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Sample records for metallurgy lectures chapter

  1. TRADITIONAL METALLURGY, NANOTECHNOLOGIES AND STRUCTURAL MATERIALS: A SORBY AWARD LECTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Louthan, M

    2007-07-17

    Traditional metallurgical processes are among the many ''old fashion'' practices that use nanoparticles to control the behavior of materials. Many of these practices were developed long before microscopy could resolve nanoscale features, yet the practitioners learned to manipulate and control microstructural elements that they could neither see nor identify. Furthermore, these early practitioners used that control to modify microstructures and develop desired material properties. Centuries old colored glass, ancient high strength steels and medieval organ pipes derived many of their desirable features through control of nanoparticles in their microstructures. Henry Sorby was among the first to recognize that the properties of rocks, minerals, metals and organic materials were controlled by microstructure. However, Mr. Sorby was accused of the folly of trying to study mountains with a microscope. Although he could not resolve nanoscale microstructural features, Mr. Sorby's observations revolutionized the study of materials. The importance of nanoscale microstructural elements should be emphasized, however, because the present foundation for structural materials was built by manipulating those features. That foundation currently supports several multibillion dollar industries but is not generally considered when the nanomaterials revolution is discussed. This lecture demonstrates that using nanotechnologies to control the behavior of metallic materials is almost as old as the practice of metallurgy and that many of the emergent nanomaterials technologists are walking along pathways previously paved by traditional metallurgists.

  2. The Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhury, S. Raj

    2011-01-01

    Academic lectures for the purpose of instruction maintain an important presence in most colleges and universities worldwide. This chapter examines the current state of the lecture and how learning sciences research can inform the most effective use of this method. The author presents evidence that the lecture can be an effective element of…

  3. Plutonium Metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Freibert, Franz J.

    2012-08-09

    Due to its nuclear properties, Pu will remain a material of global interest well into the future. Processing, Structure, Properties and Performance remains a good framework for discussion of Pu materials science Self-irradiation and aging effects continue to be central in discussions of Pu metallurgy Pu in its elemental form is extremely unstable, but alloying helps to stabilize Pu; but, questions remain as to how and why this stabilization occurs. Which is true Pu-Ga binary phase diagram: US or Russian? Metallurgical issues such as solute coring, phase instability, crystallographic texture, etc. result in challenges to casting, processing, and properties modeling and experiments. For Ga alloyed FCC stabilized Pu, temperature and pressure remain as variables impacting phase stability.

  4. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (11th, New Brunswick, New Jersey, September 20-23, 1989), Volume 2: Plenary Lectures and Symposia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Carolyn A., Ed.; Goldin, Gerald A., Ed.; Davis, Robert B., Ed.

    This document reports on the 11th annual conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (PME-NA). Plenary and response lectures and speakers include: "The Description and Analysis of Mathematical Processes" (Nicolas Herscovics); "To Know Mathematics is to Go Beyond Thinking That…

  5. The Effects of Formative Assessment Pre-Lecture Online Chapter Quizzes and Student-Initiated Inquiries to the Instructor on Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Judith C.; Majerich, David M.; Bernacki, Matthew L.; Varnum, Susan Jansen; Ducette, Joseph P.

    2011-01-01

    This study's goal was to quantify the effects pre-lecture online quizzes and student-initiated inquiries to the instructor, either virtually or in person, had on students' achievement. Pre- and post-course tests were also implemented to an experimental and a comparison section of the same course. The number of electronic administrative contacts…

  6. Metallurgy Beyond Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallino, Isabella; Busch, Ralf

    2009-08-01

    Metallurgy is one of the oldest sciences. Its history can be traced back to 6000 BCE with the discovery of Gold, and each new discovery - Copper, Silver, Lead, Tin, Iron and Mercury - marked the beginning of a new era of civilization. Currently there are 86 known metals, but until the end of the 17th century, only 12 of these were known. Steel (Fe-C alloy) was discovered in the 11th century BCE; however, it took until 1709 CE before we mastered the smelting of pig-iron by using coke instead of charcoal and started the industrial revolution. The metallurgy of nowadays is mainly about discovering better materials with superior properties to fulfil the increasing demand of the global market. Promising are the Glassy Metals or Bulk Metallic Glasses (BMGs) - discovered at first in the late 50s at the California Institute of Technology - which are several times stronger than the best industrial steels and 10-times springier. The unusual structure that lacks crystalline grains makes BMGs so promising. They have a liquid-like structure that means they melt at lower temperatures, can be moulded nearly as easily as plastics, and can be shaped into features just 10 nm across. The best BMG formers are based on Zr, Pd, Pt, Ca, Au and, recently discovered, also Fe. They have typically three to five components with large atomic size mismatch and a composition close to a deep eutectic. Packing in such liquids is very dense, with a low content of free volume, resulting in viscosities that are several orders of magnitude higher than in pure metal melts.

  7. Lecturing the lecturers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Jonathan

    2010-02-01

    João Magueijo's article "Cargo-cult training" about the failings of compulsory educational training for lecturers (December 2009 pp16-17) is an illustration of why some university lecturers do need to be educated about education. His argument that we should use lectures because students like them ignores the large body of educational research stating that this is the least effective form of education. It might, as the well-known aphorism states, be a successful means of transferring the notes of the lecturer to the notes of the students without going through the minds of either, but the evidence shows that only 10% of students learn material in this way. Rather, all the educational literature points to the fact that interactive, discursive methods are much more likely to produce learning with understanding.

  8. Extractive Metallurgy Program funded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In an effort to concentrate research on ore dressing and metal production, the National Science Foundation (NSF) formed a new basic research program as a part of its Chemical and Process Engineering Division. This program will be under the auspices of NSF's Engineering Directorate. Research is to be supported on every step of extractive metallurgy, from mining to processing to production, and even to reprocessing and disposal. Budgeting for the new program is expected to be on the order of $1.2 million for fiscal year 1981.A program of this nature was apparently considered seriously by the Carter administration as a joint Department of Interior-private industry project of considerable size. Then-Secretary of Interior Cecil Andrus evidently did not support the program, but there is wide agreement throughout the mineral industries and the university community that such research is badly needed for the U.S. to compete. A joint program could benefit by cutting across the many difficult regulations that now are blamed for slowing research in minerals processing in this country.

  9. Metals in Past Societies: A Global Perspective on Indigenous African Metallurgy Shadreck Chirikure

    SciTech Connect

    Devanathan, Ram

    2015-10-01

    This slim book (166 pages) shines a spotlight on pre-industrial African metallurgy, its global connections, and anthropological implications. It integrates seemingly disparate disciplines, such as history, geology, ethnography, archeology, and metallurgy, to illustrate the diversity and innovation in metallurgy across Africa and the role of metals in the rise of socio-economic inequalities and political power. The book has 7 chapters and the focus on metals as enablers of human needs and wants is evident in each chapter. The first chapter presents the context of the work and data sources. The second chapter focuses on the origin and development of mining and metallurgy in pre-industrial Africa. Chapter 3 is dedicated to the interaction of nature and culture in the process of mining. Chapter 4 deals with the transformation of the ore into metal by smelting and the sociocultural aspects of this process. Chapter 5 explores the social and cultural roles acquired by metals as a result of fabrication into objects. Chapter 6 examines the social role of metals, trade in metals, cultural contact, proto-globalization, and technology transfer. Finally, Chapter 7 draws lessons for global anthropology from the African experience. The sources of information are adequately cited and the long list of references at the end of each chapter will be a boon to researchers in this field. The author highlights the cultural aspects and social context of the adoption of metallurgy in Africa while drawing parallels between practices in pre-industrial Africa and those in other parts of the world. The book is peppered with delightful vignettes that offer insights into the process of transforming nature into culturally significant objects. For instance, African miners, like their counterparts in Nepal and Latin America, called upon deities, spirits and ancestors to mediate between nature and humans. Women had distinct roles in this process, but there were variations in these roles and in the

  10. The Effectiveness of Programed Instruction Versus the Lecture-Discussion Method of Teaching Basic Metallurgical Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, David Carl

    The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional lecture-discussion method and an illustrated programed textbook method when teaching a unit of instruction on the basic concepts of metallurgy. The control group used a portion of a conventional textbook accompanied by lecture, chalkboard illustration, and class discussion. The experimental…

  11. The Effectiveness of Programed Instruction Versus the Lecture-Discussion Method of Teaching Basic Metallurgical Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bockman, David Carl

    The purpose of this study was to compare the conventional lecture-discussion method and an illustrated programed textbook method when teaching a unit of instruction on the basic concepts of metallurgy. The control group used a portion of a conventional textbook accompanied by lecture, chalkboard illustration, and class discussion. The experimental…

  12. Successful Lecturing

    PubMed Central

    Copeland, H Liesel; Longworth, David L; Hewson, Mariana G; Stoller, James K

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In a study conducted over 3 large symposia on intensive review of internal medicine, we previously assessed the features that were most important to course participants in evaluating the quality of a lecture. In this study, we attempt to validate these observations by assessing prospectively the extent to which ratings of specific lecture features would predict the overall evaluation of lectures. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS After each lecture, 143 to 355 course participants rated the overall lecture quality of 69 speakers involved in a large symposium on intensive review of internal medicine. In addition, 7 selected participants and the course directors rated specific lecture features and overall quality for each speaker. The relations among the variables were assessed through Pearson correlation coefficients and cluster analysis. Regression analysis was performed to determine which features would predict the overall lecture quality ratings. The features that most highly correlated with ratings of overall lecture quality were the speaker's abilities to identify key points (r = .797) and be engaging (r = .782), the lecture clarity (r = .754), and the slide comprehensibility (r = .691) and format (r = .660). The three lecture features of engaging the audience, lecture clarity, and using a case-based format were identified through regression as the strongest predictors of overall lecture quality ratings (R2= 0.67, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS We have identified core lecture features that positively affect the success of the lecture. We believe our findings are useful for lecturers wanting to improve their effectiveness and for educators who design continuing medical education curricula. PMID:10886470

  13. Recent trends in extractive metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Metallurgists and solution geochemists are joining forces to develop processes for extraction of metals from low-grade ores. The processes, which come under the name hydrometallurgy, include several new applications of solvent extraction techniques. Aqueous solutions are employed, leaching metals from ores, mine waste dumps, and even from deposits still in the ground. It was notable, for example, that Chemical and Engineering News (Feb. 8, 1982) recently featured the subject of hydrometallurgy in a special report. They noted that ‘recovering metals by use of aqueous solutions at relatively low temperatures increasingly is competing with dry, high-temperature pyrometallurgical methods.’ The relatively new techniques have caused a revolution, of sorts, in engineering programs of university metallurgy departments. The challenge of developing selective metal dissolution processes is drawing upon the best national talent in the fields of solution geochemistry and metallurgy.

  14. Porous Materials by Powder Metallurgy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-30

    generally determine porosity and pore size of the resulting porous material. The beads can be microballoons, which are hollow inside, or they can be...proved jYi- --*;V--, - one QUALITY INSPECTED 0 Applicant: Everett Patent Application Serial Number: Navy Case Number: 78,529 5 Porous Materials...By Powder Metallurgy Background of Invention Field of Invention: This invention pertains to porous material fabrication by controlling pore size

  15. The Rules of Ferrous Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The ways in which the sciences have been delineated and categorized throughout history provide insights into the formation, stabilization, and establishment of scientific systems of knowledge. The Dresdener school’s approach for explaining and categorizing the genesis of the engineering disciplines is still valid, but needs to be complemented by further-reaching methodological and theoretical reflections. Pierre Bourdieu’s theory of social practice is applied to the question of how individual agents succeed in influencing decisively a discipline’s changing object orientation, institutionalisation and self-reproduction. Through the accumulation of social, cultural and economic capital, they succeed in realising their own organisational ideas and scientific programs. Key concepts for the analysis include the struggle for power and resources, monopolies of interpretation, and the degree of autonomy. A case study from the Aachener Technische Hochschule shows that the consolidation of ferrous metallurgy can be conceived as a symbolical struggle between Fritz Wüst, professor for ferrous metallurgy, and the German Iron and Steel Institute, leading to a construction of a system of differences in which scientists accepted being scientists rather than entrepreneurs, and entrepreneurs accepted becoming entrepreneurs and renounced science.

  16. Developments in Titanium Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froes, F. H.; Eylon, D.; Eichelman, G. E.; Burte, H. M.

    1980-02-01

    The high buy-to-fly ratio associated with many titanium components, combined with forging and machining difficulties, and recent availability problems, has led to a strong drive for near-net titanium shape fabrication. A very promising method of attaining this goal is powder metallurgy. Two major approaches are considered in this article: the "elemental" and "pre-alloyed" powder methods. Shape-making capability and mechanical properties of both technologies are presented. Consideration is given to the cost-effectiveness of the processes and mechanical performance compared to conventional fabrication methods. Design philosophies, modified to include the presence of foreign particles in the compacted article, are discussed. Emerging advances in the technology are presented and future developments forecast.

  17. [Respiratory diseases in metallurgy production workers].

    PubMed

    Shliapnikov, D M; Vlasova, E M; Ponomareva, T A

    2012-01-01

    The authors identified features of respiratory diseases in workers of various metallurgy workshops. Cause-effect relationships are defined between occupational risk factors and respiratory diseases, with determining the affection level.

  18. IMPROVED PRODUCTION OF POWDER METALLURGY ITEMS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    POWDER METALLURGY, *POWDER ALLOYS , MATERIAL FORMING, PRODUCTION, NICKEL ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , SINTERING, FORGING, PARTICLE SIZE...HIGH TEMPERATURE, SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, HOT WORKING, HEAT TREATMENT, MICROSTRUCTURE, HARDNESS, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , TITANIUM ALLOYS , ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS , CARBON ALLOYS .

  19. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys and composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisagor, W. B.; Stein, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The differences between powder and ingot metallurgy processing of aluminum alloys are outlined. The potential payoff in the use of advanced powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys in future transport aircraft is indicated. The national program to bring this technology to commercial fruition and the NASA Langley Research Center role in this program are briefly outlined. Some initial results of research in 2000-series PM alloys and composites that highlight the property improvements possible are given.

  20. Podcasting Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittain, Sarah; Glowacki, Pietrek; Van Ittersum, Jared; Johnson, Lynn

    2006-01-01

    At some point in their educations, students must learn copious amounts of information. To do this, they use a variety of well-known strategies such as study groups, note-taking services, and videotapes of lectures. In fall 2004, a group of first-year dental students at the University of Michigan (U-M) School of Dentistry asked to have all dental…

  1. Online lectures.

    PubMed

    Wink, Diane M

    2010-01-01

    In this bimonthly series, the author examines how nurse educators can use Internet and Web-based computer technologies such as search, communication, and collaborative writing tools; social networking and social bookmarking sites; virtual worlds; and Web-based teaching and learning programs. This article describes the creation of lectures that can be embedded in Web-based courses and presentations.

  2. Review of European Powder Metallurgy of Superalloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    applications will be treated separately. 5. Nickel based Disc Materials A wide variety of routes has been followed in consolidating powder superalloys for...7 AD-AG6 682 UNIVERSITY COLL OF SWANSEA (WALES) DEPT OF METALLURGY-ETC F/S 11/A REVIEW OF EUROPEAN POWDER METALLURGY OF SUPERALLOYS (U)U NL DEC 79...EBuropean Powder Nstallurgy of Superalloys , ’I I cx~by fT (~IR7Evan B.Sc., 1%.D. fo QWG4079?9 00 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE A&h FORCE tFFICE OF

  3. The Fatigue of Powder Metallurgy Alloys.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-08

    characteristics of an ingot metallurgy product, 7075 -T76. In all alloys high closure levels are observed atR=0.05 in the near threshold region, an...of two aluminum P/M alloys, X7090 and X7091. For comparison purposes, the ingot metallurgy (I/M) alloy 7075 -76 has also been tested. The results of...described in this report were obtained in extruded form from L Alcoa via Lockheed-California Company. These alloys are: P/M X7090-T6 P/M X7091-T7E69 I/M 7075

  4. Fifth Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We include the ninth chapter of "Education and Peace" by Maria Montessori (1949) to draw attention to the relationship between peace and sustainability. Nature is an integral part of peace studies. [Reprinted from "Education and Peace," pages 66-70, copyright © 1972 by Montessori-Pierson Publishing Company.

  5. Powder-Metallurgy Process And Product

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paris, Henry G.

    1988-01-01

    Rapid-solidification processing yields alloys with improved properties. Study undertaken to extend favorable property combinations of I/M 2XXX alloys through recently developed technique of rapid-solidification processing using powder metallurgy(P/M). Rapid-solidification processing involves impingement of molten metal stream onto rapidly-spinning chill block or through gas medium using gas atomization technique.

  6. The Mechanical Metallurgy of Armour Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    battlefield threats and continue to be highly competitive armour materials . The relationship between armour steel mechanical properties, specifically...their mechanical metallurgy, and ballistic performance is explained, where such performance is primarily determined by material strength, hardness and...armour materials . However, the factors that are most important for the ballistic and structural performance of armour steels are not commonly well

  7. Flipped Statistics Class Results: Better Performance than Lecture over One Year Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winquist, Jennifer R.; Carlson, Keith A.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we compare an introductory statistics course taught using a flipped classroom approach to the same course taught using a traditional lecture based approach. In the lecture course, students listened to lecture, took notes, and completed homework assignments. In the flipped course, students read relatively simple chapters and answered…

  8. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  9. The EDM surface: Topography, chemistry, and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Fuller, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The surface created by the electric discharge machining (EDM) process is of special interest because it has been shown to have a negative effect on the fatigue properties of many alloys. An understanding of the surface metallurgy and chemistry is important in predicting those alloys which are most susceptible to failure. Remedial actions, including thickness minimization, alteration, or removal of the surface layer are addressed.

  10. Modeling of Ladle Metallurgy in Steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Gordon; Krishnapisharody, Krishnakumar; Graham, Kevin

    Ladle or secondary metallurgy in steelmaking is an essential process step for the production of high-quality steel. Professor David Robertson was a pioneer in the modeling of these processes, in particular gas-metal fluid dynamic interactions and the rates of slag-metal reactions. This is now a highly active area of research, and some of the recent developments in this area will be reviewed.

  11. Adaptation illustrations: Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Matt St. Pierre; Linda. Parker

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we demonstrate how the Adaptation Workbook (Chapter 3) can be used with the Adaptation Strategies and Approaches (Chapter 2) to develop adaptation tactics for two real-world management issues. The two illustrations in this chapter are intended to provide helpful tips to managers completing the Adaptation Workbook, as well as to show how the anticipated...

  12. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  13. Densification of powder metallurgy billets by a roll consolidation technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellman, W. H.; Weinberger, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Container design is used to convert partially densified powder metallurgy compacts into fully densified slabs in one processing step. Technique improves product yield, lowers costs and yields great flexibility in process scale-up. Technique is applicable to all types of fabricable metallic materials that are produced from powder metallurgy process.

  14. Metallurgy and Heat Treating. Welding Module 7. Instructor's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This guide is intended to assist vocational educators in teaching a three-unit module in metallurgy and heat treating. The module is part of a welding curriculum that has been designed to be totally integrated with Missouri's Vocational Instruction Management System. The basic principles of metallurgy and heat treatment and techniques for…

  15. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by power metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-26

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-28

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  18. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goval, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-06-07

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  19. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  20. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-07-29

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  1. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-05-10

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  2. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2004-09-14

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  3. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2005-01-25

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  4. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-05

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of ternary mixtures consisting of: Ni powder, Cu powder, and Al powder, Ni powder, Cr powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, W powder and Al powder; Ni powder, V powder, and Al powder; Ni powder, Mo powder, and Al powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  5. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  6. Low-Cobalt Powder-Metallurgy Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Highly-stressed jet-engine parts made with less cobalt. Udimet 700* (or equivalent) is common nickel-based superalloy used in hot sections of jet engines for many years. This alloy, while normally used in wrought condition, also gas-atomized into prealloyed powder-metallurgy (PM) product. Product can be consolidated by hot isostatically pressing (HIPPM condition) and formed into parts such as turbine disk. Such jet-engine disks "see" both high stresses and temperatures to 1,400 degrees F (760 degrees C).

  7. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-08-19

    A biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: at least 60 at % Ni powder and at least one of Cr powder, W powder, V powder, Mo powder, Cu powder, Al powder, Ce powder, YSZ powder, Y powder, Mg powder, and RE powder; the article having a fine and homogeneous grain structure; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  8. Impact of Clarence Zener upon metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Mats

    1986-09-01

    A review is given of Clarence Zener's impact on physical metallurgy, based upon his famous paper on the kinetics of the decomposition of austenite. He demonstrated how basic physical principles could be applied to explain the general features of this complicated reaction. However, his models were general and many of them have been accepted for general use and are still being further developed. Zener also demonstrated the usefulness of simple mathematical treatments based upon dimensional arguments or dilute solution thermodynamics and he thus inspired the following generation of metallurgists to investigate the fundamental principles behind complicated phenomena.

  9. Tourette Association Chapters

    MedlinePlus

    ... com Arizona Email: info@tsa-az.org Website: http://tsa-az.org/ Arkansas Support Group of Northwest ... California/Hawaii Chapter Email: cbrackett2004@yahoo.com Website: http://www.tsanorcal-hawaii.org Southern California Chapter Phone: ...

  10. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  11. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Crease

    2007-12-12

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  12. Laughter in University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesi, Hilary

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses laughter in spoken academic discourse, with the aim of discovering why lecturers provoke laughter in their lectures. A further purpose of the paper is to identify episodes in British data which may differ from those in other cultural contexts where other lecturing practices prevail, and thus to inform the design of study skills…

  13. 431st Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Robert Crease

    2016-07-12

    Crease presents "Recombinant Science: The Birth of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider," a lecture that follows on the 429th Brookhaven Lecture, in which Crease talked about the early history of BNL. Both lectures are part of the ongoing celebration of BNL's 60th anniversary year.

  14. Manual for CLE Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shellaberger, Donna J.

    This manual is designed to help lawyers develop the skills needed to present effective, stimulating continuing legal education (CLE) lectures. It focuses on the particular purpose and nature of CLE lecturing, relationships and interplay of personalities in CLE, commitments and constraints which lecturers should observe, program structure and…

  15. Ancient metallurgy and nuclear waste containment

    SciTech Connect

    Goodway, M.

    1993-12-31

    Archaeological artifacts of glass, ceramic, and metal provide examples of long term durability and as such have been surveyed by the nuclear agencies of several countries as a possible guide to choices of materials for the containment of nuclear waste. In the case of metals evaluation is difficult because of the loss of many artifacts to recycling and corrosion processes, as well as by uncertainty as to the environmental history under which the remainder survived. More recently the study of ancient metallurgy has expanded to included other materials associated with metals processing. It is suggested that an impermeable ceramic composite used in ancient metals processing installations should be reproduced and tested for its resistance to radiation damage. This material was synthesized more than two millennia ago and has a proven record of durability. These installations have had no maintenance but are intact, some still holding water.

  16. Biaxially textured articles formed by powder metallurgy

    DOEpatents

    Goyal, Amit; Williams, Robert K.; Kroeger, Donald M.

    2003-10-21

    A strengthened, biaxially textured alloy article having a magnetism less than pure Ni includes a rolled and annealed, compacted and sintered powder-metallurgy preform article, the preform article having been formed from a powder mixture selected from the group of mixtures consisting of: Ni, Ag, Ag--Cu, Ag--Pd, Ni--Cu, Ni--V, Ni--Mo, Ni--Al, Ni--Cr--Al, Ni--W--Al, Ni--V--Al, Ni--Mo--Al, Ni--Cu--Al; and at least one fine metal oxide powder; the article having a grain size which is fine and homogeneous; and having a dominant cube oriented {100}<100> orientation texture; and further having a Curie temperature less than that of pure Ni.

  17. Physical metallurgy of direct-quenched steels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, K.A. ); Thompson, S.W. ); Fletcher, F.B. )

    1993-01-01

    This symposium was held during November 2-4, 1992 in Chicago as part of Materials Week '92''. This symposium focused on the metallurgy of steels containing martensitic or bainitic microstructures formed from thermomechanically processed austenite, and builds upon two recent topical meetings on the related subject of ferritic accelerated cooled steels. Papers in the first section deal with thermodynamics and kinetics of austenite transformation, the morphology of austenite transformation products, and alloy carbide precipitation. Results of investigations of relationships between processing variables, microstructure, and mechanical properties are contained in the following section. Section III is devoted specifically to boron hardenability effects. papers in the final section are concerned with product development; included here is a comprehensive overview of industrial accelerated cooling/direct quenching technology by researchers from the Nippon Steel Corporation.

  18. Electrodeposition in extractive metallurgy: An emerging technology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Thomas J.

    1992-04-01

    The electrowinning and electrorefining of metals from aqueous solutions continues to be one of the essential unit processes employed in nonferrous extractive metallurgy. Current processes effectively address both ohmic and mass transport of the primary metal ion in their design. Some deficiencies exist, however, in the basic understanding of the other two critical elements essential in cathodic deposition: activation kinetics and electrocrystallization. The understanding of the latter two must be elevated to the level of understanding of ohmic and mass transport if truly new and innovative advances are to occur. Because of the increasingly demanding standards for electrometallurgy processes and products, technical progress must be made if a competitive edge is to be maintained in the future.

  19. [Features of chronic occupational bronchitis in nonferrous metallurgy workers].

    PubMed

    Roslaia, N A; Likhacheva, E I; Vagina, E R; Roslyĭ, O F; Zhovtiak, E P; Iarina, A L; Varzina, N V

    2004-01-01

    The authors summarized results of periodic medical examinations and deep clinical studies of metallurgy workers with bronchial and pulmonary disorders. The article covers clinical and functional characteristics of toxic and dust bronchitis, clinical course and manifestations.

  20. Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking North into Lab Metallurgy Testing Area and Enrichment Motor within Recycle Recovery Building - Hematite Fuel Fabrication Facility, Recycle Recovery Building, 3300 State Road P, Festus, Jefferson County, MO

  1. 1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy from J. L. Bray, The Principles of Metallurgy, Ginn & Company, New York, 1929 - International Smelting & Refining Company, Tooele Smelter, Sinter Plant, State Route 178, Tooele, Tooele County, UT

  2. Legends Lecture Series III

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-27

    Marina Benigno (far right) at Stennis Space Center, welcomes former administrative assistants and secretaries to the third Legends Lecture Series session. Lecture participants spoke about their work experiences with Stennis directors and deputy directors. Panel participants included Janet Austill (l to r), Mary Lou Matthews, Helen Paul, Wanda Howard, Ann Westendorf and Mary Gene Dick. The Legends Lecture Series is part of a yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of Stennis Space Center.

  3. Lectures on string theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Several topics are discussed in string theory presented as three lectures to the Spring School on Superstrings at the ICTP at Trieste, Italy, in April, 1988. The first lecture is devoted to some general aspects of conformal invariance and duality. The second sketches methods for carrying out perturbative calculations in string field theory. The final lecture presents an alternative lattice approach to a nonperturbative formulation of the sum over world surfaces. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  4. Effective lecture presentation skills.

    PubMed

    Gelula, M H

    1997-02-01

    Lectures are the most popular form of teaching in medical education. As much as preparation and organization are key to the lecture's success, the actual presentation also depends upon the presenter's ability to reach the audience. Teaching is a lively activity. It calls for more than just offering ideas and data to an audience. It calls for direct contact with the audience, effective use of language, capability to use limited time effectively, and the ability to be entertaining. This article offers a structure to effective lecturing by highlighting the importance of voice clarity and speaking speed, approaches to using audiovisual aids, effectively using the audience to the lecture, and ways to be entertaining.

  5. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  6. Chapter Four: Discursive Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, the focus of attention moves from the contexts described in chapter 3 to the verbal, nonverbal, and interactional resources that participants employ in discursive practices. These resources are discussed within the frame of participation status and participation framework proposed by Goffman. Verbal resources employed by…

  7. Synthesis [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    D. Schimel; A. C. Janetos; P. Backlund; J. Hatfield; D. P. Lettenmaier; M. G. Ryan

    2008-01-01

    The preceding chapters have focused on the observed and potential impacts of climate variability and change on U.S. agriculture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity. This section synthesizes information from those sectoral chapters to address a series of questions that were posed by the CCSP agencies in the prospectus for this report and formulate a set...

  8. Train the Trainer. Facilitator Guide Sample. Basic Blueprint Reading (Chapter One).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Louis Community Coll., MO.

    This publication consists of three sections: facilitator's guide--train the trainer, facilitator's guide sample--Basic Blueprint Reading (Chapter 1), and participant's guide sample--basic blueprint reading (chapter 1). Section I addresses why the trainer should learn new classroom techniques; lecturing versus facilitating; learning styles…

  9. Lecturing: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Helen, Ed.; Smith, Brenda, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The essays in this collection explore how different lecturing situations can be handled and how lecturing confidence and techniques can be improved. The book covers a wide range of scenarios in these chapters: (1) "Learning from Objectives" (Stanley Yeo); (2) "New at This" (Sally Brown); (3) "The Smart Student" (Marilyn Baird); (4) "The Mobile…

  10. Scientific Argumentation in Public Physics Lectures: Bringing Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrating public e-lectures on contemporary physics into a traditional high-school syllabus. This approach was used in a long-distance professional development course for in-service physics teachers. Each lecture was related to a specific obligatory syllabus chapter, and was accompanied by learner-centred…

  11. Scientific Argumentation in Public Physics Lectures: Bringing Contemporary Physics into High-School Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapon, S.; Ganiel, U.; Eylon, B.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an approach to integrating public e-lectures on contemporary physics into a traditional high-school syllabus. This approach was used in a long-distance professional development course for in-service physics teachers. Each lecture was related to a specific obligatory syllabus chapter, and was accompanied by learner-centred…

  12. Lecturing: Case Studies, Experience and Practice. Case Studies of Teaching in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Helen, Ed.; Smith, Brenda, Ed.; Webb, Graham, Ed.

    The essays in this collection explore how different lecturing situations can be handled and how lecturing confidence and techniques can be improved. The book covers a wide range of scenarios in these chapters: (1) "Learning from Objectives" (Stanley Yeo); (2) "New at This" (Sally Brown); (3) "The Smart Student" (Marilyn Baird); (4) "The Mobile…

  13. Diamond Anniversary Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Dewey A.; And Others

    This document contains the texts of four lectures that were presented as part of a series commemorating the 75th anniversary of Ohio State University's Department of Agricultural Education. The first lecture, "The Conceptualization Process and Vocational Education Management," (Dewey A. Adams) discusses a five-step management behavior approach for…

  14. In Defense of Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgan, Mary

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents her arguments in favor of lecturing. She believes that students benefit from seeing education embodied in a master learner who teaches what she has learned. She concludes that lecturing should be defended because a narrow view of learning as mainly self-generated misses the fact that the vitality of the…

  15. Lectures on Law Enforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nettleship, Lois

    Three lectures on law enforcement are presented that were prepared for study purposes at Johnson County Community College. The first lecture examines the fundamental ideas of the Age of Enlightenment and discusses their influence on the American Revolution, the United States Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. Major provisions of the Bill of…

  16. Electrothermal Defect Detection in Powder Metallurgy Compacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzerrouk, Souheil; Ludwig, Reinhold; Apelian, Diran

    2006-03-01

    Faced with increasing market pressures, metal part manufacturers have turned to new processes and fabrication technologies. One of these processes is powder metallurgy (P/M), which is employed for low-cost, high-volume precision part manufacturing. Despite many advantages, the P/M process has created a number of challenges, including the need for high-speed quality assessment and control, ideally for each compact. Consequently, sophisticated quality assurance is needed to rapidly detect flaws early in the manufacturing cycle and at minimal cost. In this paper we will discuss our progress made in designing and refining an active infrared (IR) detection system for P/M compacts. After discussing the theoretical background in terms of underlying equations and boundary conditions, analytical and numerical solutions are presented that are capable of predicting temperature responses for various defect sizes and orientations of a dynamic IR testing system. Preliminary measurements with controlled and industrial samples have shown that this active IR methodology can successfully be employed to test both green-state and sintered P/M compacts. The developed system can overcome many limitations observed with a standard IR testing methodology such as emissivity, background calibration, and contact resistance.

  17. Powder metallurgy process for manufacturing core projectile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Taufik; Setyowati, Vuri Ayu; Widyastuti

    2013-09-01

    Bullets are part of the defense equipment which the development is very rapid. There are a variety of forms but the bullet Lead is a metal that has always been used for applications projectiles. Lead core constituent materials are combined with antimony. In this research will be conducted by making the material for the core projectile with Tin Lead. The addition of Tin will increase the stiffness of Lead which is soft in nature. The Lead Tin composition variation was given in 10% weight of Sn. The manufacturing process using powder metallurgy using temperature and holding time variations of sintering at 100, 150, and 200°C for 1,2, and 3 hours. XRD samples will be tested to determine the form and phase morphology was observed using SEM-EDX. These results revealed that Pb-10%wtSn Composite which is sintered in temperature 200°C for 3 hours has the greatest density, 10.695 g/cm3 as well as the smallest porosity, 2.2%. In agreement with theoretical analysis that increasing higher temperature and longer holding time give decrease in porosity level due to activation energy which further promotes grain growth. Moreover, there is no intermetallic phase formation as well as no oxide found on composites.

  18. A major advance in powder metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Stiglich, Jacob J., Jr.; Kaplan, Richard B.; Tuffias, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    Ultramet has developed a process which promises to significantly increase the mechanical properties of powder metallurgy (PM) parts. Current PM technology uses mixed powders of various constituents prior to compaction. The homogeneity and flaw distribution in PM parts depends on the uniformity of mixing and the maintenance of uniformity during compaction. Conventional PM fabrication processes typically result in non-uniform distribution of the matrix, flaw generation due to particle-particle contact when one of the constituents is a brittle material, and grain growth caused by high temperature, long duration compaction processes. Additionally, a significant amount of matrix material is usually necessary to fill voids and create 100 percent dense parts. In Ultramet's process, each individual particle is coated with the matrix material, and compaction is performed by solid state processing. In this program, Ultramet coated 12-micron tungsten particles with approximately 5 wt percent nickel/iron. After compaction, flexure strengths were measured 50 percent higher than those achieved in conventional liquid phase sintered parts (10 wt percent Ni/Fe). Further results and other material combinations are discussed.

