Science.gov

Sample records for metastatic bone cancer

  1. Trafficking of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells in Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    at 4wk showing two large metastatic foci, one at each end of the femur . The distal end shows an iatrogenic fracture presumable due to weakness caused...protein (MDA-MB 231 ) were inoculated intracardiacly into athymic mice.; femurs harvested from 1 hr to 6 wk later and analyzed by fluorescence...modifying the bone microenvironment, are needed to improve treatment of osteolytic bone metastases. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, bone, metastasis

  2. Bone targeted therapies in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rajpar, Shanna; Fizazi, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer. About 90% of metastatic patients will develop bone metastases. Bone disease is responsible of pain, deterioration of quality of life and serious bone complications. Proliferation of prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow induces osteoclast activation and osteolysis. Targeting the bone microenvironment reduces morbidity. Relevant preclinical and clinical studies of bone-targeted therapies in castration-resistant prostate cancer were identified in PubMed and clinical trial databases. Different drugs are available or in development that target bone resorption (bisphosphonates, RANK ligand inhibitors), bone formation (endothelin 1 inhibitors), cancer cell migration (SRC-family kinase inhibitors, vascular endothelial growth factor-MET inhibitors), and survival (radiopharmaceuticals). In phase III trials, zoledronic acid, denosumab, and radium-223 were shown to significantly delay skeletal-related events. Radium-223 was also shown to improve overall survival. Biomarkers of bone resorption (urinary N-telopeptide) and bone making (alkaline phosphatase) have an independent prognostic impact. Targeting the bone microenvironment is an important component of castration-resistant prostate cancer management to reduce bone complications and improve overall survival. Biomarkers of bone turnover have an independent prognostic impact.

  3. Targeted Therapies for Myeloma and Metastatic Bone Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Therapies for Myeloma and Metastatic Bone Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-C-0004 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-05-C-0004 TITLE: Targeted Therapies for Myeloma and...findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or

  4. Bone marrow endothelium-targeted therapeutics for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mai, Junhua; Huang, Yi; Mu, Chaofeng; Zhang, Guodong; Xu, Rong; Guo, Xiaojing; Xia, Xiaojun; Volk, David E; Lokesh, Ganesh L; Thiviyanathan, Varatharasa; Gorenstein, David G; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Shen, Haifa

    2014-08-10

    Effective treatment of cancer metastasis to the bone relies on bone marrow drug accumulation. The surface proteins in the bone marrow vascular endothelium provide docking sites for targeted drug delivery. We have developed a thioaptamer that specifically binds to E-selectin that is overexpressed in the vasculature of tumor and inflammatory tissues. In this study, we tested targeted delivery of therapeutic siRNA loaded in the E-selectin thioaptamer-conjugated multistage vector (ESTA-MSV) drug carrier to bone marrow for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastasis. We evaluated tumor type- and tumor growth stage-dependent targeting in mice bearing metastatic breast cancer in the bone, and carried out studies to identify factors that determine targeting efficiency. In a subsequent study, we delivered siRNA to knock down expression of the human STAT3 gene in murine xenograft models of human MDA-MB-231 breast tumor, and assessed therapeutic efficacy. Our studies revealed that the CD31(+)E-selectin(+) population accounted for 20.8%, 26.4% and 29.9% of total endothelial cells respectively inside the femur of mice bearing early, middle and late stage metastatic MDA-MB-231 tumors. In comparison, the double positive cells remained at a basal level in mice with early stage MCF-7 tumors, and jumped to 23.9% and 28.2% when tumor growth progressed to middle and late stages. Accumulation of ESTA-MSV inside the bone marrow correlated with the E-selectin expression pattern. There was up to 5-fold enrichment of the targeted MSV in the bone marrow of mice bearing early or late stage MDA-MB-231 tumors and of mice with late stage, but not early stage, MCF-7 tumors. Targeted delivery of STAT3 siRNA in ESTA-MSV resulted in knockdown of STAT3 expression in 48.7% of cancer cells inside the bone marrow. Weekly systemic administration of ESTA-MSV/STAT3 siRNA significantly extended survival of mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis. In conclusion, targeting the overexpressed E

  5. Kinetics of metastatic breast cancer cell trafficking in bone

    PubMed Central

    Phadke, Pushkar A.; Mercer, Robyn R.; Harms, John F.; Jia, Yujiang; Frost, Andra R.; Jewell, Jennifer L.; Bussard, Karen M.; Nelson, Shakira; Moore, Cynthia; Kappes, John C.; Gay, Carol V.; Mastro, Andrea M.; Welch, Danny R.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose In vivo studies have focused on the latter stages of the bone metastatic process (osteolysis), while little is known about earlier events, e.g., arrival, localization, initial colonization. Defining these initial steps may potentially identify critical points susceptible to therapeutic intervention. Experimental Design MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer cells engineered with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected into the cardiac left ventricle of athymic mice. Femurs were analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR, flow cytometry and histomorphometry at times ranging from 1 hr to 6 wk. Results Single cells were found in distal metaphyses at 1 hr post-injection and remained as single cells up to 72 hr. Diaphyseal arrest occurred rarely and few cells remained there after 24 hr. At 1 wk, numerous foci (2–10 cells) were observed, mostly adjacent to osteoblast-like cells. By 2 wk, fewer but larger foci (≥50 cells) were seen. Most bones had a single large mass at 4 wk (originating from a colony or coalescing foci) which extended into the diaphysis by 4–6 wk. Little change (<20%) in osteoblast or osteoclast numbers was observed at 2 wk; but, at 4–6 wk osteoblasts were dramatically reduced (8% of control), while osteoclasts were reduced modestly (to ~60% of control). Conclusions Early arrest in metaphysis and minimal retention in diaphysis highlight the importance of local milieu in determining metastatic potential. These results extend the Seed and Soil hypothesis by demonstrating both inter- and intra-tissue differences governing metastasis location. Ours is the first in vivo evidence that tumor cells influence not only osteoclasts, as widely believed, but also eliminate functional osteoblasts, thereby restructuring the bone microenvironment to favor osteolysis. The data also explain why bisphosphonates do heal bone despite inhibiting resorption, implying that concurrent strategies that restore osteoblast function are

  6. [One-step method of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy applied in diagnosis of the bone marrow metastatic cancer].

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Ma, Kai

    2013-08-01

    This study was aimed to explore the value of one-step method of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy applied in diagnosis of the bone marrow metastatic cancer. The total of 46 cases of bone marrow metastatic cancer were analyzed retrospectively, and the results of the bone marrow smear and the bone marrow biopsies were compared. The results indicated that the success rate of one-step method of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy was 95.7%. Metastatic carcinoma cells in clumps or clusters with morphological changes were observed in the bone marrow biopsies of the 45 patients (97.8%), but the metastatic carcinoma cell clusters were observed only in bone marrow smears of the 25 patients (54.3%). There were mild to moderate hyperplasia of fibrous tissue in the patients with metastatic cancer. In addition to the 83.3% diagnostic rate of esophageal cancer, the rest diagnostic rate of bone marrow biopsy for metastatic carcinoma was 100%. The diagnostic rate of bone marrow smear for ovarian cancer, lung cancer, gastric cancer, thoracic tumor, sigmoid colon cancer, esophageal cancer and metastatic cancer of unknown primary cancers were 33.3%, 50%, 72.2%, 60%, 50%, 33.3% and 25%, respectively. The diagnostic rate of bone marrow biopsy was higher than that of bone marrow smear. It is concluded that the success rate of drawing specimen by one-step method of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy is high. The bone marrow biopsy is better than that of aspiration in diagnosis of metastatic cancer. Combining biopsy with aspiration can improve the accuracy of diagnosis.

  7. Targeting bone metastatic cancer: Role of the mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Bertoldo, Francesco; Silvestris, Franco; Ibrahim, Toni; Cognetti, Francesco; Generali, Daniele; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Amadori, Dino; Colleoni, Marco Angelo; Conte, Pierfranco; Del Mastro, Lucia; De Placido, Sabino; Ortega, Cinzia; Santini, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    One of the great challenges of cancer medicine is to develop effective treatments for bone metastatic cancer. Most patients with advanced solid tumors will develop bone metastasis and will suffer from skeletal related events associated with this disease. Although some therapies are available to manage symptoms derived from bone metastases, an effective treatment has not been developed yet. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates cell growth and survival. Alterations in mTOR signaling have been associated with pathological malignancies, including bone metastatic cancer. Inhibition of mTOR signaling might therefore be a promising alternative for bone metastatic cancer management. This review summarizes the current knowledge on mTOR pathway signaling in bone tissue and provides an overview on the known effects of mTOR inhibition in bone cancer, both in in vitro and in vivo models.

  8. Prostate Cancer With Metastatic Lytic Bone Lesions: Positive Bone Scan Post Docetaxel Chemotherapy in the Setting of Clinically Successful Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Victoria Yvonne; Domino, Paula M.; Sutkowski, Raymond; Stillings, Stephanie A.; Trejo-Lopez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment of metastatic bone prostate cancer with Docetaxel chemotherapy per CHAARTED trial is standard of care. Timing of CT and bone scintigraphy for evaluation of successful treatment of lytic lesions is not available in the literature. We present a case of a 70 year old male with PSA of 586 and wide spread metastatic bone lytic lesions, who underwent androgen deprivation therapy and six cycles of Docetaxel chemotherapy. The patient had clinically successful treatment. Contrast enhanced CT scan demonstrated sclerotic bone lesions with PSA 2.5 at this point in treatment; however, 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy remained positive for metastatic lesions. PMID:27169018

  9. Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 .TITLE: Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...the compound (Figure 1 ). The inhibitor was slightly more effective in T-47D cells than in MCF-7 cells, but did not eradicate dormant clones much past

  10. Metastatic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... stop the growth of primary and metastatic cancer cells. This research includes finding ways to help your immune system ... the steps in the process that allow cancer cells to spread. Visit the Metastatic Cancer Research page to stay informed of ongoing research funded ...

  11. Role of stromal cell-derived factor 1α pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nisha; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. The primary site of metastasis from prostate cancers is the bone. During the last decade, multiple studies have pointed to the role of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α)/CXCR4 axis in the metastatic spread of the disease, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are still incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of the SDF1α/CXCR4 pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of disrupting the interaction between prostate tumor cells and bone environment with focus on the SDF1α pathway. PMID:27533927

  12. Potential synergistic implications for stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals in bone-metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Genetic heterogeneity and chemotherapy-resistant ‘stem cells' represent two of the most pressing issues in devising new strategies for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Though curative strategies have long been present for men with localized disease, metastatic prostate cancer is currently incurable. Though substantial improvements in outcomes are now possible through the utilization of newly approved therapies, novel combinations are clearly needed. Herein we describe potentially synergistic interactions between bone stromal-targeted radiopharmaceuticals and other therapies for treatment of bone-metastatic prostate cancer. Radiation has long been known to synergize with cytotoxic chemotherapies and recent data also suggest the possibility of synergy when combining radiation and immune-based strategies. Combination therapies will be required to substantially improve survival for men with castrate-resistant metastatic prostate cancer and we hypothesize that bone-targeted radiopharmaceuticals will play an important role in this process. PMID:21499278

  13. In Vitro Co-Culture Models of Breast Cancer Metastatic Progression towards Bone

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Chiara; Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Advanced breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone through a multistep process involving the detachment of cells from the primary tumor, their intravasation into the bloodstream, adhesion to the endothelium and extravasation into the bone, culminating with the establishment of a vicious cycle causing extensive bone lysis. In recent years, the crosstalk between tumor cells and secondary organs microenvironment is gaining much attention, being indicated as a crucial aspect in all metastatic steps. To investigate the complex interrelation between the tumor and the microenvironment, both in vitro and in vivo models have been exploited. In vitro models have some advantages over in vivo, mainly the possibility to thoroughly dissect in controlled conditions and with only human cells the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the metastatic progression. In this article we will review the main results deriving from in vitro co-culture models, describing mechanisms activated in the crosstalk between breast cancer and bone cells which drive the different metastatic steps. PMID:27571063

  14. Bone volume fraction explains the variation in strength and stiffness of cancellous bone affected by metastatic cancer and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; von Stechow, Dietrich; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph; Snyder, Brian D

    2008-12-01

    Preventing nontraumatic fractures in millions of patients with osteoporosis or metastatic cancer may significantly reduce the associated morbidity and reduce health-care expenditures incurred by these fractures. Predicting fracture occurrence requires an accurate understanding of the relationship between bone structure and the mechanical properties governing bone fracture that can be readily measured. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a single analytic relationship with either bone tissue mineral density or bone volume fraction (BV/TV) as independent variables could predict the strength and stiffness of normal and pathologic cancellous bone affected by osteoporosis or metastatic cancer. After obtaining institutional review board approval and informed consent, 15 patients underwent excisional biopsy of metastatic prostate, breast, lung, ovarian, or colon cancer from the spine and/or femur to obtain 41 metastatic cancer specimens. In addition, 96 noncancer specimens were excised from 43 age- and site-matched cadavers. All specimens were imaged using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and backscatter emission imaging and tested mechanically by uniaxial compression and nanoindentation. The minimum BV/TV, measured using quantitative micro-CT, accounted for 84% of the variation in bone stiffness and strength for all cancellous bone specimens. While relationships relating bone density to strength and stiffness have been derived empirically for normal and osteoporotic bone, these relationships have not been applied to skeletal metastases. This simple analytic relationship will facilitate large-scale screening and prediction of fracture risk for normal and pathologic cancellous bone using clinical CT systems to determine the load capacity of bones altered by metastatic cancer, osteoporosis, or both.

  15. Improving quality of life in patients with advanced cancer: Targeting metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    von Moos, Roger; Costa, Luis; Ripamonti, Carla Ida; Niepel, Daniela; Santini, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease in patients with advanced cancer is frequently associated with skeletal complications. These can be debilitating, causing pain, impaired functioning and decreased quality of life, as well as reduced survival. This review considers how the management of metastatic bone pain might be optimised, to limit the considerable burden it can impose on affected patients. Cancer-related pain is notoriously under-reported and under-treated, despite the availability of many therapeutic options. Non-opioid and opioid analgesics can be used; the latter are typically administered with radiotherapy, which forms the current standard of care for patients with metastatic bone pain. Surgery is appropriate for certain complicated cases of metastatic bone disease, and other options such as radiopharmaceuticals may provide additional relief. Treatments collectively referred to as bone-targeted agents (BTAs; bisphosphonates and denosumab) can offer further pain reduction. Initiation of therapy with BTAs is recommended for all patients with metastatic bone disease because these agents delay not only the onset of skeletal-related events but also the onset of bone pain. With evidence also emerging for pain control properties of new anticancer agents, the potential to individualise care for these patients is increased further. Optimisation of care depends on physicians' thorough appreciation of the complementary benefits that might be achieved with the various agents, as well as their limitations. Appropriate anti-tumour treatment combined with early initiation of BTAs and adequate analgesia plays a key role in the holistic approach to cancer pain management and may minimise the debilitating effects of metastatic bone pain. Copyright © 2016 Amgen Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Bone targeted therapy for preventing skeletal-related events in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Irelli, Azzurra; Cocciolone, Valentina; Cannita, Katia; Zugaro, Luigi; Di Staso, Mario; Lanfiuti Baldi, Paola; Paradisi, Stefania; Sidoni, Tina; Ricevuto, Enrico; Ficorella, Corrado

    2016-06-01

    Cancer cells can alter physiological mechanisms within bone resulting in high bone turnover, and consequently in skeletal-related events (SREs), causing severe morbidity in affected patients. The goals of bone targeted therapy, as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are the reduction of incidence and the delay in occurrence of the SREs, to improve quality of life and pain control. The toxicity profile is similar between bisphosphonates and denosumab, even if pyrexia, bone pain, arthralgia, renal failure and hypercalcemia are more common with bisphosphonates, while hypocalcemia and toothache are more frequently reported with denosumab. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) occurred infrequently without statistically significant difference. The present review aims to provide an assessment on bone targeted therapies for preventing the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic breast cancer patients, critically analyzing the evidence available so far on their effectiveness, in light of the different mechanisms of action. Thus, we try to provide tools for the most fitting treatment of bone metastatic breast cancer patients. We also provide an overview on the usefulness of bone turnover markers in clinical practice and new molecules currently under study for the treatment of bone metastatic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Metastatic colorectal cancer presenting with bone marrow metastasis: a case series and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Rita; Mukherji, Deborah; Haydar, Ali; Saroufim, Maya; Temraz, Sally

    2016-01-01

    With advances in treatment, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) are now living longer with an apparent increase in the incidence of bone and bone marrow metastases (BMM). Common sites of metastatic disease from CRC include the liver and lungs with bone metastasis rarely occurring in the absence of visceral metastatic disease. We report a series of three patients presenting with isolated bone and BMM leading to a diagnosis of primary CRC. We have reviewed the literature regarding diagnosis, potential mechanisms leading to the development of osseous metastasis and outcome. A high level of clinical suspicion and in-depth understanding of the natural history of these rare metastases may guide future management and treatment decisions. PMID:27034798

  18. Expert System for Bone Scan Interpretation Improves Progression Assessment in Bone Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Haupt, Fabian; Berding, Georg; Namazian, Ali; Wilke, Florian; Böker, Alena; Merseburger, Axel; Geworski, Lilli; Kuczyk, Markus Antonius; Bengel, Frank Michael; Peters, Inga

    2017-04-01

    The bone scan index (BSI) was introduced as a quantitative tool for tumor involvement in bone of patients with metastatic prostate cancer (mPCa). The computer-aided diagnosis device for BSI analysis EXINIbone(BSI) seems to represent technical progress for the quantitative assessment of bone involvement. But it is not yet clear if the automated BSI (aBSI) could contribute to improved evaluation of progression in patients under antiandrogens or chemotherapy in contrast to the visual interpretation and/or conventional biomarkers such as the prostate-specific antigen (PSA). In 49 mPCa patients, bone scans were performed initially and during different therapy courses. Scans were evaluated visually and by the artificial-neural-network-based expert system EXINIbone(BSI). Progression of metastatic bone involvement was defined according to the Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials Working Group 2 (PCWG2) criteria in the visual interpretation. The computer-assisted interpretation was based on different cutoff values in relative changes of the aBSI. Additionally, assessments according to bone scanning were compared to changes in the PSA value as a potential surrogate for treatment response. Using a sensitive cutoff value (5% or 10%) for the relative aBSI increase led to significantly increased progression determination compared to the visual interpretation of bone scans (49% and 43% vs. 27%, p < 0.001). In 63% of the cases PSA and BSI changes matched, whereas in 18% progression was only indicated by the aBSI. A relative cutoff of 5% for the aBSI decrease could reclassify 47 serial scan pairs which were visually interpreted as stable into 22 progressive and 25 remissive scans. Distinct thresholds of the relative aBSI could help to better assess disease progression in mPCa patients. Manual corrections of the BSI values are not required in most cases. The aBSI could serve as a useful additional parameter for therapy monitoring in mPCa patients in the future.

  19. Bone Factors Regulating the Osteotropism of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    is a recent predictor of metastasis . Little is known about the regulation of such events. We are using in vitro and in vivo models to characterize...painful bone metastasis in invasive breast cancer, offering hope for innovative therapy. Given the unchanging survival outlook for patients with... osteosarcoma cell line, DNAsed, reverse transcribed and amplified using these primers. The amplimer was then gel purified using a Quiaex II kit. The gel

  20. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  1. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  2. The Role of Osteoblast-Derived Cytokines in Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    4] G.R. Mundy, D. Chen, B.O. Oyajobi, Bone Remodeling, in: M.J. Favus (Ed.), Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral...therapeutic opportunities. Nature Reviews . Cancer, 2, 584–593. 4. Chambers, A. F., Groom, A. C., & MacDonald, I. C. (2002). Dissemination and growth of cancer...cells in metastatic sites. Nature Reviews . Cancer, 2, 563–572. 5. Batson, O. V. (1942). Annals of Internal Medicine, 16, 38–45. 6. Marks, S. C

  3. Long bone metastases as predictors of survival in patients with metastatic renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Giżewska, Agnieszka; Witkowska-Patena, Ewa; Stembrowicz-Nowakowska, Zofia; Mazurek, Andrzej; Osiecki, Sebastian; Kowalski, Łukasz; Dziuk, Mirosław; Slomka, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of long bone metastases in renal cancer patients and to evaluate their utility as predictors of survival in this group. This retrospective study included 20 patients with metastatic renal cancer and bone metastases. The patients were referred for regular bone scintigraphy in order to assess disease spread in the skeleton. The patients were divided into two groups: those with 1) metastases in the skeleton (including long bones) and those with 2) metastases in the axial skeleton only. Bone scintigraphy imaging was performed regularly up to 81 months from the first positive bone scan. During that time 11 deaths (8 among patients with long bone lesions) were recorded. Kaplan-Meyer curves showed that patients with long bone metastases tend to have lower survival probability in comparison to the ones with metastases in other bones. Bone metastases localization seems to influence survival in patients with renal cancer. Long bone-involving spread of the disease is associated with worse survival probability than the spread to the other bones.

  4. Development of Raman spectral markers to assess metastatic bone in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hao; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Sterling, Julie A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Bi, Xiaohong

    2014-11-01

    Bone is the most common site for breast cancer metastases. One of the major complications of bone metastasis is pathological bone fracture caused by chronic bone loss and degeneration. Current guidelines for the prediction of pathological fracture mainly rely on radiographs or computed tomography, which are limited in their ability to predict fracture risk. The present study explored the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to estimate pathological fracture risk by characterizing the alterations in the compositional properties of metastatic bones. Tibiae with evident bone destruction were investigated using Raman spectroscopy. The carbonation level calculated by the ratio of carbonate/phosphate ν1 significantly increased in the tumor-bearing bone at all the sampling regions at the proximal metaphysis and diaphysis, while tumor-induced elevation in mineralization and crystallinity was more pronounced in the metaphysis. Furthermore, the increased carbonation level is positively correlated to bone lesion size, indicating that this parameter could serve as a unique spectral marker for tumor progression and bone loss. With the promising advances in the development of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for deep tissue measurement, this spectral marker can potentially be used for future noninvasive evaluation of metastatic bone and prediction of pathological fracture risk.

  5. Development of Raman spectral markers to assess metastatic bone in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Nyman, Jeffry S.; Sterling, Julie A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Bi, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Bone is the most common site for breast cancer metastases. One of the major complications of bone metastasis is pathological bone fracture caused by chronic bone loss and degeneration. Current guidelines for the prediction of pathological fracture mainly rely on radiographs or computed tomography, which are limited in their ability to predict fracture risk. The present study explored the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy to estimate pathological fracture risk by characterizing the alterations in the compositional properties of metastatic bones. Tibiae with evident bone destruction were investigated using Raman spectroscopy. The carbonation level calculated by the ratio of carbonate/phosphate ν1 significantly increased in the tumor-bearing bone at all the sampling regions at the proximal metaphysis and diaphysis, while tumor-induced elevation in mineralization and crystallinity was more pronounced in the metaphysis. Furthermore, the increased carbonation level is positively correlated to bone lesion size, indicating that this parameter could serve as a unique spectral marker for tumor progression and bone loss. With the promising advances in the development of spatially offset Raman spectroscopy for deep tissue measurement, this spectral marker can potentially be used for future noninvasive evaluation of metastatic bone and prediction of pathological fracture risk. PMID:24933683

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals for Palliation of Bone Pain in Patients with Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Metastatic to Bone: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Jong, Joyce M van Dodewaard-de; Oprea-Lager, Daniela E; Hooft, Lotty; de Klerk, John M H; Bloemendal, Haiko J; Verheul, Henk M W; Hoekstra, Otto S; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M

    2016-09-01

    The majority of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer develop bone metastatic disease. It is often challenging to optimally palliate malignant bone pain. In case of multifocal pain due to diffuse osteoblastic metastases, treatment with bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals can be considered. This systematic review evaluates the efficacy of different bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals for palliation of malignant bone pain from prostate cancer. The PubMed (Medline) and Embase databases were searched for publications on 89-strontium-chloride ((89)Sr), 153-samarium-EDTMP ((153)Sm), 186-rhenium-HEDP ((186)Re), 188-rhenium-HEDP ((188)Re), and 223-radium-chloride ((223)Ra). Randomised controlled trials and prospective cohort studies were included. Metastatic bone pain had to be registered as outcome measure for prostate cancer patients separately. This review included 36 articles of which 13 randomised trials and 23 prospective studies. Of all trials, 10 studies used (89)Sr, 7 (153)Sm, 12 (186)Re, 2 (188)Re, and 2 (223)Ra; three reported on a combination of different radionuclides. Only a few trials contained a blinding procedure and several studies contained incomplete follow-up or lack of intention-to-treat analysis. It was not possible to calculate a pooled estimate of pain response to treatment with any of the radionuclides because different definitions of pain response were used. Overall, pain response percentages greater than 50-60% were seen with each radionuclide. Haematological toxicity was reported in 26 of the 36 studies and more than half of these trials stated no grade 3/4 leukopenia or thrombocytopenia occurred. In this report we reviewed the efficacy of bone-seeking radionuclides for treating bone pain from metastatic prostate cancer. Overall, treatment with bone-seeking radionuclides resulted in pain responses greater than 50-60%. Copyright © 2015 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictive factors for skeletal complications in hormone-refractory prostate cancer patients with metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Berruti, A; Tucci, M; Mosca, A; Tarabuzzi, R; Gorzegno, G; Terrone, C; Vana, F; Lamanna, G; Tampellini, M; Porpiglia, F; Angeli, A; Scarpa, R M; Dogliotti, L

    2005-01-01

    Factors predictive of skeletal-related events (SREs) in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease were investigated. We evaluated the frequency of SREs in 200 hormone-refractory patients consecutively observed at our Institution and followed until death or the last follow-up. Baseline parameters were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analysis as potential predictive factors of SREs. Skeletal-related events were observed in 86 patients (43.0%), 10 of which (5.0%) occurred before the onset of hormone-refractory disease. In univariate analysis, patient performance status (P=0.002), disease extent (DE) in bone (P=0.0001), bone pain (P=0.0001), serum alkaline phosphatase (P=0.0001) and urinary N-telopeptide of type one collagen (P=0.0001) directly correlated with a greater risk to develop SREs, whereas Gleason score at diagnosis, serum PSA, Hb, serum albumin, serum calcium, types of bone lesions and duration of androgen deprivation therapy did not. Both DE in bone (hazard ratio (HR): 1.16, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07–1.25, P=0.000) and pain score (HR: 1.13, 95% CI: 1.06–1.20, P=0.000) were independent variables predicting for the onset of SREs in multivariate analysis. In patients with heavy tumour load in bone and great bone pain, the percentage of SREs was almost twice as high as (26 vs 52%, P<0.02) and occurred significantly earlier (P=0.000) than SREs in patients with limited DE in bone and low pain. Bone pain and DE in bone independently predict the occurrence of SREs in bone metastatic prostate cancer patients with hormone-refractory disease. These findings could help physicians in tailoring the skeletal follow-up most appropriate to individual patients and may prove useful for stratifying patients enrolled in bisphosphonate clinical trials. PMID:16222309

  8. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cox, Thomas R; Rumney, Robin M H; Schoof, Erwin M; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune; Gartland, Alison; Erler, Janine T

    2015-06-04

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in patients with oestrogen-receptor negative breast cancer. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified lysyl oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonize and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications.

  9. The hypoxic cancer secretome induces pre-metastatic bone lesions through lysyl oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Thomas R.; Rumney, Robin M.H.; Schoof, Erwin M.; Perryman, Lara; Høye, Anette M.; Agrawal, Ankita; Bird, Demelza; Latif, Norain Ab; Forrest, Hamish; Evans, Holly R.; Huggins, Iain D; Lang, Georgina; Linding, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Tumour metastasis is a complex process involving reciprocal interplay between cancer cells and host stroma at both primary and secondary sites, and is strongly influenced by microenvironmental factors such as hypoxia1. Tumour-secreted proteins play a crucial role in these interactions2–5 and present strategic therapeutic potential. Metastasis of breast cancer to the bone affects approximately 85% of patients with advanced disease and renders them largely untreatable6. Specifically, osteolytic bone lesions, where bone is destroyed, lead to debilitating skeletal complications and increased patient morbidity and mortality6,7. The molecular interactions governing the early events of osteolytic lesion formation are currently unclear. Here we show hypoxia to be specifically associated with bone relapse in ER-negative breast cancer patients. Global quantitative analysis of the hypoxic secretome identified Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) as significantly associated with bone-tropism and relapse. High expression of LOX in primary breast tumours or systemic delivery of LOX leads to osteolytic lesion formation whereas silencing or inhibition of LOX activity abrogates tumour-driven osteolytic lesion formation. We identify LOX as a novel regulator of NFATc1-driven osteoclastogenesis, independent of RANK Ligand, which disrupts normal bone homeostasis leading to the formation of focal pre-metastatic lesions. We show that these lesions subsequently provide a platform for circulating tumour cells to colonise and form bone metastases. Our study identifies a novel mechanism of regulation of bone homeostasis and metastasis, opening up opportunities for novel therapeutic intervention with important clinical implications. PMID:26017313

  10. Radium-223 dichloride bone-targeted alpha particle therapy for hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormone-refractory breast cancer metastatic to bone is a clinically challenging disease associated with high morbidity, poor prognosis, and impaired quality of life owing to pain and skeletal-related events. In a preclinical study using a mouse model of breast cancer and bone metastases, Ra-223 dichloride was incorporated into bone matrix and inhibited proliferation of breast cancer cells and differentiation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts (all P values < .001) in vitro. Ra-223 dichloride also induced double-strand DNA breaks in cancer cells in vivo. Methods The US Food and Drug Administration recently approved radium-223 (Ra-223) dichloride (Ra-223; Xofigo injection) alpha-particle therapy for the treatment of symptomatic bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. On the basis of a strong preclinical rationale, we used Ra-223 dichloride to treat bone metastases in a patient with breast cancer. Results A 44-year-old white woman with metastatic breast cancer who was estrogen receptor–positive, BRCA1-negative, BRCA2-negative, PIK3CA mutation (p.His1047Arg) positive presented with diffuse bony metastases and bone pain. She had hormone refractory and chemotherapy refractory breast cancer. After Ra-223 therapy initiation her bone pain improved, with corresponding decrease in tumor markers and mixed response in 18F-FDG PET/CT and 18F-NaF bone PET/CT. The patient derived clinical benefit from therapy. Conclusion We have shown that Ra-223 dichloride can be safely administered in a patient with hormone-refractory bone metastasis from breast cancer at the US FDA–approved dose for prostate cancer. Furthermore, because the treatment did not cause any drop in hematologic parameters, it has the potential to be combined with other radiosensitizing therapies, which may include chemotherapy or targeted therapies. Given that Ra-223 dichloride is already commercially available, this case report may help future patients and provide a

  11. Role of bone and liver scans in surveying patients with breast cancer for metastatic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, D.M.; Wright, D.J.

    1987-10-01

    The objective of this study is to correlate the presence of bone and liver metastases in patients with breast cancer with respect to the results of bone and liver scans, axillary nodal status, and serum alkaline phosphatase levels. One hundred ninety-seven patients with breast cancer treated by modified radical mastectomy between the years 1978 and 1981 were studied. Fifty-nine (30%) of the total group had distant metastases during the course of observation of 60 to 96 months; of 35 patients in whom bone metastases developed, 30 had normal preoperative bone scan results. Of 21 patients who had liver metastases, 19 had normal preoperative liver scans. Nineteen (70%) of the 27 patients with abnormal bone scans had normal alkaline phosphatase levels. Seven (63%) of the 11 patients who had abnormal liver scans had a normal alkaline phosphatase. The study supports the concept that preoperative bone and liver scans are ineffective indicators of metastatic involvement. Selection of patients for screening by bone and liver scans according to alkaline phosphatase determinations was not supported by this study. The appropriate use of bone scans for screening in patients with breast carcinoma is suggested as a follow-up device in patients with positive lymph nodes.

  12. Targeted Therapies for Myeloma and Metastatic Bone Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    to the respective ends either the bone-targeting ligand or a polylactide polymer. As reported previously, we were able to procure the required...8217 O n O O R’’,R’’’ O R’’,R’’’ OH O m + Catalyst m/2 Product Scheme 1 - Synthesis of Polyethylene glycol - polylactide -co-galactide Block Copolymers...Figure 3. Synethic schemes for the preparation of PEGylated polylactide block copolymers (Scheme 1), thiolation of amino-terminated bone-targeting

  13. How MMPs Impact Bone Responses to Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    as receptor activator of nuclear factor- kB ligand (RANKL) and Dickkopf homolog 1 ( DKK1 ), which are known to be expressed by both tumor cells and...Shaughnessy, J. D., Jr (2007). Antibody-based inhibition of DKK1 suppresses tumor-induced bone resorption and multiple myeloma growth in vivo. Blood 109

  14. Trafficking of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells in Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    insufficiently sensitive (e.g., radiography ) or are impractical for adequately statistically powered experiments because of costs or labor- intensiveness... Radiography can detect osteolytic lesions only after more than half of the calcified bone matrix has been degraded (9). Microcomputerized tomography is not...acids, 5% fetal bovine serum (Atlanta Biologicals, Norcross, GA), without antibiotics or antimycotics (cDME/ F12). All cultures were confirmed to be

  15. Targeted Therapies for Myeloma and Metastatic Bone Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    appropriately-sized particles from the biodegradable polymer polylactide -co-glycolide (PLGA). We developed two protocols for preparing narrowly-distributed...linker is to start with a bifunctional PEG and selectively attach to the respective ends either the bone-targeting ligand or a polylactide polymer. As...Polyethylene glycol - polylactide -co-galactide Block Copolymers 0 ,0. R",R"’. R.,R .... O° 01 O R",R" Catalyst 0 R",R"’. Product0 R’ = -•N• or -O-CH3 0 R",R

  16. Expression of Cadherin-17 Promotes Metastasis in a Highly Bone Marrow Metastatic Murine Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Kurabayashi, Atsushi; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2017-01-01

    We previously established 4T1E/M3 highly bone marrow metastatic mouse breast cancer cells through in vivo selection of 4T1 cells. But while the incidence of bone marrow metastasis of 4T1E/M3 cells was high (~80%) when injected intravenously to mice, it was rather low (~20%) when injected subcutaneously. Therefore, using 4T1E/M3 cells, we carried out further in vitro and in vivo selection steps to establish FP10SC2 cells, which show a very high incidence of metastasis to lungs (100%) and spines (85%) after subcutaneous injection into mice. qRT-PCR and western bolt analysis revealed that cadherin-17 gene and protein expression were higher in FP10SC2 cells than in parental 4T1E/M3 cells. In addition, immunostaining revealed the presence of cadherin-17 at sites of bone marrow and lung metastasis after subcutaneous injection of FP10SC2 cells into mice. Suppressing cadherin-17 expression in FP10SC2 cells using RNAi dramatically decreased the cells' anchorage-independent growth and migration in vitro and their metastasis to lung and bone marrow in vivo. These findings suggest that cadherin-17 plays a crucial role in mediating breast cancer metastasis to bone marrow. PMID:28197418

  17. Samarium-153 treatment of bone pain in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Lars J; Lund, Lars; Jønler, Morten; Jakobsen, Mette; Abrahamsen, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Painful bone metastases are common in advanced prostate cancer. We report the clinical outcome after administration of Samarium-153 ((153)Sm), an emitter of beta-particles that concentrates in the areas of enhanced osteoblastic activity. Twenty-two patients (median age 73 years) with metastatic, hormone-refractory prostate cancer received a single bolus infusion of (153)Sm (37 MBq/kg). All patients had painful bone metastases to more than one anatomical region, and most had inadequate pain relief to narcotic analgesics. Bone specific pain, analgesic score according to WHO, ECOG performance status, and blood count were evaluated before and up to 28 weeks after treatment. Median follow-up was six weeks (mean 14 weeks). Eleven patients died within the 28 week observation period (ten from terminal disease), and four patients had their observation period truncated. Median pain score was 56.3%, 50.0%, and 50.0% of baseline values at week 4 (n = 20), 16 (n = 10), and 28 (n = 7), respectively. A reduction of baseline pain score by 50% or more was observed in 50%, 70% and 71% of patients at week 4, 16, and 28, respectively. Hematological toxicity was mild and reversible in most cases. Administration of (153)Sm to prostate cancer patients with painful bone metastases offered clinical relevant pain relief with tolerable hematological toxicity.

  18. Identification of Bone-Derived Factors Conferring De Novo Therapeutic Resistance in Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Yu, Guoyu; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Hawke, David H; Parikh, Nila U; Varkaris, Andreas; Corn, Paul; Logothetis, Christopher; Satcher, Robert L; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-11-15

    Resistance to currently available targeted therapies significantly hampers the survival of patients with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Here we demonstrate an important resistance mechanism initiated from tumor-induced bone. Studies using an osteogenic patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-118b, revealed that tumor cells resistant to cabozantinib, a Met and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, reside in a "resistance niche" adjacent to prostate cancer-induced bone. We performed secretome analysis of the conditioned medium from tumor-induced bone to identify proteins (termed "osteocrines") found within this resistance niche. In accordance with previous reports demonstrating that activation of integrin signaling pathways confers therapeutic resistance, 27 of the 90 osteocrines identified were integrin ligands. We found that following cabozantinib treatment, only tumor cells positioned adjacent to the newly formed woven bone remained viable and expressed high levels of pFAK-Y397 and pTalin-S425, mediators of integrin signaling. Accordingly, treatment of C4-2B4 cells with integrin ligands resulted in increased pFAK-Y397 expression and cell survival, whereas targeting integrins with FAK inhibitors PF-562271 or defactinib inhibited FAK phosphorylation and reduced the survival of PC3-mm2 cells. Moreover, treatment of MDA-PCa-118b tumors with PF-562271 led to decreased tumor growth, irrespective of initial tumor size. Finally, we show that upon treatment cessation, the combination of PF-562271 and cabozantinib delayed tumor recurrence in contrast to cabozantinib treatment alone. Our studies suggest that identifying paracrine de novo resistance mechanisms may significantly contribute to the generation of a broader set of potent therapeutic tools that act combinatorially to inhibit metastatic prostate cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Clinical significance of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Pantel, K

    2001-01-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumor cells to the organism is increasingly considered a hallmark in cancer progression, as emerging data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies to epithelial cytokeratins or tumor-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected on cytologic bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of these immunostained cells in bone marrow, as a frequent site of overt metastases, is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival. This screening approach may be, therefore, used to improve tumor staging and guide the stratification of patients for adjuvant therapy in clinical trials. Another promising application is monitoring the response of micrometastatic cells to adjuvant therapies, which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up. The present review summarizes the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic breast cancer cells in bone marrow.

  20. Minimal residual disease in bone marrow and peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Joachim; Rosenberg, Robert; Dahm, Michael; Janni, Wolfgang; Gutschow, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    The presence of occult micrometastases in bone marrow (BM) of patients with early breast cancer increases the risk of relapse. Detection of circulation tumor cells in peripheral blood (PB) may also influence the patient's prognosis. Few data are available on the correlation between tumor cell dissemination in BM and PB in solid epithelial tumors. Twenty-milliliter blood samples were collected from PB of 42 patients with advanced breast cancer and centrifuged using the density gradient OncoQuick (OncoQuick Greiner BioOne, Frickenhausen, Germany). The BM aspirates available from 11 of the 42 patients were centrifuged using density centrifugation Ficoll. Tumor cell detection was performed by microscopy after cytospin preparation and immunocytochemical staining with the monoclonal antibody A45-B/B3. Cytokeratin-positive cells were detected in 23 patients (55%) in the PB and in three patients (27%) in the BM. A cohort with bone lesions as the only metastatic side showed a correlation as follows: 7 of the 11 patients (64%) had negative findings in BM and PB, whereas cytokeratin-positive cells in PB were present in 3 of these 11 patients (27%). The presence of visceral metastases was associated with the detection of cytokeratin-positive cells in the PB in 20 of the 31 patients (65%) in this subgroup. The density gradient OncoQuick in combination with immunocytochemical staining allows the detection of cytokeratin-positive cells in PB of patients with advanced breast cancer. The immunocytochemical detection of cytokeratin-positive cells in PB seems to be associated with the site of metastatic manifestation.

  1. Curcumin analog UBS109 prevents bone marrow osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Zhu, Shijun; Weitzmann, M Neale; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2015-03-01

    UBS109 is a curcumin analog that possesses antitumor properties has been shown to stimulate osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether UBS109 might alleviate the inhibitory activity of breast cancer cells on osteoblastic mineralization and stimulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Mouse bone marrow cells were cocultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. UBS109 stimulated osteoblastic mineralization and suppressed adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and enhanced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Effects that were reserved by UBS109 (50-200 nM). Mineralization in preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was suppressed by coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells, while MDA-MB-231 cells did not have effects on osteoclastogenesis of RAW267.4 cells in vitro. UBS109 (500 nM) revealed toxic effects on MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells. This study demonstrates that UBS109, which is an antitumor agent, reveals restorative effects on bone marrow cell differentiation disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. This in vitro model may be a useful tool to evaluate the mechanism of breast cancer cell bone metastasis.

  2. Radium-223: Insight and Perspectives in Bone-metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Buroni, Federica Eleonora; Persico, Marco Giovanni; Pasi, Francesca; Lodola, Lorenzo; Nano, Rosanna; Aprile, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    (223)Ra prolongs overall survival in symptomatic patients affected by multiple bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostatic cancer, without visceral or nodal involvement. However, many questions remain about its mechanisms of action, and its use in clinical practice is still unresolved. First of all, what is the main target of alpha-particle emission, that is, in what way does it influences the tumor microenvironment? When is the best timing in the course of the disease, extending its use to asymptomatic low-volume or even to the micrometastatic phase? What are suitable biomarkers to be employed as prognostic factors and response indicators? Which associations with other drugs and their sequence can offer the best results, and is their effect additive or synergistic? Ultimately, in the current climate of spending review, what is the optimal cost and benefit ratio regarding available treatments? In this review, we tried to answer these questions by analyzing the available scientific literature.

  3. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    cytokines are critical for metastatic breast cancer cells to grow or remain dormant. This hypothesis is being tested using a 3D bioreactor of ECM...bone. Although we have not yet tested for cytokines, we hypothesize that the breast cancer-osteoblast inflammatory response may be exacerbated with...Scale bar = 100 μm. 7 a.2 Collagenous and non-collagenous proteins We tested whether estrogen in the medium affected the collagenous and non

  4. Identification of bone-derived factors conferring de novo therapeutic resistance in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Lin, Song-Chang; Yu, Guoyu; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Liu, Bin; Liu, Hsuan-Chen; Hawke, David H.; Parikh, Nila U.; Varkaris, Andreas; Corn, Paul; Logothetis, Christopher; Satcher, Robert L.; Yu-Lee, Li-Yuan; Gallick, Gary E.; Lin, Sue-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to currently available targeted therapies significantly hampers the survival of prostate cancer (PCa) patients with bone metastasis. Here we demonstrate an important resistance mechanism initiated from tumor-induced bone. Studies using an osteogenic patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-118b, revealed that tumor cells resistant to cabozantinib, a Met and VEGFR-2 inhibitor, reside in a "resistance niche" adjacent to PCa-induced bone. We performed secretome analysis of the conditioned medium from tumor-induced bone to identify proteins (termed "osteocrines") found within this resistance niche. In accordance with previous reports demonstrating that activation of integrin signaling pathways confers therapeutic resistance, 27 of the 90 osteocrines identified were integrin ligands. We found that following cabozantinib treatment, only tumor cells positioned adjacent to newly-formed woven bone remained viable and expressed high levels of pFAK-Y397 and pTalin-S425, mediators of integrin signaling. Accordingly, treatment of C4-2B4 cells with integrin ligands resulted in increased pFAK-Y397 expression and cell survival, whereas targeting integrins with FAK inhibitors PF-562271 or defactinib inhibited FAK phosphorylation and reduced the survival of PC3-mm2 cells. Moreover, treatment of MDA-PCa-118b tumors with PF-562271 led to decreased tumor growth, irrespective of initial tumor size. Finally, we show that upon treatment cessation, the combination of PF-562271 and cabozantinib delayed tumor recurrence in contrast to cabozantinib treatment alone. Our studies suggest that identifying paracrine de novo resistance mechanisms may significantly contribute to the generation of a broader set of potent therapeutic tools that act combinatorially to inhibit metastatic PCa. PMID:26530902

  5. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  6. Radioisotopes for the palliation of metastatic bone cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Ilora G; Mason, Malcolm D; Shelley, Mike

    2005-06-01

    Strontium-89 and samarium-153 are radioisotopes that are approved in the USA and Europe for the palliation of pain from metastatic bone cancer, whereas rhenium-186 and rhenium-188 are investigational. Radioisotopes are effective in providing pain relief with response rates of between 40% and 95%. Pain relief starts 1-4 weeks after the initiation of treatment, continues for up to 18 months, and is associated with a reduction in analgesic use in many patients. Thrombocytopenia and neutropenia are the most common toxic effects, but they are generally mild and reversible. Repeat doses are effective in providing pain relief in many patients. The effectiveness of radioisotopes can be greater when they are combined with chemotherapeutic agents such as cisplatin. Some studies with 89Sr and 153Sm indicate a reduction of hot spots on bone scans in up to 70% of patients, and suggest a possible tumoricidal action. Further studies are needed to address the questions of which isotope to use, what dose and schedule to use, and which patients will respond.

  7. [Paget's disease mimicking metastatic prostate cancer on bone scan image : a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushi, Ken; Koie, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hayato; Okamoto, Akiko; Imai, Atsushi; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Chikara

    2013-04-01

    A 61-year-old man was referred to our hospital complaining of elevated serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) (5.1 ng/ml). Histopathologic diagnosis with trans-rectal prostate biopsy specimen was adenocarcinoma, Gleason score 4+5 = 9. Bone scintigraphy revealed an abnormal uptake on left coxal bone. The patient was diagnosed with prostate cancer with bone metastasis. He received androgen deprivation therapy for two years. Serum PSA decreased to an undetected level. However, the abnormal activity of left coxal bone lesion was not changed on bone scintigraphy. Coxal bone biopsy was performed. The bone lesion was histopathologically diagnosed as Paget's disease of bone.

  8. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    matrix (ECM) and bone microenvironment cytokines are critical for metastatic breast cancer cells to grow or remain dormant. This hypothesis was tested ... tested whether estrogen in the medium affected the collagenous and non-collagenous proteins produced by the osteoblasts (Figure 4). Compared to the...However, we had read of a novel and recently discovered collagen binding protein, CNA35, isolated from S. aureus, that could be labeled with a

  9. SU-D-303-01: Spatial Distribution of Bone Metastases In Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Perk, T; Bradshaw, T; Harmon, S; Perlman, S; Liu, G; Jeraj, R

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Identification of metastatic bone lesions is critical in prostate cancer, where treatments may be more effective in patients with fewer lesions. This study aims characterize the distribution and spread of bone lesions and create a probability map of metastatic spread in bone. Methods: Fifty-five metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients received up to 3 whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Lesions were identified by physician on PET/CT and contoured using a threshold of SUV>15. An atlas-based segmentation method was used to create CT regions, which determined skeletal location of lesions. Patients were divided into 3 groups with low (N<40), medium (40100) numbers of lesions. A combination of articulated and deformable registrations was used to register the skeletal segments and lesions of each patient to a single skeleton. All the lesion data was then combined to make a probability map. Results: A total of 4038 metastatic lesions (mean 74, range 2–304) were identified. Skeletal regions with highest occurrence of lesions included ribs, thoracic spine, and pelvis with 21%, 19%, and 15% of the total number lesions and 8%, 18%, and 31 % of the total lesion volume, respectively. Interestingly, patients with fewer lesions were found to have a lower proportion of lesions in the ribs (9% in low vs. 27% in high number of lesions). Additionally, the probability map showed specific areas in the spine and pelvis where over 75% of patients had metastases, and other areas in the skeleton with a less than 2% of metastases. Conclusion: We identified skeletal regions with higher incidence of metastases and specific sub-regions in the skeleton that had high or low probability of occurrence of metastases. Additionally, we found that metastatic lesions in the ribs and skull occur more commonly in advanced disease. These results may have future applications in computer-aided diagnosis. Funding from the Prostate Cancer Foundation.

  10. Strontium-89: treatment results and kinetics in patients with painful metastatic prostate and breast cancer in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.G.; Blake, G.M.; Preston, D.F.; McEwan, A.J.; Spicer, J.A.; Martin, N.L.; Wegst, A.V.; Ackery, D.M.

    1989-03-01

    Two hundred and two patients with bone pain from metastatic cancer were treated with 40 microCi/kg of Sr-89. Patients were followed with pain diaries, records of medication taken, sleep patterns, serial bone scans and a Karnofsky Index. One hundred and thirty-seven patients with adequate followup survived at least 3 months, including 100 with prostate and 28 with breast carcinoma. Eighty of the 100 patients with prostate cancer responded, and 25 of the 28 breast cancer patients improved. Ten patients with prostate cancer and five with breast cancer became pain free. Little hematologic depression was noted. Sr-89 kinetic studies showed that strontium taken up in osteoblastic areas remained for 100 days. The tumor-to-marrow absorbed dose ratio was 10:1.

  11. Strontium-89: treatment results and kinetics in patients with painful metastatic prostate and breast cancer in bone.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R G; Blake, G M; Preston, D F; McEwan, A J; Spicer, J A; Martin, N L; Wegst, A V; Ackery, D M

    1989-03-01

    Two hundred and two patients with bone pain from metastatic cancer were treated with 40 microCi/kg of Sr-89. Patients were followed with pain diaries, records of medication taken, sleep patterns, serial bone scans and a Karnofsky Index. One hundred and thirty-seven patients with adequate followup survived at least 3 months, including 100 with prostate and 28 with breast carcinoma. Eighty of the 100 patients with prostate cancer responded, and 25 of the 28 breast cancer patients improved. Ten patients with prostate cancer and five with breast cancer became pain free. Little hematologic depression was noted. Sr-89 kinetic studies showed that strontium taken up in osteoblastic areas remained for 100 days. The tumor-to-marrow absorbed dose ratio was 10:1.

  12. Bone-Targeting Radiopharmaceuticals for the Treatment of Bone-Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Exploring the Implications of New Data

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Philip J.; Everly, Jason J.; Sartor, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Background. Clinical features of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are characterized by a high incidence of bone metastases, which are associated with impairment of quality of life, pain, skeletal-related events (SREs), and a negative impact on prognosis. Advances in the understanding of cancer cell-bone stroma interactions and molecular mechanisms have recently permitted the development of new agents. Purpose. We review the merits, applications, and limitations of emerging data sets on bone-metastatic CRPC with a focus on radium-223, an α-emitting radiopharmaceutical, and its use in therapy for this disease. Methods. References for this review were identified through searches of PubMed and Medline databases, and only papers published in English were considered. Related links in the databases were reviewed, along with relevant published guidelines, recently published abstracts from major medical meetings, and transcripts from a recent round table of clinical investigators. Results. Prior to radium-223, available bone-targeted therapies demonstrated the ability to delay SREs and palliate bone pain in patients with metastatic CRPC but without evidence of improvement in overall survival (OS). In a randomized controlled phase III trial, radium-223 demonstrated the ability to improve OS and delay SREs in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC and was not associated with significantly more grade 3 or 4 adverse events than placebo. Conclusion. Radium-223 has a targeted effect on bone metastases in CRPC and has an important role in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC. PMID:25232039

  13. Bone-targeting radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: exploring the implications of new data.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Charles J; Saylor, Philip J; Everly, Jason J; Sartor, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    Clinical features of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) are characterized by a high incidence of bone metastases, which are associated with impairment of quality of life, pain, skeletal-related events (SREs), and a negative impact on prognosis. Advances in the understanding of cancer cell-bone stroma interactions and molecular mechanisms have recently permitted the development of new agents. We review the merits, applications, and limitations of emerging data sets on bone-metastatic CRPC with a focus on radium-223, an α-emitting radiopharmaceutical, and its use in therapy for this disease. References for this review were identified through searches of PubMed and Medline databases, and only papers published in English were considered. Related links in the databases were reviewed, along with relevant published guidelines, recently published abstracts from major medical meetings, and transcripts from a recent round table of clinical investigators. Prior to radium-223, available bone-targeted therapies demonstrated the ability to delay SREs and palliate bone pain in patients with metastatic CRPC but without evidence of improvement in overall survival (OS). In a randomized controlled phase III trial, radium-223 demonstrated the ability to improve OS and delay SREs in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC and was not associated with significantly more grade 3 or 4 adverse events than placebo. Radium-223 has a targeted effect on bone metastases in CRPC and has an important role in docetaxel-pretreated or docetaxel-unfit men with symptomatic bone-metastatic CRPC. ©AlphaMed Press.

  14. Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 in Breast Cancer Cells Contributes to the Production of Endogenous Formaldehyde in the Metastatic Bone Cancer Pain Model of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhi-Qian; Li, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Wen; Luo, Wen-Hong; Li, Hui; Luo, Hong-Jun; Tang, Yan; Tang, Jun-Min; Cai, Jie; Liao, Fei-Fei; Wan, You

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone cancer pain seriously affects the quality of life of cancer patients. Our previous study found that endogenous formaldehyde was produced by cancer cells metastasized into bone marrows and played an important role in bone cancer pain. However, the mechanism of production of this endogenous formaldehyde by metastatic cancer cells was unknown in bone cancer pain rats. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is one of the major enzymes catalyzing the production of formaldehyde. The expression of LSD1 and the concentration of formaldehyde were up-regulated in many high-risk tumors. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether LSD1 in metastasized MRMT-1 breast cancer cells in bone marrows participated in the production of endogenous formaldehyde in bone cancer pain rats. Methodology/Principal Findings Concentration of the endogenous formaldehyde was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Endogenous formaldehyde dramatically increased in cultured MRMT-1 breast cancer cells in vitro, in bone marrows and sera of bone cancer pain rats, in tumor tissues and sera of MRMT-1 subcutaneous vaccination model rats in vivo. Formaldehyde at a concentration as low as the above measured (3 mM) induced pain behaviors in normal rats. The expression of LSD1 which mainly located in nuclei of cancer cells significantly increased in bone marrows of bone cancer pain rats from 14 d to 21 d after inoculation. Furthermore, inhibition of LSD1 decreased the production of formaldehyde in MRMT-1 cells in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of LSD1 inhibitor pargyline from 3 d to 14 d after inoculation of MRMT-1 cancer cells reduced bone cancer pain behaviors. Conclusion Our data in the present study, combing our previous report, suggested that in the endogenous formaldehyde-induced pain in bone cancer pain rats, LSD1 in metastasized cancer cells contributed to the production of the endogenous formaldehyde. PMID:23516587

  15. The inhibitory effect of roasted licorice extract on human metastatic breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lim, Soon Sung; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the ethanol extract of roasted licorice (rLE) could inhibit breast cancer-mediated bone destruction. rLE treatment reduced the viability of MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells but did not show any cytotoxicity in hFOB1.19 human osteoblastic cells and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). rLE inhibited expression and secretion of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in osteoblastic cells exposed to the conditioned medium of breast cancer cells. rLE dramatically inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in BMMs, thereby reducing osteoclast-mediated pit formation. Moreover, treatment with licochalcone A and isoliquiritigenin as the active components, whose contents are increased by the roasting process, remarkably suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in BMMs, respectively. Furthermore, orally administered rLE substantially blocked tumor growth and bone destruction in mice inoculated with breast cancer cells in the tibiae. Serum levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen and trabecular bone morphometric parameters were reversed to almost the same levels as the control mice by the rLE treatment. In conclusion, rLE may be a beneficial agent for preventing and treating bone destruction in patients with breast cancer.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin‐W by TGF‐beta signaling in the bone metastatic niche of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Martina, Enrico; Bottos, Alessia; Scherberich, Arnaud; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Tenascin‐W is a matricellular protein with a dynamically changing expression pattern in development and disease. In adults, tenascin‐W is mostly restricted to stem cell niches, and is also expressed in the stroma of solid cancers. Here, we analyzed its expression in the bone microenvironment of breast cancer metastasis. Osteoblasts were isolated from tumor‐free or tumor‐bearing bones of mice injected with MDA‐MB231‐1833 breast cancer cells. We found a fourfold upregulation of tenascin‐W in the osteoblast population of tumor‐bearing mice compared to healthy mice, indicating that tenascin‐W is supplied by the bone metastatic niche. Transwell and co‐culture studies showed that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) express tenascin‐W protein after exposure to factors secreted by MDA‐MB231‐1833 breast cancer cells. To study tenascin‐W gene regulation, we identified and analyzed the tenascin‐W promoter as well as three evolutionary conserved regions in the first intron. 5′RACE analysis of mRNA from human breast cancer, glioblastoma and bone tissue showed a single tenascin‐W transcript with a transcription start site at a noncoding first exon followed by exon 2 containing the ATG translation start. Site‐directed mutagenesis of a SMAD4‐binding element in proximity of the TATA box strongly impaired promoter activity. TGFβ1 induced tenascin‐W expression in human BMSCs through activation of the TGFβ1 receptor ALK5, while glucocorticoids were inhibitory. Our experiments show that tenascin‐W acts as a niche component for breast cancer metastasis to bone by supporting cell migration and cell proliferation of the cancer cells. PMID:25868708

  17. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin-W by TGF-beta signaling in the bone metastatic niche of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Martina, Enrico; Bottos, Alessia; Scherberich, Arnaud; Hynes, Nancy E; Chiquet-Ehrismann, Ruth

    2015-10-15

    Tenascin-W is a matricellular protein with a dynamically changing expression pattern in development and disease. In adults, tenascin-W is mostly restricted to stem cell niches, and is also expressed in the stroma of solid cancers. Here, we analyzed its expression in the bone microenvironment of breast cancer metastasis. Osteoblasts were isolated from tumor-free or tumor-bearing bones of mice injected with MDA-MB231-1833 breast cancer cells. We found a fourfold upregulation of tenascin-W in the osteoblast population of tumor-bearing mice compared to healthy mice, indicating that tenascin-W is supplied by the bone metastatic niche. Transwell and co-culture studies showed that human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) express tenascin-W protein after exposure to factors secreted by MDA-MB231-1833 breast cancer cells. To study tenascin-W gene regulation, we identified and analyzed the tenascin-W promoter as well as three evolutionary conserved regions in the first intron. 5'RACE analysis of mRNA from human breast cancer, glioblastoma and bone tissue showed a single tenascin-W transcript with a transcription start site at a noncoding first exon followed by exon 2 containing the ATG translation start. Site-directed mutagenesis of a SMAD4-binding element in proximity of the TATA box strongly impaired promoter activity. TGFβ1 induced tenascin-W expression in human BMSCs through activation of the TGFβ1 receptor ALK5, while glucocorticoids were inhibitory. Our experiments show that tenascin-W acts as a niche component for breast cancer metastasis to bone by supporting cell migration and cell proliferation of the cancer cells. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  18. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  19. Upregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in advanced gastric cancer contributes to bone metastatic osteolysis by inducing long pentraxin 3

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Bongkun; Lee, Eun-Jin; Shin, Min-Kyung; Park, Young Soo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Eun-Young; Lee, Hyung Keun; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2016-01-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) activates its receptor, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB; also called NTRK2) that has been shown to promote the malignant progression of several cancers. In this study, we investigated the clinical and biological significance of the BDNF/TrkB axis in the progression of human gastric cancer. The increased co-expression of the BDNF/TrkB axis was significantly correlated with bone metastatic properties in advanced gastric cancers. BDNF acting via TrkB receptors increased the levels of long pentraxin 3 (PTX3) that was related to bone metastatic status of gastric cancer by enhancing gastric cancer–osteoblastic niche interactions. In bone metastatic gastric cancer, PTX3 knockdown using small interfering RNA significantly inhibited BDNF-induced interactions of cancer cells with osteoblasts. Moreover, BDNF-derived PTX3 induction supported subsequent osteoclastogenesis, and this effect was significantly reversed by PTX3 silencing. These findings suggest that a functional interaction between BDNF/TrkB and PTX3 enhances the osteolysis of bone metastatic gastric cancer, thereby providing potential prognostic factors for the development of bone metastasis of gastric cancer. PMID:27458153

  20. Pain, PSA flare, and bone scan response in a patient with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated with radium-223, a case report.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Megan A; George, Daniel J

    2015-05-07

    Radium-223 has been shown to improve overall survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases. The bone scan response to radium-223 has only been described in one single center trial of 14 patients, none of whom achieved the outstanding bone scan response presented in the current case. In this case report, we describe a 75 year-old white man with extensively pre-treated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases who experienced a flare in pain and prostate-specific antigen, followed by dramatic clinical (pain), biochemical (prostate-specific antigen), and imaging (bone scan) response. The flare phenomena and bone scan response we observed have not previously been described with radium-223. This case suggests that the degree and duration of bone scan response may be predictive of overall survival benefit.

