gene activity are essential for evolutionary diversification. Yet, elucidating the cellular behaviors that underlie modifications to adult form remains a profound challenge. We use neural crest-derived adult pigmentation of zebrafish and pearl danio to uncover cellular bases for alternative pattern states. We show that stripes in zebrafish require a novel class of thin, fast cellular projection to promote Delta-Notch signaling over long distances from cells of the xanthophore lineage to melanophores. Projections depended on microfilaments and microtubules, exhibited meandering trajectories, and stabilized on target cells to which they delivered membraneous vesicles. By contrast, the uniformly patterned pearl danio lacked such projections, concomitant with Colony stimulating factor 1-dependent changes in xanthophore differentiation that likely curtail signaling available to melanophores. Our study reveals a novel mechanism of cellular communication, roles for differentiation state heterogeneity in pigment cell interactions, and an unanticipated morphogenetic behavior contributing to a striking difference in adult form. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12401.001 PMID:26701906

  20. Differential and Cooperative Cell Adhesion Regulates Cellular Pattern in Sensory Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Togashi, Hideru

    2016-01-01

    Animal tissues are composed of multiple cell types arranged in complex and elaborate patterns. In sensory epithelia, including the auditory epithelium and olfactory epithelium, different types of cells are arranged in unique mosaic patterns. These mosaic patterns are evolutionarily conserved, and are thought to be important for hearing and olfaction. Recent progress has provided accumulating evidence that the cellular pattern formation in epithelia involves cell rearrangements, movements, and shape changes. These morphogenetic processes are largely mediated by intercellular adhesion systems. Differential adhesion and cortical tension have been proposed to promote cell rearrangements. Many different types of cells in tissues express various types of cell adhesion molecules. Although cooperative mechanisms between multiple adhesive systems are likely to contribute to the production of complex cell patterns, our current understanding of the cooperative roles between multiple adhesion systems is insufficient to entirely explain the complex mechanisms underlying cellular patterning. Recent studies have revealed that nectins, in cooperation with cadherins, are crucial for the mosaic cellular patterning in sensory organs. The nectin and cadherin systems are interacted with one another, and these interactions provide cells with differential adhesive affinities for complex cellular pattern formations in sensory epithelia, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:27695692

  1. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body. PMID:24058151

  2. A single-cell bioluminescence imaging system for monitoring cellular gene expression in a plant body.

    PubMed

    Muranaka, Tomoaki; Kubota, Saya; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2013-12-01

    Gene expression is a fundamental cellular process and expression dynamics are of great interest in life science. We succeeded in monitoring cellular gene expression in a duckweed plant, Lemna gibba, using bioluminescent reporters. Using particle bombardment, epidermal and mesophyll cells were transfected with the luciferase gene (luc+) under the control of a constitutive [Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S)] and a rhythmic [Arabidopsis thaliana CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1 (AtCCA1)] promoter. Bioluminescence images were captured using an EM-CCD (electron multiply charged couple device) camera. Luminescent spots of the transfected cells in the plant body were quantitatively measured at the single-cell level. Luminescence intensities varied over a 1,000-fold range among CaMV35S::luc+-transfected cells in the same plant body and showed a log-normal-like frequency distribution. We monitored cellular gene expression under light-dark conditions by capturing bioluminescence images every hour. Luminescence traces of ≥50 individual cells in a frond were successfully obtained in each monitoring procedure. Rhythmic and constitutive luminescence behaviors were observed in cells transfected with AtCCA1::luc+ and CaMV35S::luc+, respectively. Diurnal rhythms were observed in every AtCCA1::luc+-introduced cell with traceable luminescence, and slight differences were detected in their rhythmic waveforms. Thus the single-cell bioluminescence monitoring system was useful for the characterization of cellular gene expression in a plant body.

  3. Manipulation of cellular spheroid composition and the effects on vascular tissue fusion

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, T.R.; Mattix, B.; Casco, M.; Herbst, A.; Williams, C.; Tarasidis, A.; Simionescu, D.; Visconti, R.P.; Alexis, F.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular spheroids were investigated as tissue-engineered building blocks that can be fused to form functional tissue constructs. While spheroids can be assembled using passive contacts for the fusion of complex tissues, physical forces can be used to promote active contacts to improve tissue homogeneity and accelerate tissue fusion. Understanding the mechanisms affecting the fusion of spheroids is critical to fabricating tissues. Here, manipulation of the spheroid composition was used to accelerate the fusion process mediated by magnetic forces. The Janus structure of magnetic cellular spheroids spatially controls iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to form two distinct domains: cells and extracellular MNPs. Studies were performed to evaluate the influence of extracellular matrix (ECM) content and cell number on the fusion of Janus magnetic cellular spheroids (JMCSs). Results showed that the integration of iron oxide MNPs into spheroids increased the production of collagen over time when compared to spheroids without MNPs. The results also showed that ring tissues composed of JMCSs with high ECM concentrations and high cell numbers fused together, but exhibited less contraction when compared to their lower concentration counterparts. Results from spheroid fusion in capillary tubes showed that low ECM concentrations and high cell numbers experienced more fusion and cellular intermixing over time when compared to their higher counterparts. These findings indicate that cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions play an important role in regulating fusion, and this understanding sets the rationale of spheroid composition to fabricate larger and more complex tissue-engineered constructs. PMID:25463485

  4. Global cellular response to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wiita, Arun P; Ziv, Etay; Wiita, Paul J; Urisman, Anatoly; Julien, Olivier; Burlingame, Alma L; Weissman, Jonathan S; Wells, James A

    2013-01-01

    How cancer cells globally struggle with a chemotherapeutic insult before succumbing to apoptosis is largely unknown. Here we use an integrated systems-level examination of transcription, translation, and proteolysis to understand these events central to cancer treatment. As a model we study myeloma cells exposed to the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, a first-line therapy. Despite robust transcriptional changes, unbiased quantitative proteomics detects production of only a few critical anti-apoptotic proteins against a background of general translation inhibition. Simultaneous ribosome profiling further reveals potential translational regulation of stress response genes. Once the apoptotic machinery is engaged, degradation by caspases is largely independent of upstream bortezomib effects. Moreover, previously uncharacterized non-caspase proteolytic events also participate in cellular deconstruction. Our systems-level data also support co-targeting the anti-apoptotic regulator HSF1 to promote cell death by bortezomib. This integrated approach offers unique, in-depth insight into apoptotic dynamics that may prove important to preclinical evaluation of any anti-cancer compound. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01236.001 PMID:24171104

  5. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Da Silva, Milene C.; Balla, György; Balla, József; Jeney, Viktória

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis,” iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endothelial activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and macrophage activation; all of these processes are considered to be proatherogenic. On the other hand, the observation that hemochromatotic patients, affected by life-long iron overload, do not show any increased incidence of atherosclerosis is perceived as the most convincing evidence against the “iron hypothesis.” Epidemiological studies and data from animal models provided conflicting evidences about the role of iron in atherogenesis. Therefore, more careful studies are needed in which issues like the source and the compartmentalization of iron will be addressed. This review article summarizes what we have learnt about iron and atherosclerosis from epidemiological studies, animal models and cellular systems and highlights the rather contributory than innocent role of iron in atherogenesis. PMID:24847266

  6. Synthesis of marmycin A and investigation into its cellular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañeque, Tatiana; Gomes, Filipe; Mai, Trang Thi; Maestri, Giovanni; Malacria, Max; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines such as doxorubicin are used extensively in the treatment of cancers. Anthraquinone-related angucyclines also exhibit antiproliferative properties and have been proposed to operate via similar mechanisms, including direct genome targeting. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of marmycin A and the study of its cellular activity. The aromatic core was constructed by means of a one-pot multistep reaction comprising a regioselective Diels-Alder cycloaddition, and the complex sugar backbone was introduced through a copper-catalysed Ullmann cross-coupling, followed by a challenging Friedel-Crafts cyclization. Remarkably, fluorescence microscopy revealed that marmycin A does not target the nucleus but instead accumulates in lysosomes, thereby promoting cell death independently of genome targeting. Furthermore, a synthetic dimer of marmycin A and the lysosome-targeting agent artesunate exhibited a synergistic activity against the invasive MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. These findings shed light on the elusive pathways through which anthraquinone derivatives act in cells, pointing towards unanticipated biological and therapeutic applications.

  7. Organic nanotubes for drug loading and cellular delivery.

    PubMed

    Wakasugi, Ai; Asakawa, Masumi; Kogiso, Masaki; Shimizu, Toshimi; Sato, Mamiko; Maitani, Yoshie

    2011-07-15

    Organic nanotubes made of synthetic amphiphilic molecules are novel materials that form by self-assembly. In this study, organic nanotubes with a carboxyl group (ONTs) at the surface were used as a carrier for the anticancer drug doxorubicin, which has a weak amine group. The IC(50) values of ONT for cells were higher than that of conventional liposomes, suggesting that ONTs are safe. The results showed that the drug loading of ONTs was susceptible to the effect of ionic strength and H(+) concentration in the medium, and drug release from ONTs was promoted at lower pH, which is favorable for the release of drugs in the endosome after cellular uptake. ONTs loaded with the drug were internalized, and the drug was released quickly in the cells, as demonstrated on transmission electron microscopy images of ONTs and the detection of a 0.05% dose of ONT chelating gadolinium in the cells. Moreover, ONT could be modified chemically with folate by simply mixing with a folate-conjugate lipid. Therefore, these novel, biodegradable organic nanotubes have the potential to be used as drug carriers for controlled and targeting drug delivery.