  19. Process Metallurgy an Enabler of Resource Efficiency: Linking Product Design to Metallurgy in Product Centric Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, Markus; van Schaik, Antoinette

    In this paper the link between process metallurgy, classical minerals processing, product centric recycling and urban/landfill mining is discussed. The depth that has to be achieved in urban mining and recycling must glean from the wealth of theoretical knowledge and insight that have been developed in the past in minerals and metallurgical processing. This background learns that recycling demands a product centric approach, which considers simultaneously the multi-material interactions in man-made complex `minerals'. Fast innovation in recycling and urban mining can be achieved by further evolving from this well developed basis, evolving the techniques and tools that have been developed over the years. This basis has already been used for many years to design, operate and control industrial plants for metal production. This has been the basis for Design for Recycling rules for End-of-Life products. Using, among others, the UNEP Metal Recycling report as a basis (authors are respectively Lead and Main authors of report), it is demonstrated that a common theoretical basis as developed in metallurgy and minerals processing can help much to level the playing field between primary processing, secondary processing, recycling, and urban/landfill mining and product design hence enhancing resource efficiency. Thus various scales of detail link product design with metallurgical process design and its fundamentals.

  20. Chapter 9: Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris A.

    2006-12-19

    Sophisticated front-end electronics are a key part of practically all modern radiation detector systems. This chapter introduces the basic principles and their implementation. Topics include signal acquisition, electronic noise, pulse shaping (analog and digital), and data readout techniques.

  1. Chapter 9: Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Algora, Carlos; Espinet-Gonzalez, Pilar; Vazquez, Manuel; Bosco, Nick; Miller, David; Kurtz, Sarah; Rubio, Francisca; McConnell,Robert

    2016-04-15

    This chapter describes the accumulated knowledge on CPV reliability with its fundamentals and qualification. It explains the reliability of solar cells, modules (including optics) and plants. The chapter discusses the statistical distributions, namely exponential, normal and Weibull. The reliability of solar cells includes: namely the issues in accelerated aging tests in CPV solar cells, types of failure and failures in real time operation. The chapter explores the accelerated life tests, namely qualitative life tests (mainly HALT) and quantitative accelerated life tests (QALT). It examines other well proven and experienced PV cells and/or semiconductor devices, which share similar semiconductor materials, manufacturing techniques or operating conditions, namely, III-V space solar cells and light emitting diodes (LEDs). It addresses each of the identified reliability issues and presents the current state of the art knowledge for their testing and evaluation. Finally, the chapter summarizes the CPV qualification and reliability standards.

  2. Pressurized metallurgy for high performance special steels and alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Zhu, H. C.; Li, H. B.; Li, Y.; Liu, F. B.

    2016-07-01

    The pressure is one of the basic parameters which greatly influences the metallurgical reaction process and solidification of steels and alloys. In this paper the history and present situation of research and application of pressurized metallurgy, especially pressurized metallurgy for special steels and alloys have been briefly reviewed. In the following part the physical chemistry of pressurized metallurgy is summarized. It is shown that pressurizing may change the conditions of chemical reaction in thermodynamics and kinetics due to the pressure effect on gas volume, solubility of gas and volatile element in metal melt, activity or activity coefficient of components, and change the physical and chemical properties of metal melt, heat transfer coefficient between mould and ingot, thus greatly influencing phase transformation during the solidification process and the solidification structure, such as increasing the solidification nucleation rate, reducing the critical nucleation radius, accelerating the solidification speed and significant macro/micro-structure refinement, and eliminating shrinkage, porosity and segregation and other casting defects. In the third part the research works of pressured metallurgy performed by the Northeastern University including establishment of pressurized induction melting (PIM) and pressurized electroslag remelting (PESR) equipments and development of high nitrogen steels under pressure are described in detail. Finally, it is considered in the paper that application of pressurized metallurgy in manufacture of high performance special steels and alloys is a relatively new research area, and its application prospects will be very broad and bright.

  3. Centenary Chronicle Chapter 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    This article offers the transcript of Robyn Archer's address at the Australian Society for Music Education (ASME) Conference in Canberra in September 2013. Archer is a singer, writer, director, artistic director, and public advocate of the arts, mainly in Australia though her reach is global. This lecture is the second of six addresses Archer gave…

  4. Streamflow data: Chapter 13

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiche, Gregg J.; Holmes, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Streamflow data are vital for a variety of water-resources issues, from flood warning to water supply planning. The collection of streamflow data is usually an involved and complicated process. This chapter serves as an overview of the streamflow data collection process. Readers with the need for the detailed information on the streamflow data collection process are referred to the many references noted in this chapter.

  5. Chapter on Distributed Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-01

    MASSACHUSETTS LABORATORY FOR INSTITUTE OF COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ("D / o O MIT/LCS/TM-384 CHAPTER ON DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING Leslie Lamport Nancy...22217 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (Miude Secuwity Ciaifiation) Chapter on Distributed Computing 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Lamport... distributed computing , distributed systems models, dis- tributed algorithms, message-passing, shared variables, 19. UBSTRACT (Continue on reverse if

  6. Legends Lecture Series III

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-07-27

    Marina Benigno (far right) at Stennis Space Center, welcomes former administrative assistants and secretaries to the third Legends Lecture Series session. Lecture participants spoke about their work experiences with Stennis directors and deputy directors. Panel participants included Janet Austill (l to r), Mary Lou Matthews, Helen Paul, Wanda Howard, Ann Westendorf and Mary Gene Dick. Austill, Howard and Westendorf all worked with center directors during their Stennis careers. Dick, Matthews and Paul served with deputy directors at Stennis. The Legends Lecture Series is part of a yearlong celebration of the 50th anniversary of Stennis Space Center.

  7. Lectures series in computational fluid dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1987-01-01

    The lecture notes cover the basic principles of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). They are oriented more toward practical applications than theory, and are intended to serve as a unified source for basic material in the CFD field as well as an introduction to more specialized topics in artificial viscosity and boundary conditions. Each chapter in the test is associated with a videotaped lecture. The basic properties of conservation laws, wave equations, and shock waves are described. The duality of the conservation law and wave representations is investigated, and shock waves are examined in some detail. Finite difference techniques are introduced for the solution of wave equations and conservation laws. Stability analysis for finite difference approximations are presented. A consistent description of artificial viscosity methods are provided. Finally, the problem of nonreflecting boundary conditions are treated.

  8. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  9. Learning from Online Video Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, H. David

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically examines the instructional value of online video lectures--videos that a course's instructor prepares to supplement classroom or online-broadcast lectures. The study examines data from a classroom course, where the videos have a slower, more step-by-step lecture style than the classroom lectures; student use of videos is…

  10. Learning from Online Video Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brecht, H. David

    2012-01-01

    This study empirically examines the instructional value of online video lectures--videos that a course's instructor prepares to supplement classroom or online-broadcast lectures. The study examines data from a classroom course, where the videos have a slower, more step-by-step lecture style than the classroom lectures; student use of videos is…

  11. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  12. The computer-based lecture.

    PubMed

    Wofford, M M; Spickard, A W; Wofford, J L

    2001-07-01

    Advancing computer technology, cost-containment pressures, and desire to make innovative improvements in medical education argue for moving learning resources to the computer. A reasonable target for such a strategy is the traditional clinical lecture. The purpose of the lecture, the advantages and disadvantages of "live" versus computer-based lectures, and the technical options in computerizing the lecture deserve attention in developing a cost-effective, complementary learning strategy that preserves the teacher-learner relationship. Based on a literature review of the traditional clinical lecture, we build on the strengths of the lecture format and discuss strategies for converting the lecture to a computer-based learning presentation.

  13. Carter Memorial Lecture 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gledhill, Robin

    2003-09-01

    The 2003 Carter Memorial Lecture was given in May by Dr Ben R Oppenheimer, Kalbfleisch Research Fellow in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Public lectures entitled "Aliens: The Scientific Search for Life on Other Planets" were given in Nelson, Dunedin, Christchurch, Wellington, Wanganui, Napier, Hamilton and Auckland. University seminars entitled "The Lyot Project" were given in Christchurch, Wellington, Hamilton and Auckland.

  14. Diagnostic and vaccine chapter.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, J H; Kokanov, S K; Verkhovsky, O A

    2010-10-01

    The first report in this chapter describes the development of a killed composite vaccine. This killed vaccine is non-infectious to humans, other animals, and the environment. The vaccine has low reactivity, is non-abortive, and does not induce pathomorphological alterations to the organs of vaccinated animals. The second report of this chapter describes the diagnostic value of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting Brucella-specific antibodies and its ability to discriminate vaccinated cattle from infected cattle. The results indicated that the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is more sensitive than traditional tests for detecting antibodies to Brucella abortus in naturally and experimentally infected cattle.

  15. Chapter 8. Data Analysis

    Treesearch

    Lyman L. McDonald; Christina D. Vojta; Kevin S. McKelvey

    2013-01-01

    Perhaps the greatest barrier between monitoring and management is data analysis. Data languish in drawers and spreadsheets because those who collect or maintain monitoring data lack training in how to effectively summarize and analyze their findings. This chapter serves as a first step to surmounting that barrier by empowering any monitoring team with the basic...

  16. Chapter Three: Investigating Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with the statement that all talk happens somewhere, somehow, at some time and is produced by somebody for some purpose, and the approach that practice theorists have taken is that talk and its context are inseparable. The challenges that face an analyst of practice are then to describe the context, describe the talk, and…

  17. Chapter 3: Energy Security

    SciTech Connect

    Foust, Thomas D.; Arent, Doug; de Carvalho Macedo, Isaias; Goldemberg, Jose; Hoysala, Chanakya; Filho, Rubens Maciel; Nigro, Francisco E. B.; Richard, Tom L.; Saddler, Jack; Samseth, Jon; Somerville, Chris R.

    2015-04-01

    This chapter considers the energy security implications and impacts of bioenergy. We provide an assessment to answer the following questions: What are the implications for bioenergy and energy security within the broader policy environment that includes food and water security, development, economic productivity, and multiple foreign policy aspects? What are the conditions under which bioenergy contributes positively to energy security?

  18. Water resources (Chapter 12)

    Treesearch

    Thomas C. Brown; Romano Foti; Jorge Ramirez

    2012-01-01

    In this chapter, we focus on the vulnerability of U.S. freshwater supplies considering all lands, not just forest and rangelands. We do not assess the condition of those lands or report on how much of our water supply originates on lands of different land covers or ownerships, because earlier Resources Planning Act (RPA) Assessment work addressed these topics....

  19. Nursery management [Chapter 16

    Treesearch

    Kim M. Wilkinson

    2009-01-01

    This handbook provides an overview of the factors that go into starting and operating a native plant nursery. Management includes all aspects of working with plants in all their phases of growth as described in Chapter 3, Crop Planning and Developing Propagation Protocols. Management also includes working with the community; organizing materials and infrastructure;...

  20. Chapter 3: Wood Decay

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of global carbon is sequestered in forest systems. Specialized fungi have evolved to efficiently deconstruct woody plant cell walls. These important decay processes generate litter, soil bound humic substances, or carbon dioxide and water. This chapter reviews the enzymology and molecular genetics of wood decay fungi, most of which are members of...

  1. User's guide [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Nicholas L. Crookston; Donald C. E. Robinson; Sarah J. Beukema

    2003-01-01

    The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter presents the model's options, provides annotated examples, describes the outputs, and describes how to use and apply the model.

  2. Adaptation workbook: Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Maria Janowiak; Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    Climate change imposes many challenges on the long-term management of ecosystems and is becoming an increasingly important consideration in land management planning and decisionmaking at a variety of spatial scales. The process outlined in this chapter helps managers incorporate climate change considerations into management planning and activities, while complementing...

  3. Aquatics [Chapter 6

    Treesearch

    F. A. Vertucci; M. A. Conrad

    1994-01-01

    Within the GLEES boundary there are three alpine lakes and several streams and ponds. The selection of GLEES as a research site for investigating of the effects of chemical and physical climate change was in part based on the accessibility of these low alkalinity "sensitive" aquatic ecosystems. This chapter provides a brief description of the physical,...

  4. Floristics [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    J. D. Haines; R. C. Musselman; C. M. Regan

    1994-01-01

    The initial habitat classification as described in Chapter 2 was conducted in 1986 and 1987 based upon field identification of plant species. A field collection of vascular plant species was made during the 1988, 1989, and 1990 summer seasons. The plant species collected were identified and verified in cooperation with the Rocky Mountain Herbarium at the University of...

  5. Forestry [Chapter 11

    Treesearch

    H. Gyde Lund; William A. Befort; James E. Brickell; William M. Ciesla; Elizabeth C. Collins; Raymond L. Czaplewski; Attilio Antonio Disperati; Robert W. Douglass; Charles W. Dull; Jerry D. Greer; Rachel Riemann Hershey; Vernon J. LaBau; Henry Lachowski; Peter A. Murtha; David J. Nowak; Marc A. Roberts; Pierre Schram; Mahadev D. Shedha; Ashbindu Singh; Kenneth C. Winterberger

    1997-01-01

    Foresters and other resource managers have used aerial photographs to help manage resources since the late 1920s. As discussed in chapter 1, however, it was not until the mid-1940s that their use became common. Obtaining photographic coverage was always a problem. For many areas of the world, reasonably complete coverage did not exist until after World War II. In...

  6. Tundra, Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    K. Nadelhoffer; L.H. Geiser

    2011-01-01

    The North American Arctic, comprising the Tundra and Arctic Cordillera ecoregions (CEC 1997, Chapter 2), covers more than 3 million km2 (300 million ha), and accounts for nearly 14 percent of the North American land mass. The North American Arctic also constitutes about 20 percent of the much larger circumpolar Arctic shared by Canada, the United...

  7. Hurrah for Chapter Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glenowyn L.

    This annotated bibliography contains a list of 42 recent Chapter Books. The bibliography is divided into the following topics: Adventure-Survival (3 titles); Autobiography-Biography (3 titles); Death (1 title); Easy Readers (8 titles); Good Reading (12 titles); Historical Fiction (10 titles); Mystery (3 titles); Newbery Award Winner, 2000; and…

  8. Research recommendations [Chapter 10

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; Alvin L. Medina; John N. Rinne

    2012-01-01

    This chapter contains a number of research recommendations that have developed from the 15 years of research on the UVR conducted by the Southwest Watershed Science Team, as well as from insights from key cooperators and contacts. It is meant to be our best insight as to where efforts should go now. Achieving these recommendations will depend on a number of factors,...

  9. Powder metallurgy of vanadium and its alloys (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Radomysel'skii, I.D.; Solntsev, V.P.; Evtushenko, O.V.

    1987-10-01

    This article reviews the current powder metallurgy technology of vanadium and its alloys. Data are given on sintering, compacting, electrowinning and other current production techniques, as well as on the corrosion behavior and mechanical and physical properties of alloys produced by these different methods. The use of vanadium alloys as reactor and jet engine materials is also briefly discussed.

  10. One step HIP canning of powder metallurgy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) powder metallurgy composites. The binders are totally removed while the HIP can of compatible refractory metal is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  11. [Hygienic evaluation of risk factors on powder metallurgy production].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    Complex hygienic, clinical, sociologic and epidemiologic studies revealed reliable relationship between work conditions and arterial hypertension, locomotory system disorders, monocytosis in powder metallurgy production workers. Findings are more probable cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, digestive tract diseases due to influence of lifestyle factors.

  12. Iron Metallurgy: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to iron metallurgy. Various aspects of iron production are described in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  13. NSF: A "Populist" Pattern in Metallurgy, Materials Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Describes the testimony of a University of Virginia professor of applied science, who charged that the National Science Foundation grants disproportionately small funds to the best university departments in the field of metallurgy and materials, while preferentially funding middle-ranked departments. (MLH)

  14. Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System Design Document

    SciTech Connect

    Bargelski, C. J.; Berrett, D. E.

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the system architecture of the Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Sample Tracking System at Los Alamos National Laboratory. During the course of the document observations are made concerning the objectives, constraints and limitations, technical approaches, and the technical deliverables.

  15. 39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH, SHOWING BUILDING NO. 318, METALLURGY LAB, ON RIGHT, BUILDING NO. 319, GENERAL PURPOSE ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, ON LEFT AND BUILDING NO. 355, ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT, IN BACKGROUND LEFT. - Picatinny Arsenal, State Route 15 near I-80, Dover, Morris County, NJ

  16. Iron Metallurgy: Technical Terminology Bulletin. Terminotech, Vol. 2, No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Electric Co. of Canada, Ltd., Montreal, Quebec.

    This issue of a bulletin of technological terminology is devoted to iron metallurgy. Various aspects of iron production are described in both French and English. An English-French dictionary of terms comprises the bulk of the document. Explanatory illustrations are appended. (JB)

  17. NSF: A "Populist" Pattern in Metallurgy, Materials Research?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapley, Deborah

    1975-01-01

    Describes the testimony of a University of Virginia professor of applied science, who charged that the National Science Foundation grants disproportionately small funds to the best university departments in the field of metallurgy and materials, while preferentially funding middle-ranked departments. (MLH)

  18. Pipeline failure: The roles played by corrosion, flow and metallurgy

    SciTech Connect

    Paisley, D.; Barrett, N.; Wilson, O.

    1999-11-01

    Carbon dioxide corrosion has been widely studied in the field and laboratory. It is recognized that flow regime and metallurgy are important factors that influence in-situ corrosion rates but there are relatively few documented case studies that are able to separate the individual contributions of corrosion, flow regime and metallurgy on the observed corrosion damage. This paper deals with failure of a pipeline where high quality inspection data together with comprehensive as-built records and stable production conditions allowed the separate influences of flow and metallurgy on corrosion to be studied. The flow regimes in the pipeline ranged from low velocity, stratified flow to high velocity, slug flow. The inspection data showed that the affect of turbulent flow was to increase the frequency of corrosion pits and, in the case of weld corrosion, the mean corrosion rate. The pipeline was constructed from two grades of steel and welded using two types of welding consumable. One grade of pipeline steel corroded at a significantly higher rate and with a higher frequency of corrosion pits than another, apparently similar steel. However, no significant relationship was found between weld metallurgy and corrosion rate or frequency.

  19. Lectures in accelerator theory

    SciTech Connect

    Month, M

    1980-01-01

    Lecture I deals with the behavior of particles in the nonlinear field arising from the electromagnetic interaction of colliding beams. The case treated, that of counter-rotating proton beams crossing each other at a non-zero angle, has the simple feature that the force between the beam is one dimensional. In lecture II, an analysis of the development of traveling waves on particle beams is presented. The situation studied is that of a uniform beam current in a circular accelerator and the excitation for the coherent motion is induced by the resistivity of the vacuum chamber wall. Finally, in lecture III, a description of the current accumulation process used at the proton storage rings at CERN (The ISR) is given. Particle pulses of rather low average current are injected and stored along the length and width of the vacuum chamber. The efficiency is very high and large currents (over 40 amperes) have been achieved.

  20. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience

    PubMed Central

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L.; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms. PMID:26561235

  1. Memory for Lectures: How Lecture Format Impacts the Learning Experience.

    PubMed

    Varao-Sousa, Trish L; Kingstone, Alan

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated what impact the presentation style of a classroom lecture has on memory, mind wandering, and the subjective factors of interest and motivation. We examined if having a professor lecturing live versus on video alters the learning experience of the students in the classroom. During the lectures, students were asked to report mind wandering and later complete a memory test. The lecture format was manipulated such that all the students received two lectures, one live and one a pre-recorded video. Results indicate that lecture format affected memory performance but not mind wandering, with enhanced memory in the live lectures. Additionally, students reported greater interest and motivation in the live lectures. Given that a single change to the classroom environment, professor presence, impacted memory performance, as well as motivation and interest, the present results have several key implications for technology-based integrations into higher education classrooms.

  2. Legends Lecture Series II

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2011-04-05

    Current and former leaders discuss the growth of NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center during a Legends Lecture Series onsite on April 5. Stennis launched the Legends Lecture Series last November as part of a yearlong celebration of its 50th anniversary. The April 5 session focused on growth of Stennis into a unique federal city during the 1970s and the establishment of NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory at the site. Presenters at the April 5 event included (l to r): George Schloegel, mayor of Gulfport; Jack Rogers, former director of NASA Center Operations at Stennis; and Wayne Mooneyhan, former director of NASA's Earth Resources Laboratory at Stennis.

  3. The Lecture Is Dead Long Live the e-Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folley, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    This research paper investigates if the traditional lecture is no longer appropriate for Neomillennial Learning Styles and whether an alternative blended approach could/should be used? Over the past decade the lecture as we know it, has gradually been under attack from constructivists, Twigg (1999) for example argues that the lecture is in the…

  4. 426th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    David Jaffe

    2016-07-12

    "The Pesky Neutrino". In this lecture, Jaffe describes the past, present and possible future of the "pesky" neutrino, the existence of which was first hypothesized in 1930 to rescue energy conservation in the radioactive beta decay of nuclei. Recent evidence that neutrinos are massive is the only experimental evidence in particle physics that is inconsistent with the Standard Model.

  5. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Vanier

    2006-02-15

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  6. 412th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Vanier

    2016-07-12

    With new radiation detectors, finding smuggled nuclear materials in a huge container among thousands of others in a busy port becomes possible. To learn about these new detectors from a specialist who has spent several years developing these technologies, watch the 412th Brookhaven Lecture, "Advanced Neutron Detection Methods: New Tools for Countering Nuclear Terrorism."

  7. 453rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Richard Ferrieri

    2016-07-12

    In this lecture titled "Striving Towards Energy Sustainability: How Will Plants Play a Role in Our Future?" Richard Ferrieri discusses how radiotracers and positron emission tomography (PET imaging) are providing a new look into plant processes that could lead to more renewable biofuels.

  8. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  9. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  10. Organic Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silversmith, Ernest F.

    1988-01-01

    Provides a listing of 35 demonstrations designed to generate interest in organic chemistry and help put points across. Topics include opening lecture; molecular structure and properties; halogenation; nucleophilic substitution, alkenes and dienes, stereochemistry, spectroscopy, alcohols and phenols, aldehydes and ketones; carboxylic acids, amines,…

  11. When Lecturing: Teach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Warren R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques that can be used to make the lecture method of teaching more effective include using pictures or objects to facilitate memory, using guided fantasies to stimulate students' imagination of processes, and the suggestopedia method for memorizing facts, principles, and vocabulary. (MSE)

  12. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1988-08-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 32 refs., 56 figs.

  13. Lectures on pulsed NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Pines, A.

    1986-09-01

    These lectures discuss some recent developments in pulsed NMR, emphasizing fundamental principles with selected illustrative applications. Major topics covered include multiple-quantum spectroscopy, spin decoupling, the interaction of spins with a quantized field, adiabatic rapid passage, spin temperature and statistics of cross-polarization, coherent averaging, and zero field NMR. 55 figs.

  14. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Peter Steinberg

    2005-12-21

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  15. Podcasting a Physics Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, James E. R.

    2008-01-01

    The technology of podcasting, or creating audio or video files that can be subscribed to over the Internet, has grown in popularity over the past few years. Many educators have already begun realizing the potential of delivering such customized content, but most efforts have focused on lecture-style humanities courses or multimedia arts courses.…

  16. 416th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Dax Fu

    2016-07-12

    "Molecular Design of a Metal Transporter." Metal transporters are proteins residing in cell membranes that keep the amount of zinc and other metals in the body in check by selecting a nutritional metal ion against a similar and much moreabundant toxic one. How transporter proteins achieve this remarkable sensitivity is one of the questions addressed by Fu in this lecture.

  17. Lecturer on tour!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-11-01

    Readers may recall the interview with Professor Peter Kalmus which appeared in the July issue of Physics Education and which indicated his latest role of lecturer for the 1998-9 Institute of Physics Schools and Colleges Lecture series. This year's lecture is entitled `Particles and the universe' and the tour was due to begin in St Andrews, Scotland, late in September. Professor Kalmus will be looking at various aspects of particle physics, quantum physics and relativity, and discussing how they reveal the secrets of the beginning of our universe. His own experience of working at CERN, the European centre for particle physics in Switzerland, as well as at other international research facilities will provide a unique insight into activity in one of the most exciting areas of physics. The talks are aimed at the 16-19 age group but members of the public are also welcome to attend. They will act as an opportunity to gain a sneak preview of the dynamic new topics that will soon feature in the A-level syllabus arising from the Institute's 16-19 project. Further details of attendance are available from the local organizers, a list of whom may be obtained from Catherine Wilson in the Education Department at the Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 0171 470 4800, fax: 0171 470 4848). The published schedule (as of September) for the lecture series consists of the following: Dates

  18. Participatory Lecture Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Battino, Rubin

    1979-01-01

    The use of participatory lecture demonstrations in the classroom is described. Examples are given for the following topics: chromatography, chemical kinetics, balancing equations, the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, Henry's law of gas solubility, electronic energy levels in atoms, and translational, vibrational, and rotational energies of…

  19. Bolden Glenn Lecture Series

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden talks about his career as a marine aviator, as Space Shuttle pilot and commander, and his leadership of America's space agency during a speech, Wednesday evening, June 27, 2012, in Washington. Bolden spoke was the guest speaker at the 2012 John H. Glenn Lecture in Space History. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  20. Abstract of Lectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Froidevaux, Lucien

    1993-01-01

    Three lectures will be given. The first one will draw from the general literature on microwave sounding from space. The next two will focus on a description of the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and results obtained from its measurements relating to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics; this will draw from material recently published (or soon-to-be published) by the MLS team.

  1. 423rd Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Mei Bai

    2016-07-12

    Among other things, scientists at BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are studying a fundamental question of particle physics: What is responsible for proton "spin"? Physicist Mei Bai discusses this topic at the 423rd Brookhaven Lecture, "RHIC: The Worlds First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider."

  2. 410th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    Peter Steinberg

    2016-07-12

    In a lecture titled "Hotter, Denser, Faster, Smaller...and Nearly Perfect: What's the Matter at RHIC?", Steinberg discusses the basic physics of the quark-gluon plasma and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, with a focus on several intriguing results from RHIC's recently ended PHOBOS experiment.

  3. Summary and conclusions [Chapter 11

    Treesearch

    Daniel G. Neary; John N. Rinne; Alvin L.. Medina

    2012-01-01

    Summaries and conclusions of each chapter are compiled here to provide a “Quick Reference” guide of major results and recommendations for the UVR. More detail can be obtained from individual chapters.

  4. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  5. In Defence of the Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, R. Scott

    2015-01-01

    In response to the lecture format coming under "attack" and being replaced by online materials and smaller tutorials, this paper attempts to offer not only a defence but also to assert that the potential value of the lecture is difficult to replicate through other learning formats. Some of the criticisms against lectures will be…

  6. 10 Suggestions for Enhancing Lecturing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heitzmann, Ray

    2010-01-01

    Criticism of the lecture method remains a staple of discussion and writing in academia--and most of the time it's deserved! Those interested in improving this aspect of their teaching might wish to consider some or all of the following suggestions for enhancing lectures. These include: (1) Lectures must start with a "grabber"; (2)…

  7. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  8. The influence of metallurgy on the formation of welding aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Anthony T

    2002-10-01

    Recent research has indicated that insoluble ultrafine aerosols (ie., particles whose physical diameters are less than 100 nm) may cause adverse health effects due to their small size, and that toxicological response may be more appropriately represented by particle number or particle surface area. Unfortunately, current exposure criteria and the associated air-sampling techniques are primarily mass-based. Welding processes are high-temperature operations that generate substantial number concentrations of ultrafine aerosols. Welding aerosols are formed primarily through the nucleation of metal vapors followed by competing growth mechanisms such as coagulation and condensation. Experimental results and mathematical tools are presented to illustrate how welding metallurgy influences the chemical aspects and dynamic processes that initiate and evolve the resultant aerosol. This research suggests that a fundamental understanding of metallurgy and aerosol physics can be exploited to suppress the formation of undesirable chemical species as well as the amount of aerosol generated during a welding process.

  9. Near-Net Shape Powder Metallurgy Rhenium Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhardt, Todd; Hamister, Mark; Carlen, Jan C.; Biaglow, James; Reed, Brian

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to produce a near-net shape (NNS) powder metallurgy (PM) rhenium combustion chamber of the size 445 N (100 lbf) used in a high performance liquid apogee engine. These engines are used in low earth Orbit and geostationary orbit for satellite positioning systems. The developments in near-net shape powder metallurgy rhenium combustion chambers reported in this paper will reduce manufacturing cost of the rhenium chambers by 25 percent, and reduce the manufacturing time by 30 to 40 percent. The quantity of rhenium metal powder used to produce a rhenium chamber is reduced by approximately 70 percent and the subsequent reduction in machining schedule and costs is nearly 50 percent.

  10. Powder Metallurgy Fabrication of Molybdenum Accelerator Target Disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lowden, Richard Andrew; Kiggans Jr., James O.; Nunn, Stephen D.; Parten, Randy J.

    2015-07-01

    Powder metallurgy approaches for the fabrication of accelerator target disks are being examined to support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC. An advantage of powder metallurgy is that very little material is wasted and, at present, dense, quality parts are routinely produced from molybdenum powder. The proposed targets, however, are thin wafers, 29 mm in diameter with a thickness of 0.5 mm, with very stringent dimensional tolerances. Although tooling can be machined to very high tolerance levels, the operations of powder feed, pressing and sintering involve complicated mechanisms, each of which affects green density and shrinkage, and therefore the dimensions and shape of the final product. Combinations of powder morphology, lubricants and pressing technique have been explored to produce target disks with minimal variations in thickness and little or no distortion. In addition, sintering conditions that produce densities for optimum target dissolvability are being determined.

  11. Chapter 13: Tools for analysis

    Treesearch

    William Elliot; Kevin Hyde; Lee MacDonald; James. McKean

    2007-01-01

    This chapter presents a synthesis of current computer modeling tools that are, or could be, adopted for use in evaluating the cumulative watershed effects of fuel management. The chapter focuses on runoff, soil erosion and slope stability predictive tools. Readers should refer to chapters on soil erosion and stability for more detailed information on the physical...

  12. Nutrient dynamics: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Likens, Gene E.; LaBaugh, James W.; Buso, Donald C.; Bade, Darren; Winter, Thomas C.; Likens, Gene E.

    2009-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the variability and trends in chemical concentrations and fluxes at Mirror Lake during the period 1981–2000. It examines the water and chemical budgets of Mirror Lake to identify and understand better long-term trends in the chemical characteristics of the lake. It also identifies the causes of changes in nutrient concentrations and examines the contribution of hydrologic pathways to the contamination of Mirror Lake by road salt. The role of groundwater and precipitation on water and chemical budgets of the lake are also examined.

  13. Crack Growth Modeling in an Advanced Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Conditions Showing Changes in Curvature After Initiation of Testing. 11. Photograph of Overall Test Set-up with MTS 5 KIP Closed- 20 Loop Equipment and...Test Matrix Used in This Program. 97 X " -A LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1. Composition of AFI15 Powder (A1339). 2 2. Particle Size Distribution of AF115...of the gamma matrix. The initial development of AF115 involved powder metallurgy HIP + forge processing. Subsequent studies included evaluation of As

  14. Microstructure and Aging of Powder-Metallurgy Al Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackburn, L. B.

    1987-01-01

    Report describes experimental study of thermal responses and aging behaviors of three new aluminum alloys. Alloys produced from rapidly solidified powders and contain 3.20 to 5.15 percent copper, 0.24 to 1.73 percent magnesium, 0.08 to 0.92 percent iron, and smaller amounts of manganese, nickel, titanium, silicon, and zinc. Peak hardness achieved at lower aging temperatures than with standard ingot-metallurgy alloys. Alloys of interest for automobile, aircraft, and aerospace applications.

  15. Powder-metallurgy superalloy strengthened by a secondary gamma phase.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kotval, P. S.

    1971-01-01

    Description of experiments in which prealloyed powders of superalloy compositions were consolidated by extrusion after the strengthening by precipitation of a body-centered tetragonal gamma secondary Ni3 Ta phase. Thin foil electron microscopy showed that the mechanical properties of the resultant powder-metallurgy product were correlated with its microstructure. The product exhibited high strength at 1200 F without loss of ductility, after thermomechanical treatment and aging.

  16. Modulus Dependence on Large Scale Porosity of Powder Metallurgy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, P. G.; Horstemeyer, M. F.; Brown, H. R.

    2012-07-01

    This article compares the existing theoretical expressions for the porosity dependence on elastic constants to experimental data for a commercially available material, FC-0205 powder metallurgy (PM) steel. The modulus of compression, tension, effective torsion, and ultrasound-based data at varying porosity levels are plotted graphically against the theoretical expressions. An equation by McAdam ( J. Iron Steel Inst. Lond., 1950, 168, p 346) was able to most accurately predict the experimental data with the adjustment of only one material constant.

  17. Seeking answers on lecturer training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozier, Jim; Austin, Jim

    2010-04-01

    Jonathan Osborne's letter (February p20) in response to João Magueijo's article on university-lecturer training (December 2009 pp16-17) surely cannot go unanswered. Contrary to what Osborne claims, Magueijo did not say that we should use lectures because students like them - in fact, he advocated the use of exactly the "interactive, discursive methods" that Osborne favours as alternatives to traditional lecture courses. The real point of Magueijo's article was that lecturer training as currently practised in the UK is a waste of time - not that lecturers need no training at all.

  18. Handouts: making the lecture portable.

    PubMed

    Kroenke, K

    1991-01-01

    Previous medical literature on preparing lecture handouts has focused on their use in student education, where as part of a course there is a series of lectures followed by an examination. Conversely, resident and practising physicians usually attend single lectures on individual topics in order to update and improve their clinical skills. Handouts designed for the latter type of lecture can serve as a useful resource in subsequent day-to-day teaching and patient care. This article examines the purpose, distribution, structure, and substance of such handouts. Guidelines to assist the speaker in preparing lecture handouts are discussed.

  19. [Encouraging experiences of interactive lectures].

    PubMed

    Lehtonen, Sanna; Linden, Anni-Maija; Ojala, Päivi M; Polvi, Anne; Sallinen, Ville; Viranta, Suvi

    2009-01-01

    Traditional lectures typically represent unidirectional transfer of information from teacher to students whilst interactive lectures involve student activity. We analyzed the experiences of students and teachers of interactive lectures by observation and questionnaires during a course organized by Helsinki Biomedical Graduate School. Teachers and the majority of students found interactive lectures highly motivating although we observed that only a fraction of students participated in discussions. Students were of the opinion that interactivity improved their learning. Supplementing lectures with interactive elements encourages students to adopt active learning techniques.