  1. Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) Mediates Metastatic Dormancy of Prostate Cancer in Bone *

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sambad; Xing, Fei; Liu, Yin; Wu, Kerui; Said, Neveen; Pochampally, Radhika; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Balaji, K. C.; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is known to frequently recur in bone; however, how dormant cells switch its phenotype leading to recurrent tumor remains poorly understood. We have isolated two syngeneic cell lines (indolent and aggressive) through in vivo selection by implanting PC3mm stem-like cells into tibial bones. We found that indolent cells retained the dormant phenotype, whereas aggressive cells grew rapidly in bone in vivo, and the growth rates of both cells in culture were similar, suggesting a role of the tumor microenvironment in the regulation of dormancy and recurrence. Indolent cells were found to secrete a high level of secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which significantly stimulated the expression of BMP7 in bone marrow stromal cells. The secreted BMP7 then kept cancer cells in a dormant state by inducing senescence, reducing “stemness,” and activating dormancy-associated p38 MAPK signaling and p21 expression in cancer cells. Importantly, we found that SPARC was epigenetically silenced in aggressive cells by promoter methylation, but 5-azacytidine treatment reactivated the expression. Furthermore, high SPARC promoter methylation negatively correlated with disease-free survival of prostate cancer patients. We also found that the COX2 inhibitor NS398 down-regulated DNMTs and increased expression of SPARC, which led to tumor growth suppression in bone in vivo. These findings suggest that SPARC plays a key role in maintaining the dormancy of prostate cancer cells in the bone microenvironment. PMID:27422817

  2. Predicting Bone Metastatic Potential of Prostate Cancer Via Computational Modeling of TGF-Beta Signaling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Cell line : HaCaT cells • Data from Inman et al. (2002) • Data source: Lo & Massague (1999) • Cell line : HaCaT cells • Input: Step input of 200pM TGF-β • Output: Total pSmad2 in cell Total pSmad2 pSmad2 ...the highly metastatic PC cell line , PC-3, to BMEC under shear stress and TGF-β1 stimulation, revealed that TGF-β1 increases PC-3 adhesion to BMEC, the...presented). The task for specific aim 2 was delayed because a new bone-marrow

  3. Bone metastatic LNCaP-derivative C4-2B prostate cancer cell line mineralizes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, D L; Tarnowski, C P; Zhang, J; Dai, J; Rohn, E; Patel, A H; Morris, M D; Keller, E T

    2001-05-15

    Prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to bone. However, unlike many other tumors that produce osteolytic lesions, prostate cancer produces osteoblastic lesions through unknown mechanisms. In the current study, we explored the ability and mechanism of an osteotropic prostate cancer cell line (C4-2B) to induce mineralization. C4-2B cells were grown in promineralization media. Mineral deposition was characterized using von Kossa staining, calcium retention, alizarin red staining, Raman spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Expression of osteoblast-related proteins was determined by RT-PCR. The nuclear level of the bone-specific transcription factor Cbfa1 was determined using western analysis and the effect of inhibiting Cbfa1 function, using a "decoy" Cbfa1 response element oligo, on mineralization was determined. The studies demonstrated that C4-2B cells, but not its nonosteotropic parent cell line LNCaP, has an osteoblastlike phenotype including production of alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteonectin, bone sialoprotein, osteoprotegerin (OPG), and OPG ligand. Most importantly, the C4-2B cells produced hydroxyapatite mineral in vitro. Furthermore, C4-2B cells expressed high nuclear levels of the bone-specific transcription factor Cbfa1, compared to LNCaP cells, which accounts for their ability to produce bone-specific proteins. Inhibition of Cbfa1, using decoy DNA Cbfa1 response elements, abrogated the ability of C4-2B to produce mineral. Finally, we determined that C4-2B cells express bone morphogenic protein-7, a known inducer of Cbfa1 expression. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism through which prostate cancer cells may directly contribute to the osteoblastic component that characterize their skeletal metastatic lesions. Prostate 47:212-221, 2001. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Honokiol, a natural plant product, inhibits the bone metastatic growth of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shigemura, Katsumi; Arbiser, Jack L; Sun, Shi-Yong; Zayzafoon, Majd; Johnstone, Peter A S; Fujisawa, Masato; Gotoh, Akinobu; Weksler, Babette; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K

    2007-04-01

    Honokiol, a soluble nontoxic natural product derived from Magnolia spp., has been shown to induce apoptosis in malignant cells. The effect of honokiol and the combined therapy with docetaxel on prostate cancer (PCa) growth and bone metastasis was investigated in experimental models. The in vitro proapoptotic effects of honokiol on human androgen-dependent and -independent PCa, bone marrow, bone marrow-derived endothelial, and prostate stroma cells were investigated. Honokiol-induced activation of caspases was evaluated by Western blot and FACS analysis. To confirm the cytotoxicity of honokiol, mice bone was inoculated in vivo with androgen-independent PCa, C4-2 cells and the effects of honokiol and/or docetaxel on PCa growth in bone were evaluated. Daily honokiol (100 mg/kg) and/or weekly docetaxel (5 mg/kg) were injected intraperitoneally for 6 weeks. PCa growth in mouse bone was evaluated by radiography, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and tissue immunohistochemistry. Honokiol induced apoptosis in all cell lines tested. In PCa cells honokiol induced apoptosis via the activation of caspases 3, 8, and 9 and the cleavage of poly-adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Honokiol was shown to inhibit the growth and depress serum PSA in mice harboring C4-2 xenografts in the skeleton and the combination with docetaxel showed additive effects that inhibited further growth without evidence of systemic toxicity. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed honokiol exhibited growth-inhibitory, apoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects on PCa xenografts. The combination of honokiol and low-dose docetaxel may be used to improve patient outcome in androgen-independent prostate cancer with bone metastasis. (c) 2007 American Cancer Society.

  5. Influence of omega-6 PUFA arachidonic acid and bone marrow adipocytes on metastatic spread from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brown, M D; Hart, C; Gazi, E; Gardner, P; Lockyer, N; Clarke, N

    2010-01-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) preferentially metastasises to the bone, and we have previously shown that the poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) is a potent stimulator of CaP invasion. Here we present that AA promotes CaP invasion by inducing bone marrow adipocyte formation. Boyden invasion-chamber assays assessed the ability of dietary oils, their PUFA components, and specific PUFA-loaded adipocytes to induce PC-3 invasion. Lipid transfer and metabolism was followed using deuterated AA and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Poly-unsaturated fatty acid constituents, but not their corresponding dietary oils, induced PC-3 invasion. PUFAs induce bone marrow adipocyte (BM-Ad) differentiation with AA inducing higher levels of BM-Ad differentiation, as compared with other PUFAs (3998+/-514.4 vs 932+/-265.8; P=0.00002), which stimulated greater PC-3 invasion than free AA (22 408.5+/-607.4 vs 16 236+/-313.9; P=0.01111) or adipocytes generated in the presence of other PUFAs. In bone marrow co-culture PC-3 and BM-Ad interactions result in direct uptake and metabolism of AA by PC-3 cells, destruction of the adipocyte and subsequent formation of a bone metastasis. The data supports the hypothesis that AA not only promotes CaP invasion, it also prepares the 'soil', making it more supportive for implantation and propagation of the migrating metastatic cell.

  6. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. Copyright © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Breast cancer (metastatic)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Median survival from metastatic breast cancer is 12 months without treatment, but young people can survive up to 20 years with the disease, whereas in other metastatic cancers this would be considered unusual. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of first-line hormonal treatment? What are the effects of second-line hormonal treatment in women who have not responded to tamoxifen? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of first-line chemotherapy in combination with a monoclonal antibody? What are the effects of second-line chemotherapy? What are the effects of treatments for bone metastases? What are the effects of treatments for spinal cord metastases? What are the effects of treatments for cerebral or choroidal metastases? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 77 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: first-line hormonal treatment using anti-oestrogens (tamoxifen), ovarian ablation, progestins, selective aromatase inhibitors, or combined gonadorelin analogues plus tamoxifen; second-line hormonal treatment using progestins or selective aromatase inhibitors; first-line non-taxane combination chemotherapy; first-line taxane-based combination chemotherapy; first-line high- versus low-dose standard chemotherapy

  8. Effects of androgen deprivation therapy and bisphosphonate treatment on bone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: results from the University of Washington Rapid Autopsy Series.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P; Dowell, Alex; True, Lawrence D; Ketchanji, Melanie; Welty, Christopher; Corey, Eva; Lange, Paul H; Higano, Celestia S; Vessella, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Qualitative and quantitative bone features were determined in nondecalcified and decalcified bone from 20 predetermined bone sites in each of 44 patients who died with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), some of which received bisphosphonate treatment (BP) in addition to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). Thirty-nine of the 44 patients (89%) had evidence of bone metastases. By histomorphometric analysis, these bone metastases were associated with a range of bone responses from osteoblastic to osteolytic with a wide spectrum of bone responses often seen within an individual patient. Overall, the average bone volume/tissue volume (BV/TV) was 25.7%, confirming the characteristic association of an osteoblastic response to prostate cancer bone metastasis when compared with the normal age-matched weighted mean BV/TV of 14.7%. The observed new bone formation was essentially woven bone, and this was a localized event. In comparing BV/TV at metastatic sites between patients who had received BP treatment and those who had not, there was a significant difference (28.6% versus 19.3%, respectively). At bone sites that were not invaded by tumor, the average BV/TV was 10.1%, indicating significant bone loss owing to ADT that was not improved (11%) in those patients who had received BPs. Surprisingly, there was no significant difference in the number of osteoclasts present at the metastatic sites between patients treated or not treated with BPs, but in bone sites where the patient had been treated with BPs, giant osteoclasts were observed. Overall, 873 paraffin-embedded specimens and 661 methylmethacrylate-embedded specimens were analyzed. Our results indicate that in CRPC patients, ADT induces serious bone loss even in patients treated with BP. Furthermore, in this cohort of patients, BP treatment increased BV and did not decrease the number of osteoclasts in prostate cancer bone metastases compared with bone metastases from patients who did not receive BP.

  9. Metastatic Bone Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... of these tumors can spread (metastasize) to the skeleton. With improved medical treatment of many cancers — especially ... A er the lung and the liver, the skeleton is the most common site of spread of ...

  10. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    tumor cells with adipocytes. Our models underline the importance of using the appropriate culture conditions to mimic physiological interactions between marrow adipocytes and metastatic tumor cells. These systems have a potential to be utilized for analyses of various factors that may be regulated by the adipocytes in bone. Their application likely extends beyond metastatic prostate cancer to other tumors that colonize the bone marrow microenvironment.

  11. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    tumor cells with adipocytes. Our models underline the importance of using the appropriate culture conditions to mimic physiological interactions between marrow adipocytes and metastatic tumor cells. These systems have a potential to be utilized for analyses of various factors that may be regulated by the adipocytes in bone. Their application likely extends beyond metastatic prostate cancer to other tumors that colonize the bone marrow microenvironment. PMID:27458427

  12. The Role of Osteoblast-Derived Cytokines in Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    www.aacrjournals.org Clin Cancer Res 2006;12(5) March1, 20061431 Current methods to detect bone metastases are insufficiently sensitive (e.g., radiography ...or are impractical for adequately statistically powered experiments because of costs or labor- intensiveness. Radiography can detect osteolytic...Carlsbad, CA) supple- mented with 2 mmol/L L-glutamine, 1 mmol/L sodium pyruvate, 0.02 mmol/L nonessential amino acids, 5% fetal bovine serum

  13. Deconvoluting the Complexity of Bone Metastatic Prostate Cancer via Computational Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    2. KEYWORDS: Provide a brief list of keywords (limit to 20 words). TGFβ- Transforming Growth Factor Beta Prostate Cancer (PCa) to Bone...intensity for each clonal population . (c-f) In silico simulations (n 24/group) were performed under control or TGF inhibition (80% efficacy) post- and pre...treatment conditions. Clonal population was measured at Day 100 (left y- axis) and Day 250 (right y-axis). The project provided the PI with

  14. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  15. Pamidronate in prevention of bone complications in metastatic breast cancer: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Hillner, B E; Weeks, J C; Desch, C E; Smith, T J

    2000-01-01

    Pamidronate is effective in reducing bony complications in patients with metastatic breast cancer who have known osteolytic lesions. However, pamidronate does not increase survival and is associated with additional financial costs and inconvenience. We conducted a post-hoc evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of pamidronate using the results of two randomized trials that evaluated pamidronate 90 mg administered intravenously every month versus placebo. The trials differed only in the initial systemic therapy administered (hormonal or chemotherapy). Total skeletal related events (SREs), including surgery for pathologic fracture, radiation for fracture or pain control, conservatively treated pathologic fracture, spinal cord compression, or hypercalcemia, were taken directly from the trials. Using a societal perspective, direct health care costs were assigned to each SRE. Each group's monthly survival was equal and was projected to decline using observed median survivals. The cost of pamidronate reflected the average wholesale price of the drug plus infusion. The value or disutility of an adverse event per month was evaluated using a zero value (events avoided) or an assigned one (range, 0.2 to 0.8). The cost of pamidronate therapy exceeded the cost savings from prevented adverse events. The difference between the treated and placebo groups was larger with hormonal systemic therapy than with chemotherapy (additional $7,685 compared with $3,968 per woman). The projected net cost per SRE avoided was $3,940 with chemotherapy and $9,390 with hormonal therapy. The cost-effectiveness ratios were $108,200 with chemotherapy and $305, 300 with hormonal therapy per quality-adjusted year. Although pamidronate is effective in preventing a feared, common adverse outcome in metastatic breast cancer, its use is associated with high incremental costs per adverse event avoided. The analysis is most sensitive to the costs of pamidronate and pathologic fractures that were asymptomatic

  16. Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer that starts in a bone is uncommon. Cancer that has spread to the bone from another ... more common. There are three types of bone cancer: Osteosarcoma - occurs most often between ages 10 and ...

  17. Direct crosstalk between cancer and osteoblast lineage cells fuels metastatic growth in bone via auto-amplification of IL-6 and RANKL signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Chow, Shu-Oi; Boernert, Katja; Basel, Dennis; Mikuscheva, Anastasia; Kim, Sarah; Fong-Yee, Colette; Trivedi, Trupti; Buttgereit, Frank; Sutherland, Robert L; Dunstan, Colin R; Zhou, Hong; Seibel, Markus J

    2014-09-01

    The bone microenvironment and its modification by cancer and host cell interactions is a key driver of skeletal metastatic growth. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expression in bone cells, and serum IL-6 levels are associated with poor clinical outcomes in cancer patients. We investigated the effects of RANKL on cancer cells and the role of tumor-derived IL-6 within the bone microenvironment. Using human breast cancer cell lines to induce tumors in the bone of immune-deficient mice, we first determined whether RANKL released by cells of the osteoblast lineage directly promotes IL-6 expression by cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We then disrupted of IL-6 signaling in vivo either via knockdown of IL-6 in tumor cells or through treatment with specific anti-human or anti-mouse IL-6 receptor antibodies to investigate the tumor effect. Finally, we tested the effect of RANK knockdown in cancer cells on cancer growth. We demonstrate that osteoblast lineage-derived RANKL upregulates secretion of IL-6 by breast cancers in vivo and in vitro. IL-6, in turn, induces expression of RANK by cancer cells, which sensitizes the tumor to RANKL and significantly enhances cancer IL-6 release. Disruption in vivo of this auto-amplifying crosstalk by knockdown of IL-6 or RANK in cancer cells, or via treatment with anti-IL-6 receptor antibodies, significantly reduces tumor growth in bone but not in soft tissues. RANKL and IL-6 mediate direct paracrine-autocrine signaling between cells of the osteoblast lineage and cancer cells, significantly enhancing the growth of metastatic breast cancers within bone. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  18. Antagonizing miR-218-5p attenuates Wnt signaling and reduces metastatic bone disease of triple negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Farina, Nicholas H.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.

    2016-01-01

    Wnt signaling is implicated in bone formation and activated in breast cancer cells promoting primary and metastatic tumor growth. A compelling question is whether osteogenic miRNAs that increase Wnt activity for bone formation are aberrantly expressed in breast tumor cells to support metastatic bone disease. Here we report that miR-218-5p is highly expressed in bone metastases from breast cancer patients, but is not detected in normal mammary epithelial cells. Furthermore, inhibition of miR-218-5p impaired the growth of bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells in the bone microenvironment in vivo. These findings indicate a positive role for miR-218-5p in bone metastasis. Bioinformatic and biochemical analyses revealed a positive correlation between aberrant miR-218-5p expression and activation of Wnt signaling in breast cancer cells. Mechanistically, miR-218-5p targets the Wnt inhibitors Sclerostin (SOST) and sFRP-2, which highly enhances Wnt signaling. In contrast, delivery of antimiR-218-5p decreased Wnt activity and the expression of metastasis-related genes, including bone sialoprotein (BSP/IBSP), osteopontin (OPN/SPP1) and CXCR-4, implicating a Wnt/miR-218-5p regulatory network in bone metastatic breast cancer. Furthermore, miR-218-5p also mediates the Wnt-dependent up-regulation of PTHrP, a key cytokine promoting cancer-induced osteolysis. Antagonizing miR-218-5p reduced the expression of PTHrP and Rankl, inhibited osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and prevented the development of osteolytic lesions in a preclinical metastasis model. We conclude that pathological elevation of miR-218-5p in breast cancer cells activates Wnt signaling to enhance metastatic properties of breast cancer cells and cancer-induced osteolytic disease, suggesting that miR-218-5p could be an attractive therapeutic target for preventing disease progression. PMID:27738322

  19. Influence of omega-6 PUFA arachidonic acid and bone marrow adipocytes on metastatic spread from prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Hart, C; Gazi, E; Gardner, P; Lockyer, N; Clarke, N

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (CaP) preferentially metastasises to the bone, and we have previously shown that the poly-unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) is a potent stimulator of CaP invasion. Here we present that AA promotes CaP invasion by inducing bone marrow adipocyte formation. Methods: Boyden invasion-chamber assays assessed the ability of dietary oils, their PUFA components, and specific PUFA-loaded adipocytes to induce PC-3 invasion. Lipid transfer and metabolism was followed using deuterated AA and Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results: Poly-unsaturated fatty acid constituents, but not their corresponding dietary oils, induced PC-3 invasion. PUFAs induce bone marrow adipocyte (BM-Ad) differentiation with AA inducing higher levels of BM-Ad differentiation, as compared with other PUFAs (3998±514.4 vs 932±265.8; P=0.00002), which stimulated greater PC-3 invasion than free AA (22 408.5±607.4 vs 16 236±313.9; P=0.01111) or adipocytes generated in the presence of other PUFAs. In bone marrow co-culture PC-3 and BM-Ad interactions result in direct uptake and metabolism of AA by PC-3 cells, destruction of the adipocyte and subsequent formation of a bone metastasis. Conclusion: The data supports the hypothesis that AA not only promotes CaP invasion, it also prepares the ‘soil', making it more supportive for implantation and propagation of the migrating metastatic cell. PMID:19997104

  20. Radium-223 in Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Current Data and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Brian; Chalhoub, Elie; Chalouhy, Carla; Sartor, Oliver

    2015-07-01

    Ra-223 (radium-223) is an alpha particle-emitting radiopharmaceutical with targeted uptake in areas of osteoblastic lesions. The combination of targeted skeletal uptake, short tissue-penetration range, and high energy of alpha particles allows for targeted cell killing and a low toxicity profile. A phase III trial (ALSYMPCA) demonstrated improvements in overall survival and symptomatic skeletal events in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and multifocal symptomatic bone metastases. Adverse events were limited but included both gastrointestinal and hematologic effects. This article will describe the historic background of Ra-223; outline the clinical studies which led to phase III trials of this agent; highlight key results of these phase III studies; and explore possible future directions for use of Ra-223 and other alpha particles--both in prostate cancer and for management of other diseases.

  1. Targeting of Runx2 by miRNA-135 and miRNA-203 Impairs Progression of Breast Cancer and Metastatic Bone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Taipaleenmäki, Hanna; Browne, Gillian; Akech, Jacqueline; Zustin, Jozef; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Janet L.; Hesse, Eric; Stein, Gary S.; Lian, Jane B.

    2015-01-01

    Progression of breast cancer to metastatic bone disease is linked to deregulated expression of the transcription factor Runx2. Therefore, our goal was to evaluate the potential for clinical use of Runx2-targeting microRNAs (miRNAs) to reduce tumor growth and bone metastatic burden. Expression analysis of a panel of miRNAs regulating Runx2 revealed a reciprocal relationship between the abundance of Runx2 protein and two miRNAs, miR-135 and miR-203. These miRNAs are highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells where Runx2 is not detected, and absent in metastatic breast cancer cells and tissue biopsies that express Runx2. Reconstituting metastatic MDA-MB-231-Luc cells with miR-135 and miR-203 reduced the abundance of Runx2 and expression of the metastasis-promoting Runx2 target genes IL-11, MMP-13, and PTHrP. Additionally, tumor cell viability was decreased and migration suppressed in vitro. Orthotopic implantation of MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 or miR-203, followed by an intratumoral administration of the synthetic miRNAs reduced the tumor growth and spontaneous metastasis to bone. Furthermore, intratibial injection of these miRNA-delivered cells impaired tumor growth in the bone environment and inhibited bone resorption. Importantly, reconstitution of Runx2 in MDA-MB-231-luc cells delivered with miR-135 and miR-203 reversed the inhibitory effect of the miRNAs on tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, we have identified that aberrant expression of Runx2 in aggressive tumor cells is related to the loss of specific Runx2-targeting miRNAs and that a clinically relevant replacement strategy by delivery of synthetic miRNAs is a candidate therapeutic approach to prevent metastatic bone disease by this route. PMID:25634212

  2. Imaging, procedural and clinical variables associated with tumor yield on bone biopsy in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKay, R R; Zukotynski, K A; Werner, L; Voznesensky, O; Wu, J S; Smith, S E; Jiang, Z; Melnick, K; Yuan, X; Kantoff, P W; Montgomery, B; Balk, S P; Taplin, M-E

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms driving disease progression is fundamental to identifying new therapeutic targets for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Owing to the prevalence of bone metastases in mCRPC, obtaining sufficient tumor tissue for analysis has historically been a challenge. In this exploratory analysis, we evaluated imaging, procedural and clinical variables associated with tumor yield on image-guided bone biopsy in men with mCRPC. Clinical data were collected prospectively from men with mCRPC enrolled on a phase II trial with serial metastasis biopsies performed according to standard clinical protocol. Imaging was retrospectively reviewed. We evaluated the percent positive biopsy cores (PPC), calculated as the number of positive cores divided by the total number of cores collected per biopsy. Twenty-nine men had 39 bone biopsies. Seventy-seven percent of bone biopsies had at least one positive biopsy core. We determined that lesion size and distance from the skin to the lesion edge correlated with tumor yield on biopsy (median PPC 75% versus 42% for lesions >8.8 cm(3) versus ⩽ 8.8 cm(3), respectively, P=0.05; median PPC 33% versus 71% for distance ⩾ 6.1 versus <6.1 cm, respectively, P = 0.02). There was a trend towards increased tumor yield in patients with increased uptake on radionuclide bone scan, higher calcium levels and shorter duration of osteoclast-targeting therapy, although this was not statistically significant. Ten men had 14 soft tissue biopsies. All soft tissue biopsies had at least one positive biopsy core. This exploratory analysis suggests that there are imaging, procedural and clinical variables that have an impact on image-guided bone biopsy yield. In order to maximize harvest of prostate cancer tissue, we have incorporated a prospective analysis of the metrics described here as part of a multi-institutional project aiming to use the molecular characterization of mCRPC tumors to

  3. Integrated Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography May Render Bone Scintigraphy Unnecessary to Investigate Suspected Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Patrick G.; Lynch, Colleen; Feeney, John N.; Patil, Sujata; Howard, Jane; Larson, Steven M.; Dickler, Maura; Hudis, Clifford A.; Jochelson, Maxine; McArthur, Heather L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Although the accurate detection of osseous metastases in the evaluation of patients with suspected metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has significant prognostic and therapeutic implications, the ideal diagnostic approach is uncertain. In this retrospective, single-institution study, we compare the diagnostic performance of integrated positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) and bone scintigraphy (BSc) in women with suspected MBC. Patients and Methods Women with suspected MBC evaluated with PET/CT and BSc (within 30 days) between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2008, were identified through institutional databases. Electronic medical records were reviewed, and radiology reports were classified as positive/negative/equivocal for osseous metastases. A nuclear medicine radiologist (blinded to correlative and clinical end points) reviewed all equivocal PET/CT and BSc images and reclassified some reports. Final PET/CT and BSc classifications were compared. Baseline patient/tumor characteristics and bone pathology were recorded and compared to the final imaging results. Results We identified 163 women who had a median age of 52 years (range, 30 to 90 years); 32% had locally advanced breast cancer, 42% had been diagnosed with breast cancer less than 12 weeks before identification. Twenty studies were originally deemed equivocal (five with PET/CT, and 15 with BSc), and 13 (65%) of these studies were reclassified after radiology review. Overall, PET/CT and BSc were highly concordant for reporting osseous metastases with 132 paired studies (81%); 32 (20%) were positive, and 100 (61%) were negative. Thirty-one occurrences (19%) were discordant. Twelve of these (39%) had pathology confirming osseous metastases: nine (of 18) were PET/CT positive and BSc negative; one (of three) was PET/CT positive and BSc equivocal; and two (of two) were PET/CT equivocal and BSc negative. Conclusion This study supports the use of PET/CT in detecting osseous metastases for

  4. Spinal IFN-γ-induced protein-10 (CXCL10) mediates metastatic breast cancer-induced bone pain by activation of microglia in rat models.

    PubMed

    Bu, Huilian; Shu, Bin; Gao, Feng; Liu, Cheng; Guan, Xuehai; Ke, Changbin; Cao, Fei; Hinton, Antentor Othrell; Xiang, Hongbing; Yang, Hui; Tian, Xuebi; Tian, Yuke

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) is a common clinical problem in breast cancer patients with bone metastasis. Recent studies shows chemokines are novel targets for treatment of CIBP. In this study, we intra-tibial inoculated with Walker 256 rat mammary gland carcinoma cells into rat bone to established metastatic breast cancer. Then we measured the expression of CXCL10 in the spinal cord of metastatic bone cancer rats, investigated the role of CXCL10 in the development of CIBP, and the underlying mechanism. Results revealed that after intra-tibial inoculation with Walker 256 cells, rats showed up-regulation of CXCL10 and its receptor CXCR3 in the spinal cord. Interestingly, intrathecally injection of recombinant CXCL10 protein induced mechanical allodynia in naïve rats. Blocking the function of CXCL10/CXCR3 pathway via anti-CXCL10 antibody or CXCR3 antagonist prevented the development of CIBP and microglial activation. Moreover, CXCL10-induced mechanical allodynia was rescued by minocycline treatment during the late-stage of CIBP, days 10-14. The regulation of CXCL10 expression involved microglial activation in a manner of autocrine positive feedback. These results suggest that CXCL10 may be a necessary algogenic molecule, especially in the development of CIBP. Its function was partly mediated via spinal microglial activation. This study provides a novel insight into the biological function of chemokine CXCL10 in the molecular mechanism underlying cancer pain. It also provides new target for clinical treatment of metastatic breast cancer-induced bone pain in future.

  5. A new model of multi-visceral and bone metastatic prostate cancer with perivascular niche targeting by a novel endothelial specific adenoviral vector.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Kaliberov, Sergey; Sohn, Rebecca E; Kaliberova, Lyudmila; Du, Yingqiu; Prior, Julie L; Leib, Daniel J; Chauchereau, Anne; Sehn, Jennifer K; Curiel, David T; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2017-01-17

    While modern therapies for metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) have improved survival they are associated with an increasingly prevalent entity, aggressive variant PCa (AVPCa), lacking androgen receptor (AR) expression, enriched for cancer stem cells (CSCs), and evidencing epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity with a varying extent of neuroendocrine transdifferentiation. Parallel work revealed that endothelial cells (ECs) create a perivascular CSC niche mediated by juxtacrine and membrane tethered signaling. There is increasing interest in pharmacological metastatic niche targeting, however, targeted access has been impossible. Here, we discovered that the Gleason 7 derived, androgen receptor negative, IGR-CaP1 cell line possessed some but not all of the molecular features of AVPCa. Intracardiac injection into NOD/SCID/IL2Rg -/- (NSG) mice produced a completely penetrant bone, liver, adrenal, and brain metastatic phenotype; noninvasively and histologically detectable at 2 weeks, and necessitating sacrifice 4-5 weeks post injection. Bone metastases were osteoblastic, and osteolytic. IGR-CaP1 cells expressed the neuroendocrine marker synaptophysin, near equivalent levels of vimentin and e-cadherin, all of the EMT transcription factors, and activation of NOTCH and WNT pathways. In parallel, we created a new triple-targeted adenoviral vector containing a fiber knob RGD peptide, a hexon mutation, and an EC specific ROBO4 promoter (Ad.RGD.H5/3.ROBO4). This vector was expressed in metastatic microvessels tightly juxtaposed to IGR-CaP1 cells in bone and visceral niches. Thus, the combination of IGR-CaP1 cells and NSG mice produces a completely penetrant metastatic PCa model emulating end-stage human disease. In addition, the metastatic niche access provided by our novel Ad vector could be therapeutically leveraged for future disease control or cure.

  6. Prostate cancer metastatic to bone has higher expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) than primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Xu, Xiaojun; Li, Bo; Brown, Edward; Farris, Alton B.; Sun, Shi-Yong; Yang, Jenny J.

    2015-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is the principal regulator of the secretion of parathyroid hormone and plays key roles in extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) homeostasis. It is also thought to participate in the development of cancer, especially bony metastases of breast and prostate cancer. However, the expression of CaSR has not been systematically analyzed in prostate cancer from patients with or without bony metastases. By comparing human prostate cancer tissue sections in microarrays, we found that the CaSR was expressed in both normal prostate and primary prostate cancer as assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We used two methods to analyze the expression level of CaSR. One was the pathological score read by a pathologist, the other was the positivity% obtained from the Aperio positive pixel count algorithm. Both of the methods gave consistent results. Metastatic prostate cancer tissue obtained from bone had higher CaSR expression than primary prostate cancer (P <0.05). The expression of CaSR in primary prostate cancers of patients with metastases to tissues other than bone was not different from that in primary prostate cancer of patients with or without bony metastases (P >0.05). The expression of CaSR in cancer tissue was not associated with the stage or status of differentiation of the cancer. These results suggest that CaSR may have a role in promoting bony metastasis of prostate cancer, hence raising the possibility of reducing the risk of such metastases with CaSR-based therapeutics. PMID:26065011

  7. Response in bone turnover markers during therapy predicts overall survival in patients with metastatic prostate cancer: analysis of three clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Som, A; Tu, S-M; Liu, J; Wang, X; Qiao, W; Logothetis, C; Corn, P G

    2012-10-23

    The bone-forming metastases of prostate cancer result from complex stromal-epithelial interactions within the tumour microenvironment. Autocrine-paracrine signalling pathways between prostate cancer epithelial cells, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts stimulate aberrant bone remodelling, and the activity of these three cell populations can be quantitatively measured using prostate-specific antigen (PSA), bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP) and urine N-telopeptide (uNTx), respectively. The purpose of the present study was to test the hypothesis that serial measurements of BAP and uNTx during therapy would facilitate monitoring of disease activity and predict the overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic prostate cancer receiving therapy. Radionuclide bone scan, PSA, BAP, and uNTx data were retrospectively analysed from three clinical trials in patients with metastatic prostate cancer conducted at our institution. Qualitative changes in bone scans and quantitative changes in PSA, BAP, and uNTx concentrations during therapy were correlated with OS. Baseline levels of BAP, but not PSA, were prognostic for OS in both androgen-dependent and castrate-resistant disease. A reduction in PSA, BAP, uNTx, or BAP/uNTx on therapy was predictive of improved OS in both patient groups. Conversely, an increase in PSA, or BAP on therapy was predictive of worse OS in both patient groups. Baseline number of lesions and response on bone scan during therapy were neither prognostic nor predictive of OS in either patient group. These observations support the concept that serial measurements of bone turnover metabolites during therapy function as clinically informative predictive biomarkers in patients with advanced prostate cancer and skeletal metastases. PSA measurements and bone scans remain essential to monitor the overall disease activity and determine the anatomic distribution of skeletal metastases.

  8. MK591, a second generation leukotriene biosynthesis inhibitor, prevents invasion and induces apoptosis in the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells: implications for the treatment of castration-resistant, bone-metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Sivalokanathan; Ghosh, Ritisha; Morisetty, Shravan; Ghosh, Jagadananda

    2015-01-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is a major clinical challenge for which no cure is currently available primarily because of the lack of proper understanding about appropriate molecular target(s). Previously we observed that inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-Lox) activity induces apoptosis in some types of prostate cancer cells, suggesting an important role of 5-Lox in the viability of prostate cancer cells. However, nothing is known about the role of 5-Lox in the survival of castration-resistant, metastatic prostate cancer cells. Thus, we tested the effects of MK591, a second-generation, specific inhibitor of 5-Lox activity, on the viability and metastatic characteristics of CRPC cells. We observed that MK591 effectively kills the bone-invading C4-2B human prostate cancer cells (which bear characteristics of CRPC), but does not affect normal, non-cancer fibroblasts (which do not express 5-Lox) in the same experimental conditions. We also observed that MK591 dramatically inhibits the in vitro invasion and soft-agar colony formation of C4-2B cells. Interestingly, we found that treatment with MK591 dramatically down-regulates the expression of c-Myc and its targets at sub-lethal doses. In light of frequent over-activation of c-Myc in a spectrum of aggressive cancers (including CRPC), and the challenges associated with inhibition of c-Myc (because of its non-enzymatic nature), our novel findings of selective killing, and blockade of invasive and soft-agar colony-forming abilities of the castration-resistant, bone-metastatic C4-2B prostate cancer cells by MK591, open up a new avenue to attack CRPC cells for better management of advanced prostate cancer while sparing normal, non-cancer body cells.

  9. Associations between aerobic exercise levels and physical and mental health outcomes in men with bone metastatic prostate cancer: a cross-sectional investigation.

    PubMed

    Zopf, E M; Newton, R U; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Cormie, P; Joseph, D; Chambers, S K; Baumann, F T; Bloch, W; Galvão, D A

    2016-09-20

    Cancer patients with bone metastases have previously been excluded from participation in physical activity programmes due to concerns of skeletal fractures. Our aim was to provide initial information on the association between physical activity levels and physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. Between 2012 and 2015, 55 prostate cancer patients (mean age 69.7 ± 8.3; BMI 28.6 ± 4.0) with bone metastases (58.2% >2 regions affected) undertook assessments for self-reported physical activity, physical and mental health outcomes (SF-36), objective physical performance measures and body composition by DXA. Sixteen men (29%) met the current aerobic exercise guidelines for cancer survivors, while 39 (71%) reported lower aerobic exercise levels. Men not meeting aerobic exercise guidelines had lower physical functioning (p = .004), role functioning (physical and emotional) (p < .05), general health scores (p = .014) as well all lower measures of physical performance (p < .05). Lower levels of aerobic exercise are associated with reduced physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases. While previous research has focused primarily in those with non-metastatic disease, our initial results suggest that higher levels of aerobic exercise may preserve physical and mental health outcomes in prostate cancer patients with bone metastases.

  10. Cancer and the metastatic substrate

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Seventy percent of cancer patients have detectable metastases when they receive a diagnosis and 90% of cancer deaths result from metastases. These two facts emphasise the urgency for research to study the mechanisms and processes that enable metastasis. We need to develop a greater understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that cause metastasis and also we need to do more. We must also consider the micro- and macro-environmental factors that influence this disease. Studying this environmental context has led us to update the ‘seed and soil’ hypothesis which dates back to the 19th century. This theory describes cancerous cells as seeds and the substrate as the soil in target organs though this may seem antiquated. Nonetheless, the tissue specificity that researchers have recently observed in metastatic colonisation supports the validity of the seed and soil theory. We now know that the metastatic potential of a tumour cell depends on multiple, reciprocal interactions between the primary tumour and distant sites. These interactions determine tumour progression. Studies of metastasis have allowed us to develop treatments that focus on therapeutic effectiveness. These new treatments account for the frequent metastasis of some tumours to target organs such as bones, lungs, brain, and liver. The purpose of this review is first to describe interactions between the cellular and molecular entities and the target organ tumour environment that enables metastasis. A second aim is to describe the complex mechanisms that mediate these interactions. PMID:28105072

  11. The Role of Osteoblast-Derived Inflammatory Cytokines in Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Shuman, Andrea M. Mastro⁎ Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, 431 S. Frear Building, University Park, PA...potential autocrine/paracrine factor in Paget’s disease of bone, J. Clin. Invest. 89 (1992) 46–52. [32] R.D. Devlin , H.G. Bone III, G.D. Roodman...Bussard :C. V. Gay :A. M. Mastro (*) Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802

  12. [Metastatic bone disease. Strategies for imaging].

    PubMed

    Scutellari, P N; Antinolfi, G; Galeotti, R; Giganti, M

    2003-04-01

    Skeletal metastases represent the most common malignant bone tumor. They occur mainly in adults and even more frequently in the elderly. The most common metastases in men are from prostate cancer (60%) and in women from breast cancer (70%). Other primitive tumors responsible for bone metastases are: lung, kidney, thyroid, alimentary tract, bladder, and skin. The spine and pelvis are the most common metastatic sites, due to the presence of red (haematopoietic active) bone marrow in a high amount. As a general rule, the radiographic pattern was lytic type; other aspects were osteosclerotic, mixed, lytic vs mixed and osteosclerotic vs lytic patterns. The main symptom is pain, although many bone metastases are asymptomatic. The most severe consequences are pathologic fractures and cord compression. Clinical evaluation of patients with skeletal metastases needs multimodal diagnostic imaging, able to detect lesions, to assess their extension and localization, and eventually drive the biopsy (for histo-morphological diagnosis). These techniques give different performances in terms of sensitivity and specificity; but none of the modalities alone seems to be adequate to yield a reliable diagnostic outcome. Therefore multidisciplinary cooperation is required to optimize the screening, clinical management and follow-up of the patients. In other terms, what is the efficacy of these new diagnostic tests compared to the "older" diagnostic tests? Frequently the new procedures do not replace the older one, but it is added to the diagnostic workup, thereby increasing costs without impacting the "patient's condition". The aim of the present work is to propose an "algorithm" for the detection and diagnosis of skeletal metastases, which may be applied differently in symptomatic and asymptomatic oncologic patients. Bone scintigraphy remains the first choice technique in the evaluation of asymptomatic patients, in whom skeletal metastases are supposed. Although it has a high sensitivity

  13. Glyphosate Vedotin for Treatment of Bone Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    H. IL-17 enhances the net angiogenic activity and in vivo growth of human non -small cell lung cancer in SCID mice through promoting CXCR-2- dependent ...hyperinsulinemia) may circulate in the body of people with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus with insulin resistance. Under hyperinsulinemic conditions...2 diabetes , and cancer: the insulin and IGF connection. Endocr Relat Cancer (2012) 19(5):F27–45. doi:10.1530/ERC- 11-0374 41. Stephenson GD, Rose DP

  14. Marrow Adipocyte-derived CXCL1 and CXCL2 Contribute to Bone Osteolysis in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardaway, Aimalie L.; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Podgorski, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Increased bone marrow adiposity is a common feature of advanced age, obesity and associated metabolic pathologies. Augmented numbers of marrow adipocytes positively correlate with dysregulated bone remodeling, also a well-established complication of metastatic disease. We have shown previously that marrow adiposity accelerates prostate tumor progression in the skeleton and promotes extensive destruction of the bone; however, the factors behind adipocyte-driven osteolysis in the skeletal tumor microenvironment are not currently known. In this study, utilizing in vivo diet-induced models of bone marrow adiposity, we reveal evidence for positive correlation between increased marrow fat content, bone degradation by ARCaP(M) and PC3 prostate tumors, and augmented levels of host-derived CXCL1 and CXCL2, ligands of CXCR2 receptor. We show by in vitro osteoclastogenesis assays that media conditioned by bone marrow adipocytes is a significant source of CXCL1 and CXCL2 proteins. We also demonstrate that both the adipocyte-conditioned media and the recombinant CXCL1 and CXCL2 ligands efficiently accelerate osteoclast maturation, a process that can be blocked by neutralizing antibodies to each of the chemokines. We further confirm the contribution of CXCR2 signaling axis to adiposity-driven osteoclastogenesis by blocking fat cell-induced osteoclast differentiation with CXCR2 antagonist or neutralizing antibodies. Together, our results link CXCL1 and CXCL2 chemokines with bone marrow adiposity and implicate CXCR2 signaling in promoting effects of marrow fat on progression of skeletal tumors in bone. PMID:25802102

  15. Drug Development Against Metastatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Sui

    2017-01-01

    While combinational diagnostic and treatment strategies over the past decades have significantly improved the overall survival of cancer patients, metastatic cancer remains a leading cause of death in developed countries. The lack of successful treatment strategies for the disease is in large part due to the complexity of the metastatic transformation, which embodies extensive cellular and extracellular alterations, enabling metastatic cancer cells to reach and colonize other organs. The mode of action for the majority of anti-cancer drugs used in clinics today is primarily tumor growth inhibition. While they are effective in destroying cancer cells, they fall short in blocking metastasis. Here we discuss the evolution of past and current anti-cancer drug development, the limits of current strategies, and possible alternative approaches for future drug development against metastatic cancers. PMID:28356899

  16. ErbB2 overexpression on occult metastatic cells in bone marrow predicts poor clinical outcome of stage I-III breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Schlimok, G; Heumos, I; Schaller, G; Riethdorf, L; Riethmüller, G; Pantel, K

    2001-03-01

    Occult hematogenous micrometastases are the major cause for metastatic relapse and cancer-related death in patients with operable primary breast cancer. Although sensitive immunocytochemical and molecular methods allow detection of individual breast cancer cells in bone marrow (BM), a major site of metastatic relapse, current detection techniques cannot discriminate between nonviable shed tumor cells and seminal metastatic cells. To address this problem, we analyzed the relevance of erbB2 overexpression on disseminated cytokeratin-18-positive breast cancer cells in the BM of 52 patients with locoregionally restricted primary breast cancer using immunocytochemical double labeling with monoclonal antibody 9G6 to the p185erbB2 oncoprotein. Expression of p185erbB2 on BM micrometastases was detected in 31 of 52 (60%) patients independent of established risk factors such as lymph node involvement, primary tumor size, differentiation grade, or expression of p185erbB2 on primary tumor cells. After a median follow-up of 64 months, patients with p185erbB2-positive BM micrometastases had developed fatal metastatic relapses more frequently than patients with p185erbB2-negative micrometastases (21 versus 7 events; P = 0.032). In multivariate analysis, the presence of p185erbB2-positive micrometastases was an independent prognostic factor with a hazard ratio of 2.78 (95% confidence interval, 1.11-6.96) for overall survival (P = 0.029). We therefore conclude that erbB2 overexpression characterizes a clinically relevant subset of breast cancer micrometastases.

  17. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis in breast cancer cells by 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses tumorigenicity in vitro and metastatic lesions of bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hiroshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Wasa, Junji; Arai, Eisuke; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kozawa, Eiji; Futamura, Naohisa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-01-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to play crucial roles in the tumorigenicity of malignant tumors. Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of HA suppressed the tumorigenicity of various malignant tumors including breast cancer. 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) has been reported to inhibit HA synthesis in several cell types. However, few studies have focused on the effects of HA inhibition in breast cancer cells by MU, nor the effects on bone metastasis. We hypothesized that MU would suppress the progression of bone metastasis via inhibition of HA synthesis. Here, we investigated the effects of MU on HA expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in addition to their tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. HAS2 mRNA expression was downregulated after 6 and 24 hr treatment with MU. Quantitative analysis of HA revealed that MU significantly inhibited the intracellular and cell surface HA. MU significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as determined by cell proliferation and TUNEL assays, respectively. Phosphorylation of Akt was suppressed after 12 and 24 hr treatment with MU. MU treatment also inhibited cell motility as well as cell invasiveness. MU also inhibited cell growth and motility in murine fibroblast cell line NIH3T3. In vivo, administration of MU inhibited the expansion of osteolytic lesions on soft X-rays in mouse breast cancer xenograft models. HA accumulation in bone metastatic lesions was perturbed peripherally. These data suggest that MU might be a therapeutic candidate for bone metastasis of breast cancer via suppression of HA synthesis and accumulation.

  18. High activity Rhenium-186 HEDP with autologous peripheral blood stem cell rescue: a phase I study in progressive hormone refractory prostate cancer metastatic to bone

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, J M; McCready, V R; Flux, G; Norman, A R; Buffa, F M; Chittenden, S; Guy, M; Pomeroy, K; Cook, G; Gadd, J; Treleaven, J; Al-Deen, A; Horwich, A; Huddart, R A; Dearnaley, D P

    2002-01-01

    We tested the feasibility and toxicity of high activities Rhenium-186 hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate, with peripheral blood stem cell rescue in patients with progressive hormone refractory prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Twenty-five patients received between 2500 and 5000 MBq of Rhenium-186 hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate followed 14 days later by the return of peripheral blood peripheral blood stem cells. Activity limiting toxicity was defined as grade III haematological toxicity, lasting at least 7 days, or grade IV haematological toxicity of any duration or any serious unexpected toxicity. Activity limiting toxicity occurred in two of six who received activities of 5000 MBq and maximum tolerated activity was defined at this activity level. Prostate specific antigen reductions of 50% or more lasting at least 4 weeks were seen in five of the 25 patients (20%) all of whom received more than 3500 MBq of Rhenium-186 hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate. The actuarial survival at 1 year is 54%. Administered activities of 5000 MBq of Rhenium-186 hydroxyethylidene diphosphonate are feasible using autologous peripheral blood peripheral blood stem cell rescue in patients with progressive hormone refractory prostate cancer metastatic to bone. The main toxicity is thrombocytopaenia, which is short lasting. A statistically significant activity/prostate specific antigen response was seen. We have now commenced a Phase II trial to further evaluate response rates. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1715–1720. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600348 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12087455

  19. Treatment of metastatic bone pain with strontium-89.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R G; Spicer, J A; Preston, D F; Wegst, A V; Martin, N L

    1987-01-01

    We have utilized 89Sr as palliative treatment for bone pain secondary to metastatic cancer in the skeleton of over 200 patients. The best results have been in patients with carcinoma of the prostate (80% response rate) and breast (89%). Results in a small number of patients with a variety of other cell types were not nearly as encouraging. Strontium-89 provides excellent palliation in the management of bone pain secondary to prostate and breast carcinoma.

  20. Organtropic Metastatic Secretomes and Exosomes in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    metastatic organ- tropism we are currently analyzing secretomes and extracellular miRNAs from lung (Lyden laboratory) and bone metastatic breast cancer...cells (Kang Laboratory). Task 1a: Identify differentially secreted miRNAs associated with bone- tropism of breast cancer cells (Months 1-36). Dr...Kang’s group is responsible for this task. Task 1b: Identify differentially secreted proteins and miRNAs associated with lung- tropism of breast

  1. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    for metastatic breast cancer cells to grow or remain dormant. This hypothesis is being tested using a 3D bioreactor of ECM, derived from osteoblasts...dormant human cells to proliferate in the bioreactor in co-culture with OB. The effect appears to depend on prostaglandin production. Chronic...growth of cancer cells, murine osteoblasts, MC3T3-E1, were grown for 2 months in the bioreactor with a basal medium of αMEM with 10mM β

  2. Sorafenib for Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared sorafenib (Nexavar®) and a placebo for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer that is no longer responding to treatment with radioactive iodine

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Early [(18)F]Sodium Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Response to Treatment in Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer to Bone.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Stephanie A; Perk, Timothy; Lin, Christie; Eickhoff, Jens; Choyke, Peter L; Dahut, William L; Apolo, Andrea B; Humm, John L; Larson, Steven M; Morris, Michael J; Liu, Glenn; Jeraj, Robert

    2017-08-20

    Purpose [(18)F]Sodium fluoride (NaF) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a promising radiotracer for quantitative assessment of bone metastases. This study assesses changes in early NaF PET/CT response measures in metastatic prostate cancer for correlation to clinical outcomes. Patients and Methods Fifty-six patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with osseous metastases had NaF PET/CT scans performed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy (n = 16) or androgen receptor pathway inhibitors (n = 40). A novel technology, Quantitative Total Bone Imaging, was used for analysis. Global imaging metrics, including maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and total functional burden (SUVtotal), were extracted from composite lesion-level statistics for each patient and tracked throughout treatment. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated as a composite end point of progressive events using conventional imaging and/or physician discretion of clinical benefit; NaF imaging was not used for clinical evaluation. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted between imaging metrics and PFS. Results Functional burden (SUVtotal) assessed midtreatment was the strongest univariable PFS predictor (hazard ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.71; P < .001). Classification of patients based on changes in functional burden showed stronger correlation to PFS than did the change in number of lesions. Various global imaging metrics outperformed baseline clinical markers in predicting outcome, including SUVtotal and SUVmean. No differences in imaging response or PFS correlates were found for different treatment cohorts. Conclusion Quantitative total bone imaging enables comprehensive disease quantification on NaF PET/CT imaging, showing strong correlation to clinical outcomes. Total functional burden assessed after three cycles of hormonal therapy or chemotherapy was predictive of PFS for men with mCRPC. This

  4. Bone Scan Index and Progression-free Survival Data for Progressive Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Who Received ODM-201 in the ARADES Multicentre Study.

    PubMed

    Reza, Mariana; Jones, Robert; Aspegren, John; Massard, Christophe; Mattila, Leena; Mustonen, Mika; Wollmer, Per; Trägårdh, Elin; Bondesson, Eva; Edenbrandt, Lars; Fizazi, Karim; Bjartell, Anders

    2016-12-01

    ODM-201, a new-generation androgen receptor inhibitor, has shown clinical efficacy in prostate cancer (PCa). Quantitative methods are needed to accurately assess changes in bone as a measurement of treatment response. The Bone Scan Index (BSI) reflects the percentage of skeletal mass a given tumour affects. To evaluate the predictive value of the BSI in metastatic castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) patients undergoing treatment with ODM-201. From a total of 134 mCRPC patients who participated in the Activity and Safety of ODM-201 in Patients with Progressive Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer clinical trial and received ODM-201, we retrospectively selected all those patients who had bone scan image data of sufficient quality to allow for both baseline and 12-wk follow-up BSI-assessments (n=47). We used the automated EXINI bone BSI software (EXINI Diagnostics AB, Lund, Sweden) to obtain BSI data. We used the Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier estimates to investigate the association among BSI, traditional clinical parameters, disease progression, and radiographic progression-free survival (rPFS). In the BSI assessments, at follow-up, patients who had a decrease or at most a 20% increase from BSI baseline had a significantly longer time to progression in bone (median not reached vs 23 wk, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.07-0.58; p=0.003) and rPFS (median: 50 wk vs 14 wk; HR: 0.35; 95% CI, 0.17-0.74; p=0.006) than those who had a BSI increase >20% during treatment. The on-treatment change in BSI was significantly associated with rPFS in mCRPC patients, and an increase >20% in BSI predicted reduced rPFS. BSI for quantification of bone metastases may be a valuable complementary method for evaluation of treatment response in mCRPC patients. An increase in Bone Scan Index (BSI) was associated with shorter time to disease progression in patients treated with ODM-201. BSI may be a valuable method of complementing treatment

  5. Osteonecrosis of the jaw as an adverse bisphosphonate event: three cases of bone metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    García Sáenz, Jose Angel; López Tarruella, Sara; García Paredes, Beatriz; Rodríguez Lajusticia, Laura; Villalobos, Laura; Díaz Rubio, Eduardo

    2007-09-01

    Bisphosphonates offer a significant improvement in the quality of life for cancer patients; these potent inhibitors of bone resorption have been shown to markedly reduce the morbidity frequently resulting from bone metastases. Despite the success of bisphosphonates as therapeutic agents, however, toxicity in the form of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) is a rare complication whose incidence rate has climbed in recent years. ONJ is defined as an unexpected development of necrotic bone in the oral cavity, and is commonly associated with administration of the bisphosphonates Pamidronate and Zoledronate. Clinical features include local pain, soft-tissue swelling, and/or loose teeth; ONJ is also often correlated with previous dental procedures, such as tooth extractions, during biphosphonate therapy. Although additional risk factors-such as corticosteroids, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, trauma or infection-exhibit etiological associations with ONJ, the real pathobiology has not yet been fully elucidated. Here we report our findings on all 2005 OJN cases presented at our institution resulting from bone metastatic prostate cancer treated with zoledronic acid. The incidence of ONJ is nearly 3% (3 out of 104) in these patients.

  6. Pembrolizumab and Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients With Metastatic Stage IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-28

    Breast Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  7. Treating metastatic cancer with nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Avi; Heller, Daniel A; Winslow, Monte M; Dahlman, James E; Pratt, George W; Langer, Robert; Jacks, Tyler; Anderson, Daniel G

    2011-12-23

    Metastasis accounts for the vast majority of cancer deaths. The unique challenges for treating metastases include their small size, high multiplicity and dispersion to diverse organ environments. Nanoparticles have many potential benefits for diagnosing and treating metastatic cancer, including the ability to transport complex molecular cargoes to the major sites of metastasis, such as the lungs, liver and lymph nodes, as well as targeting to specific cell populations within these organs. This Review highlights the research, opportunities and challenges for integrating engineering sciences with cancer biology and medicine to develop nanotechnology-based tools for treating metastatic disease.

  8. Cancer stemness and metastatic potential of the novel tumor cell line K3: an inner mutated cell of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hui; Ding, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Jiao; Mao, Fei; Sun, Zixuan; Jia, Haoyuan; Yin, Lei; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Bin; Yan, Yongmin; Zhu, Wei; Xu, Wenrong

    2017-06-13

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) transplantation has been used for therapeutic applications in various diseases. Here we report MSCs can malignantly transform in vivo. The novel neoplasm was found on the tail of female rat after injection with male rat bone marrow-derived MSCs (rBM-MSCs) and the new tumor cell line, K3, was isolated from the neoplasm. The K3 cells expressed surface antigens and pluripotent genes similar to those of rBM-MSCs and presented tumor cell features. Moreover, the K3 cells contained side population cells (SP) like cancer stem cells (CSCs), which might contribute to K3 heterogeneity and tumorigenic capacity. To investigate the metastatic potential of K3 cells, we established the nude mouse models of liver and lung metastases and isolated the corresponding metastatic cell lines K3-F4 and K3-B6. Both K3-F4 and K3-B6 cell lines with higher metastatic potential acquired more mesenchymal and stemness-related features. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is a potential mechanism of K3-F4 and K3-B6 formation.

  9. Automated detection of bone metastatic changes using serial CT scans.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jihun; Kim, Gyehyun; Lee, Jaesung; Cheon, Minsu; Park, Yongsup; Kim, Sewon; Yi, Jonghyon; Lee, Ho Yun

    2017-06-01

    Bone metastases resulting from a primary tumor invasion to the bone are common and cause significant morbidity in advanced cancer patients. Although the detection of bone metastases is often straightforward, it is difficult to identify their spread and track their changes, particularly in early stages. This paper presents a novel method that automatically finds the changes in appearance and the progress of bone metastases using longitudinal CT images. In contrast to previous methods based on nodule detection within a specific bone site in an individual CT scan, the approach in the present study is based on the subtraction between two registered CT volumes. The volumes registered using the proposed weighted-Demons registration and symmetric warping were subtracted with minimizing noise, and the Jacobian and false positive suppressions were performed to reduce false alarms. The proposed method detects the changes in bone metastases within 3min for entire chest bone structures covering the spine, ribs, and sternum. The method was validated based on 3-fold cross validation using the radiologists' markings of 459 lesions in 24 subjects and was performed with a sensitivity of 92.59%, a false positive volume of 2.58%, and 9.71 false positives per patient. Note that 113 lesions (24%) missed by the radiologists were identified by the present system and confirmed to be true metastases. Indeed, three patients diagnosed initially as normal, having no metastatic difference, by radiologists were found to be abnormal using the proposed system. Automatic detection method of bone metastatic changes in the entire chest bone was developed. Weighted Demons, symmetric warping, following false positive suppressions, and their parallel computing implementation enabled precise and fast computation of delicate changes in serial CT scans. The cross validation proved that this method can be quite useful for assisting radiologists in sensing minute metastatic changes from early stage

  10. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  11. Bisphosphonates in the Treatment of Patients with Lung Cancer and Metastatic Bone Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Olivo, Maria A.; Shah, Nimit A.; Pratt, Greg; Risser, Jan M; Symanski, Elaine; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Bisphosphonates are known to prevent skeletal-related events (SREs) in advanced breast cancer, prostate cancer and multiple myeloma. This systematic review assessed the efficacy of bisphosphonates in preventing SREs, controlling pain, and overall survival in patients with bone metastases from lung cancer. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases through November 10, 2011, for controlled trials that included lung cancer patients with bone metastases treated with bisphosphonates. Two reviewers independently extracted data on pain control, survival, SREs and evaluated the quality of each study. Meta-analyses were performed when there were two or more trials with similar outcomes. Results Twelve trials, met our inclusion criteria, and included 1,767 patients. Studies were placebo-controlled or compared bisphosphonates with other modalities (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or radioisotope therapy), or used different bisphosphonates as active controls. Randomized controlled trials did not report adequate descriptions of randomization procedures, allocation concealment, and blinding, resulting in low quality scores. Patients treated with zoledronic acid + chemotherapy had fewer SREs than those receiving chemotherapy alone (relative risk (RR) 0.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67-0.97). Pain control improved when a bisphosphonate was added to another treatment modality (chemotherapy or radiation; RR 1.18, 95%CI 1.0-1.4). Bisphosphonate therapy improved survival compared to controls, but the difference failed to reach statistical significance (mean of 72 days, 95%CI −8.9-152.9). Conclusions Treatment with bisphosphonates reduced SREs, improved pain control and showed a trend to increased survival. Bisphosphonates should be used in the treatment of patients with lung cancer and bone metastases. PMID:22956190

  12. Safety analysis of repeated high doses of samarium-153 lexidronam in men with hormone-naive prostate cancer metastatic to bone.