  8. Lin28 enhances tissue repair by reprogramming cellular metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shyh-Chang, Ng; Zhu, Hao; de Soysa, T. Yvanka; Shinoda, Gen; Seligson, Marc T.; Tsanov, Kaloyan M.; Nguyen, Liem; Asara, John M.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Daley, George Q.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Regeneration capacity declines with age, but why juvenile organisms show enhanced tissue repair remains unexplained. Lin28a, a highly-conserved RNA binding protein expressed during embryogenesis, plays roles in development, pluripotency and metabolism. To determine if Lin28a might influence tissue repair in adults, we engineered the reactivation of Lin28a expression in several models of tissue injury. Lin28a reactivation improved hair regrowth by promoting anagen in hair follicles, and accelerated regrowth of cartilage, bone and mesenchyme after ear and digit injuries. Lin28a inhibits let-7 microRNA biogenesis; however let-7 repression was necessary but insufficient to enhance repair. Lin28a bound to and enhanced the translation of mRNAs for several metabolic enzymes, thereby increasing glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Lin28a-mediated enhancement of tissue repair was negated by OxPhos inhibition, whereas a pharmacologically-induced increase in OxPhos enhanced repair. Thus, Lin28a enhances tissue repair in some adult tissues by reprogramming cellular bioenergetics. PMID:24209617

  9. Cellular self-organization by autocatalytic alignment feedback

    PubMed Central

    Junkin, Michael; Leung, Siu Ling; Whitman, Samantha; Gregorio, Carol C.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-01-01

    Myoblasts aggregate, differentiate and fuse to form skeletal muscle during both embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. For proper muscle function, long-range self-organization of myoblasts is required to create organized muscle architecture globally aligned to neighboring tissue. However, how the cells process geometric information over distances considerably longer than individual cells to self-organize into well-ordered, aligned and multinucleated myofibers remains a central question in developmental biology and regenerative medicine. Using plasma lithography micropatterning to create spatial cues for cell guidance, we show a physical mechanism by which orientation information can propagate for a long distance from a geometric boundary to guide development of muscle tissue. This long-range alignment occurs only in differentiating myoblasts, but not in non-fusing myoblasts perturbed by microfluidic disturbances or other non-fusing cell types. Computational cellular automata analysis of the spatiotemporal evolution of the self-organization process reveals that myogenic fusion in conjunction with rotational inertia functions in a self-reinforcing manner to enhance long-range propagation of alignment information. With this autocatalytic alignment feedback, well-ordered alignment of muscle could reinforce existing orientations and help promote proper arrangement with neighboring tissue and overall organization. Such physical self-enhancement might represent a fundamental mechanism for long-range pattern formation during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:22193956

  10. Exercise Prevents Diet-Induced Cellular Senescence in Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Marissa J; White, Thomas A; Evans, Glenda; Tonne, Jason M; Verzosa, Grace C; Stout, Michael B; Mazula, Daniel L; Palmer, Allyson K; Baker, Darren J; Jensen, Michael D; Torbenson, Michael S; Miller, Jordan D; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Tchkonia, Tamara; van Deursen, Jan M; Kirkland, James L; LeBrasseur, Nathan K

    2016-06-01

    Considerable evidence implicates cellular senescence in the biology of aging and chronic disease. Diet and exercise are determinants of healthy aging; however, the extent to which they affect the behavior and accretion of senescent cells within distinct tissues is not clear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise prevents premature senescent cell accumulation and systemic metabolic dysfunction induced by a fast-food diet (FFD). Using transgenic mice that express EGFP in response to activation of the senescence-associated p16(INK4a) promoter, we demonstrate that FFD consumption causes deleterious changes in body weight and composition as well as in measures of physical, cardiac, and metabolic health. The harmful effects of the FFD were associated with dramatic increases in several markers of senescence, including p16, EGFP, senescence-associated β-galactosidase, and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) specifically in visceral adipose tissue. We show that exercise prevents the accumulation of senescent cells and the expression of the SASP while nullifying the damaging effects of the FFD on parameters of health. We also demonstrate that exercise initiated after long-term FFD feeding reduces senescent phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue while attenuating physical impairments, suggesting that exercise may provide restorative benefit by mitigating accrued senescent burden. These findings highlight a novel mechanism by which exercise mediates its beneficial effects and reinforces the effect of modifiable lifestyle choices on health span. PMID:26983960

  11. Astrobiological Complexity with Probabilistic Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M.

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches.

  12. Strategies for cellular decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Theodore J; Swain, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Stochasticity pervades life at the cellular level. Cells receive stochastic signals, perform detection and transduction with stochastic biochemistry, and grow and die in stochastic environments. Here we review progress in going from the molecular details to the information-processing strategies cells use in their decision-making. Such strategies are fundamentally influenced by stochasticity. We argue that the cellular decision-making can only be probabilistic and occurs at three levels. First, cells must infer from noisy signals the probable current and anticipated future state of their environment. Second, they must weigh the costs and benefits of each potential response, given that future. Third, cells must decide in the presence of other, potentially competitive, decision-makers. In this context, we discuss cooperative responses where some individuals can appear to sacrifice for the common good. We believe that decision-making strategies will be conserved, with comparatively few strategies being implemented by different biochemical mechanisms in many organisms. Determining the strategy of a decision-making network provides a potentially powerful coarse-graining that links systems and evolutionary biology to understand biological design. PMID:19920811

  13. Cellular distributions of monocarboxylate transporters: a review.

    PubMed

    Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Kishimoto, Ayuko

    2015-01-01

    Lactate and ketone bodies play important roles as alternative energy substrates, especially in conditions with a decreased utility of glucose. Short-chain fatty acids (acetate, propionate, and butyrate), produced by bacterial fermentation, supply most of the energy substrates in ruminants such as the cow and sheep. These monocarboxylates are transfered through the plasma membrane by proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) and sodium-coupled MCTs (SMCTs). To reveal the metabolism and functional significance of monocarboxylates, the cellular localization of MCTs and SMCTs together with the expressed intensities holds great importance. This paper reviews the immunohistochemical localization of SMCTs and major MCT subtypes throughout the mammalian body. MCTs and SMCTs display a selective membrane-bound localization with porality. In contrast to the limited expression of SMCTs in the intestine and kidney, MCTs display a broader distribution pattern than GLUTs. The brain, kidney, placenta, and male genital tract express multiple subtypes of the MCT family. Determination of the cellular localization of MCTs is most controversial in the brain, possibly due to regional differences and the transcriptional modification of MCT proteins. Information on the localization of MCTs and SMCTs aids in understanding the nutrient absorption and metabolism throughout the mammalian body. In some cases, the body may use monocarboxylates as signal molecules, like hormones. PMID:26522146

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  15. The cellular slime mold: eukaryotic model microorganism.

    PubMed

    Urushihara, Hideko

    2009-04-01

    Cellular slime molds are eukaryotic microorganisms in the soil. They feed on bacteria as solitary amoebae but conditionally construct multicellular forms in which cell differentiation takes place. Therefore, they are attractive for the study of fundamental biological phenomena such as phagocytosis, cell division, chemotactic movements, intercellular communication, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. The most widely used species, Dictyostelium discoideum, is highly amenable to experimental manipulation and can be used with most recent molecular biological techniques. Its genome and cDNA analyses have been completed and well-annotated data are publicly available. A larger number of orthologues of human disease-related genes were found in D. discoideum than in yeast. Moreover, some pathogenic bacteria infect Dictyostelium amoebae. Thus, this microorganism can also offer a good experimental system for biomedical research. The resources of cellular slime molds, standard strains, mutants, and genes are maintained and distributed upon request by the core center of the National BioResource Project (NBRP-nenkin) to support Dictyostelium community users as well as new users interested in new platforms for research and/or phylogenic consideration.

  16. Mechanisms of cellular invasion by intracellular parasites.

    PubMed

    Walker, Dawn M; Oghumu, Steve; Gupta, Gaurav; McGwire, Bradford S; Drew, Mark E; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2014-04-01

    Numerous disease-causing parasites must invade host cells in order to prosper. Collectively, such pathogens are responsible for a staggering amount of human sickness and death throughout the world. Leishmaniasis, Chagas disease, toxoplasmosis, and malaria are neglected diseases and therefore are linked to socio-economical and geographical factors, affecting well-over half the world's population. Such obligate intracellular parasites have co-evolved with humans to establish a complexity of specific molecular parasite-host cell interactions, forming the basis of the parasite's cellular tropism. They make use of such interactions to invade host cells as a means to migrate through various tissues, to evade the host immune system, and to undergo intracellular replication. These cellular migration and invasion events are absolutely essential for the completion of the lifecycles of these parasites and lead to their for disease pathogenesis. This review is an overview of the molecular mechanisms of protozoan parasite invasion of host cells and discussion of therapeutic strategies, which could be developed by targeting these invasion pathways. Specifically, we focus on four species of protozoan parasites Leishmania, Trypanosoma cruzi, Plasmodium, and Toxoplasma, which are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality.