  20. The Computer-based Lecture

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Marcia M; Spickard, Anderson W; Wofford, James L

    2001-01-01

    Advancing computer technology, cost-containment pressures, and desire to make innovative improvements in medical education argue for moving learning resources to the computer. A reasonable target for such a strategy is the traditional clinical lecture. The purpose of the lecture, the advantages and disadvantages of “live” versus computer-based lectures, and the technical options in computerizing the lecture deserve attention in developing a cost-effective, complementary learning strategy that preserves the teacher-learner relationship. Based on a literature review of the traditional clinical lecture, we build on the strengths of the lecture format and discuss strategies for converting the lecture to a computer-based learning presentation. PMID:11520384

  1. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  2. Exploring Tablet PC Lectures: Lecturer Experiences and Student Perceptions in Biomedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choate, Julia; Kotsanas, George; Dawson, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    Lecturers using tablet PCs with specialised pens can utilise real-time changes in lecture delivery via digital inking. We investigated student perceptions and lecturer experiences of tablet PC lectures in large-enrolment biomedicine subjects. Lecturers used PowerPoint or Classroom Presenter software for lecture preparation and in-lecture pen-based…

  3. B.Gregory Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-11

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  4. B.Gregory Lecture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Troisième série de "Gregory lectures" en mémoire de B.Gregory (1919-1977),DG de 1965 à 1970. La première conférence B.Gregory a été donné par le Prof.V.Weisskopf, son prédécesseur. Chris Greeg (?)de Berkley prend aussi la parole

  5. Bolden Glenn Lecture Series

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-06-27

    Former United States Marine Corps pilot, astronaut, and United States Sen. John Glenn speaks to those in attendance as he introduces NASA Administrator Charles Bolden as the speaker for the 2012 John H. Glenn Lecture in Space History, Wednesday evening, June 27, 2012, at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington. Bolden talked about his career as a Marine aviator, a Space Shuttle pilot and commander, and his leadership of America's space agency. Photo Credit: (NASA/Paul E. Alers)

  6. Chapter 6: Temperature

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Leslie A.; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Hauer, F. Richard; F. Richard Hauer,; Lamberti, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Stream temperature has direct and indirect effects on stream ecology and is critical in determining both abiotic and biotic system responses across a hierarchy of spatial and temporal scales. Temperature variation is primarily driven by solar radiation, while landscape topography, geology, and stream reach scale ecosystem processes contribute to local variability. Spatiotemporal heterogeneity in freshwater ecosystems influences habitat distributions, physiological functions, and phenology of all aquatic organisms. In this chapter we provide an overview of methods for monitoring stream temperature, characterization of thermal profiles, and modeling approaches to stream temperature prediction. Recent advances in temperature monitoring allow for more comprehensive studies of the underlying processes influencing annual variation of temperatures and how thermal variability may impact aquatic organisms at individual, population, and community based scales. Likewise, the development of spatially explicit predictive models provide a framework for simulating natural and anthropogenic effects on thermal regimes which is integral for sustainable management of freshwater systems.

  7. Melt inclusions: Chapter 6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    Melt inclusions are small droplets of silicate melt that are trapped in minerals during their growth in a magma. Once formed, they commonly retain much of their initial composition (with some exceptions) unless they are re-opened at some later stage. Melt inclusions thus offer several key advantages over whole rock samples: (i) they record pristine concentrations of volatiles and metals that are usually lost during magma solidification and degassing, (ii) they are snapshots in time whereas whole rocks are the time-integrated end products, thus allowing a more detailed, time-resolved view into magmatic processes (iii) they are largely unaffected by subsolidus alteration. Due to these characteristics, melt inclusions are an ideal tool to study the evolution of mineralized magma systems. This chapter first discusses general aspects of melt inclusions formation and methods for their investigation, before reviewing studies performed on mineralized magma systems.

  8. Chapter 7: Microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Efroymson, Rebecca; Coleman, Andre; Wigmosta, Mark; Schoenung, Susan; Sokhansanj, Shahab; Langholtz, Matthew; Davis, Ryan

    2016-07-01

    This chapter of the 2016 Billion-Ton Report provides an estimate of biomass potential at given minimum selling prices. This is not a projection of actual measured biomass or a simulation of commercial projects. Biomass potential is estimated based on 30 years of hourly local climate and strain-specific biophysical characteristics using the Biomass Assessment Tool (BAT), assuming sufficient available nutrients (including CO2). As is the case for terrestrial feedstocks, important resource analysis questions for algae include not only how much of the crop may be available but also what price might be needed to procure that supply. Identifying resource co-location opportunities for algal biofuel facilities has the potential to reduce costs, utilize waste resources, and focus attention on appropriate technologies and locations for commercialization.

  9. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels will hold a meeting...

  10. Career development through local chapter involvement: perspectives from chapter members.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa; Inniss-Richter, Zipporah; Mata, Holly; Cottrell, Randall R

    2013-07-01

    The importance of career development in professional organizations has been noted in the literature. Personal and professional benefits of membership regardless of discipline can be found across the career spectrum from student to executive. The benefits of professional membership with respect to career development in local chapter organizations have seldom been studied. Local chapter participation may offer significant career development opportunities for the practitioner, faculty member, and student. The purpose of this study was to explore the importance of local chapter involvement to the career development of health education practitioners. An 18-item questionnaire was disseminated to the membership of three local SOPHE (Society for Public Health Education) chapters that explored the level of local chapter involvement and the impact of how specific professional development activities impacted career development. The results of the survey highlighted the importance of continuing education programs, networking, and leadership experience in developing one's career that are offered by local SOPHE chapter involvement. Making a positive impact in the community and earning the respect of one's peers were most often reported as indicators of career success. These factors can directly impact local chapter participation. Career development can certainly be enhanced by active participation in the local chapter of a professional association.

  11. Xenobiotics: Chapter 15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, Christine M.; Semlitsch, Raymond D.; Lannoo, Michael

    2005-01-01

    While a number of compounds have been reported as toxic to amphibians, until recently, there have been conspicuously few ecotoxicological studies concerning amphibians. Studies are now focusing on the effects of xenobiotics on amphibians, an interest likely stimulated by widespread reports of amphibian declines. It has been speculated that chemical contamination may be partially to blame for some documented amphibian declines, by disrupting growth, reproduction, and behavior. However, evidence that xenobiotics are directly to blame for population declines is sparse because environmental concentrations are typically not great enough to generate direct mortality. Although the effects of environmental contaminants on the amphibian immune system are currently unknown, it is possible that exposure to stressors such as organic pollutants (which enter ecosystems in the form of pesticides) may depress immune system function, thus allowing greater susceptibility to fungal infections. This chapter discusses toxicity testing for xenobiotics and presents the results of a study that has focused on the subtle effects of sublethal concentrations of the chemical carbaryl on tadpoles.

  12. Chapter 20: Graphite

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, Timothy D

    2012-01-01

    Graphite is truly a unique material. Its structure, from the nano- to the millimeter scale give it remarkable properties that lead to numerous and diverse applications. Graphite bond anisotropy, with strong in-plane covalent bonds and weak van der Waals type bonding between the planes, gives graphite its unique combination of properties. Easy shear of the crystal, facilitated by weak interplaner bonds allows graphite to be used as a dry lubricant, and is responsible for the substances name! The word graphite is derived from the Greek to write because of graphites ability to mark writing surfaces. Moreover, synthetic graphite contains within its structure, porosity spanning many orders of magnitude in size. The thermal closure of these pores profoundly affects the properties for example, graphite strength increases with temperature to temperatures in excess of 2200 C. Consequently, graphite is utilized in many high temperature applications. The basic physical properties of graphite are reviewed here. Graphite applications include metallurgical; (aluminum and steel production), single crystal silicon production, and metal casting; electrical (motor brushes and commutators); mechanical (seals, bearings and bushings); and nuclear applications, (see Chapter 91, Nuclear Graphite). Here we discuss the structure, manufacture, properties, and applications of Graphite.

  13. Synthesis: Chapter 19

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pardo, L.H.; Geiser, L.H.; Fenn, M.E.; Driscoll, C.T.; Goodale, C.L.; Allen, E.B.; Baron, J. S.; Bobbink, R.; Bowman, W.D.; Clark, C.M.; Emmett, B.; Gilliam, F.S.; Greaver, T.; Hall, S.J.; Lilleskov, E.A.; Liu, L.; Lynch, J.A.; Nadelhoffer, K.; Perakis, S.S.; Robin-Abbott, M. J.; Stoddard, J.L.; Weathers, K. C.

    2011-01-01

    Human activity in the last century has led to a substantial increase in nitrogen (N) emissions and deposition (Galloway et al. 2003). Because of past, and, in some regions, continuing increases in emissions (Lehmann et al. 2005, Nilles and Conley 2001), this N deposition has reached a level that has caused or is likely to cause alterations and damage in many ecosystems across the United States. In some ecoregions, the impact of N deposition has been severe and has changed the biotic community structure and composition of ecosystems. In the Mediterranean California ecoregion, for example (see Chapter 13), replacement of native by exotic invasive vegetation is accelerated because exotic species are often more productive under elevated N deposition than native species in some California grasslands, coastal sage scrub, and desert scrub (Fenn et al. 2010, Rao and Allen 2010, Rao et al. 2010, Weiss 1999, Yoshida and Allen 2004). Such shifts in plant community composition and species richness can have consequences beyond changes in ecosystem structure: shifts may lead to overall losses in biodiversity and further impair particular threatened or endangered species (Stevens et al. 2004). Th e extirpation of the endangered checkerspot butterfl y (Euphydryas editha bayensis), because the host plant for the larval stage disappears in N-enriched ecosystems (Fenn et al. 2010, Weiss 1999), is just one example of the detrimental impacts of elevated N deposition.

  14. Phillips funds AWG lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Association for Women Geoscientists Foundation has received a $9000 grant from Phillips Petroleum Company to fund the Phillips-AWG Distinguished Lectures. The money will pay travel expenses for the women geoscientists listed with the AWG Speakers Bureau.More than 100 women geoscientists are available through the AWG Speakers Bureau. Their topics cover all the Earth sciences including geology, geophysics, geochemistry, paleobotany, planetary geology and mineral exploration. Their areas of study range from the U.S., Europe and South America to Mars. They come from academia, government and industry in 33 states and the District of Columbia.

  15. Properties of porous magnesium prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Čapek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2013-01-01

    Porous magnesium-based materials are biodegradable and promising for use in orthopaedic applications, but their applications are hampered by their difficult fabrication. This work reports the preparation of porous magnesium materials by a powder metallurgy technique using ammonium bicarbonate as spacer particles. The porosity of the materials depended on the amount of ammonium bicarbonate and was found to have strong negative effects on flexural strength and corrosion behaviour. However, the flexural strength of materials with porosities of up to 28 vol.% was higher than the flexural strength of non-metallic biomaterials and comparable with that of natural bone.

  16. Welding Metallurgy and Processing Issues for Joining of Power Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lienert, Thomas J.; Reardon, Patrick T.

    2012-08-14

    Weldability issues with the pertinent alloys have been reviewed and preliminary results of our work on Haynes 25 have been presented. Further results on the mechanical properties and metallography on the EB welds are imminent. Hot-ductility experiments will commence within a few weeks. Aging studies on the effects of heat treatment using the Gleeble are also planned. MST-6 has extensive background in the welding metallurgy of the pertinent alloys. We also have considerable experience with the various welding processes to be used.

  17. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lecture's Absent Audience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciullo, Nick J.

    2017-01-01

    According to the "Oxford English Dictionary" ("OED"), the noun "lecture" dates from the 14th century and means the "action of reading, perusal. Also, that which is read or perused." This definition, while accurate and resonates today in many college classrooms, ignores a key feature of any lecture. The…

  18. Lectures on Yangian symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loebbert, Florian

    2016-08-01

    In these introductory lectures we discuss the topic of Yangian symmetry from various perspectives. Forming the classical counterpart of the Yangian and an extension of ordinary Noether symmetries, first the concept of nonlocal charges in classical, two-dimensional field theory is reviewed. We then define the Yangian algebra following Drinfel’d's original motivation to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equation. Different realizations of the Yangian and its mathematical role as a Hopf algebra and quantum group are discussed. We demonstrate how the Yangian algebra is implemented in quantum, two-dimensional field theories and how its generators are renormalized. Implications of Yangian symmetry on the two-dimensional scattering matrix are investigated. We furthermore consider the important case of discrete Yangian symmetry realized on integrable spin chains. Finally we give a brief introduction to Yangian symmetry in planar, four-dimensional super Yang-Mills theory and indicate its impact on the dilatation operator and tree-level scattering amplitudes. These lectures are illustrated by several examples, in particular the two-dimensional chiral Gross-Neveu model, the Heisenberg spin chain and { N }=4 superconformal Yang-Mills theory in four dimensions.

  19. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  1. Collective Intelligence. Chapter 17

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.

    2003-01-01

    Many systems of self-interested agents have an associated performance criterion that rates the dynamic behavior of the overall system. This chapter presents an introduction to the science of such systems. Formally, collectives are defined as any system having the following two characteristics: First, the system must contain one or more agents each of which we view as trying to maximize an associated private utility; second, the system must have an associated world utility function that rates the possible behaviors of that overall system. In practice, collectives are often very large, distributed, and support little, if any, centralized communication and control, although those characteristics are not part of their formal definition. A naturally occurring example of a collective is a human economy. One can identify the agents and their private utilities as the human individuals in the economy and the associated personal rewards they are each trying to maximize. One could then identify the world utility as the time average of the gross domestic product. ("World utility" per se is not a construction internal to a human economy, but rather something defined from the outside.) To achieve high world utility it is necessary to avoid having the agents work at cross-purposes lest phenomena like liquidity traps or the Tragedy of the Commons (TOC) occur, in which agents' individually pursuing their private utilities lowers world utility. The obvious way to avoid such phenomena is by modifying the agents utility functions to be "aligned" with the world utility. This can be done via punitive legislation. A real-world example of an attempt to do this was the creation of antitrust regulations designed to prevent monopolistic practices.

  2. Co-ordinated Classroom Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Darell Boyd

    From a series of lectures, a selection of eight are oriented principally toward the biologically developing child, and the physiological operations in visual process. The numbered lectures are--(1) The Coordinated Classroom, its Philosophy and Principles, (2) An Outline of a Biological Point of View, (3) The Evolution of Structure--despite man's…

  3. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  4. ESP Methodology for Science Lecturers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Angela; Mulyana, Cukup

    A program designed to teach university science lecturers in Indonesia how to design and teach one-semester courses in English for special purposes (ESP) is described. The program provided lecturers with training in language teaching methodology and course design. The piloting of the teacher training course, focusing on physics instruction, is…

  5. Lecture Alternatives in Teaching English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judy, Stephen, Ed.

    The five sections of the document are: General Discussion; Classroom Experiences; Evaluation and Non-Lecture Teaching; A Closing Note; and Appendix. The ten papers presented are as follows: "Lecture Alternatives and the English Class" by Stephen Judy; "Let's See How it Goes: A View of the Teacher as Manager of Student-Initiated Activities" by…

  6. Surviving Lecture: A Pedagogical Alternative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Lecture is the approach traditionally used to teach music theory courses. Although efficient in the delivery of large amounts of information in a short period of time, lecture lacks the effectiveness of an active learning approach. "Theory Survivor" is a unique cooperative-learning method based on the Student Teams-Achievement Divisions technique…

  7. Lectures on Heavy Flavor Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Helen R

    2002-11-27

    These lectures are intended as an introduction to flavor physics for graduate students in experimental high energy physics. In these four lectures the basic ideas and of the subject and some current issues are presented, but no attempt is made to teach calculational techniques and methods.

  8. Chapter 59: Web Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, M. J.

    Web services are a cornerstone of the distributed computing infrastructure that the VO is built upon yet to the newcomer, they can appear to be a black art. This perception is not helped by the miasma of technobabble that pervades the subject and the seemingly impenetrable high priesthood of actual users. In truth, however, there is nothing conceptually difficult about web services (unsurprisingly any complexities will lie in the implementation details) nor indeed anything particularly new. A web service is a piece of software available over a network with a formal description of how it is called and what it returns that a computer can understand. Note that entities such as web servers, ftp servers and database servers do not generally qualify as they lack the standardized description of their inputs and outputs. There are prior technologies, such as RMI, CORBA, and DCOM, that have employed a similar approach but the success of web services lies predominantly in its use of standardized XML to provide a language-neutral way for representing data. In fact, the standardization goes further as web services are traditionally (or as traditionally as five years will allow) tied to a specific set of technologies (WSDL and SOAP conveyed using HTTP with an XML serialization). Alternative implementations are becoming increasingly common and we will cover some of these here. One important thing to remember in all of this, though, is that web services are meant for use by computers and not humans (unlike web pages) and this is why so much of it seems incomprehensible gobbledegook. In this chapter, we will start with an overview of the web services current in the VO and present a short guide on how to use and deploy a web service. We will then review the different approaches to web services, particularly REST and SOAP, and alternatives to XML as a data format. We will consider how web services can be formally described and discuss how advanced features such as security, state

  9. Advanced Concepts. Chapter 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Les; Mulqueen, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Before there is a funded space mission, there must be a present need for the mission. Space science and exploration are expensive, and without a well-defined and justifiable need, no one is going to commit significant funding for any space endeavor. However, as discussed in Chapter 1, applications of space technology and many and broad, hence there are many ways to determine and establish a mission need. Robotic science missions are justified by their science return. To be selected for flight, questions like these must be addressed: What is the science question that needs answering, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to answer it? Why does answering the question require an expensive space flight, instead of some ground-based alternative? If the question can only be answered by flying in space, then why is this approach better than other potential approaches? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to answer the question in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? There are also many ways to justify human exploration missions, including science return, technology advancement, as well as intangible reasons, such as national pride. Nonetheless, many of the questions that need answering, are similar to those for robotic science missions: Where are the people going, why, and will the proposed mission be the most cost-effective way to get there? What is the safest method to achieve the goal? How much will it cost? And is the technology required to get there and keep the crew alive in hand and ready to use? If not, then how much will it cost and how long will it take to mature the technology to a usable level? Another reason for some groups sending spacecraft into space is for profit. Telecommunications, geospatial imaging, and tourism are examples of proven, market-driven space missions and applications. For this specific set of users, the

  10. The Lecturer's Toolkit: A Resource for Developing Learning, Teaching & Assessment. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race, Phil

    This "toolkit" ring binder is designed to help teachers develop their professional practice in higher education and to enhance their instruction and assessment. A smaller bound version of this second edition is designed to be used by individual lecturers as their personal copy; it contains fewer tasks and activities. The chapters are: (1)…

  11. The Lecturer's Toolkit: A Resource for Developing Learning, Teaching & Assessment. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Race, Phil

    This "toolkit" ring binder is designed to help teachers develop their professional practice in higher education and to enhance their instruction and assessment. A smaller bound version of this second edition is designed to be used by individual lecturers as their personal copy; it contains fewer tasks and activities. The chapters are: (1)…

  12. Lectures on stellar dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    The aim of these lectures is to give some understanding of how orbits react to the gravity of other orbits and how these reactions can lead to cooperative instabilities. We show that Angle-Action variables are peculiarly well adapted to this problem. Although these variables may at first seem unfamiliar or even esoteric, I and many others have come to appreciate them as a vital tool in galactic dynamics - so much so that those who do .not use them are working at a severe disadvantage. I strongly advocate that you make the effort to learn them now. Although much of this material has been developed over the years since 1971, some parts have been developed more recently with my students J.L. Collett and C. Pichon for whose collaboration I am most grateful. In Part II we discuss the evolution of globular clusters under the influence of the gravitational stellar encounters. In part III, the dynamics of relativistic disks is discussed.

  13. Lectures on stellar dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, D.

    The aim of these lectures is to give some understanding of how orbits react to the gravity of other orbits and how these reactions can lead to cooperative instabilities. The author shows that Angle-Action variables are peculiarly well adapted to this problem. Although these variables may at first seem unfamiliar or even esoteric, he and many others have come to appreciate them as a vital tool in galactic dynamics - so much so that those who do not use them are working at a severe disadvantage. Although much of this material has been developed over the years since 1971, some parts have been developed more recently with J. L. Collett and C. Pichon. In Part II, the author discusses the evolution of globular clusters under the influence of the gravitational stellar encounters. In Part III, the dynamics of relativistic disks is discussed.

  14. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  15. Acoustics lecturing in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beristain, Sergio

    2002-11-01

    Some thirty years ago acoustics lecturing started in Mexico at the National Polytechnic Institute in Mexico City, as part of the Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Electronics Engineering curricula, including the widest program on this field in the whole country. This program has been producing acoustics specialists ever since. Nowadays many universities and superior education institutions around the country are teaching students at the B.Sc. level and postgraduate level many topics related to acoustics, such as Architectural Acoustics, Seismology, Mechanical Vibrations, Noise Control, Audio, Audiology, Music, etc. Also many institutions have started research programs in related fields, with participation of medical doctors, psychologists, musicians, engineers, etc. Details will be given on particular topics and development.

  16. Lecture on Thermal Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.

    2006-01-01

    This lecture will cover solar thermal radiation, particularly as it relates to the high energy solar processes that are the subject of this summer school. After a general review of thermal radiation from the Sun and a discussion of basic definitions, the various emission and absorption mechanisms will be described including black-body emission, bremsstrahlung, free-bound, and atomic line emissions of all kinds. The bulk of the time will be spent discussing the observational characteristics of thermal flare plasma and what can be learned about the flare energy release process from observations of the thermal radiation at all wavelengths. Information that has been learned about the morphology, temperature distribution, and composition of the flare plasma will be presented. The energetics of the thermal flare plasma will be discussed in relation to the nonthermal energy of the particles accelerated during the flare. This includes the total energy, the radiated and conductive cooling processes, and the total irradiated energy.

  17. Chapter II. Taxonomy and Phylogeny

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The book chapter presents a review of the taxonomic distribution of ornamental geophytic plants (bulbs, tubers, corms, rhizomes) and the modern classification of the families within which they belong....

  18. Ceramic Inclusions in Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially in turbine disk applications. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that are inherent to the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have a potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they typically do not reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where known populations of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the "natural" inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface-connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life; therefore, the quantity of ceramic "seeds" added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will intersect the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface area was needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macroscopic slices from extrusions

  19. To Lecture or Not to Lecture? That is the Question.

    PubMed

    Oja, Kenneth John; Kelly, Lesly

    2016-01-01

    A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study compared the effects of an unfolding case study with lecture in a nursing orientation class on new graduate registered nurses' knowledge, perceived learning, and satisfaction with the instructional method. Although results showed that the unfolding case study was engaging, learners who received content in a lecture format achieved significantly higher posttest scores. Nursing professional development specialists will find this article helpful when considering instructional methods for new graduate registered nurses.

  20. The Oskar Fehr Lecture.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J S

    2016-06-01

    The first Oskar Fehr lecture is given in honour of Professor Fehr, a well respected ophthalmologist, who was head physician of the Department of Eye Diseases at the Rudolf Virchow Hospital from 1918. He practiced there until 1938, when he was forbidden to enter the clinic because he was Jewish and subject to the anti-Semitic laws that were instituted after the rise of the Nazi party. Dr. Fehr escaped to Great Britain, where he practiced ophthalmology into his eighties. He was the first to distinguish between granular corneal dystrophy, lattice corneal dystrophy and macular corneal dystrophy. The topic of the first Oskar Fehr lecture is Schnyder corneal dystrophy (SCD), an autosomal dominantly inherited corneal dystrophy associated with abnormal cholesterol deposition in the cornea. The clinical, histopathologic and genetic findings of 115 individuals with SCD followed over 18 years are discussed. The impact of systemic cholesterol metabolism on other diseases is reviewed. Corneal findings in SCD are predictable on the basis of patient age. All patients develop progressive corneal haze because of abnormal deposition of corneal lipid, but only half of patients with SCD have evidence of corneal crystals. The prior name for this disease, Schnyder crystalline corneal dystrophy, led me to create the International Committee for the Classification of Corneal Dystrophies, in order to create a more up-to-date and accurate nomenclature for SCD and other corneal dystrophies. The name was then changed to Schnyder corneal dystrophy. Histopathology of excised SCD corneas demonstrates abnormal deposition of only HDL cholesterol. Mutations in the UBIAD1 gene result in SCD. Three dimensional protein modeling shows that mutations result in impaired vitamin K synthesis, suggesting a common link between vitamin K and cholesterol metabolism. UBIAD1 mutations are associated with other diseases, such as bladder carcinoma and Parkinson's disease like findings in Drosophila. Studies of the

  1. N18, Powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guedou, J. Y.; Lautridou, J. C.; Honnorat, Y.

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appro-priate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 °C for long-term applications and approximately 750 °C for short-term use because of micro-structural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without signifi-cant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astroloy and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk ap-plications.

  2. N18, powder metallurgy superalloy for disks: Development and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Guedou, J.Y.; Lautridou, J.C.; Honnorat, Y. . Materials and Processes Dept.)

    1993-08-01

    The preliminary industrial development of a powder metallurgy (PM) superalloy, designated N18, for disk applications has been completed. This alloy exhibits good overall mechanical properties after appropriate processing of the material. These properties have been measured on both isothermally forged and extruded billets, as well as on specimens cut from actual parts. The temperature capability of the alloy is about 700 C for long-term applications and approximately 750 C for short-term use because of microstructural instability. Further improvements in creep and crack propagation properties, without significant reduction in tensile strength, are possible through appropriate thermomechanical processing, which results in a large controlled grain size. Spin pit tests on subscale disks have confirmed that the N18 alloy has a higher resistance than PM Astrology and is therefore an excellent alloy for modern turbine disk applications.

  3. Powder metallurgy: Solid and liquid phase sintering of copper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Rex; Weiser, Martin W.

    1993-01-01

    Basic powder metallurgy (P/M) principles and techniques are presented in this laboratory experiment. A copper based system is used since it is relatively easy to work with and is commercially important. In addition to standard solid state sintering, small quantities of low melting metals such as tin, zinc, lead, and aluminum can be added to demonstrate liquid phase sintering and alloy formation. The Taguchi Method of experimental design was used to study the effect of particle size, pressing force, sintering temperature, and sintering time. These parameters can be easily changed to incorporate liquid phase sintering effects and some guidelines for such substitutions are presented. The experiment is typically carried out over a period of three weeks.

  4. Phase Stability of a Powder Metallurgy Disk Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Gayda, John; Kantzos, P.; Telesman, Jack; Gang, Anita

    2006-01-01

    Advanced powder metallurgy superalloy disks in aerospace turbine engines now entering service can be exposed to temperatures approaching 700 C, higher than those previously encountered. They also have higher levels of refractory elements, which can increase mechanical properties at these temperatures but can also encourage phase instabilities during service. Microstructural changes including precipitation of topological close pack phase precipitation and coarsening of existing gamma' precipitates can be slow at these temperatures, yet potentially significant for anticipated disk service times exceeding 1,000 h. The ability to quantify and predict such potential phase instabilities and degradation of capabilities is needed to insure structural integrity and air worthiness of propulsion systems over the full life cycle. A prototypical advanced disk superalloy was subjected to high temperature exposures, and then evaluated. Microstructural changes and corresponding changes in mechanical properties were quantified. The results will be compared to predictions of microstructure modeling software.

  5. Aluminium alloys with transition metals prepared by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucera, V.; Prusa, F.; Vojtech, D.

    2017-02-01

    Powder metallurgy represented by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used for preparation of the AlFe16 and the AlSi20Fe16 alloys. Microstructure of the both alloys consisted of very fine intermetallic phases homogenously dispersed in the matrix of α-Al solid solution. Fine nature of microstructure led to promising results of compressive stress-strain tests performed at laboratory and elevated temperature of 400 °C. The compressive strengths of the AlSi20Fe16 and the AlFe16 alloys at laboratory temperature were 780 MPa and 508 MPa, respectively. Elevated temperature resulted in drop of the compressive strengths to 480 MPa and 211 MPa, respectively. However, the results of investigated alloys outperformed the thermally stable AlSi12Cu1Mg1Ni1 (wt. %) used as reference material.

  6. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; ...

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developedmore » for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.« less

  7. The metallurgy and processing science of metal additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Sames, William J.; List, III, Frederick Alyious; Pannala, Sreekanth; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam Suresh

    2016-03-07

    Here, additive Manufacturing (AM), widely known as 3D printing, is a method of manufacturing that forms parts from powder, wire, or sheets in a process that proceeds layer-by-layer.Many techniques (using many different names) have been developed to accomplish this via melting or solid - state joining. In this review, these techniques for producing metal parts are explored, with a focus on the science of metal AM: processing defects, heat transfer, solidification, solid- state precipitation, mechanical properties, and post-processing metallurgy. The various metal AM techniques are compared, with analysis of the strengths and limitations of each. Few alloys have been developed for commercial production, but recent development efforts are presented as a path for the ongoing development of new materials for AM processes.

  8. Scaleup of powder metallurgy processed Nb-Al multifilamentary wire

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, C.; Foner, S.; Otubo, J.; Pourrahimi, S.; Schwartz, B.; Zhang, H.

    1983-05-01

    Power metallurgy processed Nb-Al superconducting wires were fabricated from billets up to 45 mm o.d. with nominal areal reduction ratios, R, up to 2 X 10/sup 5/, Nb powder sizes from 40 to 300 ..mu..m from various sources, Al powder sizes from 9 to 75 ..mu..m, Al concentrations from 3 to 25 wt % Al and with a wide range of heat treatments. All the compacts used tap density powder in a Cu tube and swaging and/or rod rolling and subsequent wire drawing. Both single strand and bundled wires were made. Overall critical current densities, J /SUB c/, of 2 X 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 14 T and 10/sup 4/ A/cm/sup 2/ at 16 T were achieved for 6 to 8 wt % Al in Nb.

  9. Wrought processing of ingot-metallurgy gamma titanium aluminide alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Semiatin, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    The wrought processing of ingot-metallurgy, gamma titanium aluminide alloys is reviewed. Attention is focused on five major areas in the development of thermomechanical processes for these materials: (1) ingot structure and homogenization, (2) ingot breakdown via existing techniques, (3) novel processes for ingot breakdown, (4) secondary processing, and (5) process scaleup considerations. The nature of the cast microstructure and the influence of composition and ingot size on grain size and segregation are described. The design of existing processes for ingot breakdown deals with the selection of process variables and the design of cans for nonisothermal metalworking techniques. Novel breakdown processes, including smart forging, alpha forging, controlled dwell extrusion, and equal channel angular extrusion, are reviewed. In the area of secondary processing, developments related to pack rolling of sheet, superplastic sheet forming, and isothermal, closed-die forging are summarized. Lastly, scaleup considerations such as thermal cracking during ingot production are addressed.

  10. Advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys via rapid solidification technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R.

    1984-01-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 10 to 11.5 wt. pct. of iron and 1.5 to 3 wt. pct. of chromium using the technique of rapid solidification powder metallurgy were studied. Alloys were prepared as thin ribbons (.002 inch thick) rapidly solidified at uniform rate of 10(6) C/second by the melt spinning process. The melt spun ribbons were pulverized into powders (-60 to 400 mesh) by a rotating hammer mill. The powders were consolidated by hot extrusion at a high reduction ratio of 50:1. The powder extrusion temperature was varied to determine the range of desirable processing conditions necessary to yield useful properties. Powders and consolidated alloys were characterized by SEM and optical metallography. The consolidated alloys were evaluated for (1) thermal stability, (2) tensile properties in the range, room temperature to 450 F, and (3) notch toughness in the range, room temperature to 450 F.

  11. Application of superalloy powder metallurgy for aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreshfield, R. L.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In the last decade, Government/Industry programs have advanced powder metallurgy-near-net-shape technology to permit the use of hot isostatic pressed (HIP) turbine disks in the commercial aircraft fleet. These disks offer a 30% savings of input weight and an 8% savings in cost compared in cast-and-wrought disks. Similar savings were demonstrated for other rotating engine components. A compressor rotor fabricated from hot-die-forged-HIP superalloy billets revealed input weight savings of 54% and cost savings of 35% compared to cast-and-wrought parts. Engine components can be produced from compositions such as Rene 95 and Astroloy by conventional casting and forging, by forging of HIP powder billets, or by direct consolidation of powder by HIP. However, each process produces differences in microstructure or introduces different defects in the parts. As a result, their mechanical properties are not necessarily identical. Acceptance methods should be developed which recognize and account for the differences.

  12. Microwave Power Absorption in Materials for Ferrous Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Yang, Mengshen; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2016-11-01

    The characteristics of microwave power absorption in materials for ferrous metallurgy, including iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe0.925O) and bitumite, were explored by evaluating their dielectric loss (Q E) and/or magnetic loss (Q H) distributions in the 0.05-m-thick slabs of the corresponding materials exposed to 1.2-kW and 2.45-GHz microwave radiation at temperatures below 1100°C. It is revealed that the dielectric loss contributes primarily to the power absorption in Fe2O3, Fe0.925O and the bitumite at all of the examined temperatures. Their Q E values at room temperature and slab surface are 9.1311 × 103 W m-3, 23.7025 × 103 W m-3, and 49.5999 × 103 W m-3, respectively, showing that the materials have the following heating rate initially under microwave irradiation: bitumite > Fe0.925O > Fe2O3. Compared with the other materials, Fe3O4 has much stronger power absorption, primarily originated from its magnetic loss (e.g., Q H = 1.0615 × 106 W m-3, Q H/Q E = 2.4185 at 24°C and slab surface), below its Curie point, above which the magnetic susceptibility approaches to zero, thereby causing a very small Q H value at even the surface (Q H = 1.0416 × 105 W m-3 at 880°C). It is also demonstrated that inhomogeneous power distributions occur in all the slabs and become more pronounced with increasing temperature mainly due to rapid increase in permittivity. Characterizing power absorption in the oxides and the coal is expected to offer a strategic guide for improving use of microwave energy in ferrous metallurgy.