    PubMed

    Higano, Celestia S; Quick, Donald P; Bushnell, David; Sartor, Oliver

    2008-03-01

    The safety and tolerability of repetitive doses of the boneseeking radiopharmaceutical samarium-153 lexidronam (153Sm- EDTMP) were investigated in men with hormone-naive prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Within 30 days of initiating androgen deprivation, the first of 4 planned doses of 153Sm- EDTMP given every 12 weeks was administered. Growth factors were not permitted. The first cohort of 6 patients received 153Sm-EDTMP at 2 mCi/kg per dose; 3 patients completed all 4 doses and 3 received 3 doses. There were 7 episodes of grade 3 neutropenia and 1 each of grade 3 and 4 thrombocytopenia. Of 6 patients in the second cohort who received 153Sm-EDTMP 2.5 mCi/kg per dose, only 1 received all 4 doses. Four events of grade 3 neutropenia and 2 events of grade 3 thrombocytopenia were reported. The 12-week dose schedule resulted in persistent low-grade thrombocytopenia and/or leukopenia, which prevented administration of all 4 planned doses. As a result, the dose of 153Sm-EDTMP was decreased to 2 mCi/kg for a total of 3 doses administered every 16 weeks. Five of 6 patients in this cohort received all 3 doses of 153Sm-EDTMP. There were 7 episodes of reversible grade 3 neutropenia. For all 18 patients on the study, there were no drug-related serious adverse events or grade 4 nonhemmatologic toxicities. In men with hormone-naive prostate cancer metastatic to bone, the feasible dose and schedule for repeated doses of 153Sm-EDTMP is 2 mCi/kg given every 16 weeks for 3 doses.

  13. The management of pain in metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Buga, S; Sarria, J E

    2012-04-01

    Metastatic bone disease is a common cause of pain in cancer patients. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment is often necessary because simplified analgesic regimens may fail in the face of complex pain generators, especially those involved in the genesis of neuropathic pain. From the origins of formalized guidelines by the World Health Organization (WHO) to recent developments in implantable therapies, great strides have been made to meet the needs of these patients. The authors review the existing literature on the pathophysiology and treatment options for pain generated by metastatic bone disease and summarize classic and new approaches. Relatively recent animal models of malignant bone disease have allowed a better understanding of the intimate mechanisms involved in the genesis of pain, resulting in a mechanistic approach to its treatment. Analgesic strategies can be developed with specific targets in mind to complement the classic, opioid-centered WHO analgesic ladder obtaining improved outcomes and quality of life. Unfortunately, high-quality evidence is difficult to produce in pain medicine, and these concepts are evolving slowly. Treatment options are expanding for the challenging clinical problem of painful metastatic bone disease. Efforts are concentrated on developing alternative nonopioid approaches that appear to increase the success rate and improve patients' quality of life.

  14. Cancer-associated bone disease.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, R; Body, J-J; Brandi, M-L; Cannata-Andia, J; Chappard, D; El Maghraoui, A; Glüer, C C; Kendler, D; Napoli, N; Papaioannou, A; Pierroz, D D; Rahme, M; Van Poznak, C H; de Villiers, T J; El Hajj Fuleihan, G

    2013-12-01

    Bone is commonly affected in cancer. Cancer-induced bone disease results from the primary disease, or from therapies against the primary condition, causing bone fragility. Bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are efficacious in preventing and delaying cancer-related bone disease. With evidence-based care pathways, guidelines assist physicians in clinical decision-making. Of the 57 million deaths in 2008 worldwide, almost two thirds were due to non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bone is a commonly affected organ in cancer, and although the incidence of metastatic bone disease is not well defined, it is estimated that around half of patients who die from cancer in the USA each year have bone involvement. Furthermore, cancer-induced bone disease can result from the primary disease itself, either due to circulating bone resorbing substances or metastatic bone disease, such as commonly occurs with breast, lung and prostate cancer, or from therapies administered to treat the primary condition thus causing bone loss and fractures. Treatment-induced osteoporosis may occur in the setting of glucocorticoid therapy or oestrogen deprivation therapy, chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure and androgen deprivation therapy. Tumour skeletal-related events include pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, surgery and radiotherapy to bone and may or may not include hypercalcaemia of malignancy while skeletal complication refers to pain and other symptoms. Some evidence demonstrates the efficacy of various interventions including bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, in preventing or delaying cancer-related bone disease. The latter includes treatment of patients with metastatic skeletal lesions in general, adjuvant treatment of breast and prostate cancer in particular, and the prevention of cancer-associated bone disease. This has led to the development of guidelines by several societies and

  15. Cancer-associated bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Body, J.-J.; Brandi, M.-L.; Cannata-Andia, J.; Chappard, D.; El Maghraoui, A.; Glüer, C.C.; Kendler, D.; Napoli, N.; Papaioannou, A.; Pierroz, D.D.; Rahme, M.; Van Poznak, C.H.; de Villiers, T.J.; El Hajj Fuleihan, G.

    2016-01-01

    Bone is commonly affected in cancer. Cancer-induced bone disease results from the primary disease, or from therapies against the primary condition, causing bone fragility. Bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, are efficacious in preventing and delaying cancer-related bone disease. With evidence-based care pathways, guidelines assist physicians in clinical decision-making. Of the 57 million deaths in 2008 worldwide, almost two thirds were due to non-communicable diseases, led by cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Bone is a commonly affected organ in cancer, and although the incidence of metastatic bone disease is not well defined, it is estimated that around half of patients who die from cancer in the USA each year have bone involvement. Furthermore, cancer-induced bone disease can result from the primary disease itself, either due to circulating bone resorbing substances or metastatic bone disease, such as commonly occurs with breast, lung and prostate cancer, or from therapies administered to treat the primary condition thus causing bone loss and fractures. Treatment-induced osteoporosis may occur in the setting of glucocorticoid therapy or oestrogen deprivation therapy, chemotherapy-induced ovarian failure and androgen deprivation therapy. Tumour skeletal-related events include pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, surgery and radiotherapy to bone and may or may not include hypercalcaemia of malignancy while skeletal complication refers to pain and other symptoms. Some evidence demonstrates the efficacy of various interventions including bone-modifying agents, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, in preventing or delaying cancer-related bone disease. The latter includes treatment of patients with metastatic skeletal lesions in general, adjuvant treatment of breast and prostate cancer in particular, and the prevention of cancer-associated bone disease. This has led to the development of guidelines by several societies and

  16. Positive Influence of 177Lu PSMA-617 Therapy on Bone Marrow Depression Caused by Metastatic Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlenkhoff, Carl Diedrich; Gaertner, Florian; Essler, Markus; Schmidt, Matthias; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat

    2016-06-01

    A 75-year-old man with castrate-resistant prostate cancer and increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level developed severe bone marrow depression during Ra radionuclide therapy. Because of this, he was treated with Lu-PSMA in compassionate use for this not-yet-approved therapy. At the beginning of Lu-PSMA therapy, repeated blood transfusions (BT) were necessary. Six months after the last BT, after 3 cycles of Lu-PSMA, his blood count stabilized. He required no further BTs and his PSA level remained lowered.

  17. Relationship between incidence of fracture and health-related quality-of-life in metastatic breast cancer patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mark S; Miller, Paul J E; Namjoshi, Madhav; Houts, Arthur C; Stepanski, Edward J; Schwartzberg, Lee S

    2013-01-01

    This retrospective observational study describes treatment patterns and longitudinal health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) among metastatic breast cancer patients with bone metastasis from nine community oncology clinics. For description of treatment patterns, patients were classified as treated if they started zoledronic acid within 60 days of diagnosis of bone metastasis, were considered untreated if they had not, and were considered unclassified if they died or experienced fracture before 60 days had elapsed. Medical record review provided demographic and disease characteristics as well as history of treatment. Patients completed Patient Care Monitor (PCM) assessments of patient reported outcomes during routine care for up to 2 years from the date of bone metastasis diagnosis. The overall rate of fracture in the sample was 17.4%. Of the 321 patients enrolled, 160 were treated as of 60 days after diagnosis of bone metastasis, 147 were untreated, and 14 were unclassified. Of the 147 untreated as of 60 days, 82 did eventually receive zoledronic acid. More than half of all patients treated with zoledronic acid delayed the start of treatment by more than 30 days after diagnosis of bone metastasis. Patients who had a fracture showed decreased mobility and increased pain and anxiety at fracture, with recovery taking ~16 months. Key limitations included: convenience sample with information limited to medical record content, low rate of observed fractures possibly due to limited 2-year follow-up, and exclusion of non-zoledronic acid bisphosphonate use. Whereas the proportion of patients experiencing a fracture was small, the impact of fracture on HRQoL was significant and was more prominently seen to impact specific dimensions of HRQoL.

  18. Metastatic Bone Disease: Role of Transcription Factors and Future Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pratap, Jitesh; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of cancer from the earliest event of cell transformation through stages of tumor growth and metastasis at a distal site involves many complex biological processes. Underlying the numerous responses of cancer cells to the tumor microenvironment which support their survival, migration and metastasis are transcription factors that regulate the expression of genes reflecting properties of the tumor cell. A number of transcription factors have been identified that play key roles in promoting oncogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis and tissue destruction. Relevant to solid tumors and leukemias, tissue specific transcription factors that are deregulated resulting from mutations, being silenced or aberrantly expressed, have been well characterized. These are the master transcription factors of the Runx family of genes, the focus of this review, with emphasis placed on Runx2 that is abnormally expressed at very high levels in cancer cell lines that are metastatic to bone. Recent evidence has identified a correlation of Runx2 levels in advanced stages of prostate and breast cancer and demonstrated that effective depletion of Runx2 by RNA interference inhibits migration and invasive properties of the cells prevents metastatic bone disease. This striking effect is consistent with the broad spectrum of Runx2 properties in activating many genes in tumor cells that have already been established as indicators of bone metastasis in poor prognosis. Potential strategies to translate these findings for therapeutic applications are discussed. PMID:20561908

  19. Osteoblasts Are the Centerpiece of the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is comprised of diverse stromal cell populations in addition to tumor cells. Increasing evidence now clearly supports the role of microenvironment stromal cells in tumor progression and metastasis, yet the regulatory mechanisms and interactions among tumor and stromal cells remain to be elucidated. Bone metastasis is the major problem in many types of human malignancies including prostate, breast and lung cancers, and the biological basis of bone metastasis let alone curative approaches are largely undetermined. Among the many types of stromal cells in bone, osteoblasts are shown to be an important player. In this regard, osteoblasts are a key target cell type in the development of bone metastasis, but there are currently no drugs or therapeutic approaches are available that specifically target osteoblasts. This review paper summarizes the current knowledge on osteoblasts in the metastatic tumor microenvironment, aiming to provide clues and directions for future research endeavor. PMID:28029019

  20. Transforming Growth Factor Beta Signaling in Growth of Estrogen-Insensitive Metastatic Bone Lesions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Indianapolis, IN 46202 While many women with breast cancer will use estrogen receptor therapeutics such as fulvestrant, resistance is nearly inevitable...are examining the role of EGFR/TGFBR2 cross talk in bone metastatic breast cancer . The study of these pathways are important to metastatic breast... cancer , as they have been known to increase levels of the destructive cytokine parathyroid hormone related protein (PTHrP), which causes increased

  1. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D.; Williams, Noelle L.; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Methods: Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Results: Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. Conclusions: The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life. PMID:27843209

  2. Volume of Bone Metastasis Assessed with Whole-Body Diffusion-weighted Imaging Is Associated with Overall Survival in Metastatic Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Lorente, David; Blackledge, Matthew D; Collins, David J; Mateo, Joaquin; Bianchini, Diletta; Omlin, Aurelius; Zivi, Andrea; Leach, Martin O; de Bono, Johann S; Koh, Dow-Mu; Tunariu, Nina

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine the correlation between the volume of bone metastasis as assessed with diffusion-weighted (DW) imaging and established prognostic factors in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and the association with overall survival (OS). Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board; informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors analyzed whole-body DW images obtained between June 2010 and February 2013 in 53 patients with mCRPC at the time of starting a new line of anticancer therapy. Bone metastases were identified and delineated on whole-body DW images in 43 eligible patients. Total tumor diffusion volume (tDV) was correlated with the bone scan index (BSI) and other prognostic factors by using the Pearson correlation coefficient (r). Survival analysis was performed with Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression. Results The median tDV was 503.1 mL (range, 5.6-2242 mL), and the median OS was 12.9 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.7, 16.1 months). There was a significant correlation between tDV and established prognostic factors, including hemoglobin level (r = -0.521, P < .001), prostate-specific antigen level (r = 0.556, P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase level (r = 0.534, P < .001), alkaline phosphatase level (r = 0.572, P < .001), circulating tumor cell count (r = 0.613, P = .004), and BSI (r = 0.565, P = .001). A higher tDV also showed a significant association with poorer OS (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI: 1.02, 2.96; P = .035). Conclusion Metastatic bone disease from mCRPC can be evaluated and quantified with whole-body DW imaging. Whole-body DW imaging-generated tDV showed correlation with established prognostic biomarkers and is associated with OS in mCRPC. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  3. Metastatic Breast Cancer to the Common Bile Duct Presenting as Obstructive Jaundice.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is typically identified in the bones, lymph nodes, lungs and liver. Rarely does metastatic breast cancer involve the common bile duct (CBD) without direct extension from liver metastasis into the CBD. We present a woman diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in the CBD after presenting with obstructive jaundice. Patients with a history of primary breast cancer who present with obstructive jaundice secondary to CBD mass need identification of the mass in order to provide appropriate treatment.

  4. Metastatic Breast Cancer to the Common Bile Duct Presenting as Obstructive Jaundice

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, Justin; Schlepp, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is typically identified in the bones, lymph nodes, lungs and liver. Rarely does metastatic breast cancer involve the common bile duct (CBD) without direct extension from liver metastasis into the CBD. We present a woman diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in the CBD after presenting with obstructive jaundice. Patients with a history of primary breast cancer who present with obstructive jaundice secondary to CBD mass need identification of the mass in order to provide appropriate treatment. PMID:26351417

  5. A comparison inhibitory effects of cisplatin and MNPs-PEG-cisplatin on the adhesion capacity of bone metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Mohammad Javad; Koohpeima, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Hadi

    2017-10-01

    To date, high mortality in women due to malignancy breast cancer related to the metastasis to the bone is a significant challenge. As, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) conjugated with the biocompatible polymers was employed for the delivery of some hydrophobic anticancer agents, the main aim of the current research was to assess whether cisplatin-loaded MNPs enhanced the anticancer effect of free cisplatin in breast cancer cells. MNPs decorated with PEG were synthesized by an improved coprecipitation technique, and then cisplatin was loaded onto the MNPs via a simple mixing method. Afterward, its morphology, size, chemical structure, magnetic property, hydrodynamic diameter, zeta potential, and crystal structure were characterized by scanning and transmittance electron microscopy, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, dynamic light scattering, and X-ray powder diffraction and flame atomic absorption spectroscopy respectively. Additionally, the effects of cisplatin and MNPs-PEG-cisplatin on viability, migration and adhesion capacity of T47D cells were investigated by evaluating α2-integrin and β1-integrin; mRNAs were assessed by real-time RT-PCR. Consequently, the in vitro assay results showed a considerable dose-dependent inhibitory effect of cisplatin and MNPs-PEG-cisplatin on proliferation, migration, and adhesion of T47D cells. Finally, current research was shown that MNPs-PEG-cisplatin strongly increased anticancer effects compared with free cisplatin in the T47D cell line. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Radium-223 dichloride for the treatment of bone metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: an evaluation of its safety.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sten

    2015-07-01

    Approximately 10 - 20% of prostate cancer cases ultimately progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), for which there is a poor prognosis and a therapeutic need. Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223 [Xofigo]) is a first-in-class α-emitting radiopharmaceutical shown to significantly prolong overall survival in patients with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral metastases. Current treatment guidelines recommended it in both pre- and post-docetaxel settings. Radium-223 mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and key efficacy and safety data are reviewed. The evaluation of adverse events reported in the Phase III ALSYMPCA trial is summarized for the overall population and patient subpopulations (prior docetaxel, concomitant external beam radiation therapy and baseline opioid use). An evaluation of how radium-223 is being incorporated into the CRPC treatment paradigm and the implications of its safety profile for future use are provided. The pronounced efficacy and safety profile of radium-223 positions it as a valuable new therapeutic tool in the CRPC armamentarium. Its novel mechanism of action underlies low rates of hematologic adverse events. Radium-223 treatment will become common in the majority of pre-docetaxel symptomatic CRPC cases, as it has proved to be highly efficient with few safety concerns earlier in the course of disease.

  7. Metastatic carcinoma of the long bones.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Anthony I; Wodajo, Felasfa M; Malawer, Martin

    2007-11-15

    Breast, prostate, renal, thyroid, and lung carcinomas commonly metastasize to bone. Managing skeletal metastatic disease can be complex. Pain is the most common presenting symptom and requires thorough radiographic and laboratory evaluation. If plain-film radiography is not sufficient for diagnosis, a bone scan may detect occult lesions. Patients with lytic skeletal metastases may be at risk for impending fracture. Destructive lesions in the proximal femur and hip area are particularly worrisome. High-risk patients require immediate referral to an orthopedic surgeon. Patients who are not at risk for impending fracture can be treated with a combination of radiotherapy and adjuvant drug therapy. Bisphosphonates diminish pain and prolong the time to significant skeletal complications.

  8. Efficacy of sorafenib correlates with Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) risk classification and bone metastasis in Chinese patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yushi; Li, Yongqiang; Cai, Yi; Wang, Ke; Li, Hanzhong

    2016-02-01

    Several prognostic models have been developed to assess the efficacy and safety of sorafenib for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), but few studies have validated its use in Chinese patients. The objective of this single center, single arm retrospective study was to examine the efficacy and safety of sorafenib and its related prognostic clinico-pathologic factors in Chinese mRCC patients. One hundred thirty four mRCC patients were enrolled. All patients received 400 mg of sorafenib orally twice daily. The dose was subsequently adjusted in the event of treatment-induced toxicity. Tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse events (AEs) were determined. The median PFS and OS were 10 months (1-36 months) and 22 months (2-37 months), respectively. Complete, partial, and stable disease were observed in two (1.49%), 24 (17.91%), and 99 (73.88%) patients, respectively. Hand/foot skin reactions, diarrhea and fatigue were the most commonly observed AEs following sorafenib treatment. Among the AEs, only 13 grades 3 and 4 were observed. Multivariate analysis revealed that independent predictive factors for PFS included Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) status, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) risk status, and bone metastasis (all p < 0.05). Factors associated with OS included MSKCC risk values, bone metastasis and sorafenib-induced hypertension (all p < 0.05). The introduction of sorafenib therapy for mRCC in Chinese patients may lead to a favorable disease control with acceptable tolerability. In addition, the parameters predicting favorable outcomes, including ECOG status, MSKCC risk status and bone metastasis, may have prognostic value in clinical practice.

  9. Targeted drug delivery of near IR fluorescent doxorubicin-conjugated poly(ethylene glycol) bisphosphonate nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of primary and metastatic bone cancer in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rudnick-Glick, S; Corem-Salkmon, E; Grinberg, I; Margel, S

    2016-12-05

    Most primary and metastatic bone tumors demonstrate increased osteoclast activity and bone resorption. Current treatment is based on a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Severe side effects are associated with chemotherapy due to use of high dosage and nonspecific uptake. Bisphosphonates have a strong affinity to Ca(2+) ions and are widely used in the treatment of bone disorders. We have engineered a unique biodegradable bisphosphonate nanoparticle (NPs) bearing two functional surface groups: (1) primary amine groups for covalent attachment of a dye/drug (e.g. NIR dye Cy 7 or doxorubicin); (2) bisphosphonate groups for targeting and chelation to bone hydroxyapatite. In addition, these engineered NPs contain high polyethyleneglycol (PEG) concentration in order to increase their blood half life time. In vitro experiments on Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cell line, demonstrated that at a tenth of the concentration, doxorubicin-conjugated bisphosphonate NPs achieved a similar uptake to free doxorubicin. In vivo targeting experiments using the NIR fluorescence bisphosphonate NPs on both Soas-2 human osteosarcoma xenograft mouse model and orthotopic bone metastases mCherry-labeled 4T1 breast cancer mouse model confirmed specific targeting. In addition, therapeutic in vivo experiments using doxorubicin-conjugated bisphosphonate NPs demonstrated a 40% greater inhibition of tumor growth in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma xenograft mouse model when compared to free doxorubicin. In this research we have shown the potential use of doxorubicin-conjugated BP NPs for the targeting and treatment of primary and metastatic bone tumors. The targeted delivery of doxorubicin to the tumor significantly increased the efficacy of the anti-cancer drug, thus enabling the effective use of a lower concentration of doxorubicin. Furthermore, the targeting ability of the BP NPs in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model reinforced our findings that these BP NPs have the potential to be

  10. Retrospective Audit: Does Prior Assessment by Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Reduce the Risk of Osteonecrosis of The Jaw in Patients Receiving Bone-Targeted Therapies for Metastatic Cancers to the Skeleton?--Part II.

    PubMed

    Turner, Bruce; Ali, Sacha; Pati, Jhumur; Nargund, Vinod; Ali, Enamul; Cheng, Leo; Wells, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Men who receive bone-targeted therapy for metastatic prostate cancer are at increased risk of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ). Development of ONJ has been associated with the administration of bone-targeted therapies in association with other risk factors. ONJ can be distressing for a patient because it can cause pain, risk of jaw fracture, body image disturbance, difficultly eating, and difficulty maintaining good oral hygiene. The aim of this article is to report results of an audit of prior assessment by oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) before initiation of bone-targeted therapies and whether it may reduce the risk of ONJ in patients receiving bone-targeted therapies for advanced cancers.

  11. Clinicopathological and prognostic significance of Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression of distant metastatic lesions in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Inari, Hitoshi; Suganuma, Nobuyasu; Kawachi, Kae; Yoshida, Tatsuya; Yamanaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Yoshihara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Masudo, Katsuhiko; Oshima, Takashi; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Rino, Yasushi; Shimizu, Satoru; Miyagi, Yohei; Masuda, Munetaka

    2017-04-19

    Surgical biopsy of metastatic lesions followed by pathological confirmation for the investigation of biomarkers is occasionally proposed as an effective strategy in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. However, few reports have examined Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression in distant metastatic lesions of breast cancer patients. This study aimed to investigate the clinicopathological significance of subtypes and Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression in metastatic breast cancer lesions. We retrospectively studied surgical specimens of primary breast cancer tumors and their corresponding metastatic lesions from patients (n = 68) who underwent surgery for primary breast cancer tumors between December 1977 and March 2013. Tissue microarrays were constructed using primary and metastatic lesions, and were stained with antibodies against estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, and Ki-67. We also examined the clinicopathological characteristics and outcome measures of patients with metastatic breast cancer using primary and paired metastatic lesions. Compared with the primary lesions, there was no significant difference in subtypes in the metastatic lesions according to metastatic sites. Metastatic lesions of the brain, viscera, and bone exhibited slightly higher levels of Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression compared with primary lesions. A Cox proportional hazards model using multivariate analysis demonstrated that high Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression in distant metastatic lesions was associated with poorer overall survival outcomes after biopsy of recurrence lesion (hazard ratio 2.307; 95% confidence interval 1.207-4.407, P = 0.011). High Ki-67 immunohistochemical expression levels in distant metastatic lesions were independently associated with poorer overall survival outcomes after biopsy of recurrence lesion in breast cancer patients.

  12. The Role of 18F-Sodium Fluoride PET/CT Bone Scans in the Diagnosis of Metastatic Bone Disease from Breast and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulshrestha, Randeep Kumar; Vinjamuri, Sobhan; England, Andrew; Nightingale, Julie; Hogg, Peter

    2016-12-01

    We describe the role of (18)F-sodium fluoride ((18)F-NaF) PET/CT bone scanning in the staging of breast and prostate cancer. (18)F-NaF PET was initially utilized as a bone scanning agent in the 1960s and early 1970s, however, its use was restricted by the then-available γ-cameras. The advent of hybrid PET/CT cameras in the late 1990s has shown a resurgence of interest in its use and role. After a brief introduction, this paper describes the radiopharmaceutical properties, dosimetry, pharmacokinetics, and mechanism of uptake of (18)F-NaF. The performance of (18)F-NaF PET/CT is then compared with that of conventional bone scintigraphy using current evidence from the literature. Strengths and weaknesses of (18)F-NaF PET/CT imaging are highlighted. Clinical examples of improved accuracy of diagnosis and impact on patient management are illustrated. Limitations of (18)F-NaF PET/CT imaging are outlined.

  13. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans With Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    adapted’ tumors under androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Evidence exists for direct correlation between increased obesity and body-mass-index (BMI...intracrine” production of testosterone by osteotropic ASCAA modulates growth and metastatic potential of CaP cells under ADT in vitro and in vivo; (b...mechanisms is of paramount significance. “Intracrine androgens” and CaP progression. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the mainstay

  14. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-21

    Breast Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Metastatic Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  15. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  16. Stromal-Initiated Changes in the Bone Promote Metastatic Niche Development.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xianmin; Fu, Yujie; Loza, Andrew J; Murali, Bhavna; Leahy, Kathleen M; Ruhland, Megan K; Gang, Margery; Su, Xinming; Zamani, Ali; Shi, Yu; Lavine, Kory J; Ornitz, David M; Weilbaecher, Katherine N; Long, Fanxin; Novack, Deborah V; Faccio, Roberta; Longmore, Gregory D; Stewart, Sheila A

    2016-01-05

    More than 85% of advanced breast cancer patients suffer from metastatic bone lesions, yet the mechanisms that facilitate these metastases remain poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that tumor-derived factors initiate changes within the tumor microenvironment to facilitate metastasis. However, whether stromal-initiated changes are sufficient to drive increased metastasis in the bone remains an open question. Thus, we developed a model to induce reactive senescent osteoblasts and found that they increased breast cancer colonization of the bone. Analysis of senescent osteoblasts revealed that they failed to mineralize bone matrix and increased local osteoclastogenesis, the latter process being driven by the senescence-associated secretory phenotype factor, IL-6. Neutralization of IL-6 was sufficient to limit senescence-induced osteoclastogenesis and tumor cell localization to bone, thereby reducing tumor burden. Together, these data suggest that a reactive stromal compartment can condition the niche, in the absence of tumor-derived signals, to facilitate metastatic tumor growth in the bone.

  17. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  18. Inflammatory Breast Cancer from Metastatic Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Achariyapota, Vuthinun; Chuangsuwanich, Tuenjai

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the breast from tumors other than breast carcinomas are extremely rare and represent only 0.2–1.3% of all diagnosed malignant breast tumors. Furthermore, while the most common sites for advanced ovarian cancer metastases are the liver, lung, and pleura, metastasis to the breast from a primary ovarian cancer is uncommon and has only been reported in 0.03–0.6% of all breast cancers. Here we describe a case report of a 50-year-old female patient with a rare case of breast metastases from an advanced ovarian cancer, presenting as inflammatory breast cancer. Our observations emphasize the clinical importance of distinguishing between primary and metastatic breast cancer during diagnosis for the purpose of appropriate prognosis and treatment. PMID:27047697

  19. Denosumab: the era of targeted therapies in bone metastatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Santini, D; Fratto, M E; Vincenzi, B; Napoli, N; Galluzzo, S; Tantardini, M; Abbruzzese, A; Caraglia, M; Tonini, G

    2009-11-01

    This system constituted of the Receptor Activator of nuclear Factor-kB Ligand (RANKL), the Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kB (RANK) and by the decoy Receptor Osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a central role in bone resorption. Denosumab (AMG 162) is an investigational fully human monoclonal antibody with a high affinity and specificity for RANKL.This review will critically describe and discuss the recent results of clinical trial investigating denosumab in different settings of medical oncology. In particular, we will report the recently published data of clinical trials investigating denosumab in prevention of cancer treatment induced bone loss (CTIBL), in prevention of skeletal related events (SREs) in bone metastatic patients and the ongoing studies in prevention of disease recurrence in the adjuvant setting of solid tumours. The clinical data that will be reported in this review represent the first step in a path that will conduct us to explore new horizons in the field of bone health care in cancer patients.

  20. Collecting and Studying Blood and Tissue Samples From Patients With Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Prostate or Bladder/Urothelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-06

    Healthy Control; Localized Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Recurrent Urothelial Carcinoma of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  2. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzman, Daniel L; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease.

  3. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  4. Heparanase Mechanisms in Brain - Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    by 74%. These findings introduce a new concept that links microRNA mechanisms with brain metastatic breast cancer by downregulating HPSE, providing...the groundwork for heparanase-based therapeutics in patients with brain metastases, BMBC in particular. MicroRNA , Breast Cancer , Brain...by 74% (Figs. 4B-D). These findings introduce new concepts that links microRNA mechanisms with brain metastatic breast cancer by downregulating

  5. Biocompatible, Biodegradable, and Enzymatic-Cleavable MRI Contrast Agents for Early Detection of Bone Metastatic Breast cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    nanotherapeutics to hydroxyapatite can mimic the binding affinity of nanotherapeutics to the bone.(4) To facilitate the evaluation of HA binding affinity of...M. Gazzano, R. Giardino, A. Bigi, Nanocomposites of hydroxyapatite with aspartic acid and glutamic acid and their interaction with osteoblast- like...cells. Biomaterials 27, 4428 (Sep, 2006). 23. M. B. Murphy, J. D. Hartgerink, A. Goepferich, A. G. Mikos, Synthesis and in vitro hydroxyapatite

  6. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  7. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  8. TAS-102 for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared TAS-102 with placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer whose disease progressed following prior treatments or who had health conditions that prevented the re-administrati

  9. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Duodenum: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Patel, Nitin; Jadallah, Sana; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer in man. About 1 in 6 males developed prostate cancer and 1 in 35 males die of this disease. Prostate cancer behavior ranges from microscopic tumors to aggressive cancer with metastatic potential. While metastasis to bone is relatively common, prostate cancer rarely metastasizes to the cecum, pituitary gland, small bowel, maxillary sinus and skin. Our case report presents a rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer to the duodenum. Our search of the literature found only 2 cases of prostate metastases to duodenum published from 1966 to the present. To our knowledge this is the third case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with duodenal metastasis. Although it is rare but in symptomatic patients small intestine metastasis should not be ignored with advanced prostate cancer. The case demonstrates a novel presentation of a common malignancy, and should raise awareness in clinicians and radiologists that prostate cancer can present with distant metastases in absence of any local lymphadenopathy. PMID:25161979

  10. Biocompatible, Biodegradable, and Enzymatic-Cleavable MRI Contrast Agents for Early Detection of Bone Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON USAMRMC a. REPORT U b. ABSTRACT U c . THIS PAGE U UU 9 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (include area code...breast cancer, Journal of Clinical Oncology 22, 2942-2953. 6. Rodriguez, O., Fricke, S., Chien, C ., Dettin, L., VanMeter, J., Shapiro, E., Dai, H. N...Casimiro, M., Ileva, L., Dagata, J., Johnson, M. D., Lisanti, M. P., Koretsky, A., and Albanese, C . (2006) Contrast-enhanced in vivo imaging of

  11. Adipose Stem Cell-Based Therapeutic Targeting of Residual Androgens in African Americans With Bone-Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    ABSTRACT The disproportionate incidence and mortality of prostate cancer (CaP) among African Americans ( AA ) in comparison to Caucasian American (CA...are not well understood. It is believed that high circulating androgens reported in AA men may account for such racial disparities. It has been...mass-index (BMI), which is significantly higher in AA -men, and the risk for aggressive CaP. Active steroidogenic pathways are active in adipocytes

  12. Metastatic Breast Cancer, Version 1.2012

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, D. Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven Jay; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Theriault, Richard L.; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Kumar, Rashmi; Shead, Dorothy A.

    2013-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates/changes specific to the management of metastatic breast cancer in the 2012 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Breast Cancer. These changes/updates include the issue of retesting of biomarkers (estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) on recurrent disease, new information regarding first-line combination endocrine therapy for metastatic disease, a new section on monitoring of patients with metastatic disease, and new information on endocrine therapy combined with an mTOR inhibitor as a subsequent therapeutic option. PMID:22773798

  13. Differential Expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Expression in Disseminated Tumor Cells and Micrometastasis in Bone Marrow of Patients with Nonmetastatic and Metastatic Prostate Cancer: Theoretical Considerations and Clinical Implications—An Immunocytochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P.; Reyes, Eduardo; Tapia, Pablo; Badínez, Leonardo; Orellana, Nelson

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is important in the dissemination and invasion of tumor cells and activates angiogenesis. We present an immunocytochemical study of MMP-2 expression in circulating prostate cells (CPCs), disseminated tumor cells (DTCs), and micrometastasis (mM) in bone marrow of men with prostate cancer. Methods and Patients. Tumor cells were identified with anti-PSA immunocytochemistry. Positive samples underwent processing with anti-MMP-2, its expression was compared with Gleason score, concordance of expression, and metastatic and nonmetastatic disease. Results. 215 men participated, CPCs were detected in 62.7%, DTCs in 62.2%, and mM in 71.4% in nonmetastatic cancer; in metastatic cancer all had CPCs, DTCs, and mM detected. All CPCs and DTCs expressed MMP-2; in mM MMP-2 expression was positively associated with increasing Gleason score. MMP-2 expression in CPCs and DTCs showed concordance. In low grade tumors, mM and surrounding stromal cells were MMP-2 negative, with variable expression in high grade tumors; in metastatic disease, both mM and stromal cells were MMP-2 positive. Conclusions. CPCs and DTCs are different from mM, with inhibition of MMP-2 expression in mM of low grade tumors. With disease progression, MMP-2 expression increases in both mM and surrounding stromal cells, with implications for the use of bisphosphonates or MMP-2 inhibitors. PMID:23227342

  14. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  15. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  16. [Role of surgery in metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Medina-Franco, Heriberto; Suárez-Bobadilla, Yoli Lizbeth

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in Mexican women and very often patients present with advanced stages. Patients with metastatic breast cancer have limited therapeutic options and the mainstay of treatment in this disease stage is systemic chemotherapy Traditionally, the role of surgery in this context is limited to symptom palliation. The increase in efficiency of chemotherapy drugs and the new endocrine and molecular targeted therapy has prolonged the life expectancy of this group of patients and has expanded surgical indications beyond palliation. Some recent institutional reports suggest increasing survival of patients who undergo resection of limited metastatic disease. On another hand, there are reports of survival benefit when the primary tumor is removed even in presence of metastatic disease. We conducted a systematic review of the literature with the objective to analyze the role of surgery in the multidisciplinary management of metastatic breast cancer in order to improve the prognosis of this increasing group of patients.

  17. Bone marrow adipocytes promote the Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate tumors via HIF-1α activation

    PubMed Central

    Diedrich, Jonathan D.; Rajagurubandara, Erandi; Herroon, Mackenzie K.; Mahapatra, Gargi; Hüttemann, Maik; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic adaptation is increasingly recognized as a key factor in tumor progression, yet its involvement in metastatic bone disease is not understood. Bone is as an adipocyte-rich organ, and a major site of metastasis from prostate cancer. Bone marrow adipocytes are metabolically active cells capable of shaping tumor metabolism via lipolysis and lipid transfer. In this study, using in vitro and in vivo models of marrow adiposity, we demonstrate that marrow fat cells promote Warburg phenotype in metastatic prostate cancer cells. We show increased expression of glycolytic enzymes, increased lactate production, and decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes that require paracrine signaling between the two cell types. We also reveal that prostate cancer cells are capable of inducing adipocyte lipolysis as a postulated mechanism of sustenance. We provide evidence that adipocytes drive metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells via oxygen-independent mechanism of HIF-1α activation that can be reversed by HIF-1α downregulation. Importantly, we also demonstrate that the observed metabolic signature in tumor cells exposed to adipocytes mimics the expression patterns seen in patients with metastatic disease. Together, our data provide evidence for a functional relationship between marrow adipocytes and tumor cells in bone that has likely implications for tumor growth and survival within the metastatic niche. PMID:27588494

  18. [Atypical metastatic breast localization in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Serraille, A; Barazzutti, H; Greillier, L; Barlesi, F

    2015-11-01

    In the context of bronchial cancers, the most frequent sites for metastases to occur are the lung, bone, brain, liver and adrenal glands. However, metastasis to other sites does additionally occur and this might be influenced by the biological characteristics of the tumour. We report the case of a 54-year-old woman with a primary bronchial adenocarcinoma with an EML4-ALK translocation. During her treatment with crizotinib, the patient developed a lesion in her right breast. The initial pathological diagnosis was of an invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of the breast. However, an additional immuno-histochemical analysis revealed it to be a metastasis from her bronchial tumour. This case is an illustration that, in the context of a lung cancer with ALK rearrangement, synchronous or secondary lesions must be interpreted with caution. Specific biological analysis - ALK immunohistochemistry or FISH - must be performed to confirm a primary or metastatic origin for these lesions. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Collet-sicard syndrome: an uncommon manifestation of metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Gina; Alexandraki, Irene; Palacio, Carlos

    2006-08-01

    Metastatic spread of prostate adenocarcinoma to the temporal bone is very rare. Involvement of the jugular foramen may result in Collet-Sicard syndrome. This syndrome is characterized by paralysis of the lower four cranial nerves. A case of metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma involving the temporal bone causing Collet-Sicard syndrome is presented. This case highlights an uncommon manifestation of prostate adenocarcinoma causing symptoms referable to the occipital condyle of the temporal bone. Few cases have been reported in the literature of Collet-Sicard syndrome due to metastatic prostate cancer. This case reminds readers that awareness of atypical presentations may reduce diagnostic delay and expedite appropriate treatment.

  20. A radiobiological model of metastatic burden reduction for molecular radiotherapy: application to patients with bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Denis-Bacelar, Ana M; Chittenden, Sarah J; Murray, Iain; Divoli, Antigoni; Ralph McCready, V; Dearnaley, David P; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Johnson, Bernadette; Flux, Glenn D

    2017-04-07

    Skeletal tumour burden is a biomarker of prognosis and survival in cancer patients. This study proposes a novel method based on the linear quadratic model to predict the reduction in metastatic tumour burden as a function of the absorbed doses delivered from molecular radiotherapy treatments. The range of absorbed doses necessary to eradicate all the bone lesions and to reduce the metastatic burden was investigated in a cohort of 22 patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer. A metastatic burden reduction curve was generated for each patient, which predicts the reduction in metastatic burden as a function of the patient mean absorbed dose, defined as the mean of all the lesion absorbed doses in any given patient. In the patient cohort studied, the median of the patient mean absorbed dose predicted to reduce the metastatic burden by 50% was 89 Gy (interquartile range: 83-105 Gy), whilst a median of 183 Gy (interquartile range: 107-247 Gy) was found necessary to eradicate all metastases in a given patient. The absorbed dose required to eradicate all the lesions was strongly correlated with the variability of the absorbed doses delivered to multiple lesions in a given patient (r  =  0.98, P  <  0.0001). The metastatic burden reduction curves showed a potential large reduction in metastatic burden for a small increase in absorbed dose in 91% of patients. The results indicate the range of absorbed doses required to potentially obtain a significant survival benefit. The metastatic burden reduction method provides a simple tool that could be used in routine clinical practice for patient selection and to indicate the required administered activity to achieve a predicted patient mean absorbed dose and reduction in metastatic tumour burden.

  1. A radiobiological model of metastatic burden reduction for molecular radiotherapy: application to patients with bone metastases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denis-Bacelar, Ana M.; Chittenden, Sarah J.; Murray, Iain; Divoli, Antigoni; McCready, V. Ralph; Dearnaley, David P.; O’Sullivan, Joe M.; Johnson, Bernadette; Flux, Glenn D.

    2017-04-01

    Skeletal tumour burden is a biomarker of prognosis and survival in cancer patients. This study proposes a novel method based on the linear quadratic model to predict the reduction in metastatic tumour burden as a function of the absorbed doses delivered from molecular radiotherapy treatments. The range of absorbed doses necessary to eradicate all the bone lesions and to reduce the metastatic burden was investigated in a cohort of 22 patients with bone metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer. A metastatic burden reduction curve was generated for each patient, which predicts the reduction in metastatic burden as a function of the patient mean absorbed dose, defined as the mean of all the lesion absorbed doses in any given patient. In the patient cohort studied, the median of the patient mean absorbed dose predicted to reduce the metastatic burden by 50% was 89 Gy (interquartile range: 83–105 Gy), whilst a median of 183 Gy (interquartile range: 107–247 Gy) was found necessary to eradicate all metastases in a given patient. The absorbed dose required to eradicate all the lesions was strongly correlated with the variability of the absorbed doses delivered to multiple lesions in a given patient (r  =  0.98, P  <  0.0001). The metastatic burden reduction curves showed a potential large reduction in metastatic burden for a small increase in absorbed dose in 91% of patients. The results indicate the range of absorbed doses required to potentially obtain a significant survival benefit. The metastatic burden reduction method provides a simple tool that could be used in routine clinical practice for patient selection and to indicate the required administered activity to achieve a predicted patient mean absorbed dose and reduction in metastatic tumour burden.

  2. Challenges and recommendations for early identification of metastatic disease in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David; Stone, Nelson N; Yu, Evan Y; Koo, Phillip J; Freedland, Stephen J; Slovin, Susan F; Gomella, Leonard G; Berger, E Roy; Keane, Thomas E; Sieber, Paul; Shore, Neal D; Petrylak, Daniel P

    2014-03-01

    Prostate cancer is often associated with metastases to bone and/or soft tissue. The progression to metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is a seminal event in disease progression affecting treatment decisions. A multidisciplinary group was convened to review the currently available imaging guidelines for metastatic disease in prostate cancer and found no consensus on eligibility criteria, type of imaging modality, and the frequency of scanning for detecting metastatic disease. The aim of this review was to present the recommendations from the group to identify optimal strategies for early identification of metastases in patients with prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metastatic cancer of unknown primary in 21 dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossi, F; Aresu, L; Vignoli, M; Buracco, P; Bettini, G; Ferro, S; Gattino, F; Ghiani, F; Costantino, R; Ressel, L; Bellei, E; Marconato, L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to describe clinical features, treatment and outcome of 21 dogs with metastatic cancer of unknown primary (MCUP), a biopsy-proven malignancy being diagnosed at a metastatic stage, in which the anatomical origin of the primary tumour cannot be detected. All dogs underwent total-body computed tomography. Signalment, type and duration of clinical signs, metastasis site, pathology results, treatment and outcome were recorded. Carcinoma was the most common diagnosis (57.1%), followed by sarcoma, melanoma and mast cell tumour. The median number of disease sites per dog was 2, with bones, lymph nodes, lungs and spleen being the most frequent metastatic locations. The median survival for all dogs was 30 days. Overall, a primary site was not identified in 20 (95.2%) dogs. MCUP encompasses a variety of different pathologic entities and harbours a poor prognosis.

  4. Protocadherin-7 induces bone metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ai-Min; Tian, Ai-Xian; Zhang, Rui-Xue; Ge, Jie; Sun, Xuan; Cao, Xu-Chen

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •PCDH7 is overexpression in high bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells. •PCDH7 is up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues. •Suppression of PCDH7 inhibits cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. •PCDH7 induces breast cancer bone metastasis in vivo. -- Abstract: Breast cancer had a propensity to metastasize to bone, resulting in serious skeletal complications associated with poor outcome. Previous study showed that Protocadherin-7 (PCDH7) play an important role in brain metastatic breast cancer, however, the role of PCDH7 in bone metastatic breast cancer has never been explored. In the present study, we found that PCDH7 expression was up-regulation in bone metastatic breast cancer tissues by real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry assays. Furthermore, suppression of PCDH7 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro by MTT, scratch, and transwell assays. Most importantly, overexpression of PCDH7 promotes breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion in vitro, and formation of bone metastasis in vivo. These data provide an important insight into the role of PCDH7 in bone metastasis of breast cancer.

  5. The AURORA initiative for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zardavas, D; Maetens, M; Irrthum, A; Goulioti, T; Engelen, K; Fumagalli, D; Salgado, R; Aftimos, P; Saini, K S; Sotiriou, C; Campbell, P; Dinh, P; von Minckwitz, G; Gelber, R D; Dowsett, M; Di Leo, A; Cameron, D; Baselga, J; Gnant, M; Goldhirsch, A; Norton, L; Piccart, M

    2014-11-11

    Metastatic breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality among women in the Western world. To date most research efforts have focused on the molecular analysis of the primary tumour to dissect the genotypes of the disease. However, accumulating evidence supports a molecular evolution of breast cancer during its life cycle, with metastatic lesions acquiring new molecular aberrations. Recognising this critical gap of knowledge, the Breast International Group is launching AURORA, a large, multinational, collaborative metastatic breast cancer molecular screening programme. Approximately 1300 patients with metastatic breast cancer who have received no more than one line of systemic treatment for advanced disease will, after giving informed consent, donate archived primary tumour tissue, as well as will donate tissue collected prospectively from the biopsy of metastatic lesions and blood. Both tumour tissue types, together with a blood sample, will then be subjected to next generation sequencing for a panel of cancer-related genes. The patients will be treated at the discretion of their treating physicians per standard local practice, and they will be followed for clinical outcome for 10 years. Alternatively, depending on the molecular profiles found, patients will be directed to innovative clinical trials assessing molecularly targeted agents. Samples of outlier patients considered as 'exceptional responders' or as 'rapid progressors' based on the clinical follow-up will be subjected to deeper molecular characterisation in order to identify new prognostic and predictive biomarkers. AURORA, through its innovative design, will shed light onto some of the unknown areas of metastatic breast cancer, helping to improve the clinical outcome of breast cancer patients.

  6. Oral care and the use of bone-targeted agents in patients with metastatic cancers: A practical guide for dental surgeons and oncologists

    PubMed Central

    Kuchuk, Iryna; Mazzarello, Sasha; Butterfield, Kevin; Appleton, Anthony; Addison, Christina L.; Clemons, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Background Bone-targeted agents such as bisphosphonates and the RANKL antibody have revolutionised the care of patients with bone metastases. There has, however been increasing concern about the oral health of these patients and in particular osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), especially with the increasing use of these agents at higher potencies for greater periods of time. Methods A review of the published data in PubMed and meeting abstracts was performed to examine incidence, risk factors, pathogenesis, clinical course and management of osteonecrosis of the jaw with focus on cancer patients treated with bone-targeted agents (BTA) for bone metastases. This manuscript takes the most frequent and pertinent questions raised by oncologists, dentists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons and tries to give a pragmatic overview of the literature. Results The incidence of ONJ varies depending on types of bone-targeted agents, duration of treatment and additional risk factors. The causes and pathogenesis of ONJ is not fully elucidated, however bone-targeted therapy induced impaired bone remodelling, microtrauma secondary to jaw activity, and oral bacterial infection seem to be important factors. Since the treatment options for ONJ are limited and not well established, preventive strategies have to be included in patients management. Conclusions Many unanswered questions remain about the optimal oral care of patients receiving bone-targeted agents. Prospective data collection will remedy this and help to provide practical guidelines for the management and treatment of those patients that require dental intervention. PMID:26909271

  7. Metastatic Organotropism: An Intrinsic Property of Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi; Siegal, Gene P

    2017-03-01

    It has long been known that some cancers have the propensity to metastasize to certain organs thus creating a nonrandom distribution of sites for distant relapse, a phenomenon known as "metastatic organotropism." Some of these examples include ovary primary to abdominal cavity, prostate primary to bone, and pancreas primary to liver. In contrast, other tumor types, such as mammary and renal cell carcinoma, can relapse in multiple organs although approximately half of advanced breast cancers metastasize to bone. On the other hand gene expression profiling studies have identified various breast cancer classes with prognostic significance. Recent studies have revealed that breast cancer subtypes differ not only in primary tumor characteristics but also in their metastatic behavior. In particular, the luminal tumors are remarkable for their significant bone-seeking phenotype; the HER2 subtype demonstrates a significant liver-homing characteristic; whereas so-called triple-negative breast cancers predispose to lung metastases. These findings suggest that this knowledge could potentially be utilized in the development of effective disease surveillance strategies in the pursuit of precision medicine, thus necessitating further investigation.

  8. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism.

    PubMed

    McGrail, Daniel J; Kieu, Quang Minh N; Iandoli, Jason A; Dawson, Michelle R

    2015-02-23

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. Actomyosin tension as a determinant of metastatic cancer mechanical tropism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrail, Daniel J.; Kieu, Quang Minh N.; Iandoli, Jason A.; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-04-01

    Despite major advances in the characterization of molecular regulators of cancer growth and metastasis, patient survival rates have largely stagnated. Recent studies have shown that mechanical cues from the extracellular matrix can drive the transition to a malignant phenotype. Moreover, it is also known that the metastatic process, which results in over 90% of cancer-related deaths, is governed by intracellular mechanical forces. To better understand these processes, we identified metastatic tumor cells originating from different locations which undergo inverse responses to altered matrix elasticity: MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells that prefer rigid matrices and SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells that prefer compliant matrices as characterized by parameters such as tumor cell proliferation, chemoresistance, and migration. Transcriptomic analysis revealed higher expression of genes associated with cytoskeletal tension and contractility in cells that prefer stiff environments, both when comparing MDA-MB-231 to SKOV-3 cells as well as when comparing bone-metastatic to lung-metastatic MDA-MB-231 subclones. Using small molecule inhibitors, we found that blocking the activity of these pathways mitigated rigidity-dependent behavior in both cell lines. Probing the physical forces exerted by cells on the underlying substrates revealed that though force magnitude may not directly correlate with functional outcomes, other parameters such as force polarization do correlate directly with cell motility. Finally, this biophysical analysis demonstrates that intrinsic levels of cell contractility determine the matrix rigidity for maximal cell function, possibly influencing tissue sites for metastatic cancer cell engraftment during dissemination. By increasing our understanding of the physical interactions of cancer cells with their microenvironment, these studies may help develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. QUILT-2.014: Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  11. Molecular Pathway for Cancer Metastasis to Bone*

    PubMed Central

    De, Sarmishtha; Chen, Juhua; Narizhneva, Natalya V.; Heston, Warren; Brainard, Jennifer; Sage, E. Helene; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism leading to the cancer metastasis to bone is poorly understood but yet determines prognosis and therapy. Here, we define a new molecular pathway that may account for the extraordinarily high osteotropism of prostate cancer. By using SPARC (secreted protein, acidic and rich in cysteine)-deficient mice and recombinant SPARC, we demonstrated that SPARC selectively supports the migration of highly metastatic relative to less metastatic prostate cancer cell lines to bone. Increased migration to SPARC can be traced to the activation of integrins αvβ and αvβ5 on tumor cells. Such activation is induced by an autocrine vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF receptor (VEGFR)-2 loop on the tumor cells, which also supports the growth and proliferation of prostate cancer cells. A consequence of SPARC recognition by αvβ5 is enhanced VEGF production. Thus, prostate cancer cells expressing VEGF/VEGFR-2 will activate αvβ5 and αvβ5 on their surface and use these integrins to migrate toward SPARC in bone. Within the bone environment, SPARC engagement of these integrins will stimulate growth of the tumor and further production of VEGF to support neoangiogenesis, thereby favoring the development of the metastatic tumor. Supporting this model, activated integrins were found to colocalize with VEGFR-2 in tissue samples of metastatic prostate tumors from patients. PMID:12885781

  12. Radium-223 dichloride for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Turner, Philip Geoffrey; O'Sullivan, Joe

    2014-10-01

    Bone metastases are a frequent complication of many malignancies and are particularly common in metastatic prostate cancer, where they are associated with a high degree of morbidity. Until recently, treatments relied on palliative bone targeting measures with no proven survival-prolonging action or on systemic agents with general anti-prostate cancer activity but significant toxicities. Radium-223 dichloride is a bone-seeking, α-emitting, radionuclide that has recently been licensed in the US and Europe for the treatment of men with castration-resistant prostate cancer, bone metastases and no known visceral metastases. Radium-223 is the first bone-seeking radionuclide therapy proven to result in increased overall survival versus placebo. The existing market of bone-targeted agents is reviewed before considering what radium-223 adds by examining its pharmacology, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy and safety data. Initial relevant papers were identified by searching PubMed using combinations of the terms, 'Radium', 'Prostatic neoplasms', 'Bone', 'Neoplasm metastasis'. Consideration is given to further preclinical work needed into the mechanism of action of radium-223 and future clinical directions of the drug including combinations with other agents.

  13. Cancer-related ectopic expression of the bone-related transcription factor RUNX2 in non-osseous metastatic tumor cells is linked to cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic breast cancer cells frequently and ectopically express the transcription factor RUNX2, which normally attenuates proliferation and promotes maturation of osteoblasts. RUNX2 expression is inversely regulated with respect to cell growth in osteoblasts and deregulated in osteosarcoma cells. Methods Here, we addressed whether the functional relationship between cell growth and RUNX2 gene expression is maintained in breast cancer cells. We also investigated whether the aberrant expression of RUNX2 is linked to phenotypic parameters that could provide a selective advantage to cells during breast cancer progression. Results We find that, similar to its regulation in osteoblasts, RUNX2 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells is enhanced upon growth factor deprivation, as well as upon deactivation of the mitogen-dependent MEK-Erk pathway or EGFR signaling. Reduction of RUNX2 levels by RNAi has only marginal effects on cell growth and expression of proliferation markers in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Thus, RUNX2 is not a critical regulator of cell proliferation in this cell type. However, siRNA depletion of RUNX2 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces cell motility, while forced exogenous expression of RUNX2 in MCF7 cells increases cell motility. Conclusions Our results support the emerging concept that the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 functions as a metastasis-related oncoprotein in non-osseous cancer cells. PMID:21029421

  14. Treatment of metastatic Ewing's sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor of bone: evaluation of combination ifosfamide and etoposide--a Children's Cancer Group and Pediatric Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Miser, James S; Krailo, Mark D; Tarbell, Nancy J; Link, Michael P; Fryer, Christopher J H; Pritchard, Douglas J; Gebhardt, Mark C; Dickman, Paul S; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Meyers, Paul A; Donaldson, Sarah S; Moore, Sheila; Rausen, Aaron R; Vietti, Teresa J; Grier, Holcolmbe E

    2004-07-15

    One hundred twenty patients with metastatic Ewing's sarcoma or primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of bone were entered onto a randomized trial evaluating whether the addition of ifosfamide and etoposide to vincristine, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and dactinomycin improved outcomes. Thirty-two patients had metastases to lungs only, 12 patients had metastases to bone marrow or bones only, 64 patients had metastases in multiple sites, and five patients had metastases in other sites; seven patients could not be assessed precisely. Treatment comprised 9 weeks of chemotherapy before local control and 42 weeks of chemotherapy; thereafter, regimen A consisted of vincristine 2 mg/m(2), cyclophosphamide 1,200 mg/m(2), and either doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) or dactinomycin 1.25 mg/m(2). Regimen B consisted of regimen A alternating every 3 weeks with ifosfamide 1,800 mg/m(2)/d for 5 days and etoposide 100 mg/m(2)/d for 5 days. Patients treated on regimen B did not have significantly better survival than those treated on regimen A. The event-free survival (EFS) and survival (S) at 8 years were 20% (SE, 5%) and 32% (SE, 6%), respectively, for those treated on regimen A and 20% (SE, 6%) and 29% (SE, 6%), respectively, for those treated on regimen B. Patients who had only lung metastases had EFS and S of 32% (SE, 8%) and 41% (SE, 9%), respectively, at 8 years. There were six toxic deaths (5%), four from cardiac toxicity and two from sepsis (four treated on regimen B and two treated on regimen A). Two had second malignant neoplasms. Adding ifosfamide and etoposide to standard therapy does not improve outcomes of patients with Ewing's sarcoma or PNET of bone with metastases at diagnosis.

  15. Correlation of baseline biomarkers with clinical outcomes and response to fulvestrant with vandetanib or placebo in patients with bone predominant metastatic breast cancer: An OCOG ZAMBONEY sub-study.

    PubMed

    Addison, Christina L; Pond, Gregory R; Cochrane, Brandy; Zhao, Huijun; Chia, Stephen K; Levine, Mark N; Clemons, Mark

    2015-06-01

    Bone metastases are common in women with breast cancer and often result in skeletal related events (SREs). As the angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) regulates osteoclast activity and is associated with more extensive bone metastases and SRE risk in metastatic breast cancer, we hypothesized that blockade of VEGF signaling could be a therapeutic strategy for inhibiting bone metastases progression and possibly prolonging overall (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS). The Zamboney trial was a randomized placebo-controlled study designed to assess whether patients with bone predominant metastatic breast cancer benefited from addition of the VEGF receptor (VEGFR) targeting agent, vandetanib, to endocrine therapy with fulvestrant. As a companion study, evaluation of biomarkers and their potential association with response to vandetanib or SRE risk was performed. Baseline overnight fasted serum from enrolled patients was analyzed for levels of various putative biomarkers including; VEGF-A, soluble (s)VEGFR2, sVEGFR3, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and activinA by ELISA. Spearman correlation coefficients and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used to investigate potential relationships between biomarker values and baseline clinical parameters. Prognostic and predictive ability of each marker was investigated using Cox proportional hazards regression with adjustments for treatment and baseline strata of serum CTx (<400 versus ≥400 ng/L). Of 129 enrolled patients, serum was available for analysis in 101; 51 in vandetanib and 50 in placebo arm. Mean age amongst consenting patients was 59.8 years. Clinical characteristics were not significantly different between patients with or without serum biomarker data and serum markers were similar for patients by treatment arm. Baseline sVEGFR2 was prognostic for OS (HR=0.77, 95% CI=0.61-0.96, p=0.020), and although a modest association was observed, it was not significant for PFS (HR=0.90, 95% CI=0

  16. Metastatic calcification of the stomach imaged on a bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.; Ryo, U.Y.; Pinsky, S.M.