  17. Cellular Prion Protein: From Physiology to Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Yusa, Sei-ichi; Oliveira-Martins, José B.; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kikuchi, Yutaka

    2012-01-01

    The human cellular prion protein (PrPC) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored membrane glycoprotein with two N-glycosylation sites at residues 181 and 197. This protein migrates in several bands by Western blot analysis (WB). Interestingly, PNGase F treatment of human brain homogenates prior to the WB, which is known to remove the N-glycosylations, unexpectedly gives rise to two dominant bands, which are now known as C-terminal (C1) and N-terminal (N1) fragments. This resembles the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in Alzheimer disease (AD), which can be physiologically processed by α-, β-, and γ-secretases. The processing of APP has been extensively studied, while the identity of the cellular proteases involved in the proteolysis of PrPC and their possible role in prion biology has remained limited and controversial. Nevertheless, there is a strong correlation between the neurotoxicity caused by prion proteins and the blockade of their normal proteolysis. For example, expression of non-cleavable PrPC mutants in transgenic mice generates neurotoxicity, even in the absence of infectious prions, suggesting that PrPC proteolysis is physiologically and pathologically important. As many mouse models of prion diseases have recently been developed and the knowledge about the proteases responsible for the PrPC proteolysis is accumulating, we examine the historical experimental evidence and highlight recent studies that shed new light on this issue. PMID:23202518

  18. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J; Wang, Ai Ling; Yuan, Ming; Neufeld, Arthur H

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3) and apoptosis (Bax). Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration. PMID:19284657

  19. Regulation of cellular transport by klotho protein.

    PubMed

    Sopjani, Mentor; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Almilaji, Ahmad; Ahmeti, Salih; Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane

    2014-01-01

    The antiaging protein of Klotho is a transmembrane protein mainly expressed in the kidney, parathyroid glands and choroid plexus of the brain. The Klotho protein exists in two forms, a full-length membrane form and a soluble secreted form. The extracellular domain of Klotho can be enzymatically cleaved off and released into the systemic circulation where it acts as β-glucuronidase and a hormone. Soluble Klotho can be found in the blood, cerebrospinal fluid, and the urine of mammals. Klotho deficiency results in early appearance of multiple age-related disorders and premature death, whereas overexpression of Klotho exerts the opposite effect. Klotho may influence cellular transport processes across the cell membrane by inhibiting calcitriol (1,25(OH) (2)D(3)), formation or by directly affecting transporter proteins, including ion channels, carriers and pumps. Accordingly, Klotho protein is a powerful regulator of transport mechanisms across the cell membrane. Klotho regulates diverse calcium and potassium ion channels, as well as several carriers including the Na(+)-coupled excitatory amino acid transporters EAAT3 and EAAT4, the Na(+)-coupled phosphate cotransporters, NaPi-IIa and NaPi-IIb, and a Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. All those cellular transport regulations contribute in the aging suppressor role of Klotho. Future studies will help to determine if the Klotho protein regulates cell-surface expression of other transport proteins and is affecting underlying mechanisms.

  20. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  1. Diabetes Mellitus: Channeling Care through Cellular Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Shang, Yan Chen; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Hou, Jinling

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) impacts a significant portion of the world’s population and care for this disorder places an economic burden on the gross domestic product for any particular country. Furthermore, both Type 1 and Type 2 DM are becoming increasingly prevalent and there is increased incidence of impaired glucose tolerance in the young. The complications of DM are protean and can involve multiple systems throughout the body that are susceptible to the detrimental effects of oxidative stress and apoptotic cell injury. For these reasons, innovative strategies are necessary for the implementation of new treatments for DM that are generated through the further understanding of cellular pathways that govern the pathological consequences of DM. In particular, both the precursor for the coenzyme β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), nicotinamide, and the growth factor erythropoietin offer novel platforms for drug discovery that involve cellular metabolic homeostasis and inflammatory cell control. Interestingly, these agents and their tightly associated pathways that consist of cell cycle regulation, protein kinase B, forkhead transcription factors, and Wnt signaling also function in a broader sense as biomarkers for disease onset and progression. PMID:20158461

  2. Astrobiological complexity with probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches.

  3. Molecular and cellular aspects of rhabdovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Albertini, Aurélie A V; Baquero, Eduard; Ferlin, Anna; Gaudin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses enter the cell via the endocytic pathway and subsequently fuse with a cellular membrane within the acidic environment of the endosome. Both receptor recognition and membrane fusion are mediated by a single transmembrane viral glycoprotein (G). Fusion is triggered via a low-pH induced structural rearrangement. G is an atypical fusion protein as there is a pH-dependent equilibrium between its pre- and post-fusion conformations. The elucidation of the atomic structures of these two conformations for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G has revealed that it is different from the previously characterized class I and class II fusion proteins. In this review, the pre- and post-fusion VSV G structures are presented in detail demonstrating that G combines the features of the class I and class II fusion proteins. In addition to these similarities, these G structures also reveal some particularities that expand our understanding of the working of fusion machineries. Combined with data from recent studies that revealed the cellular aspects of the initial stages of rhabdovirus infection, all these data give an integrated view of the entry pathway of rhabdoviruses into their host cell.

  4. Conformational Sampling of Peptides in Cellular Environments☆

    PubMed Central

    Tanizaki, Seiichiro; Clifford, Jacob; Connelly, Brian D.; Feig, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Biological systems provide a complex environment that can be understood in terms of its dielectric properties. High concentrations of macromolecules and cosolvents effectively reduce the dielectric constant of cellular environments, thereby affecting the conformational sampling of biomolecules. To examine this effect in more detail, the conformational preference of alanine dipeptide, poly-alanine, and melittin in different dielectric environments is studied with computer simulations based on recently developed generalized Born methodology. Results from these simulations suggest that extended conformations are favored over α-helical conformations at the dipeptide level at and below dielectric constants of 5–10. Furthermore, lower-dielectric environments begin to significantly stabilize helical structures in poly-alanine at ɛ = 20. In the more complex peptide melittin, different dielectric environments shift the equilibrium between two main conformations: a nearly fully extended helix that is most stable in low dielectrics and a compact, V-shaped conformation consisting of two helices that is preferred in higher dielectric environments. An additional conformation is only found to be significantly populated at intermediate dielectric constants. Good agreement with previous studies of different peptides in specific, less-polar solvent environments, suggest that helix stabilization and shifts in conformational preferences in such environments are primarily due to a reduced dielectric environment rather than specific molecular details. The findings presented here make predictions of how peptide sampling may be altered in dense cellular environments with reduced dielectric response. PMID:17905846

  5. Molecular and Cellular Aspects of Rhabdovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Albertini, Aurélie A. V.; Baquero, Eduard; Ferlin, Anna; Gaudin, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdoviruses enter the cell via the endocytic pathway and subsequently fuse with a cellular membrane within the acidic environment of the endosome. Both receptor recognition and membrane fusion are mediated by a single transmembrane viral glycoprotein (G). Fusion is triggered via a low-pH induced structural rearrangement. G is an atypical fusion protein as there is a pH-dependent equilibrium between its pre- and post-fusion conformations. The elucidation of the atomic structures of these two conformations for the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G has revealed that it is different from the previously characterized class I and class II fusion proteins. In this review, the pre- and post-fusion VSV G structures are presented in detail demonstrating that G combines the features of the class I and class II fusion proteins. In addition to these similarities, these G structures also reveal some particularities that expand our understanding of the working of fusion machineries. Combined with data from recent studies that revealed the cellular aspects of the initial stages of rhabdovirus infection, all these data give an integrated view of the entry pathway of rhabdoviruses into their host cell. PMID:22355455

  6. Colonial and Cellular Polymorphism in Xenorhabdus luminescens

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbert, Ronald E.; Xu, Jimin; Small, Christopher L.

    1989-01-01

    A highly polymorphic Xenorhabdus luminescens strain was isolated. The primary form of X. luminescens was luminescent and nonswarming and produced a yellow pigment and antimicrobial substances. The primary form generated a secondary form that had a distinct orange pigmentation, was weakly luminescent, and did not produce antimicrobial substances. Both the primary and secondary forms generated a set of colony variants at frequencies that exceeded normal rates for spontaneous mutation. The variant forms include nonswarming and swarming forms that formed large colonies and a small-colony (SC) form. The primary and secondary forms generated their SC forms at frequencies of between 1 and 14% and 1 and 2%, respectively. The SC forms were distinct from their parental primary and secondary forms in colony and cellular morphology and in protein composition. The cellular morphology and protein patterns of the nonswarming and swarming colony variants were all very similar. The DNA fingerprints of all forms were similar. Each SC-form colony reverted at high frequency to the form from which it was derived. The proportion of parental-type cells in the SC-form colonies varied with age, with young colonies containing as few as 0.0002% parental-type cells. The primary-to-secondary switch was stable, but all the other colony forms were able to switch at high frequencies to the alternative colony phenotypes. Images PMID:16347906

  7. Astrobiological complexity with probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Vukotić, Branislav; Ćirković, Milan M

    2012-08-01

    The search for extraterrestrial life and intelligence constitutes one of the major endeavors in science, but has yet been quantitatively modeled only rarely and in a cursory and superficial fashion. We argue that probabilistic cellular automata (PCA) represent the best quantitative framework for modeling the astrobiological history of the Milky Way and its Galactic Habitable Zone. The relevant astrobiological parameters are to be modeled as the elements of the input probability matrix for the PCA kernel. With the underlying simplicity of the cellular automata constructs, this approach enables a quick analysis of large and ambiguous space of the input parameters. We perform a simple clustering analysis of typical astrobiological histories with "Copernican" choice of input parameters and discuss the relevant boundary conditions of practical importance for planning and guiding empirical astrobiological and SETI projects. In addition to showing how the present framework is adaptable to more complex situations and updated observational databases from current and near-future space missions, we demonstrate how numerical results could offer a cautious rationale for continuation of practical SETI searches. PMID:22832998

  8. Rhabdomyosarcoma: Advances in Molecular and Cellular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Guo, Wei; Shen, Jacson K.; Mankin, Henry J.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2015-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue malignancy in childhood and adolescence. The two major histological subtypes of RMS are alveolar RMS, driven by the fusion protein PAX3-FKHR or PAX7-FKHR, and embryonic RMS, which is usually genetically heterogeneous. The prognosis of RMS has improved in the past several decades due to multidisciplinary care. However, in recent years, the treatment of patients with metastatic or refractory RMS has reached a plateau. Thus, to improve the survival rate of RMS patients and their overall well-being, further understanding of the molecular and cellular biology of RMS and identification of novel therapeutic targets are imperative. In this review, we describe the most recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of RMS, including alterations in oncogenic pathways, miRNA (miR), in vivo models, stem cells, and important signal transduction cascades implicated in the development and progression of RMS. Furthermore, we discuss novel potential targeted therapies that may improve the current treatment of RMS. PMID:26420980

  9. Piezoelectric nanoribbons for monitoring cellular deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thanh D.; Deshmukh, Nikhil; Nagarah, John M.; Kramer, Tal; Purohit, Prashant K.; Berry, Michael J.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2012-09-01

    Methods for probing mechanical responses of mammalian cells to electrical excitations can improve our understanding of cellular physiology and function. The electrical response of neuronal cells to applied voltages has been studied in detail, but less is known about their mechanical response to electrical excitations. Studies using atomic force microscopes (AFMs) have shown that mammalian cells exhibit voltage-induced mechanical deflections at nanometre scales, but AFM measurements can be invasive and difficult to multiplex. Here we show that mechanical deformations of neuronal cells in response to electrical excitations can be measured using piezoelectric PbZrxTi1-xO3 (PZT) nanoribbons, and we find that cells deflect by 1 nm when 120 mV is applied to the cell membrane. The measured cellular forces agree with a theoretical model in which depolarization caused by an applied voltage induces a change in membrane tension, which results in the cell altering its radius so that the pressure remains constant across the membrane. We also transfer arrays of PZT nanoribbons onto a silicone elastomer and measure mechanical deformations on a cow lung that mimics respiration. The PZT nanoribbons offer a minimally invasive and scalable platform for electromechanical biosensing.

  10. Elements of the cellular metabolic structure

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolic covalent modifications in different molecular structures, which are able to store biochemical information that is not encoded by DNA. Some of these covalent mark patterns can be transmitted across generations (epigenetic changes). Recently, the emergence of Hopfield-like attractor dynamics has been observed in self-organized enzymatic networks, which have the capacity to store functional catalytic patterns that can be correctly recovered by specific input stimuli. Hopfield-like metabolic dynamics are stable and can be maintained as a long-term biochemical memory. In addition, specific molecular information can be transferred from the functional dynamics of the metabolic networks to the enzymatic activity involved in covalent post-translational modulation, so that determined functional memory can be embedded in multiple stable molecular marks. The metabolic dynamics governed by Hopfield-type attractors (functional processes), as well as the enzymatic covalent modifications of specific molecules (structural dynamic processes) seem to represent the two stages of the dynamical memory of cellular metabolism (metabolic memory). Epigenetic processes appear to be the structural manifestation of this cellular metabolic memory. Here, a new framework for molecular information storage in the cell is presented, which is characterized by two functionally and molecularly interrelated systems: a dynamic, flexible and adaptive system (metabolic memory) and an essentially conservative system (genetic memory). The molecular information of both systems seems to coordinate the physiological development of the whole cell. PMID:25988183

  11. Cellular neurothekeoma of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Barrett, A W; Suhr, M

    2001-12-01

    Cellular neurothekeoma is an unusual benign neoplasm which, despite its name, is of uncertain origin. This report describes a cellular neurothekeoma of the cheek mucosa, the first at this site. The tumour presented in a 29-year-old man as a discrete mucosal thickening. Histology showed a generally well circumscribed, but unencapsulated, solid tumour which replaced the entire lamina propria and permeated between minor salivary glands and bundles of striated muscle in the submucosa. There was a sub-epithelial Grenz zone. The tumour was composed of nodules of pale, epithelioid cells separated by fascicles of spindle cells, with smaller strands and nests superficially. The nuclei were vesicular and, though mainly bland, occasionally atypical. The stroma was moderately infiltrated by mixed chronic inflammatory cells. Prominent nerves and blood vessels were seen at the periphery of the lesion, and neoplastic cells were noted within intact striated muscle fascicles. With immunohistochemistry, all the neoplastic cells strongly expressed NKI/C3, synaptophysin, neurone-specific enolase and vimentin, some expressed smooth muscle actin and PGP 9.5, but all were negative for S100, factor XIIIa, CD34, CD56, CD57, CD68, chromogranin A, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen and von Willebrand factor. The origin of the lesion is thus speculative. It was, however, completely excised and in 12 months there has been no recurrence.

  12. Cellular commitment in the developing cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Marzban, Hassan; Del Bigio, Marc R.; Alizadeh, Javad; Ghavami, Saeid; Zachariah, Robby M.; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is located in the posterior cranial fossa and is critical for motor coordination and non-motor functions including cognitive and emotional processes. The anatomical structure of cerebellum is distinct with a three-layered cortex. During development, neurogenesis and fate decisions of cerebellar primordium cells are orchestrated through tightly controlled molecular events involving multiple genetic pathways. In this review, we will highlight the anatomical structure of human and mouse cerebellum, the cellular composition of developing cerebellum, and the underlying gene expression programs involved in cell fate commitments in the cerebellum. A critical evaluation of the cell death literature suggests that apoptosis occurs in ~5% of cerebellar cells, most shortly after mitosis. Apoptosis and cellular autophagy likely play significant roles in cerebellar development, we provide a comprehensive discussion of their role in cerebellar development and organization. We also address the possible function of unfolded protein response in regulation of cerebellar neurogenesis. We discuss recent advancements in understanding the epigenetic signature of cerebellar compartments and possible connections between DNA methylation, microRNAs and cerebellar neurodegeneration. Finally, we discuss genetic diseases associated with cerebellar dysfunction and their role in the aging cerebellum. PMID:25628535

  13. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Palatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Yu; Xu, Jingyue; Jiang, Rulang

    2015-01-01

    Palatogenesis involves the initiation, growth, morphogenesis, and fusion of the primary and secondary palatal shelves from initially separate facial prominences during embryogenesis to form the intact palate separating the oral cavity from the nostrils. The palatal shelves consist mainly of cranial neural crest-derived mesenchyme cells covered under a simple embryonic epithelium. Growth and patterning of the palatal shelves are controlled by reciprocal epithelial-mesenchymal interactions regulated by multiple signaling pathways and transcription factors. During palatal shelf outgrowth, the embryonic epithelium develops a “teflon” coat consisting of a single, continuous layer of periderm cells that prevents the facial prominences and palatal shelves from forming aberrant inter-epithelial adhesions. Palatal fusion involves not only spatiotemporally-regulated disruption of the periderm but also dynamic cellular and molecular processes that result in adhesion and intercalation of the palatal medial edge epithelia to form an inter-shelf epithelial seam, and subsequent dissolution of the epithelial seam to form the intact roof of the oral cavity. The complexity of regulation of these morphogenetic processes is reflected by the common occurrence of cleft palate in humans. This review will summarize major recent advances and discuss major remaining gaps in the understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms controlling palatogenesis. PMID:26589921

  14. Preventing Injuries, Promoting Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Betsy

    2004-01-01

    Simultaneously promoting a safe learning environment that encourages students to express their creative voices while exploring the rudiments of dance technique can be difficult. This article discusses how the author has learned to do it effectively by employing a few simple classroom strategies. To prevent injuries during class, the author offers…

  15. Partners: Promoting Accessible Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sable, Janet; Gravink, Jill

    1995-01-01

    The Promoting Accessible Recreation through Networking, Education, Resources and Services (PARTNERS) Project, a partnership between Northeast Passage, the University of New Hampshire, and Granite State Independent Living Foundation, helps create barrier-free recreation for individuals with physical disabilities. The paper describes PARTNERS and…

  16. Promoting Continuing Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Gayle A.

    This handbook is intended for use by institutions in marketing their continuing education programs. A section on "Devising Your Strategy" looks at identifying a target audience, determining the marketing approach, and developing a marketing plan and promotional techniques. A discussion of media options looks at the advantages and disadvantages of…

  17. Dynamics of Promotion Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rix, Elizabeth Ann

    This study attempted to identify the criteria educational administrators use when selecting individuals for promotion. Researchers compared "operative criteria" (those actually used) with "posted criteria" (those espoused). Interviews were conducted with 92 school administrators. Brown's Form PROM, derived from Kelly's role construct repertory…

  18. Promoting La Cultura Hispana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluviose, David

    2007-01-01

    Launched in 1985 at Arizona State University, the Hispanic Research Center's (HRC) efforts to promote Latino and Chicano art and issues have flourished in recent years. In 2004, the HRC hosted the Arizona International Latina/o Arts Festival in collaboration with the Mesa Southwest Museum. The HRC has also founded a mentoring institute for…

  19. Health Promotion Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jason, Leonard A.; Curie, Carrie J.; Townsend, Stephanie M.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Katz, Richard B.; Sherk, Joseph L.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews four areas from the prevention science field, including: promoting healthy behavior; preventing substance abuse; preventing high-risk sexual behaviors; and preventing child abuse and sexual abuse. Recommendations are made regarding strategies for implementing empirically validated programs, supplementing school programs with ecological…

  20. DNA damage promotes Herpes Simplex Virus-1 protein expression in a neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Volcy, Ketna; Fraser, Nigel W.

    2013-01-01

    Although the induction of the cellular DNA damage response by Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection of epithelial cells in tissue culture promotes productive infection, there has been no experimental observation of the effect of the cellular DNA damage response on HSV-1 infection in vivo or in neuronal derived cell lines in tissue culture. Thus, it has been speculated that the lack of cellular DNA damage induction during infection of neurons may promote latency in these cells. This work examines the profile of HSV-1 promoter induction and protein expression, in the absence or presence of infection; using cellular DNA damage inducing topoisomerase inhibitors (Camptothecin and Etoposide) on a neuroblastoma cell line (C1300) in which HSV-1 infection fails to induce the DNA damage response. In the absence of infection, a plasmid expressing the immediate early ICP0 promoter was the most induced by the DNA damage drug treatments compared to the early (RR) and late (VP16) gene promoters. Similarly, drug treatment of C1300 cells infected with HSV-1 virus showed enhanced protein expression for ICP0, but not ICP4 and VP16 proteins. However, when the cells were infected with a HSV-1 virus defective in the immediate early gene trans-activator VP16 (in814) and treated with the DNA damaging drugs, there was enhanced expression of immediate early and late HSV-1 proteins. Although, viral infection of the neuroblastoma cell alone did not induce DNA damage, cellular DNA damage induced by drug treatments facilitated viral promoter induction and viral protein expression. This implicates a mechanism by which HSV-1 viral genes in a quiescent or latent state may become induced by cellular DNA damage in neuronal cells to facilitate productive infection. PMID:23354549

  1. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Barbara; Nitti, Mariapaola; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Colla, Renata; Ciucis, Chiara De; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27418953

  2. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Marengo, Barbara; Nitti, Mariapaola; Furfaro, Anna Lisa; Colla, Renata; Ciucis, Chiara De; Marinari, Umberto Maria; Pronzato, Maria Adelaide; Traverso, Nicola; Domenicotti, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy.

  3. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins prevent clearance of hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Ebert, Gregor; Preston, Simon; Allison, Cody; Cooney, James; Toe, Jesse G.; Stutz, Michael D.; Ojaimi, Samar; Scott, Hamish W.; Baschuk, Nikola; Nachbur, Ueli; Torresi, Joseph; Chin, Ruth; Colledge, Danielle; Li, Xin; Warner, Nadia; Revill, Peter; Bowden, Scott; Silke, John; Begley, C. Glenn; Pellegrini, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection can result in a spectrum of outcomes from immune-mediated control to disease progression, cirrhosis, and liver cancer. The host molecular pathways that influence and contribute to these outcomes need to be defined. Using an immunocompetent mouse model of chronic HBV infection, we identified some of the host cellular and molecular factors that impact on infection outcomes. Here, we show that cellular inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (cIAPs) attenuate TNF signaling during hepatitis B infection, and they restrict the death of infected hepatocytes, thus allowing viral persistence. Animals with a liver-specific cIAP1 and total cIAP2 deficiency efficiently control HBV infection compared with WT mice. This phenotype was partly recapitulated in mice that were deficient in cIAP2 alone. These results indicate that antagonizing the function of cIAPs may promote the clearance of HBV infection. PMID:25902529

  4. Redox Homeostasis and Cellular Antioxidant Systems: Crucial Players in Cancer Growth and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ciucis, Chiara De

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their products are components of cell signaling pathways and play important roles in cellular physiology and pathophysiology. Under physiological conditions, cells control ROS levels by the use of scavenging systems such as superoxide dismutases, peroxiredoxins, and glutathione that balance ROS generation and elimination. Under oxidative stress conditions, excessive ROS can damage cellular proteins, lipids, and DNA, leading to cell damage that may contribute to carcinogenesis. Several studies have shown that cancer cells display an adaptive response to oxidative stress by increasing expression of antioxidant enzymes and molecules. As a double-edged sword, ROS influence signaling pathways determining beneficial or detrimental outcomes in cancer therapy. In this review, we address the role of redox homeostasis in cancer growth and therapy and examine the current literature regarding the redox regulatory systems that become upregulated in cancer and their role in promoting tumor progression and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27418953

  5. Retrieval algorithm for rainfall mapping from microwave links in a cellular communication network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overeem, Aart; Leijnse, Hidde; Uijlenhoet, Remko

    2016-06-01

    Microwave links in commercial cellular communication networks hold a promise for areal rainfall monitoring and could complement rainfall estimates from ground-based weather radars, rain gauges, and satellites. It has been shown that country-wide (≈ 35 500 km2) 15 min rainfall maps can be derived from the signal attenuations of approximately 2400 microwave links in such a network. Here we give a detailed description of the employed rainfall retrieval algorithm. Moreover, the documented, modular, and user-friendly code (a package in the scripting language "R") is made available, including a 2-day data set of approximately 2600 commercial microwave links from the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to promote rainfall mapping utilising microwave links from cellular communication networks as an alternative or complementary means for continental-scale rainfall monitoring.

  6. Effect of Successive Observation on Quantum Cellular Automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inui, Norio; Nakamura, Kazuya; Ide, Yusuke; Konno, Norio

    2007-08-01

    A quantum cellular automaton, which is extended from a classical cellular automaton with Wolfram’s rule 150, is studied. In contrast to the classical cellular automaton, all possible configurations exist in a quantum superposition before measurement. We show that measuring the state of only one qubit significantly aeffects the time evolution in the quantum cellular automaton. In particular, we demonstrate that, occasionally, repeating the measurement enhances the appearance of the configurations found in the classical cellular automaton. The occurrence of this enhancement is primarily determined by the results of the measurement in the early time steps, and it is sustained by a feedback mechanism.

  7. Benchmark study between FIDAP and a cellular automata code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akau, R. L.; Stockman, H. W.

    A fluid flow benchmark exercise was conducted to compare results between a cellular automata code and FIDAP. Cellular automata codes are free from gridding constraints, and are generally used to model slow (Reynolds number approximately 1) flows around complex solid obstacles. However, the accuracy of cellular automata codes at higher Reynolds numbers, where inertial terms are significant, is not well-documented. In order to validate the cellular automata code, two fluids problems were investigated. For both problems, flow was assumed to be laminar, two-dimensional, isothermal, incompressible and periodic. Results showed that the cellular automata code simulated the overall behavior of the flow field.

  8. Toxicity of pyrolysis gases from some cellular polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Machado, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    Various samples of cellular polymers were evaluated for toxicity of pyrolysis gases, using the screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. The cellular polymer samples included polyimide, polymethacrylimide, polybismaleimide, polyurethane, polyisocyanurate, polyethylene, polychloroprene, polyvinyl chloride, polystyrene, polysiloxane, and polyphosphazene. The cellular polymers exhibited varying levels of toxicity under these test conditions. Among the rigid cellular polymers, times to death were shortest with the imide type foams and longest with polyvinyl chloride and polystyrene. Among the flexible cellular polymers, times to death were shortest with polyimide and polyester, and longest with polychloroprene and polysiloxane. Increased char yield was not necessarily associated with reduced toxicity.

  9. [Chronic kidney disease and cellular calcium homeostasis].

    PubMed

    Lajdová, I; Okša, A; Spustová, A; Dzúrik, R

    2012-01-01

    Free intracellular calcium represents a critical signaling mediator in a number of biological systems. Calcium cations (Ca2+) are an important ubiquitous messenger, controlling a broad range of cellular processes. Free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is controlled by mechanisms that regulate Ca2+ entry from the extracellular space and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores, and by the activity of ATP-dependent Ca2+ pumps and antiporters that move Ca2+ back into stores or out of cells. Chronic kidney disease is associated with a significant elevation in [Ca2+]i which is toxic to the cells and may be responsible for a multiple organ dysfunction. Disturbances in cellular calcium homeostasis in patients with chronic kidney disease represent a complex process. Our studies elucidate pathophysiological mechanisms of altered cellular calcium homeostasis in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells which represent the model of nonexcitable cells in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results demonstrate that [Ca2+]i is significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells already in early stages of chronic kidney disease. The calcium concentration of intracellular stores and the capacitative calcium entry into the cells of these patients are significantly higher in comparison with healthy volunteers. Also the pore-forming P2X7 receptors participate in increased [Ca2+]i in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with chronic kidney disease. An altered P2X7 receptor function and increased P2X7 receptor expression may contribute to the complex disturbances in intracellular calcium homeostasis in chronic kidney disease. On the other hand, the activity of plasmatic membrane Ca2+-ATPases which is responsible for removing excessive calcium out of the cell, was found to be decreased by 25 % when compared to healthy subjects. It means that not only the mechanisms of entry, but also of the removal are impaired by the disease. All these alterations in

  10. ATP and microfilaments in cellular oxidant injury.

    PubMed Central

    Hinshaw, D. B.; Armstrong, B. C.; Burger, J. M.; Beals, T. F.; Hyslop, P. A.

    1988-01-01

    Oxidant injury produces dramatic changes in cytoskeletal organization and cell shape. ATP synthetic pathways are major targets of oxidant injury resulting in rapid depletion of cellular ATP following oxidant exposure. The relation of ATP depletion to the changes in microfilament organization seen following H2O2 exposure were examined in the P388D1 cell line. Three hours of glucose depletion alone resulted in a decline in cellular ATP levels to less than 10% of controls, which was comparable to ATP levels in cells 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2 in the presence of glucose. Adherent cells stained with rhodamine phalloidin, a probe specific for polymerized (F) actin, revealed a progressive shortening of microfilaments into globular aggregates within cells depleted of glucose over 3 hours, a pattern similar to earlier observations of H2O2-injured cells after 1 hour. The changes in cellular ATP associated with glucose depletion or H2O2 exposure were then correlated with G actin content measured by the DNAse 1 inhibition assay. No real differences in G actin content as a percentage of total actin were seen in P388D1 cells following 3 hours of glucose depletion or 30 to 60 minutes after exposure to 5 mM H2O2. But 2 to 3 hours after exposure to H2O2 there was a progressive decrease in G actin as a percentage of total actin within the cells. Transmission electron microscopy of cells depleted of glucose for 3 h or 1 hour after exposure to H2O2 revealed the presence of side-to-side aggregates or bundles of microfilaments within the cells. These observations suggest that declining levels of ATP either from metabolic inhibition or H2O2 injury are correlated with the fragmentation and shortening of microfilaments into aggregates. No net change in monomeric or polymeric actin was necessary for this to occur. However, at later time points after H2O2 exposure some actin assembly did occur. Images p[484]-a p481-a p482-a Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:3414780

  11. Autophagy promotes DNA-protein crosslink clearance.

    PubMed

    Mu, Haibo; Liu, Qianjin; Niu, Hong; Wang, Dongdong; Tang, Jiangjiang; Duan, Jinyou

    2016-02-01

    Toxic DNA-protein crosslinks (DPCs) can result from exposure to radiation or chemotherapeutic agents. DPCs can also accumulate during aging or stress. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying clearance of DPCs remain largely unknown. Here, we have identified an important role of autophagy in the processing of DPCs induced by three representative agents: formaldehyde, a chemical used widely in industry; UV light; and camptothecin, a cytotoxic anticancer drug. Autophagy inhibitors, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or chloroquine (CQ), promoted the accumulation of DPCs in damaged cells and injured organs. siRNA-mediated silencing of Atg5 or Atg7, two essential components for the formation of the autophagosome, gave similar results. In contrast, the autophagy inducer rapamycin (RAP) attenuated DPCs in vitro and in vivo. Our findings reveal the importance of autophagy in controlling the level of DPCs, and may open up a new avenue for understanding the formation and clearance of this detrimental DNA adduct. PMID:26921017

  12. The cellular history of the glomerulus.

    PubMed

    George, Charles R P

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the structure and functions of the cells of the glomeruli has accumulated slowly over the past 350 years. Marcello Malpighi originated the work, but it failed to progress far until Schleiden and Schwann developed their cellular theory in 1839. William Bowman linked the glomeruli to the tubules, described the parietal epithelial cells, the basement membranes, and (with Robert Todd) apparently first identified endothelial cells. Electron microscopy contributed especially to an understanding of epithelial and endothelial cell structure. Axel Key first described mesangial cells, but acceptance of these fell into abeyance for many years until Yamada incontrovertibly demonstrated their existence. Techniques such as tissue culture and molecular biological investigations have, more recently, provided much information about glomerular cell function. Progress has, throughout, depended upon the discovery of ever more powerful methods of microscopy, the development of ancillary experimental methods, the formulation of persuasive explanations for observations, and the suggestion of succinct terminology to describe the features observed.

  13. Cellular adhesion and dynamic membrane tether extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Sarah; Chou, Tom

    2009-03-01

    We consider the energetics and dynamics of pulling a ligand bound to an integral membrane receptor. Deformation of the cell membrane and cytoskeleton is considered as the ligand is pulled. We assume that deformation of the cytoskeleton obeys Hook's law up to a critical force at which the cell membrane locally detaches from the cytoskeleton and a membrane tether forms. Depending on the pulling velocity and force, a membrane tether of varying length may form before the receptor-ligand bond breaks. We study the probability of tether formation and the mean tether length at the moment of ligand detachment as a function of system parameters. This problem is applicable to AFM studies of cellular adhesion molecules, and to the biological problem of leukocyte rolling.

  14. Cellular antioxidant activity of common vegetables.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Derito, Christopher M; Liu, M Keshu; He, Xiangjiu; Dong, Mei; Liu, Rui Hai

    2010-06-01

    The measurement of antioxidant activity using biologically relevant assays is important to screen fruits, vegetables, natural products, and dietary supplements for potential health benefits. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay quantifies antioxidant activity using a cell culture model and was developed to meet the need for a more biologically representative method than the popular chemistry antioxidant capacity measures. The objective of the study was to determine the CAA, total phenolic contents, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of 27 vegetables commonly consumed in the United States. Beets, broccoli, and red pepper had the highest CAA values, whereas cucumber had the lowest. CAA values were significantly correlated to total phenolic content. Potatoes were found to be the largest contributors of vegetable phenolics and CAA to the American diet. Increased fruit and vegetable consumption is an effective strategy to increase antioxidant intake and decrease oxidative stress and may lead to reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  15. Lipid Droplets And Cellular Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Tobias C.; Farese, Robert V.

    2013-01-01

    Among organelles, lipid droplets (LDs) uniquely constitute a hydrophobic phase in the aqueous environment of the cytosol. Their hydrophobic core of neutral lipids stores metabolic energy and membrane components, making LDs hubs for lipid metabolism. In addition, LDs are implicated in a number of other cellular functions, ranging from protein storage and degradation to viral replication. These processes are functionally linked to many physiological and pathological conditions, including obesity and related metabolic diseases. Despite their important functions and nearly ubiquitous presence in cells, many aspects of LD biology are unknown. In the past few years, the pace of LD investigation has increased, providing new insights. Here, we review the current knowledge of LD cell biology and its translation to physiology. PMID:22524315

  16. Stochasticity in plant cellular growth and patterning

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Heather M.; Roeder, Adrienne H. K.

    2014-01-01

    Plants, along with other multicellular organisms, have evolved specialized regulatory mechanisms to achieve proper tissue growth and morphogenesis. During development, growing tissues generate specialized cell types and complex patterns necessary for establishing the function of the organ. Tissue growth is a tightly regulated process that yields highly reproducible outcomes. Nevertheless, the underlying cellular and molecular behaviors are often stochastic. Thus, how does stochasticity, together with strict genetic regulation, give rise to reproducible tissue development? This review draws examples from plants as well as other systems to explore stochasticity in plant cell division, growth, and patterning. We conclude that stochasticity is often needed to create small differences between identical cells, which are amplified and stabilized by genetic and mechanical feedback loops to begin cell differentiation. These first few differentiating cells initiate traditional patterning mechanisms to ensure regular development. PMID:25250034

  17. Complex dynamics of cellular automata rule 119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Chen, Fang-Yue

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamical behaviors of cellular automata rule 119 are studied from the viewpoint of symbolic dynamics in the bi-infinite symbolic sequence space Σ2. It is shown that there exists one Bernoulli-measure global attractor of rule 119, which is also the nonwandering set of the rule. Moreover, it is demonstrated that rule 119 is topologically mixing on the global attractor and possesses the positive topological entropy. Therefore, rule 119 is chaotic in the sense of both Li-Yorke and Devaney on the global attractor. It is interesting that rule 119, a member of Wolfram’s class II which was said to be simple as periodic before, actually possesses a chaotic global attractor in Σ2. Finally, it is noted that the method presented in this work is also applicable to studying the dynamics of other rules, especially the 112 Bernoulli-shift rules therein.