  13. Ceramic Inclusions In Powder Metallurgy Disk Alloys: Characterization and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Pete; Kantzos, Pete; Telesman, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Powder metallurgy alloys are increasingly used in gas turbine engines, especially as the material chosen for turbine disks. Although powder metallurgy materials have many advantages over conventionally cast and wrought alloys (higher strength, higher temperature capability, etc.), they suffer from the rare occurrence of ceramic defects (inclusions) that arise from the powder atomization process. These inclusions can have potentially large detrimental effect on the durability of individual components. An inclusion in a high stress location can act as a site for premature crack initiation and thereby considerably reduce the fatigue life. Because these inclusions are exceedingly rare, they usually don't reveal themselves in the process of characterizing the material for a particular application (the cumulative volume of the test bars in a fatigue life characterization is typically on the order of a single actual component). Ceramic inclusions have, however, been found to be the root cause of a number of catastrophic engine failures. To investigate the effect of these inclusions in detail, we have undertaken a study where a known population of ceramic particles, whose composition and morphology are designed to mimic the 'natural' inclusions, are added to the precursor powder. Surface connected inclusions have been found to have a particularly large detrimental effect on fatigue life, therefore the volume of ceramic 'seeds' added is calculated to ensure that a minimum number will occur on the surface of the fatigue test bars. Because the ceramic inclusions are irregularly shaped and have a tendency to break up in the process of extrusion and forging, a method of calculating the probability of occurrence and expected intercepted surface and embedded cross-sectional areas were needed. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the distributions of these parameters and have verified the simulated results with observations of ceramic inclusions found in macro

  14. Microwave Power Absorption in Materials for Ferrous Metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Yang, Mengshen; Hwang, Jiann-Yang; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    The characteristics of microwave power absorption in materials for ferrous metallurgy, including iron oxides (Fe2O3, Fe3O4 and Fe0.925O) and bitumite, were explored by evaluating their dielectric loss ( Q E) and/or magnetic loss ( Q H) distributions in the 0.05-m-thick slabs of the corresponding materials exposed to 1.2-kW and 2.45-GHz microwave radiation at temperatures below 1100°C. It is revealed that the dielectric loss contributes primarily to the power absorption in Fe2O3, Fe0.925O and the bitumite at all of the examined temperatures. Their Q E values at room temperature and slab surface are 9.1311 × 103 W m-3, 23.7025 × 103 W m-3, and 49.5999 × 103 W m-3, respectively, showing that the materials have the following heating rate initially under microwave irradiation: bitumite > Fe0.925O > Fe2O3. Compared with the other materials, Fe3O4 has much stronger power absorption, primarily originated from its magnetic loss (e.g., Q H = 1.0615 × 106 W m-3, Q H/ Q E = 2.4185 at 24°C and slab surface), below its Curie point, above which the magnetic susceptibility approaches to zero, thereby causing a very small Q H value at even the surface ( Q H = 1.0416 × 105 W m-3 at 880°C). It is also demonstrated that inhomogeneous power distributions occur in all the slabs and become more pronounced with increasing temperature mainly due to rapid increase in permittivity. Characterizing power absorption in the oxides and the coal is expected to offer a strategic guide for improving use of microwave energy in ferrous metallurgy.

  15. Teaching a Large Lecture Interpersonal Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Judy C.

    Though lecturing reflects the outmoded view that communication consists of action rather than transaction, large lecture classes are a reality that must be engaged. An interpersonal communication course can be adapted to the lecture hall and need not include the traditional lecture as the only teaching method. Students should be allowed to…

  16. Introductory Lectures on Collider Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Tim M. P.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2013-12-01

    These are elementary lectures about collider physics. They are aimed at graduate students who have some background in computing Feynman diagrams and the Standard Model, but assume no particular sophistication with the physics of high energy colliders.

  17. Leveraging the Shapley Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S.

    1998-05-01

    The Shapley Lectureships are both an honor and a privilege. The program has long provided the non-specialist a rare glimpse of the latest result of astronomical investigations. Shapley Lecturers carry the banner for the most interesting of all the sciences. They share the beauty and strength of astronomy by representing the discipline to non-specialists. It is important that we contribute what we can to this program. One might benefit from the frequent travel of most astronomers. Most research trips are now covered by grant money, by university money, and by Government money. Leverage this travel. For example, many meetings are held near places with small colleges. Consider sending a Shapley brochure to the science departments before your trip. Such trips may often be used to elicit a Shapley visit. Advertise the program. When we talk about astronomy to others we help all of us to keep this science alive. I will share the results of my Shapley Visits made in the last four years while traveling for NASA and NSF.

  18. Introductory lecture: nanoplasmonics.

    PubMed

    Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Nanoplasmonics or nanoscale metal-based optics is a field of science and technology with a tremendously rich and colourful history. Starting with the early works of Michael Faraday on gold nanocolloids and optically-thin gold leaf, researchers have been fascinated by the unusual optical properties displayed by metallic nanostructures. We now can enjoy selecting from over 10 000 publications every year on the topic of plasmonics and the number of publications has been doubling about every three years since 1990. This impressive productivity can be attributed to the significant growth of the scientific community as plasmonics has spread into a myriad of new directions. With 2015 being the International Year of Light, it seems like a perfect moment to review some of the most notable accomplishments in plasmonics to date and to project where the field may be moving next. After discussing some of the major historical developments in the field, this article will analyse how the most successful plasmonics applications are capitalizing on five key strengths of metallic nanostructures. This Introductory Lecture will conclude with a brief look into the future.

  19. Optional Student Use of Online Lecture Resources: Resource Preferences, Performance and Lecture Attendance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabe, M.; Christopherson, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most common uses of a course management system in the on-campus environment is to offer lecture resources to students. Few researchers have investigated how students use such resources. This study considers student use of lecture resources that offer a representation of the lecture presented (i.e. lecture outline, lecture summary, audio…

  20. What makes a great lecture? Use of lectures in a hybrid PBL curriculum.

    PubMed

    Azer, Samy A

    2009-03-01

    Lectures are of great value to students. However, with the introduction of hybrid problem-based learning (PBL) curricula into most medical schools, the emphasis on lectures has decreased. This paper discusses how lectures can be used in a PBL curriculum, what makes a great lecture, and how to deliver a lecture that fits with these changes.

  1. Lectures on perturbative string theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ooguri, Hirosi; Yin, Z. |

    1997-02-01

    These lecture notes on String Theory constitute an introductory course designed to acquaint the students with some basic factors of perturbative string theories. They are intended as preparation for the more advanced courses on non-perturbative aspects of string theories in the school. The course consists of five lectures: (1) Bosonic String, (2) Toroidal Compactifications, (3) Superstrings, (4) Heterotic Strings, and (5) Orbifold Compactifications.

  2. Fundamentals of Physics, Volume 2 (Chapters 21- 44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Part 3. Chapter 21. Electric Charge. Chapter 22. Electric Fields. Chapter 23. Gauss' Law. Chapter 24. Electric Potential. Chapter 25. Capacitance. Chapter 26. Current and Resistance. Chapter 27. Circuits. Chapter 28. Magnetic Fields. Chapter 29. Magnetic Fields Due to Currents. Chapter 30. Induction and Inductance. Chapter 31. Electromagnetic Oscillations and Alternating Current. Chapter 32. Maxwell's Equations; Magnetism of Matter. Part 4. Chapter 33. Electromagnetic Waves. Chapter 34. Images. Chapter 35. Interference. Chapter 36. Diffraction. Chapter 37. Relativity. Part 5. Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendices. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions and Problems. Index.

  3. Exploring medical student decisions regarding attending live lectures and using recorded lectures.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anmol; Saks, Norma Susswein

    2013-09-01

    Student decisions about lecture attendance are based on anticipated effect on learning. Factors involved in decision-making, the use of recorded lectures and their effect on lecture attendance, all warrant investigation. This study was designed to identify factors in student decisions to attend live lectures, ways in which students use recorded lectures, and if their use affects live lecture attendance. A total of 213 first (M1) and second year (M2) medical students completed a survey about lecture attendance, and rated factors related to decisions to attend live lectures and to utilize recorded lectures. Responses were analyzed overall and by class year and gender. M1 attended a higher percentage of live lectures than M2, while both classes used the same percentage of recorded lectures. Females attended more live lectures, and used a smaller percentage of recorded lectures. The lecturer was a key in attendance decisions. Also considered were the subject and availability of other learning materials. Students use recorded lectures as replacement for live lectures and as supplement to them. Lectures, both live and recorded, are important for student learning. Decisions about lecture placement in the curriculum need to be based on course content and lecturer quality.

  4. Chapter A7. Biological Indicators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Myers, Donna N.; Wilde, Franceska D.

    2003-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter of the manual includes procedures for the (1) determination of biochemical oxygen demand using a 5-day bioassay test; (2) collection, identification, and enumeration of fecal indicator bacteria; (3) collection of samples and information on two laboratory methods for fecal indicator viruses (coliphages); and (4) collection of samples for protozoan pathogens. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed November 25, 2003).

  5. Chapter 1: Direct Normal Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Myer, Daryl R.

    2016-04-15

    This chapter addresses the quantitative and qualitative aspects of the solar resource, the direct solar radiation. It discusses the total or integrated broadband direct beam extraterrestrial radiation (ETR). This total integrated irradiance is comprised of photons of electromagnetic radiation. The chapter also discusses the impact of the atmosphere and its effect upon the direct normal irradiance (DNI) beam radiation. The gases and particulates present in the atmosphere traversed by the direct beam reflect, absorb, and scatter differing spectral regions and proportions of the direct beam, and act as a variable filter. Knowledge of the available broadband DNI beam radiation resource data is essential in designing a concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) system. Spectral variations in the DNI beam radiation affect the performance of a CPV system depending on the solar cell technology used. The chapter describes propagation and scattering processes of circumsolar radiation (CSR), which includes the Mie scattering from large particles.

  6. Chapter A6. Field Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A6 presents procedures and guidelines for the collection of data on air and water temperature, and on dissolved-oxygen concentrations, specific electrical conductance, pH, reduction-oxidation potential, alkalinity, and turbidity in water. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A (accessed August 6, 2005).

  7. Secondary School Mathematics. Preliminary Version. Sample Chapters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Max S.; And Others

    This volume contains preliminary versions of five of the chapters prepared by the SMSG curriculum project for use in grades 7 and 8. The first four chapters and the tenth chapter in the sequence are presented. The sample chapters in this volume illustrate a number of aspects of the curriculum project: (1) association of ideas of number and space…

  8. Nobel Lecture. Aquaporin water channels.

    PubMed

    Agre, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Thank you very much. I am humbled, I am delighted; I am honored. This is every scientist's dream: to give the Nobel Lecture in Stockholm. But I would not be honest if I did not tell you that I am having a little anxiety being on this platform. I have lectured a number of times in Sweden, and I thought I would share with you some events preceding a special lecture that I gave here a few years ago. Arriving at Arlanda Airport, I waited in line at the Pass Control behind a group of businessmen in suits with briefcases. I heard the first in line asked by the control officer to state the purpose of his visit to Sweden. When the man replied "business," the officer approved and stamped his passport. One at a time, each stepped forward and was asked the same thing; each answered "business" and was approved. Eventually it was my turn, and I was dressed in rumpled clothes after spending the night in the Economy Minus section of an SAS jetliner. The officer asked me the purpose of my visit, and I said "I am here to give the von Euler Lecture at Karolinska Institute." The officer immediately looked up, stared at me, and asked, "Are you nervous?" At that point I became intensely nervous and said "Yes, I am a little nervous." The officer looked up again and stated "Well, you should be!" So if the lecturers look a little nervous, the problem is at Arlanda.

  9. Practical strategies for effective lectures.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Peter H; McCallister, Jennifer W; Luks, Andrew M; Le, Tao T; Fessler, Henry E

    2015-04-01

    Lecturing is an essential teaching skill for scientists and health care professionals in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. However, few medical or scientific educators have received training in contemporary techniques or technology for large audience presentation. Interactive lecturing outperforms traditional, passive-style lecturing in educational outcomes, and is being increasingly incorporated into large group presentations. Evidence-based techniques range from the very simple, such as inserting pauses for audience discussion, to more technologically advanced approaches such as electronic audience response systems. Alternative software platforms such as Prezi can overcome some of the visual limits that the ubiquitous PowerPoint imposes on complex scientific narratives, and newer technology formats can help foster the interactive learning environment. Regardless of the technology, adherence to good principles of instructional design, multimedia learning, visualization of quantitative data, and informational public speaking can improve any lecture. The storyline must be clear, logical, and simplified compared with how it might be prepared for scientific publication. Succinct outline and summary slides can provide a roadmap for the audience. Changes of pace, and summaries or other cognitive breaks inserted every 15-20 minutes can renew attention. Graphics that emphasize clear, digestible data graphs or images over tables, and simple, focused tables over text slides, are more readily absorbed. Text slides should minimize words, using simple fonts in colors that contrast to a plain background. Adherence to these well-established principles and addition of some new approaches and technologies will yield an engaging lecture worth attending.

  10. Chapter 6: Breeding season ecology

    Treesearch

    Mark K. Sogge

    2000-01-01

    The willow flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) breeds across much of the conterminous United States and in portions of extreme southern Canada. As might be expected in such a wide-ranging species, willow flycatchers in different portions of the range exhibit differences in appearance, song, and ecological characteristics. The intent of this chapter is to...

  11. Chapter Seven: Prospects for Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Richard F.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter suggests further ways that Practice Theory can be applied to understanding language teaching and learning. In particular, the author contends that more work is needed to describe the configuration of discursive resources in practices in foreign language communities in order to design effective pedagogies and assessments. In addition,…

  12. Chapter 2: Official Programmatic Descriptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roholt, Ross VeLure; Hildreth, R. W.; Baizerman, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Youth civic engagement is a diverse field of practice, with each initiative claiming it has a unique approach. This chapter describes three initiatives, Youth-in-Government, Youth Science Center, and Public Achievement from the point-of-view of program staff. Their view is often privileged; it is the one used for official communication and public…

  13. Purpose and applications [Chapter 1

    Treesearch

    Nicholas L. Crookston

    2003-01-01

    The Fire and Fuels Extension (FFE) to the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) simulates fuel dynamics and potential fire behavior over time, in the context of stand development and management. This chapter provides an introduction to the model by illustrating its purpose and chronicling some of the applications it has supported.

  14. Study site characterization. Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Chris Potter; Richard. Birdsey

    2008-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of the main site characterization requirements at landscape-scale sampling locations. The overview is organized according to multiple "Site Attribute" headings that require descriptions throughout a given study site area, leading ultimately to a sufficient overall site characterization. Guidance is provided to describe the major...

  15. Chapter 1. Material and methods

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, A. R.; Uemura, K.

    1976-01-01

    This chapter outlines the way in which the problems of obtaining and assessing population-related material and analysing the data were tackled. Some of the limits of the approach used, namely, the examination of nearly all deaths from several demographically defined communities, are discussed. PMID:1087187

  16. What's New in Chapter Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Glenowyn

    Listing 81 chapter books for children published between 1996-1999, this annotated bibliography gives interest level ratings, reading level ratings, a brief summary, and theme assignments. The 13 theme categories listed in alphabetical order include Adventure-Survival, Autobiography-Biography, Death, Divorce, Good Reading, Handicaps, Historical…

  17. "Don't Lecture Me"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called "Don't Lecture Me" and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  18. ``Don't Lecture Me''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanton, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Often I will listen to public radio on long drives when I am alone. Recently I happened to catch a program called ``Don't Lecture Me'' and it really caught my attention for several reasons. First, the speakers were all notable leaders in Physics Education Research such as Joe Redish, David Hestenes, and Eric Mazur. (See this month's WebSights column.) These folks are among many who have devoted their energies to understanding how students learn physics and how teachers can design classroom instruction and interactions to best meet the needs of learners. Second, on this particular trip, I had just observed a teacher whose class was very teacher-centered as the teacher lectured most of the class period. As we discussed this later, she expressed concern that she had to cover the material and didn't feel that she could do it without lecturing.

  19. Indexation Rules for Metallurgy in PASCAL. Original Title: Regles d'Indexation de la Metallurgie'--Technical Note Issued by Informascience--January 1980. Translated by Marie Wallin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Library.

    The indexing rules presented are designed for use with a new French-German database on metallurgy being developed under an agreement by CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) and BAM (Bundesanstalt fur Materialprufung, Berlin). The new database, which will feature multilingual titles and index terms (French-German-English-) and…

  20. Indexation Rules for Metallurgy in PASCAL. Original Title: Regles d'Indexation de la Metallurgie'--Technical Note Issued by Informascience--January 1980. Translated by Marie Wallin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Library.

    The indexing rules presented are designed for use with a new French-German database on metallurgy being developed under an agreement by CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Paris) and BAM (Bundesanstalt fur Materialprufung, Berlin). The new database, which will feature multilingual titles and index terms (French-German-English-) and…

  1. [Auditory-vestibular changes in workers in ferrous metallurgy manufacture].

    PubMed

    Khalkova, Zh; Kostadinova, G

    1986-01-01

    The deleterious factors of the working environment in metallurgy--physical and chemical, with a direct or indirect effect on the analyzer systems of organism could lead to some disturbances of their functions and restriction of the capacity for work of the workers. Seventy workers from coke-chemical production and 98 workers from ferro alloy production have been examined with a view to determination of the auditory and vestibular status among them. The exposure to manganese aerosols has been determined among the workers from ferro alloy production. The indices studied with various degree of exposure have been juxtaposed. Essential changes have been established in the auditory and vestibular analyzer of the workers from both productions. The vestibular disorders have a phase character. The central disorders in the otoneurological state of the workers from coke-chemical production predominate whereas the peripheral ones--among the workers from ferro alloy production. The presence of pronounced changes in the hearing and vestibular indices in the workers with the lowest degree of exposure, provided grounds to propose them as criteria for the early diagnostics of the chronic manganese intoxication.

  2. Macromolecular metallurgy of binary mesocrystals via designed multiblock terpolymers.

    PubMed

    Xie, Nan; Liu, Meijiao; Deng, Hanlin; Li, Weihua; Qiu, Feng; Shi, An-Chang

    2014-02-26

    Self-assembling block copolymers provide access to the fabrication of various ordered phases. In particular, the ordered spherical phases can be used to engineer soft mesocrystals with domain size at the 5-100 nm scales. Simple block copolymers, such as diblock copolymers, form a limited number of mesocrystals. However multiblock copolymers are capable to form more complex mesocrystals. We demonstrate that designed B1AB2CB3 multiblock terpolymers, in which the A- and C-blocks form spherical domains and the packing of these spheres can be controlled by changing the lengths of the middle and terminal B-blocks, self-assemble into various binary mesocrystals with space group symmetries of a large number of binary ionic crystals, including NaCl, CsCl, ZnS, α-BN, AlB2, CaF2, TiO2, ReO3, Li3Bi, Nb3Sn(A15), and α-Al2O3. This approach can be generalized to other terpolymers as well as to tetrapolymers to obtain ternary mesocrystals. Our study provides a new concept of macromolecular metallurgy for producing crystal phases in a mesoscale and thus makes multiblock copolymers a robust platform for the engineering of functional materials.

  3. [Possible health effects associated with Pre-Columbian metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Idrovo, Alvaro Javier

    2005-09-01

    In the Old World, several researchers have indicated that adverse health effects were associated with exposure to arsenic, and that this influenced a change in the use of copper-arsenic alloys to others less toxic. This hypothesis was evaluated for three Pre-Columbian metallurgy traditions: Central Andes, Intermediate Area, and West Mexico. The metal artifacts from the Central Andes showed arsenic concentrations similar to those in the Old World (0.5%-1.0%). In the Intermediate Area the values were smallest; however, in West Mexico the arsenic content was very high (7%-25%). In Central Andes arsenical bronze was used initially, but copper-tin alloys when introduced were preferred and distributed throughout the Inca Empire. Osteological and artistic evidences of foot amputations among Moche individuals from Central Andes support the presence of "black foot disease" (a condition associated with arsenic poisoning) among Pre-Columbian populations. In conclusion, the adverse effects of arsenic have been observed in the New World, and that these effects promoted a change toward the use of less toxic alloys.

  4. Device for preparing combinatorial libraries in powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shoufeng; Evans, Julian R G

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a powder-metering, -mixing, and -dispensing mechanism that can be used as a method for producing large numbers of samples for metallurgical evaluation or electrical or mechanical testing from multicomponent metal and cermet powder systems. It is designed to make use of the same commercial powders that are used in powder metallurgy and, therefore, to produce samples that are faithful to the microstructure of finished products. The particle assemblies produced by the device could be consolidated by die pressing, isostatic pressing, laser sintering, or direct melting. The powder metering valve provides both on/off and flow rate control of dry powders in open capillaries using acoustic vibration. The valve is simple and involves no relative movement, avoiding seizure with fine powders. An orchestra of such valves can be arranged on a building platform to prepare multicomponent combinatorial libraries. As with many combinatorial devices, identification and evaluation of sources of mixing error as a function of sample size is mandatory. Such an analysis is presented.

  5. Welding metallurgy of nickel alloys in gas turbine components

    SciTech Connect

    Lingenfelter, A. C., LLNL

    1997-05-21

    Materials for gas turbine engines are required to meet a wide range of temperature and stress application requirements. These alloys exhibit a combination of creep resistance, creep rupture strength, yield and tensile strength over a wide temperature range, resistance to environmental attack (including oxidation, nitridation, sulphidation and carburization), fatigue and thermal fatigue resistance, metallurgical stability and useful thermal expansion characteristics. These properties are exhibited by a series of solid-solution-strengthened and precipitation-hardened nickel, iron and cobalt alloys. The properties needed to meet the turbine engine requirements have been achieved by specific alloy additions, by heat treatment and by thermal mechanical processing. A thorough understanding of the metallurgy and metallurgical processing of these materials is imperative in order to successfully fusion weld them. This same basic understanding is required for repair of a component with the added dimension of the potential effects of thermal cycling and environmental exposure the component will have endured in service. This article will explore the potential problems in joining and repair welding these materials.

  6. Using Lecture Transcripts in EAP Lecture Comprehension Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebauer, Roni S.

    Native speakers, when listening to lectures, sift through the information to choose what to listen to, make hypotheses about future discourse, synthesize preceding discourse, and add their own background knowledge. Nonnative speakers, in their native languages, follow the same procedures. When dealing with a foreign language, however, they are not…

  7. Venus 3 Book: Chapter 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, F.; Svedhem, H.; Head, J.

    2014-04-01

    This will be the first chapter in the planned 'Venus 3' book, which will present the latest knowledge about all aspects of the planet Venus. Chapter 1 will include: 1. Brief history of Venus observations, from telescopic studies up to and including early space missions (Venera, Mariner) 2. Overview of key results from more recent groundbased observations and space missions, including Pioneer Venus, the later Veneras, Vega, Magellan, Akatsuki and Venus Express 3. Summary of current knowledge, in three main sections: a. Surface and interior b. Atmosphere and climate c. Thermosphere, exosphere and magnetosphere 4. Outstanding scientific questions remaining, and future mission concepts providing background, introduction and an overview to the rest of the book.

  8. [Atmospheric emission of PCDD/Fs from secondary aluminum metallurgy industry in the southwest area, China].

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Zhi-Shun; Jian, Chuan; Zhu, Ming-Ji; Deng, Li; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Qin

    2014-01-01

    Five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises in the southwest area of China were measured for emissions of PCDD/Fs. The results indicated that the emission levels of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) were 0.015-0.16 ng x m(-3), and the average was 0.093 ng x m(-3) from secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises. Emission factors of PCDD/Fs (as TEQ) from the five secondary aluminum metallurgy enterprises varied between 0.041 and 4.68 microg x t(-1) aluminum, and the average was 2.01 microg x t(-1) aluminum; among them, PCDD/Fs emission factors from the crucible smelting furnace was the highest. Congener distribution of PCDD/F in stack gas from the five secondary aluminum metallurgies was very different from each other. Moreover, the R(PCDF/PCDD) was the lowest in the enterprise which was installed only with bag filters; the R(PCDF/PCDD) were 3.8-12.6 (the average, 7.7) in the others which were installed with water scrubbers. The results above indicated that the mechanism of PCDD/Fs formation was related to the types of exhaust gas treatment device. The results of this study can provide technical support for the formulation of PCDD/Fs emission standards and the best available techniques in the secondary aluminum metallurgy industry.

  9. Informing Complex Interventions in Technology-Rich Teaching Ecologies: A Study of Structured Lecture Podcasting to Facilitate Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickles, David James

    2010-01-01

    Since 2005, there has been rapid adoption of the use of podcasting in schools. In this flood of adoption, content has been recorded and distributed, but predominantly not internally structured or pedagogically integrated. This research aims to remedy pedagogical deficiencies in lecture podcasting by making use of chapter feature technology to…

  10. News from the Suncoast Chapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AGU's serenely-named Suncoast Chapter, one of the union's several regional groups, met twice during the 1989-1990 academic year. The fall meeting featured four panelists discussing “An Oil Spill in Tampa Bay—A Disaster Waiting to Happen.” The spring meeting hosted Arthur D. Weissman, chief of the Guidance and Oversight Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency, speaking

  11. Materials for Spacecraft. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Miria M.

    2016-01-01

    The general knowledge in this chapter is intended for a broad variety of spacecraft: manned or unmanned, low Earth to geosynchronous orbit, cis-lunar, lunar, planetary, or deep space exploration. Materials for launch vehicles are covered in chapter 7. Materials used in the fabrication of spacecraft hardware should be selected by considering the operational requirements for the particular application and the design engineering properties of the candidate materials. The information provided in this chapter is not intended to replace an in-depth materials study but rather to make the spacecraft designer aware of the challenges for various types of materials and some lessons learned from more than 50 years of spaceflight. This chapter discusses the damaging effects of the space environment on various materials and what has been successfully used in the past or what may be used for a more robust design. The material categories covered are structural, thermal control for on-orbit and re-entry, shielding against radiation and meteoroid/space debris impact, optics, solar arrays, lubricants, seals, and adhesives. Spacecraft components not directly exposed to space must still meet certain requirements, particularly for manned spacecraft where toxicity and flammability are concerns. Requirements such as fracture control and contamination control are examined, with additional suggestions for manufacturability. It is important to remember that the actual hardware must be tested to understand the real, "as-built" performance, as it could vary from the design intent. Early material trades can overestimate benefits and underestimate costs. An example of this was using graphite/epoxy composite in the International Space Station science racks to save weight. By the time the requirements for vibration isolation, Space Shuttle frequencies, and experiment operations were included, the weight savings had evaporated.

  12. Vegetation and acidification, Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    David R. DeWalle; James N. Kochenderfer; Mary Beth Adams; Gary W. Miller

    2006-01-01

    In this chapter, the impact of watershed acidification treatments on WS3 at the Fernow Experimental Forest (FEF) and at WS9 on vegetation is presented and summarized in a comprehensive way for the first time. WS7 is used as a vegetative reference basin for WS3, while untreated plots within WS9 are used as a vegetative reference for WS9. Bioindicators of acidification...

  13. Chapter 07: Species description pages

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    These pages are written to be the final step in the identification process; you will be directed to them by the key in Chapter 6. Each species or group of similar species in the same genus has its own set of pages. The information in the first page describes the characteristics of the wood covered in the manual. The page shows images of similar or confusable woods,...

  14. Clinical supervision for nurse lecturers.

    PubMed

    Lewis, D

    This article builds on a previous one which discussed the use of de Bono's thinking tool, 'six thinking hats' in the clinical, managerial, educational and research areas of nursing (Lewis 1995). This article explores clinical supervision and describes how the six thinking hats may be used as a reflective tool in the supervision of nurse lecturers who teach counselling skills.

  15. Technology Lecturer Turned Technology Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines a program developed by a group of 6 teachers' college lecturers who volunteered to provide a technology program to year 7 & 8 children (11- and 12-year-olds) for a year. This involved teaching technology once a week. As technology education was a new curriculum area when first introduced to the college, few lecturers…

  16. Cruise-ship astronomy lecturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telford, Garry

    2005-06-01

    In December 2004 I was invited to present a series of lectures in Astronomy aboard "Discovery", a cruise-ship operated by World Discovery Cruises Ltd of London. Discovery left Tahiti on 15th of February 2005, and arrived in Auckland on 2nd of March 2005.

  17. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  18. TASI Lectures on Complex Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denef, Frederik

    2012-11-01

    These lecture notes give an introduction to a number of ideas and methods that have been useful in the study of complex systems ranging from spin glasses to D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Topics include the replica formalism, Parisi's solution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, overlap order parameters, supersymmetric quantum mechanics, D-brane landscapes and their black hole duals.

  19. How Do I Lecture Thee?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John P.; Murray, Judy I.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach to preparation of successful college lectures is outlined, including four stages: anticipation (of content and expectations); preparation (selection, acquisition, design, and construction); execution (attention to speech habits, demeanor, and body language); and support (evaluation, maintenance, and enhancement). (MSE)

  20. Applied Fluid Mechanics. Lecture Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregg, Newton D.

    This set of lecture notes is used as a supplemental text for the teaching of fluid dynamics, as one component of a thermodynamics course for engineering technologists. The major text for the course covered basic fluids concepts such as pressure, mass flow, and specific weight. The objective of this document was to present additional fluids…

  1. Teaching More by Lecturing Less

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Jennifer K.; Wood, William B.

    2005-01-01

    We carried out an experiment to determine whether student learning gains in a large, traditionally taught, upper-division lecture course in developmental biology could be increased by partially changing to a more interactive classroom format. In two successive semesters, we presented the same course syllabus using different teaching styles: in…

  2. Embedding Laboratory Experience in Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, James R.; Barroso, Luciana R.; Simpson, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations can be very effective at enhancing student learning and represent a mechanism for embedding laboratory experiences within a classroom setting. A key component to an effective demonstration is active student engagement throughout the entire process, leading to a guided laboratory experience in a lecture setting. Students are involved…

  3. How to Podcast Campus Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Brock

    2007-01-01

    Many college classrooms these days may as well have lighted signs over their doors that read "On Air" or "Recording in Progress." A growing number of professors are recording their lectures and making them available as podcasts--regularly updated sets of audio files that students can download to their computers or MP3 players. Some campus…

  4. Legibility in the Lecture Hall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Albert A.; Thomason, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    Recommends black chalkboards, wet-washed before every lecture and advocates the use of Railroad Crayon chalk because its softness and larger size result in a wide high-intensity line. The resulting contrast improves the visibility of material written on chalkboards. (Source for the chalk is provided.) (JM)

  5. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  6. Clickers and Formative Feedback at University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egelandsdal, Kjetil; Krumsvik, Rune Johan

    2017-01-01

    Lecturing is often criticized for being a monological and student passive way of teaching. However, digital technology such as Student Response Systems (SRS) can be used to reconstruct the traditional lecturing format. During a series of five two-hour lectures in "qualitative methods" for first year psychology students, we used SRS to…

  7. College Students' Perception of Lecturers Using Humor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tamborini, Ron; Zillmann, Dolf

    1981-01-01

    Audio-taped lectures by male or female professors were produced in four versions: no humor; sexual humor; other-disparaging humor; and self-disparaging humor. Male and female students rated lecturers' intelligence and appeal. Intelligence ratings were unaffected by humor variations, but significant lecturer-student sex interactions were found on…

  8. Experiences in Personal Lecture Video Capture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandra, Surendar

    2011-01-01

    The ability of lecture videos to capture the different modalities of a class interaction make them a good review tool. Multimedia capable devices are ubiquitous among contemporary students. Many lecturers are leveraging this popularity by distributing videos of lectures. They depend on the university to provide the video capture infrastructure.…

  9. Metaphor Use in Three UK University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Graham; Littlemore, Jeannette; Koester, Almut

    2008-01-01

    It has been claimed in recent years that, on the one hand, metaphor occurs in UK university lectures in ways that are likely to confuse ESL learners (Littlemore 2001, 2003) and on the other hand that US lecturers use it in highly structured ways, particularly involving linked clusters, to help organize the lecture and indicate the opinions of the…

  10. Corrosion inhibition of powder metallurgy Mg by fluoride treatments.

    PubMed

    Pereda, M D; Alonso, C; Burgos-Asperilla, L; del Valle, J A; Ruano, O A; Perez, P; Fernández Lorenzo de Mele, M A

    2010-05-01

    Pure Mg has been proposed as a potential degradable biomaterial to avoid both the disadvantages of non-degradable internal fixation implants and the use of alloying elements that may be toxic. However, it shows excessively high corrosion rate and insufficient yield strength. The effects of reinforcing Mg by a powder metallurgy (PM) route and the application of biocompatible corrosion inhibitors (immersion in 0.1 and 1M KF solution treatments, 0.1M FST and 1M FST, respectively) were analyzed in order to improve Mg mechanical and corrosion resistance, respectively. Open circuit potential measurements, polarization techniques (PT), scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were performed to evaluate its corrosion behavior. SECM showed that the local current of attacked areas decreased during the F(-) treatments. The corrosion inhibitory action of 0.1M FST and 1M FST in phosphate buffered solution was assessed by PT and EIS. Under the experimental conditions assayed, 0.1M FST revealed better performance. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction analyses of Mg(PM) with 0.1M FST showed the presence of KMgF(3) crystals on the surface while a MgF(2) film was detected for 1M FST. After fluoride inhibition treatments, promising results were observed for Mg(PM) as degradable metallic biomaterial due to its higher yield strength and lower initial corrosion rate than untreated Mg, as well as a progressive loss of the protective characteristics of the F(-)-containing film which ensures the gradual degradation process.

  11. POWDER METALLURGY TiAl ALLOYS: MICROSTRUCTURES AND PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, L

    2006-12-11

    The microstructures and properties of powder metallurgy TiAl alloys fabricated by hot extrusion of gas-atomized powder at different elevated temperatures were investigated. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1150 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains and coarse ordered B2 grains. Particles of ordered hexagonal {omega} phase were also observed in some B2 grains. The alloy containing B2 grains displayed a low-temperature superplastic behavior: a tensile elongation of 310% was measured when the alloy was tested at 800 C under a strain rate of 2 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1250 C consisted of a mixture of fine ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) equiaxed grains, coarse {alpha}{sub 2} grains, and lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. An observation of stacking faults associated with fine {gamma} lamellae in {alpha}{sub 2} grains reveals that the stacking fault of {alpha}{sub 2} phase plays an important role in the formation of lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies. Unlike the alloy fabricated at 1150{sup o}, the alloy fabricated at 1250{sup o} displayed no low-temperature superplasticity, but a tensile elongation of 260% at 1000 C was measured. Microstructure of the alloy fabricated at 1400 C consisted of fully lamellar ({gamma} + {alpha}{sub 2}) colonies with the colony size ranging between 50 {micro}m and 100 {micro}m, in which the width of {gamma} lamella is in a range between 100 nm and 350 nm, and the width of {alpha}{sub 2} lamella is in a range between 10 nm and 50 nm. Creep behavior of the ultrafine lamellar alloy and the effects of alloying addition on the creep resistance of the fully lamellar alloy are also investigated.