    1984-10-01

    A whole body bone scan obtained on a 21-year-old woman with sickle cell disease and chronic renal failure showed localization of the radionuclide diffusely in the stomach. The localization of the radionuclide represented metastatic calcification of the stomach caused by secondary hyperparathyroidism.

  17. Tumour but not stromal expression of β3 integrin is essential, and is required early, for spontaneous dissemination of bone-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Carter, Rachel Zoe; Micocci, Kelli Cristina; Natoli, Anthony; Redvers, Richard Paul; Paquet-Fifield, Sophie; Martin, Ana Carolina Baptista Moreno; Denoyer, Delphine; Ling, Xiawei; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Tomasin, Rebeka; Selistre-de-Araújo, Heloisa; Anderson, Robin Lesley; Pouliot, Normand

    2015-04-01

    Although many preclinical studies have implicated β3 integrin receptors (αvβ3 and αIIbβ3) in cancer progression, β3 inhibitors have shown only modest efficacy in patients with advanced solid tumours. The limited efficacy of β3 inhibitors in patients could arise from our incomplete understanding of the precise function of β3 integrin and, consequently, inappropriate clinical application. Data from animal studies are conflicting and indicate heterogeneity with respect to the relative contributions of β3-expressing tumour and stromal cell populations in different cancers. Here we aimed to clarify the function and relative contributions to metastasis of tumour versus stromal β3 integrin in clinically relevant models of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis, with particular emphasis on bone metastasis. We show that stable down-regulation of tumour β3 integrin dramatically impairs spontaneous (but not experimental) metastasis to bone and lung without affecting primary tumour growth in the mammary gland. Unexpectedly, and in contrast to subcutaneous tumours, orthotopic tumour vascularity, growth and spontaneous metastasis were not altered in mice null for β3 integrin. Tumour β3 integrin promoted migration, protease expression and trans-endothelial migration in vitro and increased vascular dissemination in vivo, but was not necessary for bone colonization in experimental metastasis assays. We conclude that tumour, rather than stromal, β3 expression is essential and is required early for efficient spontaneous breast cancer metastasis to bone and soft tissues. Accordingly, differential gene expression analysis in cohorts of breast cancer patients showed a strong association between high β3 expression, early metastasis and shorter disease-free survival in patients with oestrogen receptor-negative tumours. We propose that β3 inhibitors may be more efficacious if used in a neoadjuvant setting, rather than after metastases are established. Copyright © 2014

  18. [Bone metastasis of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hideo; Takagi, Yu; Katayanagi, So; Hoshino, Sumito; Suda, Takeshi; Hibi, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazushige; Tsutida, Akihiko; Aoki, Tatsuya

    2006-08-01

    We evaluated 19 patients with bone metastasis after surgery for gastric cancer. In a number of cases, the located in the tumor was U and M region, of macroscopic 3, and the histological type was poorly-differentiated adenocarcinoma with high-grade of lymphatic invasion. The major symptom was lumbago and back pain. The serum AFP level was high in 73.7% of the cases, and LDH was high in 47.7%. The metastatic lesion was predominantly seen in the bone with red pulp such as lumbar and thoracic vertebra and rib. The median survival time was 189 days (range: 24-509) with a poor prognosis. However, newly developed anticancer drugs were very effective for some cases, indicating that such chemotherapy should be tried for cases with bone metastasis.

  19. Sorafenib makes headway on metastatic thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    In a randomized phase III clinical trial, patients with metastatic differentiated cancer of the thyroid who were treated with sorafenib achieved median progression-free survival of 10.8 months, compared with 5.8 months among patients treated with placebo.

  20. Theranostics Targeting Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    competition for raw materials results in development of highly disordered and fenestrated (porated) blood vessels in tumor tissues separated by vascular basal...reached 50% saturation in 3 min82 on FR+ KB cells. Comparison of 2 and 3 was conducted in FR+ syngeneic M109 lung tumor model.81 Nearly identical ...efficacies of 8 and EC145 were identical .101 Phase I clinical trial of 8 for refractory and metastatic solid tumors began in 2009; in December 2010, the

  1. [Changes in the bone marrow in cancer patients. 61 bone marrow biopsies].

    PubMed

    Marsan, C; Henon, P; Cywiner-Golenzer, C; Zitouna, M M; Girardi, P

    1976-01-01

    The authors studied 61 bone marrow biopsies carried out in cancerous patients, presumably suffering from a bone metastasis and before any treatment. They feel that quantitative and qualitative changes in the bone marrow may be considered to be an indirect diagnostic indication of metastatic spread.

  2. [360 degrees instrumentation for cervical instability due to metastatic bone disease. Case report].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Jasso, J E; Clara-Altamirano, M A; Reyes-Soto, G; Cuéllar-Hubbe, M; Mejía-Pérez, J A

    2016-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases; being the breast, prostate and lung cancer which have most affected. The thoracic spine is involved in 70% of cases, followed by the lumbar and cervical region. This is a 59 years old female diagnosed with breast adenocarcinoma and metastatic bone disease in cervical spine C2, C3 level and instability of that segment because of a compression fracture of C3 greater than 80% without invasion of the spinal canal, she begins with paresthesias of upper limbs. A 360º instrumentation was performed in two stages. After the surgical procedure the patient were without neck pain and a good neurological status. Metastatic bone disease causes significant damage to the spine sometimes create instability proper instrumentation is needed to improve the functional status and prognosis of these lesions.

  3. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases.

  4. Surgical management of metastatic long bone fractures: principles and techniques.

    PubMed

    Scolaro, John Alan; Lackman, Richard D

    2014-02-01

    Management of metastatic long bone fractures requires identification of the lesion and the use of sound fracture fixation principles to relieve pain and restore function. The treating surgeon must understand the principles of pathologic fracture fixation before initiating treatment. Because these fractures occur in the context of a progressive systemic disease, management typically involves a multidisciplinary approach. When considering surgical stabilization of these fractures, the abnormal (or absent) healing environment associated with diseased bone and the overall condition of the patient must be taken into account. The goal of surgery is to obtain a rigid mechanical construct, which allows for early mobility and weight bearing. This can be achieved using internal fixation with polymethyl methacrylate cement or segmental resection and joint reconstruction. Prosthetic joint arthroplasty is a more reliable means of fracture management when insufficient bone is present for fixation. Prophylactic stabilization of impending pathologic fractures can reduce the morbidity associated with metastatic lesions.

  5. [Radionuclides for metastatic bone pain palliation].

    PubMed

    Lass, Piotr

    2002-10-01

    The paper overviews the role of systemic radionuclide therapy in patients with disseminated bone metastases. Most patients with bone metastases experience painful symptoms. Systemic radioisotope therapy is an alternative to traditional hemibody radiation in cases of multiple, diffuse metastases. Usually given as a single i.v. slow infusion it provides a pain relief beginning in one to three weeks, with a mean duration up to several months, depending on the kind of radioisotope applied. The paper overviews the role of unsealed source therapy with these bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in palliating pain, improving quality of life, indications, contraindications and complications of this therapy are discussed, as well as cost-benefit aspects.

  6. What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer After Treatment What Happens After Treatment for Bone Cancer? For some people with bone cancer, treatment ... Treatment for Bone Cancer Stops Working More In Bone Cancer About Bone Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  7. Contemporary management of metastatic bone disease: tips and tools of the trade for general practitioners.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert H; Randall, R Lor; Benevenia, Joseph; Berven, Sigurd H; Raskin, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease has a significant effect on a patient's mortality and health-related quality of life. An aging US population and improved survival rates of patients with cancer have led to an increase in the incidence of symptomatic bony metastatic lesions that may require orthopaedic care. Skeletal-related events in neoplastic disease include pain, pathologic fracture, hypercalcemia, and neural compression, including spinal cord compression. The clinical evaluation and diagnostic study of a patient with a skeletal lesion of unknown etiology should be approached carefully. In patients with widespread metastatic disease, the treatment of a skeletal-related event may be limited to stabilization of the pathologic fracture or local disease control. The treatment of metastatic bone disease is guided by the nature of the skeletal-related event, the responsiveness of the lesion to adjuvant care, and the overall condition and survival expectations of the patient. Impending pathologic fractures are often more easily treated, with less morbidity and easier recovery for patients, than completed fractures. Quality of life is the most important outcome measure in these patients. When surgery is indicated, the approach, choice of fixation, and use of adjuvant should allow for immediate and unrestricted weight bearing. Because metastatic lesions to the skeleton have a limited capacity for spontaneous healing, surgical fixation should be durable for the life expectancy of the patient. In the epiphyseal region of long bones, replacement arthroplasty is generally preferred over internal fixation. Metaphyseal and diaphyseal regions can generally be addressed with intramedullary nailing or plate fixation with adjuvant. The specific treatment of acetabular lesions is dictated by the anatomy and the degree of bone loss. Spinal stability and neural compromise are important considerations in choosing a strategy for managing spine tumors. Effective surgical approaches to metastatic

  8. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  9. Hardware failure in patients with metastatic cancer to the spine.

    PubMed

    Pedreira, Rachel; Abu-Bonsrah, Nancy; Karim Ahmed, A; De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Rory Goodwin, C; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sacks, Justin; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2017-07-19

    The spine is the most common site of skeletal metastases, affecting approximately 30% of individuals with cancer. The aim of surgical treatment for metastatic spine disease is generally palliative to address pain and/or neurologic compromise, significantly improving patients' quality of life. Patients with metastatic spine disease, however, represent a vulnerable cohort and may have comorbidities or previous treatments that impair the structural integrity of spinal hardware. As such, identifying factors that may contribute to hardware failure is an essential component in treating individuals with metastatic spine disease. The aim of this study was to identify pre-operative risk factors associated with hardware failure in patients undergoing surgical treatment for metastatic spine disease. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to include patients surgically treated for metastatic spine tumors between 2003 and 2013, at a single institution. A univariate analysis was initially performed to identify associated factors. Any associated factor with a p-value <0.20 was included in the multivariate analysis. 3 patients (1.9%), of the 159 patients included in the study, had failure of the spine instrumentation. 1 patient had metastatic prostate cancer, and 2 had metastatic breast cancer. Patient demographics, co-morbidities, tumor location, and primary tumor etiology were not found to be statistically significant, with respect to hardware failure. Predictive factors included in the multivariate model were other bone metastasis, visceral metastasis, brain metastasis, Modified Rankin scale, previous systemic chemotherapy, previous radiation to the spine, and mean survival. Previous radiation to the spine was the only factor to be significantly associated (p=0.029), present in all three patients with hardware failure. Of note, there was a trend indicating that patients with longer life expectancies were more likely to experience hardware failure (mean survival of 16

  10. Burden of metastatic bone disease from genitourinary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Peter F; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-11-01

    Bone metastases are common among patients with stage IV genitourinary cancers. Most patients with bone metastases develop at least one debilitating and potentially life-limiting skeletal-related event. These events are associated with increased medical expenses and decreased quality of life. Current guidelines recommend screening for bone metastases in men with high-risk prostate cancer, but guidance for screening and treatment of bone metastases from genitourinary cancers varies by country and setting. Several bisphosphonates have been evaluated in the advanced genitourinary cancer setting. Zoledronic acid has demonstrated efficacy in significantly reducing the risk of skeletal-related events in patients with bone metastases from a broad range of solid tumors including prostate, renal and bladder cancers, and is recommended for preserving bone health.

  11. Curing metastatic cancer: lessons from testicular germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Masters, John R W; Köberle, Beate

    2003-07-01

    Most metastatic cancers are fatal. More than 80% of patients with metastatic testicular germ-cell tumours (TGCTs), however, can be cured using cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Why are TGCTs more sensitive to chemotherapeutics than most other tumour types? Answers to this question could lead to new treatments for metastatic cancers.

  12. Management of progressive metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Waselenko, J K; Dawson, N A

    1997-10-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a growing health problem and is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. While the response of patients with metastatic prostate cancer to initial hormonal manipulation is excellent, the majority of patients eventually progress. As a result, a growing number of patients and their physicians need-to-find acceptable therapeutic alternatives. Fortunately, the number of therapies in the management armamentarium is growing and includes: alternative hormonal therapies, chemotherapy, radioisotopes, and investigational agents. The major focus of treatment has shifted to palliation and quality of life. The decline of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has become another important end point as evidence supporting a correlation with prolonged survival mounts. Enrolling eligible patients in clinical trials is critical to the development of new treatment strategies for this difficult disease.

  13. Over-treatment in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Senkus, Elżbieta; Łacko, Aleksandra

    2017-02-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an incurable disease and the main goals of treatment are prolongation of survival and preservation/improvement of quality of life. Thus the main philosophy of treatment should be to use the least toxic methods, as long as they provide sufficient disease control. In ER-positive tumours this can be in many cases achieved by endocrine therapy; in HER2-positive cancers efficacy of backbone therapy can be enhanced by an anti-HER2 agent. In patients requiring chemotherapy, consecutive single agent regimen provide disease control of a duration at least comparable to multidrug regimen, at a cost of significantly lower toxicity and are a preferred strategy in the majority of cases. Available data demonstrate, however, that aggressive chemotherapy is still overused in many metastatic breast cancer patients. The objective of this manuscript is to critically review available data on treatment choices and sequence in metastatic breast cancer across all breast cancer subtypes in relation to possible overtreatment, including therapies which are not recommended by current guidelines or not even approved. Our aim is to provide guidance on applying these data to clinical practice, but also to describe various, often non-scientific factors influencing therapeutic decisions in an aim to identify areas requiring educational and possibly political actions.

  14. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  15. MECHANISMS OF BONE METASTASES OF BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Suva, Larry J.; Griffin, Robert J.; Makhoul, Issam

    2010-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process driven by genetic alterations that elicit the progressive transformation of normal human cells into highly malignant derivatives. The altered cell proliferation phenotype of cancer involves a poorly characterized sequence of molecular events, which often result in the development of distant metastasis. In the case of breast cancer, the skeleton is amongst the most common of metastatic sites. In spite of its clinical importance, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms driving bone metastasis remain elusive. Despite advances in our understanding of the phenotype of cancer cells, the increased focus on the contribution of the tumor microenvironment and the recent revival of interest in the role of tumor propagating cells (so called cancer stem cells) that may originate or be related to normal stem cells produced in the bone marrow, many important questions remain unanswered. As such, a more complete understanding of the influences of both the microenvironment and tumor phenotype that impact the entire multi-step metastatic cascade is required. In this review the importance of tumor heterogeneity, tumor propagating cells, the microenvironment of breast cancer metastasis to bone as well as many current endocrine therapies for the prevention and treatment of metastatic breast cancer are discussed. PMID:19443538

  16. Cytomorphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma to the bone.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Christopher M; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2017-07-01

    Metastatic pituitary carcinoma to bone is rare. In this report, we present a case of a 59-year-old female with recurrent pituitary adenoma of the sparsely granulated somatotroph subtype with metastasis to a few bony sites 10 years later. Needle core biopsy (NCB) with touch preparations was performed on a 5 mm lesion in left ilium. Diff-Quik stained NCB touch preparation slides showed a few loosely cohesive epithelial polygonal cells that were arranged in nests or acini, or singly, had scant vacuolated cytoplasm and eccentrically located round nuclei (plasmacytoid) with slight nuclear pleomorphism, fine granular chromatin, conspicuous nucleoli, and smooth nuclear membrane. Trilineage hematopoietic cells of bone marrow were also appreciated in the background. H&E stained core sections showed fragments of bone and bone marrow with nests of bland epithelial cells with similar cytomorphology as seen in NCB touch preparation slides. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for juxtanuclear dot-like staining of pan-cytokeratin (CAM 5.2 and AE1/AE3) (a specific feature), neuroendocrine markers (CD56, synaptophysin, and chromogranin. Additionally, scattered cells were immunoreactive for growth hormone. Molecular test showed that tumor cells were negative for the promoter methylation of O-6-Methylguanine-DNA Methyltransferase (MGMT). Final diagnosis of metastatic pituitary carcinoma was rendered. Morphology of metastatic pituitary carcinoma, its differential, clinical presentation and treatment were discussed. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:645-650. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cancer Cell Colonisation in the Bone Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kan, Casina; Vargas, Geoffrey; Le Pape, François; Clézardin, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common complication of epithelial cancers, of which breast, prostate and lung carcinomas are the most common. The establishment of cancer cells to distant sites such as the bone microenvironment requires multiple steps. Tumour cells can acquire properties to allow epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, extravasation and migration. Within the bone metastatic niche, disseminated tumour cells may enter a dormancy stage or proliferate to adapt and survive, interacting with bone cells such as hematopoietic stem cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Cross-talk with the bone may alter tumour cell properties and, conversely, tumour cells may also acquire characteristics of the surrounding microenvironment, in a process known as osteomimicry. Alternatively, these cells may also express osteomimetic genes that allow cell survival or favour seeding to the bone marrow. The seeding of tumour cells in the bone disrupts bone-forming and bone-resorbing activities, which can lead to macrometastasis in bone. At present, bone macrometastases are incurable with only palliative treatment available. A better understanding of how these processes influence the early onset of bone metastasis may give insight into potential therapies. This review will focus on the early steps of bone colonisation, once disseminated tumour cells enter the bone marrow. PMID:27782035

  18. The effect of Neovastat (AE-941) on an experimental metastatic bone tumor model.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael H; Lee, Joanne; Orr, F William

    2002-02-01

    Bone metastases are generally associated with bone destruction which occurs in response to factors secreted by metastatic cells. Some of these factors secreted by the metastatic cells activate osteoclats while others are proteases that degrade bone collagen. To determine if Neovastat (AE-941), a naturally occurring multi-functional inhibitor of angiogenesis, is able to regulate properties that are thought to have relevance to their propensity to form bone metastases in vivo, we used the human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cell line which can metastasize to bone. We showed that Neovastat prevented the degradation of osteoid-like radiolabeled extracellular matrices which was induced by incubation of human SaOS-2 osteoblast-like cells with MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, Neovastat was demonstrated to inhibit the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 expressed by MDA-MB-231 cells. The potential of Neovastat to retard the spread, growth, and osteolysis of MDA-MB-231 cells was then estimated in vivo. Histomorphometric analysis of the vertebral bodies indicated that MDA-MB-231 cells inoculated in nude mice (intracardiac) successfully generate osteolytic metastases with an 83% reduction of the volume of medullary bone (p< or =0.01). However, when tumor-bearing animals were treated orally with Neovastat, there was only a 19% decrease in medullary bone thus indicating that Neovastat can prevent bone metastasis in this model. Consistent with histological results, radiographic analysis indicated that Neovastat decreased the number of osteolytic lesions by 33% (p< or =0.3). Moreover, a decrease in the tumor volume in bone was observed in Neovastat-treated animals. These results indicate that Neovastat may be useful in preventing bone metastasis in cancer patients.

  19. Not all secondary bone tumours are secondaries. Concurrent metastatic breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of the femur.

    PubMed

    Nath, Preethy; Sankey, Elizabeth; Murray, Elisabeth; Kurup, Harish

    2015-04-09

    We present a case of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the breast in a patient who sustained a pathological fracture of the distal femur. Histology of the distal femur lesion excised at the time of endoprosthetic replacement confirmed this to be a primary chondrosarcoma. We have reviewed the literature and identified previously documented cases of concurrent breast carcinoma and chondrosarcoma of bone. A high index of suspicion is warranted and the diagnosis must be first confirmed before rushing to internal fixation (therapeutic or prophylactic) assuming them to be secondary bone lesions from the known primary cancer even in patients with multiple metastases.

  20. Tucatinib (ONT-380) and Trastuzumab for Patients With HER2-positive Metastatic Colorectal Cancer (MOUNTAINEER)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Colorectal Cancer; Colorectal Carcinoma; Colorectal Tumors; Neoplasms, Colorectal; HER-2 Gene Amplification; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Colon Cancer; Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum

  1. Zoledronic acid in the management of metastatic bone disease.

    PubMed

    Santini, Daniele; Fratto, Maria Elisabetta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Galluzzo, Sara; Tonini, Giuseppe

    2006-12-01

    Bisphosphonate therapy has become a standard of therapy for patients with malignant bone disease. Moreover, in vivo preclinical and preliminary clinical data suggest that bisphosphonates may prevent cancer treatment-induced bone loss and the onset of malignant bone disease in patients with early-stage cancer. This comprehensive review critically reports the several preclinical evidences of action of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts, lymphocytes and tumour cells. In addition, all the clinical trials evaluating the effects of principal bisphosphonates on skeletal disease progression in patients with breast cancer, prostate cancer, non-small cell lung cancer and other cancers have been reported. Of the available bisphosphonates, intravenous zoledronic acid has demonstrated the broadest clinical activity and is actually approved for the treatment of bone metastases from any solid tumour in many countries. Renal safety is an important consideration for oncologists who are treating patients with bisphosphonates. This issue and the other topics relating to the safety of bisphosphonates are discussed in this review.

  2. Colon Cancer Metastatic to the Biliary Tree.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Alexandra T; Clayton, Steven B; Markow, Michael; Mamel, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Metastasis of colon adenocarcinoma is commonly found in the lung, liver, or peritoneum. Common bile duct (CBD) tumors related to adenomas from familial adenomatous polyposis metastasizing from outside of the gastrointestinal tract have been reported. We report a case of biliary colic due to metastatic colon adenocarcinoma to the CBD. Obstructive jaundice with signs of acalculous cholecystitis on imaging in a patient with a history of colon cancer should raise suspicion for metastasis to CBD.

  3. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  4. Radium-223 and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: All that glitters is not gold

    PubMed Central

    Aprile, Carlo; Persico, Marco G; Lodola, Lorenzo; Buroni, Federica E

    2016-01-01

    After being approved by the National Drug Agency in several countries, Radium-223 (Ra-223) is gaining wide acceptance in the treatment of bone metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer. The exact mechanism of action remain unclear: The established model of direct alpha-particle irradiation from the remodelling bone surface, where Ra-223 accumulates, surrounding the tumor foci can explain a lethal effect only on metastatic microdeposits, but not on higher tumor burden. According to the “pre-metastatic niche model”, it is likely that Ra-223 targets several non-tumoral cell types of the tumor microenvironment involved in the complex mechanism of cancer bone homing and colonization. A deeper insight into this hypothetical mechanism will lead to a more accurate dosimetric approach and to find optimal sequencing and/or combination with the other therapeutic options. PMID:27843540

  5. Optimizing initial chemotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kalyan C; Safran, Howard

    2016-05-01

    The two combination chemotherapy regimens FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel represent major breakthroughs in the management of metastatic pancreatic cancer. Both regimens showed unprecedented survival advantage in the setting of front-line therapy. However, their application for treatment of patients in the community is challenging because of significant toxicities, thus limiting potential benefits to a narrow population of patients. Modifications to the dose intensity or schedule of those regimens improve their tolerability, while likely retaining survival advantage over single-agent chemotherapy. Newer strategies to optimize these two active regimens in advanced pancreatic cancer are being explored that can help personalize treatment to individual patients.

  6. Hypoxia stabilizes GAS6/AXl signaling in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Anjali; Wang, Jingcheng; Shiozawa, Yusuke; McGee, Samantha; Kim, Jinkoo; Jung, Younghun; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E.; Havens, Aaron; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2012-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is over-expressed in a variety of cancers and is known to play a role in proliferation and invasion. Previous data from our lab indicates that Axl and its ligand GAS6 may play a role in establishing metastatic dormancy in the bone marrow microenvironment. In the current study, we found that Axl is highly expressed in metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) cell lines PC3 and DU145 and has negligible levels of expression in a non-metastatic cancer cell line LNCaP. Knockdown of Axl in PC3 and DU145 cells resulted in decreased expression of several mesenchymal markers including Snail, Slug, and N-cadherin, and enhanced expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin, suggesting that Axl is involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition in PCa cells. The Axl-knockdown PC3 and DU145 cells also displayed decreased in vitro migration and invasion. Interestingly, when PC3 and DU145 cells were treated with GAS6, Axl protein levels were down-regulated. Moreover, CoCl2, a hypoxia mimicking agent, prevented GAS6 mediated down-regulation of Axl in these cell lines. Immunochemical staining of human PCa tissue microarrays demonstrated that Axl, GAS6 and Hif1-α (indicator of hypoxia) were all co-expressed in PCa and in bone metastases, compared to normal tissues. Together, our studies indicate that Axl plays a crucial role in PCa metastasis, and that GAS6 regulates the expression of Axl. Importantly, in a hypoxic tumor microenvironment Axl expression maintained leading to enhanced signaling. PMID:22516347

  7. Metastatic cancer to the lung

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs may include: Fluid between the lung and chest wall (pleural effusion), which can cause shortness of breath or pain when taking a deep breath Further spread of the cancer Side effects of chemotherapy or radiation therapy When to Contact a Medical Professional Call ...

  8. Clinical holistic medicine: metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Solheim, Elin; Saunte, Mads E; Morad, Mohammed; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2004-10-28

    We believe that the consciousness-based/holistic medical toolbox has a serious additional offer to cancer patients and, as a consequence, designed a treatment for the patient with metastasized cancer. From a holistic perspective, cancer can be understood as a simple disturbance of the cells, arising from the tissue holding on to a trauma with strong emotional content. This is called "a blockage", where the function of the cells is allocated from their original function in the tissue to a function of holding emotions. We hope to be able not only to improve the quality of life, but also to improve survival and in some cases even induce spontaneous remission of the metastasized cancer. This paper describes how work with a patient with metastasized cancer can be done in the holistic clinical practice in 14 days on an individual basis, helping the patient to recover her human character, purpose of life, coherence, and will to live, thus improving quality of life and possibly also survival time. The holistic therapeutic work includes (1) teaching existential theory, (2) working with life perspective and philosophy of life, (3) helping the patient to acknowledge the state of the disease and the feelings connected to it, and finally (4) getting the patient into the holistic state of healing: (a) feeling old repressed emotions, (b) understanding why she got sick from a holistic point of view, and finally (c) letting go of the negative beliefs and decisions that made her sick according to the holistic theory of nongenetic diseases. The theory of the human character, the quality of life theories, the holistic theory of cancer, the holistic process theory of healing, the theory of (Antonovsky) coherence, and the life mission theory are the most important theories for the patient to find hope and mobilize the will to fight the cancer and survive. The patient went through the following phases: (1) finding the purpose of life and hidden resources; (2) confronting denial; (3

  9. New therapeutic targets for cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Krzeszinski, Jing Y.; Wan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastases are dejected consequences of many types of tumors including breast, prostate, lung, kidney and thyroid cancers. This complicated process begins with the successful tumor cell epithelial–mesenchymal transition, escape from the original site, and penetration into circulation. The homing of tumor cells to the bone depends on both tumor-intrinsic traits and various molecules supplied by the bone metastatic niche. The colonization and growth of cancer cells in the osseous environment, which awaken their dormancy to form micro- and macro-metastasis, involve an intricate interaction between the circulating tumor cells and local bone cells including osteoclasts, osteoblasts, adipocytes and macrophages. In this review, we discuss the most recent advances in the identification of new molecules and novel mechanisms during each step of bone metastasis that may serve as promising therapeutic targets. PMID:25962679

  10. Medical Management of Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Jessica E.; Sherman, Scott K.; O’Dorisio, Thomas M.; Howe, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) is an aggressive form of thyroid cancer, which occurs in both heritable and sporadic forms. Discovery that mutations in the RET protooncogene predispose to familial cases of this disease has allowed for presymptomatic identification of gene carriers and prophylactic surgery to improve the prognosis of these patients. A significant number of patients with the sporadic type of MTC and even with familial disease, still present with nodal or distant metastases, making surgical cure difficult. Over the past several decades, many different types of therapy for metastatic disease have been attempted, with limited success. Improved understanding of the molecular defects and pathways involved in both familial and sporadic MTC has resulted in new hope for these patients with the development of drugs targeting the specific alterations responsible. This new era of targeted therapy with kinase inhibitors represents a significant step forward from previous trials of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy. Although much progress has been made, additional agents and strategies are needed to achieve durable, long-term responses in patients with metastatic MTC. This article reviews the history and results of medical management for metastatic MTC from the early 1970s up until the present day. PMID:24942936

  11. Impact of bone-targeted therapies in chemotherapy-naïve metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone acetate: post hoc analysis of study COU-AA-302.

    PubMed

    Saad, Fred; Shore, Neal; Van Poppel, Hendrik; Rathkopf, Dana E; Smith, Matthew R; de Bono, Johann S; Logothetis, Christopher J; de Souza, Paul; Fizazi, Karim; Mulders, Peter F A; Mainwaring, Paul; Hainsworth, John D; Beer, Tomasz M; North, Scott; Fradet, Yves; Griffin, Thomas A; De Porre, Peter; Londhe, Anil; Kheoh, Thian; Small, Eric J; Scher, Howard I; Molina, Arturo; Ryan, Charles J

    2015-10-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) often involves bone, and bone-targeted therapy (BTT) has become part of the overall treatment strategy. Investigation of outcomes for concomitant BTT in a post hoc analysis of the COU-AA-302 trial, which demonstrated an overall clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate (AA) plus prednisone over placebo plus prednisone in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC patients. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% overall survival [OS] events) for the COU-AA-302 trial. Patients were grouped by concomitant BTT use or no BTT use. Radiographic progression-free survival and OS were coprimary end points. This report describes the third interim analysis (prespecified at 55% OS events) and involves patients treated with or without concomitant BTT during the COU-AA-302 study. Median follow-up for OS was 27.1 mo. Median time-to-event variables with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs), 95% CIs, and p values for concomitant BTT versus no BTT were obtained via Cox models. While the post hoc nature of the analysis is a limitation, superiority of AA and prednisone versus prednisone alone was demonstrated for clinical outcomes with or without BTT use. Compared with no BTT use, concomitant BTT significantly improved OS (HR 0.75; p=0.01) and increased the time to ECOG deterioration (HR 0.75; p<0.001) and time to opiate use for cancer-related pain (HR 0.80; p=0.036). The safety profile of concomitant BTT with AA was similar to that reported for AA in the overall intent-to-treat population. Osteonecrosis of the jaw (all grade 1/2) with concomitant BTT use was reported in <3% of patients. AA with concomitant BTT was safe and well tolerated in men with chemotherapy-naïve mCRPC. The benefits of AA on clinical outcomes were increased with concomitant BTT. Treatment of advanced prostate cancer often includes bone

  12. Thiocolchicoside a semi-synthetic derivative of the Glory Lily: a new weapon to fight metastatic bone resorption?

    PubMed

    Micheau, Olivier; Dufour, Florent; Walczak, Henning

    2012-04-01

    Metastatic bone disease is a serious clinical complication for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer, but few therapeutic options are currently available. Bisphosphonates are an established standard care for these patients, but new treatments are now emerging, including the use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the RANK ligand. In this issue of the BJP, Reuter et al. provide evidence that thiocolchicoside, a semi-synthetic derivative of the naturally occurring colchicoside, extracted from the seeds of Gloriosa superba (Liliaceae), prevented osteoclactogenesis by suppressing RANK ligand-mediated NF-κB activation. Thiolcolchicoside may thus represent an attractive therapeutic option for the management of bone metastatic disease.

  13. What Is Bone Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... chest wall. Other sites are the scapula (shoulder blade), ribs, or skull. Benign (non-cancerous) tumors of ... chest wall (such as the ribs or shoulder blades), and the long bones of the legs or ...

  14. Bone Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Bone Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bonecancer.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  15. Implications of occult metastatic cells for systemic cancer treatment in patients with breast or gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Harbeck, N

    2001-06-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumour cells to the organism is becoming acknowledged as a hallmark in cancer progression, since abundant clinical and experimental data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies against epithelial cytokeratins or tumour-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected in cytological bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of such immunostained cells in bone marrow is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival, even in malignancies that do not preferentially metastasise to bone. As current treatment strategies have resulted in a substantial improvement of cancer mortality rates, it is noteworthy to consider the intriguing options of immunocytochemical screening of bone marrow aspirates for occult metastatic cells. Besides improved tumour staging, such screening offers opportunities for guiding patient stratification for adjuvant therapy trials, monitoring response to adjuvant therapies (which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up), and specifically targeting tumour-biological therapies against disseminated tumour cells. The present review summarises the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic cancer cells in bone marrow.

  16. Expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye Min; Jung, Woo Hee; Koo, Ja Seung

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in different metastatic sites in metastatic breast cancer and to determine the clinical implications of these patterns. Immunohistochemical staining was used to investigate the expression of YAP and phospho-YAP in tissue microarrays from 122 cases of metastatic breast cancer (bone metastasis = 29, brain metastasis = 38, liver metastasis = 12, and lung metastasis = 43). The expression levels of YAP and phospho-YAP differed according to the metastatic site in metastatic breast cancer. Specifically, nuclear expression of phospho-YAP was high in brain metastasis but low in lung metastasis (P = 0.010). The effects of YAP and phospho-YAP expression on clinical outcomes were investigated by univariate analysis. This analysis showed that nuclear YAP positivity (P = 0.008) and nuclear phospho-YAP positivity (P = 0.003) were both associated with shorter overall survival. In conclusion, the level of YAP expression varies according to the metastatic site in metastatic breast cancer. Moreover, high YAP expression was correlated with poor prognosis.

  17. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  18. Effect of Physical Forces on the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    due to a high incidence of lung metastasis at the time of diagnosis [Bielack et al., 2008]. Despite numerous studies, there have been minimal...1998. Establishment and characterization of a murine osteosarcoma cell line (LM8) with high metastatic potential to the lung . Int J Cancer 76:418–422...Okumura M, Fujinaga T. 1999. Establishment and characterization of the growth and pulmonary metastasis of a highly lung metastasizing cell line from canine

  19. Bone Targeted Agents: Preventing skeletal complications in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Morgans, Alicia K.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Prostate cancer is both the most common malignancy and the most common cause of cancer death in men. In the United States, there were approximately 217,730 new prostate cancer diagnoses and more than 32,050 deaths in 2010 1. Skeletal complications occur at various points during the disease course, either due to bone metastases directly, or as an unintended consequence of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Up to 90% of men with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) develop bone metastases2,3. Bone metastases are associated with pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, and bone pain and can require narcotics or palliative radiation for pain relief. Additionally, ADT results in bone loss and fragility fractures. This review describes the biology of bone metastases, skeletal morbidity in men with prostate cancer, and recent advances in bone targeted therapies to prevent skeletal complications of prostate cancer. PMID:23084529

  20. TGF-β in cancer and bone: implications for treatment of bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Juárez, Patricia; Guise, Theresa A

    2011-01-01

    Bone metastases are common in patients with advanced breast, prostate and lung cancer. Tumor cells co-opt bone cells to drive a feed-forward cycle which disrupts normal bone remodeling to result in abnormal bone destruction or formation and tumor growth in bone. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a major bone-derived factor, which contributes to this vicious cycle of bone metastasis. TGF-β released from bone matrix during osteoclastic resorption stimulates tumor cells to produce osteolytic factors further increasing bone resorption adjacent to the tumor cells. TGF-β also regulates 1) key components of the metastatic cascade such as epithelial-mesenchymal transition, tumor cell invasion, angiogenesis and immunosuppression as well as 2) normal bone remodeling and coupling of bone resorption and formation. Preclinical models demonstrate that blockade of TGF-β signaling is effective to treat and prevent bone metastases as well as to increase bone mass.

  1. [Metastatic kidney cancer: new therapeutic approaches].

    PubMed

    Negrier, Sylvie; Mejean, Arnaud; Oudard, Stéphane; Escudier, Bernard

    2002-09-01

    Several promising approaches to the treatment of renal cancer have been developed over recent years. Two independent North American and European studies have demonstrated the value of nephrectomy in patients with metastatic disease: the overall survival of patients treated with interferon was improved by nephrectomy, essentially in patients with a good general status. Several publications have also emphasized the value of surgery for metastases. New experimental approaches have also been developed. Dendritic cells fused with tumour cells induced 4 complete remissions and 2 partial remissions in a series of 17 patients. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation induced lasting remissions in 10 out of 17 patients. The National Cancer Institute team, in the United States, has developed this approach for patients with an HLA-compatible relative. Finally, various molecules with promising antiangiogenic properties are currently under development in renal cancer.

  2. Staging breast cancer, rehearsing metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Sinding, Christina; Gray, Ross; Fitch, Margaret; Greenberg, Marlene

    2002-01-01

    Social science researchers have fruitfully used a range of conceptualizations of "performance": as a metaphor for social life, a way of vivifying research findings, and a form of scholarly representation. In this article, the researchers consider performance in its hermeneutic sense, as a way of generating meaning. The drama Handle With Care? Living With Metastatic Breast Cancer was created by a research team, a theater troupe, and women with breast cancer. The researchers employ an interpretive phenomenologicalframework to explore interviews with women with breast cancer involved in creating Handle With Care? The performative context in which the drama developed allowed certain illness meanings to emerge, intensify, and shift. The article also considers ethical dilemmas surfaced by this project.

  3. Management of patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cruz Jurado, J; Richart Aznar, P; García Mata, J; Fernández Martínez, R; Peláez Fernández, I; Sampedro Gimeno, T; Galve Calvo, E; Murillo Jaso, L; Polo Marqués, E; García Palomo, A

    2011-09-01

    Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Hormone treatment is one of the key strategies in the management of metastatic breast cancer. Aromatase inhibitors (AI) have been extensively studied in this setting. This section summarizes the key data regarding the use of AI in advanced breast cancer. In postmenopausal women, AI are the first line of treatment for untreated patients, or those who had prior AI treatment and progress after 12 months of adjuvant therapy. A longer disease-free interval and absence of visceral disease is associated with a better response. If tumors recur in less than 12 months, it is recommended that tamoxifen (TAM) or the estrogen-receptor antagonist fulvestrant (FUL) treatment be initiated. In the second-line setting, the best option after progression is the administration of either FUL or TAM. In the third-line setting, reintroduction of AI is considered an acceptable option. In premenopausal women who have not received prior treatment or who have progressed after 12 months following adjuvant treatment, it is recommended to initiate therapy with a combination of TAM and a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analog. If there is treatment failure with the use of this combination, megestrol acetate or an LHRH agonist plus an AI may be reasonable alternatives. Intensive research is ongoing to understand the mechanisms of resistance to hormone therapy. In human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive-patients, combinations with HER2 antagonists are associated with significant clinical activity.

  4. 'Omic approaches to preventing or managing metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Early detection of metastasis-prone breast cancers and characterization of residual metastatic cancers are important in efforts to improve management of breast cancer. Applications of genome-scale molecular analysis technologies are making these complementary approaches possible by revealing molecular features uniquely associated with metastatic disease. Assays that reveal these molecular features will facilitate development of anatomic, histological and blood-based strategies that may enable detection prior to metastatic spread. Knowledge of these features also will guide development of therapeutic strategies that can be applied when metastatic disease burden is low, thereby increasing the probability of a curative response. PMID:22216753

  5. Is metastatic pancreatic cancer an untargetable malignancy?

    PubMed Central

    Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Gharios, Joseph; Elkarak, Fadi; Antoun, Joelle; Ghosn, Marwan

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC) is one of the most aggressive malignancies, known to be chemo-resistant and have been recently considered resistant to some targeted therapies (TT). Erlotinib combined to gemcitabine is the only targeted therapy that showed an overall survival benefit in MPC. New targets and therapeutic approaches, based on new-TT, are actually being evaluated in MPC going from immunotherapy, epigenetics, tumor suppressor gene and oncogenes to stromal matrix regulators. We aim in this paper to present the major causes rendering MPC an untargetable malignancy and to focus on the new therapeutic modalities based on TT in MPC. PMID:26989465

  6. Bone Cancer: Questions and Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are there different types of primary bone cancer? Yes. Cancer can begin in any type of bone tissue. Bones are made up ... follow-up treatment necessary? What does it involve? Yes. Bone cancer ... and should report any unusual symptoms right away. Follow-up varies for ...

  7. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Kerlijne; Prenen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:26380058

  8. Microenvironment -Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0352 TITLE: Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dean...Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Microenvironment-Programmed Metastatic Prostate Cancer Stem Cells (mPCSCs) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...that eventually kills the patient. Although many PCa cell -intrinsic molecules and end-organ factors have been implicated in the metastatic

  9. Sleep disturbances in women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koopman, Cheryl; Nouriani, Bita; Erickson, Vanessa; Anupindi, Renu; Butler, Lisa D; Bachmann, Michael H; Sephton, Sandra E; Spiegel, David

    2002-01-01

    We examined sleeping problems in women with metastatic breast cancer in relation to depression, social support, and salivary cortisol. Ninety-seven women with metastatic breast cancer were drawn from a larger study on the effects of group therapy on quality of life and survival. This study is based on the baseline assessments conducted prior to randomization into treatment conditions. Sleep, depression symptoms, and social support were assessed by self-reporting. Cortisol was assessed from saliva samples taken over a 3-day period. Medical status and demographic characteristics were also examined in relation to each sleep variable in multiple regression analysis. Most women (63%) reported one or more types of sleep disturbance and 37% reported using sleeping pills in the previous 30 days. Problems with falling to sleep were significantly related to greater pain and depressive symptoms. Problems of waking during the night were significantly associated with greater depression and less education. Problems in waking/getting up were significantly associated with greater depressive symptoms and less social support. Sleepiness during the day was not significantly related to the variables in the regression model. Fewer hours of sleep were significantly associated with metastases to the bone, higher depressive symptoms, and more social support. Women who reported sleeping 9 or more hours per night, compared to those who reported a moderate amount of sleep (6.5-8.5 hours), had significantly lower 9 p.m. cortisol levels. Use of sleeping pills was more frequent among women reporting greater pain and depressive symptoms. These results suggest that women with metastatic breast cancer who are at higher risk for having sleeping problems are those who are less educated, in pain, depressed, have bony metastases, or lack social support.

  10. Radioimmune imaging of bone marrow in patients with suspected bone metastases from primary breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Duncker, C.M.; Carrio, I.; Berna, L.; Estorch, M.; Alonso, C.; Ojeda, B.; Blanco, R.; Germa, J.R.; Ortega, V. )

    1990-09-01

    Radioimmune imaging of bone marrow was performed by technetium-99m- (99mTc) labeled antigranulocyte monoclonal antibody BW 250/183 (AGMoAb) scans in 32 patients with suspected bone metastases from primary breast cancer. AGMoAb scans showed bone marrow defects in 25/32 (78%) patients; bone invasion was subsequently confirmed in 23 (72%) patients. Conventional bone scans performed within the same week detected bone metastases in 17/32 (53%) patients (p less than 0.001). AGMoAb scans detected more sites indicating metastatic disease than bone scans in 12 of these 17 patients (71%). All patients with bone metastases in the axial skeleton had bone marrow defects at least at the sites of bone metastases. Of 15 patients with normal, or indicative of, benign disease bone scans, 8 patients (53%) presented with bone marrow defects in the AGMoAb scans. Bone invasion was confirmed in six of them. AGMoAb bone marrow scans provide a method for the early detection of bone metastatic invasion in patients with breast cancer and suspected bone metastases.

  11. The bone remodeling environment is a factor in breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Li Laine; Zheng, Yu; Stalgis-Bilinski, Kellie; Dunstan, Colin R

    2011-01-01

    The bone microenvironment is clearly an important determinant of breast cancer metastasis to bone. Once established in bone, the ability for breast cancer cells to hijack normal regulatory pathways for osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival is known to form the basis of a vicious cycle that promotes both bone destruction and tumor growth. However, the importance of the background remodeling activity in the early stages of breast cancer metastatic establishment in bone has not been systematically investigated. Here we review recent studies that indicate that bone remodeling levels, as influenced by calcium and vitamin D status, do impact the ability of human breast cancer cells to grow in the bones of nude mice. These studies support the assessment and correction of calcium and vitamin D deficient states in women at risk of developing advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Identification of a Gene on Chromosome 18q21 Involved in Suppressing Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    growth properties. In vivo analysis of the metastatic potential of PC-3 cells transfected with maspin reveals that maspin is involved in the seeding ...play a specific role in the ability of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells to seed to bone. PC-3 +18 PC-3 PC-3 C5 PC-3 B7...genomic clone and demonstrated that expression of maspin at endogenous levels affects the potential of PC-3 to seed to bone. • Abstract presented at the

  13. The critical role of the bone microenvironment in cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Casimiro, Sandra; Guise, Theresa A; Chirgwin, John

    2009-10-30

    Bone metastatic disease is a late-stage event of many common cancers, such as those of prostate and breast. It is incurable and causes severe morbidity. Tumor and bone interact in a vicious cycle, where tumor-secreted factors stimulate bone cells, which in turn release growth factors and cytokines that act back on the tumor cells. Within the vicious cycle are many potential therapeutic targets for novel treatment of bone metastatic disease. Therapeutic strategies can be oriented to inhibit bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) or tumor responses to factors enriched in the bone microenvironment. Many publications, especially from pre-clinical animal models, show that this approach, especially combination treatments, can reduce tumor burden and tumor-derived bone lesions. This supports a novel paradigm: tumor growth can be effectively inhibited by targeting the bone and its microenvironment rather than the tumor itself alone.

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for metastatic bone pain palliation: available options in the clinical domain and their comparisons.

    PubMed

    Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Bone pain arising due to skeletal metastases is one of the common complications experienced by the majority of patients suffering from prostate, breast and lung cancer at the advanced stage of the disease. These patients are subjected to palliative care in order to improve the quality of their remaining life. With the gradually increasing number of cancer cases, palliation of metastatic bone pain is gaining importance. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play a pivotal role in the management of cancer pain, particularly in patients with multiple metastases, as these agents are proven to be effective in controlling the bone pain with minimum side effects. Although a plethora of such radiopharmaceuticals have been developed and evaluated in animal models, only a few are regularly used in clinics while some of these agents are at different stages of clinical evaluations. The present article describes only those bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals, which have been reported to be clinically administered till date, along with their relative merits and drawbacks.

  15. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  16. The treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, E J

    1991-01-01

    While metastatic breast cancer is not curable, it is treatable. Its treatment is associated with a relatively high rate of success, and patients are able to maintain a good quality of life for periods ranging from a few months to several years. This knowledge should encourage both the patient and the oncologist to maintain treatment as long as potentially effective therapeutic methods are available. Progress is ongoing both in the development of new forms of treatment and in new ways of using and combining already existing therapeutic modalities. There is still no established "best" or "only" first treatment of metastatic breast cancer. When secondary and later treatment is to be undertaken, the task of selecting the most appropriate treatment becomes even more complex. It is only through controlled clinical trials that useful therapeutic guidelines will develop. Treatment is a joint endeavor involving both the physician and the patient. Communication must remain open. In the final stages of the illness, treatment should be directed toward the relief of distressing symptoms and anxiety.

  17. Metastatic breast cancer in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    MEYER, AARON A.; HWANG, M.; FARASATPOUR, M.; JANARDHAN, R.; MARGENTHALER, J.A.; VIRGO, K.S.; JOHNSON, FRANK E.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a major health problem worldwide. The median survival duration for patients with metastatic breast cancer is two to three years. Approximately 1% of populations worldwide have schizophrenia. The manner in which schizophrenic patients fare when diagnosed with metastatic breast carcinoma (MBC) was evaluated. We queried the National Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) datasets using computer codes for a pre-existing diagnosis of schizophrenia and a later diagnosis of breast carcinoma. Chart-based data concerning the identified subjects were then requested. Previously determined inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to select evaluable patients from the medical records, prior to extracting demographic details and data concerning the treatment course in each subject. Ten patients had distant metastases at initial diagnosis, while seven developed MBC following prior curative-intent treatment. Two patients refused therapy. Ten did not comply with recommended management. Five harmed or threatened physicians, other caregivers or themselves. Schizophrenic patients with MBC often fail to understand the nature of their illnesses. Often they do not accept palliative treatment, while a number of them do not comply with therapy, once initiated. They often exhibit behaviors that are detrimental to themselves or others. Formal psychiatric consultation is therefore necessary in patients. Several detrimental behaviors may be predicted reliably by history alone. PMID:24649175

  18. Matrix Rigidity Induces Osteolytic Gene Expression of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruppender, Nazanin S.; Merkel, Alyssa R.; Martin, T. John; Sterling, Julie A.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Nearly 70% of breast cancer patients with advanced disease will develop bone metastases. Once established in bone, tumor cells produce factors that cause changes in normal bone remodeling, such as parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). While enhanced expression of PTHrP is known to stimulate osteoclasts to resorb bone, the environmental factors driving tumor cells to express PTHrP in the early stages of development of metastatic bone disease are unknown. In this study, we have shown that tumor cells known to metastasize to bone respond to 2D substrates with rigidities comparable to that of the bone microenvironment by increasing expression and production of PTHrP. The cellular response is regulated by Rho-dependent actomyosin contractility mediated by TGF-ß signaling. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) using both pharmacological and genetic approaches decreased PTHrP expression. Furthermore, cells expressing a dominant negative form of the TGF-ß receptor did not respond to substrate rigidity, and inhibition of ROCK decreased PTHrP expression induced by exogenous TGF-ß. These observations suggest a role for the differential rigidity of the mineralized bone microenvironment in early stages of tumor-induced osteolysis, which is especially important in metastatic cancer since many cancers (such as those of the breast and lung) preferentially metastasize to bone. PMID:21085597

  19. Omentum and bone marrow: how adipocyte-rich organs create tumour microenvironments conducive for metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Gusky, H. Chkourko; Diedrich, J.; MacDougald, O. A.; Podgorski, I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary A number of clinical studies have linked adiposity with increased cancer incidence, progression and metastasis, and adipose tissue is now being credited with both systemic and local effects on tumour development and survival. Adipocytes, a major component of benign adipose tissue, represent a significant source of lipids, cytokines and adipokines, and their presence in the tumour microenvironment substantially affects cellular trafficking, signalling and metabolism. Cancers that have a high predisposition to metastasize to the adipocyte-rich host organs are likely to be particularly affected by the presence of adipocytes. Although our understanding of how adipocytes influence tumour progression has grown significantly over the last several years, the mechanisms by which adipocytes regulate the meta-static niche are not well-understood. In this review, we focus on the omentum, a visceral white adipose tissue depot, and the bone, a depot for marrow adipose tissue, as two distinct adipocyte-rich organs that share common characteristic: they are both sites of significant metastatic growth. We highlight major differences in origin and function of each of these adipose depots and reveal potential common characteristics that make them environments that are attractive and conducive to secondary tumour growth. Special attention is given to how omental and marrow adipocytes modulate the tumour microenvironment by promoting angiogenesis, affecting immune cells and altering metabolism to support growth and survival of metastatic cancer cells. PMID:27432523

  20. Novel Therapies for Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dayyani, Farshid; Gallick, Gary E.; Logothetis, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in tumor biology have made remarkable achievements in the development of therapy for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. These advances reflect a growing appreciation for the role of the tumor microenvironment in promoting prostate cancer progression. Prostate cancer is no longer viewed predominantly as a disease of abnormally proliferating epithelial cells but rather as a disease of complex interactions between prostate cancer epithelial cells (epithelial compartment) and the surrounding tissues (stromal compartment) in which they reside. For example, prostate cancers frequently metastasize to bone, an organ that contains a microenvironment rich in extracellular matrix proteins and stromal cells including hematopoietic cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts fibroblasts, endothelial cells, adipocytes, immune cells, and mesenchymal stem cells. Multiple signaling pathways provide crosstalk between the epithelial and the stromal compartments to enhance tumor growth, including androgen receptor signaling, tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, and immune surveillance. The rationale to disrupt this “two-compartment” crosstalk has led to the development of drugs that target tumor stromal elements in addition to the cancer epithelial cell. PMID:21917607

  1. Proximal femoral replacements for metastatic bone disease: financial implications for sarcoma units.

    PubMed

    Ashford, Robert U; Hanna, Sammy A; Park, Derek H; Pollock, Rob C; Skinner, John A; Briggs, Timothy W R; Cannon, Stephen R

    2010-06-01

    Metastatic pathological fractures of the proximal femur are increasingly treated by endoprosthetic proximal femoral replacement. We report the results and the costs incurred performing these procedures at our supra-regional sarcoma unit. Sixty-two patients underwent 63 proximal femoral replacements for metastatic bone disease over a seven-year period. Breast cancer was the most common primary pathology. One patient underwent a revision procedure for infection. Twenty-two patients suffered dislocations, most commonly those undergoing a conventional arthroplasty articulation. The estimated cost of a proximal femoral replacement is 18,002 pounds at our centre. Less than half of this is reimbursed under Payment by Results. Endoprosthetic replacement of the proximal femur is an effective treatment of metastases, but is poorly reimbursed under current funding arrangements.

  2. New metastatic model of human small-cell lung cancer by orthotopic transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shuichi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ohba, Shunichi; Kohda, Yasuko; Usami, Ihomi; Masuda, Tohru; Kawada, Manabu; Nomoto, Akio

    2015-04-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer with high metastatic ability and novel strategies against the metastasis are urgently needed to improve SCLC treatment. However, the mechanism of metastasis of SCLC remains largely to be elucidated. For further studies of SCLC metastasis, we developed a new orthotopic transplantation model in mice. We established a GFP-labeled subline from the human SCLC cell line DMS273 and transplanted them orthotopically into the lung of nude mice with Matrigel. The GFP-labeled cells showed significant metastatic activity and formed metastatic foci in distant tissues such as bone, kidney, and brain, as observed in SCLC patients. From a bone metastasis focus of the mouse, we isolated another subline, termed G3H, with enhanced metastatic potential and higher hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) expression than the parental line. Further studies indicated that the HGF/MET signaling pathway was involved in in vitro motility and invasion activities of the G3H cells and treatments with MET inhibitors decreased formation of distant metastases in our orthotopic model using G3H cells. These data indicated that our model mimics the clinical aspect of SCLC such as metastatic tropism and autocrine of HGF/MET signaling. Compared with other orthotopic SCLC models, our model has a superior ability to form distant metastases. Therefore, our model will provide a valuable tool for the study of SCLC metastasis. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Treatment landscape of metastatic prostate cancer: the role of radium-223.

    PubMed

    Dermine, Alexandre; Machiels, Jean-Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The landscape of metastatic prostate cancer has changed recently with the availability of six new molecules showing an overall survival benefit. The development of compounds able to decrease the rate of complications from bone metastasis has also led to improvements in overall morbidity associated with this disease. In this paper, we briefly review the currently available drugs indicated in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, focusing on the place of the radiopharmaceutical agent radium-223 and its very unique mechanism of action and safety profile.

  4. In vivo visualization of metastatic prostate cancer and quantitation of disease progression in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kalikin, Linda M; Schneider, Abraham; Thakur, Melissa A; Fridman, Yaron; Griffin, Laura B; Dunn, Rodney L; Rosol, Thomas J; Shah, Rajal B; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; McCauley, Laurie K; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2003-01-01

    While survival periods for patients with localized prostate cancer have increased, there is still no curative therapy for metastatic disease. Using non-invasive bioluminescent imaging, we designed a comprehensive murine model to monitor tumor location and expansion. We detected micrometastases after one week that correlated by gross necropsy, autoradiography, and histopathology with organ and skeletal lesions seen clinically. We calculated in vivo kinetics for tumor growth based on biophoton emissions and observed significantly faster growth of bone lesions and of overall tumor burden in young mice compared to old mice. This model provides a controllable biological system for further investigation into the pathogenesis of metastatic prostate cancer and evaluation of new therapies.

  5. Characterization of bone quality in prostate cancer bone metastases using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiaohong; Patil, Chetan; Morrissey, Colm; Roudier, Martine P.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita; Nyman, Jeffry

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common primary tumor in men, with a high propensity to metastasize to bone. Bone metastases in prostate cancer are associated with active pathologic bone remodeling, leading to increased mortality and morbidity. Detailed characterization of bone metastases is important in the management of prostate cancer. Raman spectroscopy was applied in this study to investigate the structure and composition of metastatic bone in prostate cancer with the ultimate goal of identifying spectral features that are related to the alterations in bone quality as the bone metastases develop. Osteoblastic-, osteolytic- and tumor-absent bone specimens from prostate cancer patients were investigated using bench-top Raman microspectroscopy. Raman derived measurements of collagen mineralization, mineral crystallinity, and carbonate substitution were calculated. The osteolytic lesions demonstrated significantly lower collagen mineralization, determined by phosphate ν1/proline, and higher carbonate substitution than normal and osteoblastic bones. Mineral crystallinity was significantly lower in both blastic and lytic specimens. In addition, a significant increase in the ratio of hydroxyproine: proline was observed in the osteoblastic specimen, indicating an increase in the content of hydroxyproline at the blastic lesions. This study demonstrate that Raman spectroscopy shows promise in determining alterations in osteoblastic and osteolytic bone metastases as well as assessing the response of metastatic bone to therapies.

  6. Therapy targeted to the metastatic niche is effective in a model of stage IV breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byunghee; Kavishwar, Amol; Wang, Ping; Ross, Alana; Pantazopoulos, Pamela; Dudley, Michael; Moore, Anna; Medarova, Zdravka

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of stage IV metastatic breast cancer patients is limited to palliative options and represents an unmet clinical need. Here, we demonstrate that pharmacological inhibition of miRNA-10b - a master regulator of metastatic cell viability – leads to elimination of distant metastases in a mouse model of metastatic breast cancer. This was achieved using the miRNA-10b inhibitory nanodrug, MN-anti-miR10b, which consists of magnetic nanoparticles, conjugated to LNA-based miR-10b antagomirs. Intravenous injection of MN-anti-miR10b into mice bearing lung, bone, and brain metastases from breast cancer resulted in selective accumulation of the nanodrug in metastatic tumor cells. Weekly treatments of mice with MN-anti-miR-10b and low-dose doxorubicin resulted in complete regression of pre-existing distant metastases in 65% of the animals and a significant reduction in cancer mortality. These observations were supported by dramatic reduction in proliferation and increase in apoptosis in metastatic sites. On a molecular level, we observed a significant increase in the expression of HOXD10, which is a known target of miRNA-10b. These results represent first steps into the uncharted territory of therapy targeted to the metastatic niche. PMID:28322342

  7. Therapeutic opportunities from tumour biology in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    McLeod, H L; McKay, J A; Collie-Duguid, E S; Cassidy, J

    2000-08-01

    Tumour metastasis is the major cause of morbidity and mortality from colorectal cancer. While improvements in quality of life and patient survival have been made over the past 10 years, the majority of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer will die from their disease. As knowledge of the biology of colon cancer and its invasion/metastasis programme evolve, this presents new therapeutic opportunities for pharmacological and genetic intervention. This review discusses the current approaches to metastatic colorectal cancer therapy, details genomic and biological variance between primary and metastatic tumours, and highlights approaches for harnessing these differences to improve therapy.