  18. Biomimetic superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Liu, Jeffery Z; Chang, Shery L Y; Wu, Yanzhe; Li, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Many applications proposed for graphene require multiple sheets be assembled into a monolithic structure. The ability to maintain structural integrity upon large deformation is essential to ensure a macroscopic material which functions reliably. However, it has remained a great challenge to achieve high elasticity in three-dimensional graphene networks. Here we report that the marriage of graphene chemistry with ice physics can lead to the formation of ultralight and superelastic graphene-based cellular monoliths. Mimicking the hierarchical structure of natural cork, the resulting materials can sustain their structural integrity under a load of >50,000 times their own weight and can rapidly recover from >80% compression. The unique biomimetic hierarchical structure also provides this new class of elastomers with exceptionally high energy absorption capability and good electrical conductivity. The successful synthesis of such fascinating materials paves the way to explore the application of graphene in a self-supporting, structurally adaptive and 3D macroscopic form. PMID:23212370

  19. [Cellular model of blood coagulation process].

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Rzeźnicka, Paulina; Saluk, Joanna; Nowak, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Blood coagulation is a process which main objective is the prevention of blood loss when the integrity of the blood vessel is damaged. Over the years, have been presented a number of concepts characterizing the mechanism of thrombus formation. Since the 60s of last century was current cascade model of the coagulation wherein forming of the fibrin clot is determined by two pathways called extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. In the nineties of the last century Monroe and Hoffman presented his concept of blood coagulation process which complement the currently valid model of cells participation especially of blood platelets which aim is to provide a negatively charged phospholipid surface and thereby allow the coagulation enzymatic complexes formation. Developed conception they called cellular model of coagulation. The aim of this work was to present in details of this blood coagulation, including descriptions of its various phases.

  20. Cellular immunity and lymphokine production during spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Konstantinova, I. V.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Lesniak, A. T.; Shaffar, L.; Mandel, A.; Rykova, M. P.; Antropova, E. N.; Ferrua, B.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented on changes in cellular immunity and in the production of lymphokine in spacecrews during spaceflights. Measurements were carried out on blood samples collected from 50 cosmonauts before and after spaceflights of different duration, on board Salyut-6, Salyut-7, or Mir. Additional data were obtained from rats flown on board the Cosmos-1667 and Cosmos-1887 biosatellites. The parameters measured included the PHA responsiveness of T lymphocytes, the activity of T-helper cells and of nonspecific T suppressors, the activity of the so-called natural killer lymphocytes, the production of gamma-interferon, and the cell-surface markers. Results showed that the frequency and the extent of changes in the immunologic resistance of subjects depended on the duration of the flight. However, even after the most prolonged (365 days) spaceflight, the changes observed were mostly of a functional character with subsequent rapid return to normal.

  1. Observations on cellular structures of Porphyridium cruentum.

    PubMed

    BRODY, M; VATTER, A E

    1959-03-25

    The cellular structure of Porphyridium cruentum was studied with both light and electron microscope. The photosynthetic plastid in this red alga was found to be structurally similar to that in the Chlorophyceae and higher green plants. The phycobilins, as well as the chlorophyll, seem to be associated with the lamellae of the plastid. The pyrenoid, a region of low lamellar density, contains no tubules, and does not appear to function in synthesis or storage of reserve material. Grains of floridean starch are located in the cytoplasm, outside the plastid. Typical mitochondrial organelles were not observed. The nucleus is eccentric, and contains a nucleolus located on the inner face of the nucleus, nearest the plastid. The schedule for staining the nucleus is given in detail. Other cell structures (sheath, dictyosomes, etc.) are described. Growing cells in light of intensity leads to disruption of the parallel arrangement of the lamellar characteristic of cells grown in moderate light.

  2. Reactive nitrogen species in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Levi; Franco, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    The transduction of cellular signals occurs through the modification of target molecules. Most of these modifications are transitory, thus the signal transduction pathways can be tightly regulated. Reactive nitrogen species are a group of compounds with different properties and reactivity. Some reactive nitrogen species are highly reactive and their interaction with macromolecules can lead to permanent modifications, which suggested they were lacking the specificity needed to participate in cell signaling events. However, the perception of reactive nitrogen species as oxidizers of macromolecules leading to general oxidative damage has recently evolved. The concept of redox signaling is now well established for a number of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. In this context, the post-translational modifications introduced by reactive nitrogen species can be very specific and are active participants in signal transduction pathways. This review addresses the role of these oxidative modifications in the regulation of cell signaling events. PMID:25888647

  3. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jampel, H.D.; McGuigan, L.J.; Dunkelberger, G.R.; L'Hernault, N.L.; Quigley, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery.

  4. Cellular imaging using temporally flickering nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ilovitsh, Tali; Danan, Yossef; Meir, Rinat; Meiri, Amihai; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the surface plasmon resonance effect in gold nanoparticles enables their use as contrast agents in a variety of applications for compound cellular imaging. However, most techniques suffer from poor signal to noise ratio (SNR) statistics due to high shot noise that is associated with low photon count in addition to high background noise. We demonstrate an effective way to improve the SNR, in particular when the inspected signal is indistinguishable in the given noisy environment. We excite the temporal flickering of the scattered light from gold nanoparticle that labels a biological sample. By preforming temporal spectral analysis of the received spatial image and by inspecting the proper spectral component corresponding to the modulation frequency, we separate the signal from the wide spread spectral noise (lock-in amplification). PMID:25650019

  5. Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering: A Tipping Point

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Genevieve; Butler, Peter J.; Chang, David W.; Chien, Shu; Clegg, Robert M.; Dewey, C. Forbes; Dong, Cheng; Guo, X. Edward; Helmke, Brian P.; Hess, Henry; Jacobs, Christopher R.; Kaunas, Roland R.; Kumar, Sanjay; Lu, Helen H.; Mathur, Anshu B.; Mow, Van C.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.; Skoracki, Roman; Wang, Ning; Wang, Yingxiao; Zhu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    In January of 2011, the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) and the Society for Physical Regulation in Biology and Medicine (SPRBM) held its inaugural Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering (CMBE) conference. The CMBE conference assembled worldwide leaders in the field of CMBE and held a very successful Round Table discussion among leaders. One of the action items was to collectively construct a white paper regarding the future of CMBE. Thus, the goal of this report is to emphasize the impact of CMBE as an emerging field, identify critical gaps in research that may be answered by the expertise of CMBE, and provide perspectives on enabling CMBE to address challenges in improving human health. Our goal is to provide constructive guidelines in shaping the future of CMBE. PMID:23264805

  6. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  7. Cellular telephone-based radiation detection instrument

    DOEpatents

    Craig, William W.; Labov, Simon E.

    2011-06-14

    A network of radiation detection instruments, each having a small solid state radiation sensor module integrated into a cellular phone for providing radiation detection data and analysis directly to a user. The sensor module includes a solid-state crystal bonded to an ASIC readout providing a low cost, low power, light weight compact instrument to detect and measure radiation energies in the local ambient radiation field. In particular, the photon energy, time of event, and location of the detection instrument at the time of detection is recorded for real time transmission to a central data collection/analysis system. The collected data from the entire network of radiation detection instruments are combined by intelligent correlation/analysis algorithms which map the background radiation and detect, identify and track radiation anomalies in the region.

  8. Multichamber Multipotentiostat System for Cellular Microphysiometry

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Eduardo A.; Snider, Rachel M.; Reiserer, Ronald S.; McKenzie, Jennifer R.; Kimmel, Danielle W.; Eklund, Sven E.; Wikswo, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Multianalyte microphysiometry is a powerful technique for studying cellular metabolic flux in real time. Monitoring several analytes concurrently in a number of individual chambers, however, requires specific instrumentation that is not available commercially in a single, compact, benchtop form at an affordable cost. We developed a multipotentiostat system capable of performing simultaneous amperometric and potentiometric measurements in up to eight individual chambers. The modular design and custom LabVIEW™ control software provide flexibility and allow for expansion and modification to suit different experimental conditions. Superior accuracy is achieved when operating the instrument in a standalone configuration; however, measurements performed in conjunction with a previously developed multianalyte microphysiometer have shown low levels of crosstalk as well. Calibrations and experiments with primary and immortalized cell cultures demonstrate the performance of the instrument and its capabilities. PMID:25242863

  9. Commercialization of cellular immunotherapies for cancer.

    PubMed

    Walker, Anthony; Johnson, Robert

    2016-04-15

    Successful commercialization of a cell therapy requires more than proving safety and efficacy to the regulators. The inherent complexity of cellular products delivers particular manufacturing, logistical and reimbursement hurdles that threaten commercial viability for any therapy with a less than spectacular clinical profile that truly changes the standard of care. This is particularly acute for autologous cell therapies where patients receive bespoke treatments manufactured from a sample of their own cells and where economies of scale, which play an important role in containing the production costs for small molecule and antibody therapeutics, are highly limited. Nevertheless, the promise of 'game-changing' efficacy, as exemplified by very high levels of complete responses in refractory haematological malignancies, has attracted capital investments on a vast scale, and the attendant pace of technology development provides promising indicators for future clinical and commercial success. PMID:27068936

  10. Microfluidic Electroporation for Cellular Analysis and Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Electroporation is a simple yet powerful technique for breaching cell membrane barrier. The applications of electroporation can be generally divided into two categories: the release of intracellular proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites for analysis and the delivery of exogenous reagents such as genes, drugs and nanoparticles with therapeutic purposes or for cellular manipulation. In this review, we go over the basic physics associated with cell electroporation and highlight recent technological advances on microfluidic platforms for conducting electroporation. Within the context of its working mechanism, we summarize the accumulated knowledge on how the parameters of electroporation affect its performance for various tasks. We discuss various strategies and designs for conducting electroporation at microscale and then focus on analysis of intracellular contents and delivery of exogenous agents as two major applications of the technique. Finally, an outlook for future applications of microfluidic electroporation in increasingly diverse utilities is presented. PMID:23917998

  11. Cellular nanotechnology: making biological interfaces smarter

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Paula M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been an outburst of research on engineered cell–material interfaces driven by nanotechnology and its tools and techniques. This tutorial review begins by providing a brief introduction to nanostructured materials, followed by an overview of the wealth of nanoscale fabrication and analysis tools available for their development. This background serves as the basis for a discussion of early breakthroughs and recent key developments in the endeavour to develop nanostructured materials as smart interfaces for fundamental cellular studies, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The review covers three major aspects of nanostructured interfaces – nanotopographical control, dynamic behaviour and intracellular manipulation and sensing – where efforts are continuously being made to further understand cell function and provide new ways to control cell behaviour. A critical reflection of the current status and future challenges are discussed as a conclusion to the review. PMID:24097313

  12. Divide Et Impera--cellular auxin compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2013-02-01

    The phytohormone auxin is an essential regulator for plant growth and development. Decades of intensive research revealed the mutual importance of auxin metabolism and intercellular cell-to-cell transport for the regulation of spatiotemporal auxin distribution. Just recently, intracellular putative auxin carriers, such as the PIN-FORMED (PIN)5/PIN8 and the PIN-LIKES (PILS)2/PILS5 were discovered at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and seem to limit nuclear auxin signaling via an auxin sequestration mechanism. Moreover, these auxin carriers at the ER might provide a link between auxin compartmentalization and auxin conjugation-based metabolism. Here we review the recent findings on auxin compartmentalization at the ER and discuss its potential contribution to cellular auxin homeostasis and its importance for plant development. PMID:23200033

  13. Microfluidic electroporation for cellular analysis and delivery.

    PubMed

    Geng, Tao; Lu, Chang

    2013-10-01

    Electroporation is a simple yet powerful technique for breaching the cell membrane barrier. The applications of electroporation can be generally divided into two categories: the release of intracellular proteins, nucleic acids and other metabolites for analysis and the delivery of exogenous reagents such as genes, drugs and nanoparticles with therapeutic purposes or for cellular manipulation. In this review, we go over the basic physics associated with cell electroporation and highlight recent technological advances on microfluidic platforms for conducting electroporation. Within the context of its working mechanism, we summarize the accumulated knowledge on how the parameters of electroporation affect its performance for various tasks. We discuss various strategies and designs for conducting electroporation at the microscale and then focus on analysis of intracellular contents and delivery of exogenous agents as two major applications of the technique. Finally, an outlook for future applications of microfluidic electroporation in increasingly diverse utilities is presented.

  14. Spatial game in cellular automaton evacuation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Schantz, Anton; Ehtamo, Harri

    2015-11-01

    For numerical simulations of crowd dynamics in an evacuation we need a computationally light environment, such as the cellular automaton model (CA). By choosing the right model parameters, different types of crowd behavior and collective effects can be produced. But the CA does not answer why, when, and how these different behaviors and collective effects occur. In this article, we present a model, where we couple a spatial evacuation game to the CA. In the game, an agent chooses its strategy by observing its neighbors' strategies. The game matrix changes with the distance to the exit as the evacuation conditions develop. In the resulting model, an agent's strategy choice alters the parameters that govern its behavior in the CA. Thus, with our model, we are able to simulate how evacuation conditions affect the behavior of the crowd. Also, we show that some of the collective effects observed in evacuations are a result of the simple game the agents play.

  15. Microsystems for cellular force measurement: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayne Zheng, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Xin

    2011-05-01

    Microsystems are providing key advances in studying single cell mechanical behavior. The mechanical interaction of cells with their extracellular matrix is fundamentally important for cell migration, division, phagocytosis and aptoptosis. This review reports the development of microsystems on studying cell forces. Microsystems provide advantages of studying single cells since the scale of cells is on the micron level. The components of microsystems provide culture, loading, guiding, trapping and on chip analysis of cellular mechanical forces. This paper gives overviews on how MEMS are advancing in the field of cell biomechno sensory systems. It presents different materials, and mode of studying cell mechanics. Finally, we comment on the future directions and challenges on the state of art techniques.

  16. Analytical Solution of Traffic Cellular Automata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Hung

    2009-08-01

    Complex traffic system seems to be simulated successfully by cellular automaton (CA) models. Various models are developed to understand single-lane traffic, multilane traffic, lane-changing behavior and network traffic situations. However, the result of CA simulation can only be obtained after massive microscopic computation. Although, the mean field theory (MFT) has been studied to be the approximation of CA model, the MFT can only applied to the simple CA rules or small value of parameters. In this study, we simulate traffic flow by the NaSch model under different combination of parameters, which are maximal speed, dawdling probability and density. After that, the position of critical density, the slope of free-flow and congested regime are observed and modeled due to the simulated data. Finally, the coefficients of the model will be calibrated by the simulated data and the analytical solution of traffic CA is obtained.

  17. Cellular metabolism and macrophage functional polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linnan; Zhao, Qingjie; Yang, Tao; Ding, Wenjun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a functionally heterogeneous cell population that is mainly shaped by a variety of microenvironmental stimuli. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce a classical activation of macrophages (M1), whereas IL-4 and IL-13 induce an alternative activation program in macrophages (M2). Reprogramming of intracellular metabolisms is required for the proper polarization and functions of activated macrophages. Similar to the Warburg effect observed in tumor cells, M1 macrophages increase glucose consumption and lactate release and decreased oxygen consumption rate. In comparison, M2 macrophages mainly employ oxidative glucose metabolism pathways. In addition, fatty acids, vitamins, and iron metabolisms are also related to macrophage polarization. However, detailed metabolic pathways involved in macrophages have remained elusive. Understanding the bidirectional interactions between cellular metabolism and macrophage functions in physiological and pathological situations and the regulatory pathways involved may offer novel therapies for macrophage-associated diseases.

  18. Cellular senescence and its effector programs

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Rafik; Sadaie, Mahito; Hoare, Matthew; Narita, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a stress response that accompanies stable exit from the cell cycle. Classically, senescence, particularly in human cells, involves the p53 and p16/Rb pathways, and often both of these tumor suppressor pathways need to be abrogated to bypass senescence. In parallel, a number of effector mechanisms of senescence have been identified and characterized. These studies suggest that senescence is a collective phenotype of these multiple effectors, and their intensity and combination can be different depending on triggers and cell types, conferring a complex and diverse nature to senescence. Series of studies on senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in particular have revealed various layers of functionality of senescent cells in vivo. Here we discuss some key features of senescence effectors and attempt to functionally link them when it is possible. PMID:24449267

  19. Physical Principles of Nanoparticle Cellular Endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sulin; Gao, Huajian; Bao, Gang

    2015-09-22

    This review article focuses on the physiochemical mechanisms underlying nanoparticle uptake into cells. When nanoparticles are in close vicinity to a cell, the interactions between the nanoparticles and the cell membrane generate forces from different origins. This leads to the membrane wrapping of the nanoparticles followed by cellular uptake. This article discusses how the kinetics, energetics, and forces are related to these interactions and dependent on the size, shape, and stiffness of nanoparticles, the biomechanical properties of the cell membrane, as well as the local environment of the cells. The discussed fundamental principles of the physiochemical causes for nanoparticle-cell interaction may guide new studies of nanoparticle endocytosis and lead to better strategies to design nanoparticle-based approaches for biomedical applications.

  20. The cellular history of the glomerulus.

    PubMed

    George, Charles R P

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge about the structure and functions of the cells of the glomeruli has accumulated slowly over the past 350 years. Marcello Malpighi originated the work, but it failed to progress far until Schleiden and Schwann developed their cellular theory in 1839. William Bowman linked the glomeruli to the tubules, described the parietal epithelial cells, the basement membranes, and (with Robert Todd) apparently first identified endothelial cells. Electron microscopy contributed especially to an understanding of epithelial and endothelial cell structure. Axel Key first described mesangial cells, but acceptance of these fell into abeyance for many years until Yamada incontrovertibly demonstrated their existence. Techniques such as tissue culture and molecular biological investigations have, more recently, provided much information about glomerular cell function. Progress has, throughout, depended upon the discovery of ever more powerful methods of microscopy, the development of ancillary experimental methods, the formulation of persuasive explanations for observations, and the suggestion of succinct terminology to describe the features observed. PMID:14736025