  12. Experiences gained by establishing the IAMG Student Chapter Freiberg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernst, Sebastian M.; Liesenberg, Veraldo; Shahzad, Faisal

    2013-04-01

    The International Association for Mathematical Geosciences (IAMG) Student Chapter Freiberg was founded in 2007 at the Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg (TUBAF) in Germany by national and international graduate and undergraduate students of various geoscientific as well as natural science disciplines. The major aim of the IAMG is to promote international cooperation in the application and use of Mathematics in Geosciences research and technology. The IAMG encourages all types of students and young scientists to found and maintain student chapters, which can even receive limited financial support by the IAMG. Following this encouragement, generations of students at TUBAF have build up and established a prosperous range of activities. These might be an example and an invitation for other young scientists and institutions worldwide to run similar activities. We, some of the current and former students behind the student chapter, have organised talks, membership drives, student seminars, guest lectures, several short courses and even international workshops. Some notable short courses were held by invited IAMG distinguished lecturers. The topics included "Statistical analysis in the Earth Sciences using R - a language and environment for statistical computing and graphics", "Geomathematical Natural Resource Modeling" and "Introduction to Geostatistics for Environmental Applications and Natural Resources Evaluation: Basic Concepts and Examples". Furthermore, we conducted short courses by ourselves. Here, the topics included basic introductions into MATLAB, object oriented programming concepts for geoscientists using MATLAB and an introduction to the Keyhole Markup Language (KML). Most of those short courses lasted several days and provided an excellent and unprecedented teaching experience for us. We were given credit by attending students for filling gaps in our university's curriculum by providing in-depth and hands-on tutorials on topics, which were merely

  13. Chemical Tracer Methods: Chapter 7

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.

    2017-01-01

    Tracers have a wide variety of uses in hydrologic studies: providing quantitative or qualitative estimates of recharge, identifying sources of recharge, providing information on velocities and travel times of water movement, assessing the importance of preferential flow paths, providing information on hydrodynamic dispersion, and providing data for calibration of water flow and solute-transport models (Walker, 1998; Cook and Herczeg, 2000; Scanlon et al., 2002b). Tracers generally are ions, isotopes, or gases that move with water and that can be detected in the atmosphere, in surface waters, and in the subsurface. Heat also is transported by water; therefore, temperatures can be used to trace water movement. This chapter focuses on the use of chemical and isotopic tracers in the subsurface to estimate recharge. Tracer use in surface-water studies to determine groundwater discharge to streams is addressed in Chapter 4; the use of temperature as a tracer is described in Chapter 8.Following the nomenclature of Scanlon et al. (2002b), tracers are grouped into three categories: natural environmental tracers, historical tracers, and applied tracers. Natural environmental tracers are those that are transported to or created within the atmosphere under natural processes; these tracers are carried to the Earth’s surface as wet or dry atmospheric deposition. The most commonly used natural environmental tracer is chloride (Cl) (Allison and Hughes, 1978). Ocean water, through the process of evaporation, is the primary source of atmospheric Cl. Other tracers in this category include chlorine-36 (36Cl) and tritium (3H); these two isotopes are produced naturally in the Earth’s atmosphere; however, there are additional anthropogenic sources of them.

  14. [Analysis of changes in characteristics of arterial hypertension occupational risk in workers of nonferrous metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Vlasova, E M; Shliapnikov, D M; Lebedeva, T M

    2015-01-01

    The article covers changes in occupational cardiovascular risk for workers of nonferrous,metallurgy. Findings are that exposure to noise up to 94 dB with length of service increases possible atherosclerosis and metabolic syndrome. With 5 years of service, risk of the predicted conditions increases by 40.5%. When occupational exposure lasts over 5 years, risk of arterial hypertension increases. A group of workers without exposure to occupational factors appeared to have no connection between length of service and metabolic syndrome and arterial hypertension. Risk evolution modelling proved that risk of functional disorders in nonferrous metallurgy workers becomes unacceptable after 5 years of service (cardiovascular disorders are critical).

  15. Chapter 1 Information Management Program. User's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RMC Research Corp., Denver, CO.

    The first of seven chapters in this guide for users of the Chapter 1 Information Management Program (CHIMP) provides an introduction to the program, which was designed to help school districts maintain data and produce reports used in the evaluation of Chapter 1 programs. It is noted that these reports are useful for meeting state and federal…

  16. 15th Chapter of Surgeons Lecture: Surgeon of the new millennium--surgeon, scientist and scholar.

    PubMed

    Tan, S K

    2004-11-01

    The surgeon of the new millennium has come a long way from his humble beginnings in the Middle Ages as the lowly barber-surgeon. The skills and techniques developed by outstanding surgeons like Astley Cooper of the 19th century have withstood the test of time and have been refined by subsequent generations of surgical masters. The scientific basis of modern surgery was put on a firm footing in the early 19th century through the discovery of anaesthesia and microorganisms as a cause of many diseases and surgical complications. The 20th century brought about rapid progress in medicine, information technology (IT) and the life sciences, and closed with a big bang with the completion of the sequencing of the human genome. For the surgeon of the 21st century to remain relevant, he must embrace the concept of the Total Surgeon. Not doing so will render him irrelevant in the course of time, for having good surgical technique alone is insufficient. He must also lead in scientific endeavours to push the frontiers of the life sciences in attempts to solve the insoluble, and be scholarly in thought, attitude and behaviour. In other words, he must be a Surgeon-Scientist-Scholar.

  17. 9th Chapter of Surgeons' Lecture: the orthopaedic surgeon: historical perspective, ethical considerations and the future.

    PubMed

    Balachandran, N

    1999-05-01

    From a fishing village with colonial surgeons from the East India Company, Singapore is now a medical and business hub servicing the region and beyond in trade and medical education. Orthopaedic Surgery is a young specialty and is the fastest growing sub-specialty in Surgery. Orthopaedic education in Singapore has a structured syllabus and training is coordinated with the Royal Colleges and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Part of the training as Fellows is in the United Kingdom and USA on an HMDP Fellowship. Ethics and Continuing Medical Education need further emphasis. Sub-specialisation in Orthopaedic Surgery is now well-established in Trauma, Adult Reconstructive Surgery, Sports Medicine, Spinal Surgery, Hand Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine. Ageing in the next millennium with osteoporosis and hip fracture problems of gait and balance need more orthopaedic surgeons to be committed to rehabilitation medicine and voluntary service in the community. There is a need for good role models and knowledge on Quality Assurance, Clinical Pathways and Administration. Appropriate use of high technology and care for the aged in the community with dignity is fundamental to good ethical practice. Selfish, pecuniary interests will destroy the very soul and fabric of medicine.

  18. Objectives and Overview. Chapter 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    The RTO Task Group AVT-113 "Understanding and Modeling Vortical Flows to Improve the Technology Readiness Level for Military Aircraft" was established in April 2003. Two facets of the group, "Cranked Arrow Wing Aerodynamic Project International (CAWAPI)" and "Vortex Flow Experiment-2 (VFE-2)", worked closely together. However, because of the different requirements of each part, the CAWAPI facet concluded its work earlier (December 2006) than the VFE-2 facet (December 2007). In this first chapter of the Final Report of the Task Group an overview on its work is given, and the objectives for the Task Group are described.

  19. Earthquake ground motion: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Valley, Michael; Crouse, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the effort in seismic design of buildings and other structures is focused on structural design. This chapter addresses another key aspect of the design process—characterization of earthquake ground motion. Section 3.1 describes the basis of the earthquake ground motion maps in the Provisions and in ASCE 7. Section 3.2 has examples for the determination of ground motion parameters and spectra for use in design. Section 3.3 discusses and provides an example for the selection and scaling of ground motion records for use in response history analysis.

  20. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  1. Fourier Transform Methods. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, Simon G.; Quijada, Manuel A.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of Fourier transform spectrometers (FTS) for accurate spectrophotometry over a wide spectral range. After a brief exposition of the basic concepts of FTS operation, we discuss instrument designs and their advantages and disadvantages relative to dispersive spectrometers. We then examine how common sources of error in spectrophotometry manifest themselves when using an FTS and ways to reduce the magnitude of these errors. Examples are given of applications to both basic and derived spectrophotometric quantities. Finally, we give recommendations for choosing the right instrument for a specific application, and how to ensure the accuracy of the measurement results..

  2. Lectures in medical educaton: what students think?

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Tajammal; Farooq, Zerwa; Asad, Zunaira; Amjad, Rabbia; Badar, Iffat; Chaudhry, Abdul Majeed; Khan, Mohammad Amer Zaman; Rafique, Farida

    2014-01-01

    The volume of medical knowledge has increased exponentially and so has the need to improve the efficiency of current teaching practices.With increasing emphasis on interactive and problem based learning, the place of lectures in modern medical education has become a questionable issue. Objectives were to assess the perspective of undergraduate medical students regarding the role and effectiveness of lectures as a mode of instruction as well as the ways and means that can be employed to enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A cross sectional study was carried out among 2nd to final year medical students from five medical colleges including both private and public sector institutions. A total of 347 students participated by completing a structured questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS-17. Sixty seven percent students considered lectures as a useful mode of instruction (47% males and 77% females), whereas 83% of the students reported that clinical sessions were superior to lectures because of small number of students in clinical sessions, active student participation, enhanced clinical orientation, and interaction with patients. About 64% responded that lectures should be replaced by clinical sessions. Majority of the students (92%) reported not being able to concentrate during a lecture beyond 30 minutes, whereas 70% skipped lectures as they were boring. A significantly greater proportion of male respondents, students from clinical years, and those who skipped lectures, considered lectures to be boring, a poor utilization of time and resources, and could not concentrate for the full duration of a lecture compared to females, students from preclinical years, and those who do not skip lectures, respectively. Lecturing techniques need to be improvised. The traditional passive mode of instruction has to be replaced with active learning and inquiry based approach to adequately utilize the time and resources spent on lectures.

  3. Advances in powder metallurgy - 1991. Vol. 5 - P/M materials; Proceedings of the Powder Metallurgy Conference and Exhibition, Chicago, IL, June 9-12, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, L.F. III; Sansoucy, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    The present volume powder metallurgy materials discusses the state of the PM industry, a metallurgical evaluation of new steel powders, design criteria for the manufacturing of low-alloy steel powders, and homogenization processing of a PM maraging steel. Attention is given to the corrosion resistance of full density sintered 316 SS, the performance characteristics of a new sinter-hardening low-alloy steel, wear performance of compositions made by low alloy iron/high alloy powder mixtures, and the strengthening of an AISI 1020 steel by aluminum-microalloying during liquid dynamic compaction. Topics addressed include the influence of alloying on the properties of water-atomized copper powders, fundamentals of high pressure gas atomization process control, advanced sensors and process control of gas atomization, and bimetallic tubulars via spray forming. Also discussed are factors affecting the delamination of PM molybdenum during stamping, applications of powder metallurgy molybdenum in the 1990s, and powder processing of high-temperature oxides.

  4. Kindergarten Quantum Mechanics: Lecture Notes

    SciTech Connect

    Coecke, Bob

    2006-01-04

    These lecture notes survey some joint work with Samson Abramsky as it was presented by me at several conferences in the summer of 2005. It concerns 'doing quantum mechanics using only pictures of lines, squares, triangles and diamonds'. This picture calculus can be seen as a very substantial extension of Dirac's notation, and has a purely algebraic counterpart in terms of so-called Strongly Compact Closed Categories (introduced by Abramsky and I which subsumes my Logic of Entanglement. For a survey on the 'what', the 'why' and the 'hows' I refer to a previous set of lecture notes. In a last section we provide some pointers to the body of technical literature on the subject.

  5. TASI 2006 Lectures on Leptogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; /Fermilab /UC, Irvine

    2007-03-01

    The origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter of the Universe has been one of the great challenges in particle physics and cosmology. Leptogenesis as a mechanism for generating the cosmological baryon asymmetry of the Universe has gained significant interests ever since the advent of the evidence of non-zero neutrino masses. In these lectures presented at TASI 2006, I review various realizations of leptogenesis and allude to recent developments in this subject.

  6. Lectures on Matrix Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ydri, Badis

    The subject of matrix field theory involves matrix models, noncommutative geometry, fuzzy physics and noncommutative field theory and their interplay. In these lectures, a lot of emphasis is placed on the matrix formulation of noncommutative and fuzzy spaces, and on the non-perturbative treatment of the corresponding field theories. In particular, the phase structure of noncommutative $\\phi^4$ theory is treated in great detail, and an introduction to noncommutative gauge theory is given.

  7. Three Lectures on Hadron Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.

    2016-04-01

    These lectures explain that comparisons between experiment and theory can expose the impact of running couplings and masses on hadron observables and thereby aid materially in charting the momentum dependence of the interaction that underlies strong-interaction dynamics. The series begins with a primer on continuum QCD, which introduces some of the basic ideas necessary in order to understand the use of Schwinger functions as a nonperturbative tool in hadron physics. It continues with a discussion of confinement and dynamical symmetry breaking (DCSB) in the Standard Model, and the impact of these phenomena on our understanding of condensates, the parton structure of hadrons, and the pion electromagnetic form factor. The final lecture treats the problem of grand unification; namely, the contemporary use of Schwinger functions as a symmetry-preserving tool for the unified explanation and prediction of the properties of both mesons and baryons. It reveals that DCSB drives the formation of diquark clusters in baryons and sketches a picture of baryons as bound-states with Borromean character. Planned experiments are capable of validating the perspectives outlined in these lectures.

  8. Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant. Evaluation Findings, 1990-91. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christner, Catherine; And Others

    This report describes an evaluation of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District's (AISD) Chapter 1 and Chapter 1 Migrant programs. Chapter 1 is a federally funded compensatory educational program that provided funding in 1990-91 to 25 AISD elementary schools with high concentrations of low-income students. Chapter 1 Migrant is also a…

  9. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  10. Metallurgy, environmental pollution and the decline of Etruscan civilisation.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Adrian P; Cattani, Ilenia; Turfa, Jean M

    2010-01-01

    The Etruscans were justifiably famous in antiquity for their advanced metallurgy and for the rich mineral resources of their region (including La Tolfa, the Colline Metallifere, Mont'Amiata and Elba). We offer a new perspective on certain Iron Age and Archaic (ca. 1,000-480 BC: ) Etruscan industrial and habitation sites, and on the problem of heavy metal poisoning, still being investigated today, coincidentally in some of the same areas that originally saw Etruscan mines and workshops. This study investigates ancient sources, including literature and excavation reports, in the light of modern studies of heavy metal poisoning on human beings, plant and animal life. Furthermore, it is the first to use non-invasive Niton X-ray fluorescence analysis of samples of Etruscan (strictly ethnically Faliscan) hair (c. 350 BCE: ). The findings show the strong likelihood of heavy metal poisoning in areas of Etruscan metallurgical activity with the effects of this being responsible for or contributing to the abandonment of a number of these sites around the 6th century BC: . No thoroughly satisfactory explanation of this phenomenon has previously been offered. However, findings suggest that Faliscan women, represented by sample CG 2004-6-2, were not exposed to high levels of arsenic in life, which is not perhaps surprising for an urban aristocratic woman of the mid-4th century BC: . The reasons for the abandonment of several flourishing settlements are without doubt complex, and include political and social change. We suggest heavy metal contamination as an additional stimulus to the noted phenomenon of the peaceful abandonment, at the beginning, and at the end of the 6th century BC: , of sites in southern and northern Etruria such as Marsiliana d'Albegna (late 7th c.), Lago dell'Accesa, Acquarossa and Poggio Civitate-Murlo (late 6th c.). While the historical truth of the demise of Etruscan civilisation is much more complex, an interim set of related events, the desertion of

  11. Elevated temperature crack growth in advanced powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porr, William C., Jr.; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si powder metallurgy alloy FVS0812 is among the most promising of the elevated temperature aluminum alloys developed in recent years. The ultra fine grain size and high volume fraction of thermally stable dispersoids enable the alloy to maintain tensile properties at elevated temperatures. In contrast, this alloy displays complex and potentially deleterious damage tolerant and time dependent fracture behavior that varies with temperature. J-Integral fracture mechanics were used to determine fracture toughness (K sub IC) and crack growth resistance (tearing modulus, T) of extruded FVS0812 as a function of temperature. The alloy exhibits high fracture properties at room temperature when tested in the LT orientation, due to extensive delamination of prior ribbon particle boundaries perpendicular to the crack front. Delamination results in a loss of through thickness constraint along the crack front, raising the critical stress intensity necessary for precrack initiation. The fracture toughness and tensile ductility of this alloy decrease with increasing temperature, with minima observed at 200 C. This behavior results from minima in the intrinsic toughness of the material, due to dynamic strain aging, and in the extent of prior particle boundary delaminations. At 200 C FVS0812 fails at K levels that are insufficient to cause through thickness delamination. As temperature increases beyond the minimum, strain aging is reduced and delamination returns. For the TL orientation, K (sub IC) decreased and T increased slightly with increasing temperature from 25 to 316 C. Fracture in the TL orientation is governed by prior particle boundary toughness; increased strain localization at these boundaries may result in lower toughness with increasing temperature. Preliminary results demonstrate a complex effect of loading rate on K (sub IC) and T at 175 C, and indicate that the combined effects of time dependent deformation, environment, and strain aging

  12. Investigation of the Environmental Durability of a Powder Metallurgy Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, LaNita D.

    2004-01-01

    PM304 is a NASA-developed composite powder metallurgy material that is being developed for high temperature applications such as bushings in high temperature industrial furnace conveyor systems. My goal this summer was to analyze and evaluate the effects that heat exposure had on the PM304 material at 500 C and 650 C. The material is composed of Ni-Cr, Ag, Cr2O3, and eutectic BaF2-CaF2. PM304 is designed to eliminate the need for oil based lubricants in high temperature applications, while reducing friction and wear. However, further investigation was needed to thoroughly examine the properties of PM304. The effects of heat exposure on PM304 bushings were investigated. This investigation was necessary due to the high temperatures that the material would be exposed to in a typical application. Each bushing was cut into eight sections. The specimens were heated to 500 C or 650 C for time intervals from 1 hr to 5,000 hrs. Control specimens were kept at room temperature. Weight and thickness measurements were taken before and after the bushing sections were exposed to heat. Then the heat treated specimens were mounted and polished side by side with the control specimens. This enabled optical examination of the material's microstructure using a metallograph. The specimens were also examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The microstructures were compared to observe the effects of the heat exposure. Chemical analysis was done to investigate the interactions between Ni-Cr and BaF2-CaF2 and between Cr2O3 and BaF2-CaF2 at high temperature. To observe this, the two compounds that were being analyzed were mixed in a crucible in varied weight percentages and heated to 1100 C in a furnace for approximately two hours. Then the product was allowed to cool and was then analyzed by X-ray diffraction. Interpretation of the results is in progress.

  13. Testing of electroformed deposited iridium/powder metallurgy rhenium rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian D.; Dickerson, Robert

    1996-01-01

    High-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials offer the thermal margin for high performance and extended lifetimes for radiation-cooled rockets. Rhenium (Re) coated with iridium (Ir) allow hours of operation at 2200 C on Earth-storable propellants. One process for manufacturing Ir/Re rocket chambers is the fabrication of Re substrates by powder metallurgy (PM) and the application of Ir coatings by using electroformed deposition (ED). ED Ir coatings, however, have been found to be porous and poorly adherent. The integrity of ED Ir coatings could be improved by densification after the electroforming process. This report summarizes the testing of two 22-N, ED Ir/PM Re rocket chambers that were subjected to post-deposition treatments in an effort to densify the Ir coating. One chamber was vacuum annealed, while the other chamber was subjected to hot isostatic pressure (HIP). The chambers were tested on gaseous oxygen/gaseous hydrogen propellants, at mixture ratios that simulated the oxidizing environments of Earth-storable propellants. ne annealed ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 24 firings and 4.58 hr at a mixture ratio of 4.2. After only 9 firings, the annealed ED Ir coating began to blister and spall upstream of the throat. The blistering and spalling were similar to what had been experienced with unannealed, as-deposited ED Ir coatings. The HIP ED Ir/PM Re chamber was tested for a total of 91 firings and 11.45 hr at mixture ratios of 3.2 and 4.2. The HIP ED Ir coating remained adherent to the Re substrate throughout testing; there were no visible signs of coating degradation. Metallography revealed, however, thinning of the HIP Ir coating and occasional pores in the Re layer upstream of the throat. Pinholes in the Ir coating may have provided a path for oxidation of the Re substrate at these locations. The HIP ED Ir coating proved to be more effective than vacuum annealed and as-deposited ED Ir. Further densification is still required to

  14. Powder metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Research is reported for the tensile strength, ductility, and heat performance characterisitics of powder metallurgy (p/m) superalloys. Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys were also evaluated for their strength during thermal processing. The mechanical attributes evident in both p/m supperalloys and dispersion strengthened alloys are discussed in terms of research into their possible combination.

  15. [Concomitant influence of occupational and social risk factors on health of workers engaged into powder metallurgy].

    PubMed

    Shur, P Z; Zaĭtseva, N V; Kostarev, V G; Lebedeva-Nesevria, N A; Shliapnikov, D M

    2012-01-01

    Results of health risk evaluation in workers engaged into powder metallurgy, using complex of hygienic, medical, epidemiologic and sociologic studies, enable to define priority occupational and social risk factors, to assess degree of their influence on the workers' health and to identify occupationally induced diseases.

  16. Power metallurgy approaches to high temperature components for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probst, H. B.

    1974-01-01

    Work conducted by NASA and NASA contractors on prealloyed superalloy powders and materials strengthened by oxide dispersion is reviewed. Fabrication, tensile strength, superplasticity, grain growth control, stress rupture life, and grain-size and dispersion-level effects are covered. Distinct strength advantages of powder metallurgy superalloys over conventional wrought alloys are noted.

  17. A Guide for Planning Facilities for Occupational Preparation Programs in Metallurgy Technology. Interim Report. Research 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German, Carl, Jr.

    The major purpose of this guide is to elicit the information necessary for writing educational specifications for facilities to house technical education programs in metallurgy. It is organized in these parts: (1) Part I discusses the major purpose, underlying assumptions, recent instructional trends, and guiding principles utilized in the…

  18. The Application of Thermal Plasma to Extraction Metallurgy and Related Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akashi, K.

    1980-01-01

    Various applications of thermal plasma to extraction metallurgy and related fields are surveyed, chiefly on the basis of documents published during the past two or three years. Applications to melting and smelting, to thermal decomposition, to reduction, to manufacturing of inorganic compounds, and to other fields are considered.

  19. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200-800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700-50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  20. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago.

    PubMed

    Eichler, A; Gramlich, G; Kellerhals, T; Tobler, L; Rehren, Th; Schwikowski, M

    2017-01-31

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200-800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700-50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures.

  1. Solvent Extraction of Copper: An Extractive Metallurgy Exercise for Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smellie, Iain A.; Forgan, Ross S.; Brodie, Claire; Gavine, Jack S.; Harris, Leanne; Houston, Daniel; Hoyland, Andrew D.; McCaughan, Rory P.; Miller, Andrew J.; Wilson, Liam; Woodhall, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment for advanced undergraduate students has been developed in the context of extractive metallurgy. The experiment serves as a model of an important modern industrial process that combines aspects of organic/inorganic synthesis and analysis. Students are tasked to prepare a salicylaldoxime ligand and samples of the…

  2. Mechanical properties of modified low cobalt powder metallurgy Udimet 700 type alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harf, Fredric H.

    1989-01-01

    Eight superalloys derived from Udimet 700 were prepared by powder metallurgy, hot isostatically pressed, heat treated and their tensile and creep rupture properties determined. Several of these alloys displayed properties superior to those of Udimet 700 similarly prepared, in one case exceeding the creep rupture life tenfold. Filter clogging by extracted gamma prime, its measurement and significance are discussed in an appendix.

  3. Ice-core evidence of earliest extensive copper metallurgy in the Andes 2700 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Eichler, A.; Gramlich, G.; Kellerhals, T.; Tobler, L.; Rehren, Th.; Schwikowski, M.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of metallurgy for social and economic development is indisputable. Although copper (Cu) was essential for the wealth of pre- and post-colonial societies in the Andes, the onset of extensive Cu metallurgy in South America is still debated. Comprehensive archaeological findings point to first sophisticated Cu metallurgy during the Moche culture ~200–800 AD, whereas peat-bog records from southern South America suggest earliest pollution potentially from Cu smelting as far back as ~2000 BC. Here we present a 6500-years Cu emission history for the Andean Altiplano, based on ice-core records from Illimani glacier in Bolivia, providing the first complete history of large-scale Cu smelting activities in South America. We find earliest anthropogenic Cu pollution during the Early Horizon period ~700–50 BC, and attribute the onset of intensified Cu smelting in South America to the activities of the central Andean Chiripa and Chavin cultures ~2700 years ago. This study provides for the first time substantial evidence for extensive Cu metallurgy already during these early cultures. PMID:28139760

  4. Solvent Extraction of Copper: An Extractive Metallurgy Exercise for Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smellie, Iain A.; Forgan, Ross S.; Brodie, Claire; Gavine, Jack S.; Harris, Leanne; Houston, Daniel; Hoyland, Andrew D.; McCaughan, Rory P.; Miller, Andrew J.; Wilson, Liam; Woodhall, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary experiment for advanced undergraduate students has been developed in the context of extractive metallurgy. The experiment serves as a model of an important modern industrial process that combines aspects of organic/inorganic synthesis and analysis. Students are tasked to prepare a salicylaldoxime ligand and samples of the…

  5. Defining groundwater age: Chapter 3

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Torgersen, T.; Purtschert, R.; Phillips, F.M.; Plummer, L.N.; Sanford, W.E.; Suckow, A.

    2013-01-01

    This book investigates applications of selected chemical and isotopic substances that can be used to recognize and interpret age information pertaining to ‘old’ groundwater (defined as water that was recharged on a timescale from approximately 1000 to more than 1 000 000 a). However, as discussed below, only estimates of the ‘age’ of water extracted from wells can be inferred. These groundwater age estimates are interpreted from measured concentrations of chemical and isotopic substances in the groundwater. Even then, there are many complicating factors, as discussed in this book. In spite of these limitations, much can be learned about the physics of groundwater flow and about the temporal aspects of groundwater systems from age interpretations of measured concentrations of environmental tracers in groundwater systems. This chapter puts the concept of ‘age’ into context, including its meaning and interpretation, and attempts to provide a unifying usage for the rest of the book.

  6. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  7. Conclusions and Recommendations. Chapter 37

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, John E.; Hummel, Dietrich

    2009-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief wrap-up of the task group report and focuses on the overall conclusions and recommendations for future work for the CAWAPI and VFE-2 facets beyond the task group. The overall conclusion is that the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of CFD solvers has been improved in predicting the flow-physics of vortex-dominated flows during the work of the task group, by having flight and wind-tunnel data available for comparison. Moreover, like all good scientific studies, this task group has identified flight conditions on the F-16XL airplane or wind-tunnel test conditions for a specific leading-edge radius on the 65 delta-wing model where the TRL still needs to be increased.

  8. Lecture Notes on Multigrid Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Vassilevski, P S

    2010-06-28

    The Lecture Notes are primarily based on a sequence of lectures given by the author while been a Fulbright scholar at 'St. Kliment Ohridski' University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria during the winter semester of 2009-2010 academic year. The notes are somewhat expanded version of the actual one semester class he taught there. The material covered is slightly modified and adapted version of similar topics covered in the author's monograph 'Multilevel Block-Factorization Preconditioners' published in 2008 by Springer. The author tried to keep the notes as self-contained as possible. That is why the lecture notes begin with some basic introductory matrix-vector linear algebra, numerical PDEs (finite element) facts emphasizing the relations between functions in finite dimensional spaces and their coefficient vectors and respective norms. Then, some additional facts on the implementation of finite elements based on relation tables using the popular compressed sparse row (CSR) format are given. Also, typical condition number estimates of stiffness and mass matrices, the global matrix assembly from local element matrices are given as well. Finally, some basic introductory facts about stationary iterative methods, such as Gauss-Seidel and its symmetrized version are presented. The introductory material ends up with the smoothing property of the classical iterative methods and the main definition of two-grid iterative methods. From here on, the second part of the notes begins which deals with the various aspects of the principal TG and the numerous versions of the MG cycles. At the end, in part III, we briefly introduce algebraic versions of MG referred to as AMG, focusing on classes of AMG specialized for finite element matrices.

  9. Reducing Plate Tectonic Misconceptions with Lecture Tutorials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortz, K. M.; Smay, J. M.; Mattera, A. V.; Clark, S. K.

    2009-12-01

    In order to address student difficulties with and common misconceptions about plate tectonics, we created five Lecture Tutorials suitable for introductory geoscience courses. Lecture Tutorials are 10-15 minute worksheets that students complete in class in small groups to make learning more student-centered. Students build their knowledge with questions that progressively become more difficult, requiring them think about their misconceptions. Our research indicates that the Lecture Tutorials successfully decrease student misconceptions. For example, few introductory students identify the mantle wedge as the location of melting at subduction zones. Instead, students frequently think melting occurs at the trench, in magma chambers within volcanoes, or where images commonly show the subducting slab disappearing. One of the Lecture Tutorials helps the students determine why melting occurs and therefore identify the correct locations of melting at convergent boundaries, divergent boundaries, and hotspots. This Lecture Tutorial includes a hypothetical “debate” with statements expressing the misconceptions and one expressing the correct scientific idea of where melting occurs. Students are asked to explain why they agree with one of the statements, so they must directly think about any misconceptions they may have. Additional difficulties addressed by the Lecture Tutorials include identification of the direction of plate movement at ocean ridges and the locations and formation of basic plate tectonic features, such as trenches, volcanoes, ocean ridges, and plate boundaries. After instruction, students completed questionnaires that probed their understanding of plate tectonics, and students who completed the Lecture Tutorials performed significantly better on relevant questions. For example, when asked to circle the locations on a diagram where melting occurred, students who completed the Lecture Tutorials correctly circled the mantle wedge more often than other

  10. Live lecture versus video-recorded lecture: are students voting with their feet?

    PubMed

    Cardall, Scott; Krupat, Edward; Ulrich, Michael

    2008-12-01

    In light of educators' concerns that lecture attendance in medical school has declined, the authors sought to assess students' perceptions, evaluations, and motivations concerning live lectures compared with accelerated, video-recorded lectures viewed online. The authors performed a cross-sectional survey study of all first- and second-year students at Harvard Medical School. Respondents answered questions regarding their lecture attendance; use of class and personal time; use of accelerated, video-recorded lectures; and reasons for viewing video-recorded and live lectures. Other questions asked students to compare how well live and video-recorded lectures satisfied learning goals. Of the 353 students who received questionnaires, 204 (58%) returned responses. Collectively, students indicated watching 57.2% of lectures live, 29.4% recorded, and 3.8% using both methods. All students have watched recorded lectures, and most (88.5%) have used video-accelerating technologies. When using accelerated, video-recorded lecture as opposed to attending lecture, students felt they were more likely to increase their speed of knowledge acquisition (79.3% of students), look up additional information (67.7%), stay focused (64.8%), and learn more (63.7%). Live attendance remains the predominant method for viewing lectures. However, students find accelerated, video-recorded lectures equally or more valuable. Although educators may be uncomfortable with the fundamental change in the learning process represented by video-recorded lecture use, students' responses indicate that their decisions to attend lectures or view recorded lectures are motivated primarily by a desire to satisfy their professional goals. A challenge remains for educators to incorporate technologies students find useful while creating an interactive learning culture.

  11. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  12. Improving Lecture Quality through Training in Public Speaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mowbray, Robert; Perry, Laura B.

    2015-01-01

    Lecturing is a common instructional format but poor lecturing skills can detract from students' learning experiences and outcomes. As lecturing is essentially a form of public communication, training in public speaking may improve lecture quality. Twelve university lecturers in Malaysia participated in a six-week public speaking skills training…

  13. Henry Norris Russell's Toronto Lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devorkin, D. H.

    1996-12-01

    In February 1924, at the invitation of C. A. Chant, Russell presented a set of 14 public lectures on the state of astronomy and astrophysics. Designed to be inspirational, they also reveal Russell's contemporary views on the state of astrophysics as well as his sense of proper practice in astronomy. During his visit, Russell was interviewed by local reporters who asked his opinion about building a large observatory, one of Chant's major projects. What Russell had to say about such ventures did not please Chant one bit.

  14. Iron's Role in Aluminum: A Powder Metallurgy and Sustainability Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saller, Brandon Dale

    cryomilling. With respect to the powder, a differential scanning calorimetry and activation energy analysis elucidated the formation and phase transformation temperatures of the relevant intermetallic phases, and the microstructural factors that influenced them. With an understanding of the fundamental science behind the intermetallic formation in the Al-Fe system, the composition of helium atomized Al-2at.% Fe was chosen combined with high-pressure torsion processing to yield a bulk alloy that demonstrated an ultimate tensile strength of 488 MPa. This strength was achieved via a combination of two mechanisms: grain refinement (Hall-Petch) and dislocation-Al6Fe interactions (Orowan strengthening), with notable thermal stability present up until 450°C. Finally, the potential for Al-Fe as a sustainable alloy was studied and a link established between current environmental literature and metallurgy literature on the potential for incorporation of Fe into Al to create a structural alloy.

  15. Chapter 3 - At the roadside: Forest resources

    Treesearch

    Bryce Stokes; Timothy G. Rials; Leonard R. Johnson; Karen L. Abt; Prakash Nepal; Kenneth E. Skog; Robert C. Abt; Lixia He; Burton C. English

    2016-01-01

    Chapter 3 assesses the availability of forest resources to the roadside. Not all woody feedstocks are discussed in this chapter. Logging residues and wholetree biomass are included. Other feedstock categories have been moved to chapter 5 or are redefined to be included in the whole-tree biomass category. New methodologies and data are used in the assessment to

  16. Lecture

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of paracellular permeation of ions and solutes in the kidney is pivotally important but poorly understood. Claudins are the key components of the paracellular pathway. Defects in claudin function result in a broad range of renal diseases, including hypomagnesemia, hypercalciuria and nephrolithiasis. This review describes recent findings on the physiological function of claudins underlying paracellular transport mechanisms with a focus on renal Ca2+ handling. We have uncovered a molecular mechanism underlying paracellular Ca2+ transport in the thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL) that involves the functional interplay of three important claudin genes: claudin-14, -16 and -19, all of which are associated with human kidney diseases with hypercalciuria, nephrolithiasis and bone mineral loss. The Ca2+ sensing receptor (CaSR) signaling in the kidney has long been a mystery. By analyzing small non-coding RNA molecules in the kidney, we have uncovered a novel microRNA based signaling pathway downstream of CaSR that directly regulates claudin-14 gene expression and establishes the claudin-14 molecule as a key regulator for renal Ca2+ homeostasis. The molecular cascade of CaSR-microRNAs-claudins forms a regulatory loop to maintain proper Ca2+ homeostasis in the kidney. PMID:22504740

  17. Chapter 4: Geological Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Friedmann, J; Herzog, H

    2006-06-14

    Carbon sequestration is the long term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. The largest potential reservoirs for storing carbon are the deep oceans and geological reservoirs in the earth's upper crust. This chapter focuses on geological sequestration because it appears to be the most promising large-scale approach for the 2050 timeframe. It does not discuss ocean or terrestrial sequestration. In order to achieve substantial GHG reductions, geological storage needs to be deployed at a large scale. For example, 1 Gt C/yr (3.6 Gt CO{sub 2}/yr) abatement, requires carbon capture and storage (CCS) from 600 large pulverized coal plants ({approx}1000 MW each) or 3600 injection projects at the scale of Statoil's Sleipner project. At present, global carbon emissions from coal approximate 2.5 Gt C. However, given reasonable economic and demand growth projections in a business-as-usual context, global coal emissions could account for 9 Gt C. These volumes highlight the need to develop rapidly an understanding of typical crustal response to such large projects, and the magnitude of the effort prompts certain concerns regarding implementation, efficiency, and risk of the enterprise. The key questions of subsurface engineering and surface safety associated with carbon sequestration are: (1) Subsurface issues: (a) Is there enough capacity to store CO{sub 2} where needed? (b) Do we understand storage mechanisms well enough? (c) Could we establish a process to certify injection sites with our current level of understanding? (d) Once injected, can we monitor and verify the movement of subsurface CO{sub 2}? (2) Near surface issues: (a) How might the siting of new coal plants be influenced by the distribution of storage sites? (b) What is the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping from injection sites? What are the attendant risks? Can we detect leakage if it occurs? (3) Will surface leakage negate or reduce the

  18. Lecture Attendance and Web Based Lecture Technologies: A Comparison of Student Perceptions and Usage Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Konsky, Brian R.; Ivins, Jim; Gribble, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of web based lecture recordings on learning and attendance at lectures. Student opinions regarding the perceived value of the recordings were evaluated in the context of usage patterns and final marks, and compared with attendance data and student perceptions regarding the usefulness of lectures. The availability…

  19. The Relative Effects of Traditional Lectures and Guided Notes Lectures on University Student Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, W. Larry; Weil, Timothy M.; Porter, James C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Guided notes were employed in two undergraduate Psychology courses involving 71 students. The study design utilized an alternating treatments format to compare Traditional Lectures with Guided Notes lectures. In one of the two courses, tests were administered after each class lecture, whereas the same type of test was administered at the beginning…

  20. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. Lecture and Active Learning as a Dialectical Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallin, Irwin

    2017-01-01

    Lecture remains a valuable tool in the student learning toolbox--one that at its best helps students unpack what they read for class, place course material in context, and see how a subject matter expert solves problems. It may be useful to think of lecture and active learning as a dialectical tension satisfied by the interactive lecture. Just as…

  1. The Use of Recorded Lectures in Education and the Impact on Lecture Attendance and Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embedded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam performance is not clear. The purpose of the current study is to address the use of recorded…

  2. Lecture Is Not a Dirty Word: How to Use Active Lecture to Increase Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Jess L.

    2013-01-01

    Lecture is a much maligned classroom method of instruction. Like any other technique employed by educators, there are both effective and ineffective ways to deliver content through a lecture format. Respecting that the college learner has changed, active lecturing strategies maximize student learning of course content, engaging both modern…

  3. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  4. The Use of Recorded Lectures in Education and the Impact on Lecture Attendance and Exam Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bos, Nynke; Groeneveld, Caspar; van Bruggen, Jan; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Universities increasingly record lectures and make them available online for students. Though the technology to record these lectures is now solidly implemented and embedded in many institutions, the impact of the usage of recorded lectures on exam performance is not clear. The purpose of the current study is to address the use of recorded…

  5. Beyond Lecture Capture: What Teaching Staff Want from Web-Based Lecture Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germany, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    For the past decade, the primary use of recordings in higher education has been to make live lectures available to students for review (lecture capture). However, with the rise of podcasting and the increased focus on interaction as a means to engage students, current web-based lecture technologies (WBLT) are capable of much more than simply…

  6. The Use of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education: A Review of Institutional, Student, and Lecturer Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Frances V.; Neumann, David L.; Jones, Liz; Creed, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based lecture technologies are being used increasingly in higher education. One widely-used method is the recording of lectures delivered during face-to-face teaching of on-campus courses. The recordings are subsequently made available to students on-line and have been variously referred to as lecture capture, video podcasts, and Lectopia. We…

  7. The Use of Lecture Recordings in Higher Education: A Review of Institutional, Student, and Lecturer Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Callaghan, Frances V.; Neumann, David L.; Jones, Liz; Creed, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Web-based lecture technologies are being used increasingly in higher education. One widely-used method is the recording of lectures delivered during face-to-face teaching of on-campus courses. The recordings are subsequently made available to students on-line and have been variously referred to as lecture capture, video podcasts, and Lectopia. We…

  8. VUV thin films, chapter 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    The application of thin film technology to the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) wavelength region from 120 nm to 230 nm has not been fully exploited in the past because of absorption effects which complicate the accurate determination of the optical functions of dielectric materials. The problem therefore reduces to that of determining the real and imaginary parts of a complex optical function, namely the frequency dependent refractive index n and extinction coefficient k. We discuss techniques for the inverse retrieval of n and k for dielectric materials at VUV wavelengths from measurements of their reflectance and transmittance. Suitable substrate and film materials are identified for application in the VUV. Such applications include coatings for the fabrication of narrow and broadband filters and beamsplitters. The availability of such devices open the VUV regime to high resolution photometry, interferometry and polarimetry both for space based and laboratory applications. This chapter deals with the optics of absorbing multilayers, the determination of the optical functions for several useful materials, and the design of VUV multilayer stacks as applied to the design of narrow and broadband reflection and transmission filters and beamsplitters. Experimental techniques are discussed briefly, and several examples of the optical functions derived for selected materials are presented.

  9. Sediment transport measurements: Chapter 5

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diplas, P.; Kuhnle, R.; Gray, J.; Glysson, D.; Edwards, T.; García, Marcelo H.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment erosion, transport, and deposition in fluvial systems are complex processes that are treated in detail in other sections of this book. Development of methods suitable for the collection of data that contribute to understanding these processes is a still-evolving science. Sediment and ancillary data are fundamental requirements for the proper management of river systems, including the design of structures, the determination of aspects of stream behavior, ascertaining the probable effect of removing an existing structure, estimation of bulk erosion, transport, and sediment delivery to the oceans, ascertaining the long-term usefulness of reservoirs and other public works, tracking movement of solid-phase contaminants, restoration of degraded or otherwise modified streams, and assistance in the calibration and validation of numerical models. This chapter presents techniques for measuring bed-material properties and suspended and bed-load discharges. Well-established and relatively recent, yet adequately tested, sampling equipment and methodologies, with designs that are guided by sound physical and statistical principles, are described. Where appropriate, the theory behind the development of the equipment and guidelines for its use are presented.

  10. Chapter 08: Comments on, and additional information for, wood identification

    Treesearch

    Alex C. Wiedenhoeft

    2011-01-01

    This manual has described the theory of identification (Chapter 1), the botanical basis of wood structure (Chapter 2), the use of a hand lens (Chapter 3), how to use cutting tools to prepare wood for observation with a lens (Chapter 4), and the characters used in hand lens wood identification (Chapter 5) before leading you through an identification key (Chapter 6) and...

  11. Lectures on Dark Matter Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela

    Rotation curve measurements from the 1970s provided the first strong indication that a significant fraction of matter in the Universe is non-baryonic. In the intervening years, a tremendous amount of progress has been made on both the theoretical and experimental fronts in the search for this missing matter, which we now know constitutes nearly 85% of the Universe's matter density. These series of lectures provide an introduction to the basics of dark matter physics. They are geared for the advanced undergraduate or graduate student interested in pursuing research in high-energy physics. The primary goal is to build an understanding of how observations constrain the assumptions that can be made about the astro- and particle physics properties of dark matter. The lectures begin by delineating the basic assumptions that can be inferred about dark matter from rotation curves. A detailed discussion of thermal dark matter follows, motivating Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, as well as lighter-mass alternatives. As an application of these concepts, the phenomenology of direct and indirect detection experiments is discussed in detail.

  12. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  13. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    ScienceCinema

    Wayne Hu

    2016-07-12

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  14. The Art of the Lecture Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Lecturing hints, periodic table, mechanistic approach to predicting inorganic reaction products for substitution reactions, reaction rates, spectroscopy, and entropy role change in establishing position of equilibrium for vaporization of water and synthesis of ammonia were topics of lectures presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical…

  15. The Role of Lecturers and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molina, Víctor M.; Perera Rodríguez, Víctor Hugo; Melero Aguilar, Noelia; Cotán Fernández, Almudena; Moriña, Anabel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of how lecturers respond to students with disabilities, the initial question being: do lecturers aid or hinder students? Findings pertain to a broader research project employing a non-usual research methodology in higher education research and students with disabilities: the biographical-narrative methodology. The…

  16. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  17. Lecture 11: Some More Suggestions and Remarks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montessori, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This lecture discusses how the careful preparation of the observer, control of conditions, and precise use of materials will allow the child to "be free to manifest the phenomena which we wish to observe." This lecture was delivered at the International Training Course, London, 1921. [Reprinted from "AMI Communications" (2008).

  18. Hotseat: Opening the Backchannel in Large Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aagard, Hans; Bowen, Kyle; Olesova, Larisa

    2010-01-01

    Despite their flaws as teaching and learning environments, large lectures remain a standard teaching approach because of their relatively low cost, ease of preparation, and long tradition in education. Research shows that active inquiry yields positive results in learning outcomes, and one way to make the large lecture class more active and…

  19. Team Teaching: An Alternative to Lecture Fatigue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Sandra L.; Kanter, Sanford B.

    1984-01-01

    More than an interdisciplinary format employing lecturers from different disciplines, team teaching is an approach which involves true team work between two qualified instructors who, together, make presentations to an audience. The instructional advantages of team teaching include: (1) the elimination of lecture-style instruction in favor of a…

  20. Digital lecture recording: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Amy N B; Massa, Helen; Burne, Thomas H J

    2013-01-01

    Increasing application of information technology including web-based lectures and live-lecture recording appears to have many advantages for undergraduate nursing education. These include greater flexibility, opportunity for students to review content on demand and the improved academic management of increasing class sizes without significant increase in physical infrastructure. This study performed a quasi-experimental comparison between two groups of nursing students undertaking their first anatomy and physiology course, where one group was also provided access to streaming of recorded copies of the live lectures and the other did not. For the course in which recorded lectures were available student feedback indicated overwhelming support for such provision with 96% of students having accessed recorded lectures. There was only a weak relationship between access of recorded lectures and overall performance in the course. Interestingly, the nursing students who had access to the recorded lectures demonstrated significantly poorer overall academic performance (P < 0.001). Although this study did not specifically control for student demographics or other academic input, the data suggests that provision of recorded lectures requires improved and applied time management practices by students and caution on the part of the academic staff involved.

  1. Man and His Environment. Octagon Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, R. T., Ed.

    Utilizing the theme "Man and His Environment," the Octagon Lectures of 1969 were presented at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. Problems arising from the imbalance between the ancient forces of nature and the new forces of human culture were dealt with by the lecturers. They revealed that the most important…

  2. The Art of the Lecture Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Lecturing hints, periodic table, mechanistic approach to predicting inorganic reaction products for substitution reactions, reaction rates, spectroscopy, and entropy role change in establishing position of equilibrium for vaporization of water and synthesis of ammonia were topics of lectures presented at the Seventh Biennial Conference on Chemical…

  3. Cosmology at the Beach Lecture: Wayne Hu

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne Hu

    2009-03-02

    Wayne Hu lectures on Secondary Anisotropy in the CMB. The lecture is the first in a series of 3 he delivered as part of the "Cosmology at the Beach" winter school organized by Berkeley Lab's George Smoot in Los Cabos, Mexico from Jan. 12-16, 2009.

  4. Lecture Capture: What Can Be Automated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdet, Benoit; Bontron, Cedric; Burgi, Pierre-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Online education encompasses a variety of technologies, one of which is lecture capture--a long-standing practice at the University of Geneva. The faculty of arts has recorded most of its lectures on audiotapes since the 1970s, well before the World Wide Web existed. Modernization of the recording technologies, however, which until recently…

  5. Man and His Environment. Octagon Lectures 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appleyard, R. T., Ed.

    Utilizing the theme "Man and His Environment," the Octagon Lectures of 1969 were presented at the University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia. Problems arising from the imbalance between the ancient forces of nature and the new forces of human culture were dealt with by the lecturers. They revealed that the most important…

  6. Students' Perception of Live Lectures' Inherent Disadvantages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrovic, Juraj; Pale, Predrag

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to provide insight into various properties of live lectures from the perspective of sophomore engineering students. In an anonymous online survey conducted at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computing, University of Zagreb, we investigated students' opinions regarding lecture attendance, inherent disadvantages of live…

  7. Florence Tan Maniac Lecture, April 13, 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-04-13

    Florence Tan Maniac Lecture, April 13, 2016 NASA Engineer Florence Tan presented a Maniac Lecture entitled, "From Malaysia to Mars." Florence talked about her journey from Malaysia to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where she has been working on planetary mass spectrometers, which is characterized by challenges, frustration, excitement, and rewards.

  8. Getting Active in the Large Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Juan Carlos

    2007-01-01

    The benefits of active learning are well documented; nonetheless, the implementation of active learning strategies can be challenging in large lecture environments. The project will examine the research supporting active learning, present the implementation of simple active learning techniques in large lecture classes, and provide evidence to test…

  9. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  10. A Case Against Mandatory Lecture Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Richard M.; Flournoy, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Students' lecture attendance, course grades, class rank at the end of the first year of medical school, and scores on the NBME Part I examinations were correlated. The data suggest that a significant number of students who did not attend lectures did well academically. (MLW)

  11. Lecture Capture: What Can Be Automated?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdet, Benoit; Bontron, Cedric; Burgi, Pierre-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Online education encompasses a variety of technologies, one of which is lecture capture--a long-standing practice at the University of Geneva. The faculty of arts has recorded most of its lectures on audiotapes since the 1970s, well before the World Wide Web existed. Modernization of the recording technologies, however, which until recently…

  12. Reassessing the Value of University Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Sarah; Kennedy, Gregor

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of the lecture in contemporary higher education. Moving beyond the polarised perspectives that characterise recent debates on the subject, it considers both the potential problems and possible pedagogical, practical and social benefits of the lecture as a mode of teaching and learning. Through an examination of…

  13. The Humanity of English. 1972 Distinguished Lectures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, Urbana, IL.

    This is a collection of lectures by distinguished members of the English profession who were invited to lecture to schools located far from large urban and cultural centers. Included are papers by: John H. Fisher, "Truth Versus Beauty: An Inquiry into the Function of Language and Literature in an Articulate Society"; Walter Loban, "The Green…

  14. In Defense of the Populist Lecture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrad, Mark Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) programs like Microsoft PowerPoint and Apple Keynote have become the norm for large university lecture classes, but their record in terms of student engagement and active learning is mixed at best. Here, the author presents the merits of a "populist" lecture style that takes full advantage of the…

  15. What Predicts Skill in Lecture Note Taking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peverly, Stephen T.; Ramaswamy, Vivek; Brown, Cindy; Sumowski, James; Alidoost, Moona; Garner, Joanna

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of good lecture notes to test performance, very little is known about the cognitive processes that underlie effective lecture note taking. The primary purpose of the 2 studies reported (a pilot study and Study 1) was to investigate 3 processes hypothesized to be significantly related to quality of notes: transcription…

  16. National ESEA Chapter 1 Schoolwide Projects Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland Public Schools, OH.

    This document is a collection of schoolwide compensatory education project plans for 22 elementary schools in the Cleveland (Ohio) Public Schools system, with funding provided by Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Chapter 1 project plans are included for the following schools: (1) Alfred A. Benesch; (2) Andrew J.…

  17. Guidance for Establishing a Regional SER Chapter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Regional Society for Ecological Restoration International (SER) chapters are integral to grass root restoration efforts because they serve as a resource on ecological restoration for individuals and institutions within their chapter boundaries. SER recognized the Midwest-Great Lakes (MWGL) SER chapt...

  18. New Directions for Chapter 1. Congressional Testimony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rotberg, Iris C.

    The RAND Institute on Education and Training conducted an analysis of Federal policy options to improve education in low-income areas. The analysis focuses on Chapter 1 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the nation's program for assisting educationally disadvantaged students. After a quarter century of Chapter 1 efforts, it is…

  19. Chapter 16. Fine-root Growth Response

    SciTech Connect

    J. Devereux Joslin; Mark H. Wolfe

    2002-07-31

    As part of a multiyear study to evaluate the affects of altered water inputs to an upland forest many aspects of tree growth physiology were studied. Chapter 16 of this book deals with fine root growth as studied over a 7 year period using a variety of methods. This chapter summarizes the results and conclusions from those efforts.

  20. Education Evaluation Report, Chapter 1. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Walter L.

    This report describes and evaluates the effectiveness of programs in Delaware funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Where possible, Delaware program findings are compared to those of the Sustaining Effects Study, a federally funded national study of the precursor of Chapter 1, Title I of the Elementary…

  1. Chapter 6. Landscape Analysis for Habitat Monitoring

    Treesearch

    Samuel A. Cushman; Kevin McGarigal; Kevin S. McKelvey; Christina D. Vojta; Claudia M. Regan

    2013-01-01

    The primary objective of this chapter is to describe standardized methods for measur¬ing and monitoring attributes of landscape pattern in support of habitat monitoring. This chapter describes the process of monitoring categorical landscape maps in which either selected habitat attributes or different classes of habitat quality are represented as different patch types...

  2. Harvesting, storing, and shipping [Chapter 13

    Treesearch

    Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2009-01-01

    Plants are ready for harvest and delivery to clients after they have reached target specifications (see Chapter 2, The Target Plant Concept) and have been properly hardened (see Chapter 12, Hardening). Originally, nursery stock was grown in soil in fields; nursery managers would "lift" those seedlings out of the ground to harvest them. That traditional...

  3. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  4. Chapter 6: Selenium Toxicity to Aquatic Organisms

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter addresses the characteristics and nature of organic selenium (Se) toxicity to aquatic organisms, based on the most current state of scientific knowledge. As such, the information contained in this chapter relates to the 'toxicity assessment' phase of aquatic ecologi...

  5. Chapter 1: Biomedical knowledge integration.

    PubMed

    Payne, Philip R O

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  6. Chapter 1: Biomedical Knowledge Integration

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Philip R. O.

    2012-01-01

    The modern biomedical research and healthcare delivery domains have seen an unparalleled increase in the rate of innovation and novel technologies over the past several decades. Catalyzed by paradigm-shifting public and private programs focusing upon the formation and delivery of genomic and personalized medicine, the need for high-throughput and integrative approaches to the collection, management, and analysis of heterogeneous data sets has become imperative. This need is particularly pressing in the translational bioinformatics domain, where many fundamental research questions require the integration of large scale, multi-dimensional clinical phenotype and bio-molecular data sets. Modern biomedical informatics theory and practice has demonstrated the distinct benefits associated with the use of knowledge-based systems in such contexts. A knowledge-based system can be defined as an intelligent agent that employs a computationally tractable knowledge base or repository in order to reason upon data in a targeted domain and reproduce expert performance relative to such reasoning operations. The ultimate goal of the design and use of such agents is to increase the reproducibility, scalability, and accessibility of complex reasoning tasks. Examples of the application of knowledge-based systems in biomedicine span a broad spectrum, from the execution of clinical decision support, to epidemiologic surveillance of public data sets for the purposes of detecting emerging infectious diseases, to the discovery of novel hypotheses in large-scale research data sets. In this chapter, we will review the basic theoretical frameworks that define core knowledge types and reasoning operations with particular emphasis on the applicability of such conceptual models within the biomedical domain, and then go on to introduce a number of prototypical data integration requirements and patterns relevant to the conduct of translational bioinformatics that can be addressed via the design and

  7. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  8. Chapter 8: Biomass Pyrolysis Oils

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, Robert L.; Baldwin, Robert M.; Arbogast, Stephen; Bellman, Don; Paynter, Dave; Wykowski, Jim

    2016-09-06

    Fast pyrolysis is heating on the order of 1000 degrees C/s in the absence of oxygen to 40-600 degrees C, which causes decomposition of the biomass. Liquid product yield from biomass can be as much as 80% of starting dry weight and contains up to 75% of the biomass energy content. Other products are gases, primarily carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as solid char and ash. Residence time in the reactor is only 0.5-2 s so that relatively small, low-capital-cost reactors can be used. The low capital cost combined with greenhouse gas emission reductions relative to petroleum fuels of 50-95% makes pyrolysis an attractive process. The pyrolysis liquids have been investigated as a refinery feedstock and as stand-alone fuels. Utilization of raw pyrolysis oil has proven challenging. The organic fraction is highly corrosive because of its high organic acid content. High water content lowers the net heating value and can increase corrosivity. It can be poorly soluble in petroleum or petroleum products and can readily absorb water. Distillation residues can be as high as 50%, viscosity can be high, oils can exhibit poor stability in storage, and they can contain suspended solids. The ignition quality of raw pyrolysis oils is poor, with cetane number estimates ranging from 0 to 35, but more likely to be in the lower end of that range. While the use of raw pyrolysis oils in certain specific applications with specialized combustion equipment may be possible, raw oils must be significantly upgraded for use in on-highway spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. Upgrading approaches most often involve catalytic hydrodeoxygenation, one of a class of reactions known as hydrotreating or hydroprocessing. This chapter discusses the properties of raw and upgraded pyrolysis oils, as well as the potential for integrating biomass pyrolysis with a petroleum refinery to significantly reduce the hydroprocessing cost.

  9. Volcanism on Mars. Chapter 41

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimbelman, J. R.; Garry, W. B.; Bleacher, J. E.; Crown, D. A.

    2015-01-01

    Spacecraft exploration has revealed abundant evidence that Mars possesses some of the most dramatic volcanic landforms found anywhere within the solar system. How did a planet half the size of Earth produce volcanoes like Olympus Mons, which is several times the size of the largest volcanoes on Earth? This question is an example of the kinds of issues currently being investigated as part of the space-age scientific endeavor called "comparative planetology." This chapter summarizes the basic information currently known about volcanism on Mars. The volcanoes on Mars appear to be broadly similar in overall morphology (although, often quite different in scale) to volcanic features on Earth, which suggests that Martian eruptive processes are not significantly different from the volcanic styles and processes on Earth. Martian volcanoes are found on terrains of different age, and Martian volcanic rocks are estimated to comprise more than 50% of the Martian surface. This is in contrast to volcanism on smaller bodies such as Earth's Moon, where volcanic activity was mainly confined to the first half of lunar history (see "Volcanism on the Moon"). Comparative planetology supports the concept that volcanism is the primary mechanism for a planetary body to get rid of its internal heat; smaller bodies tend to lose their internal heat more rapidly than larger bodies (although, Jupiter's moon Io appears to contradict this trend; Io's intense volcanic activity is powered by unique gravitational tidal forces within the Jovian system; see "Volcanism on Io"), so that volcanic activity on Mars would be expected to differ considerably from that found on Earth and the Moon.

  10. Richard Feynman's popular lectures on quantum electrodynamics: The 1979 Robb lectures at Auckland University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Kwan, A. M.

    1996-06-01

    The subject of quantum electrodynamics (QED) was the subject of QED—The Strange Theory of Light and Matter, the popular book by Richard Feynman which was published by Princeton University Press in 1985. On p. 1, Feynman makes passing reference to the fact that the book is based on a series of general lectures on QED which were, however, first delivered in New Zealand. At Auckland University, these lectures were delivered in 1979, as the Sir Douglas Robb lectures, and videotapes of the lectures are held by the Auckland University Physics Department. We have carried out a detailed examination of these videotapes, and we discuss here the major differences between the original Auckland lectures and the published version. We use selected quotations from the lectures to show that the original lectures provide additional insight into Feynman's character, and have great educational value.

  11. Chapter 6: CPV Tracking and Trackers

    SciTech Connect

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Magalhaes, Pedro; Muller, Matthew

    2016-04-15

    This chapter explains the functional requirements of a concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) sun tracker. It derives the design specifications of a CPV tracker. The chapter presents taxonomy of trackers describing the most common tracking architectures, based on the number of axes, their relative position, and the foundation and placing of tracking drives. It deals with the structural issues related to tracker design, mainly related to structural flexure and its impact on the system's acceptance angle. The chapter analyzes the auto-calibrated sun tracking control, by describing the state of the art and its development background. It explores the sun tracking accuracy measurement with a practical example. The chapter discusses tracker manufacturing and tracker field works. It reviews survey of different types of tracker designs obtained from different manufacturers. Finally, the chapter deals with IEC62817, the technical standard developed for CPV sun trackers.

  12. Chapter 17: Estimating Net Savings: Common Practices

    SciTech Connect

    Violette, D. M.; Rathbun, P.

    2014-09-01

    This chapter focuses on the methods used to estimate net energy savings in evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) studies for energy efficiency (EE) programs. The chapter provides a definition of net savings, which remains an unsettled topic both within the EE evaluation community and across the broader public policy evaluation community, particularly in the context of attribution of savings to particular program. The chapter differs from the measure-specific Uniform Methods Project (UMP) chapters in both its approach and work product. Unlike other UMP resources that provide recommended protocols for determining gross energy savings, this chapter describes and compares the current industry practices for determining net energy savings, but does not prescribe particular methods.

  13. Chapter I, Chapter II, And State Compensatory Education Program Evaluations, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Sherry; And Others

    This report contains administrative summaries for program evaluations of these 11 1983-84 Chapter I, Chapter II, and state compensatory education programs in the Fort Worth Independent School District, Texas. The programs evaluated are the Elementary Resource Teacher/Aide Program; the Chapter I Parochial Reading and Mathematics Program; the…

  14. THE LINDA CRANE MEMORIAL LECTUR

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    At 90 years of age, the APTA may be facing some of the greatest national and global challenges of its history. Membership has grown from 238 in 1921 to over 70,000 in 2011, but the expansion of the APTA may be restrictive to individual participation. A leadership gap appears imminent in practice and education. Fostering every member to understand the APTA and its great work is essential to ensuring a profession that lives its core values and meets societal needs. The Linda Crane Memorial Lecture in 2011 celebrated a vision of the APTA's 100th birthday with every member serving as a “professional centenarian” who stewards the organization to continued greatness. PMID:21637394

  15. Teaching advanced genetics without lectures.

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Vicki L

    2003-01-01

    In an effort to increase student engagement and therefore student learning, an advanced genetics course was developed in which traditional lectures were eliminated. Instead, students were required to complete reading assignments before each class meeting, and those readings were then the topic of group discussion. Assigned readings alternated between text assignments and articles from the primary literature. Students were made accountable for their own preparation by the administration of a quiz at the start of each class. Group discussion of the topics engaged students in the learning process and readministration of the quiz at the end of class allowed them to benefit from the group interaction and understanding. Interspersing text readings and primary literature led to student understanding of how genetic knowledge is acquired and interpreted and how experimental detail leads to the construction of general models. PMID:14668355

  16. Summer school in Kabardino-Balkaria by BMSTU SPIE Student Chapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Gavdush, Arsenii A.; Fokina, Irina N.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2014-09-01

    This summer BMSTU SPIE Student Chapter have decided to visit Kabardino-Balkaria Republic of Caucasus (Russia) and spent there a week with children in a camp. It was called Summer school. We decided to organize it in order to engage talented and curious children in Optics and to show them how science could be funny. Education and entertainment program included such activities as lectures, optical demonstrations, laser games, hiking in the forest, and others. As a result children had a good time outdoors, learned interesting facts about optics and lasers, and of course found new friends who are keen to know more too. Four Chapter members and about 70 children of age 10-16 took part in this event.

  17. [Risk and features of occupational diseases in nonferrous metallurgy workers of Kolsky Transpolar area].

    PubMed

    Siurin, S A; Chashchin, V P; Frolova, N M

    2015-01-01

    The study covered data on 977 cases of occupational diseases in 615 workers of nonferrous metallurgy in Kolsky Transpolar area. Findings are high risk of occupational diseases in workers engaged into electrolysis production of aluminium, all nickel reprocessing and pyrometallic copper reprocessing (GR 7.02-10.0). Electrolysis operators and anode operators of aluminium production are more prone to occupational diseases, with bone and muscular disorders (46.8%) prevalent in the morbidity structure. Respiratory diseases are more prevalent (68.2-100%) in the occupational morbidity structure of copper-nickelindustry workers. Conclusion is made on mandatory improvement of the work conditions and more effective individual protective means against occupational hazards in workers of nonferrous metallurgy in Kolsky Transpolar area.

  18. Estimation and characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from magnesium metallurgy facilities in China.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhiqiang; Yang, Yufei; Tang, Zhenwu; Liu, Feng; Wang, Qi; Huang, Qifei

    2014-11-01

    Field monitoring was conducted to develop a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission inventory for the magnesium (Mg) metallurgy industry in China. PAH emissions in stack gas and fly/bottom ash samples from different smelting units of a typical Mg smelter were measured and compared. Large variations of concentrations, congener patterns, and emission factors of PAHs during the oxidation and reduction stages in the Mg smelter were observed. The measured average emission factor (166,487 μg/t Mg) was significantly higher than those of other industrial sources. Annual emission from Mg metallurgy in 2012 in China was estimated at 116 kg (514 g BaPeq) for PAHs. The results of this study suggest that PAH emission from Mg industries should be considered by local government agencies. These data may be helpful for understanding PAH levels produced by the Mg industry and in developing a PAH inventory.

  19. Preparation of Three-Dimensional Graphene Foams Using Powder Metallurgy Templates.

    PubMed

    Sha, Junwei; Gao, Caitian; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Li, Yilun; Zhao, Naiqin; Tour, James M

    2016-01-26

    A simple and scalable method which combines traditional powder metallurgy and chemical vapor deposition is developed for the synthesis of mesoporous free-standing 3D graphene foams. The powder metallurgy templates for 3D graphene foams (PMT-GFs) consist of particle-like carbon shells which are connected by multilayered graphene that shows high specific surface area (1080 m(2) g(-1)), good crystallization, good electrical conductivity (13.8 S cm(-1)), and a mechanically robust structure. The PMT-GFs did not break under direct flushing with DI water, and they were able to recover after being compressed. These properties indicate promising applications of PMT-GFs for fields requiring 3D carbon frameworks such as in energy-based electrodes and mechanical dampening.

  20. Mechanical properties of metals for biomedical applications using powder metallurgy process: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewidar, Montasser Marasy; Yoon, Ho-Chel; Lim, Jae Kyoo

    2006-06-01

    The uses of biomaterials have been revolutionizing the biomedical field in deployment as implants for humans. During the past five decades, many implant materials made of metals have been put into practical use. Powder metallurgy techniques have been used to produce controlled porous structures, such as porous coatings applied for dental and orthopedic surgical implants, which allow bony tissue ingrowth within the implant surface, thereby improving fixation. This paper examines various important metals using powder metallurgy technology to produce elements of a total hip replacement. These alloys are 316L stainless steel alloy, Co-Cr-Mo alloy, and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. Also, this paper examines current information on the mechanical properties. Mechanical properties are discussed as a function of type of materials and process of fabrication. This article addresses the engineering aspects concerning the advantages and disadvantages of each type of material.

  1. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics. II Astrophysics Symposium of the GEA-RSEF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, Ana; Manteiga, Minia

    2006-12-01

    This second volume of "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" contains a selection of lectures on a variety of topics that contribute to illustrate the current healthy state of Spanish Astrophysics. The first "lecture notes" review two space projects with a relevant participation from the Spanish Astrophysical community, CoRoT and Cassini-Huygens missions. The present-day knowledge about Titan, the solar system object with a physical environment most similar to that at Earth, is carefully revised in a pleasant lecture by Luisa María Lara, Rafael Rodrigo and José Juan López Moreno. The recent success in the launching and operativity of the CoRoT mission increases even more the interest of the review by Rafael Garrido and Hans J. Deeg illustrating the search for exoplanets by the CoRoT satellite. The potential discovery of Earth-like planets around other stars will need, apart from sophisticated technological development, the design of techniques for identifying the most representative parameters of their atmospheres and surfaces. Manuel Vazquez, P. Montañés Rodríguez and E. Pallé, review the main results of observations and simulations looking at our planet with low or null resolution, in other words, considering the Earth as an exoplanet. Our aim is to offer the specialized public, and particularly to graduate and postgraduate astrophysics students, selected comprehensive reviews on hot topics lectured by expert researchers on the subject ("Lecture Notes"). As in the first volume of the series, this issue is complemented by a set of chapters on more specific topics ("Essays").

  2. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  3. Lecture notes for criticality safety

    SciTech Connect

    Fullwood, R.

    1992-03-01

    These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein`s mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

  4. Hydrogen halide cleaning of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herbell, T. P.

    1972-01-01

    The Cr2O3 content of powder metallurgy nickel-20 chromium-3 thoria was reduced with atmospheres consisting of hydrogen plus hydrogen chloride (HCl) or hydrogen bromide (HBr). The nonthoria oxygen content or 'oxygen excess' was reduced from an initial amount of greater than 50,000 ppm to less than 100 ppm. Low temperatures were effective, but lowest oxygen levels were achieved with the highest cleaning temperature of 1200 C.

  5. LACBED characterization of dislocations in Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys processed by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, P. P.; Ibarra, A.; San Jean, J.; Morniro, J. P.; No, M. L.