  8. Molecular Subgroup of Primary Prostate Cancer Presenting with Metastatic Biology.

    PubMed

    Walker, Steven M; Knight, Laura A; McCavigan, Andrena M; Logan, Gemma E; Berge, Viktor; Sherif, Amir; Pandha, Hardev; Warren, Anne Y; Davidson, Catherine; Uprichard, Adam; Blayney, Jaine K; Price, Bethanie; Jellema, Gera L; Steele, Christopher J; Svindland, Aud; McDade, Simon S; Eden, Christopher G; Foster, Chris; Mills, Ian G; Neal, David E; Mason, Malcolm D; Kay, Elaine W; Waugh, David J; Harkin, D Paul; Watson, R William; Clarke, Noel W; Kennedy, Richard D

    2017-10-01

    Approximately 4-25% of patients with early prostate cancer develop disease recurrence following radical prostatectomy. To identify a molecular subgroup of prostate cancers with metastatic potential at presentation resulting in a high risk of recurrence following radical prostatectomy. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering was performed using gene expression data from 70 primary resections, 31 metastatic lymph nodes, and 25 normal prostate samples. Independent assay validation was performed using 322 radical prostatectomy samples from four sites with a mean follow-up of 50.3 months. Molecular subgroups were identified using unsupervised hierarchical clustering. A partial least squares approach was used to generate a gene expression assay. Relationships with outcome (time to biochemical and metastatic recurrence) were analysed using multivariable Cox regression and log-rank analysis. A molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancer with biology similar to metastatic disease was identified. A 70-transcript signature (metastatic assay) was developed and independently validated in the radical prostatectomy samples. Metastatic assay positive patients had increased risk of biochemical recurrence (multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 1.62 [1.13-2.33]; p=0.0092) and metastatic recurrence (multivariable HR=3.20 [1.76-5.80]; p=0.0001). A combined model with Cancer of the Prostate Risk Assessment post surgical (CAPRA-S) identified patients at an increased risk of biochemical and metastatic recurrence superior to either model alone (HR=2.67 [1.90-3.75]; p<0.0001 and HR=7.53 [4.13-13.73]; p<0.0001, respectively). The retrospective nature of the study is acknowledged as a potential limitation. The metastatic assay may identify a molecular subgroup of primary prostate cancers with metastatic potential. The metastatic assay may improve the ability to detect patients at risk of metastatic recurrence following radical prostatectomy. The impact of adjuvant therapies should be assessed in

  9. The use of radioisotopes for palliation of metastatic bone pain.

    PubMed

    Gkialas, I; Iordanidou, L; Galanakis, I; Giannopoulos, S

    2008-01-01

    Bone pain associated with advanced prostate and other cancers is a frequent and significant complication. Pharmaceutical therapy of bone pain includes nonsteroidal analgesics and opiates. While external beam radiation therapy remains the mainstay of pain palliation of solitary lesions, bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals have entered the armamentarium for the treatment of multiple osseous metastases. The 3 radioisotopes currently approved for treatment of pain (strontium-89/(89)Sr, samarium-153/(153)Sm and rhenium-186/(186)Re) are discussed in this review including the approved dose, method of administration and indications for use.

  10. [Reappraisal role of locoregional radiation therapy in metastatic cancers].

    PubMed

    Rancoule, Chloé; Pacaut-Vassal, Cécile; Vallard, Alexis; Mery, Benoite; Trone, Jane-Chloé; El Meddeb Hamrouni, Anis; Magné, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Recent innovations in oncology area helped to improve the prognosis of certain cancers including metastatic ones with a decrease in mortality. Recommendations describe the treatment of metastatic cancer as systemic therapy or complementary care and the role of locoregional treatment in the treatment plan only occurs in a palliative context. Currently, in the clinical practice, out of "the evidence based medicine", an early locoregional therapy (surgery or radiation therapy) can be proposed in several cases of metastatic cancers. The aim of the present review is to describe the role of the primary tumor radiation therapy in metastatic disease. In metastatic breast, prostate, cervix, rectal or nasopharyngeal cancers, locoregional treatment including radiation therapy can, in some cases, be discussed and decided in MDT. Ongoing clinical trials in these locations should soon precise the benefit of this locoregional treatment. It will also be important to define the specific criteria in order to select patients who could benefit from this treatment.

  11. Metastatic superscan on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy in a case of carcinoma colon: Common finding but rare etiology.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Sarathi; Sharma, Punit; Karunanithi, Sellam; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-07-01

    Bone scintigraphy in which there is excessive skeletal radioisotope uptake in relation to soft tissues along with absent or faint activity in the genitourinary tract is known as a 'superscan'. Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy associated with superscan along with others such as lung cancer, breast cancer and haematological malignancies. Here we present the case of a 41 year old woman with carcinoma colon with metastatic superscan on (99m)Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy, a very rare cause for metastatic superscan.

  12. Enzalutamide in metastatic prostate cancer before chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Beer, Tomasz M; Armstrong, Andrew J; Rathkopf, Dana E; Loriot, Yohann; Sternberg, Cora N; Higano, Celestia S; Iversen, Peter; Bhattacharya, Suman; Carles, Joan; Chowdhury, Simon; Davis, Ian D; de Bono, Johann S; Evans, Christopher P; Fizazi, Karim; Joshua, Anthony M; Kim, Choung-Soo; Kimura, Go; Mainwaring, Paul; Mansbach, Harry; Miller, Kurt; Noonberg, Sarah B; Perabo, Frank; Phung, De; Saad, Fred; Scher, Howard I; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Venner, Peter M; Tombal, Bertrand

    2014-07-31

    Enzalutamide is an oral androgen-receptor inhibitor that prolongs survival in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer in whom the disease has progressed after chemotherapy. New treatment options are needed for patients with metastatic prostate cancer who have not received chemotherapy, in whom the disease has progressed despite androgen-deprivation therapy. In this double-blind, phase 3 study, we randomly assigned 1717 patients to receive either enzalutamide (at a dose of 160 mg) or placebo once daily. The coprimary end points were radiographic progression-free survival and overall survival. The study was stopped after a planned interim analysis, conducted when 540 deaths had been reported, showed a benefit of the active treatment. The rate of radiographic progression-free survival at 12 months was 65% among patients treated with enzalutamide, as compared with 14% among patients receiving placebo (81% risk reduction; hazard ratio in the enzalutamide group, 0.19; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15 to 0.23; P<0.001). A total of 626 patients (72%) in the enzalutamide group, as compared with 532 patients (63%) in the placebo group, were alive at the data-cutoff date (29% reduction in the risk of death; hazard ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.60 to 0.84; P<0.001). The benefit of enzalutamide was shown with respect to all secondary end points, including the time until the initiation of cytotoxic chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.35), the time until the first skeletal-related event (hazard ratio, 0.72), a complete or partial soft-tissue response (59% vs. 5%), the time until prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression (hazard ratio, 0.17), and a rate of decline of at least 50% in PSA (78% vs. 3%) (P<0.001 for all comparisons). Fatigue and hypertension were the most common clinically relevant adverse events associated with enzalutamide treatment. Enzalutamide significantly decreased the risk of radiographic progression and death and delayed the initiation of chemotherapy

  13. Psoralen inhibits bone metastasis of breast cancer in mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunyu; Sun, Zhenping; Ye, Yiyi; Han, Xianghui; Song, Xiaoyun; Liu, Sheng

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common female malignancy and it frequently metastasizes to bone. Metastatic breast cancer continues to be the primary cause of death for women in East and Southeast Asia. Psoralen is a furocoumarin that can be isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. Psoralen exhibits a wide range of biological properties and has been demonstrated as an antioxidant, antidepressant, anticancer, antibacterial, and antiviral agent. Additionally, it is involved in the formation and regulation of bone. This study investigated whether psoralen can inhibit metastasis of breast cancer to bone in vivo. Histological, molecular biological, and imaging analyses revealed that psoralen inhibits bone metastases in mice. Psoralen may function to inhibit breast cancer cell growth in the bone microenvironment and regulate the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts in tumor-bearing mice. The results of this study suggest that psoralen is a bone-modifying agent and a potential therapeutic to treat patients with bone metastases. © 2013.

  14. Reconstructing metastatic seeding patterns of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Johannes G.; Makohon-Moore, Alvin P.; Gerold, Jeffrey M.; Bozic, Ivana; Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Vogelstein, Bert; Nowak, Martin A.

    2017-01-01

    Reconstructing the evolutionary history of metastases is critical for understanding their basic biological principles and has profound clinical implications. Genome-wide sequencing data has enabled modern phylogenomic methods to accurately dissect subclones and their phylogenies from noisy and impure bulk tumour samples at unprecedented depth. However, existing methods are not designed to infer metastatic seeding patterns. Here we develop a tool, called Treeomics, to reconstruct the phylogeny of metastases and map subclones to their anatomic locations. Treeomics infers comprehensive seeding patterns for pancreatic, ovarian, and prostate cancers. Moreover, Treeomics correctly disambiguates true seeding patterns from sequencing artifacts; 7% of variants were misclassified by conventional statistical methods. These artifacts can skew phylogenies by creating illusory tumour heterogeneity among distinct samples. In silico benchmarking on simulated tumour phylogenies across a wide range of sample purities (15–95%) and sequencing depths (25-800 × ) demonstrates the accuracy of Treeomics compared with existing methods. PMID:28139641

  15. New drug development in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Andrew J; George, Daniel J

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, drug development in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer (CRPC) remains challenging, due to the number of potentially viable molecular targets and clinical trials available, the lack of established surrogates for overall survival, and competing causes of mortality. This review will highlight the highest impact phase II and phase III trials of novel agents in the current CRPC landscape, and focus on both molecular targets and clinical trial designs that are more likely to demonstrate clinical benefit. The need for tissue correlative studies for target evaluation and drug mechanism is stressed to continue to advance the field and to define biomarkers that may identify patient populations that may derive a greater benefit from these molecular agents.

  16. Role of TGF-β in breast cancer bone metastases

    PubMed Central

    Chiechi, Antonella; Waning, David L.; Stayrook, Keith R.; Buijs, Jeroen T.; Guise, Theresa A.; Mohammad, Khalid S.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer among females worldwide leading to approximately 350,000 deaths each year. It has long been known that cancers preferentially metastasize to particular organs, and bone metastases occur in ~70% of patients with advanced breast cancer. Breast cancer bone metastases are predominantly osteolytic and accompanied by increased fracture risk, pain, nerve compression and hypercalcemia, causing severe morbidity. In the bone matrix, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is one of the most abundant growth factors, which is released in active form upon tumor-induced osteoclastic bone resorption. TGF-β, in turn, stimulates bone metastatic tumor cells to secrete factors that further drive osteolytic bone destruction adjacent to the tumor. Thus, TGF-β is a crucial factor responsible for driving the feed-forward vicious cycle of cancer growth in bone. Moreover, TGF-β activates epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, increases tumor cell invasiveness and angiogenesis and induces immunosuppression. Blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway to interrupt this vicious cycle between breast cancer and bone offers a promising target for therapeutic intervention to decrease skeletal metastasis. This review will describe the role of TGF-β in breast cancer and bone metastasis, and pre-clinical and clinical data will be evaluated for the potential use of TGF-β inhibitors in clinical practice to treat breast cancer bone metastases. PMID:24558636

  17. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  18. Mutational Profile of Metastatic Breast Cancers: A Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Celine; Bachelot, Thomas; Filleron, Thomas; Pedrero, Marion; Campone, Mario; Soria, Jean-Charles; Massard, Christophe; Lévy, Christelle; Arnedos, Monica; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Garrabey, Julie; Boursin, Yannick; Deloger, Marc; Fu, Yu; Commo, Frédéric; Scott, Véronique; Lacroix, Ludovic; Dieci, Maria Vittoria; Kamal, Maud; Diéras, Véronique; Gonçalves, Anthony; Ferrerro, Jean-Marc; Romieu, Gilles; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Mouret Reynier, Marie-Ange; Théry, Jean-Christophe; Le Du, Fanny; Guiu, Séverine; Dalenc, Florence; Clapisson, Gilles; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Jimenez, Marta; Le Tourneau, Christophe; André, Fabrice

    2016-12-01

    Major advances have been achieved in the characterization of early breast cancer (eBC) genomic profiles. Metastatic breast cancer (mBC) is associated with poor outcomes, yet limited information is available on the genomic profile of this disease. This study aims to decipher mutational profiles of mBC using next-generation sequencing. Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 216 tumor-blood pairs from mBC patients who underwent a biopsy in the context of the SAFIR01, SAFIR02, SHIVA, or Molecular Screening for Cancer Treatment Optimization (MOSCATO) prospective trials. Mutational profiles from 772 primary breast tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used as a reference for comparing primary and mBC mutational profiles. Twelve genes (TP53, PIK3CA, GATA3, ESR1, MAP3K1, CDH1, AKT1, MAP2K4, RB1, PTEN, CBFB, and CDKN2A) were identified as significantly mutated in mBC (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.1). Eight genes (ESR1, FSIP2, FRAS1, OSBPL3, EDC4, PALB2, IGFN1, and AGRN) were more frequently mutated in mBC as compared to eBC (FDR < 0.01). ESR1 was identified both as a driver and as a metastatic gene (n = 22, odds ratio = 29, 95% CI [9-155], p = 1.2e-12) and also presented with focal amplification (n = 9) for a total of 31 mBCs with either ESR1 mutation or amplification, including 27 hormone receptor positive (HR+) and HER2 negative (HER2-) mBCs (19%). HR+/HER2- mBC presented a high prevalence of mutations on genes located on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway (TSC1 and TSC2) as compared to HR+/HER2- eBC (respectively 6% and 0.7%, p = 0.0004). Other actionable genes were more frequently mutated in HR+ mBC, including ERBB4 (n = 8), NOTCH3 (n = 7), and ALK (n = 7). Analysis of mutational signatures revealed a significant increase in APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis in HR+/HER2- metastatic tumors as compared to primary TCGA samples (p < 2e-16). The main limitations of this study include the absence of bone metastases and the size of the cohort, which

  19. Targeting Angiogenesis in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Sangeetha; Raffin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Angiogenesis has become an important target in the treatment of several solid tumors, including breast cancer. As monotherapy, antiangiogenic agents have demonstrated limited activity in metastatic breast cancer (MBC); therefore, they have generally been developed for use in combination with chemotherapies. Thus far, the experience with antiangiogenic agents for MBC has been mixed. The results from one study assessing addition of the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab to paclitaxel led to approval of bevacizumab for MBC. However, the modest improvement of progression-free survival rates in subsequent MBC studies has led to reappraisal of bevacizumab. Phase III studies have not produced evidence supporting use of the multikinase inhibitor sunitinib alone or in combination with MBC chemotherapy. Experience with sorafenib in a phase IIb program indicates potential when used in select combinations, particularly with capecitabine; however, phase III confirmatory data are needed. Although antiangiogenic therapies combined with chemotherapy have increased progression-free survival rates for patients with MBC, increases in overall survival times have not been observed. Some studies have tried to combine antiangiogenic agents such as bevacizumab and sunitinib or sorafenib, but that approach has been limited because of toxicity concerns. Sequential use of antiangiogenic agents with differing mechanisms of action may be an effective approach. Despite setbacks, angiogenesis will likely remain an important target of treatment for selected patients with MBC. PMID:22843553

  20. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Haan, Josien C; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J M; van de Wiel, Mark A; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F; van Grieken, Nicole C T; Voorham, Quirinus J M; Bosch, Linda J W; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M W; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Punt, Cornelis J A; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A

    2014-11-14

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1-q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy.

  1. Genomic landscape of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Haan, Josien C.; Labots, Mariette; Rausch, Christian; Koopman, Miriam; Tol, Jolien; Mekenkamp, Leonie J. M.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Israeli, Danielle; van Essen, Hendrik F.; van Grieken, Nicole C. T.; Voorham, Quirinus J. M.; Bosch, Linda J. W.; Qu, Xueping; Kabbarah, Omar; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Ylstra, Bauke; Meijer, Gerrit A.

    2014-01-01

    Response to drug therapy in individual colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is associated with tumour biology. Here we describe the genomic landscape of tumour samples of a homogeneous well-annotated series of patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) of two phase III clinical trials, CAIRO and CAIRO2. DNA copy number aberrations of 349 patients are determined. Within three treatment arms, 194 chromosomal subregions are associated with progression-free survival (PFS; uncorrected single-test P-values <0.005). These subregions are filtered for effect on messenger RNA expression, using an independent data set from The Cancer Genome Atlas which returned 171 genes. Three chromosomal regions are associated with a significant difference in PFS between treatment arms with or without irinotecan. One of these regions, 6q16.1–q21, correlates in vitro with sensitivity to SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan. This genomic landscape of mCRC reveals a number of DNA copy number aberrations associated with response to drug therapy. PMID:25394515

  2. Economics of ramucirumab for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Kohn, Christine G; Goldstein, Daniel A

    2016-12-01

    Despite its FDA approval and incorporation into the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) treatment guidelines, ramucirumab (RAM) is associated with a drug acquisition cost that is substantially higher than other approved options. Given its substantial cost, the presence of a viable alternative treatment option, and its minimal survival improvement, the usefulness of RAM in clinical practice has been called into question. Areas covered: In this paper, we outline the cost, benefits, and economic implications of RAM from a US perspective, as it is used in the treatment of mCRC. We also dissect its use in other tumor types and in other healthcare systems around the world, and briefly compare it with similar drugs targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. We used the search engine PubMed using the following as search terms: cost-effectiveness; ramucirumab; metastatic colon cancer; angiogenesis; and value-based medicine. Expert commentary: The use of ramucirumab in the treatment of mCRC serves as a microcosm of the worsening healthcare crisis within the US and the ongoing controversy regarding oncology drug costs, benefits, and value. Therefore, there must be a joint effort in moving towards value based pricing models.

  3. Eribulin Improves Survival of Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Treatment with eribulin (Halaven™) improved overall survival in women with metastatic breast cancer whose disease progressed despite multiple rounds of prior chemotherapy, according to the results of a phase III clinical trial called EMBRACE.

  4. Enzalutamide Improves Survival in Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from an international phase III trial that compared enzalutamide (Xtandi®) and placebo for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer that had progressed during treatment with androgen deprivation therapy.

  5. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as a gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Sahebally, Shaheel M; Sehgal, Rishabh; Kelly, Justin; Faul, Peter N; Waldron, David

    2013-12-16

    Metastatic breast cancer to the small bowel (SB) presenting as gallstone ileus and resulting in SB obstruction has not been described previously. A 76-year-old woman with previous metastatic breast cancer to the axial spine and hips presented with abdominal pain and bilious vomiting. CT scanning revealed SB obstruction consistent with gallstone ileus. The patient underwent two segmental SB resections for distal ileal strictures mimicking what appeared to be macroscopic Crohn's disease. The entero-biliary fistula was undisturbed. Pathological analysis revealed the dual pathologies of gallstone ileus and metastatic carcinoma from a breast primary causing luminal SB obstruction. Improvements in staging and treatment modalities have contributed to the increased overall long-term survival for breast cancer, compelling clinicians to consider metastatic breast cancer as a differential diagnosis in women presenting with new onset of gastrointestinal symptoms in order that appropriate treatment be administered in a timely fashion.

  6. Ribociclib as First-Line Treatment for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of interim results from a phase III trial testing ribociclib plus letrozole (Femara®) as a first-line treatment for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer.

  7. Nab-Paclitaxel Plus Gemcitabine for Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared the combination of albumin-bound paclitaxel (nab-paclitaxel [Abraxane®]) and gemcitabine (Gemzar®) versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

  8. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  9. Drugs Approved for Bone Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bone cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  10. The BMP Inhibitor Coco Reactivates Breast Cancer Cells at Lung Metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific anti-metastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation. PMID:22901808

  11. Denosumab Reduces Risk of Bone Side Effects in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The biological agent denosumab (Xgeva) is more effective than zoledronic acid at decreasing the risk of bone fractures and other skeletal-related events (SRE) in men with castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer, according to results from a randomi

  12. On a mathematical model of bone marrow metastatic niche.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Ana Isabel; Tello, J Ignacio

    2017-02-01

    We propose a mathematical model to describe tumor cells movement towards a metastasis location into the bone marrow considering the influence of chemotaxis inhibition due to the action of a drug. The model considers the evolution of the signaling molecules CXCL-12 secreted by osteoblasts (bone cells responsible of the mineralization of the bone) and PTHrP (secreted by tumor cells) which activates osteoblast growth. The model consists of a coupled system of second order PDEs describing the evolution of CXCL-12 and PTHrP, an ODE of logistic type to model the Osteoblasts density and an extra equation for each cancer cell. We also simulate the system to illustrate the qualitative behavior of the solutions. The numerical method of resolution is also presented in detail.

  13. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  14. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D.; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R.; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M.; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H.; Aransay, Ana M.; Iovanna, Juan L.; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; dM Vivanco, Maria; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R.; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-01-01

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification. PMID:27553708

  15. Stratification and therapeutic potential of PML in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Martín-Martín, Natalia; Piva, Marco; Urosevic, Jelena; Aldaz, Paula; Sutherland, James D; Fernández-Ruiz, Sonia; Arreal, Leire; Torrano, Verónica; Cortazar, Ana R; Planet, Evarist; Guiu, Marc; Radosevic-Robin, Nina; Garcia, Stephane; Macías, Iratxe; Salvador, Fernando; Domenici, Giacomo; Rueda, Oscar M; Zabala-Letona, Amaia; Arruabarrena-Aristorena, Amaia; Zúñiga-García, Patricia; Caro-Maldonado, Alfredo; Valcárcel-Jiménez, Lorea; Sánchez-Mosquera, Pilar; Varela-Rey, Marta; Martínez-Chantar, Maria Luz; Anguita, Juan; Ibrahim, Yasir H; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Lawrie, Charles H; Aransay, Ana M; Iovanna, Juan L; Baselga, Jose; Caldas, Carlos; Barrio, Rosa; Serra, Violeta; Vivanco, Maria dM; Matheu, Ander; Gomis, Roger R; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-24

    Patient stratification has been instrumental for the success of targeted therapies in breast cancer. However, the molecular basis of metastatic breast cancer and its therapeutic vulnerabilities remain poorly understood. Here we show that PML is a novel target in aggressive breast cancer. The acquisition of aggressiveness and metastatic features in breast tumours is accompanied by the elevated PML expression and enhanced sensitivity to its inhibition. Interestingly, we find that STAT3 is responsible, at least in part, for the transcriptional upregulation of PML in breast cancer. Moreover, PML targeting hampers breast cancer initiation and metastatic seeding. Mechanistically, this biological activity relies on the regulation of the stem cell gene SOX9 through interaction of PML with its promoter region. Altogether, we identify a novel pathway sustaining breast cancer aggressiveness that can be therapeutically exploited in combination with PML-based stratification.

  16. Inhibition of bone resorption and growth of breast cancer in the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Buijs, Jeroen T; Que, Ivo; Löwik, Clemens W G M; Papapoulos, Socrates E; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2009-02-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, where tumor cells induce osteoclasts to locally destroy bone. During bone resorption, growth factors are locally released that may support bone metastatic growth. Differently from most other tissues, drugs that can limit local turnover, such as bisphosphonates and osteoprotegerin (OPG), are available for bone. We examined the hypothesis that inhibition of bone resorption by two different mechanisms may also affect the growth of cancer cells in bone. For this, we tested the effects of high doses of OPG and zoledronic acid (ZOL) on progression of MDA-231-B/Luc+ breast cancer cells in the bone microenvironment using whole body bioluminescent reporter imaging (BLI). Both treatments significantly inhibited the development of radiographically detectable osteolytic lesions. Histologic examination corroborated the radiographic findings, showing that both treatments preserved the integrity of bone trabeculae and prevented bone destruction (significantly higher trabecular bone volumes vs. vehicle). However, whereas practically no TRAcP-positive osteoclasts were observed in tibiae preparations of animals treated with Fc-OPG, TRAcP-positive osteoclasts were still present in the animals treated with ZOL. Intra-bone tumor burden was reduced with ZOL and Fc-OPG treatment. Although there appeared to be a trend for less overall total tumor burden upon treatment with both compounds, this was not significant as assessed by BLI and histomorphometric analysis due to the extramedullary growth of cancer cells which was not affected by these treatments. Collectively, anti-resorptive agents with different mechanisms of action - ZOL and OPG - significantly reduced cancer-induced osteolysis and intra-osseous tumor burden, but failed to restrain local tumor growth. However, interference with the bone micro-environmental growth support could still be of therapeutic relevance when given to patients early in the course of bone metastatic disease.

  17. Microwave thermal ablation of spinal metastatic bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Kastler, Adrian; Alnassan, Hussein; Aubry, Sébastien; Kastler, Bruno

    2014-09-01

    To assess feasibility, safety, and efficacy of microwave ablation of spinal metastatic bone tumors. Retrospective study of 17 patients with 20 spinal metastatic tumors treated with microwave ablation under computed tomographic guidance between March 2011 and August 2013 was performed. Ablations were performed under local anesthesia and nitrous oxide ventilation. Lesions were lumbar (n = 10), sacral (n = 7), and thoracic (n = 3) in location. Primary neoplastic sites were lung (n = 9), prostate (n = 4), kidney (n = 6), and uterus (n = 1). Adjunct cementoplasty was performed in nine cases, and a temperature-monitoring device was used in four cases. Procedure effectiveness was evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS) during a 6-month follow-up. Patient medical records were reviewed, and demographic and clinical data, tumor characteristics, and information on pain were assessed. Mean ablation time was 4.4 minutes ± 2.7 (range, 1-8 min), with an average of 3.8 cycles per ablation at 60 W (range, 30-70 W). The preprocedure mean VAS score was 7.4 ± 1.2 (range, 6-9). Pain relief was achieved in all but one patient. Follow-up VAS scores were as follows: day 0, 1.3 ± 1.8 (P < .001); day 7, 1.6 ± 1.7 (P < .001); month 1, 1.9 ± 1.6 (P < .001); month 3, 2.2 ± 1.5 (P < .001); and month 6, 2.3 ± 1.4 (P < .01). No complications were noted. Microwave ablation appears to be feasible, safe, and an effective treatment of painful refractory spinal metastases and may be considered as a potential alternative percutaneous technique in the management of spinal metastases. Copyright © 2014 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeted therapies in the management of metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fassan, Matteo; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Gomella, Leonard G; Baffa, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    The management of metastatic urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder is a common and complex clinical challenge. Despite the fact that UC is one of the most frequent tumors in the population, long term survival for metastatic disease remains low, and chemotherapy is curative for only a small minority of patients. UC is genetically heterogeneous, and it is surrounded by a complex tissue microenvironment. The problems of clinical practice in the field of metastatic bladder cancer have begun to stimulate translational research. Advances in the understanding of the molecular biology of urothelial cancer continue to contribute to the identification of molecular pathways upon which new therapeutic approaches can be targeted. New agents and strategies have recently been developed which can direct the most appropriate choice of treatment for advanced disease. A review of literature published on the targeted therapy for metastatic bladder cancer is presented, focusing on the molecular pathways shut down by the new therapeutic agents. PMID:19707309

  19. Bone and cancer: the osteoncology

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Summary In recent years clinicians have witnessed a radical change in the relationship between bone and cancer, with in particular an increase in bone metastases incidence due to an improvement of patients survival. Bone metastases are responsible for the high morbidity in cancer patients with a strong clinical impact. For all these reasons, efforts have been directed to this important field with the foundation of the osteoncology, a new scientific and clinical branch involved in the management of patients with bone cancer disease, including primary bone tumors and bone metastases. Another innovative and important osteoncology topic is the Cancer Treatment Induced Bone Loss (CTIBL) that is mainly caused by antitumoral treatment with bone resorption induction. The diagnostic and therapeutic options are described briefly in order to highlight the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in this new field. PMID:24133529

  20. Metastatic Breast Cancer in Medication-Related Osteonecrosis Around Mandibular Implants

    PubMed Central

    Favia, Gianfranco; Tempesta, Angela; Limongelli, Luisa; Crincoli, Vito; Piattelli, Adriano; Maiorano, Eugenio

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Breast cancer metastasis in medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Clinical and radiological examination • surgical treatment Specialty: Dentistry Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Many authors have considered dental implants to be unrelated to increased risk of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Nevertheless, more recently, more cases of peri-implant MRONJ (PI-MRONJ) have been described, thus becoming a challenging health problem. Also, metastatic cancer deposits are not infrequently found at peri-implant sites and this may represent an additional complication for such treatments. We present the case of a breast cancer patient with PI-MRONJ, presenting a clinically and radiologically undetected metastasis within the necrotic bone, and highlight the necessity of an accurate histopathological analysis. Case Report: A 66-year-old female patient, who had received intravenous bisphosphonates for bone breast cancer metastases, came to our attention for a non-implant surgery-triggered PI-MRONJ. After surgical resection of the necrotic bone, conventional and immunohistochemical examinations were performed, which showed breast cancer deposits within the necrotic bone. Conclusions: Cancer patients with metastatic disease, who are undergoing bisphosphonate treatment, may develop unusual complications, including MRONJ, which is a site at risk for hosting additional metastatic deposits that may be clinically and radiologically overlooked. Such risk is increased by previous or concomitant implant procedures. Consequently, clinicians should be prudent when performing implant surgery in cancer patients with advanced-stage disease and consider the possible occurrence of peri-implant metastases while planning adequate treatments in such patients. PMID:26371774

  1. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB): A metastatic mediator and emerging therapeutic target in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maric, Gordana; Rose, April AN; Annis, Matthew G; Siegel, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Molecularly targeted therapies are rapidly growing with respect to their clinical development and impact on cancer treatment due to their highly selective anti-tumor action. However, many aggressive cancers such as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) currently lack well-defined therapeutic targets against which such agents can be developed. The identification of tumor-associated antigens and the generation of antibody drug-conjugates represent an emerging area of intense interest and growth in the field of cancer therapeutics. Glycoprotein non-metastatic b (GPNMB) has recently been identified as a gene that is over-expressed in numerous cancers, including TNBC, and often correlates with the metastatic phenotype. In breast cancer, GPNMB expression in the tumor epithelium is associated with a reduction in disease-free and overall survival. Based on these findings, glembatumumab vedotin (CDX-011), an antibody-drug conjugate that selectively targets GPNMB, is currently being investigated in clinical trials for patients with metastatic breast cancer and unresectable melanoma. This review discusses the physiological and potential pathological roles of GPNMB in normal and cancer tissues, respectively, and details the clinical advances and challenges in targeting GPNMB-expressing malignancies. PMID:23874106

  2. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vuong, Winston; Sartor, Oliver; Pal, Sumanta K

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation.

  3. Radium-223 in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vuong, Winston; Sartor, Oliver; Pal, Sumanta K

    2014-01-01

    In 2004, docetaxel was approved for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For the next several years, there was a lull in drug approvals. However, from 2010 onwards, 5 additional therapies have been approved on the basis of showing a survival benefit in phase III studies. These agents include sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, abiraterone, enzalutamide and (most recently) radium-223. Amongst radiopharmaceuticals currently used for advanced prostate cancer (e.g. samarium-153 and strontium-89), radium-223 possesses several unique properties. As an alpha-emitting compound, the agent produces a high-energy output over a short range, facilitating selective destruction of tissue within the bone in the region of osteoblastic lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. The current review will outline biological rationale for radium-223 and also provide an overview of preclinical and clinical development of the agent. Rational sequencing of radium-223 and combinations, in the increasingly complex landscape of mCRPC will be discussed, along with factors influencing clinical implementation. PMID:24713838

  4. Metastatic breast cancer presenting as air-space consolidation on chest computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Haruta, Yoshinori; Yokoyama, Akihito; Nakashima, Taku; Hattori, Noboru; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2009-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman suffered from hepatic and bone metastases of breast cancer. Two months after starting combination chemotherapy with trastuzumab and docetaxel, air-space consolidation was observed in the right lower lung lobe on a chest computed tomography (CT) and a high serum KL-6 level was detected. Drug-induced pneumonitis with organizing pneumonia type was suspected, however, a transbronchial lung biopsy and cytological examination of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid provided evidence of metastatic breast cancer. While the lung is a frequently affected site from metastasis of breast cancer, we report a rare case presenting as air-space consolidation on a chest CT.

  5. [Principles, modalities and indications of the administration of Radium in cancers, focus on metastatic prostate cancer: State of arts].

    PubMed

    Bertolaso, Pauline; Leroy, Laura; Gross-Goupil, Marine; Aupee, Olivier; Ravaud, Alain; Roubaud, Guilhem; Cazeau, Anne-Laure; Le Moulec, Sylvestre

    2017-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the first cancer in men and has a specific tropism to bones. This tropism provided the rationale to develop bone targeting radiopharmaceutical agents, such as strontium, samarium and more recently the Radium-223, an alpha-emitter. In a phase III trial, ALSYMPCA, Radium-223 not only improved pain relief, but also impacted on overall survival. Despite an approval by both FDA and EMA, prescription of this agent remains limited by the lack of refund, especially in France. Radium-223 is currently evaluated in several clinical trials (combination with chemotherapy, radiotherapy or hormone therapy) in order to optimize the therapeutic sequences in metastatic bone prostate cancer and argues for being incorporated into the current therapeutic arsenal. Copyright © 2017 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Gene expression profiles of prostate cancer reveal involvement of multiple molecular pathways in the metastatic process

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Uma R; Ma, Changqing; Dhir, Rajiv; Bisceglia, Michelle; Lyons-Weiler, Maureen; Liang, Wenjing; Michalopoulos, George; Becich, Michael; Monzon, Federico A

    2007-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is characterized by heterogeneity in the clinical course that often does not correlate with morphologic features of the tumor. Metastasis reflects the most adverse outcome of prostate cancer, and to date there are no reliable morphologic features or serum biomarkers that can reliably predict which patients are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease. Understanding the differences in the biology of metastatic and organ confined primary tumors is essential for developing new prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. Methods Using Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays, we analyzed gene expression profiles of 24 androgen-ablation resistant metastatic samples obtained from 4 patients and a previously published dataset of 64 primary prostate tumor samples. Differential gene expression was analyzed after removing potentially uninformative stromal genes, addressing the differences in cellular content between primary and metastatic tumors. Results The metastatic samples are highly heterogenous in expression; however, differential expression analysis shows that 415 genes are upregulated and 364 genes are downregulated at least 2 fold in every patient with metastasis. The expression profile of metastatic samples reveals changes in expression of a unique set of genes representing both the androgen ablation related pathways and other metastasis related gene networks such as cell adhesion, bone remodelling and cell cycle. The differentially expressed genes include metabolic enzymes, transcription factors such as Forkhead Box M1 (FoxM1) and cell adhesion molecules such as Osteopontin (SPP1). Conclusion We hypothesize that these genes have a role in the biology of metastatic disease and that they represent potential therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. PMID:17430594

  7. Thiocolchicoside a semi-synthetic derivative of the Glory Lily: a new weapon to fight metastatic bone resorption?

    PubMed Central

    Micheau, Olivier; Dufour, Florent; Walczak, Henning

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic bone disease is a serious clinical complication for the treatment of patients with advanced cancer, but few therapeutic options are currently available. Bisphosphonates are an established standard care for these patients, but new treatments are now emerging, including the use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the RANK ligand. In this issue of the BJP, Reuter et al. provide evidence that thiocolchicoside, a semi-synthetic derivative of the naturally occurring colchicoside, extracted from the seeds of Gloriosa superba (Liliaceae), prevented osteoclactogenesis by suppressing RANK ligand-mediated NF-κB activation. Thiolcolchicoside may thus represent an attractive therapeutic option for the management of bone metastatic disease. LINKED ARTICLE This article is a commentary on Reuter et al., pp. 2127–2139 of this issue. To view this paper visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01702.x PMID:22122264

  8. Matricellular proteins as regulators of cancer metastasis to bone

    PubMed Central

    Trotter, Timothy N.; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of the death in cancer patients, and a frequent site of metastasis for many cancers is the bone marrow. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process is necessary for future prevention and treatment. The tumor microenvironment is now known to play a role in the metastatic cascade, both at the primary tumor and in metastatic sites, and includes both cellular and non-cellular components. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and signaling cues to cells. One particular group of molecules associated with the ECM, known as matricellular proteins, modulate multiple aspects of tumor biology, including growth, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. These proteins are also important for normal function in the bone by regulating bone formation and bone resorption. Recent studies have described a link between some of these proteins and metastasis of various tumors to the bone. The aim of this review is to summarize what is currently known about matricellular protein influence on bone metastasis. Particular attention to the contribution of both tumor cells and non-malignant cells in the bone has been given. PMID:26807761

  9. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-08-01

    Metastasis is the relentless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically, brain metastases were rarely investigated because patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts, the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biologic system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us toward new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer.

  10. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    1.2 calendar (10.0%) NIH/NCI Understanding and Targeting the Glutamine Carrier SLC1A5 in Breast Cancer Goals: The major goal of this project is to...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0551 TITLE: Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ze’ev Ronai...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0551 5c

  11. Laser immunotherapy for metastatic pancreatic cancer (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2017-02-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an extremely malignant disease with high mortality rate. Currently there is no effective therapeutic strategy for highly metastatic pancreatic cancers. Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is a combination therapeutic approach of targeted phototherapy and immunotherapy, which could destroy treated primary tumors with elimination of untreated metastases. LIT affords a remarkable efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in pancreatic tumors in mice, and results in complete tumor regression in many cases. LIT could synergize targeted phototherapy and immunological effects of immunoadjuvant, which represent a promising treatment modality to induce systemic antitumor response through a local intervention, paving the way for the treatment of highly metastatic pancreatic cancers.

  12. Pathological fracture of the femur ten years after successful radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hiroshi; Morita, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Ito, Takui; Segawa, Hiroyuki; Saito, Mari

    2004-01-01

    We describe a case involving a 75-year-old woman presenting with a femur fracture 10 years after radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer, which developed in the right femur. The lesion showed complete response with bone healing following radiation therapy; however, the patient sustained a femur fracture ten years later. Histological examination of the specimens obtained from the lesion revealed features of radiation osteonecrosis, but there was no histological evidence of tumor. To our knowledge, there has been no reported case of pathological fracture ten years after radiation therapy from radiation osteonecrosis rather than progression of the metastatic lesion. Late complications of radiation therapy should be considered with care, even when metastatic lesions demonstrate complete response to treatment.

  13. Maintenance immunotherapy in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Recchia, Francesco; Sica, Gigliola; Candeloro, Giampiero; Necozione, Stefano; Bisegna, Roberta; Bratta, Massimo; Rea, Silvio

    2008-11-01

    Maintenance chemotherapy provides only a modest survival advantage in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We have previously shown that a maintenance immunotherapy (MI) regimen based on low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 13-cis retinoic acid (RA) improved the lymphocyte and natural killer cell (NK) counts, and CD4+/CD8+ ratio in patients with a clinical benefit from chemotherapy. With the aim of improving progression-free survival (PFS), 100 consecutive MBC patients with a clinical benefit from chemotherapy were treated with an MI. Patients with MBC were eligible if they had no evidence of progression after 6-8 courses of epirubicin-paclitaxel induction chemotherapy. Treatment consisted of low-dose IL-2 and oral RA given until progression. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS); secondary endpoints were toxicity, overall survival (OS), and changes in immunological parameters. From 04/1997 to 04/2002, 100 patients with MBC were enrolled. After a median follow-up of 49 months, median PFS and OS were 37.1 and 57.5 months, respectively. No WHO grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed; grade 2 cutaneous toxicity and autoimmune reactions occurred in 19 and 16% of patients, respectively. A sustained improvement in lymphocytes, NKs, and in the CD4+/CD8+ ratio was observed, with respect to baseline values. In conclusion, MI with IL-2 and RA in MBC patients who do not progress after 6-8 courses of chemotherapy is well-tolerated, improves lymphocyte, NK, CD4+/CD8+ ratio, and appears to delay disease recurrence. A randomized trial is warranted.

  14. How Is Bone Cancer Staged?

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumors. This information about the tumor, lymph nodes, metastasis, and grade is combined in a process called ... the bone or nearby lymph nodes M1: Distant metastasis (the cancer has spread) M1a: The cancer has ...

  15. Denosumab, a RANK ligand inhibitor, for the management of bone loss in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yee, Andrew J; Raje, Noopur S

    2012-01-01

    Bone loss is a common side effect of cancer treatments, especially antihormonal treatments used in the treatment of breast and prostate cancer. Denosumab is a monoclonal antibody given subcutaneously that inhibits osteoclast activity by targeting the RANK ligand. It is effective in settings ranging from preventing skeletal-related complications in cancer patients with metastatic disease to increasing bone mineral density in patients with osteoporosis. In cancer patients with early stage disease, denosumab can attenuate bone loss from antihormonal treatments, and in prostate cancer, may reduce disease progression. Here, we will discuss the important role denosumab may play in the management of bone loss in patients with cancer.

  16. Comparative effectiveness of imaging modalities to determine metastatic breast cancer treatment response.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christoph I; Gold, Laura S; Nelson, Heidi D; Chou, Roger; Ramsey, Scott D; Sullivan, Sean D

    2015-02-01

    We performed a systematic review to address the comparative effectiveness of different imaging modalities in evaluating treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients. We searched seven multidisciplinary electronic databases for relevant publications (January 2003-December 2013) and performed dual abstraction of details and results for all clinical studies that involved stage IV breast cancer patients and evaluated imaging for detecting treatment response. Among 159 citations reviewed, 17 single-institution, non-randomized, observational studies met our inclusion criteria. Several studies demonstrate that changes in PET/CT standard uptake values are associated with changes in tumor volume as determined by bone scan, MRI, and/or CT. However, no studies evaluated comparative test performance between modalities or determined relationships between imaging findings and subsequent clinical decisions. Evidence for imaging's effectiveness in determining treatment response among metastatic breast cancer patients is limited. More rigorous research is needed to address imaging's value in this patient population.

  17. Engineering a biomimetic three-dimensional nanostructured bone model for breast cancer bone metastasis study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Mian; Fu, Yebo; Castro, Nathan J; Fu, Sidney W; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2015-03-01

    Traditional breast cancer (BrCa) bone metastasis models contain many limitations with regards to controllability, reproducibility and flexibility of design. In this study, a novel biomimetic bone microenvironment was created by integrating hydroxyapatite (HA) and native bioactive factors deposited by osteogenic induction of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) within a cytocompatible chitosan hydrogel. It was found that a 10% nanocrystalline HA (nHA) chitosan scaffold exhibited the highest BrCa adhesion and proliferation when compared to chitosan scaffolds with 20% nHA, 10% and 20% microcrystalline HA as well as amorphous HA. This 3-D tunable bone scaffold can provide a biologically relevant environment, increase cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions as found in native bone, and retain the behavior of BrCa cells with different metastasis potential (i.e. highly metastatic MDA-MB-231, less metastatic MCF-7 and transfected MDA-MB-231). The co-culture of MSCs and MDA-MB-231 in this bone model illustrated that MSCs have the capacity to upregulate the expression of the well-known metastasis-associated gene metadherin within BrCa cells. In summary, this study illustrates the ability of our 3-D bone model to create a biomimetic environment conducive to recapitulating the behavior of metastatic BrCa cells, making it a promising tool for in vitro BrCa cell bone metastasis study and for the discovery of potential therapeutics.

  18. The pro-metastatic role of bone marrow-derived cells: a focus on MSCs and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Bong Ihn; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    Several bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to promote tumour growth and progression. These cells can home to the primary tumour and become active components of the tumour microenvironment. Recent studies have also identified bone marrow-derived cells—such as mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells—as contributors to cancer metastasis. The innate versatility of these cells provides diverse functional aid to promote malignancy, ranging from structural support to signal-mediated suppression of the host immune response. Here, we review the role of mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of the bipolar nature of these bone marrow-derived cells in physiological and malignant contexts could pave the way for new therapeutics against metastatic disease. PMID:22473297

  19. Occurrence of tumours metastatic to bones and multicentric tumours with skeletal involvement in dogs.

    PubMed

    Trost, M E; Inkelmann, M A; Galiza, G J N; Silva, T M; Kommers, G D

    2014-01-01

    The skeletons of 110 dogs with malignant tumours of different origins were examined by necropsy examination over a 3-year period to identify bone metastases. Twenty-one cases of metastatic or multicentric tumours with bone involvement were recorded. In general, more female dogs presented with bony metastases; however, when the dogs with mammary tumours were omitted, the gender distribution of the cases was approximately equivalent. The mammary gland was the primary site of most of the metastatic bone lesions, followed by the musculoskeletal system and the respiratory system. The majority (77%) of metastases were grossly visible and present in multiple bones. However, in 23% of the cases, the metastases could be diagnosed only at the microscopical level. The vertebrae and the humerus were the most frequently affected bones regardless of the primary site and the histogenesis of the tumours. The results of this study revealed a high prevalence of bone metastases and/or bone involvement in dogs with multicentric tumours.

  20. First line chemotherapy plus trastuzumab in metastatic breast cancer HER2 positive - Observational institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Aitelhaj, Meryem; Lkhoyaali, Siham; Rais, Ghizlane; Boutayeb, Saber; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant disease and among the most frequent causes of cancer mortality in females worldwide. Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) is conventionally considered to be incurable. In first-line treatment of HER-2 positive MBC, randomized trials have demonstrated that trastuzumab when combined with chemotherapy significantly improves progression free survival and overall survival. To evaluate survival and toxicity of chemotherapy with Trastuzumab as first line therapy of human epithermal growth factor receptor 2 positive metastatic breast cancer, in Moroccan population. It is a phase IV observational institutional monocentric study. Including patients with metastatic breast cancer HER2 positive, as first-line chemotherapy combined with Trastuzumab from March 2009 until March 2010. Primary end point: progression free survival, secondary end point response rate and overall survival. A total of 20 patients were enrolled between March 2009 and March 2010. The lung was the first metastatic site in 60% of the cases, followed by bone, liver, nodes, skin and brain. All patients received chemotherapy with Trastuzumab: 9 of them with Docetaxel, 8 with vinorelbine, and 3 with capecitabine. The progression free survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, from the date of first cycle to the date of progression or at the last consultation, and the median was 12.8 months. Trastuzumab based chemotherapy was generally well tolerated; 5 patients (25%) presented cardiotoxicity. The results of this study join the literature and show the benefit of Trastuzumab to chemotherapy in first line metastatic breast cancer HER-2 positive. PMID:28154679

  1. Organtropic Metastatic Secretomes and Exosomes in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    ABSTRACT Metastasis to distant vital organs (bone, lung , brain) is the most devastating feature of breast cancer . We proposed to extend our current...integrative genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic analysis on the crosstalk between breast cancer cells and bone and lung microenvironments during...organ-tropic metastasis of breast cancer to bone and lung has tremendous potential impact on improving the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of

  2. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; PSA Progression; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  3. Defining the illness trajectory of metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Elizabeth; Corner, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background With significant developments in the management of metastatic breast cancer, the trajectory of progressive breast cancer is becoming increasingly complex with little understanding of the illness course experienced by women, or their ongoing problems and needs. Aim This study set out to systematically explore the illness trajectory of metastatic breast cancer using models from chronic illness as a framework. Design Longitudinal mixed methods studies detailing each woman's illness trajectory were developed by triangulating of narrative interviews, medical and nursing documentation and an assessment of functional ability using the Karnofsky Scale. The Corbin and Strauss Chronic Illness Trajectory Framework was used as a theoretical framework for the study. Participants Ten women aged between 40 and 78 years, with metastatic breast cancer. Results Women’s illness trajectories from diagnosis of metastatic disease ranged from 13 months to 5 years and 9 months. Eight of the 10 women died during the study. Chronic illness trajectory phases identified by Corbin and Strauss (pretrajectory, trajectory onset, living with progressive disease, downward phase and dying phase) were experienced by women with metastatic breast cancer. Three typical trajectories of different duration and intensity were identified. Women's lives were dominated by the physical burden of disease and treatment with little evidence of symptom control or support. Conclusions This is the first study to systematically explore the experience of women over time to define the metastatic breast cancer illness trajectory and provides evidence that current care provision is inadequate. Alternative models of care which address women's increasingly complex problems are needed. PMID:24644176

  4. The evolutionary history of lethal metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Kremeyer, Barbara; Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Tubio, Jose M C; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Brewer, Daniel S; Kallio, Heini M L; Högnäs, Gunilla; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Goody, Victoria; Latimer, Calli; O'Meara, Sarah; Dawson, Kevin J; Isaacs, William; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Nykter, Matti; Foster, Christopher; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Easton, Douglas; Whitaker, Hayley C; Neal, David E; Cooper, Colin S; Eeles, Rosalind A; Visakorpi, Tapio; Campbell, Peter J; McDermott, Ultan; Wedge, David C; Bova, G Steven

    2015-04-16

    Cancers emerge from an ongoing Darwinian evolutionary process, often leading to multiple competing subclones within a single primary tumour. This evolutionary process culminates in the formation of metastases, which is the cause of 90% of cancer-related deaths. However, despite its clinical importance, little is known about the principles governing the dissemination of cancer cells to distant organs. Although the hypothesis that each metastasis originates from a single tumour cell is generally supported, recent studies using mouse models of cancer demonstrated the existence of polyclonal seeding from and interclonal cooperation between multiple subclones. Here we sought definitive evidence for the existence of polyclonal seeding in human malignancy and to establish the clonal relationship among different metastases in the context of androgen-deprived metastatic prostate cancer. Using whole-genome sequencing, we characterized multiple metastases arising from prostate tumours in ten patients. Integrated analyses of subclonal architecture revealed the patterns of metastatic spread in unprecedented detail. Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. Lesions affecting tumour suppressor genes usually occur as single events, whereas mutations in genes involved in androgen receptor signalling commonly involve multiple, convergent events in different metastases. Our results elucidate in detail the complex patterns of metastatic spread and further our understanding of the development of resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy in prostate cancer.

  5. Nanomedicine as an emerging platform for metastatic lung cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Landesman-Milo, Dalit; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Peer, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Metastatic lung cancer is one of the most common cancers leading to mortality worldwide. Current treatment includes chemo- and pathway-dependent therapy aiming at blocking the spread and proliferation of these metastatic lesions. Nanomedicine is an emerging multidisciplinary field that offers unprecedented access to living cells and promises the state of the art in cancer detection and treatment. Development of nanomedicines as drug carriers (nanocarriers) that target cancer for therapy draws upon principles in the fields of chemistry, medicine, physics, biology, and engineering. Given the zealous activity in the field as demonstrated by more than 30 nanocarriers already approved for clinical use and given the promise of recent clinical results in various studies, nanocarrier-based strategies are anticipated to soon have a profound impact on cancer medicine and human health. Herein, we will detail the latest innovations in therapeutic nanomedicine with examples from lipid-based nanoparticles and polymer-based approaches, which are engineered to deliver anticancer drugs to metastatic lung cells. Emphasis will be placed on the latest and most attractive delivery platforms, which are developed specifically to target lung metastatic tumors. These novel nanomedicines may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention carrying new class of drugs such as RNAi and mRNA and the ability to edit the genome using the CRISPER/Cas9 system. Ultimately, these strategies might become a new therapeutic modality for advanced-stage lung cancer.

  6. Host JDP2 expression in the bone marrow contributes to metastatic spread

    PubMed Central

    Barbarov, Yelena; Timaner, Michael; Alishekevitz, Dror; Hai, Tsonwin; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun Dimerization Protein 2, JDP2, is a basic leucine zipper protein member of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) family of transcription factors. JDP2 typically suppresses gene transcription through multiple mechanisms and plays a dual role in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and proliferation which is dependent on AP-1 function. Whereas the role of JDP2 expression within cancer cells has been studied, its role in stromal cells at the tumor microenvironment is largely unknown. Here we show that mice lacking JDP2 (JDP2−/−) display a reduced rate of metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and polyoma middle T-antigen (PyMT) breast carcinoma mouse models. The replacement of wild-type bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) with JDP2-deficient BMDCs recapitulates the metastatic phenotype of JDP2−/− tumor-bearing mice. In vitro, conditioned medium of wild-type BMDCs significantly potentiates the migration and invasion capacity of LLC cells as compared to that of JDP2−/− BMDCs. Furthermore, wild-type BMDCs secrete CCL5, a chemokine known to contribute to metastasis, to a greater extent than JDP2−/− BMDCs. The supplementation of CCL5 in JDP2−/− BMDC conditioned medium was sufficient to potentiate the invasion capacity of LLC. Overall, this study suggests that JDP2-expressing BMDCs within the tumor microenvironment contribute to metastatic spread. PMID:26497998

  7. Activity of outpatient intravenous interleukin-2 and famotidine in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer.

    PubMed

    Quan, Walter D Y; Quan, Francine Marie

    2014-03-01

    Outpatient daily intravenous infusions of interleukin-2 (IL-2) have been developed to maintain anticancer activity and decrease toxicity of this agent against kidney cancer. Lymphokine activated killer cell (LAK) numbers are increased with these IL-2 schedules. Famotidine may enhance the LAK activity by increasing IL-2 internalization by the IL-2 receptor on lymphocytes. Fifteen patients with metastatic clear cell kidney cancer received IL-2 18 million IU/M² intravenously over 15-30 minutes preceded by famotidine 20 mg IV daily for 3 days for 6 consecutive weeks as outpatients. Cycles were repeated every 8 weeks. Patient characteristics were seven males/eight females, median age 59 (range: 28-70), median Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status-1; common metastatic sites were lungs (14), lymph nodes (9), liver (4), bone (4), and pancreas (4). Prior systemic therapies were oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor (8), IL-2 (6), and mTor inhibitor (2). Most common toxicities were rigors, arthralgia/myalgia, nausea/emesis, fever, and hypotension. All episodes of hypotension were reversible with intravenous fluid. No patients required hospitalization due to toxicity. One complete response (7%) and four partial responses (26%) were seen (total response rate=33%; 95% confidence interval: 15%-59%). Responses occurred in the lungs, liver, lymph nodes, and bone. Outpatient intravenous IL-2 with famotidine has activity in metastatic clear cell kidney cancer.

  8. HPMA-Copolymer Nanocarrier Targets Tumor-Associated Macrophages in Primary and Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zimel, Melissa N; Horowitz, Chloe B; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Christ, Alexander B; Wei, Xin; Wu, Jianbo; Wojnarowicz, Paulina M; Wang, Dong; Goldring, Steven R; Purdue, P Edward; Healey, John H

    2017-08-22

    Polymeric nanocarriers such as N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers deliver drugs to solid tumors and avoid the systemic toxicity of conventional chemotherapy. Because HPMA copolymers can target sites of inflammation and accumulate within innate immune cells, we hypothesized that HPMA copolymers could target tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in both primary and metastatic tumor microenvironments. We verified this hypothesis, first in preliminary experiments with isolated bone marrow macrophage cultures in vitro, and subsequently in a spontaneously metastatic murine breast cancer model generated from a well-established, cytogenetically characterized 4T1 breast cancer cell line. Using our standardized experimental conditions, we detected primary orthotopic tumor growth at 7 days and metastatic tumors at 28 days after orthotopic transplantation of 4T1 cells into the mammary fat pad. We investigated the uptake of HPMA copolymer conjugated with Alexa Fluor 647 and folic acid (P-Alexa647-FA) and HPMA copolymer conjugated with IRDye 800CW (P-IRDye), following their retroorbital injection into the primary and metastatic tumor-bearing mice. A significant uptake of P-IRDye was observed at all primary and metastatic tumor sites in these mice, and the P-Alexa647-FA signal was found specifically within CD11b+TAMs co-stained with pan macrophage marker CD68. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, a novel capacity of a P-Alexa647-FA conjugate to colocalize to CD11b+CD68+ TAMs in both primary and metastatic breast tumors. This underscores the potential of this HPMA nanocarrier to deliver functional therapeutics that specifically target tumor-promoting macrophage activation and/or polarization during tumor development. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Promotion of prostatic metastatic migration towards human bone marrow stoma by Omega 6 and its inhibition by Omega 3 PUFAs

    PubMed Central

    Brown, M D; Hart, C A; Gazi, E; Bagley, S; Clarke, N W

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown not only a relationship between the intake of dietary lipids and an increased risk of developing metastatic prostate cancer, but also the type of lipid intake that influences the risk of metastatic prostate cancer. The Omega-6 poly-unsaturated fatty acid, Arachidonic acid, has been shown to enhance the proliferation of malignant prostate epithelial cells and increase the risk of advanced prostate cancer. However, its role in potentiating the migration of cancer cells is unknown. Here we show that arachidonic acid at concentrations ⩽5 μM is a potent stimulator of malignant epithelial cellular invasion, which is able to restore invasion toward hydrocortisone-deprived adipocyte-free human bone marrow stroma completely. This observed invasion is mediated by the arachidonic acid metabolite prostaglandin E2 and is inhibited by the Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid at a ratio of 1 : 2 Omega-3 : Omega-6, and by the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398. These results identify a mechanism by which arachidonic acid may potentiate the risk of metastatic migration and secondary implantation in vivo, a risk which can be reduced with the uptake of Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids. PMID:16523199

  10. Mutational Profile of Metastatic Breast Cancers: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedrero, Marion; Campone, Mario; Soria, Jean-Charles; Massard, Christophe; Lévy, Christelle; Arnedos, Monica; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Garrabey, Julie; Boursin, Yannick; Deloger, Marc; Commo, Frédéric; Scott, Véronique; Kamal, Maud; Diéras, Véronique; Gonçalves, Anthony; Romieu, Gilles; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Mouret Reynier, Marie-Ange; Théry, Jean-Christophe; Le Du, Fanny; Guiu, Séverine; Dalenc, Florence; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Jimenez, Marta; Le Tourneau, Christophe; André, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Background Major advances have been achieved in the characterization of early breast cancer (eBC) genomic profiles. Metastatic breast cancer (mBC) is associated with poor outcomes, yet limited information is available on the genomic profile of this disease. This study aims to decipher mutational profiles of mBC using next-generation sequencing. Methods and Findings Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 216 tumor–blood pairs from mBC patients who underwent a biopsy in the context of the SAFIR01, SAFIR02, SHIVA, or Molecular Screening for Cancer Treatment Optimization (MOSCATO) prospective trials. Mutational profiles from 772 primary breast tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used as a reference for comparing primary and mBC mutational profiles. Twelve genes (TP53, PIK3CA, GATA3, ESR1, MAP3K1, CDH1, AKT1, MAP2K4, RB1, PTEN, CBFB, and CDKN2A) were identified as significantly mutated in mBC (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.1). Eight genes (ESR1, FSIP2, FRAS1, OSBPL3, EDC4, PALB2, IGFN1, and AGRN) were more frequently mutated in mBC as compared to eBC (FDR < 0.01). ESR1 was identified both as a driver and as a metastatic gene (n = 22, odds ratio = 29, 95% CI [9–155], p = 1.2e-12) and also presented with focal amplification (n = 9) for a total of 31 mBCs with either ESR1 mutation or amplification, including 27 hormone receptor positive (HR+) and HER2 negative (HER2−) mBCs (19%). HR+/HER2− mBC presented a high prevalence of mutations on genes located on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway (TSC1 and TSC2) as compared to HR+/HER2− eBC (respectively 6% and 0.7%, p = 0.0004). Other actionable genes were more frequently mutated in HR+ mBC, including ERBB4 (n = 8), NOTCH3 (n = 7), and ALK (n = 7). Analysis of mutational signatures revealed a significant increase in APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis in HR+/HER2− metastatic tumors as compared to primary TCGA samples (p < 2e-16). The main limitations of this study include the absence of bone

  11. Metastatic non-small cell lung cancer presenting with an orbital metastasis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Azad, Arun

    2008-08-13

    Metastatic disease to the orbit occurs in up to 7% of cancers. In approximately 20% of cases, there is no diagnosis of cancer at the time of presentation with orbital metastatic disease. This is a case of a 53-year-old female smoker whose initial presentation of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer was with an orbital metastasis.

  12. Development of a Gene Therapy Trial for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Clinician-Scientists Drs. Gardner, Hanh, and Ko representing a genitourinary oncologic surgeon , genitourinary oncologist and genitourinary radiation...Osteocalcin promoter-based toxic gene therapy for the treatment of osteosarcoma in experimental models. Cancer Res 1996; 56: 4614–4619. 10 Springer CJ...vector, Ad-OC-E1a, to cotarget prostate cancer and bone stroma in an experimental model of androgen- independent prostate cancer bone metastasis . Cancer

  13. Mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) as a mechanism for metastatic colonisation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gunasinghe, N P A Devika; Wells, Alan; Thompson, Erik W; Hugo, Honor J

    2012-12-01

    As yet, there is no cure for metastatic breast cancer. Historically, considerable research effort has been concentrated on understanding the processes of metastasis, how a primary tumour locally invades and systemically disseminates using the phenotypic switching mechanism of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, much less is understood about how metastases are then formed. Breast cancer metastases often look (and may even function) as 'normal' breast tissue, a bizarre observation against the backdrop of the organ structure of the lung, liver, bone or brain. Mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET), the opposite of EMT, has been proposed as a mechanism for establishment of the metastatic neoplasm, leading to questions such as: Can MET be clearly demonstrated in vivo? What factors cause this phenotypic switch within the cancer cell? Are these signals/factors derived from the metastatic site (soil) or expressed by the cancer cells themselves (seed)? How do the cancer cells then grow into a detectable secondary tumour and further disseminate? And finally--Can we design and develop therapies that may combat this dissemination switch? This review aims to address these important questions by evaluating long-standing paradigms and novel emerging concepts in the field of epithelial mesencyhmal plasticity.

  14. Clonal origin and spread of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Van Etten, Jamie L.; Dehm, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic disease is responsible for the majority of prostate cancer deaths. The standard treatment for metastatic disease is surgical or chemical castration in the form of androgen deprivation therapy. Despite initial success and disease regression, resistance to therapy ultimately develops and the disease transitions to castration resistant prostate cancer, which is uniformly fatal. Thus, developing an understanding of genetic evolution in metastasis and in response to therapy has been a focus of recent studies. Large-scale sequencing studies have provided an expansive catalog of the mutation events that occur in the prostate cancer genome at various stages of disease progression. Smaller-scale studies have interrogated the genomic composition of multiple metastatic sites within individual patients, or have tracked clonal evolution longitudinally in tissues, circulating tumor cells, or circulating tumor DNA. Collectively, these efforts have provided a new conceptual framework for understanding the origin of prostate cancer, as well as the origin and evolution of metastatic disease. In this review, we will highlight these recent insights into the spatiotemporal landscape of genetic evolution of prostate cancer. PMID:27000662

  15. Marine algal fucoxanthin inhibits the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Jeong, Han-Sol; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Joo, Myungsoo; Choi, Jun-Yong; Han, Chang-Woo; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Sue; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2013-10-04

    Metastasis is major cause of malignant cancer-associated mortality. Fucoxanthin has effect on various pharmacological activities including anti-cancer activity. However, the inhibitory effect of fucoxanthin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that fucoxanthin isolated from brown alga Saccharina japonica has anti-metastatic activity. To check anti-metastatic properties of fucoxanthin, in vitro models including assays for invasion, migration, actin fiber organization and cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction were used. Fucoxanthin inhibited the expression and secretion of MMP-9 which plays a critical role in tumor invasion and migration, and also suppressed invasion of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells as evidenced by transwell invasion assay. In addition, fucoxanthin diminished the expressions of the cell surface glycoprotein CD44 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) which play roles in migration, invasion and cancer-endothelial cell adhesion. Fucoxanthin markedly suppressed cell migration in wound healing assay and inhibited actin fiber formation. The adhesion of B16-F10 melanoma cells to the endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by fucoxanthin. Moreover, in experimental lung metastasis in vivo assay, fucoxanthin resulted in significant reduction of tumor nodules. Taken together, we demonstrate, for the first time, that fucoxanthin suppresses metastasis of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  16. The BMP inhibitor Coco reactivates breast cancer cells at lung metastatic sites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2012-08-17

    The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung, but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific antimetastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation.

  17. New and Emerging Therapies for Bone Metastases in Genitourinary Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Saylor, Philip J.; Armstrong, Andrew J.; Fizazi, Karim; Freedland, Stephen; Saad, Fred; Smith, Matthew R.; Tombal, Bertrand; Pienta, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases are a common feature of advanced genitourinary malignancies and a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality. Clinical manifestations can include pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic fractures, and spinal cord compression. Optimal systemic therapy for the skeletal component of these cancers often features a combination of disease-specific therapy and bone-targeted therapy. Some agents such as the radiopharmaceutical radium-223 blur the line between those two categories. Osteoclast inhibition is a validated strategy in the management of selected patients with bone metastases and can best be accomplished with one of two agents. Zoledronic acid is the most potent available bisphosphonate and is approved for the prevention of skeletal events due to solid tumors metastatic to bone. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds and inactivates receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand and is approved for the same indication. Radiopharmaceuticals represent a distinct strategy. Beta-emitters such as strontium-89 and samarium-153 can be effective for the palliation of pain due to bone metastases, but their use is often limited by bone marrow suppression. The alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has recently been shown to improve overall survival and prevent skeletal events in selected men with castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic to bone. Multiple ongoing clinical trials are designed to examine the potential for therapeutic inhibition of additional targets such as Src and hepatocyte growth factor (MET). This review discusses the incidence, pathophysiology, and management of bone metastases in the most prevalent genitourinary malignancies. PMID:23201471

  18. Metastatic cancer stem cells: from the concept to therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wen-Ting; Ye, Ya-Ping; Deng, Yong-Jian; Bian, Xiu-Wu; Ding, Yan-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic cancer stem cells (MCSCs) refer to a subpopulation of cancer cells with both stem cell properties and invasion capabilities that contribute to cancer metastasis. MCSCs have capability of self-renewal, potentials of multiple differentiation and development and/or reconstruction of cancer tissues. As compared with stationary cancer stem cells, MCSCs are capable of invasion to normal tissues such as vasculatures, resistance to chemo- and/or radio-therapies, escape from immune surveillance, survival in circulation and formation of metastasis. MCSCs are derived from invasive cancer stem cells (iCSCs) due to the plasticity of cancer stem cells, which is one of the characteristics of cancer cell heterogeneity. Both stages of iCSCs and MSCSs are the potential therapeutic targets for cancer metastasis in the future strategies of personalized cancer therapy.

  19. Detection of micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow of patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Deguchi, T.; Yang, M.; Ehara, H.; Ito, S.; Nishino, Y.; Takahashi, Y.; Ito, Y.; Shimokawa, K.; Tanaka, T.; Imaeda, T.; Doi, T.; Kawada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with prostate cancer were examined for micrometastases to the bone marrow using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with primers specific for the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene. Of nine patients with bone metastases detectable by bone scan imaging, five patients had PSA mRNA expression in the bone marrow detectable by RT-PCR. Of 26 patients with negative bone scan findings, seven patients had PSA mRNA expression detectable in the bone marrow. RT-PCR could detect micrometastatic prostate cancer cells in the bone marrow that were not detectable by bone scan imaging. Of 16 patients with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater, only nine (56.3%) had bone metastases detected by bone scans. Of the remaining seven patients, five had micrometastases to the bone marrow detected by RT-PCR. Overall, 14 of 16 patients (87.5%) with a serum PSA concentration of 25 ng ml(-1) or greater had metastatic bone diseases including bone marrow micrometastases. Of 19 patients with a serum PSA concentration of less than 25 ng ml(-1), two (10.5%) had only micrometastatic disease detected by RT-PCR. A significant correlation was observed between the incidence of bone involvement and the serum PSA concentration. This study suggests that RT-PCR will potentially develop into a relevant tool to assess bone involvement including bone marrow micrometastases and establish a precise correlation between serum PSA concentration and metastatic bone disease in patients with prostate cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:9043017

  20. Preventive Effects of Zoledronic Acid on Bone Metastasis in Mice Injected with Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Joon; Lee, Kyung Sun; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Oh, Young Ju

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used routinely to reduce bone-related events in breast cancer patients with bone metastasis. We evaluated the effects of zoledronic acid, a third generation, nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, to prevent bone metastasis in breast cancer. Zoledronic acid or vehicle alone was administered to nude mice either simultaneously or after intracardiac injection of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Nude mice treated with zoledronic acid at early time points showed a lower incidence of bone metastases than did vehicle-treated nude mice, but these differences were not statistically significant. Only 37.5% of mice treated with zoledronic acid at the time of tumor cell inoculation developed bone metastases compared to over 51.8% of mice receiving vehicle alone (P = 0.304). Cell count of apoptosis confirmed by immunohistochemical staining in metastatic bone tissue significantly increased in the zoledronic acid-treated groups compared to non-treated group (1,018.3 vs 282.0; P = 0.046). However, metastatic tumor cells, which invade soft tissue around the bone, did not show extensive apoptosis; there were no differences between the zoledronic acid-treated and control groups. These results suggest that zoledronic acid increases apoptosis of metastatic breast tumor cells in the bone and could therefore reduce metastatic tumor burden. These results support the use of zoledronic acid to reduce the incidence of bone metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:22147993

  1. Novel esophageal squamous cell carcinoma bone metastatic clone isolated by scintigraphy, X ray and micro PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bi-Zeng; Cao, Jie; Shao, Jin-Chen; Sun, Yan-Bing; Fan, Li-Min; Wu, Chun-Yu; Liang, Sheng; Guo, Bao-Feng; Yang, Guang; Xie, Wen-Hui; Yang, Qing-Cheng; Yang, Shun-Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To establish a Chinese esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cell line with high bone metastasis potency using 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate (99mTc-MDP) micro-pinhole scintigraphy, X ray and micro-positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) for exploring the mechanism of occurrence and development in esophageal cancer. METHODS: The cells came from a BALB/c nu/nu immunodeficient mouse, and oncogenic tumor tissue was from a surgical specimen from a 61-year-old male patient with ESCC. The cell growth curve was mapped and analysis of chromosome karyotype was performed. Approximately 1 × 106 oncogenic cells were injected into the left cardiac ventricle of immunodeficient mice. The bone metastatic lesions of tumor-bearing mice were detected by 99mTc-MDP scintigraphy, micro-PET/CT and X-ray, and were resected from the mice under deep anesthesia. The bone metastatic cells in the lesions were used for culture and for repeated intracardiac inoculation. This in vivo/in vitro experimental metastasis study was repeated for four cycles. All of the suspicious bone sites were confirmed by pathology. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to compare the gene expression in the parental cells and in the bone metastatic clone. RESULTS: The surgical specimen was implanted subcutaneously in immunodeficient mice and the tumorigenesis rate was 100%. First-passage oncogenic cells were named CEK-Sq-1. The chromosome karyotype analysis of the cell line was hypotriploid. The bone metastasis rate went from 20% with the first-passage oncogenic cells via intracardiac inoculation to 90% after four cycles. The established bone metastasis clone named CEK-Sq-1BM had a high potential to metastasize in bone, including mandible, humerus, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae, scapula and femur. The bone metastasis lesions were successfully detected by micro-pinhole bone scintigraphy, micro-PET/CT, and X-ray. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the micro

  2. Targeting Met and VEGFR Axis in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: 'Game Over'?

    PubMed

    Modena, Alessandra; Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Brunelli, Matteo; Santoni, Matteo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent advances that have been made in the therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), effective management of bone metastases remains a key goal not yet reached. The receptor tyrosine kinase MET and the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) seem to play an important role in prostate cancer progression and pathological bone turnover, representing potential targets for improving clinical outcomes in mCRPC. Studies evaluating agents that target one or both these pathways have demonstrated modest activity but no improvement in overall survival. Nevertheless, this therapeutic strategy seems to still be a promising and engaging area of prostate cancer research and the interest in better understanding the MET/VEGFR axis and the mechanism of action of these inhibitors is growing. This review describes the rationale for targeting MET and VEGFR pathway in mCRPC and provides the clinical data available to date and an update on ongoing trials.

  3. Evolving Role of Bone Biomarkers in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Janet E; Sim, Sheryl

    2010-01-01

    The preferential metastasis of prostate cancer cells to bone disrupts the process of bone remodeling and results in lesions that cause significant pain and patient morbidity. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an established biomarker in prostate cancer, it provides only limited information relating to bone metastases and the treatment of metastatic bone disease with bisphosphonates or novel noncytotoxic targeted or biological agents that may provide clinical benefits without affecting PSA levels. As bone metastases develop, factors derived from bone metabolism are released into blood and urine, including N- and C-terminal peptide fragments of type 1 collagen and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, which represent potentially useful biomarkers for monitoring metastatic bone disease. A number of clinical trials have investigated these bone biomarkers with respect to their diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive values. Results suggest that higher levels of bone biomarkers are associated with an increased risk of skeletal-related events and/or death. As a result of these findings, bone biomarkers are now being increasingly used as study end points, particularly in studies investigating novel agents with putative bone effects. Data from prospective clinical trials are needed to validate the use of bone biomarkers and to confirm that marker levels provide additional information beyond traditional methods of response evaluation for patients with metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:20824045

  4. Enhanced MAF Oncogene Expression and Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Milica; Arnal-Estapé, Anna; Rojo, Federico; Bellmunt, Anna; Tarragona, Maria; Guiu, Marc; Planet, Evarist; Garcia-Albéniz, Xabier; Morales, Mónica; Urosevic, Jelena; Gawrzak, Sylwia; Rovira, Ana; Prat, Aleix; Nonell, Lara; Lluch, Ana; Jean-Mairet, Joël; Coleman, Robert; Albanell, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are currently no biomarkers for early breast cancer patient populations at risk of bone metastasis. Identification of mediators of bone metastasis could be of clinical interest. Methods: A de novo unbiased screening approach based on selection of highly bone metastatic breast cancer cells in vivo was used to determine copy number aberrations (CNAs) associated with bone metastasis. The CNAs associated with bone metastasis were examined in independent primary breast cancer datasets with annotated clinical follow-up. The MAF gene encoded within the CNA associated with bone metastasis was subjected to gain and loss of function validation in breast cancer cells (MCF7, T47D, ZR-75, and 4T1), its downstream mechanism validated, and tested in clinical samples. A multivariable Cox cause-specific hazard model with competing events (death) was used to test the association between 16q23 or MAF and bone metastasis. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: 16q23 gain CNA encoding the transcription factor MAF mediates breast cancer bone metastasis through the control of PTHrP. 16q23 gain (hazard ratio (HR) for bone metastasis = 14.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 6.4 to 32.9, P < .001) as well as MAF overexpression (HR for bone metastasis = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.7 to 3.8, P < .001) in primary breast tumors were specifically associated with risk of metastasis to bone but not to other organs. Conclusions: These results suggest that MAF is a mediator of breast cancer bone metastasis. 16q23 gain or MAF protein overexpression in tumors may help to select patients at risk of bone relapse. PMID:26376684

  5. Increased Expression of P-Glycoprotein Is Associated with Doxorubicin Chemoresistance in the Metastatic 4T1 Breast Cancer Model

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Lili; Haque, Aliyya; Jackson, Kamilah; Hazari, Sidhartha; Moroz, Krzysztof; Jetly, Rachna; Dash, Srikanta

    2011-01-01

    Development of drug resistance is one of the major causes of breast cancer treatment failure. The goal of this study was to understand the chemoresistance mechanism using the highly metastatic 4T1 breast cancer model, which emulates stage IV breast cancer in humans. The metastatic 4T1 breast cancer cell line treated with either doxorubicin or 5-FU showed a concentration-dependent reduced cell proliferation, with induced G2-phase growth arrest (doxorubicin) or G1-phase growth arrest (5-FU). Doxorubicin treatment partially suppressed the multiorgan metastasis of 4T1 breast cancer cells in the lung, heart, liver, and bone, compared with either 5-FU or cyclophosphamide. We isolated and characterized 4T1 breast cancer cells from doxorubicin-resistant metastatic tumors (cell line 4T1-R). Multiorgan metastasis of drug-resistant 4T1 breast tumors was totally resistant to doxorubicin treatment. Our results indicate that doxorubicin is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm of resistant 4T1 breast cancer cells and that it cannot reach the nucleus because of increased nuclear expression of P-glycoprotein. Pretreatment of doxorubicin-resistant 4T1-R breast cancer cells with verapamil, a general inhibitor of P-glycoprotein, increased nuclear translocation of doxorubicin and cellular cytotoxicity. Thus, impaired nuclear translocation of doxorubicin due to increased expression of P-glycoprotein is associated with doxorubicin resistance of highly metastatic 4T1 breast cancer. PMID:21281816

  6. Outcomes of colon resection in patients with metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Hwang, Grace; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Stamos, Michael J; Carmichael, Joseph C

    2016-08-01

    Patients with advanced colorectal cancer have a high incidence of postoperative complications. We sought to identify outcomes of patients who underwent resection for colon cancer by cancer stage. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was used to evaluate all patients who underwent colon resection with a diagnosis of colon cancer from 2012 to 2014. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate patient outcomes by cancer stage. A total of 7,786 colon cancer patients who underwent colon resection were identified. Of these, 10.8% had metastasis at the time of operation. Patients with metastatic disease had significantly increased risks of perioperative morbidity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 1.44, P = .01) and mortality (AOR: 3.72, P = .01). Patients with metastatic disease were significantly younger (AOR: .99, P < .01) had a higher American Society of Anesthesiologists score (AOR: 1.29, P < .2) and had a higher rate of emergent operation (AOR: 1.40, P < .01). Overall, 10.8% of patients undergoing colectomy for colon cancer have metastatic disease. Postoperative morbidity and mortality are significantly higher than in patients with localized disease. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells.

  8. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Daniel A.; Ahmad, Bilal B.; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H.; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Regorafenib is a standard-care option for treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer that increases median overall survival by 6 weeks compared with placebo. Given this small incremental clinical benefit, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib in the third-line setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the US payer perspective. Methods We developed a Markov model to compare the cost and effectiveness of regorafenib with those of placebo in the third-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Drug costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates in 2014. Model robustness was addressed in univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results Regorafenib provided an additional 0.04 QALYs (0.13 life-years) at a cost of $40,000, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $900,000 per QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for regorafenib was > $550,000 per QALY in all of our univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Conclusion Regorafenib provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in the third-line management of metastatic colorectal cancer. The cost-effectiveness of regorafenib could be improved by the use of value-based pricing. PMID:26304904

  9. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Regorafenib for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Daniel A; Ahmad, Bilal B; Chen, Qiushi; Ayer, Turgay; Howard, David H; Lipscomb, Joseph; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Flowers, Christopher R

    2015-11-10

    Regorafenib is a standard-care option for treatment-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer that increases median overall survival by 6 weeks compared with placebo. Given this small incremental clinical benefit, we evaluated the cost-effectiveness of regorafenib in the third-line setting for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer from the US payer perspective. We developed a Markov model to compare the cost and effectiveness of regorafenib with those of placebo in the third-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Health outcomes were measured in life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Drug costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates in 2014. Model robustness was addressed in univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provided an additional 0.04 QALYs (0.13 life-years) at a cost of $40,000, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $900,000 per QALY. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for regorafenib was > $550,000 per QALY in all of our univariable and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Regorafenib provides minimal incremental benefit at high incremental cost per QALY in the third-line management of metastatic colorectal cancer. The cost-effectiveness of regorafenib could be improved by the use of value-based pricing. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. Targeting the interleukin-11 receptor α in metastatic prostate cancer: A first-in-man study

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, Renata; Millikan, Randall E; Christianson, Dawn R; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Driessen, Wouter H P; Giordano, Ricardo J; Hajitou, Amin; Hoang, Anh G; Wen, Sijin; Barnhart, Kirstin F; Baze, Wallace B; Marcott, Valerie D; Hawke, David H; Do, Kim-Anh; Navone, Nora M; Efstathiou, Eleni; Troncoso, Patricia; Lobb, Roy R; Logothetis, Christopher J; Arap, Wadih

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Receptors in tumor blood vessels are attractive targets for ligand-directed drug discovery and development. The authors have worked systematically to map human endothelial receptors (“vascular zip codes”) within tumors through direct peptide library selection in cancer patients. Previously, they selected a ligand-binding motif to the interleukin-11 receptor alpha (IL-11Rα) in the human vasculature. METHODS The authors generated a ligand-directed, peptidomimetic drug (bone metastasis-targeting peptidomimetic-11 [BMTP-11]) for IL-11Rα–based human tumor vascular targeting. Preclinical studies (efficacy/toxicity) included evaluating BMTP-11 in prostate cancer xenograft models, drug localization, targeted apoptotic effects, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analyses, and dose-range determination, including formal (good laboratory practice) toxicity across rodent and nonhuman primate species. The initial BMTP-11 clinical development also is reported based on a single-institution, open-label, first-in-class, first-in-man trial (National Clinical Trials number NCT00872157) in patients with metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. RESULTS BMTP-11 was preclinically promising and, thus, was chosen for clinical development in patients. Limited numbers of patients who had castrate-resistant prostate cancer with osteoblastic bone metastases were enrolled into a phase 0 trial with biology-driven endpoints. The authors demonstrated biopsy-verified localization of BMTP-11 to tumors in the bone marrow and drug-induced apoptosis in all patients. Moreover, the maximum tolerated dose was identified on a weekly schedule (20-30 mg/m2). Finally, a renal dose-limiting toxicity was determined, namely, dose-dependent, reversible nephrotoxicity with proteinuria and casts involving increased serum creatinine. CONCLUSIONS These biologic endpoints establish BMTP-11 as a targeted drug candidate in metastatic, castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Within a larger discovery

  11. Heterogeneity of tumor cells in the bone microenvironment: Mechanisms and therapeutic targets for bone metastasis of prostate or breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Futakuchi, Mitsuru; Fukamachi, Katsumi; Suzui, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Bone is the most common target organ of metastasis of prostate and breast cancers. This produces considerable morbidity due to skeletal-related events, SREs, including bone pain, hypercalcemia, pathologic fracture, and compression of the spinal cord. The mechanism of bone metastasis is complex and involves cooperative reciprocal interaction among tumor cells, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and the mineralized bone matrix. The interaction between the metastatic tumor and bone stromal cells has been commonly referred to as the "vicious cycle". Tumor cells stimulate osteoblasts, which in turn stimulate osteoclasts through the secretion of cytokines such as the TNF family member receptor activator of nuclear κB ligand (RANKL). Activated osteoclasts degrade the bone matrix by producing strong acid and proteinases. Bone degradation by osteoclasts releases TGFβ and other growth factors stored in the bone matrix, that further stimulate tumor cells. Bone modifying agents, targeting osteoclast activity, such as bisphosphonate and RANKL antibodies are considered as the standard of care for reducing SREs of patients with bone metastatic diseases. These agents decrease osteoclast activity and delay worsening of skeletal pain and aggravation of bone metastatic diseases. While the management of SREs by these agents may improve patients' lives, this treatment does not address the specific issues of the patients with bone metastasis such as tumor dormancy, drug resistance, or improvement of survival. Here, we review the mechanisms of bone metastasis formation, tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment, and conventional therapy for bone metastatic diseases and discuss the potential development of new therapies targeting tumor heterogeneity in the bone microenvironment.

  12. Palbociclib in Combination With Tamoxifen as First Line Therapy for Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Hormone Receptor Positive Malignant Neoplasm of Breast; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Estrogen Receptor Positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor Positive Tumor; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  13. Gemcitabine, Paclitaxel, Doxorubicin in Metastatic or Unresectable Bladder Cancer With Decreased Kidney Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-19

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  14. The role of 18F–NaF PET/CT in metastatic bone disease

    PubMed Central

    Araz, Mine; Aras, Gülseren; Küçük, Özlem N.

    2015-01-01

    Aim To investigate the role of 18F–NaF PET/CT and compare it with 99m Tc-MDP whole body bone scintigraphy and 18F-FDG PET/CT in detecting the extent of metastatic bone disease and to present our first experience with 18F–NaF PET/CT in our country. Materials and methods A total of 37 histopathologically proven cancer patients (22 male, 15 female) with bone metastasis detected on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan were prospectively enrolled Cebeci, following ethics committee approval. 18F–NaF PET/CT was performed to the participants in Ankara University Medical Faculty Nuclear Medicine Department for evaluation of symptomatic skeletal sites which were negative on Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan. A lesion based comparison was made between 18F–NaF PET/CT and Tc-99m MDP whole body bone scan for each patient and between 18F–NaF PET/CT and 18F-FDG PET/CT in 12/37 patients. Results The number of lesions demonstrated by 99m Tc-MDP bone scan and 18F–NaF PET/CT was equal in 4/37 (%11) of the cases. 18F–NaF PET/CT showed a greater number of pathological foci in 89% of participants. 18F–NaF PET/CT was able to show both lytic and blastic lesions and small lesions were better visualized due to the advantage of sectional imaging with much better resolution and higher target/background ratio. 18F–NaF PET/CT demonstrated a greater number of metastases in 10/12 (83%) of the patients when compared to 18F-FDG PET/CT. In the other two patients, bone metastasis could be demonstrated only by 18F–NaF PET/CT. The uptake of 18F-FDG was variable in blastic lesions and cranial bone involvement was missed by 18F-FDG PET/CT in some cases due to physiological brain metabolism. Conclusion Although further prospective clinical studies in specific cancer populations are indicated to set the place of 18F–NaF PET/CT in diagnostic scheme, the results of this pilot study from our country support the superiority of 18F–NaF PET/CT in investigation of bone metastasis over 99m

  15. Late metastatic colon cancer masquerading as primary jejunal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Meshikhes, A-WN; Joudeh, AA

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the small bowel from a previously resected colorectal cancer is rare and may erroneously be diagnosed as a primary small bowel carcinoma. It usually occurs several years after the primary resection. We present the case of a 67-year-old man who had undergone left hemicolectomy for colon cancer 3 years earlier and returned with subacute small bowel obstruction. This was initially thought, based on preoperative radiological findings and normal colonoscopic examination, to be due a primary jejunal cancer. Even at surgery, the lesion convincingly appeared as an obstructing primary small bowel carcinoma. However, the histology of the resected small bowel revealed metastatic colon cancer. This rare and an unusual metastatic occurrence some years after the primary resection is described and reviewed. PMID:26890851

  16. RANK- and c-Met-mediated signal network promotes prostate cancer metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Gina Chia-Yi; Zhau, Haiyen E; Wang, Ruoxiang; Rogatko, André; Feng, Xu; Zayzafoon, Majd; Liu, Youhua; Farach-Carson, Mary C; You, Sungyong; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R; Chung, Leland W K

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) metastasis to bone is lethal and there is no adequate animal model for studying the mechanisms underlying the metastatic process. Here, we report that receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) expressed by PCa cells consistently induced colonization or metastasis to bone in animal models. RANK-mediated signaling established a premetastatic niche through a feed-forward loop, involving the induction of RANKL and c-Met, but repression of androgen receptor (AR) expression and AR signaling pathways. Site-directed mutagenesis and transcription factor (TF) deletion/interference assays identified common TF complexes, c-Myc/Max, and AP4 as critical regulatory nodes. RANKL–RANK signaling activated a number of master regulator TFs that control the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Twist1, Slug, Zeb1, and Zeb2), stem cell properties (Sox2, Myc, Oct3/4, and Nanog), neuroendocrine differentiation (Sox9, HIF1α, and FoxA2), and osteomimicry (c-Myc/Max, Sox2, Sox9, HIF1α, and Runx2). Abrogating RANK or its downstream c-Myc/Max or c-Met signaling network minimized or abolished skeletal metastasis in mice. RANKL-expressing LNCaP cells recruited and induced neighboring non metastatic LNCaP cells to express RANKL, c-Met/activated c-Met, while downregulating AR expression. These initially non-metastatic cells, once retrieved from the tumors, acquired the potential to colonize and grow in bone. These findings identify a novel mechanism of tumor growth in bone that involves tumor cell reprogramming via RANK–RANKL signaling, as well as a form of signal amplification that mediates recruitment and stable transformation of non-metastatic bystander dormant cells. PMID:24478054

  17. The development of metachronous prostate cancer and chronic myeloid leukemia in a patient with metastatic rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Oztop, I; Yaren, A; Demirpence, M; Alacacioglu, I; Tuna, B; Piskin, O; Yilmaz, U

    2008-01-01

    We report herein an unusual case of metachronous triple cancers (rectum, prostate and Philadelphia(+) [Ph(+)] chronic myeloid leukemia [CML]). A metastatic rectal cancer was diagnosed in a 76-year-old male patient, who was treated with transanal tumor resection and chemotherapy. Thirty months from the initial rectal cancer diagnosis, prostate cancer was diagnosed and the patient was administered maximal androgen blockade and received palliative radiotherapy to the lumbar spine because of painful bone metastases. Thirty months after the diagnosis of rectal cancer and 12 months after the diagnosis of prostate cancer the patient developed Ph(+) CML and imatinib treatment was started. After one-year period in remission, CML evolved into accelerated phase and the patient died of intracranial hemorrhage.

  18. Metastatic Breast Cancer in Uterine Cervix: A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Proença, Sara; Reis, Maria Inês; Cominho, Joana; Conde, Pedro Casado; Santos E Pereira, Helena; Ribeiro, Filipa Castro

    2016-01-01

    Uterine cervix involvement by a distant primary tumor is a rare event. We report the following 2 cases of breast tumor metastasis to the uterine cervix with different presentations: case 1 is an isolated cervix metastasis and case 2 is a disseminated metastatic disease with cervix involvement. In both, clinical examination raised the suspicion of cervical tumor, which was confirmed to be a metastatic adenocarcinoma.The poor outcome and lack of symptoms suggest that although its rareness, all patients with breast cancer should undergo a careful routine gynecologic examination.

  19. Early use of chemotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Markowski, Mark C; Carducci, Michael A

    2016-10-03

    Since 2010, five new antineoplastic therapies have been FDA approved for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. With additional treatment options, questions arose about the optimal sequence of these agents. Until recently, chemotherapy has been deferred until later in the disease course in favor of next-generation androgen deprivation therapy. Prior to the development of abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide, clinical trials were opened investigating the combination of chemotherapy with androgen deprivation therapy in patients with metastatic hormone-sensitive disease. With the development of new oral therapies used to treat castration-resistant disease, these trials were largely forgotten or felt to be obsolete. Recently, two trials have been reported showing an overall survival benefit of the early use of chemotherapy in patients with hormone-naive prostate cancer, changing the treatment paradigm for metastatic disease. Here we review the history of chemotherapy in treating prostate cancer and the emerging evidence favoring its use as first-line therapy against metastatic hormone-sensitive disease.

  20. Role of fibrillar Tenascin-C in metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Chen, Zhiyu; Chen, Ming; Li, Dajiang; Li, Zhihua; Xiong, Yan; Dong, Jiahong; Li, Xiaowu

    2009-04-01

    Interaction of cancer cells with stroma cells facilitates tumor progression by rebuilding the existing extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment. In the tumor, upregulation of Tenascin-C (Tn-C) expression potentially can alter tumor behavior. However, the molecular mechanisms by which tumor-stroma interactions affect the tumor microenvironment have not been well characterized. In this study, we analyzed the expression of fibrillar Tn-C (fTn-C) in human metastatic pancreatic cancers. After co-culturing two pancreatic cancer cell lines, highly metastatic BxPc3 cells and non-metastatic PaCa2 cells, with stromal fibroblasts (SF), we evaluated the roles of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activation and SF in promoting Tn-C organization. Next, we evaluated whether fibrillar Tn-C promotes pancreatic cancer cell movement using cell adhesion and migration assays. Finally, we observed the relationship between MMP-2 activation and fTn-C formation in vivo by injecting the BxPc3 and PaCa2 cells into nude mice. We found that fTn-C was increased in metastatic pancreatic cancer. The fTn-C expression correlated with MMP-2 activity. In the in vitro co-culture, fTn-C organization was found only in BxPc3/SF co-cultures, and required the participation of active MMP-2. The fTn-C reduced cell adhesion and promote pancreatic cancer cell migration by decreasing the adhesive interactions between integrin alpha6beta1 and the ECM. The in vivo tumorigenesis analysis showed that the fTn-C formation and active MMP-2 were significantly increased in the BxPc3 tumors, compared to the PaCa2 tumors. These results demonstrate that Tn-C deposition into the ECM requires participation of active MMP-2 and SF. The deposited Tn-C could promote pancreatic cancer progression.

  1. ErbB2 and bone sialoprotein as markers for metastatic osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Valabrega, G; Fagioli, F; Corso, S; Madon, E; Brach del Prever, A; Biasin, E; Linari, A; Aglietta, M; Giordano, S

    2003-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone neoplasia occurring in young patients in the first two decades of life, and represents 20% of all primitive malignant bone tumours. At present, treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma is unsatisfactory. High-dose chemotherapy followed by CD34+ leukapheresis rescue may improve these poor results. Neoplastic cells contaminating the apheresis may, however, contribute to relapse. To identify markers suitable for detecting osteosarcoma cells in aphereses we analysed the expression of bone-specific genes (Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) and Osteocalcin) and oncogenes (Met and ErbB2) in 22 patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and six healthy stem cell donors. The expression of these genes in aphereses of patients affected by metastatic osteosarcoma was assessed by RT–PCR and Southern blot analysis. Met and Osteocalcin proved to be not useful markers since they are positive in aphereses of both patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and healthy stem cell donors. On the contrary, BSP was expressed at significant levels in 85% of patients. Moreover, 18% of patients showed a strong and significantly positive (seven to 16 times higher than healthy stem cell donors) ErbB2 expression. In all positive cases, neoplastic tissue also expressed ErbB2. Our data show that ErbB2 can be a useful marker for tumour contamination in aphereses of patients affected by ErbB2-expressing osteosarcomas and that analysis of Bone Sialoprotein expression can be an alternative useful marker. PMID:12569382

  2. Surgery for Bone Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery, see Cancer Surgery . Written by References The American Cancer Society medical and editorial content team Our team is ... of use state fundraising notices Site Comments © 2017 American Cancer Society, Inc. All rights reserved. The American Cancer Society ...

  3. 3D printed nanocomposite matrix for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Holmes, Benjamin; Glazer, Robert I; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2016-01-01

    Bone is one of the most common metastatic sites of breast cancer, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear, in part due to an absence of advanced platforms for cancer culture and study that mimic the bone microenvironment. In the present study, we integrated a novel stereolithography-based 3D printer and a unique 3D printed nano-ink consisting of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles suspended in hydrogel to create a biomimetic bone-specific environment for evaluating breast cancer bone invasion. Breast cancer cells cultured in a geometrically optimized matrix exhibited spheroid morphology and migratory characteristics. Co-culture of tumor cells with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells increased the formation of spheroid clusters. The 3D matrix also allowed for higher drug resistance of breast cancer cells than 2D culture. These results validate that our 3D bone matrix can mimic tumor bone microenvironments, suggesting that it can serve as a tool for studying metastasis and assessing drug sensitivity. From the Clinical Editor: Cancer remains a major cause of mortality for patients in the clinical setting. For breast cancer, bone is one of the most common metastatic sites. In this intriguing article, the authors developed a bone-like environment using 3D printing technology to investigate the underlying biology of bone metastasis. Their results would also allow a new model for other researchers who work on cancer to use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung.

  5. PET Tracer 18F-Fluciclovine Can Detect Histologically Proven Bone Metastatic Lesions: A Preclinical Study in Rat Osteolytic and Osteoblastic Bone Metastasis Models

    PubMed Central

    Oka, Shuntaro; Kanagawa, Masaru; Doi, Yoshihiro; Schuster, David M.; Goodman, Mark M.; Yoshimura, Hirokatsu

    2017-01-01

    18F-Fluciclovine (trans-1-amino-3-18F-fluorocyclobutanecarboxylic acid; anti-18F-FACBC) is a positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for diagnosing cancers (e.g., prostate and breast cancer). The most frequent metastatic organ of these cancers is bone. Fluciclovine-PET can visualize bony lesions in clinical practice; however, such lesions have not been described histologically. Methods: We investigated the potential of 14C-fluciclovine in aiding the visualization of osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastases (with histological analyses), compared with 3H-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (3H-FDG), 3H-choline chloride (3H-choline), and 99mTc-hydroxymethylene diphosphonate (99mTc-HMDP) by using triple-tracer autoradiography in rat breast cancer osteolytic (on day 12 ± 1 postinjection of MRMT-1) and prostate cancer osteoblastic (on day 20 ± 3 postinjection of AT6.1) metastatic models. Results: The distribution patterns of 14C-fluciclovine, 3H-FDG, and 3H-choline, but not 99mTc-HMDP, were similar in both models, and the lesions where these tracers accumulated were, histologically, typical osteolytic and osteoblastic lesions. 99mTc-HMDP accumulated mostly in osteoblastic lesions. 14C-fluciclovine could visualize the osteolytic lesions as early as day 6 postinjection of MRMT-1. However, differential distributions in 14C-fluciclovine and 3H-FDG existed, based on histological differences: low 14C-fluciclovine and high 3H-FDG accumulation in osteolytic lesions with inflammation. In the osteoblastic metastatic model, visualization of osteoblastic lesions with 14C-fluciclovine was not clear, yet clearer than with 3H-FDG. Although half of the osteoblastic lesions with 14C-fluciclovine accumulation showed negligible 3H-choline accumulation in comparison, they were histologically similar to lesions with marked 14C-fluciclovine and 3H-choline accumulation. Conclusion: These results suggest that fluciclovine-PET can visualize true osteolytic and osteoblastic bone metastatic lesions

  6. The Role of Megakaryocytes in Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Walter; Sosnoski, Donna M; Ohanessian, Sara E; Chandler, Paige; Mobley, Adam W; Meisel, Kacey D; Mastro, Andrea M

    2017-02-15

    Little is known about how megakaryocytes affect metastasis apart from serving as the source of platelets. We noted an increase in the number of megakaryocytes in the femurs of metastases-bearing athymic mice four weeks following intracardiac inoculation of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. How did the megakaryocytes relate to the metastases? Did megakaryocytes prepare a niche or did they increase in response to metastases? To test these possibilities, we examined two models of experimental metastasis, intracardiac inoculation of human MDA-MB-231 into athymic mice, and intramammary injection of mouse tumor cells, 4T1.2 (metastatic) or 67NR (non-metastatic) in BALB/c mice. In both models, metastatic, but not primary tumor growth was associated with increased megakaryopoiesis. At 4 weeks post injection, megakaryocytes increased ~ two-fold in the bone marrow of mice with MDA-MB-231 bone metastasis. BALB/c mice injected orthotopically with murine 4T1.2 cells showed extramedullary hematopoiesis resulting in a four-fold increase in megakaryocytes in the spleen. These findings led us to speculate that a reduction in megakaryocytes would result in reduced metastasis. Thrombopoietin knockout mice exhibited a 90% decrease in megakaryocytes compared to wild type mice. Nonetheless, they developed more aggressive metastasis than wild type. We also found with human clinical samples, an increase in megakaryocytes in the bone marrow of 75% (6/8) of patients with metastatic breast cancer compared to age and gender matched controls. The data suggested that the increase in megakaryocytes occurs in response to metastatic cells in the bone, and that megakaryocytes are in some measure protective against metastases.

  7. The Evolutionary History of Lethal Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Kremeyer, Barbara; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Tubio, Jose M.C.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Brewer, Daniel S.; Kallio, Heini M.L.; Högnäs, Gunilla; Annala, Matti; Kivinummi, Kati; Goody, Victoria; Latimer, Calli; O’Meara, Sarah; Dawson, Kevin J.; Isaacs, William; Emmert-Buck, Michael R; Nykter, Matti; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Whitaker, Hayley C.; Neal, David E.; Cooper, Colin S.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Visakorpi, Tapio; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Cancers emerge from an on-going Darwinian evolutionary process, often leading to multiple competing subclones within a single primary tumour1-4. This evolutionary process culminates in the formation of metastases, which is the cause of 90% of cancer-related deaths5. However, despite its clinical importance, little is known about the principles governing the dissemination of cancer cells to distant organs. Although the hypothesis that each metastasis originates from a single tumour cell is generally supported6-8, recent studies using mouse models of cancer demonstrated the existence of polyclonal seeding from and inter-clonal cooperation between multiple subclones9,10. In this study, we sought definitive evidence for the existence of polyclonal seeding in human malignancy and to establish the clonal relationship among different metastases in the context of androgen-deprived metastatic prostate cancer. Using whole genome sequencing, we characterised multiple metastases arising from prostate tumours in ten patients. Integrated analyses of subclonal architecture revealed the patterns of metastatic spread in unprecedented detail. Metastasis-to-metastasis spread was found to be common, either through de novo monoclonal seeding of daughter metastases or, in five cases, through the transfer of multiple tumour clones between metastatic sites. Lesions affecting tumour suppressor genes usually occur as single events, whereas mutations in genes involved in androgen receptor signalling commonly involve multiple, convergent events in different metastases. Our results elucidate in detail the complex patterns of metastatic spread and further our understanding of the development of resistance to androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer. PMID:25830880

  8. Cancer-induced bone pain: Mechanisms and models.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ondoua, A N; Symons-Liguori, A M; Vanderah, T W

    2013-12-17

    Cancerous cells can originate in a number of different tissues such as prostate, breast and lung, but often go undetected and are non-painful. Many types of cancers have a propensity to metastasize to the bone microenvironment first. Tumor burden within the bone causes excruciating breakthrough pain with properties of ongoing pain that is inadequately managed with current analgesics. Part of this failure is due to the poor understanding of the etiology of cancer pain. Animal models of cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP) have revealed that the neurochemistry of cancer has features distinctive from other chronic pain states. For example, preclinical models of metastatic cancer often result in the positive modulation of neurotrophins, such as NGF and BDNF, that can lead to nociceptive sensitization. Preclinical cancer models also demonstrate nociceptive neuronal expression of acid-sensing receptors, such as ASIC1 and TRPV1, which respond to cancer-induced acidity within the bone. CIBP is correlated with a significant increase in pro-inflammatory mediators acting peripherally and centrally, contributing to neuronal hypersensitive states. Finally, cancer cells generate high levels of oxidative molecules that are thought to increase extracellular glutamate concentrations, thus activating primary afferent neurons. Knowledge of the unique neuro-molecular profile of cancer pain will ultimately lead to the development of novel and superior therapeutics for CIBP.

  9. Use of articulated registration for response assessment of individual metastatic bone lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yip, Stephen; Jeraj, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Accurate skeleton registration is necessary to match corresponding metastatic bone lesions for response assessment over multiple scans. In articulated registration (ART), whole-body skeletons are registered by auto-segmenting individual bones, then rigidly aligning them. Performance and robustness of the ART in lesion matching were evaluated and compared to other commonly used registration techniques. Sixteen prostate cancer patients were treated either with molecular targeted therapy or chemotherapy. Ten out of the 16 patients underwent the double baseline whole-body [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans for test-retest (TRT) evaluation. Twelve of the 16 patients underwent pre- and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Skeletons at different time points were registered using ART, rigid, and deformable (DR) registration algorithms. The corresponding lesions were contoured and identified on successive PET images based on including the voxels with the standardized uptake value over 15. Each algorithm was evaluated for its ability to accurately align corresponding lesions via skeleton registration. A lesion matching score (MS) was measured for each lesion, which quantified the per cent overlap between the lesion's two corresponding contours. Three separate sensitivity studies were conducted to investigate the robustness of ART in matching: sensitivity of lesion matching to various contouring threshold levels, effects of imperfections in the bone auto-segmentation and sensitivity of mis-registration. The performance of ART (MS = 82% for both datasets, p ≪ 0.001) in lesion matching was significantly better than rigid (MSTRT = 53%, MSResponse = 46%) and DR (MSTRT = 46%, MSResponse = 45%) algorithms. Neither varying threshold levels for lesion contouring nor imperfect bone segmentation had significant (p∼0.10) impact on the ART matching performance as the MS remained unchanged. Despite the mis-registration reduced MS for ART, as low as 67% (p ≪ 0.001), the performance remained to

  10. Methods for Culturing Human Femur Tissue Explants to Study Breast Cancer Cell Colonization of the Metastatic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Zachary S.; Bachmann, Michael H.; Alluri, Rajiv V.; Maloney, William J.; Contag, Christopher H.; King, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer metastasis. Although it is widely accepted that the microenvironment influences cancer cell behavior, little is known about breast cancer cell properties and behaviors within the native microenvironment of human bone tissue.We have developed approaches to track, quantify and modulate human breast cancer cells within the microenvironment of cultured human bone tissue fragments isolated from discarded femoral heads following total hip replacement surgeries. Using breast cancer cells engineered for luciferase and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression, we are able to reproducibly quantitate migration and proliferation patterns using bioluminescence imaging (BLI), track cell interactions within the bone fragments using fluorescence microscopy, and evaluate breast cells after colonization with flow cytometry. The key advantages of this model include: 1) a native, architecturally intact tissue microenvironment that includes relevant human cell types, and 2) direct access to the microenvironment, which facilitates rapid quantitative and qualitative monitoring and perturbation of breast and bone cell properties, behaviors and interactions. A primary limitation, at present, is the finite viability of the tissue fragments, which confines the window of study to short-term culture. Applications of the model system include studying the basic biology of breast cancer and other bone-seeking malignancies within the metastatic niche, and developing therapeutic strategies to effectively target breast cancer cells in bone tissues. PMID:25867136

  11. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-30

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  12. The current status of prophylactic femoral intramedullary nailing for metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ormsby, NM; Leong, WY; Wong, W; Hughes, HE; Swaminathan, V

    2016-01-01

    The most common site for cancer to spread is bone. At post-mortem, bony metastases have been found in 70% of patients dying from breast and prostate cancer. Due to the prevalence of cancer, bone metastasis and the associated management represents a huge burden on NHS resources. In patients with metastasis, around 56% of these involve the lower limb long bones. Due to the huge forces placed upon long bones during weight bearing, there is a high risk of fracture through areas of metastasis. It is reported that 23% of pathological fractures occur in the femoral subtrochanteric region. This area is subjected to forces up to four times the body weight, resulting in poor union rate for these fractures, and significant morbidity associated with difficulty in mobilising, and in patient nursing. As cancer treatments improve, the life expectancy in this subgroup of patients is likely to increase. Therefore medium-to-long-term management of these fractures, beyond the palliative, will become essential. We aim to evaluate the current management for metastatic malignant femoral disease, with particular focus on the prophylactic augmentation of diseased femorii using intramedullary nails. PMID:28105069

  13. Myeloid-specific TGF-β signaling in bone promotes basic-FGF and breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Vander Ark, A; Lee, P; Hostetter, G; Bhowmick, N A; Matrisian, L M; Williams, B O; Miranti, C K; Li, X

    2016-05-05

    Breast cancer (BCa) bone metastases cause osteolytic bone lesions, which result from the interactions of metastatic BCa cells with osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Osteoclasts differentiate from myeloid lineage cells. To understand the cell-specific role of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) in the myeloid lineage, in BCa bone metastases, MDA-MB-231 BCa cells were intra-tibially or intra-cardially injected into LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2(floxE2/floxE2) knockout (LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO) or Tgfbr2(floxE2/floxE2) mice. Metastatic bone lesion development was compared by analysis of both lesion number and area. We found that LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 knockout significantly decreased MDA-MB-231 bone lesion development in both the cardiac and tibial injection models. LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 knockout inhibited the tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis and osteoclastogenesis of the metastatic bones. Cytokine array analysis showed that basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was downregulated in MDA-MB-231-injected tibiae from the LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO group, and intravenous injection of the recombinant bFGF to LysM(Cre)/Tgfbr2 KO mice rescued the inhibited metastatic bone lesion development. The mechanism by which bFGF rescued the bone lesion development was by promotion of tumor cell proliferation through the downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-cFos pathway after binding to the FGF receptor 1 (FGFR1). Consistent with animal studies, we found that in human BCa bone metastatic tissues, TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) and p-Smad2 were expressed in osteoclasts and tumor cells, and were correlated with the expression of FGFR1. Our studies suggest that myeloid-specific TGF-β signaling-mediated bFGF in the bone promotes BCa bone metastasis.

  14. Higher survival of refractory metastatizing breast cancer after thermotherapy and autologous specific antitumoral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pontiggia, P; Rizzo, S; Cuppone-Curto, F; Sabato, A; Rotella, G; Silvotti, M G; Martano, F

    1996-01-01

    46 women (average 54.3 yrs) with refractory metastatizing breast cancer were treated with thermotherapy and autologous specific immunotherapy (rhIL-2 ex vivo activated cells). Metastases involved one organ in 69%; in particular, bone, lung, liver. The PS after treatment was satisfactory in 41%; the outcome was better in those cases with metastases to one site. The women remaining alive were 31/46; 67% of thermoimmunotherapy treated patients were alive after a maximum survival time of 85 months (median 24 months). The 36 months of control showed a 5-fold higher survival rate in our series when challenged with that of compared women undergoing only chemotherapy (p < .001).

  15. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer: Fatal outcome following strontium-89 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, C.; McKenzie, R.; Coupland, D.B.

    1994-10-01

    A patient with metastatic prostate cancer was found to have low-grade disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). He had significant bone pain despite external-beam radiotherapy and was given {sup 89}Sr with subsequent thrombocytopenia and epistaxis. The patient died from generalized hemorrhage 36 days postinjection. Although it is not possible to establish a causal relationship between {sup 89}Sr and DIC, practitioners should be alert to complications associated with the primary disorder which might occur at a time to raise concern about the intervention. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 synthesis by human primary and metastatic bone tumors in culture.

    PubMed

    Gebhardt, M C; Lippiello, L; Bringhurst, F R; Mankin, H J

    1985-06-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is known to stimulate osteolysis in vitro and has been implicated in mediating bone resorption in several animal and human tumors. Little attention has yet to be directed toward local humoral control (including PGE2) of bone resorption in primary and metastatic bone tumors. For investigation of whether histologically identified areas of osteolytic or osteoblastic bone tumors differentially secrete PGE2 under in vitro conditions, culture media from explants of central and peripheral areas of tissue were sterilely collected from 13 surgical specimens of primary and metastatic bone tumors and assayed for (PGE2) radioimmunoassay. The results indicate a marked heterogeneity in the concentration of immunoreactive (I-PGE2) synthesis by tumors of different as well as similar cell type. PGE2 production was time-dependent in culture, and at 72 hours substantial increases were apparent compared to cultures of non-neoplastic fascia controls. Significantly higher levels of I-PGE2 were found in cultures derived from "bone-destructive" tumors. No difference in I-PGE2 synthesis was found between explants of peripheral versus central tissue of the same tumors. PGE2 is synthesized in culture by bone tumors characterized as destructive of bone at higher levels than "bone-forming" tumors, and this synthesis is inhibited by indomethacin.

  17. Enchondroma on bone scan in a patient with breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McCrea, E.S.; Johnston, G.S.

    1984-08-01

    A 45-year-old postmenopausal woman with breast cancer was treated with modified radical mastectomy and radiotherapy. She remained clinically well for two years but then complained of pain in the left upper arm during a routine follow-up visit with her physician. A roentgenogram of the left proximal humerus showed a densely sclerotic, nonhomogeneous, 2 x 6 cm lesion with stippled calcification, the appearance of which was most consistent with a mature enchondroma or bone infarct. Because metastatic breast cancer was also a possibility, a technetium Tc 99m methyldiphosphonate (MDP) bone scan was done, revealing diffuse uptake in the left proximal humeral lesion, without any other area of involvement. Although radiologically the lesion appeared benign and stable, the history of breast cancer, abnormal bone scan, and pain could not be ignored, and open surgical bone biopsy was done. From deep within the lesion at the core of the metaphysis of the proximal left humerus, the surgeon removed an enchondroma, but found no evidence of metastatic disease. Follow-up MDP bone scans after six months and four years were unchanged.

  18. Unusual presentation of metastatic gall bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Piyush; Roy, Soumyajit; Tiwari, Vivek; Mohanti, Bidhu K

    2014-01-01

    To report the first case of rare isolated breast metastasis from carcinoma gall bladder. Single patient case report. A 35-year-old pre-menopausal female presented with 2 * 2 cm right upper outer quadrant breast lump. Post-mastectomy, histology confirmed it to be metastatic adenocarcinoma positive for both Cytokeratin (CK) 7 and CK20. Past history as told by the patient revealed that 2 years back, cholecystectomy was performed for gall stones, of which no histology reports were present; she had a port site scar recurrence which showed it to be adenocarcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy was advised which the patient did not complete. This is probably the first case reported of isolated breast metastasis from gall bladder carcinoma, diagnosed retrospectively. It also highlights the importance of adjuvant treatment in gall bladder malignancy.

  19. Management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy: risk and uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Kirsten; Woods, Andrew; Gupta, Sandeep; Smith, Roger; Wynne, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic thyroid cancer is an uncommon condition to be present at the time of pregnancy, but presents a challenging paradigm of care. Clinicians must balance the competing interests of long-term maternal health, best achieved by iatrogenic hyperthyroidism, regular radioiodine therapy and avoidance of dietary iodine, against the priority to care for the developing foetus, with inevitable compromise. Additionally, epidemiological and cellular data support the role of oestrogen as a growth factor for benign and malignant thyrocytes, although communicating the magnitude of this risk to patients and caregivers, as well as the uncertain impact of any pregnancy on long-term prognosis, remains challenging. Evidence to support treatment decisions in this uncommon situation is presented in the context of a case of a pregnant teenager with known metastatic papillary thyroid cancer and recent radioiodine therapy. Learning points: Pregnancy is associated with the growth of thyroid nodules due to stimulation from oestrogen receptors on thyrocytes and HCG cross-stimulation of the TSH receptor. Thyroid cancer diagnosed during pregnancy has not been shown to be associated with increased rates of persistent or recurrent disease in most studies. There is little evidence to guide the management of metastatic thyroid cancer in pregnancy, where both maternal and foetal wellbeing must be carefully balanced. PMID:27994875

  20. Role of the neural niche in brain metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Termini, John; Neman, Josh; Jandial, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the relenteless pursuit of cancer to escape its primary site and colonize distant organs. This malignant evolutionary process is biologically heterogeneous, yet one unifying element is the critical role of the microenvironment for arriving metastatic cells. Historically brain metastases were rarely investigated since patients with advanced cancer were considered terminal. Fortunately, advances in molecular therapies have led to patients living longer with metastatic cancer. However, one site remains recalcitrant to our treatment efforts – the brain. The central nervous system is the most complex biological system, which poses unique obstacles but also harbors opportunities for discovery. Much of what we know about the brain microenvironment comes from neuroscience. We suggest that the interrelated cellular responses in traumatic brain injury may guide us towards new perspectives in understanding brain metastases. In this view, brain metastases may be conceptualized as progressive oncologic injury to the nervous system. This review discusses our evolving understanding of the bidirectional interactions between the brain milieu and metastatic cancer. PMID:25035392

  1. Relative microvessel area of the primary tumour, and not lymph node status, predicts the presence of bone marrow micrometastases detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction in patients with clinically non-metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Benoy, Ina H; Salgado, Roberto; Elst, Hilde; Van Dam, Peter; Weyler, Joost; Van Marck, Eric; Scharpé, Simon; Vermeulen, Peter B; Dirix, Luc Y

    2005-01-01

    About 50% of patients with breast cancer have no involvement of axillary lymph nodes at diagnosis and can be considered cured after primary locoregional treatment. However, about 20-30% will experience distant relapse. The group of patients at risk is not well characterised: recurrence is probably due to the establishment of micrometastases before treatment. Given the early steps of metastasis in which tumour cells interact with endothelial cells of blood vessels, and, given the independent prognostic value in breast cancer of both the quantification of tumour vascularisation and the detection of micrometastases in the bone marrow, the aim of this study was to determine the relationship between vascularisation, measured by Chalkley morphometry, and the bone marrow content of cytokeratin-19 (CK-19) mRNA, quantified by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, in a series of 68 patients with localised untreated breast cancer. The blood concentration of factors involved in angiogenesis (interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor) and of factors involved in coagulation (D-dimer, fibrinogen, platelets) was also measured. When bone marrow CK-19 relative gene expression (RGE) was categorised according to the cut-off value of 0.77 (95th centile of control patients), 53% of the patients had an elevated CK-19 RGE. Patients with bone marrow micrometastases, on the basis of an elevated CK-19 RGE, had a mean Chalkley count of 7.5 +/- 1.7 (median 7, standard error [SE] 0.30) compared with a mean Chalkley count of 6.5 +/- 1.7 in other patients (median 6, SE 0.3) (Mann-Whitney U-test; P = 0.04). Multiple regression analysis revealed that Chalkley count, not lymph node status, independently predicted CK-19 RGE status (P = 0.04; odds ratio 1.38; 95% confidence interval 1.009-1.882). Blood parameters reflecting angiogenesis and coagulation were positively correlated with Chalkley count and/or CK-19 RGE. Our data are in support of an association between

  2. Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Previously Treated, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-01

    Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  3. Radium-223 Therapy of Bone Metastases in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Sten

    2016-11-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone, often resulting in painful skeletal events, reduced quality of life, and reduced survival. Radium-223 is a first-in-class alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has proven to prolong overall survival, delay time to symptomatic skeletal events, and improve quality of life in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases and no visceral metastases. Radium-223 provides survival benefit to patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases, regardless of prior docetaxel use. This article gives an overview of the development of radium-223 from the first-in-human trial to current status. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Bone metastasis of glandular cardiac myxoma mimicking a metastatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Uppin, Shantveer G; Jambhekar, Nirmala; Puri, Ajay; Kumar, Rajiv; Agarwal, Manish; Sanghvi, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    Skeletal metastasis from a cardiac myxoma is rare. We describe an extremely unusual case of a cardiac myxoma metastasing to the femur in a 46-year-old female presenting with pain in the right hip. Radiographs showed an expansile lytic lesion with pathological fracture involving the neck and proximal shaft of the right femur. Histology revealed features of cardiac myxoma with heterologous glandular elements, which was initially mistaken for a metastatic mucin-secreting adenocarcinoma.