    2003-10-01

    Powder metallurgy Cu-AI-Ni shape memory alloys show excellent thermomechanical properties, being the fracture behavior close to the one observed in single crystals. However, the microstructural mechanisms responsible of such behavior are still under study. In this paper we present the characterization of the dislocations present in these alloys by Large Angle Convergent Beam Electron Diffraction (LACBED) in two different stages of the elaboration process: after HIP compaction and after hot rolling.

  6. Properties of WZ21 (%wt) alloy processed by a powder metallurgy route.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Sandra; Garcés, Gerardo; Pérez, Pablo; Adeva, Paloma

    2015-06-01

    Microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behaviour of WZ21 (%wt) alloy prepared by a powder metallurgy route from rapidly solidified powders have been studied. Results were compared to those of the same alloy prepared through a conventional route of casting and extrusion. The microstructure of the extruded ingot consisted of α-Mg grains and Mg3Zn3Y2 (W-phase) and LPSO-phase particles located at grain boundaries. Moreover, stacking faults were also observed within α-Mg grains. The alloy processed by the powder metallurgy route exhibited a more homogeneous and finer microstructure, with a grain size of 2 μm. In this case W-phase and Mg24Y5 phase were identified, but not the LPSO-phase. The microstructural refinement induced by the use of rapidly solidified powders strengthened the alloy at room temperature and promoted superplasticity at higher strain rates. Corrosion behaviour in PBS medium evidenced certain physical barrier effect of the almost continuous arrangements of second phases aligned along the extrusion direction in conventionally processed WZ21 alloy, with a stable tendency around 7 mm/year. On the other hand, powder metallurgy processing promoted significant pitting corrosion, inducing accelerated corrosion rate during prolonged immersion times.

  7. A millennium of metallurgy recorded by lake sediments from Morococha, Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Colin A; Abbott, Mark B; Wolfe, Alexander P; Kittleson, John L

    2007-05-15

    To date, information concerning pre-Colonial metallurgy in South America has largely been limited to the archaeological record of artifacts. Here, we reconstruct a millennium of smelting activity in the Peruvian Andes using the lake-sediment stratigraphy of atmospherically derived metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, Sb, Bi, and Ti) and lead isotopic ratios (206Pb/ 207Pb) associated with smelting from the Morococha mining region in the central Peruvian Andes. The earliest evidence for metallurgy occurs ca. 1000 A.D., coinciding with the fall of the Wari Empire and decentralization of local populations. Smelting during this interval appears to have been aimed at copper and copper alloys, because of large increases in Zn and Cu relative to Pb. A subsequent switch to silver metallurgy under Inca control (ca. 1450 to conquest, 1533 A.D.) is indicated by increases in Pb, Sb, and Bi, a conclusion supported by further increases of these metals during Colonial mining, which targeted silver extraction. Rapid development of the central Andes during the 20th century raised metal burdens by an order of magnitude above previous levels. Our results represent the first evidence for pre-Colonial smelting in the central Peruvian Andes, and corroborate the sensitivity of lake sediments to pre-Colonial metallurgical activity suggested by earlier findings from Bolivia.

  8. [THE DISCUSSION CONCERNING THE PLACE OF LECTURES AND COMPULSORY LECTURE ATTENDANCE IN MEDICAL EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Reis, Shmuel

    2016-04-01

    Luder shows that there is a lack of correlation between lecture attendance in medical school and examination performance, and thus draws attention to a discourse concerning the place of lectures and lecture attendance enforcement in 2015 and beyond. The paper addresses 4 questions: First, what is the current place of the traditional lecture in the education of medical students? Second, are there alternatives to this format of teaching? Third, what are the educational consequences of mandating lecture attendance; and fourth, should there be such enforcement? The author discusses these questions and concludes that lectures should be used sparingly, after a careful evaluation that they have an added value over learning away from the classroom. Furthermore, that there are clear guidelines on how to make the traditional lecture enhanced and educationally effective, as well as alternatives such as the "flipped classroom", e-learning and more to lectures. In addition, that lectures frequently drive learning negatively and enforcing attendance in Israel entails serious unintended consequences such as a need to monitor attendance, and a host of disciplinary adverse reactions. Finally, that besides lecture efficiency and economy (when having added value) one reason to consider compulsory attendance, may be when poor attendance negatively influences teachers morale.

  9. Instructional analysis of lecture video recordings and its application for quality improvement of medical lectures.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sunyong; Im, Sun Ju; Lee, Sun Hee; Kam, Beesung; Yune, So Joung; Lee, Sang Soo; Lee, Jung A; Lee, Yuna; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2011-12-01

    The lecture is a technique for delivering knowledge and information cost-effectively to large medical classes in medical education. The aim of this study was to analyze teaching quality, based on triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures, to strengthen teaching competency in medical school. The subjects of this study were 13 medical professors who taught 1st- and 2nd-year medical students and agreed to a triangle analysis of video recordings of their lectures. We first performed triangle analysis, which consisted of a professional analysis of video recordings, self-assessment by teaching professors, and feedback from students, and the data were crosschecked by five school consultants for reliability and consistency. Most of the distress that teachers experienced during the lecture occurred in uniform teaching environments, such as larger lecture classes. Larger lectures that primarily used PowerPoint as a medium to deliver information effected poor interaction with students. Other distressing factors in the lecture were personal characteristics and lack of strategic faculty development. Triangle analysis of video recordings of medical lectures gives teachers an opportunity and motive to improve teaching quality. Faculty development and various improvement strategies, based on this analysis, are expected to help teachers succeed as effective, efficient, and attractive lecturers while improving the quality of larger lecture classes.

  10. The AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalesvky Lecture

    SciTech Connect

    Lenhart, Suzanne; Lewis, Jennifer

    2003-06-03

    The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) in cooperation with the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) and with funding from the Department of Energy initiated a new lecture series. The purpose of the lecture series is to increase the visibility of women who have made significant contributions in applied or computational mathematics. The AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture is presented at the SIAM Annual Meeting which is a national conference. The lecturer is a woman who has made distinguished contributions in applied or computational mathematics. The lecturer is determined by the Selection Committee which consists of two members of AWM and two members of SIAM, appointed by the presidents of these organizations. The committee may solicit nominations from other members of the scientific and engineering community. The lectureship may be awarded to any woman in the scientific or engineering community. During the period of the grant the AWM-SIAM Sonia Kovalevsky Lecture Series (SKLS) included two lectures from 2003 and 2004.

  11. Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics I. I Astrophysics Symposium of the GEA-RSEF.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulla, Ana; Manteiga, Minia

    2004-12-01

    This volume entittled "Lecture Notes and Essays in Astrophysics" is the first of a series containing the invited reviews and lectures presented during the biannual meetings of the Astrophysics Group of the spanish RSEF ("Real Sociedad Española de Física"). In particular, it includes the conferences and reviews presented during the meeting held at Madrid (Spain) on July 2003 during the First Centennial of the Spanish RSEF. The book is aimed to offer the specialized public, and particularly the astrophysics postgraduate students, selected comprehensive reviews on hot topics lectured by relevant speakers on the subject ("Lecture Notes"). The issue is complemented by a set of chapters on more specific topics ("Essays"). The turn of century has been rich with new discoveries, from the detections of extrasolar planets to the discovery of the the farthest galaxies ever seen or the detection of acceleration in the expansion of the Universe. Spain is leaving her imprint in the telescope making revolution and is promoting the construction of a 10.4 metre telescope in the ``Roque de Los Muchachos" observatory, in the Island of La Palma, Spain. This book provides an interesting insight on selected topics of modern Astrophysics as developped by Spanish astronomers.

  12. Engagement of students with lectures in biochemistry and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth Ann; Hodgson, Yvonne; Macaulay, Janet Olwyn

    2012-01-01

    Academic staff at universities have become concerned about the decrease in student attendance at lectures and the implication of this on student achievement and learning. Few studies have measured actual lecture attendance in a coherent or comprehensive way. The aim of this study was to measure actual lecture attendance of students over two year levels enrolled in two separate science disciplines, biochemistry and pharmacology. The study further sought to determine the factors that influence lecture attendance. Attendance at lectures in four units of study was monitored over a 12-week semester. Attendance at lectures decreased over the semester and was lower at early morning lectures (8 A.M.; 9 A.M.). A questionnaire surveying students about their preparation for lectures, their compensation for missed lectures and the factors influencing their nonattendance was administered at the end of the semester. Students reported that the major factors influencing their attendance at lectures related to timetable issues and the quality of lecturing. If students missed lectures, the majority read the lecture notes and listened to the online recordings. The availability of online recordings of lectures was not a major influence on attendance at lectures. In three of the four units studied there was no correlation between self-reported lecture attendance and exam performance. The results of the study indicate that universities should dedicate more resources to timetabling and to supporting staff to improve the quality of their lectures. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Misinterpretations of United States pharmacopeia chapter <797>.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2012-01-01

    By now, all compounding pharmacists should be aware that United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> has been revised. However, the revisions are tedious to read and may be misinterpreted. This article discusses some of the misinterpreted revisions of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and clarifies the revisions on the topics of Terminology, The Compounder, Facilities and Environment, Personnel Cleansing and Garbing, Assigning Beyond-use Dates, and Testing. Compounders need to take a firm stand with these misinterpretations of United States Pharmacopeia Chapter <797> and educate those who are not thoroughly familiar with the document. Compounders need to be diligent in following these standards to prevent harm to the patients.

  14. Where Social and Professional Networking Meet: The Virtual Association Chapter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noxon, Rose

    2011-01-01

    Online Capella University wanted to sponsor an International Society for Performance Improvement (ISPI) chapter. Using social networking platforms, a new type of chapter was designed. The virtual chapter breaks new ground on more than the chapter's platform; it is also the first university-sponsored chapter and has a unique approach to…

  15. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-09-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills.

  16. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  17. Fire effects on prehistoric ceramics [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Trisha Rude; Anne Trinkle Jones

    2012-01-01

    In North America, prehistoric pottery is primarily earthenware (a porous ceramic, fired at a relatively low temperature). It is not glass-like or dense like other kinds of pottery such as stoneware and porcelain (see chapter 6).

  18. Chapter 42. Waterborne and Foodborne Parasites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter identifies the most prominent parasites in North America that are acquired through contaminated food and water including protozoa (Acanthamoeba, Naegleria, Entamoeba, Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cystoisospora, Cyclospora, Toxoplasma, and Balantidium), nematodes (Trichinella, Angiostrongyl...

  19. The CEQ Annual Report: Controversial Chapters Withheld

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peter, Walter G., III

    1972-01-01

    Summarizes the content of the third Annual Report and discusses the controversy concerning the withholding'' of chapters concerning the energy crisis, recycling, and the pollution of the Delaware River Valley. Possible political motivations are discussed. (AL)

  20. How to write a medical book chapter?

    PubMed Central

    Kendirci, Muammer

    2013-01-01

    Invited medical book chapters are usually requested by editors from experienced authors who have made significant contributions to the literature in certain fields requested by an editor from an experienced. Before the start of the writing process a consensus should be established between the editor and the author with regard to the title, deadline, specific instructions and content of the manuscript. Certain issues concerning a chapter can be negotiated by the parties beforehand, but some issues cannot. As writing a medical book chapter is seen as an honor in its own right, the assignment needs to be treated with sincerity by elucidating the topic in detail, and maximal effort should be made to keep in mind that the chapter will reach a large target audience. The purpose of this review article is to provide guidance to residents and junior specialists in the field of urology to improve their writing skills. PMID:26328134

  1. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  2. AMPLIFICATION OF RIBOSOMAL RNA SEQUENCES - Book Chapter

    EPA Science Inventory

    This book chapter contains the following headings and subheadings: Introduction; Experimental Approach - Precautions, Template, Primers, Reaction Conditions, Enhancers, Post Amplification; Procedures - Template DNA, Basic PCR, Thermal Cycle Parameters, Enzyme Addition, Agarose Ge...

  3. AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (CHAPTER 65)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chapter discusses the use of technologies for reducing air pollution emissions from stationary sources, with emphasis on the control of combustion gen-erated air pollution. Major stationary sources include utility power boilers, industrial boilers and heaters, metal smelting ...

  4. Chapter IV - Safety During Payload Ground Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, Paul; Dollberg, John; Trinchero, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes the typical hazards that can be expected to be encountered when processing payloads on the ground. Also described are some of the more common controls for these hazards. Many of these controls are based on hard requirements but they are also based on specific lessons learned. This chapter uses the term Flight Hardware (F/H) for all payloads regardless of size.

  5. Why do students miss lectures? A study of lecture attendance amongst students of health science.

    PubMed

    Bati, A Hilal; Mandiracioglu, Aliye; Orgun, Fatma; Govsa, Figen

    2013-06-01

    In the domain of health sciences, attendance by students at lectures is more critical. Lecture attendance is an issue which has been widely neglected. This study aims to determine those factors which affect the lecture attendance. The research data was collected by means of a questionnaire during the second semester of the academic year 2010-2011 from second-year students of the Faculties of Medicine, Pharmacy, Dentistry and Nursing. Together with demographic data, the questionnaire includes a Likert-type scale aiming to determine the factors influencing attendance at lectures. 663 participated in this study on a voluntary basis from Medical, Dentistry, Pharmacy and Nursing Faculties. Raising attainment levels, being able to take their own lecture notes, learning which aspects of the lecture content were being emphasized, and the opportunity to ask questions were amongst the chief reasons for attending lectures. It appears that the factors preventing students from attending lectures are mainly individual. Amongst the most frequently cited causes of non-attendance, sleeplessness, ill health and the inefficiency of lectures in overcrowded halls are emphasized. In the totals and sub-dimensions of the Lecture Attendance Scale, Medical Faculty students have average scores higher than those of students at other faculties. The vital nature of professional expertise and its applications, health sciences students' attendance at lectures carries greater importance. It is important to strengthen the mentoring system with regard to individual and external factors, which have been implicated as having a substantial influence on lecture attendance by students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Learning from Lecture: Investigations of Study Strategies Involving Note Taking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Matre, Nicholas H.; And Others

    Two experiments were conducted with college students as subjects in an effort to determine the note taking strategy most effective for learning from lecture. In one experiment students listened to a lecture while engaging in either parallel or distributed note taking. The information density of the lecture and the lecture presentation speed were…

  7. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  8. Break Up Your Lectures: Or Christaller Sliced Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Graham; Jenkins, Alan

    1984-01-01

    Described is a method of lecturing in which the lecture period is divided into a number of segments. Only some segments involve the lecturer talking. In others students discuss topics or complete exercises. An example of such a lecture on aspects of Christaller's central place theory is described. (Author/RM)

  9. Michael Faraday: Prince of lecturers in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Boon Leong; Lim, Jeanette B. S.

    2001-01-01

    In this note, we focus on Faraday as a lecturer/teacher. We trace his development as a lecturer/teacher and highlight his approaches in popular-science lecturing and in teaching chemistry to military cadets. We appraise his success and conclude with an account of his poignant last lecture.

  10. The Feasibility of Using Taped Lectures to Replace Class Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menne, John W.; And Others

    The students in an introductory college psychology course were given the option of attending live lectures (control group) or listening to audio-taped lectures (experimental group). Each experimental subject was issued a tape recorder, a set of lecture tapes, and a schedule of lecture topics as presented to the control group. Conducted in the fall…

  11. The Impact of Online Lecture Recordings on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Andrew; Birch, Elisa; Hancock, Phil

    2012-01-01

    The use of online lecture recordings as a supplement to physical lectures is an increasingly popular tool at many universities. This paper combines survey data with student record data for students in a "Microeconomics Principles" class to examine the relative effects of lecture attendance and online lecture recordings. The main finding…

  12. Charles Ichoku Maniac Lecture, July 25, 2016

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA climate scientist Charles Ichoku presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Reminiscences of a scientist's journey from Nawfia to NASA." Born in a small town in Nigeria, Charles traced his captivat...

  13. Drinking Water Plant Lecture-Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestling, Martha M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple way to demonstrate the principles involved in a drinking water plant. This demonstration developed for a general public lecture can be used in chemistry and biology courses for an ecological and environmental emphasis. (HM)

  14. Making lectures memorable: A cognitive perspective.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Azam; Babar, Shazia

    2016-08-01

    Lectures have been a cornerstone of medical education since the introduction of a discipline based curricular model more than two hundred years ago. Recently this instructional strategy has come under criticism because of its reliance on passive learning. There are still many medical schools that cover content predominantly through lectures due to its feasibility. With the introduction of the flipped classrooms, lectures have been given a new lease of life. Improving cognitive imprinting during lectures would enhance retrieval and promote long term storage. Simplifying the content reduces the cognitive load of the information being received and makes it more meaningful hence more memorable. To make learning memorable, rehearsal should be built into the sessions. With the exponential increase in online learning, the need for online learning technologies will require a generation of a large amount of asynchronous video content which should ideally be truly meaningful and memorable, and inspirational to our students.

  15. Drinking Water Plant Lecture-Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vestling, Martha M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a simple way to demonstrate the principles involved in a drinking water plant. This demonstration developed for a general public lecture can be used in chemistry and biology courses for an ecological and environmental emphasis. (HM)

  16. CMSC-130 Introductory Computer Science, Lecture Notes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    The CMSC 130 Introductory Computer Science lecture notes are used in the classroom for teaching CMSC 130, an introductory computer science course...using the Ada programming language. Computer science , Language concepts, Ada language, Software concepts.

  17. Lectures on probability and statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, G.P.

    1984-09-01

    These notes are based on a set of statistics lectures delivered at Imperial College to the first-year postgraduate students in High Energy Physics. They are designed for the professional experimental scientist. We begin with the fundamentals of probability theory, in which one makes statements about the set of possible outcomes of an experiment, based upon a complete a priori understanding of the experiment. For example, in a roll of a set of (fair) dice, one understands a priori that any given side of each die is equally likely to turn up. From that, we can calculate the probability of any specified outcome. We finish with the inverse problem, statistics. Here, one begins with a set of actual data (e.g., the outcomes of a number of rolls of the dice), and attempts to make inferences about the state of nature which gave those data (e.g., the likelihood of seeing any given side of any given die turn up). This is a much more difficult problem, of course, and one's solutions often turn out to be unsatisfactory in one respect or another.

  18. A peculiar lecture by Ettore Majorana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, S.

    2006-09-01

    We give, for the first time, the English translation of a manuscript by Ettore Majorana, which probably corresponds to the text for a seminar lecture delivered at the University of Naples in 1938, where he lectured on theoretical physics. Some passages reveal a physical interpretation of quantum mechanics which anticipates for several years the Feynman approach in terms of path integrals, independent of the underlying mathematical formulation.

  19. Authoring Software to Make Online Lecture Contents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Teramoto, Akemi; Akiyama, Hidenori

    An authoring software for online lecture contents has been developed. Various multimedia such as HTML, SMIL and Real System are integrated in this software, which is named EzClassMaker. Professors who are not familiar to the information technology can make the online lecture content including the sound and movies, and place the content on Leaning Management System by using this software. Only the microcomputer with this software and a microphone (or a movie camera) is requested to make the content.

  20. Indian dental students' preferences regarding lecture courses.

    PubMed

    Parolia, Abhishek; Mohan, Mandakini; Kundabala, M; Shenoy, Ramya

    2012-03-01

    Teaching and learning activities in the dental clinic or hospital are a challenging area for students as well as teachers. With various teaching methodologies being used in dental schools around the world, gaining greater understanding of students' attitudes toward these methodologies would be useful for dental educators. The objective of this study was to explore the preferences of dental students in India about various aspects of lecture courses. A structured survey consisting of ten closed-ended questions was developed, and 2,680 undergraduate students from forty-three dental schools in India were approached via e-mail with a follow-up postal mailing. Of these, 1,980 students responded, for a response rate of 73.8 percent. Most of the students reported preferring lectures with the aid of PowerPoint and chalkboard. They preferred morning lectures from 8 am to 10 am for a maximum of thirty to forty minutes for each lecture, and they preferred to receive information about the lecture topic in advance. The students said that delivery of clinical demonstrations was beneficial after the lectures, and they preferred learning-based rather than exam-oriented education. The respondents also said that attendance should be made compulsory and that numerical marking of examinations should not be replaced by a grading system.

  1. Flipped classroom or an active lecture?

    PubMed

    Pickering, James D; Roberts, David J H

    2017-08-31

    Recent changes in anatomy education have seen the introduction of flipped classrooms as a replacement to the traditional didactic lecture. This approach utilizes the increasing availability of digital technology to create learning resources that can be accessed prior to attending class, with face-to-face sessions then becoming more student-centered via discussion, collaborative learning, and problem-solving activities. Although this approach may appear intuitive, this viewpoint commentary presents a counter opinion and highlights a simple alternative that utilizes evidence-based active learning approaches as part of the traditional lecture. The active lecture takes the traditional lecture, and (1) ensures the lecture content is relevant and has clear objectives, (2) contains lecture material that is designed according to the latest evidence-base, (3) complements it with additional supplementary material, (4) creates space to check prior understanding and knowledge levels, and (5) utilizes suitable technology to facilitate continual engagement and interaction. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Geological Survey Research 1966, Chapter A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1966-01-01

    'Geological Survey Research 1966' is the seventh annual review of the econamic and scientific work of the U.S. Geological Survey. As in previous years the purpose of the volume is to make available promptly to the public the highlights of Survey investigations. This year the volume consists of 4 chapters (A through D) of Professional Paper 550. Chapter A contains a summary of significant results, and the remaining chapters are made up of collections of short technical papers. Many of the results summarized in chapter A are discussed in greater detail in the short papers or in reports listed in 'Publications in Fiscal Year 1966,' beginning on page A265. The tables of contents for chapters B through D are listed on pages A259-A264. Numerous Federal, State, county, and municipal agencies listed on pages A211-A215 cooperated financially with the Geological Survey during fiscal 1966 and have contributed significantly to the results reported here. They are identified where appropriate in the short technical papers that have appeared in Geological Survey Research and in papers published cooperatively, but generally are not identified in the brief statements in chapter A. Many individuals on the staff of the Geological Survey have contributed to 'Geological Survey Research 1966.' Reference is made to only a few. Frank W. Trainer, Water Resources Division, was responsible for organizing and assembling chapter A and for critical review of papers in chapters B-D, assisted by Louis Pavlides, Geologic Division. Marston S. Chase, Publications Division, was in charge of production aspects of the series, assisted by Jesse R. Upperco in technical editing, and William H. Elliott and James R. Hamilton in planning and preparing illustrations. The volume for next year, 'Geological Survey Research 1967,' will be published as chapters af Professional Paper 5715. Previous volumes are listed below, with their series designations. Gealagical Survey Research 1960-Prof. Paper 400 Gealagical

  3. Students' Summaries of Mathematical Lectures: Comparing the Discourse of Students with the Discourse of Lectures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Österholm, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on a distinction between process- and object-oriented discourses when characterising the discourse of university students' summaries of lectures and examining connections between students' discourse and the discourse of lectures. Results show that students' discourse in general tends to be process-oriented, by their use of…

  4. Analysis of Students' Downloading of Online Audio Lecture Recordings in a Large Biology Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper address three questions apropos of those posed by Kadel (2006) in the context of a large introductory-level undergraduate science lecture course. These questions include how podcasting is used by professors and students, whether podcasting decreases lecture attendance, and if particular podcasting options are effective teaching tools.…

  5. Forum: The Lecture and Student Learning. The Lost Art of Lecturing: Cultivating Student Listening and Notetaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Kevin R.; Hunt, Stephen K.

    2017-01-01

    As this forum's call for papers notes, lecture represents one of the more "controversial forms of instructional communication," yet remains a predominant instructional method in academia. Ironically, instructors face increasing pressure to abandon lecture at a time when these classes are popular and students readily enroll in lecture…

  6. What Enhances EFL Students' Participation in Lecture Discourse? Student, Lecturer and Discourse Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morell, Teresa

    2007-01-01

    Lecture discourse has been conventionally known to be of a monological nature. However, lectures are more highly regarded if they allow for reciprocal discourse, especially for students of other languages who need help in understanding the content and in appropriating the language. In this paper, we will attempt a qualitative analysis of the…

  7. Analysis of Students' Downloading of Online Audio Lecture Recordings in a Large Biology Lecture Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Brian T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper address three questions apropos of those posed by Kadel (2006) in the context of a large introductory-level undergraduate science lecture course. These questions include how podcasting is used by professors and students, whether podcasting decreases lecture attendance, and if particular podcasting options are effective teaching tools.…

  8. The VirtPresenter Lecture Recording System: Automated Production of Web Lectures with Interactive Content Overviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mertens, Robert; Ketterl, Markus; Vornberger, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Lecture recordings can be a powerful addition to traditional lectures and they can even serve as a main content source in a number of didactic scenarios. If users can quickly locate relevant passages in a recording, the recording combines the ease of search that comes with electronic text based media with the authenticity and wealth of information…

  9. Characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students and lecturers perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hapsari, Trusti; Putri, Dian Permana; Raharjo, Jajo Firman

    2017-05-01

    This study aims to determine the characteristics of good mathematics lecturers based on students' and lecturers' perspectivesand compare the characteristics of good lecturers/ teachers which are in accordance with the findings of some previous studies and the theories. This study is survey study. The Data were collected through questionnaires and interview. The population consists of some mathematics students from the first level through the third level and some mathematics education lecturers of a private university in West Java. Qualitative analysis was undertaken to examine the results of questionnaires and interviews. The finding shows that the characteristic of good mathematics lecturers is inspiring. They can inspire other mathematics lecturers and educators in general. Based on the students and lecturers' perspective, some characteristics of good mathematics lecturers are mastering the materials well, being on time, being objective, understanding the students, presenting the materials with clearly, and being disciplined. Some other characteristic mentioned are: teaching eagerly, being unhurried, being friendly, giving exemplary and preparing the lesson well. These characteristics are not much different from the characteristics described by some previous researchers and some theories of experts, i.e. mastering the subject matters well, pedagogic, and work wholeheartedly.

  10. The USC-OSA Student Chapter: goals and benefits for the optics community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Varela, A. I.; Gargallo, Ana; González Núñez, Héctor; Delgado-García, Tamara; Almaguer-Gómez, Citlalli; Cambronero-López, F.; Flores-Arias, M. T.

    2014-07-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter has been constituted in March 2013 by members of the University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) in Spain and sponsored by The Optical Society of America (OSA). It is formed by five graduate and one undergraduate students with the common interest in Optics and Photonics research and a professor of the USC is also involved as a faculty advisor. We decided to start this group with the aim of involving kids, precollege and undergraduate students in the world of Optics and Photonics. The activities that the USC-OSA Student Chapter members intend to realize are mainly educational tasks for the spreading of knowledge in Photonics by means of basic experiments, demonstrations and lectures by leading researchers and teachers. Most of the needed resources to accomplish these activities are provided by the OSA, such as educational posters and a portable kit for demonstrating Optics to students. At this moment the USC-OSA Student Chapter is carrying out several activities, as educational journeys at the Santiago de Compostela University Hospital Complex (CHUS), where hospitalized children can approach to Optics through some simple experiments and games. A teaching program is also being organized in collaboration with Galician secondary schools in order to show students the importance and uses of Optics and Photonics and to arouse their interest in this field, as well as encouraging them to develop their scientific thinking. Another activity will take place in November during the Science Week, which includes a program of lectures targeted to undergraduate students and an exposition of several demonstrations

  11. Fabrication and characterization of americium, neptunium and curium bearing MOX fuels obtained by powder metallurgy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebreton, Florent; Prieur, Damien; Jankowiak, Aurélien; Tribet, Magaly; Leorier, Caroline; Delahaye, Thibaud; Donnet, Louis; Dehaudt, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    MOX fuel pellets containing up to 1.4 wt% of Minor Actinides (MA), i.e. Am, Np and Cm, were fabricated to demonstrate the technical feasibility of powder metallurgy process involving, pelletizing and sintering in controlled atmosphere. The compounds were then characterized using XRD, SEM and EDX/EPMA. Dense pellets were obtained which closed porosity mean size is equal to 7 μm. The results indicate the formation of (U, Pu)O 2 solid solution. However, microstructure contains some isolated UO 2 grains. The distribution of Am and Cm appears to be homogeneous whereas Np was found to be clustered at some locations.

  12. Materials for Advanced Turbine Engines. Volume 1; Power Metallurgy Rene 95 Rotating Turbine Engine Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfouts, W. R.; Shamblen, C. E.; Mosier, J. S.; Peebles, R. E.; Gorsler, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt was made to improve methods for producing powder metallurgy aircraft gas turbine engine parts from the nickel base superalloy known as Rene 95. The parts produced were the high pressure turbine aft shaft for the CF6-50 engine and the stages 5 through 9 compressor disk forgings for the CFM56/F101 engines. A 50% cost reduction was achieved as compared to conventional cast and wrought processing practices. An integrated effort involving several powder producers and a major forging source were included.

  13. An Overview of Internal Fixation Implant Metallurgy and Galvanic Corrosion Effects.

    PubMed

    Koh, Justin; Berger, Aaron; Benhaim, Prosper

    2015-08-01

    Orthopedic and hand surgery implants for internal fixation of fractures have evolved substantially over the past 50 years. Newer metal compositions have been used, and new standards have been applied to older alloys, resulting in modern implants with unique physical properties and better clinical performances. Conventional wisdom has long dictated that implanting different metals should be avoided, but few guidelines exist regarding the safety of using in proximity implant systems of dissimilar metals. To better characterize the landscape of internal fixation implant metallurgy, we have compiled the recommendations and conclusions of the currently available and pertinent literature.

  14. Physical metallurgy: Scientific school of the Academician V.M. Schastlivtsev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabatchikova, T. I.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is to honor Academician Vadim Mikhailovich Schastlivtsev, a prominent scientist in the field of metal physics and materials science. The article comprises an analysis of the topical issues of the physical metallurgy of the early 21st century and of the contribution of V.M. Schastlivtsev and of his school to the science of phase and structural transformations in steels. In 2015, Vadim Mikhailovich celebrates his 80th birthday, and this paper is timed to this honorable date. The list of his main publications is given in it.

  15. Dose and Dose Risk Caused by Natural Phenomena - Proposed Powder Metallurgy Core Manufacturing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, W.G.

    2001-08-16

    The offsite radiological effects from high velocity straight winds, tornadoes, and earthquakes have been estimated for a proposed facility for manufacturing enriched uranium fuel cores by powder metallurgy. Projected doses range up to 30 mrem/event to the maximum offsite individual for high winds and up to 85 mrem/event for very severe earthquakes. Even under conservative assumptions on meteorological conditions, the maximum offsite dose would be about 20 per cent of the DOE limit for accidents involving enriched uranium storage facilities. The total dose risk is low and is dominated by the risk from earthquakes. This report discusses this test.

  16. Accelerated Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of an Aluminum Powder Metallurgy Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piascik, Robert S.; Newman, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Fatigue crack growth (FCG) research conducted in the near threshold regime has identified a room temperature creep crack growth damage mechanism for a fine grain powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloy (8009). At very low DK, an abrupt acceleration in room temperature FCG rate occurs at high stress ratio (R = Kmin/Kmax). The near threshold accelerated FCG rates are exacerbated by increased levels of Kmax (Kmax less than 0.4 KIC). Detailed fractographic analysis correlates accelerated FCG with the formation of crack-tip process zone micro-void damage. Experimental results show that the near threshold and Kmax influenced accelerated crack growth is time and temperature dependent.

  17. Microstructures and mechanical properties of hot isostatically pressed powder metallurgy Alloy APK-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, T. L.; Chari, Y. N.; Rao, E. S. Bhagiradha; Thamburaj, R.

    1983-03-01

    The influence of Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and heat treatment parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of powder metallurgy alloy APK-1 (a low carbon modification of Astroloy) has been investigated. Poor mechanical properties result if carbide networks are present along the prior particle boundaries (PPBs). These networks which form during powder consolidation can be avoided by manipulating HIP parameters. Heat treatments which produce a large volume fraction of fine γ’ make this alloy susceptible to environment-assisted tensile embrittlement around 760 °C.

  18. Chapter 10: CPV Multijunction Solar Cell Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Siefer, Gerald

    2016-04-15

    Characterization of solar cells can be divided into two types: the first is measurement of electrooptical semiconductor device parameters, and the second is determination of electrical conversion efficiency. This chapter reviews the multijunction concepts that are necessary for understanding Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cell characterization techniques, and describes how CPV efficiency is defined and used. For any I-V measurement of a multijunction cell, the sun simulator spectrum has to be adjusted in a way that all junctions generate the same photocurrent ratios with respect to each other as under reference conditions. The chapter discusses several procedures for spectral irradiance adjustments of solar simulators, essential for multijunction measurements. It overviews the light sources and optics commonly used in simulators for CPV cells under concentration. Finally, the chapter talks about the cell area, quantum efficiency (QE), and current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements that are needed to characterize cells as a function of irradiance.

  19. Chapter A5. Processing of Water Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1999-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) describes protocols and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses methods to be used in processing water samples to be analyzed for inorganic and organic chemical substances, including the bottling of composite, pumped, and bailed samples and subsamples; sample filtration; solid-phase extraction for pesticide analyses; sample preservation; and sample handling and shipping. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters will be announced on the USGS Home Page on the World Wide Web under 'New Publications of the U.S. Geological Survey.' The URL for this page is http:/ /water.usgs.gov/lookup/get?newpubs.

  20. Marine West Coast Forests, Chapter 9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perakis, Steven S.; Geiser, Linda H.; Lilleskov, Erik A.; Pardo, Linda H.; Robin-Abbott, Molly J.; Driscoll, Charles T.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities have greatly increased nitrogen emissions and deposition across large areas of Earth. Although nitrogen is an essential nutrient for plant growth, too much nitrogen in excess of critical loads leads to losses of biodiversity, soil and stream acidification, nutrient imbalances, and other deleterious effects. In a new report quantifying critical loads of nitrogen deposition across the United States, USGS scientist Steve Perakis and co-authors provided a chapter about responses of marine west coast forests. Much of this region is understudied with respect to nitrogen deposition, and in this chapter the authors identify known adverse effects and estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition for western Oregon and Washington and southeast Alaska forests. Perakis also contributed to the synthesis chapter, which includes background, objectives, advantages and uncertainties of critical loads, an overview of critical loads across U.S. ecoregions, and other topics.

  1. Chapter A8. Bottom-Material Samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data(National Field Manual) describes protocols (requirements and recommendations) and provides guidelines for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This release of Chapter A8 provides guidelines for the equipment and procedures needed to collect and process samples of bottom material for the evaluation of surface-water quality. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed April 2005).

  2. Chapter A1. Preparations for Water Sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.; Radtke, Dean B.; Gibs, Jacob; Iwatsubo, Rick T.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. This chapter addresses field-trip preparations, including selection of sample-collection sites for studies of surface-water quality, site reconnaissance and well selection for studies of groundwater quality, and the establishment of electronic files and field files and folders for a sampling site. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/ (accessed Jan. 31, 2005).

  3. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 13, Perpendiculars and Parallels (I), Chapter 14, Similarity. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter of the seventh unit in this SMSG series discusses perpendiculars and parallels; topics covered include the relationship between parallelism and perpendicularity, rectangles, transversals, parallelograms, general triangles, and measurement of the circumference of the earth. The second chapter, on similarity, discusses scale…

  4. [Biennial Survey of Education, 1926-1928. Bulletin, 1930, No. 16. Chapter I - Chapter XX

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Education, United States Department of the Interior, 1930

    1930-01-01

    This document contains the first twenty chapters of the Biennial Survey of Education document, covering the years 1926-1928. The following chapters are included in this document: (1) Higher education (Arthur J. Klein); (2) Medical education (N. P. Colwell); (3) Legal education (Alfred Z. Reed); (4) Significant movements in city school systems (W.…

  5. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 23, Quadratic Functions, Chapter 24, Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    The first chapter in the twelfth unit of this SMSG series deals with the following topics involving quadratic functions: parabolas, translations of the parabola, completing the square, solving quadratic equations, "falling body" functions, and the use of quadratics in solving other equations. The chapter on statistics discusses…

  6. Secondary School Mathematics, Chapter 27, Logic, Chapter 28, Applications of Probability and Statistics. Student's Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanford Univ., CA. School Mathematics Study Group.

    One chapter in the fourteenth unit of this SMSG series deals with logic; simple and compound statements, truth tables, logical equivalence, rules of a logical argument, proof, quantifiers, and negations are the topics covered. The second chapter of the unit discusses applications of probability and statistics, including random sampling,…

  7. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Background Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. Methods A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8–12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Results Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p < 0.001). The observed higher-order lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were

  8. Electronic voting to encourage interactive lectures: a randomised trial.

    PubMed

    Duggan, Paul M; Palmer, Edward; Devitt, Peter

    2007-07-27

    Electronic Voting Systems have been used for education in a variety of disciplines. Outcomes from these studies have been mixed. Because results from these studies have been mixed, we examined whether an EVS system could enhance a lecture's effect on educational outcomes. A cohort of 127 Year 5 medical students at the University of Adelaide was stratified by gender, residency status and academic record then randomised into 2 groups of 64 and 63 students. Each group received consecutive 40-minute lectures on two clinical topics. One group received the EVS for both topics. The other group received traditional teaching only. Evaluation was undertaken with two, 15-question multiple-choice questionnaires (MCQ) assessing knowledge and problem solving and undertaken as a written paper immediately before and after the lectures and repeated online 8-12 weeks later. Standardised institutional student questionnaires were completed for each lecture and independent observers assessed student behaviour during the lectures. Lecturer's opinions were assessed by a questionnaire developed for this study. Two-thirds of students randomised to EVS and 59% of students randomised to traditional lectures attended. One-half of the students in the EVS group and 41% in the traditional group completed all questionnaires. There was no difference in MCQ scores between EVS and traditional lectures (p = 0.785). The cervical cancer lectures showed higher student ranking in favour of EVS in all parameters. The breast cancer lectures showed higher ranking in favour of traditional lectures in 5 of 7 parameters (p < 0.001). The observed higher-order lecturer-students interactions were increased in the EVS lecture for one lecturer and reduced for the other. Both lecturers felt that the EVS lectures were difficult to prepare, that they were able to keep to time in the traditional lectures, that the educational value of both lecture styles was similar, and that they were neutral-to-slightly favourably

  9. [Ophthalmology lectures from the students' point of view].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, H

    2013-12-01

    Lectures with many participants are considered inefficient and ophthalmology is seen as "not so important" for those studying medicine. We wondered about the students' view on this subject. During the last lesson of a two-week-series of lectures together with the written test, 337 students of two consecutive semesters received a questionnaire with specific questions concerning ophthalmology lectures. 257 questionnaires (76 %) were returned. The students claimed that the lecture itself contributed most of the knowledge for their later medical practice, more than books, scripts, internet etc. Interactivity was welcome, audience response systems were appreciated. Personal contact to the lecturers was considered less important, a variation of the lecturers was considered advantageous. It would be seen as a serious loss if the ophthalmology lecture were abolished. These results contradict clearly the concept of the unimportance of lectures with many participants and contradict as well tendencies not to teach "small" specialties in separate lectures. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. The Web-Lecture - a viable alternative to the traditional lecture format?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibom, S.

    2004-12-01

    Educational research shows that students learn best in an environment with emphasis on teamwork, problem-solving, and hands-on experience. Still professors spend the majority of their time with students in the traditional lecture-hall setting where the combination of large classes and limited time prevents sufficient student-teacher interaction to foster an active learning environment. Can modern computer technology be used to provide "lecture-type" information to students via the World Wide Web? If so, will that help professors make better and/or different use of their scheduled time with the students? Answering these questions was the main motivation for the Extra-Solar Planet Project. The Extra-Solar Planet Project was designed to test the effectiveness of a lecture available to the student on the World Wide Web (Web-Lecture) and to engage the students in an active learning environment were their use the information presented in the Web-Lecture. The topic of the Web-Lecture was detection of extra-solar planets and the project was implemented into an introductory astronomy course at University of Wisconsin Madison in the spring of 2004. The Web-Lecture was designed to give an interactive presentation of synchronized video, audio and lecture notes. It was created using the eTEACH software developed at the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Engineering. In my talk, I will describe the project, show excerpts of the Web-Lecture, and present assessments of student learning and results of student evaluations of the web-lecture format.

  11. Explicit constructivism: a missing link in ineffective lectures?

    PubMed

    Prakash, E S

    2010-06-01

    This study tested the possibility that interactive lectures explicitly based on activating learners' prior knowledge and driven by a series of logical questions might enhance the effectiveness of lectures. A class of 54 students doing the respiratory system course in the second year of the Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery program in my university was randomized to two groups to receive one of two types of lectures, "typical" lectures (n = 28, 18 women and 10 men) or "constructivist" lectures (n = 26, 19 women and 7 men), on the same topic: the regulation of respiration. Student pretest scores in the two groups were comparable (P > 0.1). Students that received the constructivist lectures did much better in the posttest conducted immediately after the lectures (6.8 +/- 3.4 for constructivist lectures vs. 4.2 +/- 2.3 for typical lectures, means +/- SD, P = 0.004). Although both types of lectures were well received, students that received the constructivist lectures appeared to have been more satisfied with their learning experience. However, on a posttest conducted 4 mo later, scores obtained by students in the two groups were not any different (6.9 +/- 3 for constructivist lectures vs. 6.9 +/- 3.7 for typical lectures, P = 0.94). This study adds to the increasing body of evidence that there is a case for the use of interactive lectures that make the construction of knowledge and understanding explicit, easy, and enjoyable to learners.

  12. A survey of first-year biology student opinions regarding live lectures and recorded lectures as learning tools.

    PubMed

    Simcock, D C; Chua, W H; Hekman, M; Levin, M T; Brown, S

    2017-03-01

    A cohort of first-year biology students was surveyed regarding their opinions and viewing habits for live and recorded lectures. Most respondents (87%) attended live lectures as a rule (attenders), with 66% attending more than two-thirds of the lectures. In contrast, only 52% accessed recordings and only 13% viewed more than two-thirds of the available recordings. Respondents regarded lectures as efficient for information delivery (75%), and 89% enjoyed live lectures because they were useful for learning (89%), understanding coursework (94%), and keeping up with the subject (93%). Lecture enjoyment was driven less by entertainment (34%) or interaction with the lecturers (47%), although most students preferred an entertaining lecturer to a factual expert (72%). Exam marks were positively correlated with the number of lectures attended (P < 0.001) and negatively correlated with the number of recordings viewed (P < 0.05), although marks were similar for lecture attenders and nonattenders (P > 0.05). Lecture attenders mostly missed lectures to complete assessments during the same week (68%), whereas nonattenders were more likely to miss lectures due to outside commitments or preference for study from books or recorded lectures (P < 0.001). Recordings were used to replace missed lectures (64%), rather than for revision, and were viewed mostly alone (96%) in one sitting (65%). Only 22% of respondents agreed that some lectures could be replaced by recordings, but 59% agreed with having some videoconference lectures from experts on another campus. Overall, this cohort showed a clear preference for live lectures over recordings, with limited support for synchronous videoconference lectures. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Chapter 4. Work Through the Valley: Plan

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Loretta; Meade, Barbara; Koegel, Paul; Lucas-Wright, Aziza; Young-Brinn, Angela; Terry, Chrystene; Norris, Keith

    2016-01-01

    This first of three chapters on the Valley stage, or main work of a Community-Partnered Participatory Research (CPPR) initiative, concerns the planning phase of the work cycle. The main goal of this phase is to develop an action plan, which clarifies the goals, methods, responsible individuals, and timeline for doing the work. Further, this chapter reviews approaches, such as creativity and use of humor, that help level the playing field and assure community co-leadership with academic partners in developing effective action plans. PMID:20088079

  14. CHRONICLE: First All-Union Conference on Laser Metallurgy and Laser-Plasma Processing, Moscow, November 20-22, 1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    An opportunity to improve the quality and to impart fundamentally new physicochemical properties to surface layers of inorganic materials by interaction with laser radiation is of major scientific and practical importance in modern metallurgy, machine construction, and leading branches of new technology. The main topics at the First All-Union Conference on Laser Metallurgy and Laser-Plasma Processing were an improvement in the quality of metals for machine construction, protection of metals from corrosion, increase of wear resistance of products, fabrication of integrated microcircuits from semiconductors, and development of energy-saving and ecologically clean manufacturing processes.

  15. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Lesley J.; Joyce, Domino A.

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems (‘clickers’) are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students’ personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation. PMID:26594327

  16. Interactive lectures: Clickers or personal devices?

    PubMed

    Morrell, Lesley J; Joyce, Domino A

    2015-01-01

    Audience response systems ('clickers') are frequently used to promote participation in large lecture classes, and evidence suggests that they convey a number of benefits to students, including improved academic performance and student satisfaction. The limitations of these systems (such as limited access and cost) can be overcome using students' personal electronic devices, such as mobile phones, tablets and laptops together with text message, web- or app-based polling systems. Using questionnaires, we compare student perceptions of clicker and smartphone based polling systems. We find that students prefer interactive lectures generally, but those that used their own device preferred those lectures over lectures using clickers. However, device users were more likely to report using their devices for other purposes (checking email, social media etc.) when they were available to answer polling questions. These students did not feel that this distracted them from the lecture, instead, concerns over the use of smartphones centred around increased battery usage and inclusivity for students without access to suitable technology. Our results suggest that students generally preferred to use their own devices over clickers, and that this may be a sensible way to overcome some of the limitations associated with clickers, although issues surrounding levels of distraction and the implications for retention and recall of information need further investigation.

  17. Do prerecorded lecture VODcasts affect lecture attendance of first-yearpre-clinical Graduate Entry to Medicine students?

    PubMed

    Rae, Mark G; O'Malley, Dervla

    2017-03-01

    There is increasing concern amongst educators that the provision of recorded lectures may reduce student attendance of live lectures. We therefore sought to determine if the provision of prerecorded lecture video podcasts (VODcasts) to first-year Graduate Entry to Medicine (GEM) students, affected attendance at 21 Physiology lectures within three separate pre-clinical modules. Data on lecture attendance, utilization of VODcasts, and whether VODcasts should replace live lectures were drawn from three surveys conducted in academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 on all first-year GEM students in two first-year pre-clinical modules where prerecorded Physiology VODcasts were available for viewing or downloading prior to scheduled live lectures. A total of 191/214 (89%) students responded to the three surveys, with 84.3% of students attending all 21 lectures in the study. Only 4% of students missed more than one lecture in each of the three lecture series, with 79% indicating that VODcasts should not replace lectures. Therefore, we conclude that the attendance of pre-clinical GEM students at live lectures is not significantly impacted upon by the provision of lecture VODcasts, with most students viewing them as useful revision tools rather than as a replacement for live lectures.

  18. Fundamentals of Physics, Part 5 (Chapters 38-44)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halliday, David; Resnick, Robert; Walker, Jearl

    2004-05-01

    Chapter 38. Photons and Matter Waves. Chapter 39. More About Matter Waves. Chapter 40. All About Atoms. Chapter 41. Conduction of Electricity in Solids. Chapter 42. Nuclear Physics. Chapter 43. Energy from the Nucleus. Chapter 44. Quarks, Leptons, and the Big Bang. Appendix A: The International System of Units (SI). Appendix B: Some Fundamental Constants of Physics. Appendix C: Some Astronomical Data. Appendix D: Conversion Factors. Appendix E: Mathematical Formulas. Appendix F: Properties of the Elements. Appendix G: Periodic Tables of the Elements. Answers to Checkpoints and Odd-Numbered Questions, Exercises, and Problems. Index.

  19. On performing concepts during science lectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzer-Ardenghi, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2007-01-01

    When lecturing, teachers make use of both verbal and nonverbal communication. What is called teaching, therefore, involves not only the words and sentences a teacher utters and writes on the board during a lesson, but also all the hands/arms gestures, body movements, and facial expressions a teacher performs in the classroom. All of these communicative modalities constitute resources that are made available to students for making sense of and learning from lectures. Yet in the literature on teaching science, these other means of communication are little investigated and understood - and, correspondingly, they are undertheorized. The purpose of this position paper is to argue for a different view of concepts in lectures: they are performed simultaneously drawing on and producing multiple resources that are different expressions of the same holistic meaning unit. To support our point, we provide examples from a database of 26 lectures in a 12th-grade biology class, where the human body was the main topic of study. We analyze how different types of resources - including verbal and nonverbal discourse and various material artifacts - interact during lectures. We provide evidence for the unified production of these various sense-making resources during teaching to constitute a meaning unit, and we emphasize particularly the use of gestures and body orientations inside this meaning unit. We suggest that proper analyses of meaning units need to take into account not only language and diagrams but also a lecturer's pointing and depicting gestures, body positions, and the relationships between these different modalities. Scientific knowledge (conceptions) exists in the concurrent display of all sense-making resources, which we, following Vygotsky, understand as forming a unit (identity) of nonidentical entities.

  20. Chapter 8: Youth, Technology, and Media Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2006-01-01

    This chapter begins with a scenario contrasting two seemingly different images of child and media from before and after the "digital revolution." The author argues that there is much greater continuity in how this relationship has been conceptualized over the period than is commonly imagined. While not offering a comprehensive study of recent…

  1. Chapter 10:Hardwoods for timber bridges

    Treesearch

    James P. Wacker; Ed T. Cesa

    2005-01-01

    This chapter describes the joint efforts of the Forest Service and the FHWA to administer national programs including research, demonstration bridges, and technology transfer components. Summary information on a number of Forest Service-WIT demonstration bridges constructed with hardwoods is also provided.

  2. Chapter 2:Basic properties of undervalued hardwoods

    Treesearch

    John I. Zerbe

    2005-01-01

    Among the most abundant of our undervalued hardwoods are the soft maples. However, other species that are also underutilized include some species of birch and some lower grades of the hard maples. This chapter covers physical, mechanical, and other important properties of different soft maples, hard maples, and yellow birch and compares them with the properties of...

  3. Chapter 9. Benefits of International Collaboration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, we share what we have learned from working with our Brazilian colleagues on a multi university, multiyear, and multi basin ecological assessment and how those experiences were transmitted more broadly. These lessons (each of which is described in subsequent parag...

  4. Decision Support for Ecosystem Management (Chapter 28)

    Treesearch

    Keith Reynolds; Jennifer Bjork; Rachel Riemann Hershey; Dan Schmoldt; John Payne; Susan King; Lee DeCola; Mark J. Twery; Pat Cunningham

    1999-01-01

    This chapter presents a management perspective on decision support for ecosystem management.The Introduction provides a brief historical overview of decision support technology as it has been used in natural resource management, discusses the role of decision support in ecosystem management as we see it, and summarizes the current state of the technology.

  5. Other pospiviroids infecting Solanaceous plants (Book Chapter)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aside from potato spindle tuber viroid, the genus Pospiviroid contains several agents reported to naturally infect solanaceous crops (e.g. tomato, potato, pepper) or ornamental plants (e.g. Petunia hybrida, Solanum spp., Brugmansia spp.). The present chapter focuses on the following so-called solana...

  6. Chapter 9. Benefits of International Collaboration

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this chapter, we share what we have learned from working with our Brazilian colleagues on a multi university, multiyear, and multi basin ecological assessment and how those experiences were transmitted more broadly. These lessons (each of which is described in subsequent parag...

  7. Recommended Research on Artificial Gravity. Chapter 13

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos, Joan; Paloski, William; Fuller, Charles; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    Based on the summaries presented in the above sections of what is still to be learned on the effects of artificial gravity on human functions, this chapter will discuss the short- and long-term steps of research required to understand fundamentals and to validate operational aspects of using artificial gravity as an effective countermeasure for long-duration space travel.

  8. Life cycle analysis of biochar [Chapter 3

    Treesearch

    Richard D. Bergman; Hongmei Gu; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; Nathaniel M. Anderson

    2017-01-01

    All products, including bioproducts, have an impact on the environment by consuming resources and releasing emissions during their production. Biochar, a bioproduct, has received considerable attention because of its potential to sequester carbon in soil while enhancing productivity, thus aiding sustainable supply chain development. In this chapter, the environmental...

  9. Parent Involvement in Local Chapter 1 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jay, E. Deborah; Shields, Patrick M.

    This report focuses on the involvement of parents in local projects funded under Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act and Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. It researches the kind and extent of involvement, the impact of state and local factors on it, and the effect of the change from Title I to Chapter…

  10. Chapter 7: Materials for Launch Vehicle Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henson, Grant; Jone, Clyde S. III

    2017-01-01

    This chapter concerns materials for expendable and reusable launch vehicle (LV) structures. An emphasis is placed on applications and design requirements, and how these requirements are met by the optimum choice of materials. Structural analysis and qualification strategies, which cannot be separated from the materials selection process, are described.

  11. Chapter 1 Schoolwide Project Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, E. Allen; Beckstrom, Sharon

    Chapter 1 schoolwide projects are intended to serve educationally disadvantaged students by improving the instructional program provided to all students in high-poverty schools. This report provides a comprehensive look at schoolwide projects in the 1991-92 school year, using data from surveys of all schoolwide project schools. The response rate…

  12. Chapter 10. Dynamics of subalpine forests

    Treesearch

    Dennis H. Knight

    1994-01-01

    The boreal owl's fairly specific habitat requirements restrict its range in the conterminous U.S. to subalpine forests (see Chapter 9). These forests provide tree cavities, uncrusted snow that facilitates preying on small mammals, and cool microclimates essential for summer roosting. Such forests also provide habitat for the owl's prey which consists...

  13. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  14. Chapter 2. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This second chapter focuses on an analysis of the aspects that characterize the typical content of students' attitudes toward the world of computers. In this connection, it attempts to determine what is of the greatest interest to students as they deal with the world of computers, which types of programs they use, and which magazines they read…

  15. Effective Chapter 1 Programs in Oregon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrum, Phyllis

    This report describes 11 effective compensatory education programs in Oregon schools funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. One high school, four middle school, and six elementary school programs are profiled. Each profile includes the following information: (1) demographics; (2) staffing; (3) parent…

  16. Meadow management and treatment options [chapter 8

    Treesearch

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Jerry R. Miller

    2011-01-01

    Restoration and management objectives and approaches are most effective when based on an understanding of ecosystem processes and the long- and short-term causes of disturbance (Wohl and others 2005). As detailed in previous chapters, several factors are critical in developing effective management strategies for streams and their associated meadow ecosystems in the...

  17. The Chapter I Challenge: Colorado's Contribution 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Janice Rose

    Chapter I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) is the largest federally-funded program designed to provide services to elementary and secondary students to meet the special needs of educationally deprived students who reside in areas with high concentrations of low-income families. The 1994-95 school year is the last year of…

  18. Chapter 3: Status and trends of vegetation

    Treesearch

    James M. Guldin; Frank R. Thompson; Lynda L. Richards; Kyra C. Harper

    1999-01-01

    This chapter provides information about the vegetation cover of the Assessment area. The types and areal extent of vegetation in the Highlands are of interest for many reasons. Vegetation cover largely determines the availability of habitat for terrestrial animals, plants, and other organisms. Vegetation cover strongly influences what uses {e.g., timber, forage,...

  19. Chapter 3. Current management situation: Flammulated owls

    Treesearch

    Jon Verner

    1994-01-01

    The flammulated owl (Otus flammeolus) is a western mountain species associated mainly with ponderosa (Pinus ponderosa) and Jeffrey pine (Pinus jefferyi) forests in the United States and Canada (see Chapter 4). As a neotropical migrant, this small forest owl occurs on national forests in the United States during...

  20. Chapter 8. Current management situation: Boreal owls

    Treesearch

    Jon Verner

    1994-01-01

    The range of boreal owls (Aegolius funereus) in the United States includes Alaska, the mountains of the western United States, and the northern tier states from the Atlantic to Pacific (see Chapter 9). Based on the species' documented distribution (see National Geographic Society 1987, Hayward et al. 1987, Johnsgard 1988, and others) the owl may...

  1. Landscape genomics: A brief perspective [Chapter 9

    Treesearch

    Michael K. Schwartz; Gordon Luikart; Kevin S. McKelvey; Samuel A. Cushman

    2010-01-01

    Landscape genetics is the amalgamation of population genetics and landscape ecology (see Manel et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2007). In Chapter 17, we discuss landscape genetics and provide two examples of applications in the area of modeling population connectivity and inferring fragmentation. These examples, like virtually all extant landscape genetic analyses, were...

  2. Science, practice, and place [Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Daniel R. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Place-oriented inquiry and practice are proposed as keys to overcoming the persistent gap between science and practice. This chapter begins by describing some of the reasons science fails to simplify conservation practice, highlighting the challenges associated with the social and ecological sciences of multi-scaled complexity. Place concepts help scientists and...

  3. Chapter 4. Arceuthobium in North America

    Treesearch

    F. G. Hawksworth; D. Wiens; B. W. Geils

    2002-01-01

    The biology, pathology, and systematics of dwarf mistletoes are recently and well reviewed in Hawksworth and Wiens (1996). That monograph forms the basis for the text in this and chapter 5 and should be consulted for more information (for example, references, photographs, and distribution maps). In addition to extracting the information that would be most relevant to...

  4. Chapter 1 Migrant Education Program: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kauffman, Thomas B.; And Others

    This report documents the implementation of the migrant education program funded under Chapter 1 of the Education Consolidation Improvement Act in the Houston (Texas) Independent School District and evaluates the program's impact on student achievement, grades, conduct, and attendance. The program offered assistance to eligible migrant children…

  5. Chapter 12: spatial or area repellents

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spatial repellents a three-dimensional zone of protection around a host from attacks by biting arthropods. This chapter reviews current knowledge and outlines future directions for utilization of spatial repellents. Current knowledge includes the kinds of products, both active and passive devices,...

  6. Invasive species in southern Nevada [Chapter 4

    Treesearch

    Mathew L. Brooks; Steven M. Ostoja; Jeanne C. Chambers

    2013-01-01

    Southern Nevada contains a wide range of topographies, elevations, and climatic zones emblematic of its position at the ecotone between the Mojave Desert, Great Basin, and Colorado Plateau ecoregions. These varied environmental conditions support a high degree of biological diversity (Chapter 1), but they also provide opportunities for a wide range of invasive species...

  7. Adaptation strategies and approaches: Chapter 2

    Treesearch

    Patricia Butler; Chris Swanston; Maria Janowiak; Linda Parker; Matt St. Pierre; Leslie. Brandt

    2012-01-01

    A wealth of information is available on climate change adaptation, but much of it is very broad and of limited use at the finer spatial scales most relevant to land managers. This chapter contains a "menu" of adaptation actions and provides land managers in northern Wisconsin with a range of options to help forest ecosystems adapt to climate change impacts....

  8. Chapter 13, Policy options: North America

    Treesearch

    Jane Barr; James Dobrowolski; John Campbell; Philippe Le Prestre; Lori Lynch; Marc Sydnor; Robert Adler; Jose Etcheverry; Alexander Kenny; Catherine Hallmich; Jim Lazar; Russell M. Meyer; Robin Newmark; Janet Peace; Julie A. Suhr Pierce; Stephen. Yamasaki

    2012-01-01

    As previously indicated, GEO-5 shifts the GEO focus from identifying environmental problems to identifying solutions that governments can then prioritize. This chapter provides examples of a number of policy options and market mechanisms that have shown some success in improving environmental conditions in North America. They are organized by priority environmental...

  9. Chapter 3. Fresh Meat Texture and Tenderness

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This book chapter summarizes the current state of knowledge of meat tenderness and the antemortem and postmortem strategies that can be used to influence meat tenderness. Tenderness is critical to the consumer acceptance of meat products. Numerous antemortem and postmortem factors can impact tende...

  10. Chapter 2. Adolescents' Attitudes toward the Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This second chapter focuses on an analysis of the aspects that characterize the typical content of students' attitudes toward the world of computers. In this connection, it attempts to determine what is of the greatest interest to students as they deal with the world of computers, which types of programs they use, and which magazines they read…

  11. Addressing uncertainty in vulnerability assessments [Chapter 5

    Treesearch

    Linda Joyce; Molly Cross; Evan Girvatz

    2011-01-01

    This chapter addresses issues and approaches for dealing with uncertainty specifically within the context of conducting climate change vulnerability assessments (i.e., uncertainties related to identifying and modeling the sensitivities, levels of exposure, and adaptive capacity of the assessment targets).

  12. Chapter 4. Students' Attitudes toward Computer Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russian Education and Society, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors attempt not only to discern aspects that relate to age, place, and the amount of time devoted to playing computer games in adolescence, but also to study content characteristics of their attitudes such as: the developmental dynamic in the change of their genre preferences in computer games, changes in factors that…

  13. Chapter 6. available lepidopteran insect cell lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This chapter lists the known cell lines from Lepidoptera, largely based on previous compilations of insect cell lines published by W. Fred Hink. More than 320 lines from 65 species are listed. The official designation is given for each cell line as well as the species, tissue source, and, when kno...

  14. Forest management practices and silviculture. Chapter 12.

    Treesearch

    Donald A. Perala; Elon S. Verry

    2011-01-01

    This chapter is an overview of forest management and silviculture practices, and lessons learned, on the Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The forests there are a mosaic of natural regeneration and conifer plantations. Verry (1969) described forest-plant communities in detail for the study watersheds (Sl through S6) on the MEF. The remaining area is described in...

  15. Environmental legacy of copper metallurgy and Mongol silver smelting recorded in Yunnan Lake sediments.

    PubMed

    Hillman, Aubrey L; Abbott, Mark B; Yu, JunQing; Bain, Daniel J; Chiou-Peng, TzeHuey

    2015-03-17

    Geochemical measurements on well-dated sediment cores from Lake Er (Erhai) are used to determine the timing of changes in metal concentrations over 4500 years in Yunnan, a borderland region in southwestern China noted for rich mineral deposits but with inadequately documented metallurgical history. Our findings add new insight into the impacts and environmental legacy of human exploitation of metal resources in Yunnan history. We observe an increase in copper at 1500 BC resulting from atmospheric emissions associated with metallurgy. These data clarify the chronological issues related to links between the onset of Yunnan metallurgy and the advent of bronze technology in adjacent Southeast Asia, subjects that have been debated for nearly half a century. We also observe an increase from 1100 to 1300 AD in a number of heavy metals including lead, silver, zinc, and cadmium from atmospheric emissions associated with silver smelting. Culminating during the rule of the Mongols, known as the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368 AD), these metal concentrations approach levels three to four times higher than those from industrialized mining activity occurring within the catchment today. Notably, the concentrations of lead approach levels at which harmful effects may be observed in aquatic organisms. The persistence of this lead pollution over time created an environmental legacy that likely contributes to known issues in modern day sediment quality. We demonstrate that historic metallurgical production in Yunnan can cause substantial impacts on the sediment quality of lake systems, similar to other paleolimnological findings around the globe.

  16. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of porous iron prepared by powder metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Capek, Jaroslav; Vojtěch, Dalibor

    2014-10-01

    The demand for porous biodegradable load-bearing implants has been increasing recently. Based on investigations of biodegradable stents, porous iron may be a suitable material for such applications. In this study, we prepared porous iron samples with porosities of 34-51 vol.% by powder metallurgy using ammonium bicarbonate as a space-holder material. We studied sample microstructure (SEM-EDX and XRD), flexural and compressive behaviors (universal loading machine) and hardness HV5 (hardness tester) of the prepared samples. Sample porosity increased with the amount of spacer in the initial mixtures. Only the pore surfaces had insignificant oxidation and no other contamination was observed. Increasing porosity decreased the mechanical properties of the samples; although, the properties were still comparable with human bone and higher than those of porous non-metallic biomaterials and porous magnesium prepared in a similar way. Based on these results, powder metallurgy appears to be a suitable method for the preparation of porous iron for orthopedic applications.

  17. Fractionation study in bioleached metallurgy wastes using six-step sequential extraction.

    PubMed

    Krasnodebska-Ostrega, Beata; Pałdyna, Joanna; Kowalska, Joanna; Jedynak, Łukasz; Golimowski, Jerzy

    2009-08-15

    The stored metallurgy wastes contain residues from ore processing operations that are characterized by relatively high concentrations of heavy metals. The bioleaching process makes use of bacteria to recover elements from industrial wastes and to decrease potential risk of environmental contamination. Wastes were treated by solutions containing bacteria. In this work, the optimized six-stage sequential extraction procedure was applied for the fractionation of Ni, Cr, Fe, Mn, Cu and Zn in iron-nickel metallurgy wastes deposited in Southern Poland (Szklary). Fractionation and total concentrations of elements in wastes before and after various bioleaching treatments were studied. Analyses of the extracts were performed by ICP-MS and FAAS. To achieve the most effective bioleaching of Zn, Cr, Ni, Cu, Mn, Fe the usage of both autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria in sequence, combined with flushing of the residue after bioleaching is required. 80-100% of total metal concentrations were mobilized after the proposed treatment. Wastes treated according to this procedure could be deposited without any risk of environmental contamination and additionally the metals could be recovered for industrial purposes.

  18. Emission of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like PCBs from metallurgy industries in S. Korea.

    PubMed

    Yu, Byeong-Woon; Jin, Guang-Zhu; Moon, Young-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kwan; Kyoung, Jong-Dai; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2006-01-01

    The metallurgy industry and municipal waste incinerators are considered the main sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in many countries. This study investigated the emission factors and total emissions of PCDD/Fs and dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) emitted from metallurgy industries (including ferrous and nonferrous foundries) in Korea. The toxic equivalency (TEQ) emission factor of PCDD/Fs was the highest for secondary copper production, at 24451 ng I-TEQ/ton. The total estimated emissions of PCDD/Fs from these sources were 35.259 g I-TEQ/yr, comprising 0.088 g I-TEQ/yr from ferrous foundries, 31.713 g I-TEQ/yr from copper production, 1.716 g I-TEQ/yr from lead production, 0.111 g I-TEQ/yr from zinc production, and 1.631 g I-TEQ/yr from aluminum production. The total estimated annual amounts of dioxin-like PCBs emitted from these sources were 13.260 g WHO-TEQ/yr, comprising 0.014 g WHO-TEQ/yr from ferrous foundries, 12.675 g WHO-TEQ/yr from copper production, 0.170 g WHO-TEQ/yr from lead production, 0.017 g WHO-TEQ/yr from zinc production, and 0.384 g WHO-TEQ/yr from aluminum production. The highest emission factor was found for secondary copper smelting, at 9770 ng WHO-TEQ/ton.

  19. Mechanisms of fatigue crack retardation following single tensile overloads in powder metallurgy aluminum alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, G. H.; Reynolds, A. P.; Starke, E. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    In ingot metallurgy (IM) alloys, the number of delay cycles following a single tensile overload typically increases from a minimum at an intermediate baseline stress intensity range, Delta-K(B), with decreasing Delta-K(B) approaching threshold and increasing Delta-K(B) approaching unstable fracture to produce a characteristic 'U' shaped curve. Two models have been proposed to explain this behavior. One model is based on the interaction between roughness and plasticity-induced closure, while the other model only utilizes plasticity-induced closure. This article examines these models, using experimental results from constant amplitude and single overload fatigue tests performed on two powder metallurgy (PM) aluminum alloys, AL-905XL and AA 8009. The results indicate that the 'U'-shaped curve is primarily due to plasticity-induced closure, and that the plasticity-induced retardation effect is through-thickness in nature, occurring in both the surface and interior regions. However, the retardation effect is greater at the surface, because the increase in plastic strain at the crack tip and overload plastic zone size are larger in the plane-stress surface regions than in the plane-strain interior regions. These results are not entirely consistent with either of the proposed models.

  20. Development of an extra-high strength powder metallurgy nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    A program was conducted to optimize the composition of NASA IIb-11, an alloy originally developed as a wrought material, for thermal stability and to determine the feasibility for producing the alloy using powder metallurgy techniques. Seven compositions were melted and atomized, hot isostatically pressed, cross rolled to disks and heat treated. Tensile and stress rupture properties from room temperature to 870 C (1600 F) were determined in addition to thermal stability characteristics. Processing variables included hot isostatic pressing parameters and handling, cross rolling procedures and heat treatment cycles. NASA IIb-11E displayed the best combination of overall properties for service as a 760 C (1400 F) disk material. Its composition is 0.06 C, 8.5 Cr, 9.0 Co, 2.0 Mo, 7.1 W, 6.6 Ta, 4.5 Al, 0.75 Ti, 0.5 V, 0.7 Hf, 0.01 B, 0.05 Zr and balance Ni. While the alloy exhibits the highest 760 C (1400 F) rupture strength reported for any powder metallurgy disk alloy to date, additional studies to further evaluate the effects of heat treatment may be required. The alloy is not susceptible to topologically close-packed phase formation during thermal exposure at 870 C (1600 F) for 1,500 hours, but its mechanical property levels are lowered due to grain boundary carbide formation.