  5. Excellent Response to 177Lu-PSMA-617 Radioligand Therapy in a Patient With Advanced Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Evaluated by 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Roll, Wolfgang; Bode, Axel; Weckesser, Matthias; Bögemann, Martin; Rahbar, Kambiz

    2017-02-01

    Recently radiolabeled ligands targeting prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been introduced for diagnostics and treatment of prostate cancer. Labeled with Lutetium, PSMA radioligand therapy (RLT) is one of the most promising new treatments of metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer. We present images of Ga-PSMA PET/CT and parameters of response of a 75-year-old heavily pretreated metastatic castration refractory prostate cancer patient with extended bone metastases, showing an extraordinary biochemical response in PSA-levels concordant to SUV decline in bone metastases. Furthermore, this case shows that CT is of no use in assessing response in bone metastases of prostate cancer.

  6. Sorafenib in Metastatic Thyroid Cancer: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Ligy; Lai, Stephen Y.; Dong, Wenli; Feng, Lei; Dadu, Ramona; Regone, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sorafenib was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for radioiodine-resistant metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). In addition, two drugs (vandetanib and cabozantinib) have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). Several published phase II trials have investigated the efficacy of sorafenib in thyroid cancers, but to date, results from those studies have not been compared. Methods. A systematic review of the literature was performed to assess response rate, median progression-free survival, and adverse events associated with sorafenib therapy for metastatic thyroid cancers. Results. This review included seven trials involving 219 patients: 159 with DTC (papillary, follicular, and poorly differentiated), 52 with MTC, and 8 with anaplastic thyroid cancer. No study reported complete responses to treatment. Overall partial response, stable disease, and progressive disease rates were 21%, 60%, and 20%, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 18 months for patients with all subtypes of thyroid cancer. Drug was discontinued in 16% of patients because of toxicities or intolerance, and the dose was reduced in a further 56%. Side effects with an incidence ≥50% were hand-foot syndrome (74%), diarrhea (70%), skin rash (67%), fatigue (61%), and weight loss (57%). Deaths not related to progressive disease occurred in nearly 4% of patients. Conclusion. Treatment with sorafenib in patients with progressive DTC and MTC is a promising strategy, but the adverse event rate is high, leading to a high rate of dose reduction or discontinuation. Consequently, sorafenib use in patients with metastatic thyroid cancer requires careful selection of patients and careful management of side effects. PMID:24563075

  7. Long-term disease-free survival after surgical resection for multiple bone metastases from rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seok Jin; Kim, Jong Hun; Lee, Min Ro; Lee, Chang Ho; Kuh, Ja Hong; Kim, Jung Ryul

    2011-08-10

    Bone metastasis of primary colorectal cancer is uncommon. When it occurs, it is usually a late manifestation of disease and is indicative of poor prognosis. We describe a patient with multiple metachronous bone metastases from lower rectal cancer who was successfully treated with multimodal treatment including surgical resections and has shown 32 mo disease-free survival. Surgical resection of metastatic bone lesion(s) from colorectal cancer may be a good treatment option in selected patients.

  8. Salvage Lenvatinib Therapy in Metastatic Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Iñiguez-Ariza, Nicole M; Ryder, Mabel M; Hilger, Crystal R; Bible, Keith C

    2017-07-01

    Historical anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) outcomes have been terrible, with a median survival of only five months and <20% one-year survival. Improved outcomes are now achieved with aggressive initial therapy in stages IVA and IVB disease, but patients with distant metastatic disease (stage IVC) still do poorly; improved therapies are sorely needed. Kinase inhibitors have emerged as promising agents in the therapy of advanced medullary and differentiated thyroid cancer, but there are limited data regarding the use of lenvatinib in ATC. The aim of this study was to delineate clinical outcomes in a series of patients with advanced ATC in response to lenvatinib therapy. A retrospective analysis was conducted involving all lenvatinib-treated Mayo Clinic ATC patients in 2015. Of 28 distinct ATC patients seen in 2015, three (11%) with metastatic disease of ECOG performance status 2-3 were treated with lenvatinib. Two patients were male; age range at ATC diagnosis was 57-84 years. All three patients attained successful local control of their disease with surgery and/or combined chemoradiotherapy. Lenvatinib was offered as the second, third, or fourth line of therapy at the time of metastatic disease progression. Two patients incurred minor responses to therapy, with structural regression of distant metastatic tumor disease soon after starting lenvatinib treatment (at one to two months), while one patient achieved stable disease, but no Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors partial responses resulted. Overall survival after starting lenvatinib was two, six, and seven months. Fatigue and hypertension were prominent, and one patient developed pulmonary emboli while on lenvatinib. This initial single-institution experience suggests that lenvatinib may have some disease-modifying activity in metastatic ATC that is otherwise refractory to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Unfortunately, observed benefits were transient, and toxicities were prominent. Clinical trials are required

  9. Vaginal Dryness and Beyond: The Sexual Health Needs of Women Diagnosed With Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    McClelland, Sara I; Holland, Kathryn J; Griggs, Jennifer J

    2015-01-01

    While research on the sexual health of women with early stage cancer has grown extensively over the past decade, markedly less information is available to support the sexual health needs of women diagnosed with advanced breast cancer. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 32 women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (ages 35 to 77) about questions they had concerning their sexual health and intimate relationships. All participants were recruited from a comprehensive cancer center at a large Midwestern university. Three themes were examined: the role of sexual activity and intimate touch in participants' lives, unmet information needs about sexual health, and communication with medical providers about sexual concerns. Findings indicated that sexual activities with partners were important; however, participants worried about their own physical limitations and reported frequent physical (e.g., bone pains) and vaginal pain associated with intercourse. When women raised concerns about these issues in clinical settings, medical providers often focused exclusively on vaginal lubricants, which did not address the entirety of women's problems or concerns. In addition, women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer reported needing additional resources about specialized vaginal lubricants, nonpenetrative and nongenitally focused sex, and sexual positions that did not compromise their physical health yet still provided pleasure.

  10. Novel Tracers and Their Development for the Imaging of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Apolo, Andrea B.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Morris, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    There are presently no accurate methods of imaging prostate cancer metastases to bone. An unprecedented number of novel imaging agents, based on the biology of the disease, are now available for testing. We reviewed contemporary molecular imaging modalities that have been tested in humans with metastatic prostate cancer, with consideration of the studies' adherence to current prostate cancer clinical trial designs. Articles from the years 2002 to 2008 on PET using 18F-FDG, 11C-choline, 18F-choline, 18F-flouride, 11C-acetate, 11C-methionine, and 18F-fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone in patients with metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed. Although these studies are encouraging, most focus on the rising population with prostate-specific antigen, and many involve small numbers of patients and do not adhere to consensus criteria for clinical trial designs in prostate cancer. Hence, although many promising agents are available for testing, such studies would benefit from closer collaboration between those in the fields of medical oncology and nuclear medicine. PMID:18997047

  11. Novel tracers and their development for the imaging of metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Apolo, Andrea B; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Morris, Michael J

    2008-12-01

    There are presently no accurate methods of imaging prostate cancer metastases to bone. An unprecedented number of novel imaging agents, based on the biology of the disease, are now available for testing. We reviewed contemporary molecular imaging modalities that have been tested in humans with metastatic prostate cancer, with consideration of the studies' adherence to current prostate cancer clinical trial designs. Articles from the years 2002 to 2008 on PET using (18)F-FDG, (11)C-choline, (18)F-choline, (18)F-flouride, (11)C-acetate, (11)C-methionine, and (18)F-fluoro-5alpha-dihydrotestosterone in patients with metastatic prostate cancer were reviewed. Although these studies are encouraging, most focus on the rising population with prostate-specific antigen, and many involve small numbers of patients and do not adhere to consensus criteria for clinical trial designs in prostate cancer. Hence, although many promising agents are available for testing, such studies would benefit from closer collaboration between those in the fields of medical oncology and nuclear medicine.

  12. Bone-induced expression of integrin β3 enables targeted nanotherapy of breast cancer metastases.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael H; Esser, Alison K; Fox, Gregory C; Schmieder, Anne H; Yang, Xiaoxia; Hu, Grace; Pan, Dipanjan; Su, Xinming; Xu, Yalin; Novack, Deborah V; Walsh, Thomas; Colditz, Graham A; Lukaszewicz, Gabriel H; Cordell, Elizabeth; Novack, Joshua S; Fitzpatrick, James A J; Waning, David L; Mohammad, Khalid S; Guise, Theresa A; Lanza, Gregory M; Weilbaecher, Katherine N

    2017-08-30

    Bone metastases occur in ~70% of metastatic breast cancer patients often leading to skeletal injuries. Current treatments are mainly palliative and underscore the unmet clinical need for improved therapies. In this study, we provide preclinical evidence for an antimetastatic therapy based on targeting integrin β3 (β3) which is selectively induced on breast cancer cells in bone by the local bone microenvironment. In a preclinical model of breast cancer, β3 was strongly expressed on bone metastatic cancer cells but not primary mammary tumors or visceral metastases. In tumor tissue from breast cancer patients, β3 was significantly elevated on bone metastases relative to primary tumors from the same patient (n=42). Mechanistic investigations revealed that TGF--β signaling through SMAD2/SMAD3 was necessary for breast cancer induction of β3 within the bone. Using a micelle--based nanoparticle therapy that recognizes integrin αvβ3 (αvβ3--MPs of ~12.5nm), we demonstrated specific localization to breast cancer bone metastases in mice. Using this system for targeted delivery of the chemotherapeutic docetaxel, we showed that bone tumor burden could be reduced significantly with less bone destruction and less hepatotoxicity compared to equimolar doses of free docetaxel. Furthermore, mice treated with αvβ3--MP--docetaxel exhibited a significant decrease in bone-residing tumor cell proliferation compared to free docetaxel. Taken together, our results offer preclinical proof of concept for a method to enhance delivery of chemotherapeutics to breast cancer cells within the bone by exploiting their selective expression of integrin αvβ3 at that metastatic site. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Tenascin-C and integrin α9 mediate interactions of prostate cancer with the bone microenvironment.

    PubMed

    San Martin, Rebeca; Pathak, Ravi; Jain, Antrix; Jung, Sung Yun; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Piňa-Barba, Maria C; Sikora, Andrew G; Pienta, Kenneth J; Rowley, David R

    2017-09-15

    Deposition of the extracellular matrix protein tenascin-C is part of the reactive stroma response, which has a critical role in prostate cancer progression. Here we report that tenascin-C is expressed in the bone endosteum and involved associated with formation of prostate bone metastases. Metastatic cells cultured on osteo-mimetic surfaces coated with tenascin-C exhibited enhanced adhesion and colony formation as mediated by integrin α9β1. Additionally, metastatic cells preferentially migrated and colonized tenascin-C-coated trabecular bone xenografts in a novel system that employed chorioallantoic membranes of fertilized chicken eggs as host. Overall, our studies deepen knowledge about reactive stroma responses in the bone endosteum that accompany prostate cancer metastasis to trabecular bone, with potential implications to therapeutically target this process in patients. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. RAS mutations affect pattern of metastatic spread and increase propensity for brain metastasis in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Rona; Cowell, Elizabeth; Chou, Joanne F; Gewirtz, Alexandra N; Borsu, Laetitia; Vakiani, Efsevia; Solit, David B; Rosen, Neal; Capanu, Marinela; Ladanyi, Marc; Kemeny, Nancy

    2015-04-15

    RAS and PIK3CA mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) have been associated with worse survival. We sought to evaluate the impact of RAS and PIK3CA mutations on cumulative incidence of metastasis to potentially curable sites of liver and lung and other sites such as bone and brain. We performed a computerized search of the electronic medical record of our institution for mCRC cases genotyped for RAS or PIK3CA mutations from 2008 to 2012. Cases were reviewed for patient characteristics, survival, and site-specific metastasis. Among the 918 patients identified, 477 cases were RAS wild type, and 441 cases had a RAS mutation (394 at KRAS exon 2, 29 at KRAS exon 3 or 4, and 18 in NRAS). RAS mutation was significantly associated with shorter median overall survival (OS) and on multivariate analysis independently predicted worse OS (HR, 1.6; P < .01). RAS mutant mCRC exhibited a significantly higher cumulative incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis and on multivariate analysis was an independent predictor of involvement of these sites (HR, 1.5, 1.6, and 3.7, respectively). PIK3CA mutations occurred in 10% of the 786 cases genotyped, did not predict for worse survival, and did not exhibit a site-specific pattern of metastatic spread. The metastatic potential of CRC varies with the presence of RAS mutation. RAS mutation is associated with worse OS and increased incidence of lung, bone, and brain metastasis. An understanding of this site-specific pattern of spread may help to inform physicians' assessment of symptoms in patients with mCRC. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  15. Dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex as a potential drug for metastatic bone tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakatake, Hidetoshi; Ekimoto, Hisao; Aso, Mariko; Ogawa, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Asami; Suemune, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Bisphosphonates have high affinity for hydroxyapatite (HA), which is abundantly present in bone. Also, platinum complexes are known that have a wide spectrum of antitumor activities. The conjugate of bisphosphonate and a platinum complex might have HA affinity and antitumor activity, and become a drug for metastatic bone tumor. In this study, the authors synthesized platinum complexes that had dialkyl bisphosphonic acid as a ligand, and evaluated the possibility of the synthesized complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor. The synthesized dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complex was characterized, and its stability in an aqueous solution was also confirmed. The synthesized platinum complex showed higher HA affinity than other platinum complexes such as cisplatin and carboplatin in an experiment of adsorption to HA. In vitro, the platinum complex showed tumor growth inhibitory effect stronger than or equal to cisplatin, which is the most commonly used antitumor agent. Moreover, the platinum complex showed a bone absorption inhibitory effect on the osteoclast. These results suggest potential of dialkyl bisphosphonate platinum(II) complexes as a drug for metastatic bone tumor.

  16. Prolonged time to progression with fulvestrant for metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mello, Celso A L; Chinen, Ludmilla T D; da Silva, Samantha Cabral Severino; do Nascimento Matias, Carolina; Benevides, Carlos Frederico; Gimenes, Daniel Luiz; Fanelli, Marcello F

    2011-06-01

    Although the incidence of breast cancer has been declining in recent years, the disease is still one of the leading causes of cancer deaths in women. Recently, breast cancer has been treated with innovative approaches that use hormone-sensitive therapies. This is because in at least one-third of breast cancers, estrogens mediated via the estrogen receptor pathway act as endocrine growth factors. Fulvestrant has been studied as both first- and second-line therapy for locally advanced and metastatic breast cancer, but few studies have shown its effect as third-line therapy alone. To observe the disease time to progression (TTP) obtained with fulvestrant when used on metastatic breast cancer as first-, second-, and also third-line therapy. We also aimed to correlate the TTP obtained with fulvestrant with hormone receptor, HER2 expression, and metastatic site. This was a cohort study that retrospectively examined medical records of 73 postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer who were treated with fulvestrant (250 mg/month i.m. injection) and followed at the Department of Medical Oncology at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo in São Paulo, Brazil from August 2003 to December 2006. The median TTP with fulvestrant was about 11 months. When used as the first-line therapy, TTP was about 13 months; when used as second-line, TTP was about 6 months; and when used as third-line, it was about 12 months. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding the therapy line. In patients with positive ER tumors, TTP was 11 months. No significant difference in TTP was observed in negative ER tumors (TTP = 10 months). In patients with positive PgR tumors, TTP was 13 months and for negative PgR, TTP was 6 months (P = 0.008). According to the HER2 status, the TTP was 5 months for HER2+ and 10 months for HER2-. Our findings indicate that fulvestrant is an effective alternative for treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

  17. Multifaceted ability of naturally occurring polyphenols against metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingyu; Bennett, Lunawati L; Zhou, Shufeng

    2016-04-01

    Although cancer metastases are known to be the main cause of cancer-related deaths, truly effective antimetastatic therapeutics remain scarce in clinical practice. Naturally occurring polyphenols are the most abundant antioxidants in human diets. Many of them possess chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic properties against various types of cancer. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathways that mediate cancer development and progression have led to an increase of interest in preclinical investigations on the mechanisms underlying anticancer activity of polyphenols. In particular, an increasing number of preclinical studies using cultured cells and animal models have demonstrated the inhibitory effects of polyphenols on tumour cell invasion and metastasis, thereby highlighting the potential of polyphenols against metastatic cancer. This review specifically addresses growing evidence of the capability of polyphenols to impair the invasion and migration of tumour cells through a diverse set of mechanisms, including downregulation of expression of matrix metalloproteinases, modulation of regulators of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, interference with Met signalling, inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B mediated transcription, and so on. Given that metastasis occurs through a multistep process in which each step is regulated by a complex network of signalling pathways, the multi-function and multi-target characteristics of polyphenols render those promising candidates for effective adjuvant therapy against metastatic cancer.

  18. Curcumin analogue UBS109 prevents bone loss in breast cancer bone metastasis mouse model: involvement in osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Zhu, Shijun; Zhang, Shumin; Wu, Daqing; Moore, Terry M; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2014-07-01

    Bone metastasis of breast cancer typically leads to osteolysis, which causes severe pathological bone fractures and hypercalcemia. Bone homeostasis is skillfully regulated through osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Bone loss with bone metastasis of breast cancer may be due to both activation of osteoclastic bone resorption and suppression of osteoblastic bone formation. This study was undertaken to determine whether the novel curcumin analogue UBS109 has preventive effects on bone loss induced by breast cancer cell bone metastasis. Nude mice were inoculated with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells (10(6) cells/mouse) into the head of the right and left tibia. One week after inoculation, the mice were treated with control (vehicle), oral administration (p.o.) of UBS109 (50 or 150 mg/kg body weight), or intraperitoneal administration (i.p.) of UBS109 (10 or 20 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days per week for 7 weeks. After UBS109 administration for 7 weeks, hind limbs were assessed using an X-ray diagnosis system and hematoxylin and eosion staining to determine osteolytic destruction. Bone marrow cells obtained from the femurs and tibias were cultured to estimate osteoblastic mineralization and osteoclastogenesis ex vivo and in vitro. Remarkable bone loss was demonstrated in the tibias of mice inoculated with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells. This bone loss was prevented by p.o. administration of UBS109 (50 and 150 mg/kg body weight) and i.p. treatment of UBS109 (10 and 20 mg/kg) in vivo. Culture of bone marrow cells obtained from the bone tissues of mice with breast cancer cell bone metastasis showed suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and stimulated osteoclastogenesis ex vivo. These changes were not seen after culture of the bone marrow cells obtained from mice treated with UBS109. Moreover, UBS109 was found to stimulate osteoblastic mineralization and suppress lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow

  19. Metastatic Invasive Lobular Breast Cancer Presenting Clinically with Esophageal Dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Cuison, Reuben

    2017-01-01

    Background. Intra-abdominal metastases of invasive lobular breast cancer (ILBC) may be insidious. We report a case of metastatic ILBC that presented with dysphagia within weeks of a negative mammogram and before the development of intra-abdominal symptoms. Case. A 70-year-old female developed esophageal dysphagia. She underwent EGD which showed a short segment of stricture of the distal esophagus without significant mucosal changes. Biopsy was unremarkable and patient underwent lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dilation. Severe progressive dysphagia led to esophageal impaction and three LES dilatations. CT scan showed bilateral pleural effusions, more prominent on right side, and ascites. The pleural effusions were transudative. Repeat EGD with biopsy showed lymphocytic esophagitis, and she was started on swallowed fluticasone. Abdominal ultrasound with Doppler showed that the main portal vein had atypical turbulent flow that was felt to possibly be due to retroperitoneal process. The patient underwent diagnostic laparoscopy which revealed diffuse punctate lesions on the peritoneum. Pathology was consistent with metastatic ILBC. Conclusion. Dysphagia in the setting of peritoneal carcinomatosis from metastatic ILBC is a rare finding. The case highlights the importance of metastatic ILBC as a differential diagnosis for female patients with progressive dysphagia and associated ascites or pleural effusions. PMID:28191357

  20. Interventional Radiologist's perspective on the management of bone metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzato, R L; Buy, X; Grasso, R F; Luppi, G; Faiella, E; Quattrocchi, C C; Pantano, F; Beomonte Zobel, B; Tonini, G; Santini, D; Palussiere, J

    2015-08-01

    Bone metastases can be treated by interventional radiologists with a minimally invasive approach. Such treatments are performed percutaneously under radiological imaging guidance. Different interventional techniques can be applied with curative or palliative intent depending on lesions and patients' status. In the whole, available interventional techniques are distinguished into "ablative" and "consolidative". Ablative techniques achieve bone tumor necrosis by dramatically increasing or decreasing intra-tumoral temperature. This option can be performed in order to alleviate pain or to eradicate the lesion. On the other hand, consolidative techniques aim at obtaining bone defect reinforcement mainly to alleviate pain and prevent pathological fractures. We herein present evidence supporting the application of each different interventional technique, as well as common strategies followed by interventional radiologists while approaching bone metastases.

  1. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  2. Clinical significance of interleukin (IL)-6 in cancer metastasis to bone: potential of anti-IL-6 therapies

    PubMed Central

    Tawara, Ken; Oxford, Julia T; Jorcyk, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    Metastatic events to the bone occur frequently in numerous cancer types such as breast, prostate, lung, and renal carcinomas, melanoma, neuroblastoma, and multiple myeloma. Accumulating evidence suggests that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 is frequently upregulated and is implicated in the ability of cancer cells to metastasize to bone. IL-6 is able to activate various cell signaling cascades that include the STAT (signal transducer and activator of transcription) pathway, the PI3K (phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase) pathway, and the MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. Activation of these pathways may explain the ability of IL-6 to mediate various aspects of normal and pathogenic bone remodeling, inflammation, cell survival, proliferation, and pro-tumorigenic effects. This review article will discuss the role of IL-6: 1) in bone metabolism, 2) in cancer metastasis to bone, 3) in cancer prognosis, and 4) as potential therapies for metastatic bone cancer. PMID:21625400

  3. A Distributed Network for Intensive Longitudinal Monitoring in Metastatic Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Blau, C Anthony; Ramirez, Arturo B; Blau, Sibel; Pritchard, Colin C; Dorschner, Michael O; Schmechel, Stephen C; Martins, Timothy J; Mahen, Elisabeth M; Burton, Kimberly A; Komashko, Vitalina M; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Dougherty, Katy; Thomas, Anju; Miller, Christopher P; Annis, James; Fromm, Jonathan R; Song, Chaozhong; Chang, Elizabeth; Howard, Kellie; Austin, Sharon; Schmidt, Rodney A; Linenberger, Michael L; Becker, Pamela S; Senecal, Francis M; Mecham, Brigham H; Lee, Su-In; Madan, Anup; Ronen, Roy; Dutkowski, Janusz; Heimfeld, Shelly; Wood, Brent L; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P; Haussler, David; Zhu, Jingchun

    2016-01-01

    Accelerating cancer research is expected to require new types of clinical trials. This report describes the Intensive Trial of OMics in Cancer (ITOMIC) and a participant with triple-negative breast cancer metastatic to bone, who had markedly elevated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that were monitored 48 times over 9 months. A total of 32 researchers from 14 institutions were engaged in the patient's evaluation; 20 researchers had no prior involvement in patient care and 18 were recruited specifically for this patient. Whole-exome sequencing of 3 bone marrow samples demonstrated a novel ROS1 variant that was estimated to be present in most or all tumor cells. After an initial response to cisplatin, a hypothesis of crizotinib sensitivity was disproven. Leukapheresis followed by partial CTC enrichment allowed for the development of a differential high-throughput drug screen and demonstrated sensitivity to investigational BH3-mimetic inhibitors of BCL-2 that could not be tested in the patient because requests to the pharmaceutical sponsors were denied. The number and size of CTC clusters correlated with clinical status and eventually death. Focusing the expertise of a distributed network of investigators on an intensively monitored patient with cancer can generate high-resolution views of the natural history of cancer and suggest new opportunities for therapy. Optimization requires access to investigational drugs. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  4. Cabozantinib-S-Malate in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Endometrial Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Mixed Adenocarcinoma; Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  5. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil Lee, Zang Hee

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  6. Expression of PGK1 By Prostate Cancer Cells Induces Bone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jianhua; Wang, Jingcheng; Wang, Zhuo; Pedersen, Elisabeth A.; Lee, Clara H.; Hall, Christopher L.; Hogg, Phillip J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keller, Evan T.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the solid tumors that metastasize to the bone. Once there, the phenotype of the bone lesions becomes depends upon the balance between osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. We previously reported that over-expression of phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) in PCa cell lines enhanced bone formation at the metastatic site in vivo. Here, the role of PGK1 in the bone formation was further explored. We demonstrate that PCa-derived PGK1 induces osteoblastic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells. We also found that PGK1 secreted by PCa inhibits osteoclastogenesis. Finally, the expression levels of the bone specific markers in PCa cell themselves were higher in cells over expressing PGK1 than controls. Together, these data suggest that PGK1 secreted by PCa regulates bone formation at the metastatic site by increasing osteoblastic activity, decreasing osteoclastic function, and expressing an osteoblastic phenotype by PCa themselves. PMID:19825988

  7. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  8. Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    important knowledge gap we have developed an all-human hepatic bioreactor. In this award period we have established that the hepatic bioreactor is...Ecadherin shRNA and expression. SA1 Task 1b (100% completed) and 1c (80% completed): I validated the soft-walled all human hepatic bioreactor through...Breast cancer cell lines and dormancy in the all-human hepatic bioreactor SA1 Task 1b (100% completed) and 1c (90% completed): I optimized seeding

  9. Impact of molecular subtypes on metastatic breast cancer patients: a SEER population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yue; Liu, Yi-Rong; Ji, Peng; Hu, Xin; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the significance and impact of molecular subtyping stratification on metastatic breast cancer patients, we identified 159,344 female breast cancer patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database with known hormone receptor (HoR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status. 4.8% of patients were identified as having stage IV disease, and were more likely to be HER2+/HoR−, HER2+/HoR+, or HER2−/HoR−. Stage IV breast cancer patients with a HER2+/HoR+ status exhibited the highest median overall survival (OS) (44.0 months) and those with a HER2−/HoR− status exhibited the lowest median OS (13.0 months). Patients with a HER2−/HoR+ status had more bone metastasis, whereas patients with a HER2+/HoR− status had an increased incidence of liver metastasis. Brain and lung metastasis were more likely to occur in women with a HER2−/HoR− status. The multivariable analysis revealed a significant interaction between single metastasis and molecular subtype. No matter which molecular subtype, women who did not undergo primary tumour surgery had worse survival than those who experienced primary tumour surgery. Collectively, our findings advanced the understanding that molecular subtype might lead to more tailored and effective therapies in metastatic breast cancer patients. PMID:28345619

  10. Increased expression and aberrant localization of mucin 13 in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Brij K; Maher, Diane M; Ebeling, Mara C; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D; Lynch, Douglas W; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C

    2012-11-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer.

  11. Increased Expression and Aberrant Localization of Mucin 13 in Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Brij K.; Maher, Diane M.; Ebeling, Mara C.; Sundram, Vasudha; Koch, Michael D.; Lynch, Douglas W.; Bohlmeyer, Teresa; Watanabe, Akira; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Puumala, Susan E.; Jaggi, Meena

    2012-01-01

    MUC13 is a newly identified transmembrane mucin. Although MUC13 is known to be overexpressed in ovarian and gastric cancers, limited information is available regarding the expression of MUC13 in metastatic colon cancer. Herein, we investigated the expression profile of MUC13 in colon cancer using a novel anti-MUC13 monoclonal antibody (MAb, clone ppz0020) by immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis. A cohort of colon cancer samples and tissue microarrays containing adjacent normal, non-metastatic colon cancer, metastatic colon cancer, and liver metastasis tissues was used in this study to investigate the expression pattern of MUC13. IHC analysis revealed significantly higher (p<0.001) MUC13 expression in non-metastatic colon cancer samples compared with faint or very low expression in adjacent normal tissues. Interestingly, metastatic colon cancer and liver metastasis tissue samples demonstrated significantly (p<0.05) higher cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression compared with non-metastatic colon cancer and adjacent normal colon samples. Moreover, cytoplasmic and nuclear MUC13 expression correlated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors. Four of six tested colon cancer cell lines also expressed MUC13 at RNA and protein levels. These studies demonstrate a significant increase in MUC13 expression in metastatic colon cancer and suggest a correlation between aberrant MUC13 localization (cytoplasmic and nuclear expression) and metastatic colon cancer. PMID:22914648

  12. CCN3 Impairs Osteoblast and Stimulates Osteoclast Differentiation to Favor Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Véronique; Tiedemann, Kerstin; Mourskaia, Anna; Fong, Jenna E.; Tran-Thanh, Danh; Amir, Eitan; Clemons, Mark; Perbal, Bernard; Komarova, Svetlana V.; Siegel, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a preferred site for breast cancer metastasis, causing pain, fractures, spinal cord compressions, and hypercalcemia, all of which can significantly diminish the patient's quality of life. We identified CCN3 as a novel factor that is highly expressed in bone metastatic breast cancer cells from a xenograft mouse model and in bone metastatic lesions from patients with breast cancer. We demonstrate that CCN3 overexpression enhances the ability of weakly bone metastatic breast cancer cells to colonize and grow in the bone without altering their growth in the mammary fat pad. We further demonstrated that human recombinant CCN3 inhibits osteoblast differentiation from primary bone marrow cultures, leading to a higher receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL)/osteoprotegerin (OPG) ratio. In conjunction with its ability to impair osteoblast differentiation, we uncovered a novel role for CCN3 in promoting osteoclast differentiation from RANKL-primed monocyte precursors. CCN3 exerts its pro-osteoclastogenic effects by promoting calcium oscillations and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 (NFATc1) nuclear translocation. Together, these results demonstrate that CCN3 regulates the differentiation of bone resident cells to create a resorptive environment that promotes the formation of osteolytic breast cancer metastases. PMID:21514448

  13. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  14. [Metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yusuke; Hatakeyama, Shingo; Okamoto, Teppei; Suzuki, Yuichiro; Kudo, Shigemasa; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Kamimura, Noritaka; Sakaki, Hirotaka; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kimura, Hiroto; Ohyama, Chikara

    2012-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma, T2N0M1) was treated with systemicc hemotherapy and radiation therapy at the department of dentistry and oral surgery in our hospital. He had three lung metastases and renal tumors detected by screening computed tomography. The oral floor cancer responded to the treatment to achieve partial response. However, lung and renal metastases did not respond to chemotherapy. Then, the patient was referred to our clinic to rule out the possibility of lung metastasis from renal cell carcinoma. Laparoscopic left nephrectomy was performed and pathological examination on the renal lesions revealed adenoid cystic carcinoma, which had identical histopathological features to the oral floor cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first report of metastatic renal tumor from oral floor cancer (adenoid cystic carcinoma).

  15. Metastatic pancreatic cancer presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach.

    PubMed

    Garg, Shivani; Mulki, Ramzi; Sher, Daniel

    2016-03-08

    Metastatic disease from pancreatic carcinoma involving the stomach is an unusual event, and the pattern of spread in the form of linitis plastica, to our knowledge, has not been reported previously. Local recurrence after curative resection for pancreatic cancer is the most common pattern of disease. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as linitis plastica of the stomach 4 years after curative resection. A 52-year-old man presented with epigastric pain and melaena 4 years after undergoing a Whipple's procedure for a poorly-differentiated pancreatic adenocarcinoma, stage IB; T2N0M0. CT imaging of the abdomen revealed thickening of the gastric wall, and subsequent oesophagogastroduodenoscopy (OGD) revealed diffuse friable erythaematous tissue. The biopsy specimen obtained during the OGD revealed a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, with similar appearance to the prior specimen obtained from the pancreas.

  16. Photo-nano immunotherapy for metastatic cancers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Feifan

    2016-03-01

    We constructed a multifunction nano system SWNT-GC and investigated the synergize photothermal and immunological effects. Here, we improve the SWNT-GC nano system and design a new synergistic nano-particle, both have the photothermal effects and immunological effects. We investigate the therapeutic effects and detect the immune response with metastatic mouse tumor models. We also study the therapeutic mechanism after treatment in vitro and in vivo. With the enhancement of nano-materials on photothermal effects, laser treatment could destroy primary tumor and protect normal tissue with low dose laser irradiation. With the immunological effects of nano-materials, the treatment could trigger specific antitumor immune response, to eliminate the metastasis tumor. It is providing a promising treatment modality for the metastatic cancers.

  17. Tumour heterogeneity promotes collective invasion and cancer metastatic dissemination.

    PubMed

    Hallou, Adrien; Jennings, Joel; Kabla, Alexandre J

    2017-08-01

    Heterogeneity within tumour cell populations is commonly observed in most cancers. However, its impact on metastatic dissemination, one of the primary determinants of the disease prognosis, remains poorly understood. Working with a simplified numerical model of tumour spheroids, we investigated the impact of mechanical heterogeneity on the onset of tumour invasion into surrounding tissues. Our work establishes a positive link between tumour heterogeneity and metastatic dissemination, and recapitulates a number of invasion patterns identified in vivo, such as multicellular finger-like protrusions. Two complementary mechanisms are at play in heterogeneous tumours. A small proportion of stronger cells are able to initiate and lead the escape of cells, while collective effects in the bulk of the tumour provide the coordination required to sustain the invasive process through multicellular streaming. This suggests that the multicellular dynamics observed during metastasis is a generic feature of mechanically heterogeneous cell populations and might rely on a limited and generic set of attributes.

  18. Influence of BMPs on the formation of osteoblastic lesions in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Feeley, Brian T; Gamradt, Seth C; Hsu, Wellington K; Liu, Nancy; Krenek, Lucie; Robbins, Paul; Huard, Johnny; Lieberman, Jay R

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of BMPs on the formation of metastatic prostate cancer lesions to bone. Our results show that BMPs influence the development and progression of osteoblastic lesions and suggest that therapies that inhibit BMP activity may reduce the formation and progression of osteoblastic lesions. Prostate adenocarcinoma is the leading cause of cancer in North American men. The formation of skeletal metastases affects approximately 70% of patients with advanced disease, and a majority of these patients have osteoblastic lesions. Although BMPs have been found to be expressed in multiple oncogenic cell lines, their role in the formation of metastatic osteoblastic lesions remains uncharacterized. We hypothesized that BMPs influence the development of metastatic osteoblastic lesions associated with prostate cancer. Western blot analysis and RT-PCR was used to determine BMP receptor expression on osteoblastic prostate cancer cell lines LAPC-4 and LAPC-9. Migration, invasion, and cellular proliferation assays were used to quantify the effects of BMP-2, -4, and -7 on LAPC-4 cells in vitro. LAPC-9 cells alone or transfected with a retrovirus overexpressing noggin were injected into the tibias of SCID mice, and the animals were followed for 8 weeks. Tumor size was determined by radiographs and direct measurement. Histology was performed at the time of death. We determined that BMP receptor mRNA and protein was expressed on osteoblastic prostate cancer cell lines LAPC-4 and LAPC-9. In vitro studies showed that BMP-2 and -7 stimulated cellular migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells in a dose-dependent fashion, although BMP-4 had no effect. Noggin inhibited cellular migration and invasion of BMP-2- and -7-stimulated LAPC-4 cells. LAPC-9 cells implanted into immunodeficient mouse tibias formed an osteoblastic lesion with sclerotic bone at 8 weeks. Formation of osteoblastic lesions was inhibited by overexpression of noggin by prostate

  19. Effects of massage on pain, mood status, relaxation, and sleep in Taiwanese patients with metastatic bone pain: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Jane, Sui-Whi; Chen, Shu-Ling; Wilkie, Diana J; Lin, Yung-Chang; Foreman, Shuyuann Wang; Beaton, Randal D; Fan, Jun-Yu; Lu, Mei-Ying; Wang, Yi-Ya; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Liao, Mei-Nan

    2011-10-01

    To date, patients with bony metastases were only a small fraction of the samples studied, or they were entirely excluded. Patients with metastatic cancers, such as bone metastases, are more likely to report pain, compared to patients without metastatic cancer (50-74% and 15%, respectively). Their cancer pain results in substantial morbidity and disrupted quality of life in 34-45% of cancer patients. Massage therapy (MT) appears to have positive effects in patients with cancer; however, the benefits of MT, specifically in patients with metastatic bone pain, remains unknown. The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to compare the efficacy of MT to a social attention control condition on pain intensity, mood status, muscle relaxation, and sleep quality in a sample (n=72) of Taiwanese cancer patients with bone metastases. In this investigation, MT was shown to have beneficial within- or between-subjects effects on pain, mood, muscle relaxation, and sleep quality. Results from repeated-measures analysis of covariance demonstrated that massage resulted in a linear trend of improvements in mood and relaxation over time. More importantly, the reduction in pain with massage was both statistically and clinically significant, and the massage-related effects on relaxation were sustained for at least 16-18 hours postintervention. Furthermore, massage-related effects on sleep were associated with within-subjects effects. Future studies are suggested with increased sample sizes, a longer interventional period duration, and an objective and sensitive measure of sleep. Overall, results from this study support employing MT as an adjuvant to other therapies in improving bone pain management.

  20. Potential of Targeting PDE1C/2A for Suppressing Metastatic Ovarian Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    second year of the funding. With the aid of well-established metastatic ovarian cancer implantation model, we showed that cocktail of forskolin and...colonization. Images are the views of various areas in peritoneal cavity. Arrows point to metastatic implants . F. Metastatic implants were collected...treatment for 3 weeks. Mice were sacrificed and metastatic implants were collected/weighed. Data are means ± SE. n = 10. *, P < 0.001 vs vehicle

  1. Current therapeutic strategies for invasive and metastatic bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vishnu, Prakash; Mathew, Jacob; Tan, Winston W

    2011-01-01

    Background Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe, the United States, and Northern African countries. Muscle-invasive bladder cancer is an aggressive epithelial tumor, with a high rate of early systemic dissemination. Superficial, noninvasive bladder cancer can most often be cured; a good proportion of invasive cases can also be cured by a combined modality approach of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Recurrences are common and mostly manifest as metastatic disease. Those with distant metastatic disease can sometime achieve partial or complete remission with combination chemotherapy. Recent developments Better understanding of the biology of the disease has led to the incorporation of molecular and genetic features along with factors such as tumor grade, lympho-vascular invasion, and aberrant histology, thereby allowing identification of ‘favorable’ and ‘unfavorable’ cancers which helps a more accurate informed and objective selection of patients who would benefit from neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Gene expression profiling has been used to find molecular signature patterns that can potentially be predictive of drug sensitivity and metastasis. Understanding the molecular pathways of invasive bladder cancer has led to clinical investigation of several targeted therapeutics such as anti-angiogenics, mTOR inhibitors, and anti-EGFR agents. Conclusion With improvements in the understanding of the biology of bladder cancer, clinical trials studying novel and targeted agents alone or in combination with chemotherapy have increased the armamentarium for the treatment of bladder cancer. Although the novel biomarkers and gene expression profiles have been shown to provide important predictive and prognostic information and are anticipated to be incorporated in clinical decision-making, their exact utility and relevance calls for a larger prospective validation. PMID:21792316

  2. Mutational analysis and clinical correlation of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Russo, Andrea L; Borger, Darrell R; Szymonifka, Jackie; Ryan, David P; Wo, Jennifer Y; Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S; Kwak, Eunice L; Allen, Jill N; Wadlow, Raymond C; Zhu, Andrew X; Murphy, Janet E; Faris, Jason E; Dias-Santagata, Dora; Haigis, Kevin M; Ellisen, Leif W; Iafrate, Anthony J; Hong, Theodore S

    2014-05-15

    Early identification of mutations may guide patients with metastatic colorectal cancer toward targeted therapies that may be life prolonging. The authors assessed tumor genotype correlations with clinical characteristics to determine whether mutational profiling can account for clinical similarities, differences, and outcomes. Under Institutional Review Board approval, 222 patients with metastatic colon adenocarcinoma (n = 158) and rectal adenocarcinoma (n = 64) who underwent clinical tumor genotyping were reviewed. Multiplexed tumor genotyping screened for >150 mutations across 15 commonly mutated cancer genes. The chi-square test was used to assess genotype frequency by tumor site and additional clinical characteristics. Cox multivariate analysis was used to assess the impact of genotype on overall survival. Broad-based tumor genotyping revealed clinical and anatomic differences that could be linked to gene mutations. NRAS mutations were associated with rectal cancer versus colon cancer (12.5% vs 0.6%; P < .001) and with age ≥56 years (7% vs 0.9%; P = .02). Conversely, v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) mutations were associated with colon cancer (13% vs 3%; P = .024) and older age (15.8% vs 4.6%; P = .006). TP53 mutations were associated with rectal cancer (30% vs 18%; P = .048), younger age (14% vs 28.7%; P = .007), and men (26.4% vs 14%; P = .03). Lung metastases were associated with PIK3CA mutations (23% vs 8.7%; P = .004). Only mutations in BRAF were independently associated with decreased overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-5.27; P = .029). The current study suggests that underlying molecular profiles can differ between colon and rectal cancers. Further investigation is warranted to assess whether the differences identified are important in determining the optimal treatment course for these patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  3. Cancer to bone: a fatal attraction

    PubMed Central

    Weilbaecher, Katherine N.; Guise, Theresa A.; McCauley, Laurie K.

    2013-01-01

    When cancer metastasizes to bone, considerable pain and deregulated bone remodelling occurs, greatly diminishing the possibility of cure. Metastasizing tumour cells mobilize and sculpt the bone microenvironment to enhance tumour growth and to promote bone invasion. Understanding the crucial components of the bone microenvironment that influence tumour localization, along with the tumour-derived factors that modulate cellular and protein matrix components of bone to favour tumour expansion and invasion, is central to the pathophysiology of bone metastases. Basic findings of tumour–bone interactions have uncovered numerous therapeutic opportunities that focus on the bone microenvironment to prevent and treat bone metastases. PMID:21593787

  4. Generation of Organ-conditioned Media and Applications for Studying Organ-specific Influences on Breast Cancer Metastatic Behavior.

    PubMed

    Piaseczny, Matthew M; Pio, Graciella M; Chu, Jenny E; Xia, Ying; Nguyen, Kim; Goodale, David; Allan, Alison

    2016-06-13

    Breast cancer preferentially metastasizes to the lymph node, bone, lung, brain and liver in breast cancer patients. Previous research efforts have focused on identifying factors inherent to breast cancer cells that are responsible for this observed metastatic pattern (termed organ tropism), however much less is known about factors present within specific organs that contribute to this process. This is in part because of a lack of in vitro model systems that accurately recapitulate the organ microenvironment. To address this, an ex vivo model system has been established that allows for the study of soluble factors present within different organ microenvironments. This model consists of generating conditioned media from organs (lymph node, bone, lung, and brain) isolated from normal athymic nude mice. The model system has been validated by demonstrating that different breast cancer cell lines display cell-line specific and organ-specific malignant behavior in response to organ-conditioned media that corresponds to their in vivo metastatic potential. This model system can be used to identify and evaluate specific organ-derived soluble factors that may play a role in the metastatic behavior of breast and other types of cancer cells, including influences on growth, migration, stem-like behavior, and gene expression, as well as the identification of potential new therapeutic targets for cancer. This is the first ex vivo model system that can be used to study organ-specific metastatic behavior in detail and evaluate the role of specific organ-derived soluble factors in driving the process of cancer metastasis.

  5. Gamma Knife Surgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Shigeo; Shuto, Takashi; Sato, Mitsuru

    2016-05-01

    The incidences of metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer have increased. The results of Gamma Knife surgery (GKS) for the treatment of patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and uterine cervical cancers) were retrospectively analyzed to identify the efficacy and prognostic factors for local tumor control and survival. The medical records were retrospectively reviewed of 70 patients with 306 tumors who underwent GKS for brain metastases from gynecologic cancer between January 1995 and December 2013 in our institution. The primary cancers were ovarian in 33 patients with 147 tumors and uterine in 37 patients with 159 tumors. Median tumor volume was 0.3 cm(3). Median marginal prescription dose was 20 Gy. The local tumor control rates were 96.4% at 6 months and 89.9% at 1 year. There was no statistically significant difference between ovarian and uterine cancers. Higher prescription dose and smaller tumor volume were significantly correlated with local tumor control. Median overall survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and solitary brain metastasis were significantly correlated with satisfactory overall survival. Median activities of daily living (ADL) preservation survival time was 8 months. Primary ovarian cancer, controlled extracranial metastases, and higher Karnofsky Performance Status score were significantly correlated with better ADL preservation. GKS is effective for control of tumor progression in patients with brain metastases from gynecologic cancer, and may provide neurologic benefits and preservation of the quality of life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. AFM-based analysis of human metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Tondre, Julianne; Wong, Roger; Rao, Jian Yu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    Recently biomechanics of cancer cells, in particular stiffness or elasticity, has been identified as an important factor relating to cancer cell function, adherence, motility, transformation and invasion. We report on the nanomechanical responses of metastatic cancer cells and benign mesothelial cells taken from human body cavity fluids using atomic force microscopy. Following our initial study (Cross et al 2007 Nat. Nanotechnol. 2 780-3), we report on the biophysical properties of patient-derived effusion cells and address the influence of cell morphology on measured cell stiffness. Using a cytocentrifugation method, which yields morphologically indistinguishable cells that can be prepared in 1 min and avoids any possible artifacts due to 12 h ex vivo culture, we find that metastatic tumor cells are more than 80% softer than benign cells with a distribution over six times narrower than that of normal cells. Consistent with our previous study, which yielded distinguishable cell populations based on ex vivo growth and morphological characteristics, our results show it is unlikely that morphology alone is sufficient to explain the difference in elastic moduli for these two cell types. Moreover, analysis of non-specific cell adhesion inherent to tumor and normal cells collected from patients show surface adhesion of tumor cells is ~33% less adhesive compared to that of normal cells. Our findings indicate that biomechanical-based functional analysis may provide an additional platform for cytological evaluation and diagnosis of cancer in the future.

  7. Oral chemotherapy in elderly women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina-Garrido, M J; Mora-Rufete, A; Guillen-Ponce, C

    2014-06-01

    Life expectancy has significantly increased over the past 30 years, with a greater prevalence of diverse disease states, especially cancer. As older persons are a very heterogeneous group with an increased prevalence of comorbidities and a relative inability to tolerate the adverse effects of chemotherapy, the treatment of cancer in the elderly is particularly demanding. The principles of its management are similar to those in younger patients but with special considerations linked to comorbidities and clinical status. The objective of chemotherapeutic treatment in metastatic breast cancer has historically been primarily palliative. The introduction of newer approaches with improved or at least equivalent efficacy and reduced toxicity is highly desirable. Such approaches may include the use of less toxic drugs, more convenient routes of administration (e.g., oral) and home-based (outpatient) rather than hospital-based therapies. The available oral cytostatic drugs include vinorelbine and capecitabine. In this review, we analyze oral cytostatic drugs in the elderly patient diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.

  8. Acidic microenvironment and bone pain in cancer-colonized bone

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Toshiyuki; Hiasa, Masahiro; Nagata, Yuki; Okui, Tatsuo; White, Fletcher A

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancers and hematologic cancers frequently colonize bone and induce skeletal-related complications. Bone pain is one of the most common complications associated with cancer colonization in bone and a major cause of increased morbidity and diminished quality of life, leading to poor survival in cancer patients. Although the mechanisms responsible for cancer-associated bone pain (CABP) are poorly understood, it is likely that complex interactions among cancer cells, bone cells and peripheral nerve cells contribute to the pathophysiology of CABP. Clinical observations that specific inhibitors of osteoclasts reduce CABP indicate a critical role of osteoclasts. Osteoclasts are proton-secreting cells and acidify extracellular bone microenvironment. Cancer cell-colonized bone also releases proton/lactate to avoid intracellular acidification resulting from increased aerobic glycolysis known as the Warburg effect. Thus, extracellular microenvironment of cancer-colonized bone is acidic. Acidosis is algogenic for nociceptive sensory neurons. The bone is densely innervated by the sensory neurons that express acid-sensing nociceptors. Collectively, CABP is evoked by the activation of these nociceptors on the sensory neurons innervating bone by the acidic extracellular microenvironment created by bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-colonizing cancer cells. As current treatments do not satisfactorily control CABP and can elicit serious side effects, new therapeutic interventions are needed to manage CABP. Understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the acidic extracellular microenvironment is created in cancer-colonized bone and by which the expression and function of the acid-sensing nociceptors on the sensory neurons are regulated would facilitate to develop novel therapeutic approaches for the management of CABP. PMID:25987988

  9. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Regional or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-20

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  10. VEGF Trap in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Cancer of the Urothelium

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-10

    Adenocarcinoma of the Bladder; Distal Urethral Cancer; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Proximal Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IV Bladder Cancer; Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder; Urethral Cancer Associated With Invasive Bladder Cancer

  11. Comparing RECIST with EORTC criteria in metastatic bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    To compare RECIST and EORTC criteria in an evaluation of response to therapy in metastatic bladder cancer and to assess their influence on decisions to administer additional therapy. A total of 42 untreated patients (38 male, 4 female) with metastatic bladder cancer were included in the study, which took place between July 2007 and April 2013. The mean age was 66.1 ± 9.93 years (range 41-84 years). A total of 144 metastatic foci were evaluated using multislice CT and (18)FDG-PET/CT before and after first-line chemotherapy. The locations, sizes, numbers and SUV(max) of the metastatic foci before and after chemotherapy were recorded, and the response to therapy was evaluated separately using RECIST and EORTC criteria, after which a statistical comparison was made. According to the RECIST and EORTC criteria, the rate of complete remission (CR) was 9.5 and 16.6 %, the rate of partial remission (PR) was 28.6 and 40.5 %, the rate of stable disease (SD) was 23.8 and 14.3 %, and the rate of progressive disease (PD) was 31.0 and 28.6 %, respectively. The overall response rate (ORR) was 38.1 versus 57.1 %, respectively, and there were no differences between the two criteria in terms of their detection of progressive disease. The rate of SD was higher with RECIST criteria; however, the difference between the two criteria was not significant in terms of PR and CR. A group of patients that had been determined as having a SD according to RECIST criteria were grouped as PR and/or CR according to EORTC criteria. Additional chemotherapy protocols can be used in second-line chemotherapy and/or cisplatin-resistant patients, according to RECIST criteria. In evaluating the response to first-line chemotherapy for metastatic bladder cancer, EORTC criteria, using (18)FDG-PET/CT scans, can be considered as a more applicable and accurate diagnostic tool. The anatomical findings obtained through imaging methods and from functional/metabolic data obtained by PET/CT can be useful in the

  12. Association of CA 15-3 and CEA with clinicopathological parameters in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    GENG, BIAO; LIANG, MAN-MAN; YE, XIAO-BING; ZHAO, WEN-YING

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association of serum cancer antigen 15-3 (CA 15-3) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels with clinicopathological parameters in patients diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We retrospectively evaluated the medical records of 284 patients diagnosed with MBC between January, 2007 and December, 2012 who fulfilled the specified criteria and the association between the levels of the two tumor marker and clinicopathological parameters was analyzed. Of the 284 patients, elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels at initial diagnosis of recurrence were identified in 163 (57.4%) and 97 (34.2%) patients, respectively. Elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels were significantly associated with breast cancer molecular subtypes (P<0.001 and P=0.032, respectively). Cases with luminal subtypes exhibited a higher percentage of elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels compared to non-luminal subtypes. Elevated CA 15-3 level was correlated with bone metastasis (P=0.017). However, elevation of CEA was observed regardless of the site of metastasis. Elevation of CA 15-3 was significantly more common in MBC with multiple metastatic sites compared to MBC with a single metastasis (P=0.001). However, the incidence of elevated CEA levels did not differ between patients with a single and those with multiple metastatic sites. In conclusion, elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels at initial diagnosis of recurrence were found to be associated with breast cancer molecular subtypes, whereas an elevated CA 15-3 level was significantly correlated with bone metastasis and an elevated CEA level was observed regardless of metastatic site. The proportion of MBC cases with elevated CA 15-3 levels differed according to the number of metastatic sites. PMID:25469301

  13. Melanoma exosomes educate bone marrow progenitor cells toward a pro-metastatic phenotype through MET

    PubMed Central

    Peinado, Héctor; Alečković, Maša; Lavotshkin, Simon; Matei, Irina; Costa-Silva, Bruno; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Hergueta-Redondo, Marta; Williams, Caitlin; García-Santos, Guillermo; Nitadori-Hoshino, Ayuko; Hoffman, Caitlin; Badal, Karen; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Callahan, Margaret K.; Yuan, Jianda; Martins, Vilma R.; Skog, Johan; Kaplan, Rosandra N.; Brady, Mary S.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Chapman, Paul B.; Kang, Yibin; Bromberg, Jacqueline; Lyden, David

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging mediators of tumorigenesis with tissue-specific addresses and messages. We explored the function of melanoma-derived exosomes in the formation of primary tumor and metastases in mouse and human subjects. Exosomes from highly metastatic melanoma increased the metastatic behavior of primary tumors by permanently “educating” bone marrow (BM) progenitors via the MET receptor. Melanoma-derived exosomes also induced vascular leakiness at pre-metastatic sites, and reprogrammed BM progenitors towards a c-Kit+Tie2+Met+ pro-vasculogenic phenotype. Reducing Met expression in exosomes diminished the pro-metastatic behavior of BM cells. Importantly, MET expression was elevated in circulating CD45−C-KITlow/+TIE2+ BM progenitors from metastatic melanoma subjects. RAB1a, RAB5b, RAB7, and RAB27a were highly expressed in melanoma cells and Rab27a RNA interference decreased exosome production, preventing BM education, tumor growth and metastasis. Finally, we identified an exosome-specific “melanoma signature” with prognostic and therapeutic potential, comprised of TYRP2, VLA-4, HSP70, an HSP90 isoform and the MET oncoprotein. PMID:22635005

  14. Survival impact of integrative cancer care in advanced metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Block, Keith I; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Tripathy, Debu; Freels, Sally; Mead, Mark N; Block, Penny B; Steinmann, William C; Newman, Robert A; Shoham, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Integrative cancer treatment is of substantial interest to many cancer patients. Research is needed to evaluate the effects of integrative treatment on patient outcomes. We report survival data for a consecutive case series of advanced metastatic breast cancer patients who received a comprehensive clinical program combining conventional treatments with nutrition and supplementation, fitness and mind-spirit instruction at the Block Center for Integrative Cancer Treatment. Treatment outcomes using integrative care for this disease have not previously been documented; survival data will thus contribute to decisions concerning future research directions and design. Ninety consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer diagnosed during 1984-1997 who received chemotherapy at the integrative cancer center were included. Prognostic factors, treatments and survival from onset of metastases were determined from analysis of scans, labs, pathology and medical records. The log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards analyses were used, and a Kaplan-Meier curve was calculated. All patients had metastatic disease at baseline, 96% were relapsed and 52% had received prior chemotherapy for metastatic disease. Median age at onset of metastasis was 46 years. Median survival was 38 months (95% CI 27,48). Published literature on populations with somewhat more favorable prognostic factors treated in conventional clinics showed median survivals of 20 to 23 months. Through the 1990s, median survival reported in metastatic breast cancer trials or observations generally ranged from 12 to 24 months. Five-year survival was 27% for Center versus 17% for comparison patients. Despite a higher proportion of younger and relapsed patients, survival of metastatic breast cancer patients at the Center was approximately double that of comparison populations and possibly even higher compared to trials published during this period. Explanations for the advantage relative to conventional treatment alone

  15. Metastatic gastric cancer to the female genital tract

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kazushi; Wakatsuki, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Metastases to the female genital tract from gastric cancer are rare, but they significantly worsen the prognosis of such patients. The potential routes for metastasis to the female genital tract from gastric cancer include hematogenous spread, lymphatic spread and surface implantation. The rate of lymphatic metastasis to the ovary from gastric cancer has been reported to be higher compared with that from colorectal cancer. Uterine or Fallopian tube metastases are usually secondary to ovarian metastases, which are typically identified prior to the detection of gastric cancer in half of all synchronous cases, with complaints of abdominal distention, pain, palpable mass, or abnormal uterine bleeding. The prognosis of patients with female genital tract metastases from gastric cancer is extremely poor, and is worse compared with that of other primary sites, such as the breast and colorectum. In the past, surgical intervention in such patients consisted mainly of palliative resection to relieve the symptoms associated with a sizeable pelvic mass. However, recent retrospective studies based on a relatively small number of patients have reported that surgical tumor debulking plus chemotherapy may improve the prognosis of patients with metastatic ovarian cancer originating from gastric cancer. PMID:27882232

  16. Effect of Physical Forces on the Metastatic Bone Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    33(9): p. 1270-80. 2. Nathan, S.S., et al., Elevated physiologic tumor pressure promotes proliferation and chemosensitivity in human osteosarcoma . Clin Cancer Res, 2005. 11(6): p. 2389-97. APPENDICES None

  17. Functionalization of nanotextured substrates for enhanced identification of metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Nuzhat; Raziul Hasan, Mohammad; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M

    2017-09-20

    Metastasis is the major cause of low survival rates among cancer patients. Once cancer cells metastasize, it is extremely difficult to contain the disease. We report on a nanotextured platform for enhanced detection of metastatic cells. We captured metastatic (MDA-MDB-231) and non-metastatic (MCF-7) breast cancer cells on anti-EGFR aptamer modified plane and nanotextured substrates. Metastatic cells were seen to change their morphology at higher rates when captured on nanotextured substrates than on plane substrates. Analysis showed statistically different morphological behaviors of metastatic cells that were very pronounced on the nanotextured substrates. Several distance matrices were calculated to quantify the dissimilarity of cell shape change. Nanotexturing increased the dissimilarity of the metastatic cells and as a result the contrast between metastatic and non-metastatic cells increased. Jaccard distance measurements found that the shape change ratio of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells was enhanced from 1:1.01 to 1:1.81, going from plane to nanotextured substrates. The shape change ratio of the non-metastatic to metastatic cells improved from 1:1.48 to 1:2.19 for the Hausdorff distance and from 1:1.87 to 1:4.69 for the Mahalanobis distance after introducing nanotexture. Distance matrix analysis showed that nanotexture increased the shape change ratios of non-metastatic and metastatic cells. Hence, the detectability of metastatic cells increased. These calculated matrices provided clear and explicit measures to discriminate single cells for their metastatic state on functional nanotextured substrates.

  18. Functionalization of nanotextured substrates for enhanced identification of metastatic breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, Nuzhat; Raziul Hasan, Mohammad; Kim, Young-tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2017-09-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of low survival rates among cancer patients. Once cancer cells metastasize, it is extremely difficult to contain the disease. We report on a nanotextured platform for enhanced detection of metastatic cells. We captured metastatic (MDA-MDB-231) and non-metastatic (MCF-7) breast cancer cells on anti-EGFR aptamer modified plane and nanotextured substrates. Metastatic cells were seen to change their morphology at higher rates when captured on nanotextured substrates than on plane substrates. Analysis showed statistically different morphological behaviors of metastatic cells that were very pronounced on the nanotextured substrates. Several distance matrices were calculated to quantify the dissimilarity of cell shape change. Nanotexturing increased the dissimilarity of the metastatic cells and as a result the contrast between metastatic and non-metastatic cells increased. Jaccard distance measurements found that the shape change ratio of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells was enhanced from 1:1.01 to 1:1.81, going from plane to nanotextured substrates. The shape change ratio of the non-metastatic to metastatic cells improved from 1:1.48 to 1:2.19 for the Hausdorff distance and from 1:1.87 to 1:4.69 for the Mahalanobis distance after introducing nanotexture. Distance matrix analysis showed that nanotexture increased the shape change ratios of non-metastatic and metastatic cells. Hence, the detectability of metastatic cells increased. These calculated matrices provided clear and explicit measures to discriminate single cells for their metastatic state on functional nanotextured substrates.

  19. Clinical Assessment of Percutaneous Radiofrequency Ablation for Painful Metastatic Bone Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Hiroyuki Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Shomura, Yuzo; Sawada, Satoshi

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To investigate the pain-alleviating effects of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on metastatic bone tumors in relation to tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis rate following RFA. Methods. Subjects comprised 24 patients with 28 painful metastatic bone tumors. A 17G internally cooled electrode was inserted into the tumor for CT guidance and ablation was performed. Bone cement was injected following RFA for 4 tumors involving a weight-bearing bone, while 5 tumors were treated using combined RFA and external irradiation. Percent necrosis rate of the tumor was measured using contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 week after RFA. Results. Improvement in the visual analog scale (VAS) score was 4.6 {+-} 2.2 for large tumors (>5 cm, n = 12), 3.7 {+-} 1.8 for medium-sized tumors (3.1-5.0 cm, n = 11), and 3.5 {+-} 1.7 for small tumors ({<=}3 cm, n = 4), with no significant differences noted among tumor sizes. Improvement in the VAS score was 3.5 {+-} 1.3 for the 4 tumors in the RFA + bone cement group, 3.2 {+-} 1.9 for the 5 tumors in the RFA + radiation therapy group, and 4.8 {+-} 2.2 for the 18 tumors in the RFA group. No significant differences were identified between groups. The improvement in the VAS score was 3.8 {+-} 2.3, 4.0 {+-} 1.9, and 4.7 {+-} 2.6 in patients with tumor necrosis rates of 0-49%, 50-74%, and 75-100%, respectively. No significant association was observed among these three groups. Conclusion. Percutaneous RFA therapy was effective in relieving pain due to metastatic bone tumors. No relationships appear to exist between initial response and tumor size, combined therapy, and percent tumor necrosis.

  20. Establishment of a human lung cancer cell line with high metastatic potential to multiple organs: gene expression associated with metastatic potential in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tetsuhiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kawashima, Osamu; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Kakegawa, Seiichi; Sugano, Masayuki; Ibe, Takashi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Kaira, Kyoichi; Sunaga, Noriaki; Ohtaki, Youichi; Atsumi, Jun; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2012-11-01

    Convenient and reliable multiple organ metastasis model systems might contribute to understanding the mechanism(s) of metastasis of lung cancer, which may lead to overcoming metastasis and improvement in the treatment outcome of lung cancer. We isolated a highly metastatic subline, PC14HM, from the human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, PC14, using an in vivo selection method. The expression of 34,580 genes was compared between PC14HM and parental PC14 by cDNA microarray analysis. Among the differentially expressed genes, expression of four genes in human lung cancer tissues and adjacent normal lung tissues were compared using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Although BALB/c nude mice inoculated with parental PC14 cells had few metastases, almost all mice inoculated with PC14HM cells developed metastases in multiple organs, including the lung, bone and adrenal gland, the same progression seen in human lung cancer. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 981 genes were differentially (more than 3-fold) expressed between the two cell lines. Functional classification revealed that many of those genes were associated with cell growth, cell communication, development and transcription. Expression of three upregulated genes (HRB-2, HS3ST3A1 and RAB7) was higher in human cancer tissue compared to normal lung tissue, while expression of EDG1, which was downregulated, was lower in the cancer tissue compared to the normal lung. These results suggest that the newly established PC14HM cell line may provide a mouse model of widespread metastasis of lung cancer. This model system may provide insights into the key genetic determinants of widespread metastasis of lung cancer.

  1. Integrating bone targeting radiopharmaceuticals into the management of patients with castrate-resistant prostate cancer with symptomatic bone metastases.

    PubMed

    Blacksburg, Seth R; Witten, Matthew R; Haas, Jonathan A

    2015-03-01

    Metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) refers to the disease state in which metastatic prostate cancer fails to respond to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This can be manifest as a rising PSA, increase in radiographically measurable disease, or progression of clinical disease. Roughly 90 % of men with metastatic prostate cancer have bone metastases, which is a predictor of both morbidity and mortality. Historically, treatment has been palliative, consisting of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) and pharmacological analgesics for pain control and osteoclast inhibitors, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab to mitigate skeletal-related events. Older radiopharmaceuticals, such as Strontium-89 and Samarium-153, are Beta-emitting agents that were found to provide palliation but were without survival benefit and carried high risks of myelosuppression. Radium-223 is an Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical that has demonstrated a significant overall survival benefit in men with metastatic CRPC, delay to symptomatic skeletal events (SSEs), and improvement in pain control, with a favorable toxicity profile compared with placebo. Unlike EBRT, Radium-223 has systemic uptake, with the potential to address several bone metastases concurrently and provides overall survival benefit. It is a simple administration with minimal complexity and shielding requirements in experienced hands. EBRT appears to provide a more rapid and dramatic palliative benefit to any given lesion. Because Radium-223 has limited myelosuppression, the two can be thoughtfully integrated, along with multiple agents, for the treatment of men with CRPC with symptomatic bone metastases. Given its excellent safety profile, there is interest and anecdotal safety combining Radium-223 with therapies, such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. Formal recommendations regarding combination therapies will require clinical trials. The use of Alpha-emitting radiopharmaceuticals in castrate-sensitive disease

  2. Genomic Sequencing in Determining Treatment in Patients With Metastatic Cancer or Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Metastatic Neoplasm; Recurrent Neoplasm; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Unresectable Malignant Neoplasm

  3. Sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Abdulwahid M.; Fatih, Salah M.; Kakamad, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystemic, idiopathic disease. It has a highly variable clinical course. It has been reported to present in association with malignancy. Coexistence of sarcoidosis and thyroid cancer is rarely reported in the literature. Presentatioin of the case We present a case with neck swelling for 3 months, and symmetrical painless thyroid enlargement without fixation to deep tissues of the neck. Multiple nodules on the both thyroid lobes, hard irregular, grade two goiter with lymphadenopathy all over anterior neck compartments. Fine needle aspiration cytology was done under ultrasound guide from right thyroid nodule and showed papillary thyroid carcinoma. Excisional biopsy of the neck lymphnode showed picture typical for sarcoidosis. Discussion Most researchers believe that patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis are predisposed to develop malignancies, less than a dozen of cases are reported in the literature to be associated with PTC with a very wide range of presentations and clincal coarses. An interesting finding of our case is that in contrast to what is reported, both diseases were not known by the physician until the time of presentation. Conclusion Cervical lymphadenopathy in association with goiter could be metastasis, sarcoidosis or mixed, therefore should be seperately biopsied. PMID:26432997

  4. Radioembolization for primary and metastatic liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Memon, Khairuddin; Lewandowski, Robert J; Kulik, Laura; Riaz, Ahsun; Mulcahy, Mary F; Salem, Riad

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma is increasing. Most patients present beyond potentially curative options and are usually affected by underlying cirrhosis. In this scenario, trans-arterial therapies, such as radioembolization, are rapidly gaining acceptance as a potential therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and liver metastases. Radioembolization is a catheter-based liver-directed therapy that involves injection of micron-sized embolic particles loaded with a radioisotope by use of percutaneous transarterial techniques. Cancer cells are preferentially supplied by arterial blood and normal hepatocytes by portal venous blood; radioembolization therefore specifically targets tumor cells with a high dose of lethal radiation and spares healthy hepatocytes. The antitumor effect mostly comes from radiation rather than embolization. The most commonly used radioisotope is Yttrium-90. The commercially available devices are TheraSphere® (glass-based) and SIR-Sphere® (resin-based). The procedure is performed on outpatient basis. The incidence of complications is generally less than other locoregional therapies and may include nausea, fatigue, abdominal pain, hepatic dysfunction, biliary injury, fibrosis, radiation pneumonitis, gastrointestinal ulcers and vascular injury. However, these can be avoided by meticulous pretreatment assessment, careful patient selection and adequate dosimetry. This article focuses on both the technical and clinical aspects of radioembolization with emphasis on patient selection, uses and complications. PMID:21939859

  5. Prevention and treatment of bone fragility in cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Ottanelli, Silva

    2015-01-01

    vitamin D. Bisphosphonates and denosumab are used for the management of bone remodeling and bone loss induced by cancer treatments. Bisphosphonates also have anti-tumor effects per se, which are expressed in potentially prevent the development of bone metastases. In men with metastatic prostate cancer and which is induced androgen deprivation, it is usefully used denosumab 120 mg monthly or zoledronic acid 4 mg monthly. PMID:26604936

  6. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, J; Zarate, R; Bandres, E; Viudez, A; Chopitea, A; García-Foncillas, J; Gil-Bazo, I

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:17990352

  7. Evolving treatment paradigms for locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Dorff, Tanya B; Quek, Marcus L; Daneshmand, Siamak; Pinski, Jacek

    2006-11-01

    While men with early stage prostate cancer typically enjoy long-term survival after definitive management, for those who present with locally advanced or metastatic disease, survival is compromised. Multimodality therapy can prolong survival in these patients, with state-of-the-art options including intensity-modulated radiation or brachytherapy in conjunction with androgen ablation, adjuvant androgen ablation and/or chemotherapy with radical retropubic prostatectomy. In addition, novel biological therapies are being explored to target the unique molecular changes in prostate cancer cells and their interactions with the microenvironment. With these advances the outlook will undoubtedly improve, even for patients presenting with advanced disease. Careful application of these emerging therapies to a select group of prostate cancer patients most likely to obtain benefit from them is the challenge for urologists, medical oncologists and radiation oncologists for the future.

  8. Metastatic Cancer to the Larynx: A Case Report and Update.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Mehrad, Mitra; Bradley, Joseph P

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a case of colorectal carcinoma metastatic to the larynx and provide a review of the current literature. A case report with chart review was performed. A review of the current literature was performed by systematically searching PubMed, OVID, CINAHL Plus, and EMBASE. In 1988, a comprehensive literature review identified melanoma as the most common neoplasm to exhibit laryngeal involvement. Since that study, 41 subsequent cases have been reported, and among these, colorectal adenocarcinoma was the most frequent distant primary (24%). In 25 (58%) cases, curative surgery was attempted, but only 4 patients remained disease-free at last follow up. We report the history of a 52-year-old man who presented with rectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to his larynx 4 years after definitive treatment of the primary site. In patients with a laryngeal mass and a history of colorectal cancer, or those at high risk of having an occult colorectal primary, metastatic spread to the larynx must always be considered. Although secondary laryngeal metastasis portends a poor prognosis, for the select patient, surgical intervention can provide long-term disease control. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Genomic analysis of a spontaneous model of breast cancer metastasis to bone reveals a role for the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Eckhardt, Bedrich L; Parker, Belinda S; van Laar, Ryan K; Restall, Christina M; Natoli, Anthony L; Tavaria, Michael D; Stanley, Kym L; Sloan, Erica K; Moseley, Jane M; Anderson, Robin L

    2005-01-01

    A clinically relevant model of spontaneous breast cancer metastasis to multiple sites, including bone, was characterized and used to identify genes involved in metastatic progression. The metastatic potential of several genetically related tumor lines was assayed using a novel real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay of tumor burden. Based on this assay, the tumor lines were categorized as nonmetastatic (67NR), weakly metastatic to lymph node (168FARN) or lung (66cl4), or highly metastatic to lymph node, lung, and bone (4T1.2 and 4T1.13). In vitro assays that mimic stages of metastasis showed that highly metastatic tumors lines were more adhesive, invasive, and migratory than the less metastatic lines. To identify metastasis-related genes in this model, each metastatic tumor was array profiled against the nonmetastatic 67NR using 15,000 mouse cDNA arrays. A significant proportion of genes relating to the extracellular matrix had elevated expression in highly metastatic tumors. The role of one of these genes, POEM, was further investigated in the model. In situ hybridization showed that POEM expression was specific to the tumor epithelium of highly metastatic tumors. Decreased POEM expression in 4T1.2 tumors significantly inhibited spontaneous metastasis to the lung, bone, and kidney. Taken together, our data support a role for the extracellular matrix in metastatic progression and describe, for the first time, a role for POEM in this process.

  10. Metastatic Male Breast Cancer: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Foerster, Robert; Schroeder, Lars; Foerster, Frank; Wulff, Volker; Schubotz, Birgit; Baaske, Dieter; Rudlowski, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Metastasized male breast cancer (MMBC) is a rare disease. Given its low incidence, data regarding tumor biology, current treatment options, and survival rates are scarce. Patients and Methods A chart review was performed of MMBC patients consecutively registered in regional cancer registries in Germany between 1995 and 2011. Tumor characteristics, treatment, and survival rates were documented and statistically evaluated. Results 41 men with MMBC represented 25.6% of a total of 160 patients with MBC. 16 (39%) patients showed primary metastases, and 25 (61%) had recurrent metastases. Median survival from occurrence of metastasis was 32 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 68 months. 68.3% (n = 28) of the cohort received systemic therapy favoring endocrine therapy (n = 25, 61.9%). Prolonged metastatic OS (p = 0.02) was observed in patients having had a systemic treatment. Metastatic patients having received endocrine treatment showed significantly prolonged survival rates. Furthermore, patients receiving palliative chemotherapy had a significant survival benefit compared to those in whom chemotherapy was omitted. Conclusion Our results suggest that systemic treatment in the form of both palliative chemotherapy and endocrine therapy improves outcome of R. Foerster and L. Schroeder contributed equally to this article and are listed in alphabetical order. MMBC. Therefore, it seems reasonable that treatment of MMBC should be based on the guidelines for female breast cancer. PMID:25404886

  11. Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Is Dependent on Oncogenic Kras in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Meredith A.; Brisset, Jean-Christophe; Zhang, Yaqing; Bednar, Filip; Pierre, Josette; Heist, Kevin A.; Galbán, Craig J.; Galbán, Stefanie; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest human malignancies, and its prognosis has not improved over the past 40 years. Mouse models that spontaneously develop pancreatic adenocarcinoma and mimic the progression of the human disease are emerging as a new tool to investigate the basic biology of this disease and identify potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe a new model of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma based on pancreas-specific, inducible and reversible expression of an oncogenic form of Kras, together with pancreas-specific expression of a mutant form of the tumor suppressor p53. Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging to follow individual animals in longitudinal studies, we show that both primary and metastatic lesions depend on continuous Kras activity for their maintenance. However, re-activation of Kras* following prolonged inactivation leads to rapid tumor relapse, raising the concern that Kras*-resistance might eventually be acquired. Thus, our data identifies Kras* as a key oncogene in pancreatic cancer maintenance, but raises the possibility of acquired resistance should Kras inhibitors become available for use in pancreatic cancer. PMID:23226501

  12. [Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Activity during Fulvestrant Therapy for Multiple Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Kenichi; Fujisaki, Shigeru; Adachi, Keita; Suzuki, Shuhei; Masuo, Yuki; Nagashima, Saki; Hara, Yukiko; Hirano, Tomohiro; Enomoto, Katsuhisa; Tomita, Ryouichi; Gonda, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    We evaluated the clinical significance of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase(IDO)during fulvestrant therapyfor multiple metastatic breast cancer patients. IDO activitycan be measured using the tryptophan(Trp)/kynurenine(Kyn)ratio. Trp and Kyn were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC). The serum Trp/Kyn level in patients with multiple metastatic breast cancer was lower than in patients without metastases. IDO activityincreased after breast cancer metastases developed. IDO activitywas correlated with the number of metastatic lesions during toremifene and fulvestrant therapy. These results suggested that measurement of the Trp/Kyn ratio is useful to evaluate immunological metastatic status during endocrine therapy.

  13. Evolution of taxanes in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Binder, Sandra

    2013-02-01

    Taxanes have become effective therapies for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC); however, understanding the differences among them is important. Each of the taxanes currently approved for treating MBC has a unique formulation, which translates to differences in toxicity profiles and administration considerations. In this article, the rationale for the development of the taxanes paclitaxel, docetaxel, and nab-paclitaxel is reviewed from a historical perspective. The mechanisms of action, formulations, and indications of taxanes also are discussed. The impact of their formulations on clinical practice and patient care, particularly solvent-based versus novel solvent-free formulations, will be reviewed from the nursing perspective.

  14. Perspectives on Treatment of Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Jenkins, Cheryl; Parker, Chris; Fitzpatrick, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The arrival of several new agents—cabazitaxel, abiraterone acetate, enzalutamide, and radium-223—is changing the treatment options and management of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Many other novel agents are also being investigated. As new drugs become approved, new treatment strategies and markers to best select which patients will best respond to which drug are needed. This review article is a summary of a European Treatment Practices Meeting, which was convened to discuss these latest data on novel agents and current treatment strategies in the mCRPC setting. PMID:23671006

  15. [Antiestrogen treatment in postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Henriette; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Tuxen, Malgorzata; Kamby, Claus

    2007-09-10

    This review discusses the evidence for endocrine treatment in postmenopausal patients with metastatic breast cancer. First line treatment with non-steroid aromatase inhibitors (AI) yields response rates of 30% and improves progression free survival, but not overall survival, compared to tamoxifen. With second line treatment using steroid AI, estrogen antagonists or selective estrogen receptor modulators prolonged disease stabilisation is achieved in 40% of patients. With third line treatment using steroid AI and estrogen antagonists disease stabilisation is achieved in up to 30% of patients.

  16. Fulminant abdominal gas gangrene in metastatic colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mustafa; Okutur, Kerem; Aydin, Kübra; Namal, Esat; Oztürk, Akin; Balci, Cem; Demir, Gökhan

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of fulminant abdominal gas gangrene in a patient with metastatic colon cancer. A 39-year-old patient with descending colon, high-grade adenocarcinoma and coexisting liver and lymph node metastases received two courses of chemotherapy. The patient developed sudden acute abdominal symptoms accompanied by septic shock parameters. The imaging findings on computed tomography were characteristic for abdominal gas gangrene, involving liver metastases, portal vein and lymph nodes with associated pneumoperitoneum. The patient succumbed to the disease within hours following the onset of symptoms.

  17. Somatic mutations of the HER2 in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Jiang, Yanxia; Wang, Xin; Yang, Xue; Gao, Yinqi; Wang, Jing

    2014-12-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) in lung cancers predict for sensitivity to EGFR kinase inhibitors. HER2 (also known as NEU, EGFR2, or ERBB2) is a member of the EGFR family of receptor tyrosine kinases and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of certain human cancers, and mutations have recently been reported in lung cancers. We sequenced the full length of HER2 in 198 metastatic breast cancers (MBC) as well as 34 other epithelial cancers (bladder, prostate, and colorectal cancers) and compared the mutational status with clinic pathologic features and the presence of EGFR or KRAS mutations. HER2 mutations were present in 11.6 % (23 of 198) of MBC and were absent in other types of cancers. HER2 mutations were located in exon 15 and the in-frame insertions in exon 20 with corresponding region as did EGFR insertions. HER2 mutations were significantly more frequent in patient after the administration of trastuzumab (34.8 %, 8 of 23; P = 0.02). Mutations in exon 15 and 20 were more potent than wild-type HER2 in associating with activating signal transducers and inducing survival, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity.

  18. [Specific treatment situations in metastatic colorectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Arnold, Dirk; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Lang, Hauke; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Ridwelski, Karsten; Trarbach, Tanja; Staib, Ludger; Kirchner, Thomas; Geissler, Michael; Seufferlein, Thomas; Amthauer, Holger; Riess, Hanno; Schlitt, Hans J; Piso, Pompiliu

    2010-01-01

    As far as the management of primary resectable liver metastases is concerned, three approaches are currently competing with each other: surgery alone, surgery with pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, and surgery with postoperative chemotherapy alone. The core of the argument for pre- and postoperative chemotherapy in these patients is the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 40983 study, which concluded that, in comparison with surgery alone, perioperative chemotherapy improved the 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) by 7 months. In contrast to this, there are two smaller studies--at a somewhat lower strength of evidence-- indicating that adjuvant chemotherapy extends PFS by 9.1 months compared with surgery alone. In Germany, the adjuvant approach continues to be favored in many places; this can also be seen in the formulation of the S3 guideline. In patients with unresectable liver metastases--with the associated difficulty of classification due to the lack of clear and definitive criteria--preoperative systemic therapy to induce 'conversion' is indicated, in order to allow secondary resection. In KRAS wild-type tumors, high response rates (in terms of a reduction in size of the metastases, such as according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors)) and a high conversion rate are achieved using a cetuximab/chemotherapy combination. Triple chemotherapy combinations with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), oxaliplatin and irinotecan also produce high response rates. Bevacizumab/chemotherapy combinations have led to a high number of complete and partial pathohistological remissions in phase II studies; these seem to correlate with long survival times. In the absence of long-term survival data, it therefore seems to remain unclear as to what is the best parameter to use in order to assess the success of preoperative treatment. Lung metastases, too, or local peritoneal carcinomatosis can nowadays be operated on in selected patients

  19. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program: a multi-disciplinary investigation of bone metastases from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brockton, Nigel T; Gill, Stephanie J; Laborge, Stephanie L; Paterson, Alexander H G; Cook, Linda S; Vogel, Hans J; Shemanko, Carrie S; Hanley, David A; Magliocco, Anthony M; Friedenreich, Christine M

    2015-07-10

    Bone is the most common site of breast cancer distant metastasis, affecting 50-70 % of patients who develop metastatic disease. Despite decades of informative research, the effective prevention, prediction and treatment of these lesions remains elusive. The Breast Cancer to Bone (B2B) Metastases Research Program consists of a prospective cohort of incident breast cancer patients and four sub-projects that are investigating priority areas in breast cancer bone metastases. These include the impact of lifestyle factors and inflammation on risk of bone metastases, the gene expression features of the primary tumour, the potential role for metabolomics in early detection of bone metastatic disease and the signalling pathways that drive the metastatic lesions in the bone. The B2B Research Program is enrolling a prospective cohort of 600 newly diagnosed, incident, stage I-IIIc breast cancer survivors in Alberta, Canada over a five year period. At baseline, pre-treatment/surgery blood samples are collected and detailed epidemiologic data is collected by in-person interview and self-administered questionnaires. Additional self-administered questionnaires and blood samples are completed at specified follow-up intervals (24, 48 and 72 months). Vital status is obtained prior to each follow-up through record linkages with the Alberta Cancer Registry. Recurrences are identified through medical chart abstractions. Each of the four projects applies specific methods and analyses to assess the impact of serum vitamin D and cytokine concentrations, tumour transcript and protein expression, serum metabolomic profiles and in vitro cell signalling on breast cancer bone metastases. The B2B Research Program will address key issues in breast cancer bone metastases including the association between lifestyle factors (particularly a comprehensive assessment of vitamin D status) inflammation and bone metastases, the significance or primary tumour gene expression in tissue tropism, the

  20. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  1. Diagnosis and surgical management of breast cancer metastatic to the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Derek G; Yurter, Alp; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Sciubba, Daniel M

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of death in Western women. Breast cancer most commonly metastasizes to the bone and has a particular affinity with the spine, accounting for 2/3 of osseous metastases discovered. With significant improvements in cancer therapies, the number of patients at risk for symptomatic spinal metastases is likely to increase. Patients may suffer from intractable pain and neurological dysfunction, negatively influencing their quality of life. Timely diagnosis of patients is crucial and has been aided by several breakthrough advances in imaging techniques which aid in detection, staging, and follow-up of bone metastases. Breast metastases are usually responsive to hormonal therapy and pharmacologic interventions, but skeletal metastases often require surgical intervention. The treatments are palliative but goals include the preserving or restoring neurologic function, ensuring spinal stability, and relieving pain. Advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation have allowed more effective decompression and stabilization of the spine, and with the support of recent evidence the trend has shifted towards using more advanced surgical options in appropriately selected patients. In this review, the clinical presentation, diagnosis, patient selection, and surgical management of breast cancer metastatic to the spine are discussed. PMID:25114843

  2. [A case of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Nushijima, Youichirou; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Sugimoto, Keishi; Nakaguchi, Kazunori; Kan, Kazuomi; Maruyama, Hirohide; Doi, Sadayuki; Okamura, Shu; Murata, Kohei

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic gastric cancer is uncommon, and metastasis of colorectal cancer to the stomach is extremely rare. We report a case of metastatic gastric cancer that originated from transverse colon cancer. A 52-year-old woman underwent a left hemicolectomy and D3 lymph node dissection based on a diagnosis of transverse colon cancer. The pathology results were as follows: mucinous adenocarcinoma, type 2, 6 × 11 cm, ss, ly1 v1, pm (-), dm (-), n1 (+), P0, H0, M0, Stage IIIa. The patient received XELOX as postoperative adjuvant therapy for 6 months. One year and 3 months after the left hemicolectomy, gastroscopy revealed a submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach and an incipient cancer in the cardia of the stomach, and a colonoscopy revealed an incipient cancer in the transverse colon. An endoscopic ultrasonography fine needle aspiration biopsy of the submucosal tumor in the lower body of the stomach was performed. Histology showed that this tumor was a mucinous adenocarcinoma similar to the primary transverse colon cancer, which led to a diagnosis of metastatic gastric cancer originating from transverse colon cancer. Distant metastasis was not detected. Endoscopic submucosal dissection of the incipient gastric cancer was performed, as were distal gastrectomy and partial colectomy. Peritoneal dissemination and para-aortic lymph node recurrence were detected 7 months after the second surgery.

  3. Berberine inhibits the metastatic ability of prostate cancer cells by suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated genes with predictive and prognostic relevance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chia-Hung; Tang, Wan-Chun; Sia, Peik; Huang, Chi-Chen; Yang, Pei-Ming; Wu, Ming-Heng; Lai, I-Lu; Lee, Kuen-Haur

    2015-01-01

    Over 70% of cancer metastasis from prostate cancer develops bone metastases that are not sensitive to hormonal therapy, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) genetic program is implicated as a significant contributor to prostate cancer progression. As such, targeting the EMT represents an important therapeutic strategy for preventing or treating prostate cancer metastasis. Berberine is a natural alkaloid with significant antitumor activities against many types of cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which berberine represses the metastatic potential of prostate cancer. The effects of berberine on cell migration and invasion were determined by transwell migration assay and Matrigel invasion assay. Expressions of EMT-related genes were determined by an EMT PCR Array and a quantitative RT-PCR. The prognostic relevance of berberine's modulation of EMT-related genes in prostate cancer was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Berberine exerted inhibitory effects on the migratory and invasive abilities of highly metastatic prostate cancer cells. These inhibitory effects of berberine resulted in significant repression of a panel of mesenchymal genes that regulate the developmental EMT. Among EMT-related genes downregulated by berberine, high BMP7, NODAL and Snail gene expressions of metastatic prostate cancer tissues were associated with shorter survival of prostate cancer patients and provide potential therapeutic interventions. We concluded that berberine should be developed as a pharmacological agent for use in combination with other anticancer drug for treating metastatic prostate cancer.

  4. Efficacy of Exemestane in Korean Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer after Failure of Nonsteroidal Aromatase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, June Koo; Lee, Daewon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lim, Yoojoo; Lee, Eunyoung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Kim, Tae-Yong; Han, Sae-Won; Oh, Do-Youn; Lee, Se-Hoon; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, Tae-You; Noh, Dong-Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Exemestane has shown good efficacy and tolerability in postmenopausal women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer. However, clinical outcomes in Korean patients have not yet been reported. Methods Data on 112 postmenopausal women with metastatic breast cancer were obtained retrospectively. Clinicopathological characteristics and treatment history were extracted from medical records. All patients received 25 mg exemestane daily until objective disease progression. Progression-free survival (PFS) was the primary endpoint, and secondary endpoints were overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), and clinical benefit rate (CBR=complete response+partial response+stable disease for 6 months). Results The median age of the subjects was 55 years (range, 28-76 years). Exemestane treatment resulted in a median PFS of 5.7 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.4-7.0 months) and median OS of 21.9 months (95% CI, 13.6-30.3 months). ORR was 6.4% and CBR was 46.4% for the 110 patients with evaluable lesions. Symptomatic visceral disease was independently associated with shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 3.611; 95% CI, 1.904-6.848; p<0.001), compared with bone-dominant disease in a multivariate analysis of PFS after adjusting for age, hormone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, Ki-67 status, dominant metastasis site, and sensitivity to nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor (AI) treatment. Sensitivity to previous nonsteroidal AI treatment was not associated with PFS, suggesting no cross-resistance between exemestane and nonsteroidal AIs. Conclusion Exemestane was effective in postmenopausal Korean women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who failed previous nonsteroidal AI treatment. PMID:23593084

  5. Regulation of breast cancer-induced bone lesions by β-catenin protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Shi, Heidi Y; Stock, Stuart R; Stern, Paula H; Zhang, Ming

    2011-12-09

    Breast cancer patients have an extremely high rate of bone metastases. Morphological analyses of the bones in most of the patients have revealed the mixed bone lesions, comprising both osteolytic and osteoblastic elements. β-Catenin plays a key role in both embryonic skeletogenesis and postnatal bone regeneration. Although this pathway is also involved in many bone malignancy, such as osteosarcoma and prostate cancer-induced bone metastases, its regulation of breast cancer bone metastases remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the β-catenin signaling pathway has a significant impact on the bone lesion phenotype. In this study, we established a novel mouse model of mixed bone lesions using intratibial injection of TM40D-MB cells, a breast cancer cell line that is highly metastatic to bone. We found that both upstream and downstream molecules of the β-catenin pathway are up-regulated in TM40D-MB cells compared with non-bone metastatic TM40D cells. TM40D-MB cells also have a higher T cell factor (TCF) reporter activity than TM40D cells. Inactivation of β-catenin in TM40D-MB cells through expression of a dominant negative TCF4 not only increases osteoclast differentiation in a tumor-bone co-culture system and enhances osteolytic bone destruction in mice, but also inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Surprisingly, although tumor cells overexpressing β-catenin did induce a slight increase of osteoblast differentiation in vitro, these cells display a minimal effect on osteoblastic bone formation in mice. These data collectively demonstrate that β-catenin acts as an important determinant in mixed bone lesions, especially in controlling osteoblastic effect within tumor-harboring bone environment.

  6. Regulation of Breast Cancer-induced Bone Lesions by β-Catenin Protein Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Shi, Heidi Y.; Stock, Stuart R.; Stern, Paula H.; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer patients have an extremely high rate of bone metastases. Morphological analyses of the bones in most of the patients have revealed the mixed bone lesions, comprising both osteolytic and osteoblastic elements. β-Catenin plays a key role in both embryonic skeletogenesis and postnatal bone regeneration. Although this pathway is also involved in many bone malignancy, such as osteosarcoma and prostate cancer-induced bone metastases, its regulation of breast cancer bone metastases remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that the β-catenin signaling pathway has a significant impact on the bone lesion phenotype. In this study, we established a novel mouse model of mixed bone lesions using intratibial injection of TM40D-MB cells, a breast cancer cell line that is highly metastatic to bone. We found that both upstream and downstream molecules of the β-catenin pathway are up-regulated in TM40D-MB cells compared with non-bone metastatic TM40D cells. TM40D-MB cells also have a higher T cell factor (TCF) reporter activity than TM40D cells. Inactivation of β-catenin in TM40D-MB cells through expression of a dominant negative TCF4 not only increases osteoclast differentiation in a tumor-bone co-culture system and enhances osteolytic bone destruction in mice, but also inhibits osteoblast differentiation. Surprisingly, although tumor cells overexpressing β-catenin did induce a slight increase of osteoblast differentiation in vitro, these cells display a minimal effect on osteoblastic bone formation in mice. These data collectively demonstrate that β-catenin acts as an important determinant in mixed bone lesions, especially in controlling osteoblastic effect within tumor-harboring bone environment. PMID:22009747

  7. Targeting Siah2 as Novel Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    summarized in our 2013 publication in Chemical Biology . At that stage, the inhibitory peptide was 35- 45 amino acids long, although the backbone of the actual...Metastasis Biology and Targeting Goals: To understand the basic biology of lethal prostate cancer progression to bone metastasis, and the design of

  8. Psychological interventions for women with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mohammed; Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Gillespie, David; Edwards, Adrian G K

    2013-06-04

    Psychological symptoms are associated with metastatic breast cancer. This is the basis for exploring the impact of psychological interventions on psychosocial and survival outcomes. One early study appeared to show significant survival and psychological benefits from psychological support while subsequent studies have revealed conflicting results. This review is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004 and previously updated in 2007. To assess the effects of psychological interventions on psychosocial and survival outcomes for women with metastatic breast cancer. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Group Specialised Register, MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO), online trials and research registers in June/July 2011. Further potentially relevant studies were identified from handsearching references of previous trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses.  Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs of psychological interventions, which recruited women with metastatic breast cancer. Outcomes selected for analyses were overall survival, psychological outcomes, pain, quality of life, condition-specific outcome measures, relationship and social support measures, and sleep quality. Studies were excluded if no discrete data were available on women with metastatic breast cancer.  Two review authors independently extracted the data and assessed the quality of the studies using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Where possible, authors were contacted for missing information. Data on the nature and setting of the intervention, relevant outcome data, and items relating to methodological quality were extracted. Meta-analyses was performed using a random-effects or fixed-effect Mantel-Haenszel model, depending on expected levels of heterogeneity. Ten RCTs with 1378 women were identified. Of the seven RCTs on group psychological interventions, three were on cognitive behavioural therapy and four were

  9. Effects of locoregional radiotherapy in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Geovanne Pedro; de Andrade Carvalho, Heloisa; Stuart, Silva Radwanski; Mano, Max Senna; Marta, Gustavo Nader

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to assess the clinical outcomes of patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who underwent local radiation therapy (RT) for the primary site. Between 2005 and 2013, we retrospectively evaluated patients with MBC who received breast or chest wall RT with or without regional lymph node irradiation. 2761 patients with breast cancer were treated with RT. Of them, 125 women with stage IV breast carcinoma were included. The median follow-up was 15 months (ranging from 3.8 to 168 months), when 54.7% of the patients had died; local progression was observed in 22.8% of the patients. The mean overall survival (OS) and local progression free survival (LoPFS) were 23.4 ± 2.4 months and 45.1 ± 2.9 months, respectively. Three- and five-year overall survival rates were, respectively, 21.2% and 13.3%. Local progression free survival was the same, 67.3%, at three and five years, respectively. Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) (p = 0.015), number of metastatic sites (p = 0.031), RT dose (p = 0.0001) and hormone therapy (p = 0.0001) were confirmed as independent significant variables correlated with OS. The variables that were independently correlated with LoPFS were the number of previous chemotherapy lines (p = 0.038) and RT dose (p = 0.0001). RT of the primary site in patients with MBC is well tolerated. The factors that presented positive impact on survival were good KPS, low disease burden (1-3 metastatic sites), and the use of hormone therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Lymph node-independent liver metastasis in a model of metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Ida B; Good, Zinaida; Jubb, Adrian M; Fuh, Germaine; Wang, Xi; Junttila, Melissa R; Jackson, Erica L; Leong, Kevin G

    2014-03-26

    Deciphering metastatic routes is critically important as metastasis is a primary cause of cancer mortality. In colorectal cancer (CRC), it is unknown whether liver metastases derive from cancer cells that first colonize intestinal lymph nodes, or whether such metastases can form without prior lymph node involvement. A lack of relevant metastatic CRC models has precluded investigations into metastatic routes. Here we describe a metastatic CRC mouse model and show that liver metastases can manifest without a lymph node metastatic intermediary. Colorectal tumours transplanted onto the colonic mucosa invade and metastasize to specific target organs including the intestinal lymph nodes, liver and lungs. Importantly, this metastatic pattern differs from that observed following caecum implantation, which invariably involves peritoneal carcinomatosis. Anti-angiogenesis inhibits liver metastasis, yet anti-lymphangiogenesis does not impact liver metastasis despite abrogating lymph node metastasis. Our data demonstrate direct hematogenous spread as a dissemination route that contributes to CRC liver malignancy.

  11. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticle-containing scaffolds for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pathi, Siddharth P; Lin, Debra D W; Dorvee, Jason R; Estroff, Lara A; Fischbach, Claudia

    2011-08-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to bone, where it leads to secondary tumor growth, osteolytic bone degradation, and poor clinical prognosis. Hydroxyapatite Ca(10)(PO(4))(6)(OH)(2) (HA), a mineral closely related to the inorganic component of bone, may be implicated in these processes. However, it is currently unclear how the nanoscale materials properties of bone mineral, such as particle size and crystallinity, which change as a result of osteolytic bone remodeling, affect metastatic breast cancer. We have developed a two-step hydrothermal synthesis method to obtain HA nanoparticles with narrow size distributions and varying crystallinity. These nanoparticles were incorporated into gas-foamed/particulate leached poly(lactide-co-glycolide) scaffolds, which were seeded with metastatic breast cancer cells to create mineral-containing scaffolds for the study of breast cancer bone metastasis. Our results suggest that smaller, poorly-crystalline HA nanoparticles promote greater adsorption of adhesive serum proteins and enhance breast tumor cell adhesion and growth relative to larger, more crystalline nanoparticles. Conversely, the larger, more crystalline HA nanoparticles stimulate enhanced expression of the osteolytic factor interleukin-8 (IL-8). Our data suggest an important role for nanoscale HA properties in the vicious cycle of bone metastasis and indicate that mineral-containing tumor models may be excellent tools to study cancer biology and to define design parameters for non-tumorigenic mineral-containing or mineralized matrices for bone regeneration.

  12. Chromothripsis and progression-free survival in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skuja, Elina; Kalniete, Dagnija; Nakazawa-Miklasevica, Miki; Daneberga, Zanda; Abolins, Arnis; Purkalne, Gunta; Miklasevics, Edvins

    2017-01-01

    Metastatic dissemination of the primary tumor is the major cause of death in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Multiple chromosomal breaks and chromothripsis, a phenomenon involving multiple chromosomal fragmentations occurring in a single catastrophic event, are associated with cancer genesis, progression and developing of metastases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chromothripsis and total breakpoint count (breakpoint instability index) on progression-free survival (PFS). A total of 19 patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) receiving FOLFOX first-line palliative chemotherapy between August, 2011 and October, 2012 were selected for this study. The results indicated that the highest breakpoint count was observed in chromosomes 1, 2 and 6. Chromothripsis was detected in 52.6% of the study patients. Furthermore, chromothripsis was associated with an increased median PFS (mPFS; 14 vs. 8 months, respectively; P=0.03), but an association with overall survival was not identified. The present study demonstrated that chromothripsis affected CRC patient survival, suggesting a role for this event as a prognostic and predictive marker in mCRC treatment. PMID:28357089

  13. A novel framework for the temporal analysis of bone mineral density in metastatic lesions using CT images of the femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoop, Tom H.; Derikx, Loes C.; Verdonschot, Nico; Slump, Cornelis H.

    2015-03-01

    In the progressive stages of cancer, metastatic lesions in often develop in the femur. The accompanying pain and risk of fracture dramatically affect the quality of life of the patient. Radiotherapy is often administered as palliative treatment to relieve pain and restore the bone around the lesion. It is thought to affect the bone mineralization of the treated region, but the quantitative relation between radiation dose and femur remineralization remains unclear. A new framework for the longitudinal analysis of CT-scans of patients receiving radiotherapy is presented to investigate this relationship. The implemented framework is capable of automatic calibration of Hounsfield Units to calcium equivalent values and the estimation of a prediction interval per scan. Other features of the framework are temporal registration of femurs using elastix, transformation of arbitrary Regions Of Interests (ROI), and extraction of metrics for analysis. Build in Matlab, the modular approach aids easy adaptation to the pertinent questions in the explorative phase of the research. For validation purposes, an in-vitro model consisting of a human cadaver femur with a milled hole in the intertrochanteric region was used, representing a femur with a metastatic lesion. The hole was incrementally stacked with plates of PMMA bone cement with variable radiopaqueness. Using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) test, changes in density distribution due to an increase of the calcium concentration could be discriminated. In a 21 cm3 ROI, changes in 8% of the volume from 888 ± 57mg • ml-1 to 1000 ± 80mg • ml-1 could be statistically proven using the proposed framework. In conclusion, the newly developed framework proved to be a useful and flexible tool for the analysis of longitudinal CT data.

  14. A novel antimetabolite: TAS-102 for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Baba, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    TAS-102 is a new oral anti-tumor drug, composed of a thymidine-based nucleoside analog (trifluridine: FTD) and a thymidine phosphorylase inhibitor (tipiracil hydrochloride: TPI). TAS-102 has been shown to significantly improve overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in placebo-controlled randomized phase II and III trials. The current review summarizes mechanisms of action, pharmacokinetics/dynamics and preclinical and clinical data of TAS-102 in colorectal cancer. TAS-102 is a new salvage-line treatment option for patients with mCRC. TAS-102 is well tolerated and has great potential in future clinical drug combination therapies.

  15. Complexity of FGFR signalling in metastatic urothelial cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Vida, Alejo; Saggese, Matilde; Hughes, Simon; Rudman, Sarah; Chowdhury, Simon; Smith, Neil R; Lawrence, Peter; Rooney, Claire; Dougherty, Brian; Landers, Donal; Kilgour, Elaine; Arkenau, Hendrik-Tobias

    2015-10-24

    Urothelial cancers (UC) are the fourth most common tumours worldwide after prostate (or breast), lung and colorectal cancer. Despite recent improvements in their management, UC remain an aggressive disease associated with a poor outcome. Following disease progression on first-line platinum-based chemotherapy, very few effective treatment options are available and none of them have shown significant improvement in overall survival. Alterations of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway including amplification, mutations and overexpression are common in UC. Pre-clinical data suggest that the presence of such dysregulations may confer sensitivity to FGFR inhibitors. We present here the case of a patient with a metastatic UC of the renal pelvis with lymph node metastases treated with the selective FGFR inhibitor AZD4547. To date, the patient has been on a study drug for 32 months with acceptable tolerance and maintained radiological partial response as per RECIST 1.1 criteria. Exploratory biomarker analysis showed FGFR3, FGFR1, FGF-ligand and fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 (FRS2) expression in the patient's tumour, together with the presence of a germ-line mutation in the FGFR3 extracellular binding domain. This is not a known hotspot mutation, and the functional significance remains unclear. The FGFR inhibitor AZD4547 exhibits antitumour activity in a metastatic urothelial cancer displaying FGFR1, FGFR3, FGF-ligand and FRS2 expression. This lends support to the further exploration of FGFR inhibitors in urothelial cancer. Further studies are required to determinate the most effective way to select those patients most likely to respond.

  16. Radium-223 Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer: An Update on Literature with Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Appleman, Leonard J.; Mountz, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.) is the first α-particle emitter therapeutic agent approved by the FDA, with benefits in overall survival and delay in symptomatic skeletal event for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Recent post hoc analyses of the phase III ALSYMPCA trial support the previously established safety profile as well as therapeutic effect and clinical outcome of Radium-223. Currently, Radium-223 is approved as a single agent therapy for metastatic CRPC. Clinical trials are currently investigating Radium-223 in additional clinical settings such as earlier asymptomatic disease and in combination with other agents including hormonal therapeutic agents and immunotherapeutic as well as chemotherapeutic agents. Trials are also ongoing in patients with other primary cancers such as breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and renal cancer metastatic to bone. In this article, the physics and radiobiology, as well as a literature update on the use of Radium-223, are provided along with case presentations, aiming at a better appreciation of research data as well as the assimilation of research data into clinical practice. PMID:27774318

  17. Radium-223 Therapy for Patients with Metastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer: An Update on Literature with Case Presentation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nghi C; Shah, Muhammad; Appleman, Leonard J; Parikh, Rahul; Mountz, James M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo®, Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals Inc.) is the first α-particle emitter therapeutic agent approved by the FDA, with benefits in overall survival and delay in symptomatic skeletal event for patients with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Recent post hoc analyses of the phase III ALSYMPCA trial support the previously established safety profile as well as therapeutic effect and clinical outcome of Radium-223. Currently, Radium-223 is approved as a single agent therapy for metastatic CRPC. Clinical trials are currently investigating Radium-223 in additional clinical settings such as earlier asymptomatic disease and in combination with other agents including hormonal therapeutic agents and immunotherapeutic as well as chemotherapeutic agents. Trials are also ongoing in patients with other primary cancers such as breast cancer, thyroid cancer, and renal cancer metastatic to bone. In this article, the physics and radiobiology, as well as a literature update on the use of Radium-223, are provided along with case presentations, aiming at a better appreciation of research data as well as the assimilation of research data into clinical practice.

  18. Pan FGFR Kinase Inhibitor BGJ398 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-19

    Colon Adenocarcinoma; Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma; Rectal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  19. [Two cases of effective weekly paclitaxel administration and concurrent radiation for metastatic breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Kokufu, Ikuo; Tanei, Tomonori; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kimura, Fumihiko; Fukuda, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yano, Tokiharu; Yamada, Katsumi; Tamaoka, Koichi; Hosono, Masako

    2003-01-01

    We report two cases in which weekly paclitaxel (TXL) administration and concurrent radiation was effective for metastatic breast cancer. TXL (80 mg/m2) was infused over 1 hour after short premedication. Case 1: A 50-year-old woman was found to have atelectasis of the middle lobe after treatment for brain metastasis. She was diagnosed with hilar, mediastinal and supraclavicular lymph nodes metastases. She received weekly TXL administration and concurrent radiation to the mediastinum and supraclavicular fossa. The metastatic lymph nodes had disappeared one month after the treatment. Case 2: A 31-year-old woman was diagnosed with advanced breast cancer with lung, pleural, bone and orbital metastases. She received weekly TXL administration and concurrent radiation to the orbit. The lung and pleural metastases had disappeared and the orbital metastasis was decreased by 75% one month after the treatment, and the case was assessed as a partial response. Leukopenia and other major adverse effects were not observed in either of the two cases.

  20. Keratin 13 expression reprograms bone and brain metastases of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Lawrence W.; Chu, Gina C-Y; Wu, Jason B-Y.; Huang, Jen-Ming; Li, Quanlin; You, Sungyong; Kim, Jayoung; Lu, Yi-Tsung; Mrdenovic, Stefan; Wang, Ruoxiang; Freeman, Michael R.; Garraway, Isla; Lewis, Michael S.; Chung, Leland W. K.; Zhau, Haiyen E.

    2016-01-01

    Lethal progression of prostate cancer metastasis can be improved by developing animal models that recapitulate the clinical conditions. We report here that cytokeratin 13 (KRT13), an intermediate filament protein, plays a directive role in prostate cancer bone, brain, and soft tissue metastases. KRT13 expression was elevated in bone, brain, and soft tissue metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and in primary and metastatic clinical prostate, lung, and breast cancer specimens. When KRT13 expression was determined at a single cell level in primary tumor tissues of 44 prostate cancer cases, KRT13 level predicted bone metastasis and the overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Genetically enforced KRT13 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines drove metastases toward mouse bone, brain and soft tissues through a RANKL-independent mechanism, as KRT13 altered the expression of genes associated with EMT, stemness, neuroendocrine/neuromimicry, osteomimicry, development, and extracellular matrices, but not receptor activator NF-κB ligand (RANKL) signaling networks in prostate cancer cells. Our results suggest new inhibitors targeting RANKL-independent pathways should be developed for the treatment of prostate cancer bone and soft tissue metastases. PMID:27835867

  1. Successful whole-exome sequencing from a prostate cancer bone metastasis biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Van Allen, EM; Foye, A; Wagle, N; Kim, W; Carter, SL; McKenna, A; Simko, JP; Garraway, LA; Febbo, PG

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Comprehensive molecular characterization of cancer that has metastasized to bone has proved challenging, which may limit the diagnostic and potential therapeutic opportunities for patients with bone-only metastatic disease. METHODS We describe successful tissue acquisition, DNA extraction, and whole-exome sequencing from a bone metastasis of a patient with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (PCa). RESULTS The resulting high-quality tumor sequencing identified plausibly actionable somatic genomic alterations that dysregulate the phosphoinostide 3-kinase pathway, as well as a theoretically actionable germline variant in the BRCA2 gene. CONCLUSIONS We demonstrate the feasibility of diagnostic bone metastases profiling and analysis that will be required for the widespread application of prospective ‘precision medicine’ to men with advanced PCa. PMID:24366412

  2. [New therapeutical strategies in metastatic hormone-dependent breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Vilquin, Paul; Cohen, Pascale; Maudelonde, Thierry; Tredan, Olivier; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bachelot, Thomas; Heudel, Pierre-Etienne

    2015-04-01

    Hormone-dependent breast cancer is the first example of cancer treated by targeted therapy for more than 30 years. Blocking estrogen pathway was the first therapeutical strategy for this subtype of breast cancer, and remains the principle of current standard treatment. Despite the efficacy of drugs used in endocrine therapy, hormone resistance is a major problem for the management of patients with hormone-dependent breast cancer. In this review, we will discuss the development of strategies targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, CDK4/6 (Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4/6) and FGFR (Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor) in hormone-dependent metastatic breast cancer (ER+). Recent results of clinical trials showed that combination of endocrine therapy with such pharmacological inhibitors is a promising strategy to overcome endocrine resistance. Mutated forms and isoforms of ERα have been recently discovered and its targeting could represent an therapeutic alternative. Future progress will focus on the identification of new compounds and combinations with other targeted therapies to improve the efficacy of such inhibitors in clinical practice.

  3. Abiraterone plus Prednisone in Metastatic, Castration-Sensitive Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Fizazi, Karim; Tran, NamPhuong; Fein, Luis; Matsubara, Nobuaki; Rodriguez-Antolin, Alfredo; Alekseev, Boris Y; Özgüroğlu, Mustafa; Ye, Dingwei; Feyerabend, Susan; Protheroe, Andrew; De Porre, Peter; Kheoh, Thian; Park, Youn C; Todd, Mary B; Chi, Kim N

    2017-07-27

    Abiraterone acetate, a drug that blocks endogenous androgen synthesis, plus prednisone is indicated for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. We evaluated the clinical benefit of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone with androgen-deprivation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed, metastatic, castration-sensitive prostate cancer. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 1199 patients to receive either androgen-deprivation therapy plus abiraterone acetate (1000 mg daily, given once daily as four 250-mg tablets) plus prednisone (5 mg daily) (the abiraterone group) or androgen-deprivation therapy plus dual placebos (the placebo group). The two primary end points were overall survival and radiographic progression-free survival. After a median follow-up of 30.4 months at a planned interim analysis (after 406 patients had died), the median overall survival was significantly longer in the abiraterone group than in the placebo group (not reached vs. 34.7 months) (hazard ratio for death, 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.51 to 0.76; P<0.001). The median length of radiographic progression-free survival was 33.0 months in the abiraterone group and 14.8 months in the placebo group (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.55; P<0.001). Significantly better outcomes in all secondary end points were observed in the abiraterone group, including the time until pain progression, next subsequent therapy for prostate cancer, initiation of chemotherapy, and prostate-specific antigen progression (P<0.001 for all comparisons), along with next symptomatic skeletal events (P=0.009). These findings led to the unanimous recommendation by the independent data and safety monitoring committee that the trial be unblinded and crossover be allowed for patients in the placebo group to receive abiraterone. Rates of grade 3 hypertension and hypokalemia were higher in the abiraterone group. The addition of abiraterone

  4. ANGPTL2 increases bone metastasis of breast cancer cells through enhancing CXCR4 signaling.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Tetsuro; Endo, Motoyoshi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Odagiri, Haruki; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Takayuki; Tanoue, Hironori; Ito, Hitoshi; Yugami, Masaki; Miyata, Keishi; Morinaga, Jun; Horiguchi, Haruki; Motokawa, Ikuyo; Terada, Kazutoyo; Morioka, Masaki Suimye; Manabe, Ichiro; Iwase, Hirotaka; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Oike, Yuichi

    2015-03-16

    Bone metastasis of breast cancer cells is a major concern, as it causes increased morbidity and mortality in patients. Bone tissue-derived CXCL12 preferentially recruits breast cancer cells expressing CXCR4 to bone metastatic sites. Thus, understanding how CXCR4 expression is regulated in breast cancer cells could suggest approaches to decrease bone metastasis of breast tumor cells. Here, we show that tumor cell-derived angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) increases responsiveness of breast cancer cells to CXCL12 by promoting up-regulation of CXCR4 in those cells. In addition, we used a xenograft mouse model established by intracardiac injection of tumor cells to show that ANGPTL2 knockdown in breast cancer cells attenuates tumor cell responsiveness to CXCL12 by decreasing CXCR4 expression in those cells, thereby decreasing bone metastasis. Finally, we found that ANGPTL2 and CXCR4 expression levels within primary tumor tissues from breast cancer patients are positively correlated. We conclude that tumor cell-derived ANGPTL2 may increase bone metastasis by enhancing breast tumor cell responsiveness to CXCL12 signaling through up-regulation of tumor cell CXCR4 expression. These findings may suggest novel therapeutic approaches to treat metastatic breast cancer.

  5. TH-E-BRF-08: Subpopulations of Similarly-Responding Lesions in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C; Harmon, S; Perk, T; Jeraj, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In patients with multiple lesions, resistance to cancer treatments and subsequent disease recurrence may be due to heterogeneity of response across lesions. This study aims to identify subpopulations of similarly-responding metastatic prostate cancer lesions in bone using quantitative PET metrics. Methods: Seven metastatic prostate cancer patients treated with AR-directed therapy received pre-treatment and mid-treatment [F-18]NaF PET/CT scans. Images were registered using an articulated CT registration algorithm and transformations were applied to PET segmentations. Midtreatment response was calculated on PET-based texture features. Hierarchical agglomerative clustering was used to form groups of similarly-responding lesions, with the number of natural clusters (K) determined by the inconsistency coefficient. Lesion clustering was performed within each patient, and for the pooled population. The cophenetic coefficient (C) quantified how well the data was clustered. The Jaccard Index (JI) assessed similarity of cluster assignments from patient clustering and from population clustering. Results: 188 lesions in seven patients were identified for analysis (between 6 to 53 lesions per patient). Lesion response was defined as percent change relative to pre-treatment for 23 uncorrelated PET-based feature identifiers. . High response heterogeneity was found across all lesions (i.e. range ΔSUVmax =−95.98% to 775.00%). For intra-patient clustering, K ranged from 1–20. Population-based clustering resulted in 75 clusters, of 1-6 lesions each. Intra-patient clustering resulted in higher quality clusters than population clustering (mean C=0.95, range=0.89 to 1.00). For all patients, cluster assignments from population clustering showed good agreement to intra-patient clustering (mean JI=0.87, range=0.68 to 1.00). Conclusion: Subpopulations of similarly-responding lesions were identified in patients with multiple metastatic lesions. Good agreement was found between

  6. The sensory and coping intervention for women newly diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, Margaret; Donovan, Heidi; Slavish, Kathleen

    2010-09-01

    Preparatory information at the time of metastatic breast cancer diagnosis can be used to enhance patients' coping ability. Women with metastatic breast cancer evaluated a multimedia educational intervention designed to provide sensory and coping information regarding illness. Twenty women with metastatic breast cancer evaluated the materials. The intervention was evaluated very favorably and women identified the materials as needed information. However, they expressed dislike of content outlining possible concerns suggesting future iterations include only positive content. Findings confirm the acceptability and usability of these materials for further testing and ultimately for integration into cancer care practice.

  7. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  8. Prospective Study Evaluating the Impact of Tissue Confirmation of Metastatic Disease in Patients With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Eitan; Miller, Naomi; Geddie, William; Freedman, Orit; Kassam, Farrah; Simmons, Christine; Oldfield, Maria; Dranitsaris, George; Tomlinson, George; Laupacis, Andreas; Tannock, Ian F.; Clemons, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Decisions about treatment for women with metastatic breast cancer are usually based on the estrogen (ER), progesterone (PgR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status of the primary tumor. Retrospective data suggest that discordance between primary and metastatic lesions leads to detrimental outcome. This prospective study investigated receptor status of primary tumors and metastases in the same patient and assessed the impact of discordance on patient management and survival. Patients and Methods Biopsies of suspected metastases were analyzed for ER, PgR, and HER2. Primary tumors and metastases were analyzed using similar methodology. The treating oncologist indicated a treatment plan before and after biopsy to determine whether the result influenced management. Patients were followed up for progression or death. Results Of 121 women undergoing biopsy, 80% could be analyzed for receptor status. Discordance in ER, PgR, and HER2 between the primary and the metastasis was 16%, 40%, and 10%, respectively. Biopsy led to a reported change of management in 14% of women (95% CI, 8.4% to 21.5%). Fine-needle aspiration and biopsy of bone led to reduced ability to analyze receptors. After a median follow-up of 12 months, there were no trends for an association between receptor discordance and either time to treatment failure or overall survival. Conclusion Biopsy of metastases is technically feasible. Clinicians alter immediate management in one of seven patients on the basis of results of the biopsy, and discordance is not then associated with detrimental effects on outcome. Tissue confirmation should be considered in women with breast cancer and suspected metastatic recurrence. PMID:22124102

  9. Oxaliplatin Plus Irinotecan in Treating Patients With Metastatic Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-24

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Liver Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  10. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harabech, Mariem; Kiselovs, Normunds Rungevics; Maenhoudt, Wim; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Roost, Dirk; Dupré, Luc

    2017-05-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in an alternating magnetic field (AMF). Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  11. Modeling Efficacy of Bevacizumab Treatment for Metastatic Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Rezwan; Chyou, Po-Huang; Burmester, James K

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Bevacizumab, an FDA-approved adjuvant treatment for metastatic colon cancer, has extended survival for many patients. However, factors predicting response to treatment remain undefined. Patients and Methods: Relevant clinical and environmental data were abstracted from medical records of 149 evaluable patients treated with bevacizumab for metastatic colon cancer at a multi-specialty clinic. Tumor response was calculated from radiologic reports using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria