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Sample records for metastatic carcinomatous cell

  1. Two-color cytofluorometry and cellular properties of the urokinase receptor associated with a human metastatic carcinomatous cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, K.; Gojobori, T.; Tanifuji, M. )

    1991-02-01

    Purified human urokinase was labeled with either fluorescein isothiocyanate or iodine-125 and used as a probe for binding to the human metastatic carcinomatous cell line, Detroit 562. Cytofluorometry showed that the ligand bound preferentially to cells that had been exposed to acidic pH. The binding was competitive and decreased after mild tryptic digestion. The bound ligand could be removed by restoration of the cells to a low pH. Therefore, the cells had specific binding sites. The bound urokinase was involved in the breakdown of fibrin. Two-color cytofluorometric maps were constructed by counterstaining with propidium iodide. Results suggested that there were different cell populations that had different numbers of receptors and amounts of DNA. We cloned cells and found that single clones had homogeneous levels of receptors with different dissociation constants (from 10(-13) to 10(-11) mol/mg protein) for different clones. Cells of one clone, C5, which had high levels of receptor production, moved characteristically on a glass substratum coated with gold particles and reacted with wheat germ agglutinin, but not with concanavalin A. The receptors were found together with adhesion proteins at the sites where the cells adhered to the substrate. These results and the data obtained by zymography of the cellular proteins suggested that the urokinase-type plasminogen activators were bound to the receptors. The membrane-associated activator may stimulate local proteolysis, facilitating the migration of the tumor cell across the substrate.

  2. Carcinomatous Meningitis: The Natural History of Successfully Treated Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tadepalli, S.; Coleman, T.; Hacket, L.A.; Liles, G.B.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis due to bladder cancer is a rare entity reported only in case reports. Optimal therapy is thus poorly defined with earlier cases reporting an unsuccessful outcome. Here we report a case of late carcinomatous meningitis secondary to transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder occurring in a patient in complete remission. He was successfully treated with intrathecal methotrexate and whole brain irradiation and experienced prolonged survival after treatment. With modern chemotherapy increasing complete remissions and survival rates in patients with TCC, more and more patients are being reported with carcinomatous meningitis. We raise the question of whether central nervous system prophylaxis should be considered in patients with TCC achieving a complete remission to chemotherapy in the metastatic setting. PMID:21941490

  3. Small cell carcinoma of the ureter with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinomatous components associated with ureteral stone.

    PubMed

    Kim, T S; Seong, D H; Ro, J Y

    2001-12-01

    We report a case of primary small cell carcinoma of the ureter with squamous cell and transitional cell carcinomatous components associated with ureteral stone, which is unique in that the patient has remained free of tumor recurrence for 36 months after the surgery without adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A 60-yr-old man presented himself with a right flank pain. Computed tomography revealed an ill-defined mass and a stone in the lower one third of the right ureter, and hydronephroureterosis above the stone-impacted site. The patient underwent right nephroureterectomy and stone removal. Upon gross examination, a 3.8 x 1.8 x 1.2 cm white and partly yellow mass was noted in the anterior part of the ureter, resulting in indentation of the ureteral lumen on the posterior side. Light microscopic examination revealed that the mass was mainly composed of small cell carcinoma, and partly squamous cell and transitional cell carcinomatous components. The overlying ureteral mucosa and renal pelvis also contained multifocal dysplastic transitional epithelium and transitional cell carcinoma in situ. There was no vascular invasion, and the surgical margins were free of tumor. The small cell carcinomatous component was positive for chromogranin, neuron specific enolase, synaptophysin, and pancytokeratin but negative for high molecular-weight cytokeratin (K-903) by immunohistochemistry.

  4. Composite renal cell carcinoma with clear cell renal cell carcinomatous and carcinoid tumoral elements: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, A; Delaunay, C; Gauchotte, G; Oliver, A; Boudrant, G; Montagne, K

    2010-02-01

    Renal endocrine tumours are extremely rare, and carcinoid tumoral elements in renal cell carcinoma have never been reported. This is the first report of a composite renal cell carcinoma containing a clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with carcinoid tumoral elements, in a patient with synchronous metastatic disease. In the absence of specific radiological and clinical manifestations, typical morphological features as well as an immunostaining profile of neuroendocrine differentiation were identified by microscopy. Secondary nodal and liver localisations were characterised by carcinoid elements only. Despite antiangiogenic therapy, liver metastasis progressed, suggesting that adjuvant therapy cannot be based on the presence of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma component. In this context, extensive tissue sampling is recommended to reveal the endocrine component that is the most aggressive element of such a composite carcinoma.

  5. [Ulceration of the heel in a woman from Djibouti: squamous cell carcinoma with carcinomatous lymphangitis].

    PubMed

    Bertani, A; Massoure, P L; Menguy, P; Lamblin, G; Eve, O; Morand, J J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a case in which a heel ulcer with atypical features, i.e., large size and rapid progression, led to diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. Patient management was based on specialist advice obtained by "tele-dermatology" based on pictures and comments transmitted over the Internet. However, due to the risk of spreading and impossibility of providing other medical treatment (radiotherapy-chemotherapy), the lower limb was amputated at the top of the thigh.

  6. Computed tomography in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Nyree; Grant, Lee Alexander; Bharwani, Nishat; Sohaib, S Aslam

    2009-08-01

    Recent developments in chemotherapy have resulted in several new drug treatments for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). These therapies have shown improved progression-free survival and are applicable to many more patients than the conventional cytokine-based treatments for metastatic RCC. Consequently imaging is playing a greater part in the management of such patients. Computed tomography (CT) remains the primary imaging modality with other imaging modalities playing a supplementary role. CT is used in the diagnosis and staging of metastatic RCC. It is used in the follow-up of patients after nephrectomy, in assessing the extent of metastatic disease, and in evaluating response to treatment. This review looks at the role of CT in patients with metastatic RCC and describes the appearances of metastatic RCC before and following systemic therapy.

  7. Perioperative Considerations in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Flavin, Kate; Vasdev, Nikhil; Ashead, Jim; Lane, Tim; Hanbury, Damian; Nathan, Paul; Gowrie-Mohan, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma are complex, with the potential for significant complications, and require extensive pre-, peri-, and postoperative management. This article discusses, in depth, the necessary considerations in the treatment of these patients. PMID:27833463

  8. [Long-term survival of a breast cancer patient with carcinomatous pleuritis and carcinomatous cardiac tamponade successfully treated by multimodality therapy].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yosuke; Tsuboi, Kaori; Yamamoto, Akira; Tsuda, Shoichi; Tsujii, Shigehiro; Yagi, Ken; Kitamura, Tatsuhiko

    2015-04-01

    A 69-year old woman was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea and pain in her left breast. Computed tomography revealed a massive quantity of left pleural effusion, a tumor in the left breast(5 cm in diameter), left cervical and supraclavicular lymph node metastasis, and a large left axillary metastatic mass. Based on a core needle biopsy, her breast tumor was diagnosed pathologically as scirrhous carcinoma, which was positive for estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor and negative for HER2 using the FISH assay, and left pleural metastasis was diagnosed cytologically. The carcinomatous pleural effusion was successfully controlled using pleural instillations of pirarubicin HCl and OK-432 after pleural drainage. A near clinical complete response was achieved by EC systemic chemotherapy(6 months)followed by endocrine therapy(letrozole), but 3 months later she was diagnosed cytologically with carcinomatous cardiac tamponade. After operative pericardial drainage, intrapericardial instillations of cisplatin and OK-432 successfully prevented re-accumulation of pericardial effusion. Systemic chemotherapy(weekly paclitaxel)for 11 months and endocrine therapy(letrozole)resulted in a clinical complete response. One year and 10 months after pericardial drainage, she underwent surgery(mastectomy and axillary lymph node dissection level II)because of two small tumors in the left breast which were found to be malignant using PET-CT. One tumor(diameter 1.6 cm)was found pathologically to consist of degenerated cancer cells, and another tumor(diameter 2 cm)was diagnosed as recurrent cancer. There was no lymph node metastasis in the axilla except for a single mass(1.4×0.7×0.3 cm), which was composed of extremely degenerative and necrotic non-lymphoid cancerous tissue. Since having the surgery, she has not experienced recurrence on hormone therapy with fulvestrant, and to date she is still alive, 3 years and 5 months since the left pleural metastasis episode.

  9. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  10. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  11. Giant metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bognet, Rachel; Thompson, Christina; Campanelli, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with a rapidly growing, asymptomatic mass on his left mid-back for the past 3 months. The patient's medical history revealed an intentional 60-pound weight loss over the previous 2 years along with smoking approximately 1 pack of cigarettes per day. On physical examination, a fungating, 11-cm red tumor with palpable broader underlying extension (23 cm total) was present on the left mid-back with distinct red dermal nodules in a dermatomal distribution. In close proximity were two ulcerated nodules, proven histologically to be basal cell carcinomas. In the left groin was massive, fixed lymphadenopathy. A punch biopsy of the tumor was performed, which showed a dense infiltrate of small, round hyperchromatic blue cells that stained positive for CD 56 and pancytokeratin in a perinuclear dot pattern. Tumor cells were negative for CK20, TTF, CK7, and LCA.

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Errami, Mounir; Margulis, Vitali; Huerta, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Because of the asymptomatic natural history of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), by the time a diagnosis is made, metastatic disease is present in about one third of the cases. Thus, the overall survival of patients with RCC remains poor. Ultimately up to 50% of patients with RCC will develop metastases. Metastatic lesions from RCC are usually observed in the lungs, liver or bone. Metastases to the brain or the skin from RCC are rare. Here we present a patient diagnosed with RCC, found to have no evidence of metastases at the time of nephrectomy, who presented two years later with metastases to the scalp. We review the literature of patients with this rare site of metastasis and outline the overall prognosis of this lesion compared to other site of metastases from RCC. PMID:28191289

  13. Metastatic Basal cell carcinoma accompanying gorlin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome.

  14. Aural carcinoma with chondroid metaplasia at metastatic sites in a dog.

    PubMed

    Romanucci, Mariarita; Malatesta, Daniela; Marinelli, Alessia; Di Lorenzo, Pierluigi; Della Salda, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    A case of aural carcinoma with chondroid metaplasia at metastatic foci in an 8-year-old male pug is described. Multiple metastases in both lungs and the right submandibular, parotid, retropharyngeal, cervical and prescapular lymph nodes were detected. Histologically, the skin of the right ear canal appeared to be diffusely infiltrated by cords and nests of neoplastic epithelial cells, showing multifocal contiguity with the overlying hyperplastic squamous epithelium. Most of the carcinomatous cells were arranged in a glandular-like pattern, with formation of lumens containing epithelial cells attached to the peripheral cell layer by elongated intercellular bridges. Scattered foci of keratinization with central accumulations of compact, laminated keratin were also observed, and histochemical stains failed to detect mucinous secretory material. Even though histological and histochemical findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acantholytic squamous cell carcinoma, CAM5.2 immunostaining was detectable in the majority, although not all, neoplastic cells, confirming a diagnosis of poorly differentiated ceruminous gland carcinoma. Pulmonary metastatic nodules revealed multifocal areas of cartilaginous metaplasia with apparent transition of carcinomatous cells to chondroid cells, showing nuclear atypia and focal cytokeratin immunostaining. Carcinomatous cells surrounding chondroid areas also revealed focal vimentin and S100 immunoreactivity. Histological evidence of transition between the two components, as well as the presence of intermediate cells displaying both epithelial and mesenchymal immunohistochemical features, strongly indicated a final diagnosis of carcinosarcoma, in which chondrosarcomatous elements were derived from carcinoma cells.

  15. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  16. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  17. Differential Expression of Ccn4 and Other Genes Between Metastatic and Non-metastatic EL4 Mouse Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    S. CHAHAL, MANPREET; TERESA KU, H.; ZHANG, ZHIHONG; M. LEGASPI, CHRISTIAN; LUO, ANGELA; M. HOPKINS, MANDI; E. MEIER, KATHRYN

    2016-01-01

    Background: Previous work characterized variants of the EL4 murine lymphoma cell line. Some are non-metastatic, and others metastatic, in syngenic mice. In addition, metastatic EL4 cells were stably transfected with phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which further enhanced metastasis. Materials and Methods: Microarray analyses of mRNA expression was performed for non-metastatic, metastatic, and PLD2-expressing metastatic EL4 cells. Results: Many differences were observed between non-metastatic and metastatic cell lines. One of the most striking new findings was up-regulation of mRNA for the matricellular protein WNT1-inducible signaling pathway protein 1 (CCN4) in metastatic cells; increased protein expression was verified by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Other differentially expressed genes included those for reproductive homeobox 5 (Rhox5; increased in metastatic) and cystatin 7 (Cst7; decreased in metastatic). Differences between PLD2-expressing and parental cell lines were limited but included the signaling proteins Ras guanyl releasing protein 1 (RGS18; increased with PLD2) and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2; decreased with PLD2). Conclusion: The results provide insights into signaling pathways potentially involved in conferring metastatic ability on lymphoma cells. PMID:27807066

  18. Sequential Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Burke, John M.; Agrawal, Manish; Hauke, Ralph J.; Hutson, Thomas E.; Doshi, Gury; Fleming, Mark T.; Vogelzang, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has changed dramatically in the past decade. As the number of available agents, and related volume of research, has grown, it is increasingly complex to know how to optimally treat patients. The authors are practicing medical oncologists at the US Oncology Network, the largest community-based network of oncology providers in the country, and represent the leadership of the Network’s Genitourinary Research Committee. We outline our thought process in approaching sequential therapy of mRCC and the use of real-world data to inform our approach. We also highlight the evolving literature that will impact practicing oncologists in the near future. PMID:28326277

  19. [Surgical treatment of lung cancer with carcinomatous pleuritis].

    PubMed

    Yokoi, Kohei; Matsuguma, Haruhisa

    2013-07-01

    Carcinomatous pleuritis in patients with lung cancer is usually found to accompany frank malignant effusion and/or multiple pleural tumors and is associated with poor outcomes. The disease condition is now classified as stage IV (M1a) in the present TNM staging system and is generally considered to be a contraindication for surgical resection. However, this condition is sometimes discovered, with or without a small amount of pleural effusion, at thoracotomy in patients with resectable non-small cell lung cancer. The incidence was reported to be approximately 3%, and in such patients surgical treatment has been performed in some institutions. The surgical procedures employed are diverse, including limited resection, lobectomy, pneumonectomy, and extrapleural pneumonectomy. The median postoperative survival times and 5-year survival rates were reported to be 17-30 months and 13-24%, respectively. We performed extrapleural pneumonectomy in 23 patients from 1988 to 2012, and the median survival time and 5-year survival rate are 34 months and 34%, respectively. Among 12 patients with pathologic N0-1 disease, 6 patients are alive without disease 4 to 288 months after surgery, for a median survival time and 5-year survival rate of 126 months and 61%, respectively. Our results indicate that carefully selected patients with carcinomatous pleuritis may be candidates for curative extrapleural pneumonectomy.

  20. Single-cell analysis reveals a stem-cell program in human metastatic breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Devon A; Bhakta, Nirav R; Kessenbrock, Kai; Prummel, Karin D; Yu, Ying; Takai, Ken; Zhou, Alicia; Eyob, Henok; Balakrishnan, Sanjeev; Wang, Chih-Yang; Yaswen, Paul; Goga, Andrei; Werb, Zena

    2015-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of cancer, metastasis remains the cause of >90% of cancer-related mortality. Understanding metastasis initiation and progression is critical to developing new therapeutic strategies to treat and prevent metastatic disease. Prevailing theories hypothesize that metastases are seeded by rare tumour cells with unique properties, which may function like stem cells in their ability to initiate and propagate metastatic tumours. However, the identity of metastasis-initiating cells in human breast cancer remains elusive, and whether metastases are hierarchically organized is unknown. Here we show at the single-cell level that early stage metastatic cells possess a distinct stem-like gene expression signature. To identify and isolate metastatic cells from patient-derived xenograft models of human breast cancer, we developed a highly sensitive fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based assay, which allowed us to enumerate metastatic cells in mouse peripheral tissues. We compared gene signatures in metastatic cells from tissues with low versus high metastatic burden. Metastatic cells from low-burden tissues were distinct owing to their increased expression of stem cell, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, pro-survival, and dormancy-associated genes. By contrast, metastatic cells from high-burden tissues were similar to primary tumour cells, which were more heterogeneous and expressed higher levels of luminal differentiation genes. Transplantation of stem-like metastatic cells from low-burden tissues showed that they have considerable tumour-initiating capacity, and can differentiate to produce luminal-like cancer cells. Progression to high metastatic burden was associated with increased proliferation and MYC expression, which could be attenuated by treatment with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. These findings support a hierarchical model for metastasis, in which metastases are initiated

  1. Gene expression profiling allows distinction between primary and metastatic squamous cell carcinomas in the lung.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Estilo, Cherry; Maghami, Ellie; Sarkaria, Inderpal S; Pham, Duy Khanh; O-charoenrat, Pornchai; Socci, Nicholas D; Ngai, Ivan; Carlson, Diane; Ghossein, Ronald; Viale, Agnes; Park, Bernard J; Rusch, Valerie W; Singh, Bhuvanesh

    2005-04-15

    Lung neoplasms commonly develop in patients previously treated for head and neck carcinomas. The derivation of these tumors, either as new primary lung cancers or as metastatic head and neck cancers, is difficult to establish based on clinical or histopathologic criteria since both are squamous cell carcinomas and have identical features under light microscopy. However, this distinction has significant treatment and prognostic implications. Gene expression profiling was performed on a panel of 52 sequentially collected patients with either primary lung (n = 21) or primary head and neck (n = 31) carcinomas using the Affymetrix HG_U95Av2 high-density oligonucleotide microarray. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering with Ward linkage and the Pearson correlation metric was performed. To assess robustness, bootstrap resampling was performed with 1,000 iterations. A t test of the normalized values for each gene was used to determine the genes responsible for segregating head and neck from lung primary carcinomas, and those with the most differential expression were used for later analyses. In the absence of a large "test" set of tumors, we used a supervised leave-one-out cross-validation to test how well we could predict the tumor origin. Once a gene expression profile was established, 12 lung lesions taken from patients with previously treated head and neck cancers were similarly analyzed by gene expression profiling to determine their sites of origin. Unsupervised clustering analysis separated the study cohort into two distinct groups which reliably remained segregated with bootstrap resampling. Group 1 consisted of 30 tongue carcinomas. Group 2 consisted of 21 lung cancers and 1 tongue carcinoma. The clustering was not changed even when normal lung or tongue profiles were subtracted from the corresponding carcinomatous lesions, and a leave-one-out cross-validation showed a 98% correct prediction (see Supplementary Data 1). A minimum set of 500 genes required to

  2. Lobular Carcinoma of the Breast Metastatic to the Spleen and Accessory Spleen: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that accessory spleen (also known as supernumerary spleen, splenunculus, or splenule) can be found in 10–30% of patients undergoing autopsies, metastatic disease occurring in this organ has been barely reported. A case of lobular breast carcinoma metastatic to the spleen and accessory spleen found incidentally at therapeutic splenectomy for severe anemia and thrombocytopenia is described. On microscopic examination both organs revealed severe fibrocongestive changes and extramedullary hematopoiesis with no obvious carcinomatous involvement. Cytokeratin 7, estrogen receptors, and GATA3 immunohistochemistry disclosed the presence of numerous metastatic breast carcinoma cells infiltrating the splenic parenchyma. This case demonstrates that metastatic carcinoma can be encountered, although rarely, in accessory spleens and that cytokeratin stain should be performed in sections of spleens and/or accessory spleens excised from cancer patients in which the presence of malignant epithelial cells is not recognized on routine sections. PMID:27672468

  3. Metastatic Mechanisms in Follicular Cell-Derived Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phay, John E.; Ringel, Matthew D.

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid cancer incidence is rising annually largely related to enhanced detection and of early stage well-differentiated primary tumors. The prognosis for patients with early stage thyroid cancer is outstanding with most patients being cured with surgery. In selected cases, I-131 is administered to treat known or suspected residual or metastatic disease. Even patients with loco-regional metastases typically have an outstanding long-term prognosis, albeit with monitoring and occasional intervention for residual or recurrent disease. In contrast, individuals with distant metastases from thyroid cancer, particular older patients with larger metastatic burdens and those with poorly differentiated tumors, have a poor prognosis. Patients with metastatic anaplastic thyroid cancer have a particularly poor prognosis. Published clinical trials indicate that transient disease control and partial remissions can be achieved with kinase inhibitor therapy directed toward angiogenic targets, and that in some cases, I-131 uptake can be enhanced. However, the direct targets of activity in metastatic lesions are incompletely defined and clear evidence that these treatments increase the duration or quality of life of patients is lacking, underscoring the need for improved knowledge regarding the metastatic process to inform the development of new therapies. In this review, we will focus on current data and hypotheses regarding key regulators of metastatic dormancy, metastatic progression, and the role of putative cancer stem cells. PMID:24036131

  4. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas.

  5. MicroRNA expression profiles in metastatic and non-metastatic giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Mosakhani, Neda; Pazzaglia, Laura; Benassi, Maria Serena; Borze, Ioana; Quattrini, Irene; Picci, Piero; Knuutila, Sakari

    2013-05-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a skeletal neoplasm, a locally aggressive tumor that occasionally metastasizes to the lungs. To identify novel biomarkers associated with GCTB progression and metastasis, we performed a miRNA microarray on ten primary tumors of GCTB, of which five developed lung metastases and the rest remained metastasis-free. Between metastatic and non-metastatic GCTB, 12 miRNAs were differentially expressed (such as miR-136, miR-513a-5p, miR-494, miR-224, and miR-542-5p). A decreased level of miR-136 in metastatic versus non-metastatic GCTB was significantly confirmed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) (p=0.04). To identify potential target genes for the differentially expressed miRNAs, we used three target prediction databases. Then, to functionally validate the potential target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs, we re-analyzed our previous gene expression data from the same ten patients. Eight genes such as NFIB, TNC, and FLRT2 were inversely expressed relative to their predicted miRNA regulators. NFIB expression correlated in metastatic GCTB with no or low expression of miR-136, and this gene was selected for further verification with qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Verification of NFIB mRNA and protein by qRT-PCR showed elevated expression levels in metastatic GCTBs. Further, the protein expression level of NFIB was tested in an independent validation cohort of 74 primary archival GCTB specimens. In the primary tumors that developed metastases compared to the disease-free group, NFIB protein was moderately to strongly expressed at a higher frequency. Thus, in GCTB, miR-136 and NFIB may serve as prognostic makers.

  6. Mechanosensitive pannexin-1 channels mediate microvascular metastatic cell survival.

    PubMed

    Furlow, Paul W; Zhang, Steven; Soong, T David; Halberg, Nils; Goodarzi, Hani; Mangrum, Creed; Wu, Y Gloria; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Sohail F

    2015-07-01

    During metastatic progression, circulating cancer cells become lodged within the microvasculature of end organs, where most die from mechanical deformation. Although this phenomenon was first described over a half-century ago, the mechanisms enabling certain cells to survive this metastasis-suppressive barrier remain unknown. By applying whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing technology to isogenic cancer cells of differing metastatic capacities, we identified a mutation encoding a truncated form of the pannexin-1 (PANX1) channel, PANX1(1-89), as recurrently enriched in highly metastatic breast cancer cells. PANX1(1-89) functions to permit metastatic cell survival during traumatic deformation in the microvasculature by augmenting ATP release from mechanosensitive PANX1 channels activated by membrane stretch. PANX1-mediated ATP release acts as an autocrine suppressor of deformation-induced apoptosis through P2Y-purinergic receptors. Finally, small-molecule therapeutic inhibition of PANX1 channels is found to reduce the efficiency of breast cancer metastasis. These data suggest a molecular basis for metastatic cell survival on microvasculature-induced biomechanical trauma.

  7. Marine algal fucoxanthin inhibits the metastatic potential of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tae-Wook; Choi, Hee-Jung; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Jeong, Han-Sol; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Joo, Myungsoo; Choi, Jun-Yong; Han, Chang-Woo; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Jae-Sue; Ha, Ki-Tae

    2013-10-04

    Metastasis is major cause of malignant cancer-associated mortality. Fucoxanthin has effect on various pharmacological activities including anti-cancer activity. However, the inhibitory effect of fucoxanthin on cancer metastasis remains unclear. Here, we show that fucoxanthin isolated from brown alga Saccharina japonica has anti-metastatic activity. To check anti-metastatic properties of fucoxanthin, in vitro models including assays for invasion, migration, actin fiber organization and cancer cell-endothelial cell interaction were used. Fucoxanthin inhibited the expression and secretion of MMP-9 which plays a critical role in tumor invasion and migration, and also suppressed invasion of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells as evidenced by transwell invasion assay. In addition, fucoxanthin diminished the expressions of the cell surface glycoprotein CD44 and CXC chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4) which play roles in migration, invasion and cancer-endothelial cell adhesion. Fucoxanthin markedly suppressed cell migration in wound healing assay and inhibited actin fiber formation. The adhesion of B16-F10 melanoma cells to the endothelial cells was significantly inhibited by fucoxanthin. Moreover, in experimental lung metastasis in vivo assay, fucoxanthin resulted in significant reduction of tumor nodules. Taken together, we demonstrate, for the first time, that fucoxanthin suppresses metastasis of highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

  8. Multiple metastatic renal cell carcinoma isolated to pancreas.

    PubMed

    Comunoğlu, Cem; Altaca, Gülüm; Demiralay, Ebru; Moray, Gökhan

    2012-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastases to the pancreas are reported to be rare. Isolated multiple pancreatic metastases are even rarer. We report a 68-year-old asymptomatic male patient who presented with multiple metastatic nodular lesions in the pancreas demonstrated by computerized tomography 3.5 years after radical nephrectomy performed for clear cell RCC. Spleen-preserving total pancreatectomy was performed. Gross examination revealed five well-demarcated tumoral nodules in the head, body and tail of the pancreas. Histopathological examination revealed clusters of epithelial clear cells, immunohistochemically positive for CD10 and vimentin, and negative for CK19 and chromogranin, supporting a diagnosis of metastatic RCC. The patient has remained well at 29 months post-resection, in agreement with recent experience that radical resection for multiple isolated metastatic nodular lesions can achieve improved survival and better quality of life.

  9. (-)-Gossypol reduces invasiveness in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Acquisition of metastatic ability by prostatic cancer cells is the most lethal aspect of prostatic cancer progression. (-)-Gossypol, a polyphenolic compound present in cottonseeds, possesses anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects in various cancer cells. In this study, the differences betwee...

  10. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  11. Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Seth, Abhishek; Palmer, Thomas R; Campbell, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice from metastatic lung cancer is extremely rare. Most reported cases have had small cell cancer of lung or adenocarcinoma of lung as primary malignancy metastasizing to the biliary system. We report the case of a patient presenting with symptoms of obstructive jaundice found to have metastatic involvement of hepatobiliary system from squamous cell cancer (SCC) of lung. ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) with biliary stenting is the procedure of choice in such patients. Our case is made unique by the fact that technical difficulties made it difficult for the anesthesiologists to intubate the patient for an ERCP. As a result percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) with internal-external biliary drainage was performed.

  12. [A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer with Carcinomatous Pleurisy Successfully Treated with Biweekly Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takashi; Goto, Yoshinari; Sakiyama, Kana; Kimura, Morihiko

    2016-11-01

    A 72-year-old woman underwent mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for left breast cancer at the age of 43 years, and was diagnosed with breast cancer metastasis to the pleura at the age of 68 years. She had been sequentially treated with hormonal therapies, but complained of a cough and dyspnea after 4 years. Chest radiography showed right pleural effusion, and cytological examination of the pleural effusion revealed adenocarcinoma cells. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was administered. Two months later, the pleural effusion had disappeared. Biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy was continued without any severe adverse events. After 30 months, the patient has remained free of carcinomatous pleurisy recurrence. Therefore, biweekly paclitaxel and bevacizumab therapy can be safely and effectively administered to elderly patients with carcinomatous pleurisy.

  13. Signet cell adenocarcinoma of the rectum metastatic to the orbit.

    PubMed

    Charles, Norman C; Ng, Diana D; Zoumalan, Christopher I

    2012-01-01

    A 24-year-old man developed abdominal carcinomatosis from signet cell carcinoma of the rectum. His only distal metastasis involved the superior orbit. Orbital pathology showed signet cells with a characteristic immunopathologic pattern. No hereditary syndrome was found. The authors identified only 5 cases in the literature describing colorectal adenocarcinoma metastatic to the orbit, with 2 showing histopathology. The authors believe that this rare case represents the first illustrating bona fide signet cell colorectal cancer involving the orbit.

  14. Cell stiffness is a biomarker of the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenwei; Mezencev, Roman; Kim, Byungkyu; Wang, Lijuan; McDonald, John; Sulchek, Todd; Sulchek Team; McDonald Team

    2013-03-01

    The metastatic potential of cells is an important parameter in the design of optimal strategies for the personalized treatment of cancer. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we show that ovarian cancer cells are generally softer and display lower intrinsic variability in cell stiffness than non-malignant ovarian epithelial cells. A detailed study of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells (HEY A8) and their less invasive parental cells (HEY), demonstrates that deformability can serve as an accurate biomarker of metastatic potential. Comparative gene expression profiling indicate that the reduced stiffness of highly metastatic HEY A8 cells is associated with actin cytoskeleton remodeling, microscopic examination of actin fiber structure in these cell lines is consistent with this prediction. Our results indicate that cell stiffness not only distinguishes ovarian cancer cells from non-malignant cells, but may also be a useful biomarker to evaluate the relative metastatic potential of ovarian and perhaps other types of cancer cells.

  15. Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia. Blast cell aggregates simulating metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Pui, C H; Rivera, G; Mirro, J; Stass, S; Peiper, S; Murphy, S B

    1985-11-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is a rare leukemia that can present diagnostic problems. We describe two children who have this disease and had clumps of blast cells in their bone marrow, a finding usually attributed to metastatic tumor. The megakaryocytic origin of the cells was supported by their cytochemical staining pattern (positive alpha-naphthyl acetate esterase resistant to sodium fluoride inhibition and negative alpha-naphthyl butyrate esterase) and by the presence of factor VIII-related antigen. Ultrastructural studies of blast cells from one patient demonstrated platelet peroxidase. The mechanism of blast cell clump formation in these cases is unknown; nevertheless, awareness that this feature can occur in acute megakaryoblastic leukemia may avoid a misdiagnosis of metastatic solid tumor.

  16. Extracellular matrix mediators of metastatic cell colonization characterized using scaffold mimics of the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Caffe, Jordan R.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Azarin, Samira M.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells colonize the pre-metastatic niche, which is a complex microenvironment consisting partially of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. We sought to identify and validate novel contributors to tumor cell colonization using ECM coated poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds as mimics of the pre-metastatic niche. Utilizing orthotopic breast cancer mouse models, fibronectin and collagen IV-coated scaffolds implanted in the subcutaneous space captured colonizing tumor cells, showing a greater than 2-fold increase in tumor cell accumulation at the implant site compared to uncoated scaffolds. As a strategy to identify additional ECM colonization contributors, decellularized matrix (DCM) from lungs and livers containing metastatic tumors were characterized. In vitro, metastatic cell adhesion was increased on DCM coatings from diseased organs relative to healthy DCM. Furthermore, in vivo implantations of diseased DCM-coated scaffolds had increased tumor cell colonization relative to healthy DCM coatings. Mass-spectrometry proteomics was performed on healthy and diseased DCM to identify candidates associated with colonization. Myeloperoxidase was identified as abundantly present in diseased organs and validated as a contributor to colonization using myeloperoxidase-coated scaffold implants. This work identified novel ECM proteins associated with colonization using decellularization and proteomics techniques and validated candidates using a scaffold to mimic the pre-metastatic niche. PMID:26844426

  17. The dual role of TLR3 in metastatic cell line.

    PubMed

    Matijevic, Tanja; Pavelic, Jasminka

    2011-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are members of transmembrane proteins that recognize conserved molecular motifs of viral and bacterial origin and initiate innate immune response. As the role of TLRs in tumors cells is still not clear, our aim was to investigate the role of TLR3 in primary tumor and metastatic cells (SW480, SW620, FaDu and Detroit 562). We have reported here on the dual role of TLR3 in pharynx metastatic cell line (Detroit 562); on one hand TLR3 activation drove cells to apoptosis while on the other its stimulation contributed to tumor progression by altering the expression of tumor promoting genes (PLAUR, RORB) and enhancing the cell migration potential. In addition, we have shown TLR3 signaling pathway is functional in another metastatic cancer cell line (SW620) suggesting TLR3 might be important in the process of tumor metastasis. Since TLR3 agonists have been used in tumor therapy with the aim to activate immune system, scientific contribution of this work is drawing attention to the importance of further work on this topic, especially pro-tumor effect of TLR3, in order to avoid possible side-effects.

  18. [Antalgic radiotherapy in lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathies].

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Gaeta, M; Pergolizzi, S; Settineri, N; Frosina, P; De Renzis, C

    1994-06-01

    Lumbosacral carcinomatous neuropathy (LCN) may be caused by infiltration or compression of the lumbosacral plexi and nerves from intrapelvic or paraaortic neoplasms. The authors submitted 23 patients complaining of LCN with CT documented intrapelvic or paraaortic tumors to palliative radiotherapy. Megavoltage external beam irradiation was administered using a 6-MV linear accelerator. Treatment field sizes ranged from 56 cm2 to 235 cm2 (mean: 150.54 cm2) and encompassed only the site where the disease involved the lumbosacral plexus or its branches. > or = 3 Gy/day fractions were used. Twenty-one of 22 assessable patients (95.4%) obtained LCN pain relief; 19 (86.3%) obtained complete LCN pain relief. The median time to pain progression (TPP) was 150 days (range: 39-510 days). The median survival was 165 days. Seven patients were LCN pain-free at death. Two patients are alive and LCN pain-free. The remaining 12 patients had recurrent LCN pain: four of them were reirradiated at the site of previous neuropathy and only two had partial relief again. The authors conclude that it is advisable to submit to palliative radiotherapy the inoperable disseminated and/or recurrent cancer patients complaining of LCN, to use large fractions not to occupy the extant time of their already short life-expectancy, and to design small fields to avoid acute side-effects.

  19. [A Case of Recurrent Breast Cancer with Carcinomatous Pleurisy Successfully Treated with Paclitaxel and Bevacizumab after Radical Mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Nanae; Moriya, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Tamio; Yamagishi, Youji; Hasegawa, Shou; Tsuda, Hitoshi; Hase, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Junji

    2015-06-01

    A 61-year-old postmenopausal woman with breast cancer and carcinomatous pleurisy was successfully treated with bevacizumab and paclitaxel. In December 2008, after receiving preoperative chemotherapy consisting of q3w 4 cycles of EC (E: 90 mg/m2, C: 600 mg/m2) and 12 cycles of weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m2), the patient underwent modified radical mastectomy with axillary lymph node dissection for right breast cancer. Pathological examination showed residual tumor cells and lymph node metastasis (pT4bN2M0, Stage III b). In July 2012, 3 and a half years later, she complained of a cough and dyspnea. Chest X-ray and computed tomography scans showed a pleural effusion involving the entire left thoracic cavity, indicating carcinomatous pleurisy. Bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy was initiated. Soon thereafter, the pleural fluid disappeared, tumor marker levels decreased, and symptoms were ameliorated. After 6 cycles of bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy, the patient continuously received 3 cycles of weekly paclitaxel (80 mg/m2). Two years and 4 months since the diagnosis, she has remained free of carcinomatous pleurisy recurrence. She is currently receiving hormone therapy on an outpatient basis. Bevacizumab and paclitaxel therapy is potentially effective for the treatment of patients with carcinomatous pleurisy, providing a chance for long-term survival.

  20. Vismodegib: in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2012-07-30

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the US, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. Vismodegib selectively and potently inhibits the Hedgehog signalling pathway by binding to Smoothened, thereby inhibiting the activation of Hedgehog target genes. Oral vismodegib was effective in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (n = 63) or metastatic (n = 33) BCC, according to the results of an ongoing, noncomparative, multinational, pivotal, phase II trial (ERIVANCE BCC). In this trial (using a clinical cutoff date of 26 November 2010), the independent review facility overall response rate was 42.9% in patients with locally advanced BCC and 30.3% in patients with metastatic BCC. In both patients with locally advanced BCC and those with metastatic BCC, the median duration of response was 7.6 months and median progression-free survival was 9.5 months. Oral vismodegib had an acceptable tolerability profile in patients with advanced BCC.

  1. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  2. Nuclear dynamics in metastatic cells studied by quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Silvia; Kandel, Mikhail; Sridharan, Shamira; Monroy, Freddy; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    We used a new quantitative high spatiotemporal resolution phase imaging tool to explore the nuclear structure and dynamics of individual cells. We used a novel analysis tool to quantify the diffusion outside and inside the nucleus of live cells. We also obtained information about the nuclear spatio temporal mass density in metastatic cells. The results indicate that in the cytoplasm, the intracellular transport is mainly active (direct, deterministic), while inside the nucleus it is both active and passive (diffusive, random). We calculated the standard deviation of velocities in active transport and the diffusion coefficient for passive transport.

  3. Carcinomatous meningitis: Leptomeningeal metastases in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C.

    2013-01-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) results from metastatic spread of cancer to the leptomeninges, giving rise to central nervous system dysfunction. Breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma are the most frequent causes of LM among solid tumors in adults. An early diagnosis of LM, before fixed neurologic deficits are manifest, permits earlier and potentially more effective treatment, thus leading to a better quality of life in patients so affected. Apart from a clinical suspicion of LM, diagnosis is dependent upon demonstration of cancer in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or radiographic manifestations as revealed by neuraxis imaging. Potentially of use, though not commonly employed, today are use of biomarkers and protein profiling in the CSF. Symptomatic treatment is directed at pain including headache, nausea, and vomiting, whereas more specific LM-directed therapies include intra-CSF chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and site-specific radiotherapy. A special emphasis in the review discusses novel agents including targeted therapies, that may be promising in the future management of LM. These new therapies include anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib and gefitinib in nonsmall cell lung cancer, anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab in breast cancer, anti-CTLA4 ipilimumab and anti-BRAF tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as vermurafenib in melanoma, and the antivascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody bevacizumab are currently under investigation in patients with LM. Challenges of managing patients with LM are manifold and include determining the appropriate patients for treatment as well as the optimal route of administration of intra-CSF drug therapy. PMID:23717798

  4. Coexistence of microfilaria with metastatic adenocarcinomatous deposit from breast in axillary lymph node cytology: A rare association

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nibedita; Saha, Arpita; Mishra, Pritinanda

    2017-01-01

    Filariasis is a global social health problem of tropical and sub tropical countries like India. W.bancrofti accounts for 95% of cases of lymphatic filariasis. Microfilaria in cytosmears are a rare finding. We report a case of 55 year old female presented with right axillary swelling with ipsilateral breast lump. Cytosmears from the lymph node aspirate showed metastatic adenocarcinomatous deposits and a bunch of microfilariae surrounding the tumor cells and the aspirate from the breast shows ductal carcinoma. We report an additional case of a rare association of microfilaria co-existing with carcinomatous deposit in the lymph node. PMID:28182075

  5. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  6. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST).

    PubMed

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites.

  7. Management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma – mini review

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Himanshu; Sood, Swapan

    2015-01-01

    The management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has evolved considerably in the last decade. A number of different systemic molecular targeted agents that have been recently approved have improved the survival of patients with mRCC. This mini-review focuses on the implementation of multi-modality therapy in the management of mRCC and the approved indications of the various available novel agents. These novel agents have expanded our armamentarium and improved clinical outcomes of this challenging disease that has considerable biological heterogeneity and clinical variability. PMID:28326262

  8. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients.

  9. Renal cell carcinoma metastatic to gallbladder: a survival advantage to simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hellenthal, Nicholas J; Stewart, Gregory S; Cambio, Angelo J; Delair, Sean M

    2007-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a relatively uncommon cancer. Patients presenting with a renal adenocarcinoma are often found to have evidence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. Herein, we describe the case of a 39-year-old male with renal cell carcinoma and a synchronous metastatic focus to the gallbladder. The patient underwent a successful simultaneous nephrectomy and cholecystectomy and is doing well 30 months after surgery without evidence of disease recurrence. A thorough metastatic work-up along with aggressive surgical intervention in patients with renal cell carcinoma and unusual metastatic foci can provide a long-term favorable outcome.

  10. Different growth and metastatic phenotypes associated with a cell-intrinsic change of Met in metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Eri; Sakai, Katsuya; Nishiuchi, Takumi; Imamura, Ryu; Sato, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic phenotypic change contributes to the metastatic progression and drug resistance in malignant melanoma. Nevertheless, mechanisms for a phenotypic change have remained to be addressed. Here, we show that Met receptor expression changes in a cell-autonomous manner and can distinguish phenotypical differences in growth, as well as in metastatic and drug-resistant characteristics. In metastatic melanoma, the cells are composed of Met-low and Met-high populations. Met-low populations have stem-like gene expression profiles, are resistant to chemotherapeutic agents, and have shown abundant angiogenesis and rapid tumor growth in subcutaneous inoculation. Met-high populations have a differentiated phenotype, are relatively resistant to B-RAF inhibitor, and are highly metastatic to the lungs. Met plays a definitive role in lung metastasis because the lung metastasis of Met-high cells requires Met, and treatment of mice with the Met-containing exosomes from Met-high cells facilitates lung metastasis by Met-low cells. Clonal cell fate analysis showed the hierarchical phenotypical changes from Met-low to Met-high populations. Met-low cells either showed self-renewal or changed into Met-high cells, whereas Met-high cells remained Met-high. Clonal transition from Met-low to Met-high cells accompanied changes in the gene expression profile, in tumor growth, and in metastasis that were similar to those in Met-high cells. These findings indicate that malignant melanoma has the ability to undergo phenotypic change by a cell-intrinsic/autonomous mechanism that can be characterized by Met expression. PMID:27683122

  11. Association between shortage of energy supply and nuclear gene mutations leading to carcinomatous transformation.

    PubMed

    DU, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Anaerobic bacteria use glycolysis, an oxygen-independent metabolic pathway, whereas energy metabolism in the evolved eukaryotic cell is performed via oxidative phosphorylation, with all eukaryotic cell activities depending upon high energy consumption. However, in cancer cells evolving from eukaryotic cells, the energy metabolism switches from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis. The shortage of energy supply induces cancer cells to acquire specific characteristics. Base pair renewal is the most energy-consuming process in the cell, and shortage of energy supply may lead to errors in this process; the more prominent the shortage in energy supply, the more errors are likely to occur in base pair renewal, resulting in gene mutations and expression of cancer cell characteristics. Thus, shortage of energy supply is associated with carcinomatous transformation.

  12. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  13. Optical detection of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chih-Ling; Chiu, Wen-Tai; Lo, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chin-Ho; Chen, Yu-Bin; Chang, Shu-Jing; Ke, Tung-Ting; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Wu, Hua-Lin

    2015-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for 90% of all cancer-related deaths in humans. As a result, reliable techniques for detecting metastatic cells are urgently required. Although various techniques have been proposed for metastasis detection, they are generally capable of detecting metastatic cells only once migration has already occurred. Accordingly, the present study proposes an optical method for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells using a scanned laser pico-projection system (SLPP). The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using five pairs of cancer cell lines and two pairs of non-cancer cell lines treated by IPTG induction in order to mimic normal cells with an overexpression of oncogene. The results show that for all of the considered cell lines, the SLPP speckle contrast of the high-metastatic cells is significantly higher than that of the low-metastatic cells. As a result, the speckle contrast measurement provides a reliable means of distinguishing quantitatively between low- and high-metastatic cells of the same origin. Compared to existing metastasis detection methods, the proposed SLPP approach has many advantages, including a higher throughput, a lower cost, a larger sample size and a more reliable diagnostic performance. As a result, it provides a highly promising solution for physical characterization of metastatic cancer cells in vitro.

  14. IGFBP‐3 inhibits Wnt signaling in metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zingariello, Maria; Sancillo, Laura; Panasiti, Vincenzo; Polinari, Dorina; Martella, Marianna; Rosa Alba, Rana; Londei, Paola

    2016-01-01

    In previous works, we have shown that insulin‐like growth factor‐binding protein‐3 (IGFBP‐3), a tissue and circulating protein able to bind to IGFs, decreases drastically in the blood serum of patients with diffuse metastatic melanoma. In agreement with the clinical data, recombinant IGFBP‐3 was found to inhibit the motility and invasiveness of cultured metastatic melanoma cells and to prevent growth of grafted melanomas in mice. The present work was aimed at identifying the signal transduction pathways underlying the anti‐tumoral effects of IGFBP‐3. We show that the anti‐tumoral effect of IGFBP‐3 is due to inhibition of the Wnt pathway and depends upon the presence of CD44, a receptor protein known to modulate Wnt signaling. Once it has entered the cell, IGFBP‐3 binds the Wnt signalosome interacting specifically with its component GSK‐3β. As a consequence, the β‐catenin destruction complex dissociates from the LRP6 Wnt receptor and GSK‐3β is activated through dephosphorylation, becoming free to target cytoplasmic β‐catenin which is degraded by the proteasomal pathway. Altogether, the results suggest that IGFBP‐3 is a novel and effective inhibitor of Wnt signaling. As IGFBP‐3 is a physiological protein which has no detectable toxic effects either on cultured cells or live mice, it might qualify as an interesting new therapeutic agent in melanoma, and potentially many other cancers with a hyperactive Wnt signaling. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27377812

  15. Axitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Kardas, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study Due to the emergence of new therapeutic opportunities in the second-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma, the choice of the appropriate medication requires consideration. Making the selection one should take into account the likelihood of response, the probability of toxicity, properties of the drug and the clinical characteristics of the patient. Aim of the work was to confirm antitumor efficacy of axitinib in patients with metastatic clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma in the second line treatment remaining under the care of our institution. The primary objective was to determine antitumor activity, secondary – to evaluate progression free survival, safety of the treatment and to analyse clinical characteristics of treated population. Results Treatment records of 27 patients (9 females, 18 males) treated from October 2014 to the present (July 2016) were reviewed. The median duration of treatment which corresponds to the time to disease progression in observed population was 6 months (range: under 1 month – 16 months). 1 patient (3.7%) had got objective response (PR, partial remission). Clinical benefit rate (PR + SD (stable disease) was 66%. 9 patients (33.33%) experienced treatment toxicity only in the first degree of CTCAE (common toxicity criteria for adverse events), 11 patients (40.74%) presented the second degree toxicity and 5 patients (18.5%) – third degree. The most commonly reported treatment related adverse events were diarrhea (47%), fatigue (26%), hand-foot syndrome (26%), deterioration of blood pressure control (22.2%), abnormal liver function tests (18.5%), mucositis (11.1%). We observed 3 cases of unacceptable toxicity. Conclusions Axitinib confirms its effectiveness also in situation outside clinical trials, however, it is characterized by significant toxicity. Therefore, qualification for treatment should take into account the clinical patient characteristics. Effective diagnosis and treatment of side effects and

  16. Postradiation lumbosacral radiculopathy with spinal root cavernomas mimicking carcinomatous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Ducray, François; Guillevin, Rémy; Psimaras, Dimitri; Sanson, Marc; Mokhtari, Karima; Delanian, Sylvie; Navarro, Soledad; Maisonobe, Thierry; Cornu, Philippe; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Pradat, Pierre-François

    2008-01-01

    Lumbosacral radiculopathy is a rare complication of radiotherapy and may be challenging to differentiate from diagnosis of a tumor recurrence. We reviewed the records of three patients with a past history of cancer and radiotherapy who were referred for suspicion of carcinomatous meningitis on lumbar MRI, but whose final diagnosis was radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculopathy. The three patients developed a progressive lumbosacral radiculopathy at 20, 13, and 47 years after lumbar radiotherapy delivered for renal cancer, Hodgkin’s disease, and a seminoma, respectively. MRI showed a diffuse, nodular enhancement of the cauda equina nerve roots on T1 sequences, suggestive of leptomeningeal metastasis. A slowly progressive clinical course over several years and negative cerebrospinal fluid cytologic analysis ruled out the diagnosis of carcinomatous meningitis. Because of the radiologic findings, a biopsy was performed in two patients. In the first, a biopsy limited to the arachnoid excluded a malignant infiltration. In the second, a biopsy of the enhancing lesions demonstrated spinal root cavernomas. These observations, together with three recent case reports in the literature, delineate a syndrome of “radiation-induced lumbosacral radiculopathy with multiple spinal root cavernomas” that mimics carcinomatous meningitis on MRI. Its diagnosis is important in order to avoid inappropriate treatment and useless or dangerous spinal root biopsies. PMID:18755918

  17. Metastatic Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma with Gastrointestinal Involvement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Brian; Schwartz, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) involving the gastrointestinal tract as the sole site of metastatic disease is exceedingly rare. We report a patient with known cutaneous SCC that metastasized to regional lymph nodes who, after therapy, appeared to be disease free until a small metastatic lesion was identified on colonoscopy within a diverticular orifice. He was subsequently noted to have more diffuse gastrointestinal involvement, including a small bowel lesion not previously identified on imaging. The presence of a gastrointestinal metastatic lesion in this setting should prompt consideration to exclude other synchronous lesions and the need for possible additional systemic therapy.

  18. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  19. Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma-Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 .TITLE: Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Overcoming Bone Marrow Stroma- Mediated Chemoresistance in DAMD17-03- 1 -0524 Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert...the compound (Figure 1 ). The inhibitor was slightly more effective in T-47D cells than in MCF-7 cells, but did not eradicate dormant clones much past

  20. Axitinib in sequential therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hryciuk, Beata; Stec, Rafał; Mączewski, Michał; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy of new molecularly targeted drugs in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC), confirmed in clinical studies in relation to survival and prolongation of time to progression, has became a big chance for patients with metastatic renal cell cancer. Axitinib is a potent and selective receptor tyrosine kinase for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR-1, -2, -3), platelet-derived growth factor β (PDGRF-β) and c-KIT. This is a case report of a 57-year old female patient with a history of left nephrectomy due to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The patient had received three prior systemic treatments (interferon – sorafenib – everolimus). After consecutive progression the patient was qualified to 4th line therapy – axitinib at a dose of 5 mg twice daily. Partial response to treatment was achieved. After 6 months therapy was stopped due to the disease progression. The total time to progression was 37.5 months. The total survival time from the disease diagnosis was 45 months. Based on literature date and own experience we showed that sequential treatment RCC is associated with improved survival. In summary, axitinib may be an effective drug after failure of tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (TKI) therapy in previous lines of therapy.

  1. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-05-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents.

  2. Phenotypic screening of a library of compounds against metastatic and non-metastatic clones of a canine mammary gland tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Michishita, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Murai, K; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metastases are associated with a poor prognosis for canine mammary gland tumours (CMGTs). Metastatic and non-metastatic clones were isolated previously from a single malignant CMGT cell line. The difference in metastatic potential between the two cell lines was hypothesised to be associated with distinct cellular signalling. The aim of this study was to screen for compounds that specifically target metastatic cells in order to improve CMGT therapeutic outcomes. The two clonal cell lines were characterised by transcriptome analysis and their sensitivity to a library of 291 different compounds was compared. The metastatic clone exhibited elevated expression of molecules associated with degradation of the extracellular matrix, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype. This was confirmed using a matrigel invasion assay and by assessment of aldehyde dehydrogenase activity. The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex inhibitors (MRCIs; rotenone, antimycin and oligomycin) significantly inhibited the growth of the metastatic clone. Although MRCIs similarly depleted mitochondrial ATP in both clones, the subsequent cellular response was different, with toxicity to the metastatic clone being independent of AMP-activated protein kinase activity. The results of this study suggest a potential utility of MRCIs as anti-tumour agents against metastatic CMGTs. Further studies are needed to investigate the clinical utility of MRCIs and to determine the association between MRCI sensitivity and malignancy.

  3. Optical redox ratio identifies metastatic potential-dependent changes in breast cancer cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Alhallak, Kinan; Rebello, Lisa G.; Muldoon, Timothy J.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2016-01-01

    The development of prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic risk could reduce the number of patients receiving chemotherapy for tumors with low metastatic potential. Recent evidence points to a critical role for cell metabolism in driving breast cancer metastasis. Endogenous fluorescence intensity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) can provide a label-free method for assessing cell metabolism. We report the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD + NADH) of four isogenic triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with varying metastatic potential. Under normoxic conditions, the redox ratio increases with increasing metastatic potential (168FARN>4T07>4T1), indicating a shift to more oxidative metabolism in cells capable of metastasis. Reoxygenation following acute hypoxia increased the redox ratio by 43 ± 9% and 33 ± 4% in the 4T1 and 4T07 cells, respectively; in contrast, the redox ratio decreased 14 ± 7% in the non-metastatic 67NR cell line. These results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio is sensitive to the metabolic adaptability of breast cancer cells with high metastatic potential and could potentially be used to measure dynamic functional changes that are indicative of invasive or metastatic potential. PMID:27895979

  4. Functional significance of secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 in metastatic renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Saini, Sharanjot; Liu, Jan; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Kawakami, Kazumori; Hirata, Hiroshi; Dahiya, Rajvir

    2009-09-01

    The secreted Frizzled-related protein 1 (SFRP1) is a Wingless-type (Wnt) antagonist that has been associated with various malignancies, including renal cell carcinomas (RCC). However, the functional significance of SFRP1 has never been investigated in metastatic RCC. Here, we investigated the role of this molecule in kidney cancer progression and metastasis. Using Wnt pathway-focused cDNA expression profiling in normal renal, primary RCC, and metastatic RCC cell lines, we identified that SFRP1 is up-regulated in metastatic RCC. SFRP1 overexpression in metastatic RCC was confirmed by immunostaining in renal tissues. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying SFRP1 up-regulation by analyzing DNA methylation and histone modification patterns on SFRP1 promoter. We found that this gene is unmethylated/hypomethylated and enriched in activating histone modifications in metastatic RCC. To understand the functional significance of SFRP1 overexpression in metastatic RCC with regard to tumorigenesis, we used a small interfering RNA-mediated approach to knockdown the gene and monitored cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and metastatic behavior. Proliferation was unaltered and apoptosis increased on attenuation of SFRP1 expression. Also, SFRP1 depletion decreased the invasive potential of the metastatic RCC cell line, suggesting that the overexpression of this Wnt antagonist may be related to invasiveness and metastatic behavior in RCC. We investigated the molecular basis of the role of SFRP1 in invasion and metastasis and found that matrix metalloproteinase MMP10 is regulated by SFRP1. In conclusion, our data suggest that SFRP1 plays a role in the metastatic potential of RCC. The present findings may be important in the design of treatment modalities for metastatic RCC.

  5. Organ-specific isogenic metastatic breast cancer cell lines exhibit distinct Raman spectral signatures and metabolomes.

    PubMed

    Winnard, Paul T; Zhang, Chi; Vesuna, Farhad; Kang, Jeon Woong; Garry, Jonah; Dasari, Ramachandra Rao; Barman, Ishan; Raman, Venu

    2017-01-27

    Molecular characterization of organ-specific metastatic lesions, which distinguish them from the primary tumor, will provide a better understanding of tissue specific adaptations that regulate metastatic progression. Using an orthotopic xenograft model, we have isolated isogenic metastatic human breast cancer cell lines directly from organ explants that are phenotypically distinct from the primary tumor cell line. Label-free Raman spectroscopy was used and informative spectral bands were ascertained as differentiators of organ-specific metastases as opposed to the presence of a single universal marker. Decision algorithms derived from the Raman spectra unambiguously identified these isogenic cell lines as unique biological entities - a finding reinforced through metabolomic analyses that indicated tissue of origin metabolite distinctions between the cell lines. Notably, complementarity of the metabolomics and Raman datasets was found. Our findings provide evidence that metastatic spread generates tissue-specific adaptations at the molecular level within cancer cells, which can be differentiated with Raman spectroscopy.

  6. Establishment and characterization of a new highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line derived from Saos2

    PubMed Central

    Du, Lin; Fan, Qiming; Tu, Bing; Yan, Wei; Tang, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignancy of bone in adolescents and young adults. There is a shortage of tumorigenic and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell lines that can be used for metastasis study. Here we establish and characterize a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that is derived from Saos2 cell line based on bioluminescence. The occasional pulmonary metastatic cells developed from Saos2 were isolated, harvested, characterized and named Saos2-l. The parental Saos2 and Saos2-l cells were further characterized both in vitro and in vivo. Results showed that Saos2-l cells demonstrated increased cell adhesion, migration and invasion compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Conversely, Saos2-l cells grew at a slightly slower rate than that of the parental cells. When injected into nude mice, Saos2-l cells had a greater increase in developing pulmonary metastases compared to the parental Saos2 cells. Further transcriptional profiling analysis revealed that some gene expression were up-regulated or down-regulated in the highly metastatic Saos2-l cells, indicating possible influencing factors of metastasis. Thus, we have established and characterized a highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cell line that should serve as a valuable tool for future investigations on the pathogenesis, metastasis and potential treatments of human osteosarcoma. PMID:25031706

  7. Metastatic pancreatic islet cell carcinoma to the orbit: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Amin M.; Teichmann, Klaus; Dabbagh, Najwa; Huaman, Antonio M.

    1998-03-01

    We report a rare case of pancreatic islet cell carcinoma metastatic to the orbit in a 29-year-old woman. The initial symptomatology, progression of the disease, and radiologic and histopathologic findings are presented and discussed.

  8. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joachims, Zohar; Feinmesser, Raphael; Purim, Ofer; Halpern, Marisa; Brenner, Baruch; Fenig, Eyal; Roizman, Pepi; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Feinmesser, Meora

    2008-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the development and progression of many tumors, and its inhibition has been shown to block tumor growth. This study examined COX-2 expression in primary and metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 26 primary MCCs and 7 lymph node metastases were stained immunohistochemically with a monoclonal antibody directed against COX-2, and the percentage and intensity of staining were analyzed semiquantitatively. Immunopositivity for COX-2 was found in 20 primary tumors (77%), and was diffuse in 16 of them (80%). Staining intensity was strong in 5 tumors (19%), moderate in 6 (23%), and weak in 9 (35%). Five metastases (71%) showed similar staining. Prominent mitotic activity was associated with more diffuse COX-2 immunopositivity. No association was found between COX-2 expression and outcome. This study confirms that most MCCs express COX-2 and shows that COX-2 expression is related to one parameter of aggressive behavior--a high mitotic rate--but not to any others. The possibility of treating MCC with COX-2 inhibitors should be considered.

  10. Systemic Therapies for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sumanta K.; Vanderwalde, Ari; Hurria, Arti; Figlin, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapies has radically changed the treatment paradigm for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). However, multiple clinical dilemmas have emerged. For instance, limited data are available to juxtapose the safety and efficacy profile of targeted therapies between older and younger adults. Herein, pivotal trials of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)- and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-directed therapies are assessed in the context of their implications in treating older adults with mRCC. In general, subset analyses from these pivotal studies suggest similar efficacy of targeted therapies amongst older adults. Aging is accompanied by a multitude of physiological changes, as well as an increased prevalence of co-morbidities. The age-related toxicity profiles of targeted agents for mRCC are detailed to provide a framework for the risks and benefits of these therapies in older adults. Ultimately, tools such as the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) that account for physiological (as opposed to chronological) age may prove useful in the evaluation and treatment of older adults with mRCC. PMID:21812499

  11. Exosomes secreted from human colon cancer cells influence the adhesion of neighboring metastatic cells: Role of microRNA-210

    PubMed Central

    Bigagli, Elisabetta; Luceri, Cristina; Guasti, Daniele; Cinci, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cancer-secreted exosomes influence tumor microenvironment and support cancer growth and metastasis. MiR-210 is frequently up-regulated in colorectal cancer tissues and correlates with metastatic disease. We investigated whether exosomes are actively released by HCT-8 colon cancer cells, the role of exosomal miR-210 in the cross-talk between primary cancer cells and neighboring metastatic cells and its contribution in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). After 7 d of culture, a subpopulation of viable HCT-8 cells detached the monolayer and started to grow in suspension, suggesting anoikis resistance and a metastatic potential. The expression of key proteins of EMT revealed that these cells were E-cadherin negative and vimentin positive further confirming their metastatic phenotype and the acquisition of anoikis resistance. Metastatic cells, in the presence of adherently growing HCT-8, continued to grow in suspension whereas only if seeded in cell-free wells, were able to adhere again and to form E-cadherin positive and vimentin negative new colonies, suggesting the occurrence of MET. The chemosensitivity to 5 fluorouracil and to FOLFOX-like treatment of metastatic cells was significantly diminished compared to adherent HCT-8 cells. Of note, adherent new colonies undergoing MET, were insensitive to both chemotherapeutic strategies. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that adherently growing HCT-8, actually secreted exosomes and that exosomes in turn were taken up by metastatic cells. When exosomes secreted by adherently growing HCT-8 were administered to metastatic cells, MET was significantly inhibited. miR-210 was significantly upregulated in exosomes compared to its intracellular levels in adherently growing HCT-8 cells and correlated to anoikis resistance and EMT markers. Exosomes containing miR-210 might be considered as EMT promoting signals that preserve the local cancer

  12. Sunitinib in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thomas A.; Gore, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an oral multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that targets various receptors, including vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFRs). Sunitinib received approval in 2006 and became a standard treatment option in the first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) after a phase III trial showed superiority compared with interferon alpha (IFN-α). Sunitinib has also shown activity in second-line treatment in several trials. Most of the combination trials with sunitinib with various agents have led to considerable toxicity without improving efficacy. Sunitinib alone causes significant side effects and has a distinct profile with diarrhoea, hypertension, skin effects hypothyroidism, fatigue and nausea of special interest. The recommended dose of sunitinib in mRCC is 50 mg orally daily for 4 weeks, followed by 2 weeks off treatment (4/2 schedule). An alternative 2 weeks on, 1 week off schedule (2/1 schedule) seems to be of similar efficacy and better tolerability and could be more widely used in the future. An intermittent treatment strategy with a stop in remission and re-induction after progression showed efficacy in smaller trials and is currently being evaluated in a phase III trial. Direct comparison of sunitinib with pazopanib in first-line treatment showed a similar efficacy for both TKIs with a distinct toxicity profile. Data from two phase II trials showed that sunitinib has also activity in non-clear cell cancer and is an option due to a lack of better alternatives. Currently, after immune checkpoint inhibitors have shown very promising results in the second-line treatment of RCC, they are being tested in a number of phase III trials in the first-line setting. The future will show the position of sunitinib in the first-line treatment of RCC in the era of the immune checkpoint inhibitors. PMID:27904651

  13. Modulation of the Metastatic Activity of Melanoma Cells by Laminin and Fibronectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terranova, Victor P.; Williams, Jeannette E.; Liotta, Lance A.; Martin, George R.

    1984-11-01

    Metastatic mouse melanoma cells have a high affinity for the basement membrane and the ability to degrade it; these properties may allow tumor cells to invade the membrane and disseminate. In this study it was found that the metastatic potential of mouse melanoma cells varied when the cells were exposed in culture to fibronectin or laminin. After removal of fibronectin or exposure to laminin, the cells had an increased affinity for basement membrane collagen, were more invasive of basement membranes in vitro, and produced more lung colonies in vivo. These changes are correlated with and may be due to an increase in the laminin-binding capacity of the tumor cell surface.

  14. [Carcinomatous meningitis: The radiation therapist's point of view].

    PubMed

    Espenel, S; Vallard, A; Langrand-Escure, J; Ben Mrad, M; Méry, B; Rivoirard, R; Moriceau, G; Guy, J-B; Trone, J-C; Moncharmont, C; Wang, G; Diao, P; Bernichon, É; Chanal, É; Fournel, P; Magné, N

    2016-02-01

    Carcinomatous meningitis complicates 5 to 10% of cancers, essentially with breast cancers, lung cancers and melanomas. The incidence probably increased because of therapeutic advances in oncology. Treatment is based on external beam radiotherapy, systemic treatment, intrathecal chemotherapy and supportive care. The aim of this work was to review data on external radiation therapy and carcinomatous meningitis. There are few evidences on the subject, but it is a major topic of interest. A whole brain radiation therapy is indicated in case of brain metastases or clinical encephalitis. Focal radiation therapy is recommended on symptomatic, bulky or obstructive sites. The dose depends on performance status (20 to 40 Gy in five to 20 fractions), volume to treat and available techniques (classic fractionation or hypofractionation via stereotactic radiosurgery). The objective of radiation therapy is to improve quality of life. Association with systemic therapy improves overall survival. Administration of sequential intrathecal chemotherapy may also improve overall survival, but induces more toxicity. The use of new radiotherapy techniques and development of radiosensitizing molecules in patients with good performance status could improve survival in this frequent complication of cancer.

  15. Quantitative proteomics of extracellular vesicles derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Choi, Do-Young; Hong, Bok Sil; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Gho, Yong Song

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells actively release extracellular vesicles (EVs), including exosomes and microvesicles, into surrounding tissues. These EVs play pleiotropic roles in cancer progression and metastasis, including invasion, angiogenesis, and immune modulation. However, the proteomic differences between primary and metastatic cancer cell-derived EVs remain unclear. Here, we conducted comparative proteomic analysis between EVs derived from human primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) and their metastatic derivatives (SW620). Using label-free quantitation, we identified 803 and 787 proteins in SW480 EVs and SW620 EVs, respectively. Based on comparison between the estimated abundance of EV proteins, we identified 368 SW480 EV-enriched and 359 SW620 EV-enriched proteins. SW480 EV-enriched proteins played a role in cell adhesion, but SW620 EV-enriched proteins were associated with cancer progression and functioned as diagnostic indicators of metastatic cancer; they were overexpressed in metastatic colorectal cancer and played roles in multidrug resistance. As the first proteomic analysis comparing primary and metastatic cancer-derived EVs, this study increases our understanding of the pathological function of EVs in the metastatic process and provides useful biomarkers for cancer metastasis.

  16. An animal model for colon cancer metastatic cell line with enhanced metastasizing ability. Establishment and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lin, J C; Cheng, J Y; Tzeng, C C; Yeh, M Y; Meng, C L

    1991-06-01

    We have developed an animal model for colon cancer metastasis and produced a metastasizing tumor after using a microinjection technique to inject SW480 cells into the cecal wall of athymic nude mice during "minilaparotomy." After the metastatic foci formed in murine lung, an in vitro primary culture was performed and a new metastatic cancer cell line, which was designated as CC-ML3, was established. The studies included: 1) the comparison between SW 480 and CC-ML3 in morphology, growth kinetics, seeding and plating efficiency, and karyotype; and 2) carcino-embryonic antigen determination, origination, and metastatic ability of CC-ML3. The results showed that CC-ML3 was significantly different from SW480 in vitro and possessed a high metastatic potential in vivo. This newly developed animal model may thus be useful for studying the biology and pathogenesis of metastasis of human colonic cancer.

  17. Stimulation of Hepatoma Cell Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential by Proteins Secreted From Irradiated Nonparenchymal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Leyuan; Wang Zhiming; Gao Yabo; Wang Lingyan; Zeng Zhaochong

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine whether factors secreted by irradiated liver nonparenchymal cells (NPCs) may influence invasiveness and/or metastatic potential of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to elucidate a possible mechanism for such effect. Methods and Materials: Primary rat NPCs were cultured and divided into irradiated (10-Gy X-ray) and nonirradiated groups. Forty-eight hours after irradiation, conditioned medium from irradiated (SR) or nonirradiated (SnonR) cultures were collected and added to sublethally irradiated cultures of the hepatoma McA-RH7777 cell line. Then, hepatoma cells were continuously passaged for eight generations (RH10Gy-SR and RH10Gy-SnonR). The invasiveness and metastatic potential of McA-RH7777, RH10Gy-SnonR, and RH10Gy-SR cells were evaluated using an in vitro gelatinous protein (Matrigel) invasion and an in vivo metastasis assay. In addition, SR and SnonR were tested using rat cytokine antibody arrays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In vitro gelatinous protein invasion assay indicated that the numbers of invading cells was significantly higher in RH10Gy-SR (40 {+-} 4.74) than in RH10Gy-SnonR (30.6 {+-} 3.85) cells, and lowest in McA-RH7777 (11.4 {+-} 3.56) cells. The same pattern was observed in vivo in a lung metastasis assay, as evaluated by number of metastatic lung nodules seen with RH10Gy-SR (28.83 {+-} 5.38), RH10Gy-SnonR (22.17 {+-} 4.26), and McA-RH7777 (8.3 {+-} 3.8) cells. Rat cytokine antibody arrays and ELISA demonstrated that metastasis-promoting cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} and interleukin-6), circulating growth factors (vascular endothelial growth factor and epidermal growth factor), and metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were upregulated in SR compared with SnonR. Conclusions: Radiation can increase invasiveness and metastatic potential of sublethally irradiated hepatoma cells, and soluble mediators released from irradiated NPCs promote this potential. Increased secretion of

  18. Proteome profiling of exosomes derived from human primary and metastatic colorectal cancer cells reveal differential expression of key metastatic factors and signal transduction components.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Greening, David W; Barnes, Thomas W; Lim, Justin W; Tauro, Bow J; Rai, Alin; Xu, Rong; Adda, Christopher; Mathivanan, Suresh; Zhao, Wei; Xue, Yanhong; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Simpson, Richard J

    2013-05-01

    Exosomes are small extracellular 40-100 nm diameter membrane vesicles of late endosomal origin that can mediate intercellular transfer of RNAs and proteins to assist premetastatic niche formation. Using primary (SW480) and metastatic (SW620) human isogenic colorectal cancer cell lines we compared exosome protein profiles to yield valuable insights into metastatic factors and signaling molecules fundamental to tumor progression. Exosomes purified using OptiPrep™ density gradient fractionation were 40-100 nm in diameter, were of a buoyant density ~1.09 g/mL, and displayed stereotypic exosomal markers TSG101, Alix, and CD63. A major finding was the selective enrichment of metastatic factors (MET, S100A8, S100A9, TNC), signal transduction molecules (EFNB2, JAG1, SRC, TNIK), and lipid raft and lipid raft-associated components (CAV1, FLOT1, FLOT2, PROM1) in exosomes derived from metastatic SW620 cells. Additionally, using cryo-electron microscopy, ultrastructural components in exosomes were identified. A key finding of this study was the detection and colocalization of protein complexes EPCAM-CLDN7 and TNIK-RAP2A in colorectal cancer cell exosomes. The selective enrichment of metastatic factors and signaling pathway components in metastatic colon cancer cell-derived exosomes contributes to our understanding of the cross-talk between tumor and stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment.

  19. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma presenting with skin metastasis.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Ölçücüoğlu, Erkan; Kasap, Yusuf; Yığman, Metin; Güneş, Zeki Ender; Gazel, Eymen

    2015-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of upper urinary system account for 5% of all TCCs. The incidence of such metastases ranges from 0.18% to 2%. Experimental studies reported a general unsatisfactory survival time following skin metastasis. We report in this paper a case of metastatic urinary system TCC, which had become evident with a skin lesion in the right hypogastric region. A 60-year-old female patient with a history of being operated upon due to renal pelvic TCC was admitted to our outpatient clinic with complaints of red skin lesion in the near vicinity of the operational incision scar for 3 months. Her medical history revealed nothing but nephroureterectomy operation on the upper urinary system; moreover, it was learned that she had been ignoring what was recommended to her for routine controls. Thoraco-abdominal computed tomographic (CT) examination performed on the basis of aforementioned findings depicted a mass lesion of 24*20 mm dimension with high contrast uptake detected within the subcutaneous fat tissue in the right abdominal wall. The skin lesion depicted in CT was surgically excised. The pathological examination of the excised material was reported to be compatible with TCC. The patient was referred due to abdominal lesion to medical oncology after the operation. Followed up under chemotherapy protocol, the patient died 3 months after the metastasectomy operation. Skin metastasis of upper urinary system TCCs, especially renal pelvic TCCs, are quite rare conditions. Among the likely skin sites of metastasis for genitourinary system TCCs are head, face, extremities, suprapubic region and abdomen. Taking into consideration the low survival rates, the importance of early diagnosis of recurrences and/or distant metastases should be better appreciated. These patients die soon after the skin metastasis even with the administration of aggressive therapy. Similarly, our patient died 90 days after the diagnosis of skin metastasis despite the oncologic

  20. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma presenting with skin metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Ölçücüoğlu, Erkan; Kasap, Yusuf; Yığman, Metin; Güneş, Zeki Ender; Gazel, Eymen

    2015-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinomas (TCC) of upper urinary system account for 5% of all TCCs. The incidence of such metastases ranges from 0.18% to 2%. Experimental studies reported a general unsatisfactory survival time following skin metastasis. We report in this paper a case of metastatic urinary system TCC, which had become evident with a skin lesion in the right hypogastric region. A 60-year-old female patient with a history of being operated upon due to renal pelvic TCC was admitted to our outpatient clinic with complaints of red skin lesion in the near vicinity of the operational incision scar for 3 months. Her medical history revealed nothing but nephroureterectomy operation on the upper urinary system; moreover, it was learned that she had been ignoring what was recommended to her for routine controls. Thoraco-abdominal computed tomographic (CT) examination performed on the basis of aforementioned findings depicted a mass lesion of 24*20 mm dimension with high contrast uptake detected within the subcutaneous fat tissue in the right abdominal wall. The skin lesion depicted in CT was surgically excised. The pathological examination of the excised material was reported to be compatible with TCC. The patient was referred due to abdominal lesion to medical oncology after the operation. Followed up under chemotherapy protocol, the patient died 3 months after the metastasectomy operation. Skin metastasis of upper urinary system TCCs, especially renal pelvic TCCs, are quite rare conditions. Among the likely skin sites of metastasis for genitourinary system TCCs are head, face, extremities, suprapubic region and abdomen. Taking into consideration the low survival rates, the importance of early diagnosis of recurrences and/or distant metastases should be better appreciated. These patients die soon after the skin metastasis even with the administration of aggressive therapy. Similarly, our patient died 90 days after the diagnosis of skin metastasis despite the oncologic

  1. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-09-06

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field.

  2. Heterogeneity of isozyme expression in tumor cells does not correlate with metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Siciliano, M J; Fidler, I J

    1986-01-01

    The major purpose of these studies was to determine whether the expression of isozymes by tumor cells was heterogeneous among tumor cell subpopulations within a neoplasm and whether expression of one or another isozyme correlated with metastatic potential of tumor cells. The expression levels of 40 isozymes were determined in 56 cell lines, many of them clonal, from nine different murine and human tumors. The enzymes chosen for study are involved in nucleotide, carbohydrate and pentose phosphate metabolism, and as such are indicators of the general metabolic and differentiational status of the cell. The tumors studied included two murine and two human malignant melanomas, four murine fibrosarcomas, and one human prostatic adenocarcinoma. The lines isolated from these tumors consisted of cells that are tumorigenic non-metastatic, tumorigenic low metastatic and tumorigenic highly metastatic. Clonally derived cell lines from a given tumor differed in their expression of a number of different isozymes, including adenosine deaminase, creatine phosphokinase-B and lactate dehydrogenase. Different patterns of isozyme expression were observed among different tumor types as well as between tumors of the same type; however, there were no differences in isozyme expression for any enzyme tested that correlated with metastatic ability of tumor cells.

  3. Advanced new strategies for metastatic cancer treatment by therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geon-Tae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    The field of therapeutic stem cell and oncolytic virotherapy for cancer treatment has rapidly expanded over the past decade. Oncolytic viruses constitute a promising new class of anticancer agent because of their ability to selectively infect and destroy tumor cells. Engineering of viruses to express anticancer genes and specific cancer targeting molecules has led to the use of these systems as a novel platform of metastatic cancer therapy. In addition, stem cells have a cancer specific migratory capacity, which is available for metastatic cancer targeting. Prodrug activating enzyme or anticancer cytokine expressing stem cells successfully inhibited the proliferation of cancer cells. Preclinical models have clearly demonstrated anticancer activity of these two platforms against a number of different cancer types and metastatic cancer. Several systems using therapeutic stem cells or oncolytic virus have entered clinical trials, and promising results have led to late stage clinical development. Consequently, metastatic cancer therapies using stem cells and oncolytic viruses are extremely promising. The following review will focus on the metastatic cancer targeting mechanism of therapeutic stem cells and oncolytic viruses, and potential challenges ahead for advancing the field. PMID:27494901

  4. Synthesis and shedding of hyaluronan from plasma membranes of human fibroblasts and metastatic and non-metastatic melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lüke, H J; Prehm, P

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of hyaluronan synthesis and shedding was analysed in human fibroblasts and in two melanoma cells that differed in the metastatic potential and proteolysis of the hyaluronan receptor CD44. Dissociation of nascent hyaluronan from plasma membranes isolated from fibroblasts by high salt concentrations led to activation of hyaluronan synthase. Hyaluronan synthesis was also enhanced in plasma membranes from fibroblasts that had been treated with hyaluronidase or trypsin. Hyaluronan oligosaccharides stimulated hyaluronan production in fibroblast cultures. These results indicated that nascent high-molecular-mass hyaluronan inhibited its own chain elongation, if it was retained in the vicinity of the synthase by cell-surface receptors. The results also indicated that increased hyaluronan synthesis and shedding correlated with proteolysis of CD44 on the melanoma cell lines, which has been observed by others. PMID:10493913

  5. Induction of trismus by sunitinib and pazopanib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Ridhima; Montgomery, Bruce; Pandha, Hardev S.

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors sunitinib and pazopanib are used as first-line agents in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Treatment-related toxicities have been described with both these drugs. This report describes a patient with metastatic renal carcinoma who developed trismus while being treated with these agents and is, to the best of our knowledge, the first such case to be reported. PMID:28197036

  6. Vismodegib: a guide to its use in locally advanced or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2013-02-01

    Vismodegib is the first Hedgehog pathway inhibitor to be approved in the USA, where it is indicated for the treatment of adults with metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC), or with locally advanced BCC that has recurred following surgery or who are not candidates for surgery, and who are not candidates for radiation. In an ongoing, noncomparative, phase II trial, oral vismodegib was effective in and had an acceptable tolerability profile in the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC.

  7. Establishment and characterization of a novel human cholangiocarcinoma cell line with high metastatic activity.

    PubMed

    Uthaisar, Kwuntida; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Seubwai, Wunchana; Talabnin, Chutima; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Obchoei, Sumalee; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Okada, Seiji; Wongkham, Sopit

    2016-09-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly metastatic tumor, and the lung is a common site of metastasis. A greater understanding of the biology of metastases is needed to improve treatment outcomes. Herein, a highly metastatic human CCA subline, KKU-213L5 from an original cell line, KKU-213 that has marginally metastatic ability, was established and characterized. KKU-213L5 was selected in vivo through the fifth serial passage of pulmonary metastasized tissues via tail-vein injection in NOD/scid/Jak3 mice. The metastatic abilities of the KKU-213L5 cells were compared with the parental line in vitro and in vivo. The expression profile of this metastatic cell line was determined using real-time PCR. KKU-213L5 cells were found to possess higher metastatic phenotypes, i.e., growth rates, stem cell surface markers (CD133), migration and invasion characteristics when compared with the parental cells. Compared to the KKU-213 cells, KKU-213L5 cells formed larger tumors in subcutaneous xenografted mice and had a >10-fold increase in lung metastases in the tail-vein injected metastatic mouse model. Mice injected intravenously with KKU-213L5 cells had a significantly shorter survival. Analysis of the expressed genes related to progression of cancer revealed significant upregulation of anterior gradient protein-2 (AGR2) and suppression of KiSS-1 in the KKU-213L5 cells. The association of these two genes with metastasis was affirmed in CCA patient tissues since increased AGR2 expression and decreased KiSS-1 expression were found in higher stage patient tumors. In conclusion, a highly metastatic human CCA cell line was established and characterized. It is plausible that the differential expression between the parental KKU-213 and highly metastatic KKU-213L5 cells may be beneficial to classify novel genes associated with metastasis. The KKU-213L5 cell line should serve as a valued device for discovering the molecular mechanisms of CCA metastasis and enabling the search for an

  8. Comparative metabolic and lipidomic profiling of human breast cancer cells with different metastatic potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Hyun; Kwon, Yeo-Jung; Chun, Young-Jin; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2016-01-01

    This study conducted comprehensive and comparative metabolic and lipidomic profiling of a human epithelial breast cell line (MCF-10A), a slightly metastatic (MCF-7), and a highly metastatic (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell line using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and direct infusion mass spectrometry (DI-MS). Among 39 metabolites identified by GC-MS analysis, xanthine, glucose-6-phosphate, mannose-6-phosphate, guanine, and adenine were selected as prognostic markers of breast cancer metastasis. Major metabolic pathways involved in differentiation of the cell lines were alanine, aspartate, and glutamate metabolism, purine metabolism and glycine, serine, and threonine metabolism. Among 44 intact lipid species identified by DI-MS analysis, the levels of most phospholipids were higher in both metastatic groups than in normal cells. Specifically, the levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) 18:0/20:4, phosphatidylinositol (PI) 18:0/20:4, and phosphatidylcholine (PC) 18:0/20:4 were markedly higher while those of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) 18:1/18:1 and PI 18:0/18:1 were lower in MDA-MB-231 cells than in MCF-7 cells. A partial-least-squares regression model was developed and validated for predicting the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. The information obtained in this study will be useful when developing diagnostic tools and for identifying potential therapeutic targets for metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27564096

  9. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E.; McClatchey, P. Mason; Thomas, Susan N.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell–cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner. PMID:26349809

  10. GAD1 Upregulation Programs Aggressive Features of Cancer Cell Metabolism in the Brain Metastatic Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Patricia M; Lee, Dennis D; Guldner, Ian H; O'Tighearnaigh, Treasa K; Howe, Erin N; Palakurthi, Bhavana; Eckert, Kaitlyn E; Toni, Tiffany A; Ashfeld, Brandon L; Zhang, Siyuan

    2017-04-11

    The impact of altered amino acid metabolism on cancer progression is not fully understood. We hypothesized that a metabolic transcriptome shift during metastatic evolution is crucial for brain metastasis. Here we report a powerful impact in this setting caused by epigenetic upregulation of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1), a regulator of the GABA neurotransmitter metabolic pathway. In cell-based culture and brain metastasis models, we found that downegulation of the DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 induced by the brain microenvironment-derived clusterin resulted in decreased GAD1 promoter methylation and subsequent upregulation of GAD1 expression in brain metastatic tumor cells. In a system to dynamically visualize cellular metabolic responses mediated by GAD1, we monitored the cytosolic NADH:NAD+ equilibrium in tumor cells. Reducing GAD1 in metastatic cells by primary glia cell co-culture abolished the capacity of metastatic cells to utilize extracellular glutamine, leading to cytosolic accumulation of NADH and increased oxidative status. Similarly, genetic or pharmacological disruption of the GABA metabolic pathway decreased the incidence of brain metastasis in vivo. Taken together, our results show how epigenetic changes in GAD1 expression alter local glutamate metabolism in the brain metastatic microenvironment, contributing to a metabolic adaption that facilitates metastasis outgrowth in that setting.

  11. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Dae-Seung; Mun, Jeong-Geon; Jeong, Mi-Young; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2016-08-27

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) through increasing the expression of epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreasing the expressions of mesenchymal markers; N-cadherin, vimentin, β-catenin, and Snail. Moreover, ARC inhibited migration and invasion through reducing of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expressions. In an experimental metastasis model, ARC significantly inhibited lung metastasis of CT26 cells. Taken together, our study demonstrates the inhibitory effects of ARC on colorectal metastasis.

  12. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  13. Fourier analysis of cell motility: correlation of motility with metastatic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Partin, A W; Schoeniger, J S; Mohler, J L; Coffey, D S

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a computerized, mathematical system for quantitating the various types of cell motility. This Fourier analysis method simultaneously quantifies for individual cells (i) temporal changes in cell shape represented by cell ruffling, undulation, and pseudopodal extension, (ii) cell translation, and (iii) average cell size and shape. This spatial-temporal Fourier analysis was tested on a series of well-characterized animal tumor cell lines of rat prostatic cancer to study in a quantitative manner the correlation of cell motility with increasing in vivo metastatic potential. Fourier motility coefficients measuring pseudopodal extension correlated best with metastatic potential in the cell lines studied. This study demonstrated that Fourier analysis provides quantitative measurement of cell motility that may be applied to the study of biological processes. This analysis should aid in the study of the motility of individual cells in various areas of cellular and tumor biology. Images PMID:2919174

  14. Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the main cause of death from cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating cancer cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are starting to understand. Infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds, and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue, are key steps for metastatic colonization. These obstacles make metastasis a highly inefficient process, but once metastases are established current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. A better understanding of the mechanistic determinants of metastatic colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  15. Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A number of developments have altered the treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer. These include increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways, as well as the outcomes of several large-scale trials. As a result, treatments are becoming more efficacious and more personalized, and are changing the management and prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients. This is resulting in increased survival in select patient groups. In this paper, a simplified algorithm for treating patients with metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer is presented. PMID:25325013

  16. Mesenchymal Cancer Cell-Stroma Crosstalk Promotes Niche Activation, Epithelial Reversion, and Metastatic Colonization

    PubMed Central

    del Pozo Martin, Yaiza; Park, Danielle; Ramachandran, Anassuya; Ombrato, Luigi; Calvo, Fernando; Chakravarty, Probir; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Derzsi, Stefanie; Hill, Caroline S.; Sahai, Erik; Malanchi, Ilaria

    2015-01-01

    Summary During metastatic colonization, tumor cells must establish a favorable microenvironment or niche that will sustain their growth. However, both the temporal and molecular details of this process remain poorly understood. Here, we found that metastatic initiating cells (MICs) exhibit a high capacity for lung fibroblast activation as a result of Thrombospondin 2 (THBS2) expression. Importantly, inhibiting the mesenchymal phenotype of MICs by blocking the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated kinase AXL reduces THBS2 secretion, niche-activating ability, and, consequently, metastatic competence. Subsequently, disseminated metastatic cells revert to an AXL-negative, more epithelial phenotype to proliferate and decrease the phosphorylation levels of TGF-β-dependent SMAD2-3 in favor of BMP/SMAD1-5 signaling. Remarkably, newly activated fibroblasts promote this transition. In summary, our data reveal a crosstalk between cancer cells and their microenvironment whereby the EMT status initially triggers and then is regulated by niche activation during metastatic colonization. PMID:26670048

  17. Trafficking of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells in Bone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    at 4wk showing two large metastatic foci, one at each end of the femur . The distal end shows an iatrogenic fracture presumable due to weakness caused...protein (MDA-MB 231 ) were inoculated intracardiacly into athymic mice.; femurs harvested from 1 hr to 6 wk later and analyzed by fluorescence...modifying the bone microenvironment, are needed to improve treatment of osteolytic bone metastases. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Breast cancer, bone, metastasis

  18. Radiation therapy in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Onufrey, V.; Mohiuddin, M.

    1985-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the kidney is an unusual tumor, both in its biological behavior and in its response to radiation treatment. Historically, these tumors have been considered to be radioresistant, and the role of radiation therapy remains questionable in the primary management of this disease. However, radiation treatment is routinely used in the palliation of metastatic lesions for relief of symptoms. Therefore, we have undertaken a review of our experience in the treatment of this disease to determine the effectiveness of radiation in its palliation. From 1956 to 1981, 125 patients with metastatic lesions from hypernephroma have been treated in the Department of Radiation Therapy at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Most patients were referred for relief of bone pain (86), brain metastasis (12), spinal cord compression (9), and soft tissue masses (18). Total doses varied from 2000 rad to a maximum of 6000 rad. Response to treatment was evaluated on the basis of relief of symptoms, either complete, partial or no change. Our results indicate a significantly higher response rate of 65% for total doses equal to or greater than a TDF of 70, as compared to 25% for doses lower than a TDF of 70. No difference in response was observed either for bone or soft tissue metastasis or visceral disease. This leads us to believe that metastatic lesions from adenocarcinomas of the kidney should be treated to higher doses to obtain maximum response rates. Analysis of these results are presented in detail.

  19. The BMP Inhibitor Coco Reactivates Breast Cancer Cells at Lung Metastatic sites

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific anti-metastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation. PMID:22901808

  20. Patient-Specific B-Cell Antibody Factories to Treat Metastatic Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...clinical interface training and education to assure optimal sample viability and lack of the unique immortalization virus, Epstein Barr Virus ( EBV ). All...Breast Cancer, Sentinel lymph node, B-cell, EBV immortalization, Cancer Antigens Patient-Specific B-Cell Antibody Factories to Treat Metastatic

  1. Targeted Therapies: Bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-01

    Rini and colleagues provide additional data on bevacizumab and interferon-alpha in clear-cell carcinoma of the kidney; a comparison of these results with the findings from contemporary trials suggests that bevacizumab and interferon-alpha is another clinically useful treatment option for patients with metastatic renal-cell carcinoma.

  2. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system.

    PubMed

    Weight, Ryan M; Viator, John A; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Lisle, Allison E

    2006-10-15

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  3. Photoacoustic detection of metastatic melanoma cells in the human circulatory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weight, Ryan M.; Viator, John A.; Dale, Paul S.; Caldwell, Charles W.; Lisle, Allison E.

    2006-10-01

    Detection of disseminating tumor cells among patients suffering from various types and stages of cancer can function as an early warning system, alerting the physician of the metastatic spread or recurrence of the disease. Early detection of such cells can result in preventative treatment of the disease, while late stage detection can serve as an indicator of the effectiveness of chemotherapeutics. The prognostic value of exposing disseminating tumor cells poses an urgent need for an efficient, accurate screening method for metastatic cells. We propose a system for the detection of metastatic circulating tumor cells based on the thermoelastic properties of melanoma. The method employs photoacoustic excitation coupled with a detection system capable of determining the presence of disseminating cells within the circulatory system in vitro. Detection trials consisting of tissue phantoms and a human melanoma cell line resulted in a detection threshold of the order of ten individual cells, thus validating the effectiveness of the proposed mechanism. Results imply the potential to assay simple blood draws, from healthy and metastatic patients, for the presence of cancerous melanoma providing an unprecedented method for routine cancer screening.

  4. Current Treatment Algorithms for Patients with Metastatic Non-Small Cell, Non-Squamous Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The treatment paradigm for metastatic non-small cell, non-squamous lung cancer is continuously evolving due to new treatment options and our increasing knowledge of molecular signal pathways. As a result of treatments becoming more efficacious and more personalized, survival for selected groups of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients is increasing. In this paper, three algorithms will be presented for treating patients with metastatic non-squamous, NSCLC. These include treatment algorithms for NSCLC patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations, ALK rearrangements, or wild-type/wild-type tumors. As the world of immunotherapy continues to evolve quickly, a future algorithm will also be presented. PMID:28373963

  5. Trials with TALL-1O4 Cells for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    AD Award Number: DAMD17-97-C- 7056 TITLE: Phase I Trial~with TALL-104 Cells for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Daniela...Metastatic Breast Cancer DAMD17-97-C- 7056 It AU1ITDI(SI Da~iela Sa~mol, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMEM(S N0 A•ESS . PERFORMING ORGANIZATIONREPORT...a commercial PCR kit (ATCC, Rockville, MD). Three times a week, cells were harvested by centrifugation in 250 ml conical tubes ( Corning , New York, NY

  6. Targeted therapies in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: overview of the past year.

    PubMed

    Gross-Goupil, Marine; Massard, Christophe; Ravaud, Alain

    2012-02-01

    During the past half-decade, clinical trials have permitted major progress in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma with the first generation of targeted therapies (bevacizumab, sunitinib, sorafenib, everolimus, and temsirolimus). New targeted agents such as axitinib, tivozanib, and dovitinib, all of which are tyrosine kinase inhibitors, have been developed in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. In the same time, more information regarding mechanism of disease and drug resistance shed light on new targets and new potent agents. We report an overview of the more relevant data published over the past year, which may modify the therapeutic landscape of kidney cancer in the near future.

  7. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Guilhem; El Bouchtaoui, Morad; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-08-07

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities.We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived.Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC.

  8. An optofluidic constriction chip for monitoring metastatic potential and drug response of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martinez Vazquez, R; Nava, G; Veglione, M; Yang, T; Bragheri, F; Minzioni, P; Bianchi, E; Di Tano, M; Chiodi, I; Osellame, R; Mondello, C; Cristiani, I

    2015-04-01

    Cellular mechanical properties constitute good markers to characterize tumor cells, to study cell population heterogeneity and to highlight the effect of drug treatments. In this work, we describe the fabrication and validation of an integrated optofluidic chip capable of analyzing cellular deformability on the basis of the pressure gradient needed to push a cell through a narrow constriction. We demonstrate the ability of the chip to discriminate between tumorigenic and metastatic breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB231) and between human melanoma cells with different metastatic potential (A375P and A375MC2). Moreover, we show that this chip allows highlighting the effect of drugs interfering with microtubule organization (paclitaxel, combretastatin A-4 and nocodazole) on cancer cells, which leads to changes in the pressure-gradient required to push cells through the constriction. Our single-cell microfluidic device for mechanical evaluation is compact and easy to use, allowing for an extensive use in different laboratory environments.

  9. Role of stromal cell-derived factor 1α pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nisha; Duda, Dan G.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Metastatic prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in men. The primary site of metastasis from prostate cancers is the bone. During the last decade, multiple studies have pointed to the role of the stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha (SDF1α)/CXCR4 axis in the metastatic spread of the disease, but the mechanisms that underlie this effect are still incompletely understood. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of the role of the SDF1α/CXCR4 pathway in bone metastatic prostate cancer. We also discuss the therapeutic potential of disrupting the interaction between prostate tumor cells and bone environment with focus on the SDF1α pathway. PMID:27533927

  10. Comparative Gene Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Stem Cell-Like Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Anna M.; Lewicki, Sławomir; Helbrecht, Igor; Brodaczewska, Klaudia; Koch, Irena; Zdanowski, Robert; Król, Magdalena; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent advancement in cancer research has shown that tumors are highly heterogeneous, and multiple phenotypically different cell populations are found in a single tumor. Cancer development and tumor growth are driven by specific types of cells—stem cell-like cancer cells (SCLCCs)—which are also responsible for metastatic spread and drug resistance. This research was designed to verify the presence of SCLCCs in renal cell cancer cell lines. Subsequently, we aimed to characterize phenotype and cell biology of CD105+ cells, defined previously as renal cell carcinoma tumor-initiating cells. The main goal of the project was to describe the gene-expression profile of stem cell-like cancer cells of primary tumor and metastatic origin. Materials and Methods Real-time PCR analysis of stemness genes (Oct-4, Nanog and Ncam) and soft agar colony formation assay were conducted to check the stemness properties of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cell lines. FACS analysis of CD105+ and CD133+ cells was performed on RCC cells. Isolated CD105+ cells were verified for expression of mesenchymal markers—CD24, CD146, CD90, CD73, CD44, CD11b, CD19, CD34, CD45, HLA-DR and alkaline phosphatase. Hanging drop assay was used to investigate CD105+ cell-cell cohesion. Analysis of free-floating 3D spheres formed by isolated CD105+ was verified, as spheres have been hypothesized to contain undifferentiated multipotent progenitor cells. Finally, CD105+ cells were sorted from primary (Caki-2) and metastatic (ACHN) renal cell cancer cell lines. Gene-expression profiling of sorted CD105+ cells was performed with Agilent’s human GE 4x44K v2 microarrays. Differentially expressed genes were further categorized into canonical pathways. Network analysis and downstream analysis were performed with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Results Metastatic RCC cell lines (ACHN and Caki-1) demonstrated higher colony-forming ability in comparison to primary RCC cell lines. Metastatic RCC cell lines harbor

  11. High glucose levels boost the aggressiveness of highly metastatic cholangiocarcinoma cells via O-GlcNAcylation

    PubMed Central

    Phoomak, Chatchai; Vaeteewoottacharn, Kulthida; Silsirivanit, Atit; Saengboonmee, Charupong; Seubwai, Wunchana; Sawanyawisuth, Kanlayanee; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2017-01-01

    Increased glucose utilization is a feature of cancer cells to support cell survival, proliferation, and metastasis. An association between diabetes mellitus and cancer progression was previously demonstrated in cancers including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). This study was aimed to determine the effects of high glucose on protein O-GlcNAcylation and metastatic potentials of CCA cells. Two pairs each of the parental low metastatic and highly metastatic CCA sublines were cultured in normal (5.6 mM) or high (25 mM) glucose media. The migration and invasion abilities were determined and underlying mechanisms were explored. Results revealed that high glucose promoted migration and invasion of CCA cells that were more pronounced in the highly metastatic sublines. Concomitantly, high glucose increased global O-GlcNAcylated proteins, the expressions of vimentin, hexokinase, glucosamine-fructose-6-phosphate amidotransferase (GFAT) and O-GlcNAc transferase of CCA cells. The glucose level that promoted migration/invasion was shown to be potentiated by the induction of GFAT, O-GlcNAcylation and an increase of O-GlcNAcylated vimentin and vimentin expression. Treatment with a GFAT inhibitor reduced global O-GlcNAcylated proteins, vimentin expression, and alleviated cell migration. Altogether, these results suggested the role of high glucose enhanced CCA metastasis via modulation of O-GlcNAcylation, through the expressions of GFAT and vimentin. PMID:28262738

  12. Platelet factors induce chemotactic migration of murine mammary adenocarcinoma cells with different metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed Central

    Sarach, M. A.; Rovasio, R. A.; Eynard, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The chemotactic response of neoplastic cells (NC) induced by soluble platelet factors was investigated. NC suspensions isolated from murine mammary gland adenocarcinomas having different metastatic capabilities were incubated in Boyden's chambers and challenged with (1) 'Early Platelet Factors' (EP), obtained from the soluble fraction of recently collagen-activated human platelets, and (2) 'Late Platelet Factors' (LP), isolated after 24 hours incubation of the platelet aggregates. Chemotaxis was expressed as the distance travelled by NC through nitrocellulose filters. NC isolated from M3, the tumour line having the stronger metastatic potential, showed a significant chemotactic response towards LP factors, whereas NC from the M2 line exhibiting the lower metastatic behaviour, showed a chemotactic response towards EP factors. Both tumour cell lines lacked motion capability towards the well known chemoattractant peptide N-f-Met-Leu-Phe-Phe as well as to serum, plasma, collagen type I or culture medium. The different chemotactic response of both tumour lines when they were challenged by concentration gradients of factors released by early or late collagen-activated human platelets, confirm a relationship between platelet activity and metastatic capabilities and suggests that platelet chemoattractants might play a role in the metastatic dissemination of these mammary gland adenocarcinomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:8217786

  13. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland.

  14. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  15. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeer, Daniel W.; Coppock, Joseph D.; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M.; Spanos, William C.; Onken, Michael D.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H.; Vermeer, Paola D.

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60–80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  16. CD44 integrates signaling in normal stem cell, cancer stem cell and (pre)metastatic niches.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karin; Motiani, Karan; Giridhar, Premkumar Vummidi; Kasper, Susan

    2013-03-01

    The stem cell niche provides a regulatory microenvironment for cells as diverse as totipotent embryonic stem cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs) which exhibit stem cell-like characteristics and have the capability of regenerating the bulk of tumor cells while maintaining self-renewal potential. The transmembrane glycoprotein CD44 is a common component of the stem cell niche and exists as a standard isoform (CD44s) and a range of variant isoforms (CD44v) generated though alternative splicing. CD44 modulates signal transduction through post-translational modifications as well as interactions with hyaluronan, extracellular matrix molecules and growth factors and their cognate receptor tyrosine kinases. While the function of CD44 in hematopoietic stem cells has been studied in considerable detail, our knowledge of CD44 function in tissue-derived stem cell niches remains limited. Here we review CD44s and CD44v in both hematopoietic and tissue-derived stem cell niches, focusing on their roles in regulating stem cell behavior including self-renewal and differentiation in addition to cell-matrix interactions and signal transduction during cell migration and tumor progression. Determining the role of CD44 and CD44v in normal stem cell, CSC and (pre)metastatic niches and elucidating their unique functions could provide tools and therapeutic strategies for treating diseases as diverse as fibrosis during injury repair to cancer progression.

  17. Enhanced OXPHOS, glutaminolysis and β-oxidation constitute the metastatic phenotype of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Mariana F; Obre, Emilie; de Melo, Fabiana H M; Santos, Gilson C; Galina, Antonio; Jasiulionis, Miriam G; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Rumjanek, Franklin D; Amoêdo, Nivea D

    2016-03-15

    Tumours display different cell populations with distinct metabolic phenotypes. Thus, subpopulations can adjust to different environments, particularly with regard to oxygen and nutrient availability. Our results indicate that progression to metastasis requires mitochondrial function. Our research, centered on cell lines that display increasing degrees of malignancy, focused on metabolic events, especially those involving mitochondria, which could reveal which stages are mechanistically associated with metastasis. Melanocytes were subjected to several cycles of adhesion impairment, producing stable cell lines exhibiting phenotypes representing a progression from non-tumorigenic to metastatic cells. Metastatic cells (4C11+) released the highest amounts of lactate, part of which was derived from glutamine catabolism. The 4C11+ cells also displayed an increased oxidative metabolism, accompanied by enhanced rates of oxygen consumption coupled to ATP synthesis. Enhanced mitochondrial function could not be explained by an increase in mitochondrial content or mitochondrial biogenesis. Furthermore, 4C11+ cells had a higher ATP content, and increased succinate oxidation (complex II activity) and fatty acid oxidation. In addition, 4C11+ cells exhibited a 2-fold increase in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨmit). Consistently, functional assays showed that the migration of cells depended on glutaminase activity. Metabolomic analysis revealed that 4C11+ cells could be grouped as a subpopulation with a profile that was quite distinct from the other cells investigated in the present study. The results presented here have centred on how the multiple metabolic inputs of tumour cells may converge to compose the so-called metastatic phenotype.

  18. Critical appraisal of pazopanib as treatment for patients with advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2011-01-01

    The management of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has undergone significant changes during the past 10 years, with the treatment of metastatic RCC undergoing the most radical changes. These developments reflect an enhanced understanding of this tumor's underlying biology, which was then translated into the development of a new treatment paradigm. Current therapeutic approaches for the management of patients with metastatic RCC utilize knowledge of histology, molecular abnormalities, clinical prognostic factors, the natural history of this malignancy, and the treatment efficacy and toxicity of available agents. The treatment options available for patients with metastatic RCC have changed dramatically over the past 6 years. Interferon-α and interleukin-2 were the previous mainstays of therapy, but since December 2005, six new agents have been approved in the US for the treatment of advanced RCC. Three are multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) including sunitinib, sorafenib, and pazopanib, two target the mammalian target of rapamycin (temsirolimus and everolimus), and one is a humanized monoclonal antibody (bevacizumab in combination with interferon-α). The current review focuses on the newest TKI available to treat patients with metastatic RCC, pazopanib. The development of this agent both preclinically and clinically is reviewed. The efficacy and safety data from the pivotal clinical trials are discussed, and the potential role of pazopanib in the treatment of patients with metastatic RCC in comparison to other treatment alternatives is critically appraised. This agent has a favorable overall risk benefit, and the available data demonstrate efficacy in patients with metastatic RCC who are either treatment-naïve or cytokine refractory. It therefore represents another alternative for treatment of metastatic RCC patients.

  19. ErbB2 and bone sialoprotein as markers for metastatic osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Valabrega, G; Fagioli, F; Corso, S; Madon, E; Brach del Prever, A; Biasin, E; Linari, A; Aglietta, M; Giordano, S

    2003-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone neoplasia occurring in young patients in the first two decades of life, and represents 20% of all primitive malignant bone tumours. At present, treatment of metastatic osteosarcoma is unsatisfactory. High-dose chemotherapy followed by CD34+ leukapheresis rescue may improve these poor results. Neoplastic cells contaminating the apheresis may, however, contribute to relapse. To identify markers suitable for detecting osteosarcoma cells in aphereses we analysed the expression of bone-specific genes (Bone Sialoprotein (BSP) and Osteocalcin) and oncogenes (Met and ErbB2) in 22 patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and six healthy stem cell donors. The expression of these genes in aphereses of patients affected by metastatic osteosarcoma was assessed by RT–PCR and Southern blot analysis. Met and Osteocalcin proved to be not useful markers since they are positive in aphereses of both patients with metastatic osteosarcoma and healthy stem cell donors. On the contrary, BSP was expressed at significant levels in 85% of patients. Moreover, 18% of patients showed a strong and significantly positive (seven to 16 times higher than healthy stem cell donors) ErbB2 expression. In all positive cases, neoplastic tissue also expressed ErbB2. Our data show that ErbB2 can be a useful marker for tumour contamination in aphereses of patients affected by ErbB2-expressing osteosarcomas and that analysis of Bone Sialoprotein expression can be an alternative useful marker. PMID:12569382

  20. Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Pleura: A Rare Complication of Hidradenitis Suppurativa

    PubMed Central

    Joglekar, Kiran; Jackson, Christopher; Kadaria, Dipen; Sodhi, Amik

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma Symptoms: Short of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pleural biopsy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), also known as Marjolin ulcer, is a rare complication of hidradenitis suppurativa (HS). Metastatic SCC from HS typically involves the axial skeleton or abdominopelvic viscera. Metastatic disease to the lungs is a rare phenomenon with only three reported cases of lung parenchyma. We present a biopsy proven case of metastatic SCC to the pleura from gluteal HS. Case Report: A 46-year-old male with a history of recently diagnosed Marjolin ulcer secondary to gluteal HS was transferred to our intensive care unit for acute hypoxemic respiratory failure secondary to recurrent pleural effusion. On examination, patient was febrile (38.3°C), normotensive (blood pressure 98/65 mm Hg), tachycardic (116 beats/minute) and tachypneic (40 breaths/minute) with oxygen saturation of 93% on room air. He was in moderate distress requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Chest examination revealed decreased breath sounds bilaterally and skin examination was significant for 18 cm wide sacral lesion. CT thorax showed bilateral pleural effusions, pleural thickening, and scattered nodular densities within both lungs concerning for metastatic disease. Thoracentesis showed lymphocyte predominant exudate with negative cytology for malignant cells. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) illustrated thickened pleural rind with histopathology and positive p40 stain consistent with invasive well-to-moderately differentiated keratinizing SCC. Conclusions: SCC arising from HS is rare and metastatic disease to the pleura has not been reported previously. Strong clinical suspicion for malignancy is warranted in patients with advanced HS and evolving pulmonary symptoms despite negative cytology. PMID:28028308

  1. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  2. Review of the treatment of metastatic non small cell lung carcinoma: A practical approach

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Vera

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, as we have a better knowledge and understanding of the biology of non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), which leads us to targeting biomarkers driving the NSCLC carcinogenesis and metastatic potential, we now have an increased number of options to offer our patients with NSCLC. We also realize the importance of distinguishing squamous and non squamous histology to guide our treatment decisions of NSCLC. The palliative care concomitant with therapies from the very start of the treatment also showed an impact on survival. This review examines the treatment options in all lines of therapy for metastatic NSCLC that have been approved in Canada, the United States, or Europe. PMID:21773076

  3. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  4. Metastin is not involved in metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karapanagiotou, Eleni M; Dilana, Kalliopi D; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Gratsias, Ioannis; Tsimpoukis, Sotirios; Polyzos, Aris; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2011-06-01

    Metastin, the product of the KISS-1 gene, seems to represent a strong suppressant of metastasis for some types of cancer. The aim of this study is to explore whether circulating levels of metastin could be used as a marker for the metastatic potential of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as well as a diagnostic marker in NSCLC patients. The possible correlation between metastin and leptin circulating levels was also evaluated. Fasting serum levels of metastin and leptin were determined in 96 NSCLC patients at diagnosis (76 with metastatic disease and 21 with locally advanced disease) and 49 healthy volunteers using commercial available ELISA. Serum metastin levels presented no differences between NSCLC patients and healthy volunteers (1.18 ± 0.98 vs. 1.17 ± 0.39 ng/ml, P = 0.979) as well as between patients with metastatic and locally advanced disease (1.17 ± 1.05 vs. 1.21 ± 0.64 ng/ml, P = 0.872). There was no statistically significant correlation between circulating metastin and leptin levels in NSCLC patients and patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease. This study shows a lack of direct involvement of metastin in the diagnosis and metastatic potential of NSCLC.

  5. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  6. Anti-tumor Properties of cis-Resveratrol Methylated Analogues in Metastatic Mouse Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Valery L.; Toseef, Tayyaba; Nazumudeen, Fathima B.; Rivoira, Christian; Spatafora, Carmela; Tringali, Corrado; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol (E-3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenol found in red wine that has been shown to have multiple anti-cancer properties. Although cis (Z) and trans (E) isomers of resveratrol occur in nature, the cis form is not biologically active. However, methylation at key positions of the cis form results in more potent anti-cancer properties. This study determined that synthetic cis-polymethoxystilbenes (methylated analogues of cis-resveratrol) inhibited cancer-related phenotypes of metastatic B16 F10 and non-metastatic B16 F1 mouse melanoma cells. In contrast with cis or trans-resveratrol and trans-polymethoxystilbene which were ineffective at 10 μM, cis-polymethoxystilbenes inhibited motility and proliferation of melanoma cells with low micromolar specificity (IC50 <10 μM). Inhibitory effects by cis-polymethoxystilbenes were significantly stronger with B16 F10 cells and were accompanied by decreased expression of β-tubulin and pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein, a marker of metastatic B16 cells. Thus, cis-polymethoxystilbenes have potential as chemotherapeutic agents for metastatic melanoma. PMID:25567208

  7. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Withers, Sita S; Lawson, Corinne M; Burton, Andrew G; Rebhun, Robert B; Steffey, Michele A

    2016-03-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence.

  8. Management of an invasive and metastatic Sertoli cell tumor with associated myelotoxicosis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Withers, Sita S.; Lawson, Corinne M.; Burton, Andrew G.; Rebhun, Robert B.; Steffey, Michele A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the surgical and post-operative management of a large, invasive, and metastatic functional Sertoli cell tumor in a 9-year-old cryptorchid male Labrador retriever dog. Despite residual disease after surgery, bone marrow recovery occurred without administration of bone marrow stimulants and serum estradiol accurately predicted tumor recurrence. PMID:26933269

  9. Paranuclear blue inclusions in metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma in the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Wittchow, R; Laszewski, M; Walker, W; Dick, F

    1992-09-01

    Paranuclear blue inclusions (PBIs) are frequently identified within metastatic undifferentiated small cell carcinoma (SCC) cells on air-dried bone marrow aspirates stained with Wright's stain. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of this finding, 116 bone marrow aspirates containing metastatic neoplasms were evaluated for the presence and frequency of PBIs. Bone marrow specimens included 47 cases of metastatic SCC of the lung, 13 cases of large cell lymphoma, 19 cases of neuroblastoma, five cases of small, noncleaved cell lymphoma, seven cases of rhabdomyosarcoma, three cases of Ewing's sarcoma, three cases of other sarcomas, and 19 cases of non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). PBIs were identified in 40 of 47 (85%) cases of SCC and their frequency varied from 0 to 24% of tumor cells among different cases. In approximately half the cases of SCC, PBIs were identified in 1 to 4% tumor cells; and in eight cases, PBIs were present in 5% or more of tumor cells. PBIs were also identified in two of seven (29%) cases of rhabdomyosarcoma and one case of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, but they were not seen in Ewing's sarcoma, small non-cleaved cell lymphoma, large cell lymphoma, neuroblastoma, or non-small cell carcinoma. In addition, PBIs were not seen in alcohol-fixed, Papanicolaou-stained cytology specimens containing SCC. Ultrastructurally, PBIs may represent phagocytized nuclear/cellular material. PBIs are a feature of small cell carcinoma on air-dried, cytologic material stained with Romanowsky type stains. Their presence may provide diagnostic information with regard to the differential diagnosis of metastatic SCC in the bone marrow. Future studies evaluating non-bone marrow Wright's stained fine-needle aspiration specimens are needed to determine if PBIs are useful in distinguishing SCC from other poorly differentiated tumors in the cytology laboratory.

  10. Optical Strategies for Studying Metastatic Mechanisms, Tumor Cell Detection and Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    study we have used 2 prostate cancer cell lines. The LNCaP human prostate cancer cells initially isolated from a lymph node biopsy are useful for...cell line is fast growing, poorly differentiated, and metastatic to the lungs and lymph nodes. To determine if this subcurative PDT- induced decrease in...5 – PDT increases the fraction of animals with lymph node metastases. At the time of sacrifice the lungs, pelvic lymph nodes, liver and spines

  11. Cetuximab strongly enhances immune cell infiltration into liver metastatic sites in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuka; Hazama, Shoichi; Suzuki, Nobuaki; Tokumitsu, Yukio; Kanekiyo, Shinsuke; Tomochika, Shinobu; Tsunedomi, Ryouichi; Tokuhisa, Yoshihiro; Iida, Michihisa; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Shigeru; Ueno, Tomio; Yoshino, Shigefumi; Nagano, Hiroaki

    2017-03-01

    Cetuximab has activity against colorectal cancers. Recent studies demonstrated that cetuximab induces antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity via immune cells, and a new immune-related mechanism of inducing immunogenic cell death. This study aimed to evaluate the immune responses induced by cetuximab in tumor microenvironments at liver metastasis sites of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We assessed immune cell infiltration in the liver metastatic sites of 53 colorectal cancer patients. These patients were divided into three groups according to the treatment before operation: chemotherapy with cetuximab, chemotherapy without cetuximab, and no chemotherapy. The inflammatory cells in the liver metastatic sites were assessed by hematoxylin-eosin staining, focusing on the invasive margin. The overall inflammatory reaction and number of lymphoid cells were assessed with a four-point scoring system. We then assessed immune cell infiltration (CD3, CD8 and CD56) in 15 liver metastatic sites. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated more inflammatory cells in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups (P < 0.001). Of note, inflammatory cells were found in intratumoral areas, and the destruction of cancer cell foci was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group. Moreover, a higher infiltration of CD3+ (P = 0.003), CD8+ (P = 0.003) and CD56+ (P = 0.001) cells was observed in the chemotherapy with cetuximab group than in the other groups. These results suggest that cetuximab might have an immune-enhancing effect. As such, the immune-related mechanism of action of cetuximab may enhance the efficacy of combination therapy, such as chemotherapy and immunotherapy using therapeutic peptides.

  12. Visualization of immediate immune responses to pioneer metastatic cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Headley, Mark B; Bins, Adriaan; Nip, Alyssa; Roberts, Edward W; Looney, Mark R; Gerard, Audrey; Krummel, Matthew F

    2016-03-24

    Lung metastasis is the lethal determinant in many cancers and a number of lines of evidence point to monocytes and macrophages having key roles in its development. Yet little is known about the immediate fate of incoming tumour cells as they colonize this tissue, and even less known about how they make first contact with the immune system. Primary tumours liberate circulating tumour cells (CTCs) into the blood and we have developed a stable intravital two-photon lung imaging model in mice for direct observation of the arrival of CTCs and subsequent host interaction. Here we show dynamic generation of tumour microparticles in shear flow in the capillaries within minutes of CTC entry. Rather than dispersing under flow, many of these microparticles remain attached to the lung vasculature or independently migrate along the inner walls of vessels. Using fluorescent lineage reporters and flow cytometry, we observed 'waves' of distinct myeloid cell subsets that load differentially and sequentially with this CTC-derived material. Many of these tumour-ingesting myeloid cells collectively accumulated in the lung interstitium along with the successful metastatic cells and, as previously understood, promote the development of successful metastases from surviving tumour cells. Although the numbers of these cells rise globally in the lung with metastatic exposure and ingesting myeloid cells undergo phenotypic changes associated with microparticle ingestion, a consistently sparse population of resident conventional dendritic cells, among the last cells to interact with CTCs, confer anti-metastatic protection. This work reveals that CTC fragmentation generates immune-interacting intermediates, and defines a competitive relationship between phagocyte populations for tumour loading during metastatic cell seeding.

  13. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  14. Transfusion of sickle cells may be a therapeutic option for patients suffering metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease will sickle under conditions of hypoxemia and acidosis which is a similar milieu found in malignant tumors. While control of tumor angiogenesis has long been a goal of cancer therapy, selective occlusion of tumor blood supply may be achieved by transfusion of sickle cells into patients who suffer metastatic cancer. Although this potential therapy has not been previously reported in the medical literature, the concept may have been elusive to medical mainstream thinking because it requires transfusion of diseased cells. For this therapy to be effective, other environmental factors may need to be manipulated such inducing mild hypoxemia or hypercarbia (respiratory acidosis) to induce red cell sickling. Preliminary evidence supportive of this therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is provided by case evidence that sickle cell occlusion of a malignant brain tumor (glioma) produced tumor necrosis. Also sickle cells have been successfully transfused into primates. Furthermore, donor blood is crossmatched and transfused into patients suffering from sickle cell disease regularly in clinics and this procedure is associated with acceptable morbidity. Most importantly, animal models of sickle cell disease and cancer currently exist, and this theory could be tried with available technologies including ultrasound detection of vaso-occlusion. While the proposed therapy may not cure metastatic cancer, this treatment could prove useful for decreasing the size and perhaps the pain from metastatic tumor burden. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ABO Rh compatible crossmatched sickle cells transfused into patients who suffer metastatic cancer under controlled conditions of blood oxygenation and pH will selectively produce vaso-occlusive infarcts in malignant tumors and be a useful therapy. The author hopes for further investigations.

  15. Two Canine Papillomaviruses Associated With Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Two Related Basenji Dogs.

    PubMed

    Luff, J; Rowland, P; Mader, M; Orr, C; Yuan, H

    2016-11-01

    Papillomaviruses (PV) are associated with benign mucosal and cutaneous epithelial proliferations. In dogs, PV-associated pigmented plaques and papillomas can undergo malignant transformation, but this is rare, and most cases of canine squamous cell carcinoma do not arise from PV-induced precursor lesions. We describe herein the progression of pigmented plaques to invasive and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma associated with 2 canine papillomaviruses (CPV) in 2 related Basenji dogs. Immunohistochemistry for PV antigen revealed strong nuclear immunoreactivity within keratinocytes from pigmented plaques from both dogs, consistent with a productive viral infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerate primers for the L1 gene revealed PV DNA sequences from 2 different CPVs. In situ hybridization for CPV revealed strong hybridization signals within the pigmented plaques and neoplastic squamous epithelial cells from both dogs. We report here progression of PV-associated pigmented plaques to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma within 2 Basenji dogs associated with 2 different CPVs.

  16. Metastatic potential of cloned murine melanoma cells transfected with activated c-Ha-ras.

    PubMed

    Price, J E; Aukerman, S L; Ananthaswamy, H N; McIntyre, B W; Schackert, G; Schackert, H K; Fidler, I J

    1989-08-01

    We sought to determine whether the transfection of tumorigenic but not metastatic cells with the activated c-Ha-ras oncogene was invariably associated with acquisition of the metastatic phenotype. Three clonally derived lines of the K-1735 murine melanoma, characterized as nonmetastatic or poorly metastatic, were transfected with plasmids containing the 6.6-kilobase BamHI fragment of the mutant human c-Ha-ras gene and the neo gene, that confers resistance to neomycin (pSV2neoEJ). Cells transfected with pSV2neo, a plasmid containing the neo gene, served as controls for the procedure of Polybrene-mediated transfection. All cell lines were injected into syngeneic C3H/HeN and into athymic mice, and the results were compared with those produced by highly metastatic K-1735 M-2 cells. Although the pSV2neoEJ-transfected cells produced more rapidly growing s.c. tumors than the control cell lines did, the incidence of spontaneous metastasis was not increased. Following i.v. inoculation, the c-Ha-ras transfectants were retained in lung vasculature in greater proportions than pSV2neo counterpart transfectants were. The c-Ha-ras transfectants also produced significantly more lung tumor colonies, which grew faster than the few lung tumor colonies in mice given injections of control melanoma cells. We concluded that transfection of the activated c-Ha-ras oncogene into nonmetastatic K-1735 melanoma cells leads to accelerated tumor growth in vivo and can confer the ability to form lung colonies after i.v. injection but not the ability to metastasize from a primary s.c. tumor.

  17. Metastatic Insulinoma Following Resection of Nonsecreting Pancreatic Islet Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Ilyssa O.; Van Ha, Thuong G.; Kaplan, Edwin L.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2013-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented to our clinic for recurrent hypoglycemia after undergoing resection of an incidentally discovered nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumor 6 years ago. She underwent a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, after which she developed diabetes and was placed on an insulin pump. Pathology showed a pancreatic endocrine neoplasm with negative islet hormone immunostains. Two years later, computed tomography scan of the abdomen showed multiple liver lesions. Biopsy of a liver lesion showed a well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm, consistent with pancreatic origin. Six years later, she presented to clinic with 1.5 years of recurrent hypoglycemia. Laboratory results showed elevated proinsulin, insulin levels, and c-peptide levels during a hypoglycemic episode. Computed tomography scan of the abdomen redemonstrated multiple liver lesions. Repeated transarterial catheter chemoembolization and microwave thermal ablation controlled hypoglycemia. The unusual features of interest of this case include the transformation of nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumor to a metastatic insulinoma and the occurrence of atrial flutter after octreotide for treatment. PMID:26425568

  18. Recognition and capture of metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma cells using aptamer-conjugated quantum dots and magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fu-Bing; Rong, Yuan; Fang, Min; Yuan, Jing-Ping; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Li, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Metastatic recurrence is the most important biological behavior of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the main cause of treatment failure. Early prediction of metastasis is currently impossible due to the lack of specific molecular probes to recognize metastatic HCC cells. Aptamers have recently emerged as promising potential molecular probes for biomedical applications. Two well-matched HCC cell lines including HCCLM9 with high metastatic potential and MHCC97-L with low metastatic potential, were used to select aptamers for HCC metastasis. With a whole-cell-SELEX strategy, in which HCCLM9 cells were used as target cells and MHCC97-L cells as subtractive cell, 6 potential aptamers had been generated. Detailed study on selected aptamer LY-1 revealed that it could bind metastatic HCC cells with high affinity and specificity, not only in cells culture and animal models of HCC metastasis, but also in clinical HCC specimens. Moreover, the aptamer LY-1 and magnetic particles conjugates could efficiently capture the HCC cells from complex mixture whole blood. These studies demonstrated that this HCC specific aptamer LY-1 could be a promising molecular probe to recognize metastatic HCC cells.

  19. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Poff, A M; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, T N; D'Agostino, D P

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use.

  20. Ketone supplementation decreases tumor cell viability and prolongs survival of mice with metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Poff, AM; Ari, C; Arnold, P; Seyfried, TN; D’Agostino, DP

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells express an abnormal metabolism characterized by increased glucose consumption owing to genetic mutations and mitochondrial dysfunction. Previous studies indicate that unlike healthy tissues, cancer cells are unable to effectively use ketone bodies for energy. Furthermore, ketones inhibit the proliferation and viability of cultured tumor cells. As the Warburg effect is especially prominent in metastatic cells, we hypothesized that dietary ketone supplementation would inhibit metastatic cancer progression in vivo. Proliferation and viability were measured in the highly metastatic VM-M3 cells cultured in the presence and absence of β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB). Adult male inbred VM mice were implanted subcutaneously with firefly luciferase-tagged syngeneic VM-M3 cells. Mice were fed a standard diet supplemented with either 1,3-butanediol (BD) or a ketone ester (KE), which are metabolized to the ketone bodies βHB and acetoacetate. Tumor growth was monitored by in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Survival time, tumor growth rate, blood glucose, blood βHB and body weight were measured throughout the survival study. Ketone supplementation decreased proliferation and viability of the VM-M3 cells grown in vitro, even in the presence of high glucose. Dietary ketone supplementation with BD and KE prolonged survival in VM-M3 mice with systemic metastatic cancer by 51 and 69%, respectively (p < 0.05). Ketone administration elicited anticancer effects in vitro and in vivo independent of glucose levels or calorie restriction. The use of supplemental ketone precursors as a cancer treatment should be further investigated in animal models to determine potential for future clinical use. PMID:24615175

  1. The BMP inhibitor Coco reactivates breast cancer cells at lung metastatic sites.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hua; Chakraborty, Goutam; Lee-Lim, Ai Ping; Mo, Qianxing; Decker, Markus; Vonica, Alin; Shen, Ronglai; Brogi, Edi; Brivanlou, Ali H; Giancotti, Filippo G

    2012-08-17

    The mechanistic underpinnings of metastatic dormancy and reactivation are poorly understood. A gain-of-function cDNA screen reveals that Coco, a secreted antagonist of TGF-β ligands, induces dormant breast cancer cells to undergo reactivation in the lung. Mechanistic studies indicate that Coco exerts this effect by blocking lung-derived BMP ligands. Whereas Coco enhances the manifestation of traits associated with cancer stem cells, BMP signaling suppresses it. Coco induces a discrete gene expression signature, which is strongly associated with metastatic relapse to the lung, but not to the bone or brain in patients. Experiments in mouse models suggest that these latter organs contain niches devoid of bioactive BMP. These findings reveal that metastasis-initiating cells need to overcome organ-specific antimetastatic signals in order to undergo reactivation.

  2. Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    regulate the development of anti-tumor immune responses . Importantly, our results show that, compared to unfused DC and tumor cells, the DC/ breast tumor...AD Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0487 TITLE: Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer ...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Fusions of Breast Carcinoma and Dendritic Cells as a Vaccine for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

  3. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M’rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy. PMID:27795755

  4. Metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bellahammou, Khadija; Lakhdissi, Asmaa; Akkar, Othman; Rais, Fadoua; Naoual, Benhmidou; Elghissassi, Ibrahim; M'rabti, Hind; Errihani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common skin cancer, characterised by a slow growing behavior, metastasis are extremely rare, and it occurs in less than 0, 1% of all cases. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a rare form of basal cell carcinoma, more aggressive and defined as a tumor measuring more than 5 cm at its largest diameter. Only 1% of all basal cell carcinoma develops to a giant basal cell carcinoma, resulting of patient's negligence. Giant basal cell carcinoma is associated with higher potential of metastasis and even death, compared to ordinary basal cell carcinoma. We report a case of giant basal cell carcinoma metastaticin lung occurring in a 79 years old male patient, with a fatal evolution after one course of systemic chemotherapy. Giant basal cell carcinoma is a very rare entity, early detection of these tumors could prevent metastasis occurrence and improve the prognosis of this malignancy.

  5. Uncovering cancer cell behavioral phenotype in 3-D in vitro metastatic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liyu; Sun, Bo; Duclos, Guillaume; Kam, Yoonseok; Gatenby, Robert; Stone, Howard; Austin, Robert

    2012-02-01

    One well-known fact is that cancer cell genetics determines cell metastatic potentials. However, from a physics point of view, genetics as cell properties cannot directly act on metastasis. An agent is needed to unscramble the genetics first before generating dynamics for metastasis. Exactly this agent is cell behavioral phenotype, which is rarely studied due to the difficulties of real-time cell tracking in in vivo tissue. Here we have successfully constructed a micro in vitro environment with collagen based Extracellular Matrix (ECM) structures for cell 3-D metastasis. With stable nutrition (glucose) gradient inside, breast cancer cell MDA-MB-231 is able to invade inside the collagen from the nutrition poor site towards the nutrition rich site. Continuous confocal microscopy captures images of the cells every 12 hours and tracks their positions in 3-D space. The micro fluorescent beads pre-mixed inside the ECM demonstrate that invasive cells have altered the structures through mechanics. With the observation and the analysis of cell collective behaviors, we argue that game theory may exist between the pioneering cells and their followers in the metastatic cell group. The cell collaboration may explain the high efficiency of metastasis.

  6. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5+ regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, E. C.; Hamilton, M. J.; Young, A.; Wadsworth, B. J.; LePard, N. E.; Lee, H. N.; Firmino, N.; Collier, J. L.; Bennewith, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C–C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C–C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80+ macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5+ Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth. PMID:27471618

  7. Maraviroc decreases CCL8-mediated migration of CCR5(+) regulatory T cells and reduces metastatic tumor growth in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, E C; Hamilton, M J; Young, A; Wadsworth, B J; LePard, N E; Lee, H N; Firmino, N; Collier, J L; Bennewith, K L

    2016-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial physiological role in the regulation of immune homeostasis, although recent data suggest Tregs can contribute to primary tumor growth by suppressing antitumor immune responses. Tregs may also influence the development of tumor metastases, although there is a paucity of information regarding the phenotype and function of Tregs in metastatic target organs. Herein, we demonstrate that orthotopically implanted metastatic mammary tumors induce significant Treg accumulation in the lungs, which is a site of mammary tumor metastasis. Tregs in the primary tumor and metastatic lungs express high levels of C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) relative to Tregs in the mammary fat pad and lungs of tumor-free mice, and Tregs in the metastatic lungs are enriched for CCR5 expression in comparison to other immune cell populations. We also identify that C-C chemokine ligand 8 (CCL8), an endogenous ligand of CCR5, is produced by F4/80(+) macrophages in the lungs of mice with metastatic primary tumors. Migration of Tregs toward CCL8 ex vivo is reduced in the presence of the CCR5 inhibitor Maraviroc. Importantly, treatment of mice with Maraviroc (MVC) reduces the level of CCR5(+) Tregs and metastatic tumor burden in the lungs. This work provides evidence of a CCL8/CCR5 signaling axis driving Treg recruitment to the lungs of mice bearing metastatic primary tumors, representing a potential therapeutic target to decrease Treg accumulation and metastatic tumor growth.

  8. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  9. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  10. Differentiation of highly metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Zhenlin; Sun, Zhenzhen; Li, Jingwen; Ye, Qing; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Xie, Shusen

    2016-10-01

    The primary hypothesis tested in the study was that nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells at different stage of invasion and metastasis can be differentiated using multiphoton microscopy (MPM). CNE1 and CNE2Z cells were cultured and used in this study. The activity of cell migration and invasion was measured using Transwell assays. At the same time, the morphologic features were quantified from the multiphoton images. The measurements of Transwell migration and invasion showed that the invasion and migration of CNE2Z cells were significantly enhanced when compared with that of CNE1 cells. Also, statistically significant differences in the morphologic features were found between two kinds of cancer cells. In conclusion, it is feasible to use MPM to differentiate cancer cells with different stage of invasion and metastasis.

  11. Molecular Analysis of Motility in Metastatic Mammary Adenocarcinoma Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-09-01

    Culture MTLn3 cells were clonally derived from a lung metastasis of the 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma ( Neri et al., 1982) (kindly provided by Dr...MTLn3 cells were plated on collagen I coated MATTEK tissue culture dishes for 24 hours. Cells were plated at a density of 5000 cells/sq cm and...mM KOH; 4 mM MgC12 ; 10 mM EGTA pH 6.5 with 20 mM KOH; 5 1M phallacidin; 0.025 % saponin) was added to the culture well. After 15 seconds of extraction

  12. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  13. N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase IVa regulates metastatic potential of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through glycosylation of CD147.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianhui; Wang, Shujing; Yu, Shengjin; He, Jingna; Zheng, Weilong; Zhang, Jianing

    2012-08-01

    N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GnT)-IV a is a key enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the GlcNAC β1-4 branch on the core structure of complex N-Glycans, which is the common substrate for other N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, such as GnT-III and GnT-V. Our recent study indicates that the expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells was much higher than that in Hepa1-6 cells, these two mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines have high and no metastatic potential in lymph nodes respectively. To investigate the effects of GnT-IVa on the metastasis of hepatocarcinoma, exogenous GnT-IVa was introduced into Hepa1-6 cells, and on the other hand, the expression of GnT-IVa was down-regulated in Hca-F cells. The engineered overexpression of GnT-IVa in Hepa1-6 cells increased the antennary branches of complex N-glycans and reduced bisecting branches in vitro and in vivo, which leads to the increase in migration and metastatic capability of hepatocarcinoma cells. Conversely, down-regulated expression of GnT-IVa in Hca-F cells showed reduced tetra-antennary branches of N-Glycans, and significantly decreased the migration and metastatic capability. Furthermore, we found that the regulated GnT-IVa converts the heterogeneous N-glycosylated forms of CD147 in Hepa1-6 and Hca-F cells, and significantly changed the antennary oligosaccharide structures on CD147. These results suggest that GnT-IVa could be acting as a key role in migration and metastasis of mouse hepatocarcinoma cells through altering the glycosylation of CD147. These findings should be valuable in delineating the important function of GnT-IVa during the process of hepatocarcinoma growth and metastasis.

  14. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the buccal mucosa masquerading as a salivary gland neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Kudva, Ranjini; Nayal, Bhavna; Kantipudi, Swarna; Ray, Satadru

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis to the oral cavity is a rare occurrence with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) being the third most common tumor to metastasize to this location. Buccal mucosa is rarely involved and in the absence of a known primary, such lesions pose a diagnostic challenge to the pathologist. The histomorphological features may mimic a primary salivary gland neoplasm adding to the dilemma. We present one such case of metastatic RCC of the buccal mucosa. PMID:27721630

  15. Oncogenic LINE-1 Retroelements Sustain Prostate Tumor Cells and Promote Metastatic Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    RNA -sequencing data that we are part way through processing, but suggests so far significant activation of non-coding RNA sequences derived from RNA ...metastasis tumor tissues in the UTHSCSA tissue bank, however the RNA was not considered of sufficient quality to submit for RNA sequencing. We did RNA ...sequencing of LNCaP cell line RNA as this is derived from a prostate cancer lymph node metastatic deposit, although the bioinformatics analysis has

  16. Prognostic factors for survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: update 2008.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2009-05-15

    A variety of prognostic factor models to predict survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma have been developed. Diverse populations of patients with variable treatments have been used for these analyses. A variety of clinical, pathologic, and molecular factors have been studied, but current models use predominantly easily obtained clinical factors. These approaches are reviewed, and current approaches to further refine and develop these techniques are reviewed.

  17. Green tea extract selectively targets nanomechanics of live metastatic cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Sarah E.; Jin, Yu-Sheng; Lu, Qing-Yi; Rao, JianYu; Gimzewski, James K.

    2011-05-01

    Green tea extract (GTE) is known to be a potential anticancer agent (Yang et al 2009 Nat. Rev. Cancer 9 429-39) with various biological activities (Lu et al 2005 Clin. Cancer Res. 11 1675-83 Yang et al 1998 Carcinogenesis 19 611-6) yet the precise mechanism of action is still unclear. The biomechanical response of GTE treated cells taken directly from patient's body samples was measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) (Binnig et al 1986 Phys. Rev. Lett. 56 930). We found significant increase in stiffness of GTE treated metastatic tumor cells, with a resulting value similar to untreated normal mesothelial cells, whereas mesothelial cell stiffness after GTE treatment is unchanged. Immunofluorescence analysis showed an increase in cytoskeletal-F-actin in GTE treated tumor cells, suggesting GTE treated tumor cells display mechanical, structural and morphological features similar to normal cells, which appears to be mediated by annexin-I expression, as determined by siRNA analysis of an in vitro cell line model. Our data indicates that GTE selectively targets human metastatic cancer cells but not normal mesothelial cells, a finding that is significantly advantageous compared to conventional chemotherapy agents.

  18. Metapristone (RU486 derivative) inhibits cell proliferation and migration as melanoma metastatic chemopreventive agent.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning; Chen, Jiahang; Liu, Weiqun; Wang, Jichuang; Liu, Jian; Jia, Lee

    2017-04-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation and metastasis are the two well-known manifestations of melanoma. We hypothesized that metapristone, a potential cancer metastatic chemopreventive agent derived from mifepristone (RU486), had a dual function to fight cancer. In the present study, our findings clearly demonstrated that metapristone had modest cytostatic effect in melanoma cells. Metapristone inhibited cell viability and induced both early and late apoptosis in B16F10 and A375 cells in a time- and concentrate-dependent manner. Metapristone-treatment caused the cell arrest at the G0/G1 stage, and the inhibition of colony formation in B16F10 cells. Western blot analysis further revealed that metapristone treatment elicited a decline of Akt and ERK phosphorylation and Bcl-2, and facilitated expression of total P53 and Bax in A375 cells. In addition, cell migration and invasion were significantly suppressed by metapristone through down-regulating the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, N-cadherin and vimentin, whereas up-regulating E-cadherin expression. Notably, metapristone exhibited anti-metastatic activity in melanoma B16F10 cells in vivo. Our results reveal metapristone, having the dual function of anti-proliferation and anti-migration for melanoma cell lines, may be a useful chemopreventive agent to reduce the risk of melanoma cancer metastasis.

  19. Development of a highly metastatic model that reveals a crucial role of fibronectin in lung cancer cell migration and invasion

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The formation of metastasis is the most common cause of death in patients with lung cancer. A major implement to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer metastasis has been the lack of suitable models to address it. In this study, we aimed at establishing a highly metastatic model of human lung cancer and characterizing its metastatic properties and underlying mechanisms. Methods The human lung adeno-carcinoma SPC-A-1 cell line was used as parental cells for developing of highly metastatic cells by in vivo selection in NOD/SCID mice. After three rounds of selection, a new SPC-A-1sci cell line was established from pulmonary metastatic lesions. Subsequently, the metastatic properties of this cell line were analyzed, including optical imaging of in vivo metastasis, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analysis of several epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) makers and trans-well migration and invasion assays. Finally, the functional roles of fibronectin in the invasive and metastatic potentials of SPC-A-1sci cells were determined by shRNA analysis. Results A spontaneously pulmonary metastatic model of human lung adeno-carcinoma was established in NOD/SCID mice, from which a new lung cancer cell line, designated SPC-A-1sci, was isolated. Initially, the highly metastatic behavior of this cell line was validated by optical imaging in mice models. Further analyses showed that this cell line exhibit phenotypic and molecular alterations consistent with EMT. Compared with its parent cell line SPC-A-1, SPC-A-1sci was more aggressive in vitro, including increased potentials for cell spreading, migration and invasion. Importantly, fibronectin, a mesenchymal maker of EMT, was found to be highly expressed in SPC-A-1sci cells and down-regulation of it can decrease the in vitro and in vivo metastatic abilities of this cell line. Conclusions We have successfully established a new human lung cancer cell line with highly metastatic potentials

  20. Stem cell-like transcriptional reprogramming mediates metastatic resistance to mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mateo, F; Arenas, E J; Aguilar, H; Serra-Musach, J; de Garibay, G Ruiz; Boni, J; Maicas, M; Du, S; Iorio, F; Herranz-Ors, C; Islam, A; Prado, X; Llorente, A; Petit, A; Vidal, A; Català, I; Soler, T; Venturas, G; Rojo-Sebastian, A; Serra, H; Cuadras, D; Blanco, I; Lozano, J; Canals, F; Sieuwerts, A M; de Weerd, V; Look, M P; Puertas, S; García, N; Perkins, A S; Bonifaci, N; Skowron, M; Gómez-Baldó, L; Hernández, V; Martínez-Aranda, A; Martínez-Iniesta, M; Serrat, X; Cerón, J; Brunet, J; Barretina, M P; Gil, M; Falo, C; Fernández, A; Morilla, I; Pernas, S; Plà, M J; Andreu, X; Seguí, M A; Ballester, R; Castellà, E; Nellist, M; Morales, S; Valls, J; Velasco, A; Matias-Guiu, X; Figueras, A; Sánchez-Mut, J V; Sánchez-Céspedes, M; Cordero, A; Gómez-Miragaya, J; Palomero, L; Gómez, A; Gajewski, T F; Cohen, E E W; Jesiotr, M; Bodnar, L; Quintela-Fandino, M; López-Bigas, N; Valdés-Mas, R; Puente, X S; Viñals, F; Casanovas, O; Graupera, M; Hernández-Losa, J; Ramón Y Cajal, S; García-Alonso, L; Saez-Rodriguez, J; Esteller, M; Sierra, A; Martín-Martín, N; Matheu, A; Carracedo, A; González-Suárez, E; Nanjundan, M; Cortés, J; Lázaro, C; Odero, M D; Martens, J W M; Moreno-Bueno, G; Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Villanueva, A; Gomis, R R; Pujana, M A

    2016-12-19

    Inhibitors of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) are currently used to treat advanced metastatic breast cancer. However, whether an aggressive phenotype is sustained through adaptation or resistance to mTOR inhibition remains unknown. Here, complementary studies in human tumors, cancer models and cell lines reveal transcriptional reprogramming that supports metastasis in response to mTOR inhibition. This cancer feature is driven by EVI1 and SOX9. EVI1 functionally cooperates with and positively regulates SOX9, and promotes the transcriptional upregulation of key mTOR pathway components (REHB and RAPTOR) and of lung metastasis mediators (FSCN1 and SPARC). The expression of EVI1 and SOX9 is associated with stem cell-like and metastasis signatures, and their depletion impairs the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. These results establish the mechanistic link between resistance to mTOR inhibition and cancer metastatic potential, thus enhancing our understanding of mTOR targeting failure.Oncogene advance online publication, 19 December 2016; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.427.

  1. Elective neck management for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michael P; Amdur, Robert J; Werning, John W; Dziegielewski, Peter; Morris, Christopher G; Mendenhall, William M

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine if radiotherapy (RT) alone to the cervical lymphatics is a suitable alternative to elective neck dissection (END) in patients who undergo parotidectomy and postoperative RT for squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the parotid area lymph nodes (PALN). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 107 patients consecutively treated from November 1969 to March 2012 for cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN with a clinically node-negative neck. Primary therapy consisted of parotidectomy in all cases. We compared regional (cervical) control in two subgroups: 42 patients treated with END and RT and 65 patients treated with elective neck irradiation (ENI) alone. The median time of follow-up was 5.5 years (range 0.3-30 years) for all patients and 11 years for living patients (range 1.8-26 years). There was 1 neck recurrence in each subgroup: END and RT, 1/42 (2 %); and ENI alone, 1/65 (1.5 %). No patient experienced a complication related to neck RT. ENI to a dose of approximately 50-60 Gy is a suitable alternative to END and postoperative RT in patients with squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to the PALN.

  2. Tumor Mutational Load and Immune Parameters across Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Risk Groups.

    PubMed

    de Velasco, Guillermo; Miao, Diana; Voss, Martin H; Hakimi, A Ari; Hsieh, James J; Tannir, Nizar M; Tamboli, Pheroze; Appleman, Leonard J; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Choueiri, Toni K

    2016-10-01

    Patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) have better overall survival when treated with nivolumab, a cancer immunotherapy that targets the immune checkpoint inhibitor programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), rather than everolimus (a chemical inhibitor of mTOR and immunosuppressant). Poor-risk mRCC patients treated with nivolumab seemed to experience the greatest overall survival benefit, compared with patients with favorable or intermediate risk, in an analysis of the CheckMate-025 trial subgroup of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) prognostic risk groups. Here, we explore whether tumor mutational load and RNA expression of specific immune parameters could be segregated by prognostic MSKCC risk strata and explain the survival seen in the poor-risk group. We queried whole-exome transcriptome data in renal cell carcinoma patients (n = 54) included in The Cancer Genome Atlas who ultimately developed metastatic disease or were diagnosed with metastatic disease at presentation and did not receive immune checkpoint inhibitors. Nonsynonymous mutational load did not differ significantly by the MSKCC risk group, nor was the expression of cytolytic genes-granzyme A and perforin-or selected immune checkpoint molecules different across MSKCC risk groups. In conclusion, this analysis revealed that mutational load and expression of markers of an active tumor microenvironment did not correlate with MSKCC risk prognostic classification in mRCC. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 820-2. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Squamous cell carcinoma of cervix metastatic to ileal loop

    SciTech Connect

    Hulecki, S.J.; Klein, F.A.; Davis, J.E.

    1985-12-01

    A case is presented of squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix with an isolated metastasis to an ileal loop six years after diversion and seven years after definitive treatment of the primary lesion with irradiation.

  4. [Successful Management by Immunoglobulin for Sunitinib-Induced Thrombocytopenia in a Patient with Advanced Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Satoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi; Watanabe, Masaki; Hashizume, Kazumi; Kobayashi, Shin; Azumi, Makoto; Kita, Masafumi; Iwata, Tatsuya; Matsumoto, Seiji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2016-02-01

    An 81-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a right renal tumor with vena cava thrombus and multiple lung metastases that were detected by computed tomography (CT) scan during evaluation of respiratory discomfort. We started medical treatment with sunitinib at a dose of 50 mg daily in a 2-week-on, 1-week-off schedule after confirming clear cell renal cell carcinoma by tumor biopsy. After 2-week sunitinib treatment, thrombocytopenia continued and platelet count decreased to 1.8×10(9)/l at day 11 after stopping sunitinib. We needed to administer a total of 60 units platelet transfusion because of persistent thrombocytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration did not reveal myelosuppression or carcinoma invasion to bone marrow. Under the clinical diagnosis of drug-induced thrombocytopenia secondary to sunitinib, we started immunoglobulin therapy at day 23 after stopping sunitinib. Platelet count returned to normal 10 days after starting immunoglobulin. The patient developed exacerbating lung metastasis and carcinomatous lymphangiosis during subsequent course and died of renal cell carcinoma 79 days after starting sunitinib. Thrombocytopenia after sunitinib therapy is often encountered but prolonged thrombocytopenia is rare after stopping sunitinib. This case suggests that immunoglobulin therapy is effective for drug-induced prolonged thrombocytopenia through immunological mechanism.

  5. The Metastatic Potential and Chemoresistance of Human Pancreatic Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwandin, Vikash J.; Bishop, J. Michael; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) typically have the capacity to evade chemotherapy and may be the principal source of metastases. CSCs for human pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDAC) have been identified, but neither the metastatic potential nor the chemoresistance of these cells has been adequately evaluated. We have addressed these issues by examining side-population (SP) cells isolated from the Panc-1 and BxPC3 lines of human PDAC cells, the oncogenotypes of which differ. SP cells could be isolated from monolayers of Panc-1, but only from spheroids of BxPC3. Using orthotopic xenografts into the severely immunocompromised NSG mouse, we found that SP cells isolated from both cell lines produced tumors that were highly metastatic, in contrast to previous experience with PDAC cell lines. SP cells derived from both cell lines expressed the ABCG2 transporter, which was demonstrably responsible for the SP phenotype. SP cells gave rise to non-SP (NSP) cells in vitro and in vivo, a transition that was apparently due to posttranslational inhibition of the ABCG2 transporter. Twenty-two other lines of PDAC cells also expressed ABCG2. The sensitivity of PDAC SP cells to the vinca alkaloid vincristine could be greatly increased by verapamil, a general inhibitor of transporters. In contrast, verapamil had no effect on the killing of PDAC cells by gemcitabine, the current first-line therapeutic for PDAC. We conclude that the isolation of SP cells can be a convenient and effective tool for the study of PDAC CSCs; that CSCs may be the principal progenitors of metastasis by human PDAC; that the ABCG2 transporter is responsible for the SP phenotype in human PDAC cells, and may be a ubiquitous source of drug-resistance in PDAC, but does not confer resistance to gemcitabine; and that inhibition of ABCG2 might offer a useful adjunct in a therapeutic attack on the CSCs of PDAC. PMID:26859746

  6. Cofilin drives cell-invasive and metastatic responses to TGF-β in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collazo, Joanne; Zhu, Beibei; Larkin, Spencer; Martin, Sarah K; Pu, Hong; Horbinski, Craig; Koochekpour, Shahriar; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-04-15

    Cofilin (CFL) is an F-actin-severing protein required for the cytoskeleton reorganization and filopodia formation, which drives cell migration. CFL binding and severing of F-actin is controlled by Ser3 phosphorylation, but the contributions of this step to cell migration during invasion and metastasis of cancer cells are unclear. In this study, we addressed the question in prostate cancer cells, including the response to TGF-β, a critical regulator of migration. In cells expressing wild-type CFL, TGF-β treatment increased LIMK-2 activity and cofilin phosphorylation, decreasing filopodia formation. Conversely, constitutively active CFL (SerAla) promoted filipodia formation and cell migration mediated by TGF-β. Notably, in cocultures of prostate cancer epithelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts, active CFL promoted invasive migration in response to TGF-β in the microenvironment. Further, constitutively active CFL elevated the metastatic ability of prostate cancer cells in vivo. We found that levels of active CFL correlated with metastasis in a mouse model of prostate tumor and that in human prostate cancer, CFL expression was increased significantly in metastatic tumors. Our findings show that the actin-severing protein CFL coordinates responses to TGF-β that are needed for invasive cancer migration and metastasis.

  7. Anti-metastatic effect of Smilax china L. extract on MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Nho, Kyoung Jin; Chun, Jin Mi; Kim, Ho Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Cancer metastases are not always cured by chemotherapy. Conventional and alternative drugs, including Chinese herbal remedies, have been developed to target metastatic cancer cells. Smilax china L. (SCL), a member of the Smilacaceae family, exerts anti-inflammatory, detoxification and anti-cancer effects. However, the effect of SCL on breast cancer cell metastasis and the underlying mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a SCL ethanol extract (SCLE) on the proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells, as well as the expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). Cell proliferation was assessed using the Cell Counting Kit‑8 and cell migration was determined by wound healing assay. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to quantify the mRNA levels of uPA, uPAR and TIMPs. SCLE markedly inhibited the proliferation and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells, and reduced the mRNA levels of the extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation-associated molecules uPA, uPAR. By contrast, SCLE significantly increased the mRNA levels of TIMP1 and TIMP2. These findings show that SCLE exerts an anti-metastatic effect on human breast cancer cells, which may involve the modulation of ECM degradation.

  8. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Yao; Bae, Kyungmi; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1{alpha}) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia ({>=}24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia ({<=}6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1{alpha}. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  9. Implications of occult metastatic cells for systemic cancer treatment in patients with breast or gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Rosenberg, R; Thorban, S; Harbeck, N

    2001-06-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumour cells to the organism is becoming acknowledged as a hallmark in cancer progression, since abundant clinical and experimental data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies against epithelial cytokeratins or tumour-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected in cytological bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of such immunostained cells in bone marrow is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival, even in malignancies that do not preferentially metastasise to bone. As current treatment strategies have resulted in a substantial improvement of cancer mortality rates, it is noteworthy to consider the intriguing options of immunocytochemical screening of bone marrow aspirates for occult metastatic cells. Besides improved tumour staging, such screening offers opportunities for guiding patient stratification for adjuvant therapy trials, monitoring response to adjuvant therapies (which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up), and specifically targeting tumour-biological therapies against disseminated tumour cells. The present review summarises the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic cancer cells in bone marrow.

  10. Hypoxia-induced lysyl oxidase is a critical mediator of bone marrow cell recruitment to form the pre-metastatic niche

    PubMed Central

    Erler, Janine T.; Bennewith, Kevin L.; Cox, Thomas R.; Lang, Georgina; Bird, Demelza; Koong, Albert; Le, Quynh-Thu; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Tumor cell metastasis is facilitated by “pre-metastatic niches” formed in destination organs by invading bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is critical for pre-metastatic niche formation. LOX secreted by hypoxic breast tumor cells accumulates at pre-metastatic sites, cross-links collagen-IV in the basement membrane, and is essential for CD11b+ myeloid cell recruitment. CD11b+ cells adhere to cross-linked collagen-IV and produce matrix metalloproteinase-2 which cleaves collagen, enhancing the invasion and recruitment of BMDCs and metastasizing tumor cells. LOX inhibition prevents CD11b+ cell recruitment and metastatic growth. CD11b+ cells and LOX also co-localize in biopsies of human metastases. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for LOX in pre-metastatic niche formation and support targeting LOX for the treatment and prevention of metastatic disease. PMID:19111879

  11. The in vitro invasiveness and interactions with laminin of K-1735 melanoma cells. Evidence for different laminin-binding affinities in high and low metastatic variants.

    PubMed

    Albini, A; Aukerman, S L; Ogle, R C; Noonan, D M; Fridman, R; Martin, G R; Fidler, I J

    1989-01-01

    The invasive and metastatic characteristics of cloned cells derived from the K-1735 murine melanoma were investigated. Cell lines which are highly metastatic in mice were found to be invasive in vitro, and to show an enhanced attachment to, spreading on and migration toward laminin. As attachment, spreading and directional migration are thought to be receptor-mediated events, the binding of laminin to these cells was studied. Biotinylated laminin was used to evaluate receptor binding by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) and this method was compared with that in which the binding of radioactive laminin is measured. Both studies revealed that metastatic K-1735 cells (a) have more receptors for laminin compared with non-metastatic cells and (b) exhibit a second population of low-affinity binding sites not present on the non-metastatic cells. The differences in receptor number and type may account for the greater interaction of metastatic cells with laminin and their invasive phenotype.

  12. Recent Advances in the Medical Treatment of Recurrent or Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumbla, Rekha A; Figlin, Robert A; Posadas, Edwin M

    2017-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) historically has had limited treatment options in the metastatic setting but in the last decade, a significant arsenal of new therapies has emerged. Specifically, targeted anti-angiogenic therapies through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibition and immunotherapy through PD-1 inhibition have become the foundation of metastatic RCC treatment increasing not only progression-free survival but also an improved overall survival with improved toxicity profiles compared with older therapies such as IL-2 and interferon. With the development of these newer medications, the optimal sequence and pairing of treatments is not yet well understood but important studies are ongoing as this information will allow for more effective and safe treatment of patients.

  13. Targeted therapies used sequentially in metastatic renal cell cancer: overall results from a large experience.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Giuseppe; Verzoni, Elena; Iacovelli, Roberto; Guadalupi, Valentina; Gelsomino, Francesco; Buzzoni, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    Targeted therapies have improved survival in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC); however, expert opinion on the optimal therapeutic strategy is divided. This retrospective study evaluates different sequential schemes of targeted therapies in 310 patients with advanced/metastatic RCC who received different systemic agents - sorafenib, sunitinib, bevacizumab, everolimus, temsirolimus and axitinib - alone or in different sequences, until disease progression or intolerable toxicity (median follow-up: 37 months). The median overall survival (OS) was 22 months and the 5-year OS was 23.4%; differential therapeutic schemes were not associated with differences in OS. A worse performance status, no nephrectomy and a poor-risk classification according to the Motzer criteria was associated with a shorter OS. These findings support the use of targeted therapies in the treatment of RCC, even in a large unselected population from a single institution, and suggest that treatment should be tailored to meet individual circumstances and needs.

  14. Metastatic transitional cell carcinoma in proximal humerus of a dog

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Sarah; Murphy, Kimberly A.; Nykamp, Stephanie G.; Allavena, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) was diagnosed in the proximal humerus of a dog that was presented with persistent right forelimb lameness with no clinical signs of urinary tract involvement. A diagnosis of TCC was made from surgical biopsy of the humeral lesion with subsequent necropsy revealing the prostatic urethra as the primary site of the tumor. PMID:22379204

  15. [Successful therapy of metastatic basal cell carcinoma with vismodegib].

    PubMed

    Zutt, M; Mazur, F; Bergmann, M; Lemke, A J; Kaune, K M

    2014-11-01

    A 71-year-old man presented with giant basal cell carcinoma on the abdomen which had metastasized. He was treated with oral vismodegib. Both the primary ulcerated tumor on the abdomen and the metastases responded. Vismodegib was well tolerated without significant side effects. The tumor recurred promptly after vismodegib was discontinued, and then was resistant to therapy when vismodegib was re-administered.

  16. Netrin-1 expression confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitamant, Julien; Guenebeaud, Céline; Coissieux, Marie-May; Guix, Catherine; Treilleux, Isabelle; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Bachelot, Thomas; Bernet, Agnès; Mehlen, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Netrin-1, an axon navigation cue was proposed to play a crucial role during colorectal tumorigenesis by regulating apoptosis. The netrin-1 receptors DCC and UNC5H were shown to belong to the family of dependence receptors that share the ability to induce apoptosis in the absence of their ligands. Such a trait confers on these receptors a tumor suppressor activity. Expression of one of these dependence receptors at the surface of a tumor cell is indeed speculated to render this cell dependent on ligand availability for its survival, hence inhibiting uncontrolled cell proliferation or metastasis. Consequently, it is a selective advantage for a tumor cell to lose this dependence receptor activity, as previously described with losses of DCC and UNC5H expression in human cancers. However, the model predicts that a similar advantage may be obtained by gaining autocrine expression of the ligand. We describe here that, unlike human nonmetastatic breast tumors, a large fraction of metastatic breast cancers overexpress netrin-1. Moreover, we show that netrin-1-expressing mammary metastatic tumor cell lines undergo apoptosis when netrin-1 expression is experimentally decreased or when decoy soluble receptor ectodomains are added. Such treatments prevent metastasis formation both in a syngenic mouse model of lung colonization of a mammary cancer cell line and in a model of spontaneous lung metastasis of xenografted human breast tumor. Thus, netrin-1 expression observed in a large fraction of human metastatic breast tumors confers a selective advantage for tumor cell survival and potentially represents a promising target for alternative anticancer therapeutic strategies. PMID:18353983

  17. Epigenetic impacts of ascorbate on human metastatic melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Sascha; Sinnberg, Tobias W; Berger, Alexander; Noor, Seema; Levesque, Mitchell Paul; Böcker, Alexander; Niessner, Heike; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Garbe, Claus; Busch, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, increasing evidence has emerged demonstrating that high-dose ascorbate bears cytotoxic effects on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, making ascorbate a pro-oxidative drug that catalyzes hydrogen peroxide production in tissues instead of acting as a radical scavenger. This anticancer effect of ascorbate is hypoxia-inducible factor-1α- and O2-dependent. However, whether the intracellular mechanisms governing this effect are modulated by epigenetic phenomena remains unknown. We treated human melanoma cells with physiological (200 μM) or pharmacological (8 mM) ascorbate for 1 h to record the impact on DNA methyltransferase (DNMT)-activity, histone deacetylases (HDACs), and microRNA (miRNA) expression after 12 h. The results were analyzed with the MIRUMIR online tool that estimates the power of miRNA to serve as potential biomarkers to predict survival of cancer patients. FACS cell-cycle analyses showed that 8 mM ascorbate shifted BLM melanoma cells toward the sub-G1 fraction starting at 12 h after an initial primary G2/M arrest, indicative for secondary apoptosis induction. In pharmacological doses, ascorbate inhibited the DNMT activity in nuclear extracts of MeWo and BLM melanoma cells, but did not inhibit human HDAC enzymes of classes I, II, and IV. The expression of 151 miRNAs was altered 12 h after ascorbate treatment of BLM cells in physiological or pharmacological doses. Pharmacological doses up-regulated 32 miRNAs (≥4-fold) mainly involved in tumor suppression and drug resistance in our preliminary miRNA screening array. The most prominently up-regulated miRNAs correlated with a significantly increased overall survival of breast cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients of the MIRUMIR database with high expression of the respective miRNA. Our results suggest a possible epigenetic signature of pharmacological doses of ascorbate in human melanoma cells and support further pre-clinical and possibly even clinical evaluation of

  18. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I.; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  19. Emergence of chemoresistance in a metastatic basal cell carcinoma patient after complete response to hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449).

    PubMed

    Meani, Rowena E; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Kelly, John W

    2014-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449, Genentech, USA), a small molecule inhibitor of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, has potent anti-tumour activity in advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We report a case of a 67-year-old Australian man with metastatic BCC including pulmonary disease with malignant effusion who showed a dramatic complete response to vismodegib but subsequently experienced a recurrence of pulmonary disease, indicative of chemoresistance to vismodegib. This case is the first to illustrate chemoresistance in a patient with metastatic BCC, and demonstrates the need for closely monitoring metastatic BCC patients even after an apparently complete response.

  20. Spontaneous dormancy of metastatic breast cancer cells in an all human liver microphysiologic system

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, S E; Clark, A M; Taylor, D P; Young, C L; Pillai, V C; Stolz, D B; Venkataramanan, R; Lauffenburger, D; Griffith, L; Wells, A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metastatic outgrowth in breast cancer can occur years after a seeming cure. Existing model systems of dormancy are limited as they do not recapitulate human metastatic dormancy without exogenous manipulations and are unable to query early events of micrometastases. Methods: Here, we describe a human ex vivo hepatic microphysiologic system. The system is established with fresh human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs) creating a microenvironment into which breast cancer cells (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) are added. Results: The hepatic tissue maintains function through 15 days as verified by liver-specific protein production and drug metabolism assays. The NPCs form an integral part of the hepatic niche, demonstrated within the system through their participation in differential signalling cascades and cancer cell outcomes. Breast cancer cells intercalate into the hepatic niche without interfering with hepatocyte function. Examination of cancer cells demonstrated that a significant subset enter a quiescent state of dormancy as shown by lack of cell cycling (EdU− or Ki67−). The presence of NPCs altered the cancer cell fraction entering quiescence, and lead to differential cytokine profiles in the microenvironment effluent. Conclusions: These findings establish the liver microphysiologic system as a relevant model for the study of breast cancer metastases and entry into dormancy. PMID:25314052

  1. Tissue engineering a surrogate niche for metastatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Berry, Janice E; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Taichman, Russell S; Kaplan, David L

    2015-05-01

    In breast and prostate cancer patients, the bone marrow is a preferred site of metastasis. We hypothesized that we could use tissue-engineering strategies to lure metastasizing cancer cells to tissue-engineered bone marrow. First, we generated highly porous 3D silk scaffolds that were biocompatible and amenable to bone morphogenetic protein 2 functionalization. Control and functionalized silk scaffolds were subcutaneously implanted in mice and bone marrow development was followed. Only functionalized scaffolds developed cancellous bone and red bone marrow, which appeared as early as two weeks post-implantation and further developed over the 16-week study period. This tissue-engineered bone marrow microenvironment could be readily manipulated in situ to understand the biology of bone metastasis. To test the ability of functionalized scaffolds to serve as a surrogate niche for metastasis, human breast cancer cells were injected into the mammary fat pads of mice. The treatment of animals with scaffolds had no significant effect on primary tumor growth. However, extensive metastasis was observed in functionalized scaffolds, and the highest levels for scaffolds that were in situ manipulated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). We also applied this tissue-engineered bone marrow model in a prostate cancer and experimental metastasis setting. In summary, we were able to use tissue-engineered bone marrow to serve as a target or "trap" for metastasizing cancer cells.

  2. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J.; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell—endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  3. Improved detection of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic high-risk prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kuske, Andra; Gorges, Tobias M.; Tennstedt, Pierre; Tiebel, Anne-Kathrin; Pompe, Raisa; Preißer, Felix; Prues, Sandra; Mazel, Martine; Markou, Athina; Lianidou, Evi; Peine, Sven; Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Riethdorf, Sabine; Beyer, Burkhard; Schlomm, Thorsten; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of blood-based assays to monitor minimal residual disease (MRD) in non-metastatic prostate cancer (PCa) remains unclear. Proving that clinically relevant circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be detected with available technologies could address this. This study aimed to improve CTC detection in non-metastatic PCa patients by combining three independent CTC assays: the CellSearch system, an in vivo CellCollector and the EPISPOT. Peripheral blood samples from high-risk PCa patients were screened for CTCs before and three months after radical prostatectomy (RP). Combining the results of both time points, CTCs were detected in 37%, 54.9% and 58.7% of patients using CellSearch, CellCollector and EPISPOT, respectively. The cumulative positivity rate of the three CTC assays was 81.3% (87/107) with 21.5% (23/107) of patients harboring ≥5 CTCs/7.5 ml blood. Matched pair analysis of 30 blood samples taken before and after surgery indicated a significant decrease in CTCs captured by the CellCollector from 66% before RP to 34% after therapy (p = 0.031). CTC detection by EPISPOT before RP significantly correlated with PSA serum values (p < 0.0001) and clinical tumor stage (p = 0.04), while the other assays showed no significant correlations. In conclusion, CTC-based liquid biopsies have the potential to monitor MRD in patients with non-metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:28000772

  4. Targeted therapy for cytokine-refractory metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and treatment in the community.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2006-05-01

    This report of a case of cytokine-refractory metastatic, clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) presents some current issues related to use of targeted therapy in the community. Due to the different mechanisms of cytostatic vs. cytotoxic agents, traditional response assessments may not always apply in deciding when to either continue or stop treatment. While community physicians may increasingly focus more on duration of response, symptom relief, and how well patients tolerate treatment, there is a clear need for validated surrogate markers of biologic activity and response, as well as randomized trials that directly compare some of the targeted therapies being applied in advanced RCC.

  5. Metastatic progression and gene expression between breast cancer cell lines from African American and Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Yancy, Haile F; Mason, Jacquline A; Peters, Sharla; Thompson, Charles E; Littleton, George K; Jett, Marti; Day, Agnes A

    2007-01-01

    African American (AA) women have a lower overall incidence of breast cancer than do Caucasian (CAU) women, but a higher overall mortality. Little is known as to why the incidence of breast cancer is lower yet mortality is higher in AA women. Many studies speculate that this is only a socio-economical problem. This investigation suggests the possibility that molecular mechanisms contribute to the increased mortality of AA women with breast cancer. This study investigates the expression of 14 genes which have been shown to play a role in cancer metastasis. Cell lines derived from AA and CAU patients were analyzed to demonstrate alterations in the transcription of genes known to be involved in cancer and the metastatic process. Total RNA was isolated from cell lines and analyzed by RT-PCR analysis. Differential expression of the 14 targeted genes between a spectrum model (6 breast cancer cell lines and 2 non-cancer breast cell lines) and a metastasis model (12 metastatic breast cancer cell lines) were demonstrated. Additionally, an in vitro comparison of the expression established differences in 5 of the 14 biomarker genes between African American and Caucasian breast cell lines. Results from this study indicates that altered expression of the genes Atp1b1, CARD 10, KLF4, Spint2, and Acly may play a role in the aggressive phenotype seen in breast cancer in African American women. PMID:17472751

  6. Prophylactic Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccines Efficiently Inhibit Metastases in Murine Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Markov, Oleg V; Mironova, Nadezhda L; Sennikov, Sergey V; Vlassov, Valentin V; Zenkova, Marina A

    2015-01-01

    Recent data on the application of dendritic cells (DCs) as anti-tumor vaccines has shown their great potential in therapy and prophylaxis of cancer. Here we report on a comparison of two treatment schemes with DCs that display the models of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination using three different experimental tumor models: namely, Krebs-2 adenocarcinoma (primary tumor), melanoma (B16, metastatic tumor without a primary node) and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC, metastatic tumor with a primary node). Dendritic cells generated from bone marrow-derived DC precursors and loaded with lysate of tumor cells or transfected with the complexes of total tumor RNA with cationic liposomes were used for vaccination. Lipofectamine 2000 and liposomes consisting of helper lipid DOPE (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine) and cationic lipid 2D3 (1,26-Bis(1,2-de-O-tetradecyl-rac-glycerol)-7,11,16,20-tetraazahexacosan tetrahydrocloride) were used for RNA transfection. It was shown that DCs loaded with tumor lysate were ineffective in contrast to tumor-derived RNA. Therapeutic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/Lipofectamine 2000 was the most efficient for treatment of non-metastatic Krebs-2, where a 1.9-fold tumor growth retardation was observed. Single prophylactic vaccination with DCs loaded by lipoplexes RNA/2D3 was the most efficient to treat highly aggressive metastatic tumors LLC and B16, where 4.7- and 10-fold suppression of the number of lung metastases was observed, respectively. Antimetastatic effect of single prophylactic DC vaccination in metastatic melanoma model was accompanied by the reductions in the levels of Th2-specific cytokines however the change of the levels of Th1/Th2/Th17 master regulators was not found. Failure of double prophylactic vaccination is explained by Th17-response polarization associated with autoimmune and pro-inflammatory reactions. In the case of therapeutic DC vaccine the polarization of Th1-response was found nevertheless

  7. Differential targets of CpG island hypermethylation in primary and metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Smiraglia, D; Smith, L; Lang, J; Rush, L; Dai, Z; Schuller, D; Plass, C

    2003-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) often metastasise to the cervical lymph nodes. It is known for HNSCC as well as other cancers that progression from normal tissue to primary tumour and finally to metastatic tumour is characterised by an accumulation of genetic mutations. DNA methylation, an epigenetic modification, can result in loss of gene function in cancer, similar to genetic mutations such as deletions and point mutations. We have investigated the DNA methylation phenotypes of both primary HNSCC and metastatic tumours from 13 patients using restriction landmark genomic scanning (RLGS). With this technique, we were able to assess the methylation status of an average of nearly 1300 CpG islands for each tumour. We observed that the number of CpG islands hypermethylated in metastatic tumours is significantly greater than what is found in the primary tumours overall, but not in every patient. Interestingly, the data also clearly show that many loci methylated in a patient's primary tumour are no longer methylated in the metastatic tumour of the same patient. Thus, even though metastatic HNSCC methylate a greater proportion of CpG islands than do the primary tumours, they do so at different subsets of loci. These data show an unanticipated variability in the methylation state of loci in primary and metastatic HNSCCs within the same patient. We discuss two possible explanations for how different epigenetic events might arise between the primary tumour and the metastatic tumour of a person. PMID:12525538

  8. Role of partial nephrectomy as cytoreduction in the management of metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Karam, J A; Babaian, K N; Tannir, N M; Matin, S F; Wood, C G

    2015-06-01

    In this review, we describe the role, feasibility and safety of partial nephrectomy in the setting of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Partial nephrectomy is currently the preferred therapeutic modality in patients with localized renal tumors, while radical cytoreductive nephrectomy is the standard of care for appropriately selected patients with metastatic disease. Several studies have shown the prognostic value of percentage tumor removed when cytoreductive nephrectomy is done. This concept of percentage tumor removal and the associated benefit should also be applied when considering patients for cytoreductive partial nephrectomy; however, the potential adverse events after partial nephrectomy should be kept in mind, as these, when they occur, could delay time to starting systemic therapy. Several small retrospective studies have shown the feasibility of this approach in carefully selected patient groups. In well-selected patients with metastatic disease and primary tumors that are amenable to nephron sparing approaches, partial nephrectomy could offer an alternative to radical nephrectomy, with manageable adverse events, and good renal functional outcomes. Preserving renal function in this population could allow these patients to participate in clinical trial that they otherwise might not qualify for.

  9. Periaortic lymph node involvement by metastatic angiosarcoma and benign sinus mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Isotalo, P A; Jabit, M; Wenckebach, G F

    2001-05-01

    Hyperplastic mesothelial cells involving lymph node sinuses have only been recently described. Most nodal mesothelial cells are thought to originate from mesothelial surfaces disrupted by serosal effusions. Dislodged mesothelial cells likely gain access to submesothelial lymphatics via mesothelial stomata and disseminate to draining lymph nodes. Unusual lymph node architectural patterns result when benign sinus mesothelial cells occur concurrently with a neoplastic nodal process. We describe a young man who developed diffuse metastases from a primary cardiac angiosarcoma. His periaortic lymph nodes contained metastatic angiosarcoma and hyperplastic mesothelial cells with a sinus distribution. The patient had a clinical history of progressive haemoperitoneum, exacerbated by thrombocytopaenia and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Massive haemoperitoneum of 5000 ml was confirmed at autopsy. This is the first report to suggest that multiple episodes of intraperitoneal haemorrhage and ascites may both act in the same manner to cause dislodgment and dissemination of mesothelial cells to draining lymph node sinuses.

  10. Primary adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHUANGZHI; ZHENG, AIPING; MAO, XIANGMING; SHI, BENTAO; LI, XIANXIN

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare adrenal carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases have been reported since 1987. Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma presents a diagnostic challenge due to its atypical symptoms and histological patterns. At the time of diagnosis, a large percentage of patients are already at the metastatic stage and succumb within a few months. The present study reports a case of a 59-year-old man presenting with asthenia and weight loss with adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan and ultrasonography of the patient's abdomen suggested a large homogeneous mass in the right adrenal gland, and a CT scan of his chest suggested lung metastasis. Right adrenalectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sarcomatous and carcinomatous differentiation elements. Immunohistochemical examination revealed tumor cell positivity for vimentin and cytokeratin. At the 6-month follow-up the patient exhibited no disease progression and refused further proposed treatment. The patient was alive at the time of writing the current report. The present case report additionally reviews the literature, for the purpose of raising awareness of these rare lesions and assisting in achieving accurate diagnoses and effective treatment. PMID:27123074

  11. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  12. Anti-metastatic activity of fangchinoline in human gastric cancer AGS cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhengrong; He, Tengfei; Zhao, Kui; Xing, Chungen

    2017-01-01

    Fangchinoline (FCL) is an active component isolated from the traditional medicinal plant Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has been reported to possess anti-cancer functions in several types of cancers; however, the effect of FCL on gastric cancer metastasis and its underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of FCL on the cell migration and invasion of human metastatic gastric cancer AGS cells and its mechanisms. Our study demonstrates that FCL dosage dependently suppressed the adhesion, migration and invasion capacities of human gastric cancer AGS cells without obvious cytotoxic effects. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays demonstrated that FCL greatly inhibited the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels, while it significantly increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1 and TIMP2 messenger RNAs. Our results also indicated that FCL repressed the phosphorylation of AKT in gastric cancer AGS cells. In summary, FCL may exert its anti-metastatic property in human gastric cancer cells in vitro by suppression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, increase of TIMP1 and TIMP2 genes, and inhibition of AKT phosphorylation. FCL may be a drug candidate for the treatment of gastric cancer metastasis.

  13. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  14. Analysis of autophagic flux in response to sulforaphane in metastatic prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Palomera-Sanchez, Zoraya; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2015-01-01

    Scope The phytochemical sulforaphane has been shown to decrease prostate cancer metastases in a genetic mouse model of prostate carcinogenesis, though the mechanism of action is not fully known. Sulforaphane has been reported to stimulate autophagy, and modulation of autophagy has been proposed to influence sulforaphane cytotoxicity; however, no conclusions about autophagy can be drawn without assessing autophagic flux, which has not been characterized in prostate cancer cells following sulforaphane treatment. Methods and Results We conducted an investigation to assess the impact of sulforaphane on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines at a concentration shown to decrease metastasis in vivo. Autophagic flux was assessed by multiple autophagy related proteins and substrates. We found that sulforaphane can stimulate autophagic flux and cell death only at high concentrations, above what has been observed in vivo. Conclusion These results suggest that sulforaphane does not directly stimulate autophagy or cell death in metastatic prostate cancer cells under physiologically relevant conditions, but instead supports the involvement of in vivo factors as important effectors of sulforaphane- mediated prostate cancer suppression. PMID:26108801

  15. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 expression enhances the metastatic collective migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaminota, Teppei; Yano, Hajime; Shiota, Kohei; Nomura, Noriko; Yaguchi, Haruna; Kirino, Yui; Ohara, Kentaro; Tetsumura, Issei; Sanada, Tomoyoshi; Ugumori, Toru; Tanaka, Junya; Hato, Naohito

    2017-04-22

    Cancer cells can migrate as collectives during invasion and/or metastasis; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of this form of migration are less clear compared with single cell migration following epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Elevated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger1 (NHE1) expression has been suggested to have malignant roles in a number of cancer cell lines and in vivo tumor models. Furthermore, a metastatic human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell line (SASL1m) that was isolated based on its increased metastatic potential also exhibited higher NHE1 expression than its parental line SAS. Time-lapse video recordings indicated that both cell lines migrate as collectives, although with different features, e.g., SASL1m was much more active and changed the direction of migration more frequently than SAS cells, whereas locomotive activities were comparable. SASL1m cells also exhibited higher invasive activity than SAS in Matrigel invasion assays. shRNA-mediated NHE1 knockdown in SASL1m led to reduced locomotive and invasive activities, suggesting a critical role for NHE1 in the collective migration of SASL1m cells. SASL1m cells also exhibited a higher metastatic rate than SAS cells in a mouse lymph node metastasis model, while NHE1 knockdown suppressed in vivo SASL1m metastasis. Finally, elevated NHE1 expression was observed in human HNSCC tissue, and Cariporide, a specific NHE1 inhibitor, reduced the invasive activity of SASL1m cells, implying NHE1 could be a target for anti-invasion/metastasis therapy.

  16. Preventing postoperative metastatic disease by inhibiting surgery-induced dysfunction in natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Tai, Lee-Hwa; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Bélanger, Simon; Ly, Lundi; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Zhang, Jiqing; Rintoul, Julia L; Ananth, Abhirami A; Lam, Tiffany; Breitbach, Caroline J; Falls, Theresa J; Kirn, David H; Bell, John C; Makrigiannis, Andrew P; Auer, Rebecca A

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell clearance of tumor cell emboli following surgery is thought to be vital in preventing postoperative metastases. Using a mouse model of surgical stress, we transferred surgically stressed NK cells into NK-deficient mice and observed enhanced lung metastases in tumor-bearing mice as compared with mice that received untreated NK cells. These results establish that NK cells play a crucial role in mediating tumor clearance following surgery. Surgery markedly reduced NK cell total numbers in the spleen and affected NK cell migration. Ex vivo and in vivo tumor cell killing by NK cells were significantly reduced in surgically stressed mice. Furthermore, secreted tissue signals and myeloid-derived suppressor cell populations were altered in surgically stressed mice. Significantly, perioperative administration of oncolytic parapoxvirus ovis (ORFV) and vaccinia virus can reverse NK cell suppression, which correlates with a reduction in the postoperative formation of metastases. In human studies, postoperative cancer surgery patients had reduced NK cell cytotoxicity, and we show for the first time that oncolytic vaccinia virus markedly increases NK cell activity in patients with cancer. These data provide direct in vivo evidence that surgical stress impairs global NK cell function. Perioperative therapies aimed at enhancing NK cell function will reduce metastatic recurrence and improve survival in surgical cancer patients.

  17. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as a Paranasal Sinus Mass: The Importance of Differential Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Altissimi, Giancarlo; Turchetta, Rosaria; Rigante, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Metastases in the paranasal sinuses are rare; renal cell carcinoma is the most common cancer that metastasizes to this region. We present the case of a patient with a 4-month history of a rapidly growing mass of the nasal pyramid following a nasal trauma, associated with spontaneous epistaxis and multiple episodes of hematuria. Cranial CT scan and MRI showed an ethmoid mass extending to the choanal region, the right orbit, and the right frontal sinus with an initial intracranial extension. Patient underwent surgery with a trans-sinusal frontal approach using a bicoronal incision combined with an anterior midfacial degloving; histological exam was compatible with a metastasis of clear cell renal cell carcinoma. Following histological findings, a total body CT scan showed a solitary 6 cm mass in the upper posterior pole of the left kidney identified as the primary tumor. Although rare, metastatic renal cell carcinoma should always be suspected in patients with nasal or paranasal masses, especially if associated with symptoms suggestive of a systemic involvement such as hematuria. A correct early-stage diagnosis of metastatic RCC can considerably improve survival rate in these patients; preoperative differential diagnosis with contrast-enhanced imaging is fundamental for the correct treatment and follow-up strategy. PMID:28168075

  18. Anti-metastatic activity of biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles on human fibrosarcoma cell line HT-1080.

    PubMed

    Karuppaiya, Palaniyandi; Satheeshkumar, Elumalai; Chao, Wei-Ting; Kao, Lin-Yi; Chen, Emily Chin-Fun; Tsay, Hsin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Plants are exploited as a potential source for the large-scale production of noble gold nanoparticles in the recent years owing to their various potential applications in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. The present work describes green biosynthetic procedures for the production of gold nanoparticles for the first time by using an aqueous extract of the Dysosma pleiantha rhizome. The biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were confirmed and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results revealed that aqueous extract of D. pleiantha rhizome has potential to reduce chloroauric ions into gold nanoparticles and the synthesized gold nanoparticles were showed spherical in shape with an average of 127nm. Further, we investigated the anti-metastatic activity of biosynthesized gold nanoparticles against human fibrosarcoma cancer cell line HT-1080. The results showed that the biosynthesized gold nanoparticles were non-toxic to cell proliferation and, also it can inhibit the chemo-attractant cell migration of human fibrosarcoma cancer cell line HT-1080 by interfering the actin polymerization pathway. Thus, the usage of gold nanoparticles biosynthesized from D. pleiantha rhizome can be used as a potential candidate in the drug and gene delivery to metastatic cancer.

  19. Registered report: Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization

    PubMed Central

    Incardona, Francesca; Doroudchi, M Mehdi; Ismail, Nawfal; Carreno, Alberto; Griner, Erin; Anna Lim, Minyoung; Iorns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology seeks to address growing concerns about reproducibility in scientific research by replicating selected results from a substantial number of high-profile papers in the field of cancer biology published between 2010 and 2012. This Registered report describes the proposed replication plan of key experiments from ‘Interactions between cancer stem cells and their niche govern metastatic colonization’ by Malanchi and colleagues, published in Nature in 2012 (Malanchi et al., 2012). The key experiments that will be replicated are those reported in Figures 2H, 3A, 3B, and S13. In these experiments, Malanchi and colleagues analyze messenger RNA levels of periostin (POSTN) in pulmonary fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and immune cells isolated from mice with micrometastases to determine which cell type is producing POSTN in the metastatic niche (Figure 2H; Malanchi et al., 2012). Additionally, they examine MMTV-PyMT control or POSTN null mice to test the effect of POSTN on primary tumor growth and metastasis (Figures 3A, 3B, and S13; Malanchi et al., 2012). The Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology is a collaboration between the Center for Open Science and Science Exchange, and the results of the replications will be published in eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06938.001 PMID:26086719

  20. Comparison of MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels between primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Kensuke; Motozawa, Keiko; Omagari, Daisuke; Gojoubori, Takahiro; Ikeda, Takayuki; Asano, Masatake; Gionhaku, Nobuhito

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play important roles in tumor growth. The present study investigated the expression levels of MMP2 and MMP9 in relation to the distribution of TAMs in the primary and metastatic regions of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Twenty-nine cases of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) with regional lymph node metastasis were selected from available documents in the archives of the Department of Pathology, Nihon University School of Dentistry. Four-micrometer-thick sections were prepared from the primary and metastatic regions. Each section was subjected to immunohistochemical staining using anti-MMP2, anti-MMP9, and anti-CD68 antibodies. The distribution and localization of MMPs and TAMs were compared between primary and metastatic regions. The expression levels of both MMPs were higher in the metastatic regions of lingual and gingival cancers. Statistically significant differences were observed in both T1 and T2 cases. In contrast to the higher expression of MMPs in metastatic regions, a higher number of TAMs were distributed in the primary regions. From these results, MMP expression levels and the numbers of TAMs were expected to have an inverse relationship between the primary and metastatic regions of OSCC. (J Oral Sci 58, 59-65, 2016).

  1. Lactoferrin selectively triggers apoptosis in highly metastatic breast cancer cells through inhibition of plasmalemmal V-H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Cátia S.; Guedes, Joana P.; Gonçalves, Marília; Loureiro, Luís; Castro, Lisandra; Gerós, Hernâni; Rodrigues, Lígia R.; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of cancer affecting women. Despite the good prognosis when detected early, significant challenges remain in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. The recruitment of the vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-H+-ATPase) to the plasma membrane, where it mediates the acidification of the tumor microenvironment (TME), is a recognized feature involved in the acquisition of a metastatic phenotype in breast cancer. Therefore, inhibitors of this pump have emerged as promising anticancer drugs. Lactoferrin (Lf) is a natural pro-apoptotic iron-binding glycoprotein with strong anticancer activity whose mechanism of action is not fully understood. Here, we show that bovine Lf (bLf) preferentially induces apoptosis in the highly metastatic breast cancer cell lines Hs 578T and MDA-MB-231, which display a prominent localisation of V-H+-ATPase at the plasma membrane, but not in the lowly metastatic T-47D or in the non-tumorigenic MCF-10-2A cell lines. We also demonstrate that bLf decreases the extracellular acidification rate and causes intracellular acidification in metastatic breast cancer cells and, much like the well-known proton pump inhibitors concanamycin A and bafilomycin A1, inhibits V-H+-ATPase in sub-cellular fractions. These data further support that bLf targets V-H+-ATPase and explain the selectivity of bLf for cancer cells, especially for highly metastatic breast cancer cells. Altogether, our results pave the way for more rational in vivo studies aiming to explore this natural non-toxic compound for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:27556694

  2. Interleukin-4 Expressed By Neoplastic Cells Provokes an Anti-Metastatic Myeloid Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Connie S.; Kim, Hyeyeon; Mullins, Graeme; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; LeBrun, David P.; Elliott, Bruce E.; Greer, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-4 (IL-4) can induce macrophages to undergo alternative activation and polarize toward an M2-like or wound healing phenotype. Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are thought to assume M2-like properties, and it has been suggested they promote tumor growth and metastasis through effects on the tumor stroma, including extracelluar matrix remodeling and angiogenesis. IL-4 also promotes macrophage survival and formation of multinucleated giant cells, which have enhanced phagocytic behavior. This study was designed to explore the effect of cancer cell derived IL-4 on the tumor immune stroma and metastasis. Methods The metastatic mouse mammary carcinoma cell line AC2M2 was transduced with control or IL-4 encoding retroviruses and employed in orthotopic engraftment models. Tumor growth and metastasis were assessed. The cellular composition and biomarker expression of tumors were examined by immunohistochemical staining and flow cytometry; the transcriptome of the immune stroma was analyzed by nanoString based transcript quantitation; and in vivo and in vitro interactions between cancer cells and macrophages were assessed by flow cytometry and co-culture with video-time lapse microscopy, respectively. Results Unexpectedly, tumors from IL-4 expressing AC2M2 engrafted cells grew at reduced rates, and most surprising, they lost all metastatic potential relative to tumors from control AC2M2 cells. Myeloid cell numbers were not increased in IL-4 expressing tumors, but their expression of the M2 marker arginase I was elevated. Transcriptome analysis revealed an immune signature consistent with IL-4 induced M2 polarization of the tumor microenvironment and a generalized increase in myeloid involvement in the tumor stroma. Flow cytometry analysis indicated enhanced cancer cell phagocytosis by TAMs from IL-4 expressing tumors, and co-culture studies showed that IL-4 expressing cancer cells supported the survival and promoted the in vitro phagocytic behavior of

  3. Novel therapeutic options for second-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    VON KLOT, CHRISTOPH-A. J.; MERSEBURGER, AXEL S.; KUCZYK, MARKUS A.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has gained a variety of therapeutic options since the introduction of targeted therapy, starting in 2007. The basic molecular mechanisms included predominantly the targeting of vascular endothelial growth factor or the inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin. Recently, results from two randomized controlled trials, the CheckMate-25 and the METEOR trial, regarding therapy for RCC in the second-line setting have been published. In the present review, the current status of second-line therapy in mRCC is discussed, together with results from the two newly introduced substances, nivolumab and cabozantinib. PMID:27313856

  4. Pemetrexed plus dendritic cells as third-line therapy for metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bin; Li, Rui; Chang, Chun-Xiao; Han, Yong; Shi, Sheng-Bin; Tian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of pemetrexed plus dendritic cells (DCs) when administered as third-line treatment for metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). All patients in the study group had previously failed first-line treatment with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin-based regimens, as well as second-line treatment with taxane-based regimens. A total of 31 patients were treated with pemetrexed (500 mg/m2) plus DCs on day 1, every 3 weeks. DCs were given for one cycle of 21 days. Thirty patients were evaluated for their response. No patient had a complete response, three patients (10.0%) had a partial response, ten patients (33.3%) had stable disease, and 17 patients (56.7%) had progressive disease. The overall response rate was 10.0%. The median progression-free survival (PFS) time was 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.7–3.2), and the median overall survival (OS) time was 7.1 months (95% CI, 6.4–7.9). The median PFS and OS times among patients with high and low levels of miR-143 expression in their blood serum were significantly different: median PFS times =3.2 months (95% CI, 2.9–3.4) and 2.7 months (95% CI, 2.4–3.0), respectively (P=0.017), and median OS times =7.8 months (95% CI, 6.8–8.9) and 6.3 months (95% CI, 5.3–7.3), respectively (P=0.036). No patient experienced Grade 4 toxicity. Combined third-line treatment with pemetrexed and DCs was marginally effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced ESCC. Serum miR-143 levels are a potential biomarker for predicting the efficacy of pemetrexed plus DCs in the treatment of ESCC. PMID:27418834

  5. Radiation Therapy and MK-3475 for Patients With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer, Renal Cell Cancer, Melanoma, and Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-18

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Lung Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  6. Translocation of BBAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus reduces the metastatic ability of vemurafenib-resistant SKMEL28 cells.

    PubMed

    Thang, Nguyen Dinh; Minh, Nguyen Van; Huong, Pham Thu

    2017-01-01

    To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that treatment of vemurafenib-resistant SKMEL28 (SKMEL28-R) cells with paclitaxel leads to a shift in localization of the E3-ligase BBAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, consequently decreasing the metastatic ability of this cell line. The present study revealed that the movement of BBAP from the cytoplasm to nucleus initiated a change in cell morphology. In addition, the translocation of BBAP led to a decrease of metastatic characteristics in SKMEL28‑R cells, including migration and invasion via downregulation of the phosphorylated form of focal adhesion kinase and N‑cadherin, as well as an upregulation of p21 and E-cadherin. The results of the present study suggested that BBAP may not only be a novel biomarker for melanoma, but also a novel therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  7. Different deficiencies in the prevention of tumorigenic-low-metastatic murine K-1735b melanoma cells from producing metastases.

    PubMed

    Aukerman, S L; Price, J E; Fidler, I J

    1986-10-01

    To produce metastasis, malignant tumor cells must be able to complete a sequence of many steps that depend not only on tumor cell properties but also on ability of the tumor cells to interact effectively with host homeostatic mechanisms to avoid destruction. Therefore, it should be possible to isolate clonal populations non- or low metastatic. In a study of K-1735 clones introduced into normal syngeneic hosts, the reasons for the lack of or low ability of metastasis production did indeed differ among different clones. Some clones were identified that were low metastatic in syngeneic C3H/HeN mice because of antigenic characteristics. Others failed to give rise to metastases because they could not survive and grow once arrested in the lung parenchyma. These data suggested that the success of future studies dealing with genetic analysis of the metastatic phenotype could depend on the use of appropriate tumor cell populations.

  8. The adoptive transfer of cultured T cells for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, James C

    2013-01-01

    T cells have been shown to be capable of rejecting a patient's tumor. Weak responses to current vaccines and the toxicity of exogenously administered cytokines limit the intensity of the T-cell response that can be actively generated in vivo. Adoptive T-cell transfer enhances an intrinsically weak immune response to cancer by activating and expanding tumor reactive T cells in vitro and manipulating the environment of the host at the time of transfer. One can frequently find tumor-reactive T cells in metastatic lesions in patients with melanoma, and expand them in vitro for readministration. When successful, this adoptive cellular immunotherapy has resulted in sustainable curative outcomes. Subsequently, the applicability of adoptive T-cell transfer has been greatly expanded by the development of methods to genetically engineer open-repertoire human T-cells to confer tumor reactivity. This re-direction of T-cell specificity can be achieved by introducing a variety of receptors that ligate tumor-associated antigens and then trigger the normal activation mechanism of T cells. Future T-cell engineering will add a new dimension by reprogramming T-cell functions for optimal tumor rejection. The antigens recognized by T cells, the techniques to procure and grow tumor reactive T cells, the conditioning of the recipient to optimize efficacy, and the results of clinical protocols are reviewed herein.

  9. Phagocytosis and solubilization of fixed cells by metastatic hamster embryo fibroblasts, Nil2C2

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, H.; Nishino, Y.; Nishimura, K.; Noda, Y.; Otsu, H.

    1984-05-01

    When Nil2C2, a metastatic clone derived from hamster embryo fibroblasts (Nil), was inoculated over (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled fixed cells, Nil2C2 cells solubilized and phagocytosed fixed cells, and the radioactivity was released into the culture medium as trichloroacetic acid-soluble fragments. The solubilization of fixed cells was dependent on both the time of incubation of living cells with fixed cells and the number of living cells inoculated. Nil2C2 cells were shown by autoradiographic and electron microscopic studies to peel off fixed cells and ingest them as large fragments. The solubilization of fixed cells was significantly decreased when plasminogen was depleted from the culture medium. Protease inhibitors such as leupeptin, epsilon-aminocaproic acid, and soybean trypsin inhibitor partially inhibited the proteolysis and phagocytosis of Nil2C2 cells. Mouse peritoneal macrophages activated by Salmonella typhimurium solubilized fixed cells after the addition of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. However, they did not phagocytose fixed cells as large fragments.

  10. Tocilizumab unmasks a stage-dependent interleukin-6 component in statin-induced apoptosis of metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Minichsdorfer, Christoph; Wasinger, Christine; Sieczkowski, Evelyn; Atil, Bihter

    2015-01-01

    The interleukin (IL)-6 inhibits the growth of early-stage melanoma cells, but not metastatic cells. Metastatic melanoma cells are susceptible to statin-induced apoptosis, but this is not clear for early-stage melanoma cells. This study aimed to investigate the IL-6 susceptibility of melanoma cells from different stages in the presence of simvastatin to overcome loss of growth arrest. ELISA was used to detect secreted IL-6 in human melanoma cells. The effects of IL-6 were measured by western blots for STAT3 and Bcl-2 family proteins. Apoptosis and proliferation were measured by caspase 3 activity, Annexin V staining, cell cycle analysis, and a wound-healing assay. Human metastatic melanoma cells A375 and 518A2 secrete high amounts of IL-6, in contrast to early-stage WM35 cells. Canonical IL-6 signaling is intact in these cells, documented by transient phosphorylation of STAT3. Although WM35 cells are highly resistant to simvastatin-induced apoptosis, coadministration with IL-6 enhanced the susceptibility to undergo apoptosis. This proapoptotic effect of IL-6 might be explained by a downregulation of Bcl-XL, observed only in WM35 cells. Furthermore, the IL-6 receptor blocking antibody tocilizumab was coadministered and unmasked an IL-6-sensitive proportion in the simvastatin-induced caspase 3 activity of metastatic melanoma cells. These results confirm that simvastatin facilitates apoptosis in combination with IL-6. Although endogenous IL-6 secretion is sufficient in metastatic melanoma cells, exogenously added IL-6 is needed for WM35 cells. This effect may explain the failure of simvastatin to reduce melanoma incidence in clinical trials and meta-analyses. PMID:26020489

  11. New treatment options for metastatic renal cell carcinoma with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Kevin; Fang, Chunhui; Wu, Shenhong

    2017-02-02

    Angiogenesis is a critical process in the progression of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Agents targeting angiogenesis have played a primary role in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy almost always occurs, and major progress has been made in understanding its underlying molecular mechanism. Axitinib and everolimus have been used extensively in patients whom have had disease progression after prior anti-angiogenesis therapy. Recently, several new agents have been shown to improve overall survival in comparison with everolimus. This review provides an in-depth summary of drugs employable in the clinical setting, the rationale to their use, and the studies conducted leading to their approval for use and provides perspective on the paradigm shift in the treatment of renal cell carcinoma. Highlighted are the newly approved agents cabozantinib, nivolumab, and lenvatinib for advanced renal cell carcinoma patients treated with prior anti-angiogenesis therapy.

  12. High OCT4A levels drive tumorigenicity and metastatic potential of medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Teixeira Dos Santos, Márcia Cristina; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Leite Pereira, Márcia Cristina; Furukawa, Gabriela; Gimenes da Cruz, Daniel Sanzio; Goldfeder, Mauricio Barbugiani; Reily Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rosenberg, Carla; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2017-02-07

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive pediatric brain tumor, in which sporadic expression of the pluripotency factor OCT4 has been recently correlated with poor patient survival. However the contribution of specific OCT4 isoforms to tumor aggressiveness is still poorly understood. Here, we report that medulloblastoma cells stably overexpressing the OCT4A isoform displayed enhanced clonogenic, tumorsphere generation, and invasion capabilities. Moreover, in an orthotopic metastatic model of medulloblastoma, OCT4A overexpressing cells generated more developed, aggressive and infiltrative tumors, with tumor-bearing mice attaining advanced metastatic disease and shorter survival rates. Pro-oncogenic OCT4A effects were expression-level dependent and accompanied by distinct chromosomal aberrations. OCT4A overexpression in medulloblastoma cells also induced a marked differential expression of non-coding RNAs, including poorly characterized long non-coding RNAs and small nucleolar RNAs. Altogether, our findings support the relevance of pluripotency-related factors in the aggravation of medulloblastoma traits classically associated with poor clinical outcome, and underscore the prognostic and therapeutic value of OCT4A in this challenging type of pediatric brain cancer.

  13. Impact of Non-Pulmonary Visceral Metastases in the Prognosis and Practice of Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Lorena; Martignano, Filippo; Gallà, Valentina; Maugeri, Antonio; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Non-pulmonary visceral metastases, in bones, brain and liver, represent nearly the 10% of metastatic sites of advanced germ cell tumors and are associated with poor prognosis. This review article summarizes major evidences on the impact of different visceral sites on the prognosis, treatment and clinical outcome of patients with germ cell tumors. The clinic-biological mechanisms by which these metastatic sites are associated with poor clinical outcome remain unclear. The multimodality treatment showed a potential better survival, in particular in patients with relapsed disease. Patients with advanced germ cell tumors with visceral metastases should be referred to centers with high expertise in the clinical management of such disease. PMID:27471579

  14. Adenosine potentiates the therapeutic effects of neural stem cells expressing cytosine deaminase against metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Wonyoung; Seol, Ho Jun; Seong, Dong-Ho; Kim, Jandi; Kim, Yonghyun; Kim, Seung U; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2013-09-01

    Tumor-tropic properties of neural stem cells (NSCs) provide a novel approach with which to deliver targeting therapeutic genes to brain tumors. Previously, we developed a therapeutic strategy against metastatic brain tumors using a human NSC line (F3) expressing cytosine deaminase (F3.CD). F3.CD converts systemically administered 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC), a blood-brain barrier permeable nontoxic prodrug, into the anticancer agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). In this study, we potentiated a therapeutic strategy of treatment with nucleosides in order to chemically facilitate the endogenous conversion of 5-FU to its toxic metabolite 5-FU ribonucleoside (5-FUR). In vitro, 5-FUR showed superior cytotoxic activity against MDA-MB-435 cancer cells when compared to 5-FU. Although adenosine had little cytotoxic activity, the addition of adenosine significantly potentiated the in vitro cytotoxicity of 5-FU. When MDA-MB‑435 cells were co-cultured with F3.CD cells, F3.CD cells and 5-FC inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-435 cells more significantly in the presence of adenosine. Facilitated 5-FUR production by F3.CD was confirmed by an HPLC analysis of the conditioned media derived from F3.CD cells treated with 5-FC and adenosine. In vivo systemic adenosine treatment also significantly potentiated the therapeutic effects of F3.CD cells and 5-FC in an MDA-MB-435 metastatic brain tumor model. Simple adenosine addition improved the antitumor activity of the NSCs carrying the therapeutic gene. Our results demonstrated an increased therapeutic potential, and thereby, clinical applicability of NSC-based gene therapy.

  15. Adenovirus MART-1-engineered autologous dendritic cell vaccine for metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Vujanovic, Lazar; Lee, Yohan; Dissette, Vivian B; Yang, Jin-Quan; Vu, Hong T; Seja, Elizabeth; Oseguera, Denise K; Potter, Douglas M; Glaspy, John A; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni

    2008-04-01

    We performed a phase 1/2 trial testing the safety, toxicity, and immune response of a vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a replication-defective adenovirus (AdV) encoding the full-length melanoma antigen MART-1/Melan-A (MART-1). This vaccine was designed to activate MART-1-specific CD+8 and CD4+ T cells. Metastatic melanoma patients received 3 injections of 10(6) or 10(7) DCs, delivered intradermally. Cell surface phenotype and cytokine production of the DCs used for the vaccines were tested, and indicated intermediate maturity. CD8+ T-cell responses to MART-1 27-35 were assessed by both major histocompatibility complex class I tetramer and interferon (IFN)-gamma enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) before, during, and after each vaccine and CD4+ T-cell responses to MART-1 51-73 were followed by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. We also measured antigen response breadth. Determinant spreading from the immunizing antigen MART-1 to other melanoma antigens [gp100, tyrosinase, human melanoma antigen-A3 (MAGE-A3)] was assessed by IFN-gamma ELISPOT. Twenty-three patients were enrolled and 14 patients received all 3 scheduled DC vaccines. Significant CD8+ and/or CD4+ MART-1-specific T-cell responses were observed in 6/11 and 2/4 patients evaluated, respectively, indicating that the E1-deleted adenovirus encoding the cDNA for MART-1/Melan-A (AdVMART1)/DC vaccine activated both helper and killer T cells in vivo. Responses in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to additional antigens were noted in 2 patients. The AdVMART1-transduced DC vaccine was safe and immunogenic in patients with metastatic melanoma.

  16. Adenovirus MART-1–engineered Autologous Dendritic Cell Vaccine for Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, Lisa H.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Vujanovic, Lazar; Lee, Yohan; Dissette, Vivian B.; Yang, Jin-Quan; Vu, Hong T.; Seja, Elizabeth; Oseguera, Denise K.; Potter, Douglas M.; Glaspy, John A.; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Summary We performed a phase 1/2 trial testing the safety, toxicity, and immune response of a vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transduced with a replication-defective adenovirus (AdV) encoding the full-length melanoma antigen MART-1/Melan-A (MART-1). This vaccine was designed to activate MART-1–specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Metastatic melanoma patients received 3 injections of 106 or 107 DCs, delivered intradermally. Cell surface phenotype and cytokine production of the DCs used for the vaccines were tested, and indicated intermediate maturity. CD8+ T-cell responses to MART-127-35 were assessed by both major histocompatibility complex class I tetramer and interferon (IFN)-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) before, during, and after each vaccine and CD4+ T-cell responses to MART-151-73 were followed by IFN-γ ELISPOT. We also measured antigen response breadth. Determinant spreading from the immunizing antigen MART-1 to other melanoma antigens [gp100, tyrosinase, human melanoma antigen-A3 (MAGE-A3)] was assessed by IFN-γ ELISPOT. Twenty-three patients were enrolled and 14 patients received all 3 scheduled DC vaccines. Significant CD8+ and/or CD4+ MART-1–specific T-cell responses were observed in 6/11 and 2/4 patients evaluated, respectively, indicating that the E1-deleted adeno-virus encoding the cDNA for MART-1/Melan-A (AdV-MART1)/DC vaccine activated both helper and killer T cells in vivo. Responses in CD8+ and CD4+ T cells to additional antigens were noted in 2 patients. The AdVMART1-transduced DC vaccine was safe and immunogenic in patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:18317358

  17. Anti-Metastatic Effect of Dehydrocorydaline on H1299 Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Cells via Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases and B Cell Lymphoma 2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyun; Sohn, Eun Jung; Yoon, Sang Wook; Kim, Chang Geun; Lee, Sangil; Kim, Joe Young; Baek, Namin; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Though Dehydrocorydaline, an alkaloid isolated from Corydalis turtschaninovii tuber, was known to have anti-coronary artery disease, anti-inflammatory, apoptotic, anti-allergic, anti-acetylcholinesterase, and antitumor effects, the underlying anti-metastatic mechanism of Dehydrocorydalin was never elucidated in lung cancer cells so far. Thus, in the present study, the anti-metastatic effect of Dehydrocorydaline was examined in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells, mainly targeting matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) signaling. Here, Dehydrocorydaline exerted weak cytotoxicity and attenuated the protein expression of Bcl-2 and activated Bax in a concentration-dependent manner in NSCLC cells, such as A549, H460, H1299, and H596 cells. Also, Dehydrocorydaline suppressed the migration of H1299 cells by wound healing assay and transwell migration assay. Consistently, Dehydrocorydaline attenuated mRNA and protein levels of MMP7 and MMP9 as metastasis biomarkers in H1299 cells by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Of note, Bcl-2 overexpression reduced the cytotoxic and anti-metastatic effects of Dehydrocorydaline on pCDNA-Bcl-2 transfected H1299 cells. Overall, our findings provide scientific evidence that Dehydrocorydaline exerts anti-metastatic potential via suppression of MMPs and Bcl-2 signaling in NSCLC cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Genetic landscape of metastatic and recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, Matthew L.; Goh, Gerald; Chiosea, Simion I.; Bauman, Julie E.; Freilino, Maria L.; Zeng, Yan; Wang, Lin; Diergaarde, Brenda B.; Gooding, William E.; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Herbst, Roy S.; Lifton, Richard P.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Recurrence and/or metastasis occurs in more than half of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and these events pose the greatest threats to long-term survival. We set out to identify genetic alterations that underlie recurrent/metastatic HNSCC. METHODS. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on genomic DNA extracted from fresh-frozen whole blood and patient-matched tumor pairs from 13 HNSCC patients with synchronous lymph node metastases and 10 patients with metachronous recurrent tumors. Mutational concordance within and between tumor pairs was used to analyze the spatiotemporal evolution of HNSCC in individual patients and to identify potential therapeutic targets for functional evaluation. RESULTS. Approximately 86% and 60% of single somatic nucleotide variants (SSNVs) identified in synchronous nodal metastases and metachronous recurrent tumors, respectively, were transmitted from the primary index tumor. Genes that were mutated in more than one metastatic or recurrent tumor, but not in the respective primary tumors, include C17orf104, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor, type 3 (ITPR3), and discoidin domain receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (DDR2). Select DDR2 mutations have been shown to confer enhanced sensitivity to SRC-family kinase (SFK) inhibitors in other malignancies. Similarly, HNSCC cell lines harboring endogenous and engineered DDR2 mutations were more sensitive to the SFK inhibitor dasatinib than those with WT DDR2. CONCLUSION. In this WES study of patient-matched tumor pairs in HNSCC, we found synchronous lymph node metastases to be genetically more similar to their paired index primary tumors than metachronous recurrent tumors. This study outlines a compendium of somatic mutations in primary, metastatic, and/or recurrent HNSCC cancers, with potential implications for precision medicine approaches. FUNDING. National Cancer Institute, American Cancer Society, Agency for Science, Technology and Research of Singapore

  19. Blocking TNF-α inhibits angiogenesis and growth of IFIT2-depleted metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuo-Chu; Liu, Chung-Ji; Lin, Tsung-Jen; Mar, Ai-Chung; Wang, Hsiu-Hua; Chen, Chi-Wei; Hong, Zi-Xuan; Lee, Te-Chang

    2016-01-28

    Our previous study demonstrated that the depletion of interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (IFIT2) promoted metastasis and was associated with a poor prognosis in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Our current study explores the major downstream signaling involved in IFIT2 depletion-induced OSCC metastasis. To this end, we used two cell lines (designated sh-control-xeno and sh-IFIT2-xeno) derived from human OSCC xenografts expressing sh-control and sh-IFIT2, respectively, and one metastatic OSCC subline (sh-IFIT2-meta) from an IFIT2-depleted metastatic tumor. We found that the sh-IFIT2-meta cells proliferated more slowly than the sh-control-xeno cells but exhibited higher migration and chemoresistance. Using microarray technology and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, we found that TNF-α was one of the major downstream targets in IFIT2-depleted OSCC cells. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting, and ELISA results confirmed that TNF-α was upregulated in the sh-IFIT2-meta cells. Blocking TNF-α abolished the angiogenic activity induced by the sh-IFIT2-meta cells. Furthermore, the human-specific TNF-α antibody golimumab significantly inhibited in vivo angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis of sh-IFIT2-meta cells. These results demonstrate that IFIT2 depletion results in TNF-α upregulation, leading to angiogenesis and metastasis of OSCC cells.

  20. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ramaker, Ryne C.; Cooper, Sara J.; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S.; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L.; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M.; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation. PMID:27574806

  1. Kinase Gene Expression Profiling of Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma Tissue Identifies Potential New Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Ghatalia, Pooja; Yang, Eddy S; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Ramaker, Ryne C; Cooper, Sara J; Chen, Dongquan; Sudarshan, Sunil; Wei, Shi; Guru, Arjun S; Zhao, Amy; Cooper, Tiffiny; Della Manna, Deborah L; Naik, Gurudatta; Myers, Richard M; Sonpavde, Guru

    2016-01-01

    Kinases are therapeutically actionable targets. Kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improve outcomes in metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), but are not curative. Metastatic tumor tissue has not been comprehensively studied for kinase gene expression. Paired intra-patient kinase gene expression analysis in primary tumor (T), matched normal kidney (N) and metastatic tumor tissue (M) may assist in identifying drivers of metastasis and prioritizing therapeutic targets. We compared the expression of 519 kinase genes using NanoString in T, N and M in 35 patients to discover genes over-expressed in M compared to T and N tissue. RNA-seq data derived from ccRCC tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used to demonstrate differential expression of genes in primary tumor tissue from patients that had metastasis at baseline (n = 79) compared to those that did not develop metastasis for at least 2 years (n = 187). Functional analysis was conducted to identify key signaling pathways by using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis. Of 10 kinase genes overexpressed in metastases compared to primary tumor in the discovery cohort, 9 genes were also differentially expressed in TCGA primary tumors with metastasis at baseline compared to primary tumors without metastasis for at least 2 years: EPHB2, AURKA, GSG2, IKBKE, MELK, CSK, CHEK2, CDC7 and MAP3K8; p<0.001). The top pathways overexpressed in M tissue were pyridoxal 5'-phosphate salvage, salvage pathways of pyrimidine ribonucleotides, NF-kB signaling, NGF signaling and cell cycle control of chromosomal replication. The 9 kinase genes validated to be over-expressed in metastatic ccRCC may represent currently unrecognized but potentially actionable therapeutic targets that warrant functional validation.

  2. The Vitamin D Analog, MART-10, Attenuates Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Chen, Shin-Cheh; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Hsu, Jun-Te; Chen, Li-Wei; Kuo, Sheng-Fong; Takano, Masashi; Kittaka, Atsushi; Chen, Tai C.; Sun, Chi-Chin; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2016-01-01

    Regarding breast cancer treatment, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a difficult issue. Most TNBC patients die of cancer metastasis. Thus, to develop a new regimen to attenuate TNBC metastatic potential is urgently needed. MART-10 (19-nor-2α-(3-hydroxypropyl)-1α,25(OH)2D3), the newly-synthesized 1α,25(OH)2D3 analog, has been shown to be much more potent in cancer growth inhibition than 1α,25(OH)2D3 and be active in vivo without inducing obvious side effect. In this study, we demonstrated that both 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 could effectively repress TNBC cells migration and invasion with MART-10 more effective. MART-10 and 1α,25(OH)2D3 induced cadherin switching (upregulation of E-cadherin and downregulation of N-cadherin) and downregulated P-cadherin expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. The EMT(epithelial mesenchymal transition) process in MDA-MB-231 cells was repressed by MART-10 through inhibiting Zeb1, Zeb2, Slug, and Twist expression. LCN2, one kind of breast cancer metastasis stimulator, was also found for the first time to be repressed by 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10 in breast cancer cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity was also downregulated by MART-10. Furthermore, F-actin synthesis in MDA-MB-231 cells was attenuated as exposure to 1α,25(OH)2D3 and MART-10. Based on our result, we conclude that MART-10 could effectively inhibit TNBC cells metastatic potential and deserves further investigation as a new regimen to treat TNBC. PMID:27110769

  3. Does hormonal therapy have a therapeutic role in metastatic primary small cell neuroendocrine breast carcinoma? Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alkaied, Homam; Harris, Kassem; Brenner, Arnold; Awasum, Michael; Varma, Seema

    2012-06-01

    Primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of breast (NECB) is a very rare tumor; the World Health Organization(WHO) subcategorized these tumors into 3 major histologic subtypes: solid, small cell carcinoma (SMCC), and large cell NE carcinoma. The SMCC subtype is the least common and most aggressive and has been reported to be as aggressive as its pulmonary counterpart. SMCC is usually confirmed based on clinical, pathologic,and imaging studies. Local disease is usually managed in a fashion similar to that of the usual ductal breast cancer; in the metastatic SMCC setting, regimens that are implemented in small cell lung cancer are usually attempted, according to case reports and published small case series. Hormone receptors can be expressed in more than 90% of the solid tumor subtype; however its expression is manifested in about 50% of cases of SMCC. Although hormonal therapy can be used successfully to treat the usual metastatic ductal breast cancer,its utility in metastatic SMCC has not been reported. We report an impressive response to hormonal therapy in a patient with late relapse of breast carcinoma with a metastatic SMCC subtype that expressed hormone receptors. The response to hormonal therapy was sustained for about 12 months. The response to hormonal therapy is definitely an interesting finding that, to our knowledge, has not been described before in the setting of metastatic SMCC. We suggest considering adding hormonal therapy to the treatment pipeline for primary SMCC of the breast that express hormone receptors.

  4. Relationship between primary and metastatic testicular germ cell tumors: a clinicopathologic analysis of 100 cases.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, William P; Czerniak, Bogdan A; Guo, Charles C

    2013-10-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (GCTs) commonly metastasize to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes (RPLNs). We evaluated 100 cases of RPLN dissection specimens with viable GCTs after chemotherapy and compared them with their corresponding orchiectomy specimens. The mean age of patients was 28 years (range, 15-58 years). The testicular tumors consisted of mixed GCT (n = 72), teratoma (n = 18), seminoma (n = 4), embryonal carcinoma (n = 3), yolk sac tumor (n = 1), and no viable tumor (n = 2). Somatic malignant components were found in 5 cases. The metastatic tumors in the RPLNs consisted of only teratoma (n = 77) and non-teratomatous GCT (n = 23). Twenty-one patients had only teratoma in the RPLNs but not in the testis, and 10 patients had metastatic non-teratomatous GCT components that were not observed in the testis. Six patients had somatic malignant components in the RPLNs, but only one of them had such a component in the testis. Overall, 13 patients died of disease in a mean of 42 months, and the patients with only teratoma in the RPLNs had a lower mortality rate (9%) than those with non-teratomatous components (26%) (P = .044). One patient with somatic components in the primary GCT and 3 patients with somatic components in the metastases died of disease. Our study demonstrates that there is frequent discordance of histologic composition between primary and metastatic testicular GCTs. Teratoma is the most common component in treated GCTs and is usually associated with a more favorable clinical outcome than non-teratomatous GCTs. The presence of somatic components in the RPLNs metastasis indicates a poor prognosis.

  5. Dynamic epigenetic changes to VHL occur with sunitinib in metastatic clear cell renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Grant D.; Powles, Thomas; Van Neste, Christophe; Meynert, Alison; O'Mahony, Fiach; Laird, Alexander; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Trooskens, Geert; Van Criekinge, Wim; De Meyer, Tim; Harrison, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Genetic intratumoral heterogeneity (ITH) hinders biomarker development in metastatic clear cell renal cancer (mccRCC). Epigenetic relative to genetic ITH or the presence of consistent epigenetic changes following targeted therapy in mccRCC have not been evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine methylome/genetic ITH and to evaluate specific epigenetic and genetic changes associated with sunitinib therapy. Patients and methods Multi-region DNA sampling performed on sequential frozen pairs of primary tumor tissue from 14 metastatic ccRCC patients, in the Upfront Sunitinib (SU011248) Therapy Followed by Surgery in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cancer: a Pilot Phase II Study (SuMR; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01024205), at presentation (biopsy) and after 3-cycles of 50mg sunitinib (nephrectomy). Untreated biopsy and nephrectomy samples before and after renal artery ligation were controls. Ion Proton sequencing of 48 key ccRCC genes, and MethylCap-seq DNA methylation analysis was performed, data was analysed using the statistical computing environment R. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed complete methylome clustering of biopsy and three nephrectomy samples for each patient (14/14 patients). For mutational status, untreated biopsy and all treated nephrectomy samples clustered together in 8/13 (61.5%) patients. The only methylation target significantly altered following sunitinib therapy was VHL promoter region 7896829 which was hypermethylated with treatment (FDR=0.077, P<0.001) and consistent for all patients (pre-treatment 50% patients had VHL mutations, 14% patients VHL hypermethylation). Renal artery ligation did not affect this result. No significant differences in driver or private mutation count was found with sunitinib treatment. Conclusions Demonstration of relative methylome homogeneity and consistent VHL hypermethylation, after sunitinib, may overcome the hurdle of ITH present at other molecular levels for

  6. Identification and validation of dysregulated metabolic pathways in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    White, Nicole M A; Newsted, Daniel W; Masui, Olena; Romaschin, Alexander D; Siu, K W Michael; Yousef, George M

    2014-03-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a devastating disease with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 9 % and low response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Targeted therapies have slightly improved patient survival, but are only effective in a small subset of patients, who eventually develop resistance. A better understanding of pathways contributing to tumor progression and metastasis will allow for the development of novel targeted therapies and accurate prognostic markers. We performed extensive bioinformatics coupled with experimental validation on proteins dysregulated in mRCC. Gene ontology analysis showed that many proteins are involved in oxidation reduction, metabolic processes, and signal transduction. Pathway analysis showed metabolic pathways are altered in mRCC including glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, and the pentose phosphate pathway. RT-qPCR analysis showed that genes involved in the citric acid cycle were downregulated in metastatic RCC while genes of the pentose phosphate pathway were overexpressed. Protein-protein interaction analysis showed that most of the 198 proteins altered in mRCC clustered together and many were involved in glycolysis and pyruvate metabolism. We identified 29 reported regions of chromosomal aberrations in metastatic disease that correlate with the direction of protein dysregulation in mRCC. Furthermore, 36 proteins dysregulated in mRCC are predicted to be targets of metastasis-related miRNAs. A more comprehensive understanding of the pathways dysregulated in metastasis can be useful for the development of new therapies and novel prognostic markers. Also, multileveled analyses provide a unique "snapshot" of the molecular "environment" in RCC with prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  7. The pro-metastatic role of bone marrow-derived cells: a focus on MSCs and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Bong Ihn; Kang, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    Several bone marrow-derived cells have been shown to promote tumour growth and progression. These cells can home to the primary tumour and become active components of the tumour microenvironment. Recent studies have also identified bone marrow-derived cells—such as mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells—as contributors to cancer metastasis. The innate versatility of these cells provides diverse functional aid to promote malignancy, ranging from structural support to signal-mediated suppression of the host immune response. Here, we review the role of mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells in cancer metastasis. A better understanding of the bipolar nature of these bone marrow-derived cells in physiological and malignant contexts could pave the way for new therapeutics against metastatic disease. PMID:22473297

  8. Prevalence and heterogeneity of circulating tumour cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Shenjere, Patrick; Hodgson, Clare; Hodgetts, Jackie; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Lorigan, Paul; Dive, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are detectable by the MelCAM and high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA)-dependent CellSearch platform. However, CTCs which do not express these capture and detection markers are not detectable by CellSearch. Consequently, we explored the use of isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET), a marker independent, filtration-based device to determine the prevalence and heterogeneity of CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients. Ninety patients were prospectively recruited and blood samples taken before treatment. Patients' blood was filtered using the ISET platform. CTCs were enumerated using dual immunohistochemistry with positive selection by S100 expression and exclusion of leucocytes and endothelial cells expressing CD45 or CD144, respectively. A panel of markers (Melan-A, MITF, MelCAM, high molecular melanoma-associated antigen, CD271 and MAGEC) was also examined. Fifty-one patients (57%) had CTCs (range 1-44 CTCs/4 ml blood) and 12 patients also had circulating tumour microemboli. Seven patients had S100- CTCs, 11 patients' CTCs were S100+ and 33 patients had S100+ and S100- CTCs. Substantial intrapatient and interpatient heterogeneity was observed for all other melanoma-associated markers. CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma are detectable using the flexible marker-independent ISET platform. CTCs display significant marker expression heterogeneity implying that marker-dependent platforms would not detect all CTCs and multimarker assays are now required to reveal the biological significance of this CTC heterogeneity.

  9. Carboplatin, Paclitaxel, Cetuximab, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  10. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a renal transplant patient diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Alastal, Yaseen; Hammad, Tariq A; Rafiq, Ehsan; Nawras, Mohamad; Alaradi, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) biopsy sampling of enlarged lymph nodes is increasingly used to diagnose metastatic tumors, especially of the gastrointestinal tract and the lungs. Herein, we describe the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma from a native kidney of a 54 year-old male patient, who had a 5-years history of renal transplant, by EUS-FNA of mediastinal and celiac lymph nodes. Histological and immunohistochemical findings confirmed the origin of metastatic tumor. EUS-FNA with proper cytological evaluation can be useful in the diagnosis of metastatic renal cell carcinoma in renal transplant patients. PMID:28326261

  11. [A case of metastatic pulmonary cancer from renal cell carcinoma masquerading as pulmonary vein varix].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Kotaro; Endo, Katsuhiko; Fukai, Ichiro

    2010-07-01

    A 66-year-old woman underwent nephrectomy to treat renal cell carcinoma 5 years previously. Enhanced CT to locate the tumor revealed a lesion very close to the right upper pulmonary vein. Six months later, the nodule grew to 14mm in maximum dimension and it seemed to be a varix of the right upper pulmonary vein on 3D-CT. However, pulmonary artery angiography (PAG) denied this possibility. PET-CT revealed the nodule to be positive for FDG uptake (maxSUV 2.7 in the early phase and 2.2 in the late phase), suggesting that it contained solid tissue with malignant characteristics. Eventually, right upper lobectomy was performed. The nodule was a metastatic renal cell carcinoma with extremely abundant vascular components. This conspicuous feature of the tumor appeared to mimic a pulmonary vein varix on enhanced CT scan and 3D angiogram.

  12. Metastatic clear cell carcinoma of the kidney: therapeutic role of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Ronald M

    2010-03-26

    The biology and pathogenesis of clear cell carcinoma of the kidney has been extensively investgated, and the role of von Hipple-Landau gene inactivation and tumor associated angiogenesis is now recognized. Development of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors and phase 3 clinical trials utilizing this class of agents has produced a new treatment paradigm for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). One of the active regimens identified is the combination of bevacizumab and interferon-α. Recently published reports provided evidence of the clinical and biologic activity of this therapy. The current manuscript reviews the background and rationale for the activity of bevacizumab in RCC, and results from recent clinical trials with this agent alone or in combination with targeted agents or cytokines. The role of this therapy in contrast to other targeted agents is reviewed, and the potential utility as well as questions raised by recent studies are discussed.

  13. Locally advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma: molecular pathways, treatment options and new targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Salas, Veronica; Alegre, Marta; Garcés, Joan Ramón; Puig, Lluis

    2014-06-01

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been identified as important to normal embryonic development in living organisms and it is implicated in processes including cell proliferation, differentiation and tissue patterning. Aberrant Hh pathway has been involved in the pathogenesis and chemotherapy resistance of different solid and hematologic malignancies. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and medulloblastoma are two well-recognized cancers with mutations in components of the Hh pathway. Vismodegib has recently approved as the first inhibitor of one of the components of the Hh pathway (smoothened). This review attempts to provide current data on the molecular pathways involved in the development of BCC and the therapeutic options available for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic BCC, and the new targeted therapies in development.

  14. Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Rojas, José Manuel; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Morales, María del Puerto; Barber, Domingo F

    2015-10-28

    Due to its aggressive behavior, pancreatic cancer is one of the principal causes of cancer-related deaths. The highly metastatic potential of pancreatic tumor cells demands the development of more effective anti-metastatic approaches for this disease. Although polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEI-coated SPIONs) have been studied for their utility as transfection agents, little is known of their effect on tumor cell biology. Here we demonstrated that PEI-coated SPIONs have potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic tumor cell migration/invasion, through inhibition of Src kinase and decreased expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 metalloproteinases. When treated with PEI-coated SPIONs, the pancreatic tumor cell line Pan02 showed reduced invadosome density and thus, a decrease in their ability to invade through basement membrane. These nanoparticles temporarily downmodulated microRNA-21, thereby upregulating the cell migration inhibitors PTEN, PDCD4 and Sprouty-1. PEI-coated SPIONs thus show intrinsic, possibly anti-metastatic properties for modulating pancreatic tumor cell migration machinery, which indicates their potential as anti-metastatic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  15. Highly metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones stimulate bone marrow by secretion of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3 activity.

    PubMed

    McGary, C T; Miele, M E; Welch, D R

    1995-12-01

    Circulating neutrophil (polymorphonuclear leukocyte levels rise 50-fold in 13762NF tumor-bearing rats in proportion to the tumor's metastatic potential. Purified tumor-elicited neutrophils enhance metastasis of syngeneic tumor cells when co-injected intravenously; however, circulating and phorbol ester-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils do not. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the source of tumor-elicited neutrophils in metastatic tumor-bearing rats. We examined the bone marrow in rats bearing tumors of poorly, moderately, and highly metastatic cell clones. Marrow from rats with highly metastatic tumors had increased cellularity (100%), myeloid to erythroid ratio (10:1), and megakaryocytes compared with control rats (cellularity, approximately 80%; myeloid to erythroid ratio, 5:1), with marrows from rats with moderately metastatic tumors having intermediate values. This suggested production of a colony-stimulating factor by the metastatic cells. To confirm this, bone marrow colony formation from control and tumor-bearing rats was compared. Colony number increased in proportion to the metastatic potential of the tumor. Conditioned medium from metastatic cells supported growth of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor/interleukin-3-dependent 32Dcl3 cell line, but media from nonmetastatic or moderately metastatic cells did not. Antibodies to murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor neutralized 32Dcl3 growth in tumor cell conditioned medium. These results suggest production of a granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor or interleukin-3-like activity by highly metastatic 13762NF clones and implicate a possible role for colony-stimulating factors in regulating the metastatic potential of mammary adenocarcinoma cell clones.

  16. Neural stem cell-based dual suicide gene delivery for metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Natsume, A; Lee, H J; Motomura, K; Nishimira, Y; Ohno, M; Ito, M; Kinjo, S; Momota, H; Iwami, K; Ohka, F; Wakabayashi, T; Kim, S U

    2012-11-01

    In our previous works, we demonstrated that human neural stem cells (NSCs) transduced with the cytosine deaminase (CD) gene showed remarkable 'bystander killer effect' on glioma and medulloblastoma cells after administration of the prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC). In addition, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) is a widely studied enzyme used for suicide gene strategies, for which the prodrug is ganciclovir (GCV). To apply this strategy to brain metastasis treatment, we established here a human NSC line (F3.CD-TK) expressing the dual suicide genes CD and TK. We examined whether F3.CD-TK cells intensified the antitumor effect on lung cancer brain metastases. In vitro studies showed that F3.CD-TK cells exerted a marked bystander effect on human lung cancer cells after treatment with 5-FC and GCV. In a novel experimental brain metastases model, intravenously administered F3 cells migrated near lung cancer metastatic lesions, which were induced by the injection of lung cancer cells via the intracarotid artery. More importantly, F3.CD-TK cells in the presence of prodrugs 5-FC and GCV decreased tumor size and considerably prolonged animal survival. The results of the present study indicate that the dual suicide gene-engineered, NSC-based treatment strategy might offer a new promising therapeutic modality for brain metastases.

  17. Characterization of a Novel Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cell Line of LNCaP Origin

    PubMed Central

    Castanares, Mark A.; Copeland, Ben T.; Chowdhury, Wasim H.; Liu, Minzhi M.; Rodriguez, Ronald; Pomper, Martin G.; Lupold, Shawn E.; Foss, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The LNCaP cell line was originally isolated from the lymph node of a patient with metastatic prostate cancer. Many cell lines have been derived from LNCaP by selective pressures to study different aspects of prostate cancer progression. When injected subcutaneously into male athymic nude mice, LNCaP and its derivatives rarely metastasize. Methods Here, we describe the characteristics of a new LNCaP derivative, JHU-LNCaPSM, which was generated by long term passage in normal cell culture conditions. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) analysis and genomic sequencing verified JHU-LNCaP-SM derivation from parental LNCaP cells. JHU-LNCaP-SM cells express the same mutated androgen receptor (AR) but unlike LNCaP, are no longer androgen dependent for growth. The cells demonstrate an attenuated androgen responsiveness in transcriptional assays and retain androgen sensitive expression of PSA, AR, and PSMA. Unlike parental LNCaP, JHU-LNCaP-SM cells quickly form subcutaneous tumors in male athymic nude mice, reliably metastasize to the lymph nodes and display a striking intra-tumoral and spreading hemorrhagic phenotype as tumor xenografts. Conclusions The JHU-LNCaP-SM cell line is a new isolate of LNCaP, which facilitates practical, preclinical studies of spontaneous metastasis of prostate cancer through lymphatic tissues. PMID:26499105

  18. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Natalie; Pestrin, Marta; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Malorni, Luca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach. PMID:24670368

  19. Precision Oncology: Identifying Predictive Biomarkers for the Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Modi, Parth K.; Farber, Nicholas J.; Singer, Eric A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent FDA approval of multiple new pharmaceutical agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has left physicians with several options for first- and second- line therapy. With limited head-to-head comparisons, however, there is a paucity of evidence to recommend the use of one agent over another. To address this knowledge gap, Voss et al. identified serum biomarkers from specimens collected during the RECORD-3 trial, a comparative study of first-line sunitinib versus first-line everolimus. Of the biomarkers identified, the 5 most strongly associated with first-line everolimus progression-free survival (PFS1L) were combined to form a composite biomarker score (CBS). The CBS was significantly associated with everolimus PFS1L in multivariate regression analysis. This study is an example of the additional value offered by a randomized trial with prospective biospecimen collection and a significant step towards identifying predictive biomarkers for the treatment of metastatic RCC. As further comparative trials are performed, it will be essential that biomarkers are appropriately identified and validated in order to further the goal of precision oncology. PMID:27540511

  20. Sialoglycoproteins of murine RAW117 large cell lymphoma/lymphosarcoma sublines of various metastatic colonization properties

    SciTech Connect

    Irimura, T.; Tressler, R.J.; Nicolson, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    A metastatic model for large-cell lymphoma/lymphosarcoma has been developed by sequential selection in vivo of the murine RAW117 cell line for enhanced liver metastasis or in vitro for loss of lectin-binding properties. The metastatic variants obtained from such selections show alterations in cell surface lectin-binding components, such as the wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-reactive sialoglycoproteins. Detergent lysates from RAW117 cells were analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) followed by reaction with /sup 125/I-labeled WGA. The (/sup 125/I)WGA became bound to a diffuse band of M/sub r/ 120,000-200,000 in the gels that overlapped with the major sialoglycoprotein band revealed by the periodate-sodium borotritide labeling. However, the (/sup 125/I)WGA reactivity diminished when gels were pretreated with mild acid to remove sialic acid in situ. The binding of (/sup 125/I)WGA to the glycoprotein(s) was greater in the high liver-colonizing RAW117--H10 subline than in the parental RAW117-P line. Another lectin with different saccharide specificity, Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA/sub I/), became bound to a similar class of sialoglycoproteins, as well as to glycoproteins of lower M/sub r/, but only when the gels were pretreated with mild acid to remove sialic acid. /sup 125/)WGA reactivity to the sialoglycoprotein components, before and after Smith degradation in situ, strongly suggests that the oligosaccharide back-bones are highly branched and asparagine-linked.

  1. Active angiogenesis in metastatic renal cell carcinoma predicts clinical benefit to sunitinib-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    del Puerto-Nevado, L; Rojo, F; Zazo, S; Caramés, C; Rubio, G; Vega, R; Chamizo, C; Casado, V; Martínez-Useros, J; Rincón, R; Rodríguez-Remírez, M; Borrero-Palacios, A; Cristóbal, I; Madoz-Gúrpide, J; Aguilera, O; García-Foncillas, J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sunitinib represents a widely used therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients. Even so, there is a group of patients who show toxicity without clinical benefit. In this work, we have analysed pivotal molecular targets involved in angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A, VEGF receptor 2 (KDR), phosphorylated (p)KDR and microvascular density (MVD)) to test their potential value as predictive biomarkers of clinical benefit in sunitinib-treated renal cell carcinoma patients. Methods: Vascular endothelial growth factor-A, KDR and pKDR-Y1775 expression as well as CD31, for MVD visualisation, were determined by immunohistochemistry in 48 renal cell carcinoma patients, including 23 metastatic cases treated with sunitinib. Threshold was defined for each biomarker, and univariate and multivariate analyses for progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were carried out. Results: The HistoScore mean value obtained for VEGF-A was 121.6 (range, 10–300); for KDR 258.5 (range, 150–300); for pKDR-Y1775 10.8 (range, 0–65) and the mean value of CD31-positive structures for MVD visualisation was 49 (range, 10–126). Statistical differences for PFS (P=0.01) and OS (P=0.007) were observed for pKDR-Y1775 in sunitinib-treated patients. Importantly, pKDR-Y1775 expression remained significant after multivariate Cox analysis for PFS (P=0.01; HR: 5.35, 95% CI, 1.49–19.13) and for OS (P=0.02; HR: 5.13, 95% CI, 1.25–21.05). Conclusions: Our results suggest that the expression of phosphorylated (i.e., activated) KDR in tumour stroma might be used as predictive biomarker for the clinical outcome in renal cell carcinoma first-line sunitinib-treated patients. PMID:24786599

  2. Modulating the vascular behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells by curcumin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Palange, Anna L.; Mascolo, Daniele Di; Singh, Jaykrishna; Franceschi, Maria S. De; Carallo, Claudio; Gnasso, Agostino; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    The spreading of tumor cells to secondary sites (tumor metastasis) is a complex process that involves multiple, sequential steps. Vascular adhesion and extravasation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one, critical step. Curcumin, a natural compound extracted from Curcuma longa, is known to have anti-tumoral, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory properties and affect the expression of cell adhesion molecules, mostly by targeting the NF-κB transcription factor. Here, upon treatment with curcumin, the vascular behavior of three different estrogen receptor negative (ER–) breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) is analyzed using a microfluidic system. First, the dose response to curcumin is characterized at 24, 48, and 72 h using a XTT assay. For all three cell lines, an IC50 larger than 20 µM is observed at 72 h; whereas no significant reduction in cell viability is detected for curcumin concentrations up to 10 µM. Upon 24 h treatment at 10 µM of curcumin, SK-BR3 and MDA-MB-231 cells show a decrease in adhesion propensity of 40% (p = 0.02) and 47% (p = 0.001), respectively. No significant change is documented for the less metastatic MDA-MB-468 cells. All three treated cell lines show a 20% increase in rolling velocity from 48.3 to 58.7 µm/s in SK-BR-3, from 64.1 to 73.77 µm/s in MDA-MB-231, and from 57.5 to 74.4 µm/s in MDA-MB-468. Collectively, these results suggest that mild curcumin treatments could limit the metastatic potential of these adenocarcinoma cell lines, possibly by altering the expression of adhesion molecules, and the organization and stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton. Future studies will elucidate the biophysical mechanisms regulating this curcumin-induced behavior and further explore the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:23162792

  3. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  4. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  5. Clinical significance of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Pantel, K

    2001-01-01

    The early and clinically occult spread of viable tumor cells to the organism is increasingly considered a hallmark in cancer progression, as emerging data suggest that these cells are precursors of subsequent distant relapse. Using monoclonal antibodies to epithelial cytokeratins or tumor-associated cell membrane glycoproteins, individual carcinoma cells can be detected on cytologic bone marrow preparations at frequencies of 10(-5) to 10(-6). Prospective clinical studies have shown that the presence of these immunostained cells in bone marrow, as a frequent site of overt metastases, is prognostically relevant with regard to relapse-free and overall survival. This screening approach may be, therefore, used to improve tumor staging and guide the stratification of patients for adjuvant therapy in clinical trials. Another promising application is monitoring the response of micrometastatic cells to adjuvant therapies, which, at present, can only be assessed retrospectively after an extended period of clinical follow-up. The present review summarizes the current data on the clinical significance of occult metastatic breast cancer cells in bone marrow.

  6. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y

    2008-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs. These DCs subsequently stimulate marked and systemic immune activation. Here, we examined whether this level of immune activation is sufficient to overcome tumor-induced tolerogenic environment for treating an established aggressive epithelial tumor. We showed that a combination treatment of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and cytosine-phosphate-guanine-containing oligonucleotide stimulated large numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs in situ from transgene-modified stem cells. Moreover, these in situ generated and activated DCs markedly stimulated activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells by augmenting their numbers, as well as function, even in a tumor-bearing tolerogenic environment. This leads to significant improvement in the therapeutic efficacy of established pulmonary metastases. This study suggests that lentiviral vector-modified stem cells as DC progenitors may be used as an effective therapeutic regimen for treating metastatic epithelial tumors. PMID:18084244

  7. Metastatic pancreatic polypeptide-secreting islet cell tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Cruz Cardona, Janice A; Wamsley, Heather L; Farina, Lisa L; Kiupel, Matti

    2010-09-01

    A 14-year-old female spayed Golden Retriever was presented to the University of Florida's Veterinary Medical Center with history of lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis, intermittent vomiting, watery diarrhea, and weight loss for over a year. CBC, biochemical profile, and urinalysis were within reference intervals. Abdominal ultrasonographic examination revealed mesenteric and jejunal lymphadenopathy and hyperechoic hepatic nodules. Cytologic examination of the enlarged lymph nodes revealed loosely cohesive cells with moderate nuclear pleomorphism and rare punctate eosinophilic cytoplasmic granules. The cytologic interpretation was metastatic neuroendocrine neoplasia. On surgical exploration, a mass was detected in the right lobe of the pancreas. Histologic evaluation determined the mass to be an islet cell tumor. Approximately 98% of cells were positive by immunolabeling for pancreatic polypeptide (PP), and only rare cells were positive for insulin or somatostatin. All cells were negative for glucagon, gastrin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, protein gene product 9.5, synaptophysin, and chromogranins A and B. Pancreatic tumors that primarily produce PP are rare in dogs, and this is the first report of both the cytologic and histologic features of an islet cell tumor predominantly secreting PP. Clinical signs for these tumors are typically absent or nonspecific; signs may include watery diarrhea, as noted in this dog, although the diarrhea may have resulted from lymphoplasmacytic gastroenteritis. Additional case studies are needed to further characterize the cytomorphologic features and clinical presentation of PP-secreting islet cell tumor, or polypeptidoma, in dogs.

  8. Intracellular calcium oscillations in strongly metastatic human breast and prostate cancer cells: control by voltage-gated sodium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Rizaner, Nahit; Onkal, Rustem; Fraser, Scott P; Pristerá, Alessandro; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2016-10-01

    The possible association of intracellular Ca(2+) with metastasis in human cancer cells is poorly understood. We have studied Ca(2+) signaling in human prostate and breast cancer cell lines of strongly versus weakly metastatic potential in a comparative approach. Intracellular free Ca(2+) was measured using a membrane-permeant fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicator dye (Fluo-4 AM) and confocal microscopy. Spontaneous Ca(2+) oscillations were observed in a proportion of strongly metastatic human prostate and breast cancer cells (PC-3M and MDA-MB-231, respectively). In contrast, no such oscillations were observed in weakly/non metastatic LNCaP and MCF-7 cells, although a rise in the resting Ca(2+) level could be induced by applying a high-K(+) solution. Various parameters of the oscillations depended on extracellular Ca(2+) and voltage-gated Na(+) channel activity. Treatment with either tetrodotoxin (a general blocker of voltage-gated Na(+) channels) or ranolazine (a blocker of the persistent component of the channel current) suppressed the Ca(2+) oscillations. It is concluded that the functional voltage-gated Na(+) channel expression in strongly metastatic cancer cells makes a significant contribution to generation of oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) activity. Possible mechanisms and consequences of the Ca(2+) oscillations are discussed.

  9. Inoculated Cell Density as a Determinant Factor of the Growth Dynamics and Metastatic Efficiency of a Breast Cancer Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Gregório, Ana C.; Fonseca, Nuno A.; Moura, Vera; Lacerda, Manuela; Figueiredo, Paulo; Simões, Sérgio; Dias, Sérgio; Moreira, João Nuno

    2016-01-01

    4T1 metastatic breast cancer model have been widely used to study stage IV human breast cancer. However, the frequent inoculation of a large number of cells, gives rise to fast growing tumors, as well as to a surprisingly low metastatic take rate. The present work aimed at establishing the conditions enabling high metastatic take rate of the triple-negative murine 4T1 syngeneic breast cancer model. An 87% 4T1 tumor incidence was observed when as few as 500 cancer cells were implanted. 4T1 cancer cells colonized primarily the lungs with 100% efficiency, and distant lesions were also commonly identified in the mesentery and pancreas. The drastic reduction of the number of inoculated cells resulted in increased tumor doubling times and decreased specific growth rates, following a Gompertzian tumor expansion. The established conditions for the 4T1 mouse model were further validated in a therapeutic study with peguilated liposomal doxorubicin, in clinical used in the setting of metastatic breast cancer. Inoculated cell density was proven to be a key methodological aspect towards the reproducible development of macrometastases in the 4T1 mouse model and a more reliable pre-clinical assessment of antimetastatic therapies. PMID:27820870

  10. Final results from the large sunitinib global expanded-access trial in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gore, M E; Szczylik, C; Porta, C; Bracarda, S; Bjarnason, G A; Oudard, S; Lee, S-H; Haanen, J; Castellano, D; Vrdoljak, E; Schöffski, P; Mainwaring, P; Hawkins, R E; Crinò, L; Kim, T M; Carteni, G; Eberhardt, W E E; Zhang, K; Fly, K; Matczak, E; Lechuga, M J; Hariharan, S; Bukowski, R

    2015-01-01

    Background: We report final results with extended follow-up from a global, expanded-access trial that pre-regulatory approval provided sunitinib to metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients, ineligible for registration-directed trials. Methods: Patients ⩾18 years received oral sunitinib 50 mg per day on a 4-weeks-on–2-weeks-off schedule. Safety was assessed regularly. Tumour measurements were scheduled per local practice. Results: A total of 4543 patients received sunitinib. Median treatment duration and follow-up were 7.5 and 13.6 months. Objective response rate was 16% (95% confidence interval (CI): 15–17). Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 9.4 months (95% CI: 8.8–10.0) and 18.7 months (95% CI: 17.5–19.5). Median PFS in subgroups of interest: aged ⩾65 years (33%), 10.1 months; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status ⩾2 (14%), 3.5 months; non-clear cell histology (12%), 6.0 months; and brain metastases (7%), 5.3 months. OS was strongly associated with the International Metastatic Renal-Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium prognostic model (n=4065). The most common grade 3/4 treatment-related adverse events were thrombocytopenia (10%), fatigue (9%), and asthenia, neutropenia, and hand–foot syndrome (each 7%). Conclusion: Final analysis of the sunitinib expanded-access trial provided a good opportunity to evaluate the long-term side effects of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor used worldwide in mRCC. Efficacy and safety findings were consistent with previous results. PMID:26086878

  11. OX40+ regulatory T cells in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma suppress effector T cell responses and associate with metastatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chester; August, Suzannah; Albibas, Amel; Behar, Ramnik; Cho, Shin-Young; Polak, Marta E; Theaker, Jeff; MacLeod, Amanda S; French, Ruth R; Glennie, Martin J; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Healy, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the most common human cancer with metastatic potential. Despite T cells accumulating around cSCCs, these tumors continue to grow and persist. To investigate reasons for failure of T cells to mount a protective response in cSCC, we focused on regulatory T cells (Tregs) as this suppressive population is well represented among the infiltrating lymphocytes. Experimental Design Flow cytometry was conducted on cSCC lymphocytes and in vitro functional assays were performed using sorted tumoral T cells. Lymphocyte subsets in primary cSCCs were quantified immunohistochemically. Results FOXP3+ Tregs were more frequent in cSCCs than in peripheral blood (p<0.0001, n=86 tumors). Tumoral Tregs suppressed proliferation of tumoral effector CD4+ (p=0.005, n=10 tumors) and CD8+ T cells (p=0.043, n=9 tumors) and inhibited interferon-γ secretion by tumoral effector T cells (p=0.0186, n=11 tumors). The costimulatory molecule OX40 was expressed predominantly on tumoral Tregs (p<0.0001, n=15 tumors) and triggering OX40 with an agonist anti-OX40 antibody overcame the suppression exerted by Tregs, leading to increased tumoral effector CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation (p=0.0098, n=10 tumors). Tregs and OX40+ lymphocytes were more abundant in primary cSCCs which metastasized than in primary cSCCs which had not metastasized (n=48 and n=49 tumors respectively). Conclusions Tregs in cSCCs suppress effector T cell responses and are associated with subsequent metastasis, suggesting a key role for Tregs in cSCC development and progression. OX40 agonism reversed the suppressive effects of Tregs in vitro, suggesting that targeting OX40 could benefit the subset of cSCC patients at high risk of metastasis. PMID:27034329

  12. Favorable prognostic influence of T-box transcription factor Eomesodermin in metastatic renal cell cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dielmann, Anastasia; Letsch, Anne; Nonnenmacher, Anika; Miller, Kurt; Keilholz, Ulrich; Busse, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    T-box transcription factors, T-box expressed in T cells (T-bet) encoded by Tbx21 and Eomesodermin (Eomes), drive the differentiation of effector/memory T cell lineages and NK cells. The aim of the study was to determine the prognostic influence of the expression of these transcription factors in peripheral blood (pB) in a cohort of 41 metastatic (m) RCC patients before receiving sorafenib treatment and to analyze their association with the immunophenotype in pB. In contrast to Tbx21, in the multivariate analysis including clinical features, Eomes mRNA expression was identified as an independent good prognostic factor for progression-free survival (PFS, p = 0.042) and overall survival (OS, p = 0.001) in addition to a favorable ECOG performance status (p = 0.01 and p = 0.008, respectively). Eomes expression correlated positively not only with expression of Tbx21 and TGFβ1 mRNA, but also with mRNA expression of the activation marker ICOS, and with in vivo activated HLA-DR(+) T cells. Eomes expression was negatively associated with TNFα-producing T cells. On protein level, Eomes was mainly expressed by CD56(+)CD3(-) NK cells in pB. In conclusion, we identified a higher Eomes mRNA expression as an independent good prognostic factor for OS and PFS in mRCC patients treated with sorafenib.

  13. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of spleen diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration.

    PubMed

    McGregor, Douglas H; Wu, Yaping; Weston, Allan P; McAnaw, Mary P; Bromfield, Cecil; Bhattatiry, Manu M

    2003-07-01

    Splenic metastases are infrequent, and determination of the primary site by fine-needle aspiration (FNA) can be complex. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who was found to have a large heterogeneously enhancing 8 x 7-inch splenic mass by abdominal computed tomography (CT). FNA by transesophageal endoscopic ultrasonography demonstrated atypical cells conclusive for malignancy and consistent with metastatic renal cell carcinoma based on cytomorphology, histochemical lipid positivity, and immunohistochemical positivity for cytokeratin, vimentin, and renal cell carcinoma marker. Repeat CT with and without arteriovenous contrast demonstrated bilateral renal cysts, including a 0.9 x 0.8-cm lesion on the left with significant enhancement. Splenectomy confirmed the radiological and cytological findings, and left kidney exploration and nephrectomy demonstrated a small (1.5 cm) lower pole renal cell carcinoma of chromophil (papillary) type, histologically similar to the splenic metastasis. This case demonstrates the diagnostic importance of interdisciplinary involvement (oncology, radiology, gastroenterology, pathology, and general and urologic surgery); cytomorphology; histochemistry, including fat stain on frozen cell block; and immunohistochemistry, including the recently developed renal cell carcinoma marker.

  14. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R.; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L.; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies. PMID:24811334

  15. Enrichment of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs) using negative selection from patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Powrnima; Jacobs, Barbara; Derakhshan, Adeeb; Moore, Lee R; Elson, Paul; Triozzi, Pierre L; Borden, Ernest; Zborowski, Maciej

    2014-05-15

    Circulating tumor cells have emerged as prognostic biomarkers in the treatment of metastatic cancers of epithelial origins viz., breast, colorectal and prostate. These tumors express Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) on their cell surface which is used as an antigen for immunoaffinity capture. However, EpCAM capture technologies are of limited utility for non-epithelial cancers such as melanoma. We report a method to enrich Circulating Melanoma Cells (CMCs) that does not presuppose malignant cell characteristics. CMCs were enriched by centrifugation of blood samples from healthy (N = 10) and patient (N = 11) donors, followed by RBC lysis and immunomagnetic depletion of CD45-positive leukocytes in a specialized magnetic separator. CMCs were identified by immunocytochemistry using Melan-A or S100B as melanoma markers and enumerated using automated microscopy image analyses. Separation was optimized for maximum sensitivity and recovery of CMCs. Our results indicate large number of CMCs in Stage IV melanoma patients. Analysis of survival suggested a trend toward decreased survival with increased number of CMCs. Moreover, melanoma-associated miRs were found to be higher in CMC-enriched fractions in two patients when compared with the unseparated samples, validating this method as applicable for molecular analyses. Negative selection is a promising approach for isolation of CMCs and other EpCAM -negative CTCs, and is amenable to molecular analysis of CMCs. Further studies are required to validate its efficacy at capturing specific circulating cells for genomic analysis, and xenograft studies.

  16. Combination of miR-21 with Circulating Tumor Cells Markers Improve Diagnostic Specificity of Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xingwang; Wang, Xiaoming; Shen, Hongyan; Deng, Rong; Xue, Kecheng

    2015-09-01

    Circulating miR-21 is upregulated in breast cancer. However, correlation of miR-21 expression with clinic pathologic characteristics remains questionable. In this study, we investigate whether combination of circulation miR-21 with circulating tumor cells (CTCs) marker (EpCAM, MUS1, HER2) could improve diagnostic specificity of metastatic breast cancer. Total 223 breast cancer patients were included. 89 % patients were associated with upregulation of miR-21 compared with health control. 20 % patients were detected for CTCs marker positive. For higher specificity purpose, triple marker positive samples were selected as true CTCs positive, which only occupied 59.5 % of total metastatic breast cancer patients. Specificity of detection of CTCs was 96.7 %. Furthermore, 59.5 % metastatic breast cancer patients were shown both abnormal miR-21 and true CTCs positive according to distribution of true CTCs positive and abnormal miR-21; Combination of miR-21 and CTCs was increased specificity of metastatic detection to 100 %. Our findings suggested that combination of miR-21 with CTCs marker could be used for better diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer in the future.

  17. Chemotherapy With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Recurrent Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Neck With Occult Primary; Recurrent Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Recurrent Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Salivary Gland Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma Metastatic in the Neck With Occult Primary; Stage IV Hypopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IV Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVA Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVA Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVA Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVB Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVB Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVB Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVB Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Stage IVC Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Laryngeal Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Lip and Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v6 and v7; Stage IVC Major Salivary Gland Cancer AJCC v7; Stage IVC Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oral Cavity Verrucous Carcinoma; Stage IVC Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma AJCC v7; Tongue Carcinoma; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma to Neck With Occult Primary

  18. Sorafenib Tosylate, Cisplatin, and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-01

    Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Salivary Gland Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer; Untreated Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary

  19. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  20. Sequential pathogenesis of metastatic VHL mutant clear cell renal cell carcinoma: putting it together with a translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, N; Pagliaro, L

    2016-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) accounts for ∼80% of all RCC, and biallelic Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene defects occur in ∼75% of sporadic ccRCC. The etiopathogenesis of VHL mutant metastatic RCC, based on our understanding to date of molecular mechanisms involved, is a sequence of events which can be grouped under the following: (i) loss of VHL activity (germline/somatic mutation + inactivation of the wild-type copy); (ii) constitutive activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway due to loss of VHL activity and transcription of genes involved in angiogenesis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, invasion, metastasis, survival, anaerobic glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway; (iii) interactions of the HIF pathway with other oncogenic pathways; (iv) genome-wide epigenetic changes (potentially driven by an overactive HIF pathway) and the influence of epigenetics on various oncogenic, apoptotic, cell cycle regulatory and mismatch repair pathways (inhibition of multiple tumor suppressor genes); (v) immune evasion, at least partially caused by changes in the epigenome. These mechanisms interact throughout the pathogenesis and progression of disease, and also confer chemoresistance and radioresistance, making it one of the most difficult metastatic cancers to treat. This article puts together the sequential pathogenesis of VHL mutant ccRCC by elaborating these mechanisms and the interplay of oncogenic pathways, epigenetics, metabolism and immune evasion, with a perspective on potential therapeutic strategies. We reflect on the huge gap between our understanding of the molecular biology and currently accepted standard of care in metastatic ccRCC, and present ideas for better translational research involving therapeutic strategies with combinatorial drug approach, targeting different aspects of the pathogenesis.

  1. Metastatic Calcinosis Cutis: A Case in a Child with Acute Pre-B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Castanedo-Cázares, Juan Pablo; Reyes-Herrera, Amalia; Hernández-Blanco, Diana; Oros-Ovalle, Cuauhtémoc; Torres-Álvarez, Bertha

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcemia in children with malignancy is an uncommon condition. It has been described in leukemia patients with impaired renal excretion of calcium or osteolytic lesions. Metastatic calcinosis cutis (MCC) may develop if hypercalcemia persists. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with an atypical dermatosis and unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Considered clinical diagnoses were xanthomas, histiocytosis, molluscum contagiosum, and nongenital warts. Cutaneous histological analysis showed amorphous basophilic deposits in the dermis suggestive of calcium deposits. Laboratory tests confirmed serum hypercalcemia. Extensive investigations such as bone marrow biopsy established the diagnosis of an acute pre-B cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia in hematopoietic malignancies is unusual, especially as initial manifestation of the disease. Careful review of the literature fails to reveal previous reports of these peculiar cutaneous lesions of MCC in children with leukemia. PMID:26346120

  2. Hypertension and Angiotensin System Inhibitors in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Derosa, Lisa; Izzedine, Hassane; Albiges, Laurence; Escudier, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (HTN) is a class effect of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapies, including the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. Data are conflicting regarding the role of the renin-angiotensin system on angiogenesis and recent data suggest that the use of angiotensin system inhibitors (ASIs; angiotensin receptor blockers or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors) is associated with improved survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), particularly when used with VEGF targeted therapies. The aim of this review is to discuss the available treatment options for mRCC and associated incidence of hypertension as well as summarize the known data about ASIs use and mRCC. Additionally, given that the optimal management of HTN remains unclear, we will focus on prevention strategies and propose potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:27994768

  3. Vismodegib: the first drug approved for advanced and metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dubey, A K; Dubey, S; Handu, S S; Qazi, M A

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) usually involves surgical interventions and laser ablation, but in locally advanced BCC, which arise either from earlier untreated lesions or from recurrence of aggressive BCC, surgery and radiotherapy are not helpful. Vismodegib, the first oral-targeted therapy for locally advanced and metastatic BCC, unsuitable for surgery or radiotherapy, was recently approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The drug was under the priority review program of FDA and was approved on the basis of promising results of phase II trial. Vismodegib acts by targeting the hedgehog pathway, which is activated abnormally in most BCCs. Approval of vismodegib is a big step ahead in the treatment of advanced BCC, where there was no other effective drug therapy till now.

  4. Alternative therapies for metastatic breast cancer: multimodal approach targeting tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Sambi, Manpreet; Haq, Sabah; Samuel, Vanessa; Qorri, Bessi; Haxho, Fiona; Hill, Kelli; Harless, William; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2017-01-01

    One of the primary challenges in developing effective therapies for malignant tumors is the specific targeting of a heterogeneous cancer cell population within the tumor. The cancerous tumor is made up of a variety of distinct cells with specialized receptors and proteins that could potentially be viable targets for drugs. In addition, the diverse signals from the local microenvironment may also contribute to the induction of tumor growth and metastasis. Collectively, these factors must be strategically studied and targeted in order to develop an effective treatment protocol. Targeted multimodal approaches need to be strategically studied in order to develop a treatment protocol that is successful in controlling tumor growth and preventing metastatic burden. Breast cancer, in particular, presents a unique problem because of the variety of subtypes of cancer that can arise and the multiple drug targets that could be exploited. For example, the tumor stage and subtypes often dictate the appropriate treatment regimen. Alternate multimodal therapies should consider the importance of time-dependent drug administration, as well as targeting the local and systemic tumor environment. Many reviews and papers have briefly touched on the clinical implications of this cellular heterogeneity; however, there has been very little discussion on the development of study models that reflect this diversity and on multimodal therapies that could target these subpopulations. Here, we summarize the current understanding of the origins of intratumoral heterogeneity in breast cancer subtypes, and its implications for tumor progression, metastatic potential, and treatment regimens. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing specific breast cancer models for research, including in vitro monolayer systems and three-dimensional mammospheres, as well as in vivo murine models that may have the capacity to encompass this heterogeneity. Lastly, we summarize some of the current

  5. Pemetrexed disodium in recurrent locally advanced or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Pivot, X; Raymond, E; Laguerre, B; Degardin, M; Cals, L; Armand, J P; Lefebvre, J L; Gedouin, D; Ripoche, V; Kayitalire, L; Niyikiza, C; Johnson, R; Latz, J; Schneider, M

    2001-01-01

    This phase II study determined response rate of patients with locally advanced or metastatic head and neck cancer treated with pemetrexed disodium, a new multitargeted antifolate that inhibits thymidylate synthase, dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. 35 patients with local or metastatic relapse of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (31 male, 4 female; median age 53 years) were treated with pemetrexed 500 mg m2 administered as a 10-minute infusion on day 1 of a 21-day cycle. Patients received 1 to 8 cycles of therapy. 9 patients (26.5%) had an objective response, with a median response duration of 5.6 months (range 2.9–20 months). 15 (44.1%) had stable disease, and 8 (23.5%) had progressive disease. 2 patients were not assessable for response. Median overall survival was 6.4 months (range 0.7–28.1 months; 95% CI: 3.9–7.7 months). 24 patients (68.6%) experienced grade 3/4 neutropenia, with febrile neutropenia in 4 (11.4%). Grade 3/4 anaemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 11 (34.3%) and 6 (17.1%) patients, respectively. The most frequent non-haematological toxicity was grade 3/4 mucositis (17.1%; 6 patients). In conclusion, pemetrexed is active in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Although substantial haematological toxicities were experienced by patients, subsequent studies have shown that these toxicities can be proactively managed by folic acid and vitamin B12 supplementation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11531245

  6. Effect of Citrus bergamia juice on human neuroblastoma cells in vitro and in metastatic xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Navarra, M; Ursino, M R; Ferlazzo, N; Russo, M; Schumacher, U; Valentiner, U

    2014-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial pediatric solid tumor with poor prognosis in children with disseminated stage of disease. A number of studies show that molecules largely distributed in commonly consumed fruits and vegetables may have anti-tumor activity. In this study we evaluate the effect of Citrus bergamia (bergamot) juice (BJ) in vitro and in a spontaneous metastatic neuroblastoma SCID mouse model. Qualitative and quantitative characterizations of BJ flavonoid fractions were performed by RP-HPLC/PDA/MS. We show that BJ significantly affects SK-N-SH and LAN-1 cell proliferation in vitro, but fails to reduce primary tumor weight in vivo. Moreover, BJ reduced cell adhesiveness and invasion of LAN-1 and SK-N-SH cells in vitro and the number of pulmonary metastases under consideration of the number of tumor cells in the blood in mice inoculated with LAN-1 cells in vivo. These effects without any apparent sign of systemic toxicity confirm the potential clinical interest of BJ and lay the basis for further investigation in cancer.

  7. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-06-30

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC.

  8. CRISPR-Mediated VHL Knockout Generates an Improved Model for Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schokrpur, Shiruyeh; Hu, Junhui; Moughon, Diana L.; Liu, Peijun; Lin, Lucia C.; Hermann, Kip; Mangul, Serghei; Guan, Wei; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xu, Hua; Wu, Lily

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is nearly incurable and accounts for most of the mortality associated with RCC. Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) is a tumour suppressor that is lost in the majority of clear cell RCC (ccRCC) cases. Its role in regulating hypoxia-inducible factors-1α (HIF-1α) and -2α (HIF-2α) is well-studied. Recent work has demonstrated that VHL knock down induces an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotype. In this study we showed that a CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knock out of VHL in the RENCA model leads to morphologic and molecular changes indicative of EMT, which in turn drives increased metastasis to the lungs. RENCA cells deficient in HIF-1α failed to undergo EMT changes upon VHL knockout. RNA-seq revealed several HIF-1α-regulated genes that are upregulated in our VHL knockout cells and whose overexpression signifies an aggressive form of ccRCC in the cancer genome atlas (TCGA) database. Independent validation in a new clinical dataset confirms the upregulation of these genes in ccRCC samples compared to adjacent normal tissue. Our findings indicate that loss of VHL could be driving tumour cell dissemination through stabilization of HIF-1α in RCC. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon can guide the search for more effective treatments to combat mRCC. PMID:27358011

  9. Pro-metastatic NEDD9 regulates individual cell migration via caveolin-1-dependent trafficking of integrins

    PubMed Central

    Kozyulina, Polina Y.; Loskutov, Yuriy V.; Kozyreva, Varvara K.; Rajulapati, Anuradha; Ice, Ryan J.; Jones, Brandon. C.; Pugacheva, Elena N.

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of tumor cells relies on efficient cell adhesion and migration, which in turn depends upon endocytic trafficking of integrins. In the current work, it was found that depletion of pro-metastatic protein, NEDD9, in breast cancer (BC) cells results in a significant decrease in individual cell migration due to impaired trafficking of ligand-bound integrins. NEDD9 deficiency does not affect the expression or internalization of integrins but heightens caveolae-dependent trafficking of ligand-bound integrins to early endosomes. Increase in mobility of ligand-bound integrins is concomitant with an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (CAV1) and volume of CAV1-vesicles. NEDD9 directly binds to CAV1 and co-localizes within CAV1 vesicles. In the absence of NEDD9, the trafficking of ligand-bound integrins from early to late endosomes is impaired, resulting in a significant decrease in degradation of ligand/integrin complexes and an increase in recycling of ligand-bound integrins from early endosomes back to the plasma membrane without ligand disengagement, thus leading to low adhesion and migration. Re-expression of NEDD9 or decrease in the amount of active, tyrosine 14 phosphorylated (Tyr14) CAV1 in NEDD9 depleted cells rescues the integrin trafficking deficiency and restores cellular adhesion and migration capacity. Collectively, these findings indicate that NEDD9 orchestrates trafficking of ligand-bound integrins through the attenuation of CAV1 activity. PMID:25319010

  10. Combined effects of terazosin and genistein on a metastatic, hormone-independent human prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kee-Lung; Cheng, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Li-Wen; Hsieh, Bau-Shan; Hu, Yu-Chen; Chih, Tsai-Tung; Shyu, Huey-Wen; Su, Shu-Jem

    2009-04-08

    Metastatic prostate cancer progresses from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent. Terazosin, a long-acting selective alpha1-adrenoreceptor antagonist, induces apoptosis of prostate cancer cells in an alpha1-adrenoreceptor-independent manner, while genistein, a major soy isoflavone, inhibits the growth of several types of cancer cells. The present study was designed to test the therapeutic potential of a combination of terazosin and genistein using a metastatic, hormone-independent prostatic cancer cell line, DU-145. Terazosin or genistein treatment inhibited the growth of DU-145 cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas had no effect on normal prostate epithelial cells. Addition of 1 microg/ml of terazosin, which was inactive alone, augmented the growth inhibitory effect of 5 microg/ml of genistein. Co-treatment with terazosin resulted in the genistein-induced arrest of DU-145 cells in G2/M phase being overridden and an increase in apoptotic cells, as evidenced by procaspase-3 activation and PARP cleavage. The combination also caused a greater decrease in the levels of the apoptosis-regulating protein, Bcl-XL, and of VEGF165 and VEGF121 than genistein alone. In conclusion, the terazosin/genistein combination was more effective in inhibiting cell growth and VEGF expression as well as inducing apoptosis of the metastatic, androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line, DU-145, than either alone. The doses used in this study are in lower and nontoxic anticancer dosage range, suggesting this combination has potential for therapeutic use.

  11. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  12. Heterogeneous proliferative potential of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with solid epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Solakoglu, Oender; Maierhofer, Christine; Lahr, Georgia; Breit, Elisabeth; Scheunemann, Peter; Heumos, Isabella; Pichlmeier, Uwe; Schlimok, Günter; Oberneder, Ralph; Köllermann, Manfred W.; Köllermann, Jens; Speicher, Michael R.; Pantel, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    Bone marrow is a major homing site for circulating epithelial tumor cells. The present study was aimed to assess the proliferative capacity of occult metastatic cells in bone marrow of patients with operable solid tumors especially with regard to their clinical outcome. We obtained bone marrow aspirates from 153 patients with carcinomas of the prostate (n = 46), breast (n = 45), colon (n = 33), and kidney (n = 29). Most of the patients (87%) had primary disease with no clinical signs of overt metastases [tumor-node-metastasis (TNM)-stage UICC (Union Internationale Contre le Cancer) I-III]. After bone marrow was cultured for 21–102 days under special cell culture conditions, viable epithelial cells were detected by cytokeratin staining in 124 patients (81%). The cultured epithelial cells harbored Ki-ras2 mutations and numerical chromosomal aberrations. The highest median number of expanded tumor cells was observed in prostate cancer (2,619 per flask). There was a significant positive correlation between the number of expanded tumor cells and the UICC-stage of the patients (P = 0.03) or the presence of overt metastases (P = 0.04). Moreover, a strong expansion of tumor cells was correlated to an increased rate of cancer-related deaths (P = 0.007) and a reduced survival of the patients (P = 0.006). In conclusion, the majority of cancer patients have viable tumor cells in their bone marrow at primary tumor diagnosis, and the proliferative potential of these cells determines the clinical outcome. PMID:11854519

  13. Successful hepatectomy for metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the anal canal—a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Tercia Tarciane; Belotto, Marcos; Peixoto, Renata D’Alpino

    2016-01-01

    Despite rare, metastatic anal carcinoma confers a poor prognosis. Systemic chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment for advanced disease while the role of biologics and/or surgical resection of metastatic disease are anecdotal. Compared to isolated liver colorectal or neuroendocrine cancer liver metastases, there is far less experience with resection or nonsurgical local ablative procedures for patients with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver. We report the case of a 67-year-old woman with metastatic anal carcinoma to the liver who was successfully treated with liver resection and remains free of relapse more than one year later. PMID:28078133

  14. Novel inhibitors of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cakarovski, Kristina; Leung, Jenny Y; Restall, Christina; Carin-Carlson, Anna; Yang, Eunice; Perlmutter, Patrick; Anderson, Robin; Medcalf, Robert; Dear, Anthony E

    2004-07-01

    The plasminogen-activating (PA) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzyme systems are implicated in proteolytic turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with biologic processes including wound healing, inflammation and angiogenesis. Aberrant expression of components of the PA and MMP enzyme systems occurs in the pathogenesis of metastatic cancer. Oxamflatin (Ox), a novel hydroxamic acid derivative, inhibits u-PA mRNA expression and proteolytic activity while simultaneously upregulating the expression of the natural inhibitor of u-PA, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI-2) in metastatic cancer cells. We have characterized the effects of Ox and a novel derivative, Metacept-1 (MCT-1), on PA and MMP-mediated proteolysis and invasion in several metastatic tumor lines. Both compounds are able to inhibit u-PA-, MMP-2- and MMP-9-mediated gene expression at low micromolar concentrations as well as u-PA- and MMP-mediated proteolysis as assessed by zymography, with MCT-1 being the more effective of the 2 agents in some assays. Cellular invasion assays correlate with gene expression and zymography experiments identifying both Ox and MCT-1 as able to inhibit invasion of metastatic cancer cell lines through matrigel at nanomolar concentrations, with MCT-1 more effective than Ox in 2 of the 3 cancer cell lines assessed.

  15. Differing Von Hippel Lindau Genotype in Paired Primary and Metastatic Tumors in Patients with Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Susan A. J.; Tavares, Emmanuel J.; Golshayan, Ali R.; Rini, Brian I.; Aydin, Hakan; Zhou, Ming; Sercia, Linda; Wood, Laura; Ganapathi, Mahrukh K.; Bukowski, Ronald M.; Ganapathi, Ram

    2012-01-01

    In sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC), the von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene is inactivated by mutation or methylation in the majority of primary (P) tumors. Due to differing effects of wild-type (WT) and mutant (MT) VHL gene on downstream signaling pathways regulating angiogenesis, VHL gene status could impact clinical outcome. In CCRCC, comparative genomic hybridization analysis studies have reported genetic differences between paired P and metastatic (M) tumors. We thus sequenced the VHL gene in paired tumor specimens from 10 patients to determine a possible clonal relationship between the P tumor and M lesion(s) in patients with CCRCC. Using paraffin-embedded specimens, genomic DNA from microdissected samples (>80% tumor) of paired P tumor and M lesions from all 10 patients, as well as in normal tissue from 6 of these cases, was analyzed. The DNA was used for PCR-based amplification of each of the 3 exons of the VHL gene. Sequences derived from amplified samples were compared to the wild-type VHL gene sequence (GenBank Accession No. AF010238). Methylation status of the VHL gene was determined using VHL methylation-specific PCR primers after DNA bisulfite modification. In 4/10 (40%) patients the VHL gene status differed between the P tumor and the M lesion. As expected, when the VHL gene was mutated in both the P tumor and M lesion, the mutation was identical. Further, while the VHL genotype differed between the primary tumor in different kidneys or multiple metastatic lesions in the same patient, the VHL germline genotype in the normal adjacent tissue was always wild-type irrespective of the VHL gene status in the P tumor. These results demonstrate for the first time that the VHL gene status can be different between paired primary and metastatic tissue in patients with CCRCC. PMID:22655276

  16. Proteolysis-a characteristic of tumor-initiating cells in murine metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hillebrand, Larissa E.; Bengsch, Fee; Hochrein, Jochen; Hülsdünker, Jan; Bender, Julia; Follo, Marie; Busch, Hauke; Boerries, Melanie; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor initiating cells (TICs) have been identified and functionally characterized in hematological malignancies as well as in solid tumors such as breast cancer. In addition to their high tumor-initiating potential, TICs are founder cells for metastasis formation and are involved in chemotherapy resistance. In this study we explored molecular pathways which enable this tumor initiating potential for a cancer cell subset of the transgenic MMTV-PyMT mouse model for metastasizing breast cancer. The cell population, characterized by the marker profile CD24+CD90+CD45−, showed a high tumorigenicity compared to non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells in colony formation assays, as well as upon orthotopic transplantation into the mammary fat pad of mice. In addition, these orthotopically grown CD24+CD90+CD45− TICs metastasized to the lungs. The transcriptome of TICs freshly isolated from primary tumors by cell sorting was compared with that of sorted non-CD24+CD90+CD45− cancer cells by RNA-seq. In addition to more established TIC signatures, such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition or mitogen signaling, an upregulated gene set comprising several classes of proteolytic enzymes was uncovered in the TICs. Accordingly, TICs showed high intra- and extracellular proteolytic activity. Application of a broad range of protease inhibitors to TICs in a colony formation assay reduced anchorage independent growth and had an impact on colony morphology in 3D cell culture assays. We conclude that CD24+CD90+CD45− cells of the MMTV- PyMT mouse model possess an upregulated proteolytic signature which could very well represent a functional hallmark of metastatic TICs from mammary carcinomas. PMID:27542270

  17. Radiation-induced increase in expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin in melanoma cells: effects on metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Piechocki, M P; Honn, K V

    1992-06-01

    We investigated the effects of nonlethal gamma radiation on the metastatic potential of the murine tumor cell line, B16 melanoma. The ability of B16 cells to adhere to fibronectin, which is in part mediated by the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptor, is predictive of metastatic potential. We determined that exposure to 0.25-2.5 Gy gamma radiation significantly enhanced B16 cell adhesion to fibronectin. The radiation-enhanced adhesion was dependent on enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 integrin. We observed that 15 min after 0.5 Gy radiation, 99% of irradiated B16 tumor cells were positively labeled with monoclonal antibodies directed against alpha IIb beta 3 compared to 22% of sham-irradiated cells. Radiation-enhanced expression of the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor is reversible and down-regulation begins within 2-4 h postirradiation. Finally, we found that irradiation significantly enhanced the ability of B16 cells to form metastases in a lung colony assay. It is concluded that a relationship exists between radiation effects on the B16 tumor cells, alpha IIb beta 3 receptor expression, adhesion in vitro, and metastasis in vivo. We suggest that low-dose radiation, at levels comparable to those used in fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy, may alter the metastatic phenotype and potential of surviving tumor cells via a rapid alteration in their surface expression of alpha IIb beta 3 integrin receptors.

  18. miR-493 induction during carcinogenesis blocks metastatic settlement of colon cancer cells in liver

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Koji; Ishiguro, Tatsuya; Midorikawa, Yutaka; Ohata, Hirokazu; Izumiya, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Naoto; Sato, Ai; Sakai, Hiroaki; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Liver metastasis is a major lethal complication associated with colon cancer, and post-intravasation steps of the metastasis are important for its clinical intervention. In order to identify inhibitory microRNAs (miRNAs) for these steps, we performed ‘dropout' screens of a miRNA library in a mouse model of liver metastasis. Functional analyses showed that miR-493 and to a lesser extent miR-493* were capable of inhibiting liver metastasis. miR-493 inhibited retention of metastasized cells in liver parenchyma and induced their cell death. IGF1R was identified as a direct target of miR-493, and its inhibition partially phenocopied the anti-metastatic effects. High levels of miR-493 and miR-493*, but not pri-miR-493, in primary colon cancer were inversely related to the presence of liver metastasis, and attributed to an increase of miR-493 expression during carcinogenesis. We propose that, in a subset of colon cancer, upregulation of miR-493 during carcinogenesis prevents liver metastasis via the induction of cell death of metastasized cells. PMID:22373578

  19. Tumor cell-driven extracellular matrix remodeling drives haptotaxis during metastatic progression

    PubMed Central

    Oudin, Madeleine J.; Jonas, Oliver; Kosciuk, Tatsiana; Broye, Liliane C.; Guido, Bruna C.; Wyckoff, Jeff; Riquelme, Daisy; Lamar, John M.; Asokan, Sreeja B.; Whittaker, Charlie; Ma, Duanduan; Langer, Robert; Cima, Michael J.; Wisinski, Kari B.; Hynes, Richard O.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Keely, Patricia J.; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.

    2016-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the tumor microenvironment, but its role in promoting metastasis is incompletely understood. Here we show that FN gradients elicit directional movement of breast cancer cells, in vitro and in vivo. Haptotaxis on FN gradients requires direct interaction between α5β1 integrin and Mena, an actin regulator, and involves increases in focal complex signaling and tumor-cell-mediated extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Compared to Mena, higher levels of the pro-metastatic MenaINV isoform associate with α5, which enables 3D haptotaxis of tumor cells towards the high FN concentrations typically present in perivascular space and in the periphery of breast tumor tissue. MenaINV and FN levels were correlated in two breast cancer cohorts, and high levels of MenaINV were significantly associated with increased tumor recurrence as well as decreased patient survival. Our results identify a novel tumor-cell-intrinsic mechanism that promotes metastasis through ECM remodeling and ECM guided directional migration. PMID:26811325

  20. Metastatic Signet-Ring Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Lin, Diana Murro; Park, Ji-Weon; Gattuso, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Primary bladder signet-ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is extremely rare and associated with an aggressive course. To our knowledge, we describe the first metastatic bladder SRCC identified in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A 68-year-old male with 1 year history of primary bladder SRCC with spinal metastasis presented with multiple falls and loss of consciousness. Brain imaging showed high signal in the frontoparietal sulci and superior cerebellum. CSF analysis was significant for increased leukocytes with monocyte predominance while protein and glucose values were within normal range. There was a hypercellular population of pleomorphic tumor cells with signet-ring morphology, similar to those seen in his diagnostic bladder biopsies. The signet-ring cells were positive for cytokeratin 7 and 20 and negative for CDX-2 and prostate-specific antigen. The patient's clinical condition rapidly deteriorated and he died less than a week after presentation. At autopsy, brain sections revealed signet ring cells in the meninges overlying the cerebrum, cerebellum, brainstem, spinal cord, and pituitary with superficial invasion of the brain parenchyma. No brain parenchymal lesions were present. This case illustrates a unique complication of primary bladder SRCC. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:73-76. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Establishment of an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtaining laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Chen, L W; Wang, J L; Zhang, L Y; Yang, S M; Li, C S; Yu, N; Zhao W, J D; Zhao, L D; Li, K; Liu, M B; Zhai, S Q

    2013-01-01

    To establish an animal model of spontaneous cervical lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and obtain laryngocarcinoma cells with high metastatic potential, laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2 in logarithmic phase were inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice. HEP-2 cells metastasized to the cervical lymph nodes were isolated, cultured, and re-inoculated under the lingual margin mucosa of nude mice twice. The tumor formation in the tongue and in the cervical lymph nodes was confirmed by pathological examination. Carcinoma cells' ability of invasion and migration was detected by transwell assay. Human specific Alu sequences were detected by PCR, which indicated that the tumor cells originated from human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell line HEP-2. Finally, an animal model of spontaneous lymph node metastasis of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma was successfully established. Laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells with high metastatic potential to lymph nodes were obtained through repeated inoculations. .

  2. Hitting the Bull’s-Eye in Metastatic Cancers—NSAIDs Elevate ROS in Mitochondria, Inducing Malignant Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Stephen John; Pritchard, Rhys; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Ralph, Raymond Keith

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastases that impede the function of vital organs are a major cause of cancer related mortality. Mitochondrial oxidative stress induced by hypoxia, low nutrient levels, or other stresses, such as genotoxic events, act as key drivers of the malignant changes in primary tumors to enhance their progression to metastasis. Emerging evidence now indicates that mitochondrial modifications and mutations resulting from oxidative stress, and leading to OxPhos stimulation and/or enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, are essential for promoting and sustaining the highly metastatic phenotype. Moreover, the modified mitochondria in emerging or existing metastatic cancer cells, by their irreversible differences, provide opportunities for selectively targeting their mitochondrial functions with a one-two punch. The first blow would block their anti-oxidative defense, followed by the knockout blow—promoting production of excess ROS, capitulating the terminal stage—activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP), specifically killing metastatic cancer cells or their precursors. This review links a wide area of research relevant to cellular mechanisms that affect mitochondria activity as a major source of ROS production driving the pro-oxidative state in metastatic cancer cells. Each of the important aspects affecting mitochondrial function are discussed including: hypoxia, HIFs and PGC1 induced metabolic changes, increased ROS production to induce a more pro-oxidative state with reduced antioxidant defenses. It then focuses on how the mitochondria, as a major source of ROS in metastatic cancer cells driving the pro-oxidative state of malignancy enables targeting drugs affecting many of these altered processes and why the NSAIDs are an excellent example of mitochondria-targeted agents that provide a one-two knockout activating the mPTP and their efficacy as selective anticancer metastasis drugs. PMID:25688484

  3. Profiling of differential expression of messenger RNA in normal, benign, and metastatic prostate cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Ratna; Robles, Liza D; Gibson, Jane; Muroski, Megan

    2002-12-01

    To understand the phenotypic changes associated with prostate cancer development and metastasis, we investigated differential gene expression in primary and established prostate cell lines used as models. We have used a differential display of messenger RNA (DDRT-PCR) technique using 168 primer combinations and total RNA from BPH-1, LNCaP, and PC3 cells to identify filter-based cDNA microarrays containing 18,376 nonredundant clones of genes and expressed sequence tags (EST) using mRNA from PrEC and MDAPCa2a cells to identify genes that are differentially expressed in normal, benign, and cancerous prostate cell lines. Twenty-five cDNA with a significant difference in expression of 76 candidate cDNA, as identified by DDRT-PCR and confirmed by slot-blot analysis, were selected for sequence analysis. Of these, 14 cDNA were further confirmed by Northern blot analysis. Analysis of the cDNA microarray data showed that a variety of genes/EST were up- or down-regulated in the metastatic prostate tumor cells and a majority of these genes encode cytoskeletal proteins and proteins with regulatory function. Expression profile of two EST was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We also have identified a number of genes exhibiting differential expression in prostate cancer cells, which were not known earlier to be involved in prostate cancer. This report provides a comparative analysis of differential gene expression between normal prostatic epithelial cells and prostate cancer cells, and a foundation to facilitate in-depth studies on the mechanism of prostate cancer development and metastasis.

  4. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  5. Use of Palliative Radiotherapy Among Patients With Metastatic Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hayman, James A. Abrahamse, Paul H.; Lakhani, Indu; Earle, Craig C.; Katz, Steven J.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is known to effectively palliate many symptoms of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Anecdotally, RT is believed to be commonly used in this setting, but limited population-based data are available. The objective of this study was to examine the utilization patterns of palliative RT among elderly patients with Stage IV NSCLC and, in particular, to identify factors associated with its use. Methods and Materials: A retrospective population-based cohort study was performed using linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify 11,084 Medicare beneficiaries aged {>=}65 years who presented with Stage IV NSCLC in the 11 SEER regions between 1991 and 1996. The primary outcome was receipt of RT. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with receipt of RT. Results: A total of 58% of these patients received RT, with its use decreasing over time (p = 0.01). Increasing age was negatively associated with receipt of treatment (p <0.001), as was increasing comorbidities (p <0.001). Factors positively associated with the receipt of RT included income (p = 0.001), hospitalization (p <0.001), and treatment with chemotherapy (p <0.001). Although the use varied across the SEER regions (p = 0.001), gender, race/ethnicity, and distance to the nearest RT facility were not associated with treatment. Conclusions: Elderly patients with metastatic NSCLC frequently receive palliative RT, but its use varies, especially with age and receipt of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to determine whether this variability reflects good quality care.

  6. Wide spetcrum mutational analysis of metastatic renal cell cancer: a retrospective next generation sequencing approach.

    PubMed

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Gruppioni, Elisa; Massari, Francesco; Giunchi, Francesca; Altimari, Annalisa; Ciccarese, Chiara; Bimbatti, Davide; Scarpa, Aldo; Iacovelli, Roberto; Porta, Camillo; Virinder, Sarhadi; Tortora, Giampaolo; Artibani, Walter; Schiavina, Riccardo; Ardizzoni, Andrea; Brunelli, Matteo; Knuutila, Sakari; Martignoni, Guido

    2017-01-31

    Renal cell cancer (RCC) is characterized by histological and molecular heterogeneity that may account for variable response to targeted therapies. We evaluated retrospectively with a next generation sequencing (NGS) approach using a pre-designed cancer panel the mutation burden of 32 lesions from 22 metastatic RCC patients treated with at least one tyrosine kinase or mTOR inhibitor. We identified mutations in the VHL, PTEN, JAK3, MET, ERBB4, APC, CDKN2A, FGFR3, EGFR, RB1, TP53 genes. Somatic alterations were correlated with response to therapy. Most mutations hit VHL1 (31,8%) followed by PTEN (13,6%), JAK3, FGFR and TP53 (9% each). Eight (36%) patients were wild-type at least for the genes included in the panel.A genotype concordance between primary RCC and its secondary lesion was found in 3/6 cases. Patients were treated with Sorafenib, Sunitinib and Temsirolimus with partial responses in 4 (18,2%) and disease stabilization in 7 (31,8%). Among the 4 partial responders, 1 (25%) was wild-type and 3 (75%) harbored different VHL1 variants. Among the 7 patients with disease stabilization 2 (29%) were wild-type, 2 (29%) PTEN mutated, and single patients (14% each) displayed mutations in VHL1, JAK3 and APC/CDKN2A. Among the 11 non-responders 7 (64%) were wild-type, 2 (18%) were p53 mutated and 2 (18%) VHL1 mutated.No significant associations were found among RCC histotype, mutation variants and response to therapies. In the absence of predictive biomarkers for metastatic RCC treatment, a NGS approach may address single patients to basket clinical trials according to actionable molecular specific alterations.

  7. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-01-01

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers. PMID:26498688

  8. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome.

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 in tumor-associated macrophages promotes metastatic potential of breast cancer cells through Akt pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Qiu, Zhu; Huang, Jing; Li, Yunhai; Huang, Hongyan; Xiang, Tingxiu; Wan, Jingyuan; Hui, Tianli; Lin, Yong; Li, Hongzhong; Ren, Guosheng

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) promote cancer development and progression by releasing various cytokines and chemokines. Previously, we have found that the number of COX-2+ TAMs was associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. However, the mechanism remains enigmatic. In this study, we show that COX-2 in breast TAMs enhances the metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. COX-2 in TAMs induces MMP-9 expression and promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells. In addition, COX-2/PGE2 induces IL-6 release in macrophages. Furthermore, we find that the activation of Akt pathway in cancer cells is crucial for the pro-metastatic effect of COX-2+ TAMs by regulating MMP-9 and EMT. These findings indicate that TAMs facilitate breast cancer cell metastasis through COX-2-mediated intercellular communication. PMID:27994517

  10. Signal transduction and downregulation of C-MET in HGF stimulated low and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Husmann, Knut; Ducommun, Pascal; Sabile, Adam A; Pedersen, Else-Marie; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-09-04

    The poor outcome of osteosarcoma (OS), particularly in patients with metastatic disease and a five-year survival rate of only 20%, asks for more effective therapeutic strategies targeting malignancy-promoting mechanisms. Dysregulation of C-MET, its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the fusion oncogene product TPR-MET, first identified in human MNNG-HOS OS cells, have been described as cancer-causing factors in human cancers. Here, the expression of these molecules at the mRNA and the protein level and of HGF-stimulated signaling and downregulation of C-MET was compared in the parental low metastatic HOS and MG63 cell lines and the respective highly metastatic MNNG-HOS and 143B and the MG63-M6 and MG63-M8 sublines. Interestingly, expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 in all cell lines investigated, but phospho-Stat3 remained at basal levels. Downregulation of HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was much faster in the HGF expressing MG63-M8 cells than in HOS cells. Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal and to a lesser extent the lysosomal pathway in the cell lines investigated. Thus, HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 signaling as well as proteasomal degradation of HGF activated C-MET are potential therapeutic targets in OS.

  11. Genes Regulated in Metastatic Osteosarcoma: Evaluation by Microarray Analysis in Four Human and Two Mouse Cell Line Systems

    PubMed Central

    Muff, Roman; Ram Kumar, Ram Mohan; Botter, Sander M.; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a rare bone neoplasm that affects mainly adolescents. It is associated with poor prognosis in case of metastases formation. The search for metastasis predicting markers is therefore imperative to optimize treatment strategies for patients at risk and important for the search of new drugs for the treatment of this devastating disease. Here, we have analyzed by microarray the differential gene expression in four human and two mouse OS cell line systems consisting of parental cell lines with low metastatic potential and derivatives thereof with increased metastatic potential. Using two osteoblastic cell line systems, the most common OS phenotype, we have identified forty-eight common genes that are differentially expressed in metastatic cell lines compared to parental cells. The identified subset of metastasis relevant genes in osteoblastic OS overlapped only minimally with differentially expressed genes in the other four preosteoblast or nonosteoblastic cell line systems. The results imply an OS phenotype specific expression pattern of metastasis regulating proteins and form a basis for further investigation of gene expression profiles in patients' samples combined with survival analysis with the aim to optimize treatment strategies to develop new drugs and to consequently improve the survival of patients with the most common form of osteoblastic OS. PMID:23213280

  12. Vaccination with Irradiated Autologous Melanoma Cells Engineered to Secrete Human Granulocyte--Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Generates Potent Antitumor Immunity in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soiffer, Robert; Lynch, Thomas; Mihm, Martin; Jung, Ken; Rhuda, Catherine; Schmollinger, Jan C.; Hodi, F. Stephen; Liebster, Laura; Lam, Prudence; Mentzer, Steven; Singer, Samuel; Tanabe, Kenneth K.; Benedict Cosimi, A.; Duda, Rosemary; Sober, Arthur; Bhan, Atul; Daley, John; Neuberg, Donna; Parry, Gordon; Rokovich, Joseph; Richards, Laurie; Drayer, Jan; Berns, Anton; Clift, Shirley; Cohen, Lawrence K.; Mulligan, Richard C.; Dranoff, Glenn

    1998-10-01

    We conducted a Phase I clinical trial investigating the biologic activity of vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete human granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with metastatic melanoma. Immunization sites were intensely infiltrated with T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, macrophages, and eosinophils in all 21 evaluable patients. Although metastatic lesions resected before vaccination were minimally infiltrated with cells of the immune system in all patients, metastatic lesions resected after vaccination were densely infiltrated with T lymphocytes and plasma cells and showed extensive tumor destruction (at least 80%), fibrosis, and edema in 11 of 16 patients examined. Antimelanoma cytotoxic T cell and antibody responses were associated with tumor destruction. These results demonstrate that vaccination with irradiated autologous melanoma cells engineered to secrete granulocyte--macrophage colony-stimulating factor stimulates potent antitumor immunity in humans with metastatic melanoma.

  13. Autocrine secretion of 15d-PGJ2 mediates simvastatin-induced apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wasinger, Christine; Künzl, Martin; Minichsdorfer, Christoph; Höller, Christoph; Zellner, Maria; Hohenegger, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite new therapeutic approaches, metastatic melanomas still have a poor prognosis. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and exert anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions. We have recently shown that simvastatin triggers an apoptotic burst in human metastatic melanoma cells by the synthesis of an autocrine factor. Experimental Approach The current in vitro study was performed in human metastatic melanoma cell lines (A375, 518a2) and primary human melanocytes and melanoma cells. The secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells was analysed with two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis and MS. The signalling pathways involved were analysed at the protein and mRNA level using pharmacological approaches and siRNA technology. Key Results Simvastatin was shown to activate a stress cascade, leading to the synthesis of 15-deoxy-12,14-PGJ2 (15d-PGJ2), in a p38- and COX-2-dependent manner. Significant concentrations of 15d-PGJ2 were reached in the medium of melanoma cells, which were sufficient to activate caspase 8 and the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Inhibition of lipocalin-type PGD synthase, a key enzyme for 15d-PGJ2 synthesis, abolished the apoptotic effect of simvastatin. Moreover, 15d-PGJ2 was shown to bind to the fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5), which was up-regulated and predominantly detected in the secretome of simvastatin-stressed cells. Knockdown of FABP5 abolished simvastatin-induced activation of PPAR-γ and amplified the apoptotic response. Conclusions and Implications We characterized simvastatin-induced activation of the 15d-PGJ2/FABP5 signalling cascades, which triggered an apoptotic burst in melanoma cells but did not affect primary human melanocytes. These data support the rationale for the pharmacological targeting of 15d-PGJ2 in metastatic melanoma. PMID:25091578

  14. Expert Recommendations for First-Line Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma in Special Subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Puente, Javier; García Del Muro, Xavier; Pinto, Álvaro; Láinez, Nuria; Esteban, Emilio; Arranz, José Ángel; Gallardo, Enrique; Méndez, María José; Maroto, Pablo; Grande, Enrique; Suárez, Cristina

    2016-04-01

    The availability of agents targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor or mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] pathways has provided new treatment options for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Based on the results of pivotal randomized clinical trials, specific recommendations have been established for management of these patients in first- and second-line settings. However, certain subgroups of patients may be excluded or under-represented in clinical trials, including patients with poor performance status, brain metastases, and cardiac or renal comorbidities, elderly patients, and those with non-clear cell histology. For these subpopulations, management recommendations have emerged from expanded access programs (EAPs), small phase II studies, retrospective analysis of clinical data, and expert opinion. This paper describes recommendations from an expert panel for the treatment of metastatic RCC in these subpopulations. The efficacy of targeted agents appears to be inferior in these patient subgroups relative to the general RCC population. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and mTOR inhibitors can be administered safely to elderly patients and those with poor performance status, although dose and schedule modifications are often needed, and close monitoring and management of adverse events is essential. In addition to local surgical treatment and radiotherapy for brain metastases, systemic treatment with a TKI should be offered as part of multidisciplinary care.While there are currently no data from randomized trials, sunitinib has the greatest body of evidence, and it should be considered the first choice in patients with a good prognosis. Patients with an acute cardiac event within the previous 6 months, New York Heart Association grade III heart failure, or uncontrolled high blood pressure should not be treated with TKIs. In patients with mild or moderate renal failure, there are no contraindications to TKI treatment. TKIs can be

  15. Establishment of a human lung cancer cell line with high metastatic potential to multiple organs: gene expression associated with metastatic potential in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tetsuhiro; Shimizu, Kimihiro; Kawashima, Osamu; Kamiyoshihara, Mitsuhiro; Kakegawa, Seiichi; Sugano, Masayuki; Ibe, Takashi; Nagashima, Toshiteru; Kaira, Kyoichi; Sunaga, Noriaki; Ohtaki, Youichi; Atsumi, Jun; Takeyoshi, Izumi

    2012-11-01

    Convenient and reliable multiple organ metastasis model systems might contribute to understanding the mechanism(s) of metastasis of lung cancer, which may lead to overcoming metastasis and improvement in the treatment outcome of lung cancer. We isolated a highly metastatic subline, PC14HM, from the human pulmonary adenocarcinoma cell line, PC14, using an in vivo selection method. The expression of 34,580 genes was compared between PC14HM and parental PC14 by cDNA microarray analysis. Among the differentially expressed genes, expression of four genes in human lung cancer tissues and adjacent normal lung tissues were compared using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Although BALB/c nude mice inoculated with parental PC14 cells had few metastases, almost all mice inoculated with PC14HM cells developed metastases in multiple organs, including the lung, bone and adrenal gland, the same progression seen in human lung cancer. cDNA microarray analysis revealed that 981 genes were differentially (more than 3-fold) expressed between the two cell lines. Functional classification revealed that many of those genes were associated with cell growth, cell communication, development and transcription. Expression of three upregulated genes (HRB-2, HS3ST3A1 and RAB7) was higher in human cancer tissue compared to normal lung tissue, while expression of EDG1, which was downregulated, was lower in the cancer tissue compared to the normal lung. These results suggest that the newly established PC14HM cell line may provide a mouse model of widespread metastasis of lung cancer. This model system may provide insights into the key genetic determinants of widespread metastasis of lung cancer.

  16. Optimization of a Neural Stem-Cell-Mediated Carboxylesterase/Irinotecan Gene Therapy for Metastatic Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Gutova, Margarita; Goldstein, Leanne; Metz, Marianne; Hovsepyan, Anahit; Tsurkan, Lyudmila G; Tirughana, Revathiswari; Tsaturyan, Lusine; Annala, Alexander J; Synold, Timothy W; Wan, Zesheng; Seeger, Robert; Anderson, Clarke; Moats, Rex A; Potter, Philip M; Aboody, Karen S

    2017-03-17

    Despite improved survival for children with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma (NB), recurrent disease is a significant problem, with treatment options limited by anti-tumor efficacy, patient drug tolerance, and cumulative toxicity. We previously demonstrated that neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing a modified rabbit carboxylesterase (rCE) can distribute to metastatic NB tumor foci in multiple organs in mice and convert the prodrug irinotecan (CPT-11) to the 1,000-fold more toxic topoisomerase-1 inhibitor SN-38, resulting in significant therapeutic efficacy. We sought to extend these studies by using a clinically relevant NSC line expressing a modified human CE (hCE1m6-NSCs) to establish proof of concept and identify an intravenous dose and treatment schedule that gave maximal efficacy. Human-derived NB cell lines were significantly more sensitive to treatment with hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan as compared with drug alone. This was supported by pharmacokinetic studies in subcutaneous NB mouse models demonstrating tumor-specific conversion of irinotecan to SN-38. Furthermore, NB-bearing mice that received repeat treatment with intravenous hCE1m6-NSCs and irinotecan showed significantly lower tumor burden (1.4-fold, p = 0.0093) and increased long-term survival compared with mice treated with drug alone. These studies support the continued development of NSC-mediated gene therapy for improved clinical outcome in NB patients.

  17. Gene expression profiles of circulating tumor cells versus primary tumors in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Weekhout, Marleen; Mostert, Bianca; Reijm, Esther A; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B; Peeters, Dieter J; Hamberg, Paul; Seynaeve, Caroline; Jager, Agnes; de Jongh, Felix E; Smid, Marcel; Dirix, Luc Y; Kehrer, Diederik F S; van Galen, Anne; Ramirez-Moreno, Raquel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; Gratama, Jan W; Martens, John W M; Foekens, John A; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2015-06-28

    Before using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as liquid biopsy, insight into molecular discrepancies between CTCs and primary tumors is essential. We characterized CellSearch-enriched CTCs from 62 metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients with ≥5 CTCs starting first-line systemic treatment. Expression levels of 35 tumor-associated, CTC-specific genes, including ESR1, coding for the estrogen receptor (ER), were measured by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction and correlated to corresponding primary tumors. In 30 patients (48%), gene expression profiles of 35 genes were discrepant between CTCs and the primary tumor, but this had no prognostic consequences. In 15 patients (24%), the expression of ER was discrepant. Patients with ER-negative primary tumors and ER-positive CTCs had a longer median TTS compared to those with concordantly ER-negative CTCs (8.5 versus 2.1 months, P = 0.05). From seven patients, an axillary lymph node metastasis was available. In two patients, the CTC profiles better resembled the lymph node metastasis than the primary tumor. Our findings suggest that molecular discordances between CTCs and primary tumors frequently occur, but that this bears no prognostic consequences. Alterations in ER-status between primary tumors and CTCs might have prognostic implications.

  18. Metastatic basal cell carcinoma with amplification of PD-L1: exceptional response to anti-PD1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Sadakatsu; Goodman, Aaron M; Cohen, Philip R; Jensen, Taylor J; Ellison, Christopher K; Frampton, Garrett; Miller, Vincent; Patel, Sandip P; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic basal cell carcinomas are rare malignancies harbouring Hedgehog pathway alterations targetable by SMO antagonists (vismodegib/sonidegib). We describe, for the first time, the molecular genetics and response of a patient with Hedgehog inhibitor-resistant metastatic basal cell carcinoma who achieved rapid tumour regression (ongoing near complete remission at 4 months) with nivolumab (anti-PD1 antibody). He had multiple hallmarks of anti-PD1 responsiveness including high mutational burden (> 50 mutations per megabase; 19 functional alterations in tissue next-generation sequencing (NGS; 315 genes)) as well as PDL1/PDL2/JAK2 amplification (as determined by both tissue NGS and by analysis of plasma-derived cell-free DNA). The latter was performed using technology originally developed for the genome-wide detection of sub-chromosomal copy-number alterations (CNAs) in noninvasive prenatal testing and showed numerous CNAs including amplification of the 9p24.3-9p22.2 region containing PD-L1, PD-L2 and JAK2. Of interest, PD-L1, PD-L2 and JAK2 amplification is a characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma, which is exquisitely sensitive to nivolumab. In conclusion, selected SMO antagonist-resistant metastatic basal cell carcinomas may respond to nivolumab based on underlying molecular genetic mechanisms that include PD-L1 amplification and high tumour mutational burden. PMID:27942391

  19. Programmed death-1 ligand 1 and 2 are highly expressed in pleomorphic carcinomas of the lung: Comparison of sarcomatous and carcinomatous areas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sehui; Kim, Moon-Young; Koh, Jaemoon; Go, Heounjeong; Lee, Dong Soo; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2015-11-01

    Pleomorphic carcinoma (PC) of the lung is a rare type of poorly differentiated non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) that belongs to sarcomatoid carcinoma (SC). It exhibits aggressive behaviour and resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Recently, immunotherapy targeting the programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD ligand 1 (PD-L1) pathway has demonstrated favourable clinical outcomes in NSCLC. However, the expression patterns of PD-1-related molecules in pulmonary PC remain elusive. PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression was estimated in 41 cases of PC using immunohistochemistry. CD8(+) and PD-1(+) tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) were also evaluated. PD-L1 and PD-L2 were highly expressed in pulmonary PCs (90.2% [37/41)]; 87.8% [36/41]). The amount of CD8(+) or PD-1(+) TILs and the ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs in PC were higher in males, smokers and older patients. PD-L1-positive PCs were infiltrated by higher numbers of CD8(+) TILs compared to PD-L1-negative cases (P=0.006). Of note, PD-L1 expression in pulmonary PCs was significantly higher in sarcomatous areas than in the carcinomatous portion (P=0.006). PC patients with a high ratio of PD-1(+)/CD8(+) TILs showed a shorter progression-free survival (P=0.036), whereas PD-L1 and PD-L2 expression had no prognostic implications. Our study demonstrates that pulmonary PCs very frequently express PD-L1 and PD-L2. Moreover, their expression is higher in sarcomatous cells than in carcinomatous areas. Thus, targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may represent a potential therapeutic candidate for this aggressive tumour.

  20. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase overexpression increases metastatic growth of B16 melanoma cells in the mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Carretero, Julian; Ortega, Angel; Medina, Ignacio; Rodilla, Vicente; Pellicer, José A; Estrela, José M

    2002-01-01

    B16 melanoma (B16M) cells with high glutathione (GSH) content show rapid proliferation in vitro and high metastatic activity in the liver in vivo. gamma-Glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-mediated extracellular GSH cleavage and intracellular GSH synthesis were studied in vitro in B16M cells with high (F10) and low (F1) metastatic potential. GGT activity was modified by transfection with the human GGT gene (B16MF1/Tet-GGT cells) or by acivicin-induced inhibition. B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells exhibited higher GSH content (35 +/- 6 and 40 +/- 5 nmol/10(6) cells, respectively) and GGT activity (89 +/- 9 and 37 +/- 7 mU/10(6) cells, respectively) as compared (P <.05) with B16MF1 cells (10 +/- 3 nmol GSH and 4 mU GGT/10(6) cells). Metastasis (number of foci/100 mm(3) of liver) increased in B16MF1 cells pretreated with GSH ester ( approximately 3-fold, P <.01), and decreased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT and B16MF10 cells pretreated with the GSH synthesis inhibitor L-buthionine (S,R)-sulphoximine ( approximately 5-fold and 2-fold, respectively, P <.01). Liver, kidney, brain, lung, and erythrocyte GSH content in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice decreased as compared with B16MF1- and non-tumor-bearing mice. Organic anion transporting polypeptide 1-independent sinusoidal GSH efflux from hepatocytes increased in B16MF1/Tet-GGT- or B16MF10-bearing mice ( approximately 2-fold, P <.01) as compared with non-tumor-bearing mice. Our results indicate that tumor GGT activity and an intertissue flow of GSH can regulate GSH content of melanoma cells and their metastatic growth in the liver.

  1. Common glycoproteins expressing polylactosamine-type glycans on matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cells show different glycan profiles.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Mitsui, Yosuke; Kakoi, Naotaka; Yamada, Keita; Hayakawa, Takao; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2014-02-07

    Recently, we reported comparative analysis of glycoproteins which express cancer-specific N-glycans on various cancer cells and identified 24 glycoproteins having polylactosamine (polyLacNAc)-type N-glycans that are abundantly present in malignant cells [ Mitsui et al., J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 2012 , 70 , 718 - 726 ]. In the present study, we applied the technique to comparative studies on common glycoproteins present in the matched patient primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Metastatic melanoma cells (WM266-4) contained a large amount of polyLacNAc-type N-glycans in comparison with primary melanoma cells (WM115). To identify the glycoproteins expressing these N-glycans, glycopeptides having polyLacNAc-type N-glycans were captured by a Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)-immobilized agarose column. The captured glycopeptides were analyzed by LC/MS after removing N-glycans, and some glycoproteins such as basigin, lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4 (CSPG4) were identified in both WM115 and WM266-4 cells. The expression level of polyLacNAc of CSPG4 in WM266-4 cells was significantly higher than that in WM115 cells. In addition, sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains in CSPG4 showed dramatic changes between these cell lines. These data show that characteristic glycans attached to common proteins observed in different stages of cancer cells will be useful markers for determining degree of malignancies of tumor cells.

  2. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  3. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, John P.; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; Di Santo, James P.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RASwt metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR− RASwt, EGFR+ RASmut, and EGFR+ BRAFmut cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR+ colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR+ colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR−RASwt (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR+ RASmut (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR+ BRAFmut (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR+ RASmut colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered. PMID:28220124

  4. Emerging and Mechanism-Based Therapies for Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie J.; Bhatia, Shailender; Parvathaneni, Upendra; Iyer, Jayasri G.; Nghiem, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer with a disease-specific mortality of approximately 40 %. The association of MCC with a recently discovered polyomavirus, combined with the increased incidence and mortality of MCC among immunocompromised patients, highlight the importance of the immune system in controlling this cancer. Initial management of MCC is summarized within the NCCN guidelines and in recently published reviews. The high rate of recurrent and metastatic disease progression in MCC, however, presents a major challenge in a cancer that lacks mechanism-based, disease-specific therapies. Traditional treatment approaches have focused on cytotoxic chemotherapy that, despite frequent initial efficacy, rarely provides durable responses and has high morbidity among the elderly. In addition, the immunosuppressive nature of chemotherapy is of concern when treating a virus-associated cancer for which survival is unusually tightly linked to immune function. With a median survival of 9.6 months after development of an initial metastasis (n=179, described herein), and no FDA-approved agents for this cancer, there is an urgent need for more effective treatments. We review diverse management options for patients with advanced MCC, with a focus on emerging and mechanism-based therapies, some of which specifically target persistently expressed viral antigens. These treatments include single-dose radiation and novel immunotherapies, some of which are in clinical trials. Due to their encouraging efficacy, low toxicity, and lack of immune suppression, these therapies may offer viable alternatives to traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. PMID:23436166

  5. A simple prognostic model for overall survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Hazem I.; Patenaude, Francois; Toumishey, Ethan; Ross, Laura; Abdelsalam, Mahmoud; Reiman, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The primary purpose of this study was to develop a simpler prognostic model to predict overall survival for patients treated for metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) by examining variables shown in the literature to be associated with survival. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of patients treated for mRCC at two Canadian centres. All patients who started first-line treatment were included in the analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model was constructed using a stepwise procedure. Patients were assigned to risk groups depending on how many of the three risk factors from the final multivariate model they had. Results: There were three risk factors in the final multivariate model: hemoglobin, prior nephrectomy, and time from diagnosis to treatment. Patients in the high-risk group (two or three risk factors) had a median survival of 5.9 months, while those in the intermediate-risk group (one risk factor) had a median survival of 16.2 months, and those in the low-risk group (no risk factors) had a median survival of 50.6 months. Conclusions: In multivariate analysis, shorter survival times were associated with hemoglobin below the lower limit of normal, absence of prior nephrectomy, and initiation of treatment within one year of diagnosis. PMID:27217858

  6. Sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: recommendations for management of noncardiovascular toxicities.

    PubMed

    Kollmannsberger, Christian; Bjarnason, Georg; Burnett, Patrick; Creel, Patricia; Davis, Mellar; Dawson, Nancy; Feldman, Darren; George, Suzanne; Hershman, Jerome; Lechner, Thomas; Potter, Amy; Raymond, Eric; Treister, Nathaniel; Wood, Laura; Wu, Shenhong; Bukowski, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The multitargeted tyrosine-kinase inhibitor sunitinib has emerged as one of the standards of care for good- and intermediate-risk metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Although generally associated with acceptable toxicity, sunitinib exhibits a novel and distinct toxicity profile that requires monitoring and management. Fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, oral changes, hand-foot syndrome and other skin toxicity, thyroid dysfunction, myelotoxicity, and hypertension seem to be the most common and clinically relevant toxicities of sunitinib. Drug dosing and treatment duration are correlated with response to treatment and survival. Treatment recommendations for hypertension have been published but, currently, no standard guidelines exist for the management of noncardiovascular side effects. To discuss the optimal management of noncardiovascular side effects, an international, interdisciplinary panel of experts gathered in November 2009. Existing literature on incidence, severity, and underlying mechanisms of side effects as well as on potential treatment options were carefully reviewed and discussed. On the basis of these proceedings and the thorough review of the existing literature, recommendations were made for the monitoring, prevention, and treatment of the most common noncardiovascular side effects and are summarized in this review. The proactive assessment and consistent and timely management of sunitinib-related side effects are critical to ensure optimal treatment benefit by allowing appropriate drug dosing and prolonged treatment periods.

  7. Considerations for the design of future clinical trials in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Escudier, Bernard; Heng, Daniel Y C; Smyth-Medina, Arthur; Porta, Camillo

    2014-02-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) remains incurable in most cases, and there is a need to improve outcomes through clinical research, which will include development of novel molecularly targeted or immunotherapeutic agents. There are also many remaining questions regarding the optimization of currently available regimens, including the utility of dose escalation, the benefit of combination therapy, and the optimal sequences of therapies. Addressing these clinical questions will require careful planning and the inclusion of novel elements in trial designs. Future trials should include molecular phenotyping and selection of patients most likely to benefit from targeted therapies. In this article, we consider lessons learned from previous trials in mRCC and discuss how these lessons might be implemented in the design of future trials that focus on clinically useful questions and provide results that can be readily interpreted. The ultimate aim of the next generation of mRCC trials will be rapid cost-effective identification, testing, and approval of agents that can improve prognosis in this challenging disease.

  8. Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    Award Number: TITLE: “Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma...SUBTITLE Targeting Alpha5 Beta1 Integrin to Prevent Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell Invasion: PhScN Target Site Definition and Plasma Stability 5a...desirable target. Our research tested definitively the hypothesis that both PHSCN and PhScN peptides inhibit α5β1 integrin fibronectin receptor

  9. Signal transduction and downregulation of C-MET in HGF stimulated low and highly metastatic human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Husmann, Knut; Ducommun, Pascal; Sabile, Adam A.; Pedersen, Else-Marie; Born, Walter; Fuchs, Bruno

    2015-09-04

    The poor outcome of osteosarcoma (OS), particularly in patients with metastatic disease and a five-year survival rate of only 20%, asks for more effective therapeutic strategies targeting malignancy-promoting mechanisms. Dysregulation of C-MET, its ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and the fusion oncogene product TPR-MET, first identified in human MNNG-HOS OS cells, have been described as cancer-causing factors in human cancers. Here, the expression of these molecules at the mRNA and the protein level and of HGF-stimulated signaling and downregulation of C-MET was compared in the parental low metastatic HOS and MG63 cell lines and the respective highly metastatic MNNG-HOS and 143B and the MG63-M6 and MG63-M8 sublines. Interestingly, expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 in all cell lines investigated, but phospho-Stat3 remained at basal levels. Downregulation of HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 phosphorylation was much faster in the HGF expressing MG63-M8 cells than in HOS cells. Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal and to a lesser extent the lysosomal pathway in the cell lines investigated. Thus, HGF-stimulated Akt and Erk1/2 signaling as well as proteasomal degradation of HGF activated C-MET are potential therapeutic targets in OS. - Highlights: • Expression of TPR-MET was only observed in MNNG-HOS cells. • HGF stimulated the phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2 but not of Stat3 in osteosarcoma cell lines. • Degradation of HGF-activated C-MET occurred predominantly through the proteasomal pathway.

  10. Cell-surface galectin-3 confers resistance to TRAIL by impeding trafficking of death receptors in metastatic colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, N; Byrd, J C; Sun, Y; Hafley, M; Ramirez, K; Burks, J; Bresalier, R S

    2012-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis and preferentially kills tumor cells by engaging specific glycosylated death receptors, resulting in the internalization of ligand/receptor complexes and recruitment of the initiator caspase-8 to an activation platform known as the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC). However, emergence of TRAIL-resistant sub-populations may contribute to therapeutic failure. To investigate resistance mechanisms, we isolated a stable TRAIL-resistant sub-population of the metastatic colon cancer cell line LS-LIM6, designated LIM6-TR. LIM6-TR cells are impaired in endocytosis of TRAIL/death receptors complexes and failed to recruit/activate caspase-8 to the DISC upon TRAIL stimulation. Differential activation of Wnt and JNK pathways is not responsible for acquisition of TRAIL resistance. LIM6-TR cells display a marked increase in cell-surface expression of galectin-3, an endogenous lectin, which co-localizes with and binds death receptors. Silencing of galectin-3 restores TRAIL sensitivity and promotes TRAIL-mediated endocytosis of TRAIL/death receptors complexes. Inhibitors of galectin-3 and glycosylation also re-sensitize LIM6-TR to TRAIL and restore internalization of ligand/receptors complexes. These studies identify a novel TRAIL-resistance mechanism in which galectin-3 impedes trafficking of death receptor by anchoring them in glycan nano-clusters, blocking the execution of the apoptosis signal.

  11. Altering the Microenvironment to Promote Dormancy of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cell in a 3D Bone Culture System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    for metastatic breast cancer cells to grow or remain dormant. This hypothesis is being tested using a 3D bioreactor of ECM, derived from osteoblasts...dormant human cells to proliferate in the bioreactor in co-culture with OB. The effect appears to depend on prostaglandin production. Chronic...growth of cancer cells, murine osteoblasts, MC3T3-E1, were grown for 2 months in the bioreactor with a basal medium of αMEM with 10mM β

  12. Human metastatic melanoma cell lines express high levels of growth hormone receptor and respond to GH treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sustarsic, Elahu G.; Junnila, Riia K.; Kopchick, John J.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Most cancer types of the NCI60 have sub-sets of cell lines with high GHR expression. •GHR is highly expressed in melanoma cell lines. •GHR is elevated in advanced stage IV metastatic tumors vs. stage III. •GH treatment of metastatic melanoma cell lines alters growth and cell signaling. -- Abstract: Accumulating evidence implicates the growth hormone receptor (GHR) in carcinogenesis. While multiple studies show evidence for expression of growth hormone (GH) and GHR mRNA in human cancer tissue, there is a lack of quantification and only a few cancer types have been investigated. The National Cancer Institute’s NCI60 panel includes 60 cancer cell lines from nine types of human cancer: breast, CNS, colon, leukemia, melanoma, non-small cell lung, ovarian, prostate and renal. We utilized this panel to quantify expression of GHR, GH, prolactin receptor (PRLR) and prolactin (PRL) mRNA with real-time RT qPCR. Both GHR and PRLR show a broad range of expression within and among most cancer types. Strikingly, GHR expression is nearly 50-fold higher in melanoma than in the panel as a whole. Analysis of human metastatic melanoma biopsies confirmed GHR gene expression in melanoma tissue. In these human biopsies, the level of GHR mRNA is elevated in advanced stage IV tumor samples compared to stage III. Due to the novel finding of high GHR in melanoma, we examined the effect of GH treatment on three NCI60 melanoma lines (MDA-MB-435, UACC-62 and SK-MEL-5). GH increased proliferation in two out of three cell lines tested. Further analysis revealed GH-induced activation of STAT5 and mTOR in a cell line dependent manner. In conclusion, we have identified cell lines and cancer types that are ideal to study the role of GH and PRL in cancer, yet have been largely overlooked. Furthermore, we found that human metastatic melanoma tumors express GHR and cell lines possess active GHRs that can modulate multiple signaling pathways and alter cell proliferation. Based on

  13. Sunitinib-induced hypothyroidism predicts progression-free survival in metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Buda-Nowak, Anna; Kucharz, Jakub; Dumnicka, Paulina; Kuzniewski, Marek; Herman, Roman Maria; Zygulska, Aneta L; Kusnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2017-04-01

    Sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) used in treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), gastrointestinal stromal tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. One of the most common side effects related to sunitinib is hypothyroidism. Recent trials suggest correlation between the incidence of hypothyroidism and treatment outcome in patients treated with TKI. This study evaluates whether development of hypothyroidism is a predictive marker of progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with mRCC treated with sunitinib. Twenty-seven patients diagnosed with clear cell mRCC, after nephrectomy and in 'good' or 'intermediate' MSKCC risk prognostic group, were included in the study. All patients received sunitinib as a first-line treatment on a standard schedule (initial dose 50 mg/day, 4 weeks on, 2 weeks off). The thyroid-stimulating hormone serum levels were obtained at the baseline and every 12 weeks of treatment. In statistic analyses, we used Kaplan-Meier method for assessment of progression-free survival; for comparison of survival, we used log-rank test. In our study, the incidence of hypothyroidism was 44%. The patients who had developed hypothyroidism had better median PFS to patients with normal thyroid function 28,3 months [95% (CI) 20.4-36.2 months] versus 9.8 months (6.4-13.1 months). In survival analysis, we perceive that thyroid dysfunction is a predictive factor of a progression-free survival (PFS). In the unified group of patients, the development of hypothyroidism during treatment with sunitinib is a positive marker for PFS. During that treatment, thyroid function should be evaluated regularly.

  14. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices

    PubMed Central

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion. PMID:26813872

  15. Correlating confocal microscopy and atomic force indentation reveals metastatic cancer cells stiffen during invasion into collagen I matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staunton, Jack R.; Doss, Bryant L.; Lindsay, Stuart; Ros, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical interactions between cells and their microenvironment dictate cell phenotype and behavior, calling for cell mechanics measurements in three-dimensional (3D) extracellular matrices (ECM). Here we describe a novel technique for quantitative mechanical characterization of soft, heterogeneous samples in 3D. The technique is based on the integration of atomic force microscopy (AFM) based deep indentation, confocal fluorescence microscopy, finite element (FE) simulations and analytical modeling. With this method, the force response of a cell embedded in 3D ECM can be decoupled from that of its surroundings, enabling quantitative determination of the elastic properties of both the cell and the matrix. We applied the technique to the quantification of the elastic properties of metastatic breast adenocarcinoma cells invading into collagen hydrogels. We found that actively invading and fully embedded cells are significantly stiffer than cells remaining on top of the collagen, a clear example of phenotypical change in response to the 3D environment. Treatment with Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor significantly reduces this stiffening, indicating that actomyosin contractility plays a major role in the initial steps of metastatic invasion.

  16. Reactive astrocytes promote the metastatic growth of breast cancer stem-like cells by activating Notch signalling in brain.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fei; Kobayashi, Aya; Okuda, Hiroshi; Watabe, Misako; Pai, Sudha K; Pandey, Puspa R; Hirota, Shigeru; Wilber, Andrew; Mo, Yin-Yuan; Moore, Brian E; Liu, Wen; Fukuda, Koji; Iiizumi, Megumi; Sharma, Sambad; Liu, Yin; Wu, Kerui; Peralta, Elizabeth; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2013-03-01

    Brain metastasis of breast cancer profoundly affects the cognitive and sensory functions as well as morbidity of patients, and the 1 year survival rate among these patients remains less than 20%. However, the pathological mechanism of brain metastasis is as yet poorly understood. In this report, we found that metastatic breast tumour cells in the brain highly expressed IL-1β which then 'activated' surrounding astrocytes. This activation significantly augmented the expression of JAG1 in the astrocytes, and the direct interaction of the reactivated astrocytes and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) significantly stimulated Notch signalling in CSCs. We also found that the activated Notch signalling in CSCs up-regulated HES5 followed by promoting self-renewal of CSCs. Furthermore, we have shown that the blood-brain barrier permeable Notch inhibitor, Compound E, can significantly suppress the brain metastasis in vivo. These results represent a novel paradigm for the understanding of how metastatic breast CSCs re-establish their niche for their self-renewal in a totally different microenvironment, which opens a new avenue to identify a novel and specific target for the brain metastatic disease.

  17. High-Dose Chemotherapy With Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Overview of Six Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Donald A.; Ueno, Naoto T.; Johnson, Marcella M.; Lei, Xiudong; Caputo, Jean; Smith, Dori A.; Yancey, Linda J.; Crump, Michael; Stadtmauer, Edward A.; Biron, Pierre; Crown, John P.; Schmid, Peter; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Rosti, Giovanni; Bregni, Marco; Demirer, Taner

    2011-01-01

    Purpose High doses of effective chemotherapy are compelling if they can be delivered safely. Substantial interest in supporting high-dose chemotherapy with bone marrow or autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in the 1980s and 1990s led to the initiation of randomized trials to evaluate its effect in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. Methods We identified six randomized trials in metastatic breast cancer that evaluated high doses of chemotherapy with transplant support versus a control regimen without stem-cell support. We assembled a single database containing individual patient information from these trials. The primary analysis of overall survival was a log-rank test comparing high dose versus control. We also used Cox proportional hazards regression, adjusting for known covariates. We addressed potential treatment differences within subsets of patients. Results The effect of high-dose chemotherapy on overall survival was not statistically different (median, 2.16 v 2.02 years; P = .08). A statistically significant advantage in progression-free survival (median, 0.91 v 0.69 years) did not translate into survival benefit. Subset analyses found little evidence that there are groups of patients who might benefit from high-dose chemotherapy with hematopoietic support. Conclusion Overall survival of patients with metastatic breast cancer in the six randomized trials was not significantly improved by high-dose chemotherapy; any benefit from high doses was small. No identifiable subset of patients seems to benefit from high-dose chemotherapy. PMID:21768454

  18. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  19. Phase I trial of intravenous peptide-pulsed dendritic cells in patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, R; Wang, F; Jeffery, G; Marty, V; Kuniyoshi, J; Bade, E; Ryback, M E; Weber, J

    2001-01-01

    Sixteen patients with metastatic stage IV melanoma were treated with use of intravenous infusions of dendritic cells (DC) derived by incubation of plastic-adherent peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with IL-4 and GM-CSF for 8 days in serumless AIM-V medium, followed by overnight pulsing with peptides. The tyrosinase368-376 (370D) and gp100(209-217 (210M)) peptides restricted to HLA class I A*0201 each differed from wild type by one amino acid modified to increase HLA binding. Median age was 49, with nine men and seven women. All patients, except one, had visceral disease. Patients received escalating doses of peptide-pulsed DCs at 10e7, 3 x 10e7, and 10e8 cells/dose twice at 2 weeks apart, with toxicity and clinical and immune responses as the principal endpoints. The first infusion of DCs was fresh, and frozen DCs were given for the second infusion of each cycle. Mean DC purity by flow cytometry was 49%, with a mean HLA-DR level of 57%, CD86 of 41%, CD58 of 46%, and mean CD14 cells of 0.9%. Toxicity was minimal, with two patients having transient grade III DC-related toxicity. Ten patients received one cycle of treatment and six patients received two cycles of treatment. One patient had a complete remission (CR) of lung and pleural disease after two cycles of DC therapy. Two additional patients had stable disease and two patients had mixed responses. Overall immunity was assessed by recall skin testing with peptides, gamma interferon ELISA assays of peptide specific cytolytic T cell (CTL) stimulated twice with peptide, IL-2, and IL-7 over 24 days, and peptide-specific tetramer assays performed before and after vaccination. Five of 16 patients had an immune response to gp100 or tyrosinase by gamma interferon ELISA assay; four of five were clinically stable or had tumor regression. These data suggest that melanoma antigen peptide-pulsed DC given intravenously are not toxic, and regression or stability of tumor appeared to correlate with the detection of a

  20. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  1. Masitinib demonstrates anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in primary and metastatic feline injection-site sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, J; Saba, C; Gogal, R; Lamberth, O; Vandenplas, M L; Hurley, D J; Dubreuil, P; Hermine, O; Dobbin, K; Turek, M

    2012-06-01

    Dysregulation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) may play a role in feline injection-site sarcoma (ISS) cell growth and viability. Masitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor approved for treatment of canine mast cell tumours, is highly selective for the PDGFR signalling pathway and may offer a new therapeutic approach for this disease. The in vitro effects of masitinib on growth, apoptosis and PDGFR signalling in two novel ISS cell lines were investigated. PDGFR expression was confirmed by Western blot in cell lines derived from a primary ISS tumour (JB) and a corresponding, histologically confirmed ISS lung metastasis (JBLM). Masitinib inhibited cell growth and PDGFR phosphorylation in both cell lines. Higher drug concentrations were required to inhibit growth than to modulate ligand-induced autophosphorylation of PDGFR. These in vitro data suggest that masitinib displays activity against both primary and metastatic ISS cell line and may aid in the clinical management of ISS.

  2. Bamboo salt has in vitro anticancer activity in HCT-116 cells and exerts anti-metastatic effects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Kim, So-Young; Park, Kun-Young

    2013-01-01

    Bamboo salt is a traditional food widely used in Korea. The in vitro anticancer effects of this salt were evaluated in HCT-116 human colon cancer cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. A 1% salt concentration of bamboo salt baked nine times (9×) inhibited the growth of HCT-116 cells by 53%, which was higher than salt baked three times (3×) or once (1×; 44% and 41%, respectively) and much higher than solar sea salt (Korean sea salt) and purified salt (22% and 18%, respectively). To elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms underlying the anticancer effect of the salt samples in cancer cells, expression of genes associated with apoptosis, inflammation, and metastasis was measured with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Bamboo salt (9×) significantly induced apoptosis in cancer cells (P<.05) by upregulating Bax, caspase-9, and caspase-3, and downregulating Bcl-2. The expression of genes associated with inflammation (NF-κB, iNOS, and COX-2) was significantly downregulated (P<.05) by 9× bamboo salt, demonstrating its anti-inflammatory properties. The 9× bamboo salt also exerted a greater anti-metastatic effect on cancer cells than the other salts as demonstrated by decreased mRNA expression of MMP genes and increased expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases, which was confirmed by the inhibition of tumor metastasis induced in colon 26-M3.1 cells in BALB/c mice. In contrast, purified and solar salts increased metastasis in the mice. Our results demonstrated that 9× bamboo salt had the most potent in vitro anticancer effect, induced apoptosis, had anti-inflammatory activities, and exerted in vivo anti-metastatic effects. Additionally, the anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-metastatic effects of the 1× and 3× bamboo salts were stronger than those of the purified and solar salts.

  3. CCR7 regulates cell migration and invasion through MAPKs in metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fa-Yu; Safdar, Jawad; Li, Zhen-Ning; Fang, Qi-Gen; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Zhong-Fei; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Migration and invasion of tumor cells are essential prerequisites for the formation of metastasis in malignant diseases. Previously, we have reported that CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) regulates the mobility of squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (SCCHN) cells through several pathways, such as integrin and cdc42. In this study, we investigated the connection between CCR7 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members, and their influence on cell invasion and migration in metastatic SCCHN cells. Western blotting, immunostaining and fluorescence microcopy were used to detect the protein expression and distribution of MAPKs, and the Migration assay, Matrigel invasion assay and wound-healing assay to detect the role of MAPKs in CCR7 regulating cell mobility. To analyze the correlation between CCR7 and MAPK activity and clinicopathological factors immunohistochemical staining was emplyed. The results showed stimulation of CCL19 and the activation of CCR7 could induce ERK1/2 and JNK phosphorylation, while it had no efect on p38. After activation, ERK1/2 and JNK promoted E-cadherin low expression and Vimentin high expression. The MAPK pathway not only mediated CCR7 induced cell migration, but also mediated invasion speed. The immunohistochemistry results showed that CCR7 was correlated with the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in SCCHN, and these molecules were all associated with lymph node metastasis. Therefore, our study demonstrates that MAPK members (ERK1/2 and JNK) play a key role in CCR7 regulating SCCHN metastasis.

  4. [Bevacizumab as first-line therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma: Progression-free survival for 3 years].

    PubMed

    Pichler, R; Horninger, W; Aigner, F; Heidegger, I

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 72-year-old woman who was diagnosed in 2006 with renal cell cancer (RCC) and had undergone consecutive tumor nephrectomy (clear-cell RCC, Fuhrmann grade II, stage pT3a, R0). Over the years, the patient underwent several surgical and radiological interventions due to various metastatic lesions. This case report describes the 3-year progression-free survival in a patient who underwent first-line therapy with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab. Except for hypertension, the patient does not suffer currently from any other side effects of bevacizumab therapy.

  5. Socioeconomic factors and survival in patients with non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xu, Cheng; Chen, Yu-Pei; Liu, Xu; Tang, Ling-Long; Chen, Lei; Mao, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Rui; Zhou, Guan-Qun; Li, Wen-Fei; Lin, Ai-Hua; Sun, Ying; Ma, Jun

    2017-04-06

    The effect of socioeconomic factors on receipt of definitive treatment and survival outcomes in non-metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unclear. Eligible patients (n = 37,995) were identified from the United States Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 2007 and 2012. Socioeconomic factors (i.e., median household income, education level, unemployment rate, insurance status, marital status and residence) were included in univariate/multivariate Cox regression analysis; validated factors were used to generate nomograms for cause-specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS), and a prognostic score model for risk stratification. Low- and high-risk groups were compared for all cancer subsites. Impact of race/ethnicity on survival was investigated in each risk group. Marital status, median household income and insurance status were included in the nomograms for CSS and OS, which had higher c-indexes than the 6th edition TNM staging system (all P-values < 0.001). Based on three disadvantageous socioeconomic factors (i.e., unmarried status, uninsured status, median household income < US $65,394), the prognostic score model generated four risk subgroups with scores of 0, 1, 2 or 3, which had significantly separated CSS/OS curves (all P-values < 0.001). Low-risk patients (score 0-1) were more likely to receive definitive treatment and obtain better CSS/OS than high-risk patients (score 2-3). Chinese and non-Hispanic black patients with high-risk socioeconomic status had best and poorest CSS/OS, respectively. Therefore, marital status, median household income and insurance status have significance for predicting survival outcomes. Low-risk socioeconomic status and Chinese race/ethnicity confer protective effects in HNSCC. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Amdahl, J.; Diaz, J.; Park, J.; Nakhaipour, H.R.; Delea, T.E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Canada and elsewhere, pazopanib and sunitinib—tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor receptors—are recommended as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mrcc). A large randomized noninferiority trial of pazopanib versus sunitinib (comparz) demonstrated that the two drugs have similar efficacy; however, patients randomized to pazopanib experienced better health-related quality of life (hrqol) and nominally lower rates of non-study medical resource utilization. Methods The cost-effectiveness of pazopanib compared with sunitinib for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care system perspective was evaluated using a partitioned-survival model that incorporated data from comparz and other secondary sources. The time horizon of 5 years was based on the maximum duration of follow-up in the final analysis of overall survival from the comparz trial. Analyses were conducted first using list prices for pazopanib and sunitinib and then by assuming that the prices of sunitinib and pazopanib would be equivalent. Results Based on list prices, expected costs were CA$10,293 less with pazopanib than with sunitinib. Pazopanib was estimated to yield 0.059 more quality-adjusted life-years (qalys). Pazopanib was therefore dominant (more qalys and lower costs) compared with sunitinib in the base case. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, pazopanib was dominant in 79% of simulations and was cost-effective in 90%–100% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Assuming equivalent pricing, pazopanib yielded CA$917 in savings in the base case, was dominant in 36% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis simulations, and was cost-effective in 89% of simulations at a threshold cost-effectiveness ratio of CA$100,000. Conclusions Compared with sunitinib, pazopanib is likely to be a cost-effective option for first-line treatment of mrcc from a Canadian health care

  7. Predictive Factors for Second-Line Therapy in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ivanyi, Philipp; Hornig, Mareike; Grünwald, Viktor

    2017-01-01

    Currently, about 50% of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) receive a second-line therapy. Therefore, the choice at each subsequent treatment line remains an important issue. In this retrospective study, we sought to identify pretreatment clinical parameters that could predict the likelihood of a patient receiving a second-line therapy. One hundred and sixty-one mRCC patients who received targeted therapy were evaluated. Descriptive statistics, Kaplan–Meier overall survival (OS), Cox regression, and binary logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Second-line therapy was given to 105 patients (65%). Patients with grade 1 tumor received second-line therapy more frequently than those with grade 2/3 tumors (P = 0.03). Only tumor grade was significantly different between patients receiving, or not receiving, second-line treatment. Median OS was significantly superior in patients receiving second-line therapy (32 versus 14 months; P = 0.007; hazard ratio [HR], 1.75; P = 0.008), patients with grade 1 tumors (130 versus 29 months in G2/3 tumors; HR, 3.85; P = 0.009), and in patients without early tumor progression (41 versus 11 months; HR, 5.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.06–8.31; P < 0.001). In binary logistic regression, we identified early progression to be significantly associated with a higher probability of not receiving a second-line therapy (HR, 2.50; 95% CI, 1.01–6.21; P = 0.048). This study hypothesizes that pretreatment grade and early progression are predictive parameters for the selection of patients for second-line therapy.

  8. Clinical significance of sunitinib-associated macrocytosis in metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bourlon, Maria T; Gao, Dexiang; Trigero, Sara; Clemons, Julia E; Breaker, Kathryn; Lam, Elaine T; Flaig, Thomas W

    2016-12-01

    Increases in the mean corpuscular volume (MCV) have been observed in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) on tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) treatment; however, its association with progression-free-survival (PFS) is unknown. We aimed to characterize TKI-associated macrocytosis in mRCC and its relationship with PFS. Retrospective review of data on macrocytosis and thyroid dysfunction on mRCC patients treated with sunitinib and/or sorafenib. These results are evaluated in the context of our previous report on the association of hypothyroidism in this setting. We assessed PFS as clinically defined by the treating physician. Seventy-four patients, 29 of whom received both drugs, were included. A treatment period was defined as time from initiation to discontinuation of either sunitinib or sorafenib; 103 treatment periods [sorafenib (47), sunitinib (56)] were analyzed. Macrocytosis was found in 55 and 8% of sunitinib- and sorafenib-treated patients, respectively, P < 0.001. The median time to developing macrocytosis was 3 months (m, range 1-7). Median PFS in sunitinib-treated patients was 11 m (95% CI: 6-19). Median PFS was higher among those with macrocytosis compared to normocytosis (21 m [95% CI: 11-25] vs. 4 m [95% CI: 3-8] P = 0.0001). Macrocytosis and hypothyroidism were two significant predictors of PFS. The greatest difference in PFS among all patients was observed in patients with both macrocytosis and hypothyroidism (25 m), compared to the normocytic and euthyroid patients (5 m) (P < 0.0001). Sunitinib-related macrocytosis was associated with prolonged PFS, and concurrent development of hypothyroidism and macrocytosis further prolonged PFS. Increased MCV may have a role as a predictive biomarker for sunitinib. Prospective studies accounting for other known prognostic factors are needed to confirm this finding.

  9. Ipilimumab administered to metastatic melanoma patients who progressed after dendritic cell vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Boudewijns, Steve; Koornstra, Rutger H. T.; Westdorp, Harm; Schreibelt, Gerty; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Geukes Foppen, Marnix H.; Haanen, John B.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Figdor, Carl G.; Bol, Kalijn F.; Gerritsen, Winald R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Ipilimumab has proven to be effective in metastatic melanoma patients. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of ipilimumab in advanced melanoma patients who showed progressive disease upon experimental dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. Methods: Retrospective analysis of 48 stage IV melanoma patients treated with ipilimumab after progression upon DC vaccination earlier in their treatment. DC vaccination was given either as adjuvant treatment for stage III disease (n = 18) or for stage IV disease (n = 30). Ipilimumab (3 mg/kg) was administered every 3 weeks for up to 4 cycles. Results: Median time between progression upon DC vaccination and first gift of ipilimumab was 5.4 mo. Progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients that received ipilimumab after adjuvant DC vaccination, and patients that received DC vaccination for stage IV melanoma, were 35% and 7% at 1 y and 35% and 3% at 2 y, while the median PFS was 2.9 mo and 3.1 mo, respectively. Median overall survival of patients pre-treated with adjuvant DC vaccination for stage III melanoma was not reached versus 8.0 mo (95% CI, 5.2–10.9) in the group pre-treated with DC vaccination for stage IV disease (HR of death, 0.36; p = 0.017). Grade 3 immune-related adverse events occurred in 19% of patients and one death (2%) was related to ipilimumab. Conclusions: Clinical responses to ipilimumab were found in a considerable number of advanced melanoma patients with progression after adjuvant DC vaccination for stage III disease, while the effect was very limited in patients who showed progression after DC vaccination for stage IV disease. PMID:27622070

  10. Sunitinib therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma: recommendations for management of side effects

    PubMed Central

    Kollmannsberger, C; Soulieres, D; Wong, R; Scalera, A; Gaspo, R; Bjarnason, G

    2007-01-01

    Sunitinib, a new vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibitor, has demonstrated high activity in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and is now widely used for patients with metastatic disease. Although generally well tolerated and associated with a low incidence of common toxicity criteria grade 3 or 4 toxicities, sunitinib exhibits a distinct pattern of novel side effects that require monitoring and management. This article summarizes the most important side effects and proposes recommendations for their monitoring, prevention and treatment, based on the existing literature and on suggestions made by an expert group of Canadian oncologists. Fatigue, diarrhea, anorexia, oral changes, skin toxicity and hypertension seem to be the most clinically relevant toxicities of sunitinib. Fatigue may be partly related to the development of hypothyroidism during sunitinib therapy for which patients should be observed and, if necessary, treated. Hypertension can be treated with standard antihypertensive therapy and rarely requires treatment discontinuation. Neutropenia and thrombocytopenia usually do not require intervention, in particular no episodes of neutropenic fever have been reported to date. A decrease in left ventricular ejection fraction is a rare, but potentially life-threatening side effect. Because of its metabolism by cytochrome P450 3A4 a number of drugs can potentially interact with sunitinib. Clinical response and toxicity should be carefully observed when sunitinib is combined with either a cytochrome P450 3A4 inducer or inhibitor and doses adjusted as necessary. Knowledge about side effects, as well as the proactive assessment and consistent management of sunitinib-related side effects, is critical to ensure optimal benefit from sunitinib treatment. PMID:18542784

  11. Improvement in survival end points of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma through sequential targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Emiliano; Schmidinger, Manuela; Heng, Daniel Y C; Grünwald, Viktor; Escudier, Bernard

    2016-11-01

    Survival of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has improved since the advent of targeted therapy. Approved agents include the multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) sunitinib, sorafenib, axitinib, pazopanib, cabozantinib, and lenvatinib (approved in combination with everolimus), the anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors everolimus and temsirolimus, and the programmed death-1 (PD-1) targeted immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. The identification of predictive and prognostic factors of survival is increasing, and both clinical predictive factors and pathology-related prognostic factors are being evaluated. Serum-based biomarkers and certain histologic subtypes of RCC, as well as clinical factors such as dose intensity and the development of some class effect adverse events, have been identified as predictors of survival. Expression levels of microRNAs, expression of chemokine receptor 4, hypermethylation of certain genes, VEGF polymorphisms, and elevation of plasma fibrinogen or d-dimer have been shown to be prognostic indicators of survival. In the future, prognosis and treatment of patients with mRCC might be based on genomic classification, especially of the 4 most commonly mutated genes in RCC (VHL, PBRM1, BAP1, and SETD2). Median overall survival has improved for patients treated with a first-line targeted agent compared with survival of patients treated with first-line interferon-α, and results of clinical trials have shown a survival benefit of sequential treatment with targeted agents. Prognosis of patients with mRCC will likely improve with optimization and individualization of current sequential treatment with targeted agents.

  12. Efficacy and safety of sunitinib in elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hutson, T E; Bukowski, R M; Rini, B I; Gore, M E; Larkin, J M; Figlin, R A; Barrios, C H; Escudier, B; Lin, X; Fly, K; Martell, B; Matczak, E; Motzer, R J

    2014-01-01

    Background: We retrospectively analyzed sunitinib outcome as a function of age in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. Methods: Data were pooled from 1059 patients in six trials. Kaplan–Meier estimates of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared by log-rank test between patients aged <70 (n=857; 81%) and ⩾70 (n=202; 19%) years. Results: In first-line patients, median PFS was comparable in younger and older patients, 9.9 vs 11.0 months, respectively (HR, 0.89; 95% CI: 0.73–1.09; P=0.2629), as was median OS, 23.6 vs 25.6 months (HR, 0.93; 95% CI: 0.74–1.18; P=0.5442). Similarly, in cytokine-refractory patients, median PFS was 8.1 vs 8.4 months (HR, 0.79; 95% CI: 0.49–1.28; P=0.3350), while median OS was 20.2 vs 15.8 months (HR, 1.14; 95% CI: 0.73–1.79; P=0.5657). Some treatment-emergent adverse events were significantly less common in younger vs older patients, including fatigue (60% vs 69%), cough (20% vs 29%), peripheral edema (17% vs 27%), anemia (18% vs 25%), decreased appetite (13% vs 29%), and thrombocytopenia (16% vs 25% all P<0.05). Hand–foot syndrome was more common in younger patients (32% vs 24%). Conclusions: Advanced age should not be a deterrent to sunitinib therapy and elderly patients may achieve additional clinical benefit. PMID:24434434

  13. Immunochemotherapy with interleukin-2, interferon- α and 5-fluorouracil for progressive metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a multicenter phase II study

    PubMed Central

    Herpen, C M L van; Jansen, R L H; Kruit, W H J; Hoekman, K; Groenewegen, G; Osanto, S; Mulder, P H M De

    2000-01-01

    In patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma response rates of 7–26% have been achieved with immunotherapy. A high response rate of 48% in 35 patients has been reported for treatment with the combination of interferon-α (IFN-α), interleukin-2 (IL-2) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (Atzpodien et al (1993 a) Eur J Cancer29A: S6–8). We conducted a multicentre phase II study to confirm these results. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma patients were treated as outpatients with an 8-week treatment cycle. Recombinant human IL-2 20 MU m−2was administered subcutaneously (s.c.) three times a week (t.i.w) in weeks 1 and 4 and 5 MU m−2t.i.w. in weeks 2 and 3. Recombinant human IFN-α 2a 6 MU m−2was administered s.c. once in weeks 1 and 4 and t.i.w. in weeks 2 and 3, and 9 MU m−2t.i.w. in weeks 5–8. 5-FU (750 mg m−2) was given as a bolus injection intravenous once a week in weeks 5–8. The treatment cycle was repeated once in case of response or minor response. Fifty-two patients entered the study. All had undergone a nephrectomy and had progressive metastatic disease. The median WHO-performance status was 1, the median number of metastatic sites was 2 (range 1–5) and the median time between the diagnosis of the primary tumour and the start of treatment was 12.9 months (range 1–153). Among the 51 patients, including four patients with early progressive disease, who were evaluable for response, the response rate was 11.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.9–20.7%), with no complete responses. Median duration of response was 8.3 (range 3.8–22.4+) months. Median survival was 16.5 (range 1.8–30.5+) months. Grade 3/4 toxicity (WHO) occurred in 29/52 (55.8%) of the patients in cycle 1 and in 6/16 (37.5%) of the patients in cycle 2. It consisted mainly of anorexia, fatigue, nausea, fever and leucocytopenia. We cannot confirm the high response rate in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma treated with the combination of IFN-α, IL-2 and 5-FU, as described

  14. New 3D-Culture Approaches to Study Interactions of Bone Marrow Adipocytes with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Herroon, Mackenzie Katheryn; Diedrich, Jonathan Driscoll; Podgorski, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Adipocytes are a major component of the bone marrow that can critically affect metastatic progression in bone. Understanding how the marrow fat cells influence growth, behavior, and survival of tumor cells requires utilization of in vitro cell systems that can closely mimic the physiological microenvironment. Herein, we present two new three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to study adipocyte-tumor cell interactions in vitro. The first is a transwell-based system composed of the marrow-derived adipocytes in 3D collagen I gels and reconstituted basement membrane-overlayed prostate tumor cell spheroids. Tumor cells cultured under these 3D conditions are continuously exposed to adipocyte-derived factors, and their response can be evaluated by morphological and immunohistochemical analyses. We show via immunofluorescence analysis of metabolism-associated proteins that under 3D conditions tumor cells have significantly different metabolic response to adipocytes than tumor cells grown in 2D culture. We also demonstrate that this model allows for incorporation of other cell types, such as bone marrow macrophages, and utilization of dye-quenched collagen substrates for examination of proteolysis-driven responses to adipocyte- and macrophage-derived factors. Our second 3D culture system is designed to study tumor cell invasion toward the adipocytes and the consequent interaction between the two cell types. In this model, marrow adipocytes are separated from the fluorescently labeled tumor cells by a layer of collagen I. At designated time points, adipocytes are stained with BODIPY and confocal z-stacks are taken through the depth of the entire culture to determine the distance traveled between the two cell types over time. We demonstrate that this system can be utilized to study effects of candidate factors on tumor invasion toward the adipocytes. We also show that immunohistochemical analyses can be performed to evaluate the impact of direct interaction of prostate

  15. Metastatic signet ring cell carcinoma of unknown primary origin: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Taee, Ahmad; Almukhtar, Rawaa; Lai, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the increasingly sophisticated diagnostic workup, detailed investigations fail to reveal a primary site of origin for about 3–5% of metastatic tumors. The most commonly reported subtype in cancer of unknown primary origin is adenocarcinoma. Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare poorly differentiated aggressive subtype of adenocarcinoma that most commonly arise from the gastrointestinal tract. It usually presents late and is associated with poor prognosis. Treatment options remain limited to anecdotal reports. However, immunohistochemical studies can be useful in suggesting an origin and therefore may help guide investigations and treatment options. Here we present an unusual case of metastatic SRCC of unknown primary origin presenting as peritoneal carcinomatosis in a 73-year-old man. We also review the literature on metastatic SRCC of unknown primary origin and discuss the relevant findings. This work highlights the importance of collaboration between clinicians and pathologists as well as detailed histopathological, immunohistochemical, and molecular analyses which can help guide investigations and management options. PMID:27570777

  16. Development of Hemolytic Anemia in a Nivolumab-Treated Patient with Refractory Metastatic Squamous Cell Skin Cancer and Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, K.S.; Heine, A.; Weimann, T.; Kristiansen, G.; Brossart, P.

    2016-01-01

    Management of patients with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer, refractory to initial therapy with standard chemotherapy and radiation protocols, remains difficult with poor overall prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Recently, promising response rates with nivolumab, a programmed death receptor-1-blocking antibody, in squamous cancer of the head and neck have been demonstrated. Considering the similar histological patterns of squamous cell cancer of the skin and squamous cell cancer of the head and neck, we assumed that nivolumab could also be effective in our patients with refractory metastatic squamous cell cancer of the skin. So far, there have been no clinical data on the therapeutic efficacy of nivolumab in squamous cell skin cancer. We here present a case of a patient with metastatic squamous cell skin cancer refractory to previous therapies, who showed a good response to nivolumab over a period of 5 months, but developed a serious hemolytic crisis under nivolumab treatment after eight applications. PMID:27462240

  17. Deep-proteome mapping of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells: From oncogenic addiction to druggable targets

    PubMed Central

    Litou, Zoi I.; Konstandi, Ourania A.; Giannopoulou, Aikaterini F.; Anastasiadou, Ema; Voutsinas, Gerassimos E.; Tsangaris, George Th.; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.

    2017-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is a malignant tumor of skin melanocytes that are pigment-producing cells located in the basal layer (stratum basale) of epidermis. Accumulation of genetic mutations within their oncogenes or tumor-suppressor genes compels melanocytes to aberrant proliferation and spread to distant organs of the body, thereby resulting in severe and/or lethal malignancy. Metastatic melanoma’s heavy mutational load, molecular heterogeneity and resistance to therapy necessitate the development of novel biomarkers and drug-based protocols that target key proteins involved in perpetuation of the disease. To this direction, we have herein employed a nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-MS/MS) proteomics technology to profile the deep-proteome landscape of WM-266-4 human metastatic melanoma cells. Our advanced melanoma-specific catalogue proved to contain 6,681 unique proteins, which likely constitute the hitherto largest single cell-line-derived proteomic collection of the disease. Through engagement of UNIPROT, DAVID, KEGG, PANTHER, INTACT, CYTOSCAPE, dbEMT and GAD bioinformatics resources, WM-266-4 melanoma proteins were categorized according to their sub-cellular compartmentalization, function and tumorigenicity, and successfully reassembled in molecular networks and interactomes. The obtained data dictate the presence of plastically inter-converted sub-populations of non-cancer and cancer stem cells, and also indicate the oncoproteomic resemblance of melanoma to glioma and lung cancer. Intriguingly, WM-266-4 cells seem to be subjected to both epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) and mesenchymal-to-epithelial (MET) programs, with 1433G and ADT3 proteins being identified in the EMT/MET molecular interface. Oncogenic addiction of WM-266-4 cells to autocrine/paracrine signaling of IL17-, DLL3-, FGF(2/13)- and OSTP-dependent sub-routines suggests their critical contribution to the metastatic melanoma chemotherapeutic refractoriness. Interestingly, the

  18. Nutritional screening is strongly associated with overall survival in patients treated with targeted agents for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Weijie; Zhang, Guiming; Sun, Lijiang; Ma, Qi; Cheng, Yue; Zhang, Hailiang; Shi, Guohai; Zhu, Yao; Ye, Dingwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Although commonly observed, malnutrition is poorly characterized and frequently underdiagnosed in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The ability of nutritional screening tools to predict overall survival (OS) in patients with RCC has not been adequately validated. The objective of this study was to investigate the performance of nutritional screening tools and their additional prognostic value in patients with metastatic RCC treated with targeted therapies. Methods Patients were prospectively recruited from three tertiary hospitals between 2009 and 2013. Nutritional status was evaluated using the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) and the Mini Nutritional Assessment–Short Form (MNA–SF). Their OS and early grade 3/4 adverse events were recorded as outcomes of interest, and their associations with nutritional status were assessed using Cox regression and logistic regression, respectively. The incremental value in prognostication was evaluated using concordance index and decision curve analyses. Results Of the 300 enrolled patients, 95 (31.7%) and 64 (21.3%) were classified as being at risk of malnutrition according to the GNRI and MNA–SF, respectively. Both GNRI and MNA–SF were independent predictors of OS in multivariate analyses and provided significant added benefit to Heng risk classification. Compared with the MNA–SF, the GNRI contributed a higher increment to the concordance index (0.041 vs. 0.016). Nutritional screening, however, was not associated with early grade 3/4 adverse events in multivariate analyses. Further investigations are needed using more comprehensive and accurate assessment tools. Conclusions This prospective study confirmed the importance of nutritional screening tools in survival prognostication in patients with metastatic RCC. The standardized and objective measurements would allow clinicians to identify metastatic RCC patients at risk of poor survival outcomes. Individualized nutritional

  19. Effects of Combined Treatment With Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Patients With Refractory Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ally, Mina S.; Ransohoff, Katherine; Sarin, Kavita; Atwood, Scott X.; Rezaee, Melika; Bailey-Healy, Irene; Kim, Jynho; Beachy, Philip A.; Chang, Anne Lynn S.; Oro, Anthony; Tang, Jean Y.; Colevas, A. Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Tumor resistance is an emerging problem for Smoothened (SMO) inhibitor–treated metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Arsenic trioxide and itraconazole antagonize the hedgehog (HH) pathway at sites distinct from those treated by SMO inhibitors. OBJECTIVE To determine whether administration of intravenous arsenic trioxide and oral itraconazole in patients with metastatic BCC is associated with a reduction in GLI1 messenger RNA expression in tumor and/or normal skin biopsy samples. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Five men with metastatic BCC who experienced relapse after SMO inhibitor treatment underwent intravenous arsenic trioxide treatment for 5 days, every 28 days, and oral itraconazole treatment on days 6 to 28. Data were collected from April 10 to November 14, 2013. Follow-up was completed on October 3, 2015, and data were analyzed from June 5 to October 6, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was the change in messenger RNA levels of the GLI family zinc finger 1 (GLI1) gene (HH-pathway target gene) in biopsy specimens of normal skin or BCC before and after treatment. Secondary objectives were evaluation of tumor response and tolerability. RESULTS Of the 5 patients (mean [SD] age, 52 [9] years; age range, 43-62 years), 3 completed 3 cycles of treatment and 2 discontinued treatment early owing to disease progression or adverse events. Adverse effects included grade 2 transaminitis and grade 4 leukopenia with a grade 3 infection. Overall, arsenic trioxide and itraconazole reduced GLI1 messenger RNA levels by 75% from baseline (P < .001). The best overall response after 3 treatment cycles was stable disease in 3 patients. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Targeting the HH pathway with sequential arsenic trioxide and itraconazole treatment is a feasible treatment for metastatic BCC. Although some patients experienced stable disease for 3 months, none had tumor shrinkage, which may be owing to transient GLI1 suppression with sequential dosing

  20. In Vivo Efficacy of Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell-Derived NK Cells in the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Veluchamy, John P; Lopez-Lastra, Silvia; Spanholtz, Jan; Bohme, Fenna; Kok, Nina; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Verheul, Henk M W; Di Santo, James P; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) act by inhibiting EGFR downstream signaling and by eliciting a natural killer (NK) cell-mediated antitumor response. The IgG1 mAb cetuximab has been used for treatment of RAS(wt) metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, showing limited efficacy. In the present study, we address the potential of adoptive NK cell therapy to overcome these limitations investigating two allogeneic NK cell products, i.e., allogeneic activated peripheral blood NK cells (A-PBNK) and umbilical cord blood stem cell-derived NK cells (UCB-NK). While cetuximab monotherapy was not effective against EGFR(-) RAS(wt), EGFR(+) RAS(mut), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) cells, A-PBNK were able to initiate lysis of EGFR(+) colon cancer cells irrespective of RAS or BRAF status. Cytotoxic effects of A-PBNK (but not UCB-NK) were further potentiated significantly by coating EGFR(+) colon cancer cells with cetuximab. Of note, a significantly higher cytotoxicity was induced by UCB-NK in EGFR(-)RAS(wt) (42 ± 8 versus 67 ± 7%), EGFR(+) RAS(mut) (20 ± 2 versus 37 ± 6%), and EGFR(+) BRAF(mut) (23 ± 3 versus 43 ± 7%) colon cancer cells compared to A-PBNK and equaled the cytotoxic efficacy of the combination of A-PBNK and cetuximab. The antitumor efficacy of UCB-NK cells against cetuximab-resistant human EGFR(+) RAS(mut) colon cancer cells was further confirmed in an in vivo preclinical mouse model where UCB-NK showed enhanced antitumor cytotoxicity against colon cancer independent of EGFR and RAS status. As UCB-NK have been proven safe in a recently conducted phase I clinical trial in acute myeloid leukemia, a fast translation into clinical proof of concept for mCRC could be considered.

  1. Stromal-cell and cancer-cell exosomes leading the metastatic exodus for the promised niche.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Robert M

    2013-06-18

    Exosomes are thought to play an important role in metastasis. Luga and colleagues have described the production of exosomes by stromal cells such as cancer-associated fibroblasts that are taken up by breast cancer cells and are then loaded with Wnt 11, which is associated with stimulation of the invasiveness and metastasis of the breast cancer cells. Previous studies have shown that exosomes produced by breast cancer cells are taken up by stromal fibroblasts and other stromal cells, suggesting that exosomes are agents of cross-talk between cancer and stromal cells to stimulate metastasis. Imaging of exosomes by labeling with fluorescent proteins will enlighten the process by which exosomes enhance metastasis, including premetastatic niche formation.

  2. The mannose receptor LY75 (DEC205/CD205) modulates cellular phenotype and metastatic potential of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Faddaoui, Adnen; Bachvarova, Magdalena; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Macdonald, Elizabeth; Vanderhyden, Barbara; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) dissemination is still poorly understood. Previously, we identified the mannose receptor LY75 gene as hypomethylated in high-grade (HG) serous EOC tumors, compared to normal ovarian tissues. LY75 represents endocytic receptor expressed on dendritic cells and so far, has been primarily studied for its role in antigen processing and presentation. Here we demonstrate that LY75 is overexpressed in advanced EOC and that LY75 suppression induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in EOC cell lines with mesenchymal morphology (SKOV3 and TOV112), accompanied by reduction of their migratory and invasive capacity in vitro and enhanced tumor cell colonization and metastatic growth in vivo. LY75 knockdown in SKOV3 cells also resulted in predominant upregulation of functional pathways implicated in cell proliferation and metabolism, while pathways associated with cell signaling and adhesion, complement activation and immune response were mostly suppressed. Moreover, LY75 suppression had an opposite effect on EOC cell lines with epithelial phenotype (A2780s and OV2008), by directing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with reduced capacity for in vivo EOC cell colonization, as similar/identical signaling pathways were reversely regulated, when compared to mesenchymal LY75 knockdown EOC cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a gene displaying such pleiotropic effects in sustaining the cellular phenotype of EOC cells and points to novel functions of this receptor in modulating EOC dissemination. Our data also support previous findings regarding the superior capacity of epithelial cancer cells in metastatic colonization of distant sites, compared to cancer cells with mesenchymal-like morphology. PMID:26871602

  3. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration diagnosis of Merkel cell carcinoma metastatic to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Jane; Adeniran, Adebowale J; Cai, Guoping; Theoharis, Constantine G A; Ustun, Berrin; Beckman, Danita; Aslanian, Harry R; Harigopal, Malini

    2014-03-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare and highly aggressive primary neuroendocrine carcinoma of the skin with a high propensity for local, regional, and distant spread. Distant metastasis of MCC to the pancreas is uncommonly seen and may impose a diagnostic challenge cytologically. Here we report a case of MCC with pancreatic metastasis, which was diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA). The aspirates revealed both single and clustered epithelial cells with scant cytoplasm and round nuclei with stippled chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. Immunocytochemically, the tumor cells were positive for CK20, synaptophysin, CD56, and CD117. The neoplastic cells were also identified by flow cytometry as non-hematopoietic cells which were positive for CD56 and negative for CD45. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed by EUS-FNA. There have been several reports of MCC metastatic to the pancreas diagnosed only at the time of surgical resection. However, a preoperative diagnosis allows for appropriate management while sparing a patient the morbidity of unnecessary procedures.

  4. Molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells resemble the liver metastasis more closely than the primary tumor in metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M.; Mostert, Bianca; Lalmahomed, Zarina; Bolt-de Vries, Joan B.; van Galen, Anne; Smid, Marcel; Kraan, Jaco; Van, Mai; de Weerd, Vanja; Ramírez-Moreno, Raquel; Biermann, Katharina; Verhoef, Cornelis; Grünhagen, Dirk J.; IJzermans, Jan N.M.; Gratama, Jan W.; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Background CTCs are a promising alternative for metastatic tissue biopsies for use in precision medicine approaches. We investigated to what extent the molecular characteristics of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) resemble the liver metastasis and/or the primary tumor from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Results The CTC profiles were concordant with the liver metastasis in 17/23 patients (74%) and with the primary tumor in 13 patients (57%). The CTCs better resembled the liver metastasis in 13 patients (57%), and the primary tumor in five patients (22%). The strength of the correlations was not associated with clinical parameters. Nine genes (CDH1, CDH17, CDX1, CEACAM5, FABP1, FCGBP, IGFBP3, IGFBP4, and MAPT) displayed significant differential expressions, all of which were downregulated, in CTCs compared to the tissues in the 23 patients. Patients and Methods Patients were retrospectively selected from a prospective study. Using the CellSearch System, CTCs were enumerated and isolated just prior to liver metastasectomy. A panel of 25 CTC-specific genes was measured by RT-qPCR in matching CTCs, primary tumors, and liver metastases. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated and considered as continuous variables with r=1 representing absolute concordance and r= -1 representing absolute discordance. A cut-off of r>0.1 was applied in order to consider profiles to be concordant. Conclusions In the majority of the patients, CTCs reflected the molecular characteristics of metastatic cells better than the primary tumors. Genes involved in cell adhesion and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition were downregulated in the CTCs. Our results support the use of CTC characterization as a liquid biopsy for precision medicine. PMID:27340863

  5. A Phase II Study of Intermittent Sunitinib in Previously Untreated Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ornstein, Moshe C; Wood, Laura S; Elson, Paul; Allman, Kimberly D; Beach, Jennifer; Martin, Allison; Zanick, Beth R; Grivas, Petros; Gilligan, Tim; Garcia, Jorge A; Rini, Brian I

    2017-01-23

    Purpose Sunitinib is a standard initial therapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC), but chronic dosing requires balancing toxicity with clinical benefit. The feasibility and clinical outcome with intermittent sunitinib dosing in patients with mRCC was explored. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naïve, clear cell mRCC were treated with four cycles of sunitinib (50 mg once per day, 4 weeks of receiving treatment followed by 2 weeks of no treatment). Patients with a ≥ 10% reduction in tumor burden (TB) after four cycles had sunitinib held, with restaging scans performed every two cycles. Sunitinib was reinitiated for two cycles in those patients with an increase in TB by ≥ 10%, and again held with ≥ 10% TB reduction. This intermittent sunitinib dosing continued until Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors-defined disease progression while receiving sunitinib, or unacceptable toxicity occurred. The primary objective was feasibility, defined as the proportion of eligible patients who underwent intermittent therapy. Results Of 37 patients enrolled, 20 were eligible for intermittent therapy and all patients (100%) entered the intermittent phase. Patients were not eligible for intermittent sunitinib because of progressive disease (n = 13), toxicity (n = 1), or consent withdrawal (n = 3) before the end of cycle 4. The objective response rate was 46% after the first four cycles of therapy. The median increase in TB during the periods off sunitinib was 1.6 cm (range, -2.9 to 3.4 cm) compared with the TB immediately before stopping sunitinib. Most patients exhibited a stable sawtooth pattern of TB reduction while receiving sunitinib and TB increase while not receiving sunitinib. Median progression-free survival to date is 22.4 months (95% CI, 5.4 to 37.6 months) and median overall survival is 34.8 months (95% CI, 14.8 months to not applicable). Conclusion Periodic extended sunitinib treatment breaks are feasible and clinical efficacy does not

  6. High-dose Chemotherapy and the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer: Selecting the Regimen and the Source of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fields; Agaliotis; Janssen; Perkins; Ballester; Hiemenz; Zorsky; Elfenbein

    1994-05-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell rescue has been associated with an increased overall response rate and improved progression-free survival for patients with metastatic breast cancer when compared retrospectively to standard therapy. The optimal source of stem cells - peripheral blood or autologous bone marrow - has not been determined. We present results from two high-dose regimens - ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) or mitoxantrone and thiotepa (MITT) followed by autologous stem cell rescue - and analyze the outcomes for patients based on the regimen used and the source of stem cells. Disease responsiveness at the time of high-dose therapy is the most important factor for determining outcome. The source of stem cells did not affect progression-free survival for either group.

  7. Caveolin-1-Enhanced Motility and Focal Adhesion Turnover Require Tyrosine-14 but Not Accumulation to the Rear in Metastatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Rina J.; Lobos, Lorena; Díaz, María I.; Díaz, Natalia; Härtel, Steffen; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F. G.

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is known to promote cell migration, and increased caveolin-1 expression is associated with tumor progression and metastasis. In fibroblasts, caveolin-1 polarization and phosphorylation of tyrosine-14 are essential to promote migration. However, the role of caveolin-1 in migration of metastatic cells remains poorly defined. Here, caveolin-1 participation in metastatic cell migration was evaluated by shRNA targeting of endogenous caveolin-1 in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells and ectopic expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells. Depletion of caveolin-1 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduced, while expression in B16-F10 cells promoted migration, polarization and focal adhesion turnover in a sequence of events that involved phosphorylation of tyrosine-14 and Rac-1 activation. In B16-F10 cells, expression of a non-phosphorylatable tyrosine-14 to phenylalanine mutant failed to recapitulate the effects observed with wild-type caveolin-1. Alternatively, treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2 reduced caveolin-1 phosphorylation on tyrosine-14 and cell migration. Surprisingly, unlike for fibroblasts, caveolin-1 polarization and re-localization to the trailing edge were not observed in migrating metastatic cells. Thus, expression and phosphorylation, but not polarization of caveolin-1 favor the highly mobile phenotype of metastatic cells. PMID:22505999

  8. Cytology diagnosis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma, synchronous to pancreas, and metachronous to thyroid and contralateral adrenal: Report of a case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Aqiba; Tiscornia-Wasserman, Patricia G

    2017-02-01

    Renal cell carcinoma metastases to pancreas, thyroid, and contralateral adrenal gland are decidedly uncommon. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is the most frequent subtype. Cytology diagnosis may be challenging. A 74-year-old male with remote history of vocal cord malignancy and hypertension presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography (CT) revealed 8.4 cm left renal mass highly suspicious for renal cell carcinoma, a 1.8 cm mass within vessels near left adrenal and a 2.5 cm mass in pancreatic tail. Right pulmonary middle lobe showed two small nodules. Metastatic CCRCC was diagnosed on preoperative transgastric, endoscopic ultrasound guided fine-needle aspiration cytology of pancreatic tail mass. Left radical nephrectomy and distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy confirmed CCRCC (pT3bNxM1), with metastases in adrenal and pancreatic tail. The 3p deletion identification in pancreatic tumor suggested CCRCC origin. Follow-up positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT) scan revealed left thyroid lower pole mass. Thyroid ultrasound showed three clustered 6 mm nodules in left mid pole. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (US-FNA) biopsies, 4-month post-nephrectomy, were consistent with metastatic renal cell carcinoma in lower, and atypia of undetermined significance in mid poles respectively. Left lobectomy and isthmus and pyramidal lobe resections confirmed metastatic renal cell carcinoma. One year post-radical nephrectomy, contralateral adrenal lesion noted on PET-CT was interpreted as metastatic CCRCC on CT-guided core biopsy with touch imprints. Rapid on-site evaluation was implemented, and immunoprofile typical of CCRCC substantiated cytomorphology at all three sites. Previously reported cases of renal cell carcinoma metastases to organs as in the described case are reviewed as well. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:161-167. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The CT20 peptide causes detachment and death of metastatic breast cancer cells by promoting mitochondrial aggregation and cytoskeletal disruption.

    PubMed

    Lee, M W; Bassiouni, R; Sparrow, N A; Iketani, A; Boohaker, R J; Moskowitz, C; Vishnubhotla, P; Khaled, A S; Oyer, J; Copik, A; Fernandez-Valle, C; Perez, J M; Khaled, A R

    2014-05-22

    Metastasis accounts for most deaths from breast cancer, driving the need for new therapeutics that can impede disease progression. Rationally designed peptides that take advantage of cancer-specific differences in cellular physiology are an emerging technology that offer promise as a treatment for metastatic breast cancer. We developed CT20p, a hydrophobic peptide based on the C terminus of Bax that exhibits similarities with antimicrobial peptides, and previously reported that CT20p has unique cytotoxic actions independent of full-length Bax. In this study, we identified the intracellular actions of CT20p which precede cancer cell-specific detachment and death. Previously, we found that CT20p migrated in the heavy membrane fractions of cancer cell lysates. Here, using MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, we demonstrated that CT20p localizes to the mitochondria, leading to fusion-like aggregation and mitochondrial membrane hyperpolarization. As a result, the distribution and movement of mitochondria in CT20p-treated MDA-MB-231 cells was markedly impaired, particularly in cell protrusions. In contrast, CT20p did not associate with the mitochondria of normal breast epithelial MCF-10A cells, causing little change in the mitochondrial membrane potential, morphology or localization. In MDA-MB-231 cells, CT20p triggered cell detachment that was preceded by decreased levels of α5β1 integrins and reduced F-actin polymerization. Using folate-targeted nanoparticles to encapsulate and deliver CT20p to murine tumors, we achieved significant tumor regression within days of peptide treatment. These results suggest that CT20p has application in the treatment of metastatic disease as a cancer-specific therapeutic peptide that perturbs mitochondrial morphology and movement ultimately culminating in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, cell detachment, and loss of cell viability.

  10. Crosstalk from non-cancerous mitochondria can inhibit tumor properties of metastatic cells by suppressing oncogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Ma, Yewei; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Zhang, Yiqun; Yotnda, Patricia; Creighton, Chad J; Chan, Wai-Yee; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nucleus cross talks and mitochondrial retrograde regulation can play a significant role in cellular properties. Transmitochondrial cybrid systems (cybrids) are an excellent tool to study specific effects of altered mitochondria under a defined nuclear background. The majority of the studies using the cybrid model focused on the significance of specific mitochondrial DNA variations in mitochondrial function or tumor properties. However, most of these variants are benign polymorphisms without known functional significance. From an objective of rectifying mitochondrial defects in cancer cells and to establish mitochondria as a potential anticancer drug target, understanding the role of functional mitochondria in reversing oncogenic properties under a cancer nuclear background is very important. Here we analyzed the potential reversal of oncogenic properties of a highly metastatic cell line with the introduction of non-cancerous mitochondria. Cybrids were established by fusing the mitochondria DNA depleted 143B TK- ρ0 cells from an aggressive osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria from benign breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, moderately metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and 143B cells. In spite of the uniform cancerous nuclear background, as observed with the mitochondria donor cells, cybrids with benign mitochondria showed high mitochondrial functional properties including increased ATP synthesis, oxygen consumption and respiratory chain activities compared to cybrids with cancerous mitochondria. Interestingly, benign mitochondria could reverse different oncogenic characteristics of 143B TK(-) cell including cell proliferation, viability under hypoxic condition, anti-apoptotic properties, resistance to anti-cancer drug, invasion, and colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumor growth in nude mice. Microarray analysis suggested that several oncogenic pathways observed in cybrids with cancer mitochondria are inhibited in cybrids with

  11. Sarcosine Up-Regulates Expression of Genes Involved in Cell Cycle Progression of Metastatic Models of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heger, Zbynek; Merlos Rodrigo, Miguel Angel; Michalek, Petr; Polanska, Hana; Masarik, Michal; Vit, Vitezslav; Plevova, Mariana; Pacik, Dalibor; Eckschlager, Tomas; Stiborova, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The effects of sarcosine on the processes driving prostate cancer (PCa) development remain still unclear. Herein, we show that a supplementation of metastatic PCa cells (androgen independent PC-3 and androgen dependent LNCaP) with sarcosine stimulates cells proliferation in vitro. Similar stimulatory effects were observed also in PCa murine xenografts, in which sarcosine treatment induced a tumor growth and significantly reduced weight of treated mice (p < 0.05). Determination of sarcosine metabolism-related amino acids and enzymes within tumor mass revealed significantly increased glycine, serine and sarcosine concentrations after treatment accompanied with the increased amount of sarcosine dehydrogenase. In both tumor types, dimethylglycine and glycine-N-methyltransferase were affected slightly, only. To identify the effects of sarcosine treatment on the expression of genes involved in any aspect of cancer development, we further investigated expression profiles of excised tumors using cDNA electrochemical microarray followed by validation using the semi-quantitative PCR. We found 25 differentially expressed genes in PC-3, 32 in LNCaP tumors and 18 overlapping genes. Bioinformatical processing revealed strong sarcosine-related induction of genes involved particularly in a cell cycle progression. Our exploratory study demonstrates that sarcosine stimulates PCa metastatic cells irrespectively of androgen dependence. Overall, the obtained data provides valuable information towards understanding the role of sarcosine in PCa progression and adds another piece of puzzle into a picture of sarcosine oncometabolic potential. PMID:27824899

  12. Yes-mediated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase at tyrosine 861 increases metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chatterji, Tanushree; Varkaris, Andreas S; Parikh, Nila U; Song, Jian H; Cheng, Chien-Jui; Schweppe, Rebecca E; Alexander, Stephanie; Davis, John W; Troncoso, Patricia; Friedl, Peter; Kuang, Jian; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Gallick, Gary E

    2015-04-30

    To study the role of FAK signaling complexes in promoting metastatic properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells, we selected stable, highly migratory variants, termed PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3, from two well-characterized PCa cell lines, PC3 and DU145. These variants were not only increased migration and invasion in vitro, but were also more metastatic to lymph nodes following intraprostatic injection into nude mice. Both PC3 Mig-3 and DU145 Mig-3 were specifically increased in phosphorylation of FAK Y861. We therefore examined potential alterations in Src family kinases responsible for FAK phosphorylation and determined only Yes expression was increased. Overexpression of Yes in PC3 parental cells and src-/-fyn-/-yes-/- fibroblasts selectively increased FAK Y861 phosphorylation, and increased migration. Knockdown of Yes in PC3 Mig-3 cells decreased migration and decreased lymph node metastasis following orthotopic implantation of into nude mice. In human specimens, Yes expression was increased in lymph node metastases relative to paired primary tumors from the same patient, and increased pFAK Y861 expression in lymph node metastases correlated with poor prognosis. These results demonstrate a unique role for Yes in phosphorylation of FAK and in promoting PCa metastasis. Therefore, phosphorylated FAK Y861 and increased Yes expression may be predictive markers for PCa metastasis.

  13. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Head and Neck Cancer or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer; Insular Thyroid Cancer; Metastatic Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Parathyroid Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Thyroid Cancer; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Papillary Thyroid Cancer; Stage III Salivary Gland Cancer; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Stage IVA Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IVA Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Follicular Thyroid Cancer; Stage IVA Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IVA Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus

  14. Transcriptional silencing of N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in metastatic colon cancer cell line SW620.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Chen, Hong

    2011-02-01

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) plays vital roles in tumor metastasis suppression and is frequently silenced in metastatic colon cancers. NDRG1 is silenced in a highly metastatic colon cancer cell line SW620. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential mechanisms involved in silencing of the NDRG1 gene. SW480 and SW620 are two colon cancer cell lines established from the same patient with different metastatic potentials, making them an ideal model for investigation of metastatic mechanisms. Knockdown of NDRG1 in SW480 to a level that is similar to that in SW620 also modulated cell cycle and proliferation in SW480 towards the status of the highly metastatic SW620. Epigenetic mechanisms of the transcriptional control of NDRG1 were investigated. The silencing of NDRG1 in SW620 was not due to promoter hyper-methylation as bisulfite sequencing of the NDRG1 promoter showed minimal DNA methylation in both cell lines. On the other hand, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed a significantly higher level of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) association with the NDRG1 promoter in SW480 compared to SW620, in agreement with its gene expression level. The low Pol II binding at the NDRG1 promoter in SW620 was associated with gene-wide decrease in histone H4 acetylation and increase in histone H3 serine 10 phosphorylation. Meanwhile, the NDRG1 coding region showed much higher histone H3 lysine 4 methylation in SW480. In conclusion we observed unique histone modifications in two colon cancer cell lines with different metastatic potentials, indicating possible mechanisms for the down-regulation of NDRG1 in metastatic SW620.

  15. Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    post-injection. It generally takes around 30- 60 days for MDA-MB-231 model to form brain metastasis in Rag 1 -/- mice. We have successfully finished...1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0021 TITLE: Targeting Neuronal-like Metabolism of Metastatic Tumor Cells as a Novel Therapy for Breast Cancer Brain ...Cancer Brain Metastasis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Siyuan Zhang 5d. PROJECT

  16. Quantitative proteomics of fractionated membrane and lumen exosome proteins from isogenic metastatic and nonmetastatic bladder cancer cells reveal differential expression of EMT factors.

    PubMed

    Jeppesen, Dennis Kjølhede; Nawrocki, Arkadiusz; Jensen, Steffen Grann; Thorsen, Kasper; Whitehead, Bradley; Howard, Kenneth A; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Larsen, Martin R; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe

    2014-03-01

    Cancer cells secrete soluble factors and various extracellular vesicles, including exosomes, into their tissue microenvironment. The secretion of exosomes is speculated to facilitate local invasion and metastatic spread. Here, we used an in vivo metastasis model of human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 without metastatic capacity and its two isogenic derivate cell lines SLT4 and FL3, which form metastases in the lungs and liver of mice, respectively. Cultivation in CLAD1000 bioreactors rather than conventional culture flasks resulted in a 13- to 16-fold increased exosome yield and facilitated quantitative proteomics of fractionated exosomes. Exosomes from T24, SLT4, and FL3 cells were partitioned into membrane and luminal fractions and changes in protein abundance related to the gain of metastatic capacity were identified by quantitative iTRAQ proteomics. We identified several proteins linked to epithelial-mesenchymal transition, including increased abundance of vimentin and hepatoma-derived growth factor in the membrane, and casein kinase II α and annexin A2 in the lumen of exosomes, respectively, from metastatic cells. The change in exosome protein abundance correlated little, although significant for FL3 versus T24, with changes in cellular mRNA expression. Our proteomic approach may help identification of proteins in the membrane and lumen of exosomes potentially involved in the metastatic process.

  17. Depth of remission is a prognostic factor for survival in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Grünwald, Viktor; McKay, Rana R.; Krajewski, Katherine M.; Kalanovic, Daniel; Lin, Xun; Perkins, Julia J.; Simantov, Ronit; Choueiri, Toni K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Response remains an important endpoint in clinical cancer trials. However, the prognostic utility of best tumor response in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) remains vague. Objective To define the prognostic relevance of the depth of remission in mRCC Design, setting, and participants Pooled data of 2,749 patients from phase II and III clinical trials of the Pfizer data-base in mRCC was analyzed. Tumor-shrinkage was categorized by fractions of best percent change in the sum of the largest diameter of target lesions. Outcome was computed by Kaplan-Meier curves and correlation was assessed by Cox regression, including a 6-month landmark. Intervention Sunitinib, sorafenib, axitinib, temsirolimus, temsirolimus and/or IFN-α. Outcome Measurements and Statistical Analysis Categorized tumor-shrinkage, overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS). Results and limitations Major tumor shrinkage of 60% or more occurred in about 10% of patients and was associated with a median overall survival (OS) of 54.5 months. With depth of remission, OS expectations declined steadily (26.4, 16.6, 10.4, and 7.3 months). The association was maintained when stratified by type of therapy, line of therapy, and performance status. The 6-month landmark Cox proportional regression analyses confirmed the prognostic relevance of major tumor shrinkage (HR 0.29; CI 95% 0.22–0.39; p<0.001). The major limitation of our study is the variability of imaging intervals among studies. Conclusions This is the first and largest analysis of best tumor response in mRCC. We demonstrate that depth of remission is an independent prognostic factor in mRCC. Patient summary It remains unknown whether tumor shrinkage during therapy is needed to achieve clinical activity in mRCC. Our analysis shows that the magnitude of tumor shrinkage correlates with a better survival in patients. This observation may be used as a clinical research tool in future trials. Trial registration NCT00054886, NCT

  18. Nivolumab versus Cabozantinib: Comparing Overall Survival in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Witold; Karcher, Helene

    2016-01-01

    Renal-cell carcinoma (RCC) affects over 330,000 new patients every year, of whom 1/3 present with metastatic RCC (mRCC) at diagnosis. Most mRCC patients treated with a first-line agent relapse within 1 year and need second-line therapy. The present study aims to compare overall survival (OS) between nivolumab and cabozantinib from two recent pivotal studies comparing, respectively, each one of the two emerging treatments against everolimus in patients who relapse following first-line treatment. Comparison is traditionally carried out using the Bucher method, which assumes proportional hazard. Since OS curves intersected in one of the pivotal studies, models not assuming proportional hazards were also considered to refine the comparison. Four Bayesian parametric survival network meta-analysis models were implemented on overall survival (OS) data digitized from the Kaplan-Meier curves reported in the studies. Three models allowing hazard ratios (HR) to vary over time were assessed against a fixed-HR model. The Bucher method favored cabozantinib, with a fixed HR for OS vs. nivolumab of 1.09 (95% confidence interval: [0.77, 1.54]). However, all models with time-varying HR showed better fits than the fixed-HR model. The log-logistic model fitted the data best, exhibiting a HR for OS initially favoring cabozantinib, the trend inverting to favor nivolumab after month 5 (95% credible interval <1 from 10 months). The initial probability of cabozantinib conferring superior OS was 54%, falling to 41.5% by month 24. Numerical differences in study-adjusted OS estimates between the two treatments remained small. This study evidences that HR for OS of nivolumab vs. cabozantinib varies over time, favoring cabozantinib in the first months of treatment but nivolumab afterwards, a possible indication that patients with poor prognosis benefit more from cabozantinib in terms of survival, nivolumab benefiting patients with better prognosis. More evidence, including real

  19. Metastatic Primary Signet Ring Cell Carcinoma of Rectum: A Case Report of 10-Year-old Male Child

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kumkum; Singh, Amit; Bhutra, Shyam; Pachori, Geeta; Jangir, Mahesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Signet ring cell carcinomas of the colon and rectum are well documented in the adult population, but the incidence is very low in the paediatric population. Signet ring cell carcinoma has more malignant potential, mostly present as advanced stage and carries very poor prognosis. We are describing a 10-year-old male patient who presented with acute intestinal obstruction; radiology revealed large bowel obstruction and was diagnosed metastatic primary signet ring cell carcinoma of rectum on biopsy. We have discussed the diagnostic work-up and the management of this rare entity. Due to the high mortality that can be caused by a delay in making the correct diagnosis, signet ring cell carcinoma of colorectum represents a special diagnostic and surgical challenge. PMID:24701526

  20. Involvement of the mRNA binding protein CRD-BP in the regulation of metastatic melanoma cell proliferation and invasion by hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Craig, Evisabel A; Weber, Jonathan D; Spiegelman, Vladimir S

    2012-12-15

    We have previously shown that the mRNA binding protein CRD-BP is overexpressed in human melanomas, where it promotes cell survival and resistance to chemotherapy. The present study investigates the role of hypoxia, a common characteristic of the tumor microenvironment, in the regulation of CRD-BP expression and melanoma cell responses. We found that hypoxia increases CRD-BP levels in metastatic melanoma cell lines but not in melanocytes or primary melanoma cells. Hypoxic stimulation transcriptionally regulates CRD-BP by facilitating the acetylation of histones within the CRD-BP gene and by modulating the extent of HIF1α binding to the CRD-BP promoter. Hypoxia significantly enhances the proliferative and invasive potential of metastatic melanoma cells but not that of normal or primary melanoma cells. Furthermore, inhibition of CRD-BP impairs the ability of metastatic cells to proliferate and invade in response to hypoxia. These findings identify CRD-BP as a novel effector of hypoxic responses that is relevant for the selection of metastatic cells. This work also describes a previously unknown role for CRD-BP in the regulation of melanoma cell invasion and highlights the importance of the hypoxic microenvironment in determining cell fate.

  1. Intrathecal Methotrexate and Craniospinal Radiotherapy Can Be an Effective Treatment of Carcinomatous Meningitis in Patients with Breast Cancer: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Magdalena; Addeo, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer occurs as a complication in up to 5% of all cases. It is a very devastating diagnosis, with a median patient survival of about 3 months. Treatment is very controversial, and different modalities of treatment have been used but none of them show significant benefit for overall survival. Case Reports We report 2 cases of carcinomatous meningitis in breast cancer patients. They received a similar treatment of a combination of intrathecal (IT) methotrexate followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Both patients survived for many years after treatment and are in complete clinical and radiological remission. Conclusion Meningeal metastasis from breast cancer can be very effectively treated with IT and/or systemic chemotherapy followed by craniospinal radiotherapy. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of this sequential combination of chemotherapy with radiotherapy. PMID:27920689

  2. Annexin A1 contributes to pancreatic cancer cell phenotype, behaviour and metastatic potential independently of Formyl Peptide Receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Belvedere, Raffaella; Bizzarro, Valentina; Forte, Giovanni; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Parente, Luca; Petrella, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    Annexin A1 (ANXA1) is a Ca2+-binding protein over-expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC). We recently reported that extracellular ANXA1 mediates PC cell motility acting on Formyl Peptide Receptors (FPRs). Here, we describe other mechanisms by which intracellular ANXA1 could mediate PC progression. We obtained ANXA1 Knock-Out (KO) MIA PaCa-2 cells using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology. LC-MS/MS analysis showed altered expression of several proteins involved in cytoskeletal organization. As a result, ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 partially lost their migratory and invasive capabilities with a mechanism that appeared independent of FPRs. The acquisition of a less aggressive phenotype has been further investigated in vivo. Wild type (WT), PGS (scrambled) and ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 cells were engrafted orthotopically in SCID mice. No differences were found about PC primary mass, conversely liver metastatization appeared particularly reduced in ANXA1 KO MIA PaCa-2 engrafted mice. In summary, we show that intracellular ANXA1 is able to preserve the cytoskeleton integrity and to maintain a malignant phenotype in vitro. The protein has a relevant role in the metastatization process in vivo, as such it appears attractive and suitable as prognostic and therapeutic marker in PC progression. PMID:27412958

  3. Anti-metastatic activities of Antrodia camphorata against human breast cancer cells mediated through suppression of the MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Tsai, Ching-Tsan; Huang, Yi-Ting; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Lin, Elong; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The fermented culture broth of Antrodia camphorata (A. camphorata) has been shown to promote cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of human estrogen-nonresponsive MDA-MB-231 cells. Herein, we demonstrate that non-cytotoxic concentrations (20-80 μg/mL) of A. camphorata markedly inhibited the invasion/migration of highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells as shown by an in vitro transwell and a wound-healing repair assay. The results of a gelatin zymography assay showed that A. camphorata suppressed the activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Western blot results demonstrated that treatment with A. camphorata decreased the expression of MMP-9, MMP-2, uPA, uPA receptor (uPAR) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); while the expression of the endogenous inhibitors of these proteins, i.e., tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2), and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, increased. Further investigation revealed that A. camphorata suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK1/2. A. camphorata treatment also led to a dose-dependent inhibition on NF-κB binding and activation. This is the first report confirming the anti-metastatic activity of this potentially beneficial mushroom against human breast cancer.

  4. U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval: vismodegib for recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Axelson, Michael; Liu, Ke; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Wang, Jian; Zhao, Hong; Kufrin, Dubravka; Palmby, Todd; Dong, Zedong; Russell, Anne Marie; Miksinski, Sarah; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2013-05-01

    The data and regulatory considerations leading to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) January 30, 2012 approval of Erivedge (vismodegib) capsules for the treatment of patients with recurrent, locally advanced, or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) are described. The FDA's approval decision was based primarily on the results observed in a single-arm, parallel cohort, international trial of vismodegib, administered orally at 150 mg daily until disease progression, in patients with pathologically confirmed, recurrent, locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) or metastatic basal cell carcinoma (mBCC). An independent review committee confirmed an overall response rate (ORR) of 30.3% [95% confidence interval (CI): 15.6-48.2] in 33 patients with mBCC and an ORR of 42.9% (95% CI: 30.5-56.0) in 63 patients with laBCC; median response durations were 7.6 months and 7.6 months for patients with mBCC and laBCC, respectively. The most common adverse reactions were muscle spasms, alopecia, dysgeusia, weight loss, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, decreased appetite, constipation, cough, arthralgias, vomiting, headache, ageusia, insomnia, and upper respiratory tract infection. Animal toxicology studies confirmed that vismodegib is a potent teratogenic agent. Approval was based on durable objective tumor responses supported by knowledge of the pathologic role of Hedgehog signaling in BCC and acceptable toxicity in a population without effective alternative therapies.

  5. N-acetylgalactosamine glycans function in cancer cell adhesion to endothelial cells: A role for truncated O-glycans in metastatic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bapu, Deepashree; Runions, John; Kadhim, Munira; Brooks, Susan Ann

    2016-06-01

    Failure in O-glycan chain extension exposing Tn antigen (GalNAc-O-Ser/Thr) is clinically associated with cancer metastasis. This study provides evidence of a functional role for aberrant GalNAc-glycans in cancer cell capture from blood flow and/or adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion of breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers was modelled under sweeping flow. Adhesion of metastatic, GalNAc glycan-rich, MCF7 and ZR 75 1 cells to endothelium increased over timepoints up to 1.5 hour, after which it plateaued. Adhesion was significantly inhibited (p < 0.001) when cell surface GalNAc-glycans were masked, an effect not seen in GalNAc glycan-poor, non-metastatic BT 474 cells. Masking irrelevant galactose- and mannose-glycans had no inhibitory effect. Imaging of cells post-adhesion over a 24 hour time course using confocal and scanning electron microscopy revealed that up to 6 hours post-adhesion, motile, rounded cancer cells featuring lamellipodia-like processes crawled on an intact endothelial monolayer. From 6-12 hours post-adhesion, cancer cells became stationary, adopted a smooth, circular flattened morphology, and endothelial cells retracted from around them leaving cleared zones in which the cancer cells proceeded to form colonies through cell division.

  6. Proliferation and metastatic potential of endometrial cancer cells in response to metformin treatment in a high versus normal glucose environment

    PubMed Central

    de Barros Machado, Amanda; dos Reis, Vania; Weber, Sebastian; Jauckus, Julia; Brum, Ilma Simoni; von Eye Corleta, Helena; Strowitzki, Thomas; Capp, Edison; Germeyer, Ariane

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the potential preventive and therapeutic role of metformin, the present study aimed to investigate the capability of low-dose metformin in the efficient inhibition of cancer development and the reduction of the metastasis of endometrial adenocarcinoma type I and primary endometrial epithelial cells (eEPs), with the drug acting as a treatment in a hyperinsulinemic environment exposed to high and normal glucose conditions. The Ishikawa endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line and primary eEPs were exposed to an environment with high (17 mM) or normal glucose (5 mM) and treated with insulin, low-dose metformin (0.1 mM) or a combined treatment. Metastatic potential was assessed by migration and invasion assays, and relative cell proliferation was determined. Metformin at a low dose potently inhibited the insulin action, decreasing the ability of the endometrial cancer (EC) cell line to migrate and invade in a high and normal glucose environment, and decreasing the migration ability of the primary eEPs. In the EC cell line, the insulin treatment increased the proliferation, without any subsequent reduction of proliferation by the addition of 0.1 mM metformin; however, relative cell proliferation sensitivity to metformin was observed in the range between 1 and 5 mM regardless of the glucose concentration present. Overall, metformin at 0.1 mM is not efficient enough to decrease the proliferation in an EC cell line. However, at this concentration, metformin can inhibit the insulin action in endometrial epithelial cancer cells, demonstrating an anti-metastatic effect in high and normal glucose environments. PMID:27900046

  7. Differential expression of functional guanylyl cyclases in melanocytes: absence of nitric-oxide-sensitive isoform in metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Das, P K; van den Wijngaard, R M; Lenz, W; Klockenbring, T; Malcharzyk, V; Drummer, C; Gerzer, R

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive endogenous molecule with multiple functions and its cellular signaling activity is mainly mediated by activation of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) hemeprotein. The expression of the NO-sensitive soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase was studied in various cultured melanocytic cells by measuring the accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the presence and absence of NO donors. Here we report that 3-morpholino-sydnonimine, a donor of NO redox species, and (Z)-1-[2- (2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, a direct NO donor, induced a 20-fold increase in intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in nonmetastatic melanoma cells and normal melanocytes in culture that could be related to cellular melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was due to stimulation of the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase as such increase was completely abolished by using a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of functional soluble guanylyl cyclase was further confirmed by the presence of alpha1 and beta1 subunits in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, none of the NO donors induced guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in metastatic melanoma cells, which could be attributed to the absence of the beta1 subunit that is essential for catalytic activity of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase. Metastatic melanoma cells produced higher levels of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in response to natriuretic peptides than other cell types, however, due to upregulation of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase activities, but they are less pigmented or unpigmented. The present finding suggests that NO signaling in association with melanogenesis is dependent on the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, whereas absence of soluble guanylyl

  8. Glucocorticoid resistance of migration and gene expression in a daughter MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cell line selected for high metastatic potential

    PubMed Central

    Fietz, Ebony R.; Keenan, Christine R.; López-Campos, Guillermo; Tu, Yan; Johnstone, Cameron N.; Harris, Trudi; Stewart, Alastair G.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are commonly used to prevent chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting despite a lack of understanding of their direct effect on cancer progression. Recent studies suggest that glucocorticoids inhibit cancer cell migration. However, this action has not been investigated in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative breast tumour cells, although activation of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is associated with a worse prognosis in ER-negative breast cancers. In this study we have explored the effect of glucocorticoids on the migration of the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast tumour cell line and the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231-HM.LNm5 cell line that was generated through in vivo cycling. We show for the first time that glucocorticoids inhibit 2- and 3-dimensional migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. Selection of cells for high metastatic potential resulted in a less migratory cell phenotype that was resistant to regulation by glucocorticoids and showed decreased GR receptor expression. The emergence of glucocorticoid resistance during metastatic selection may partly explain the apparent disparity between the clinical and in vitro evidence regarding the actions of glucocorticoids in cancer. These findings highlight the highly plastic nature of tumour cells, and underscore the need to more fully understand the direct effect of glucocorticoid treatment on different stages of metastatic progression. PMID:28262792

  9. Trapping and dynamic manipulation with magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging of targeted microspheres mimicking metastatic cancer cells trafficking in the vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenwei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of micro-scale objects mimicking metastatic cancer cells in a flow field have been demonstrated with magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging. Coupled contrast agents combining gold nanorods (15 nm × 50 nm; absorption peak around 730 nm) with 15 nm diameter magnetic nanospheres were targeted to 10 μm polystyrene beads recirculating in a 1.6 mm diameter tube mimicking a human peripheral vessel. Targeted objects were then trapped by an external magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system consisting of two disc magnets separated by 6 cm to form a polarizing field (0.04 Tesla in the tube region) to magnetize the magnetic contrast agents, and a custom designed cone magnet array with a high magnetic field gradient (about 0.044 Tesla/mm in the tube region) producing a strong trapping force to magnetized contrast agents. Results show that polystyrene beads linked to nanocomposites can be trapped at flow rates up to 12 ml/min. It is shown that unwanted background in a photoacoustic image can be significantly suppressed by changing the position of the cone magnet array with respect to the tube, thus creating coherent movement of the trapped objects. This study makes mmPA imaging very promising for differential visualization of metastatic cells trafficking in the vasculature.

  10. Post-transcriptional Control of Tumor Cell Autonomous Metastatic Potential by CCR4-NOT Deadenylase CNOT7

    PubMed Central

    Faraji, Farhoud; Hu, Ying; Yang, Howard H.; Lee, Maxwell P.; Winkler, G. Sebastian; Hafner, Markus; Hunter, Kent W.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the role of an aberrant transcriptome as a driver of metastatic potential. Deadenylation is a general regulatory node for post-transcriptional control by microRNAs and other determinants of RNA stability. Previously, we demonstrated that the CCR4-NOT scaffold component Cnot2 is an inherited metastasis susceptibility gene. In this study, using orthotopic metastasis assays and genetically engineered mouse models, we show that one of the enzymatic subunits of the CCR4-NOT complex, Cnot7, is also a metastasis modifying gene. We demonstrate that higher expression of Cnot7 drives tumor cell autonomous metastatic potential, which requires its deadenylase activity. Furthermore, metastasis promotion by CNOT7 is dependent on interaction with CNOT1 and TOB1. CNOT7 ribonucleoprotein-immunoprecipitation (RIP) and integrated transcriptome wide analyses reveal that CNOT7-regulated transcripts are enriched for a tripartite 3’UTR motif bound by RNA-binding proteins known to complex with CNOT7, TOB1, and CNOT1. Collectively, our data support a model of CNOT7, TOB1, CNOT1, and RNA-binding proteins collectively exerting post-transcriptional control on a metastasis suppressive transcriptional program to drive tumor cell metastasis. PMID:26807845

  11. Review of the Interaction Between Body Composition and Clinical Outcomes in Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer Treated With Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Steven M.; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic renal cell cancer (mRCC) currently focuses on inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Obesity confers a higher risk of RCC. However, the influence of obesity on clinical outcomes in mRCC in the era of targeted therapy is less clear. This review focuses on the impact of body composition on targeted therapy outcomes in mRCC. The International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium database has the largest series of patients evaluating the impact of body mass index (BMI) on outcomes in mRCC patients treated with targeted therapy. Overall survival was significantly improved in overweight patients (BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2), and this observation was externally validated in patients who participated in Pfizer trials. In contrast, sarcopenia is consistently associated with increased toxicity to inhibitors of angiogenesis and mTOR. Strengthening patients with mRCC and sarcopenia, through a structured exercise program and dietary intervention, may improve outcomes in mRCC treated with targeted therapies. At the same time, the paradox of obesity being a risk factor for RCC while offering a better overall survival in response to targeted therapy needs to be further evaluated.

  12. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-06-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis.

  13. 15-LOX-1 suppression of hypoxia-induced metastatic phenotype and HIF-1α expression in human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuanqing; Mao, Fei; Zuo, Xiangsheng; Moussalli, Micheline J; Elias, Elias; Xu, Weiguo; Shureiqi, Imad

    2014-01-01

    The expression of 15-lipoxygenase-1 (15-LOX-1) is downregulated in colon cancer and other major cancers, and 15-LOX-1 reexpression in cancer cells suppresses colonic tumorigenesis. Various lines of evidence indicate that 15-LOX-1 expression suppresses premetastatic stages of colonic tumorigenesis; nevertheless, the role of 15-LOX-1 loss of expression in cancer epithelial cells in metastases continues to be debated. Hypoxia, a common feature of the cancer microenvironment, promotes prometastatic mechanisms such as the upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, a transcriptional master regulator that enhances cancer cell metastatic potential, angiogenesis, and tumor cell invasion and migration. We have, therefore, tested whether restoring 15-LOX-1 in colon cancer cells affects cancer cells' hypoxia response that promotes metastasis. We found that 15-LOX-1 reexpression in HCT116, HT29LMM, and LoVo colon cancer cells inhibited survival, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, angiogenesis, cancer cell migration and invasion, and HIF-1α protein expression and stability under hypoxia. These findings demonstrate that 15-LOX-1 expression loss in cancer cells promotes metastasis and that therapeutically targeting ubiquitous 15-LOX-1 loss in cancer cells has the potential to suppress metastasis. PMID:24634093

  14. Zn{sup 2+} induces apoptosis in human highly metastatic SHG-44 glioma cells, through inhibiting activity of the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Zhang, Shangrong; Li, Shu Jie

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Hv1 is expressed in highly metastatic glioma cell. •Zn{sup 2+} ions induces apoptosis in highly metastatic glioma cells. •Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion. •Zn{sup 2+} ions reduce the gelatinase activity. •Inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth. -- Abstract: In contrast to the voltage-gated K{sup +} channels, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 contains a voltage-sensor domain but lacks a pore domain. Here, we showed that Hv1 is expressed in the highly metastatic glioma cell SHG-44, but lowly in the poorly metastatic glioma cell U-251. Inhibition of Hv1 activity by 140 μM zinc chloride induces apoptosis in the human highly metastatic glioma cells. Zn{sup 2+} ions markedly inhibit proton secretion, and reduce the gelatinase activity in the highly metastatic glioma cells. In vivo, the glioma tumor sizes of the implantation of the SHG-44 xenografts in nude mice that were injected zinc chloride solution, were dramatically smaller than that in the controlled groups. The results demonstrated that the inhibition of Hv1 activity via Zn{sup 2+} ions can effectively retard the cancer growth and suppress the cancer metastasis by the decrease of proton extrusion and the down-regulation of gelatinase activity. Our results suggest that Zn{sup 2+} ions may be used as a potential anti-glioma drug for glioma therapy.

  15. α-Tubulin acetylation elevated in metastatic and basal-like breast cancer cells promotes microtentacle formation, adhesion, and invasive migration.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Amanda E; Vitolo, Michele I; Whipple, Rebecca A; Charpentier, Monica S; Goloubeva, Olga G; Ioffe, Olga B; Tuttle, Kimberly C; Slovic, Jana; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon B; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cases of breast cancer pose the primary challenge in clinical management of this disease, demanding the identification of effective therapeutic strategies that remain wanting. In this study, we report that elevated levels of α-tubulin acetylation are a sufficient cause of metastatic potential in breast cancer. In suspended cell culture conditions, metastatic breast cancer cells exhibited high α-tubulin acetylation levels that extended along microtentacle (McTN) protrusions. Mutation of the acetylation site on α-tubulin and enzymatic modulation of this posttranslational modification exerted a significant impact on McTN frequency and the reattachment of suspended tumor cells. Reducing α-tubulin acetylation significantly inhibited migration but did not affect proliferation. In an analysis of more than 140 matched primary and metastatic tumors from patients, we found that acetylation was maintained and in many cases increased in lymph node metastases compared with primary tumors. Proteomic analysis of an independent cohort of more than 390 patient specimens further documented the relationship between increased α-tubulin acetylation and the aggressive behaviors of basal-like breast cancers, with a trend toward increased risk of disease progression and death in patients with high-intensity α-tubulin acetylation in primary tumors. Taken together, our results identify a tight correlation between acetylated α-tubulin levels and aggressive metastatic behavior in breast cancer, with potential implications for the definition of a simple prognostic biomarker in patients with breast cancer.

  16. Progastrin overexpression imparts tumorigenic/metastatic potential to embryonic epithelial cells: phenotypic differences between transformed and non-transformed stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kantara, Carla; Ortiz, Ixiu; Swiercz, Rafal; Kuo, Joyce; Davey, Robert; Escobar, Kenneth; Ullrich, Robert; Singh, Pomila

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that overexpression of progastrin in embryonic epithelial cells (HEKmGAS-cells) increased proliferation of the cells, compared to that of control HEKC-cells. Here we report the novel finding that tumorigenic and metastatic potential of HEKmGAS cells is also increased significantly, compared to that of HEKC cells. Cell-surface associated annexinA2 (CS-ANXA2) binds progastrin and is over-expressed on cancer-cells, allowing us to successfully use fluorescently-labeled progastrin-peptide for enumerating metastatic lesions of transformed/cancer cells in vivo. Next, we examined the hypothesis that increased tumorigenic/metastatic potential of isogenic HEKmGAS vs HEKC cells maybe due to transformed-phenotype of stem-cells. FACSorting/FACScanning of cells demonstrated significant increases in percent DCLK1/Lgr5 positive stem-cells, co-expressing CD44/CS-ANXA2, in HEKmGAS vs HEKC-cells. Distinct differences were noted in morphology of HEKC vs HEKmGAS spheroidal growths on non-adherent cultures (selective for stem cells). HEKC-spheroids were rounded with distinct perimeters (basement membranes?), while HEKmGAS-spheroids were amorphous, with no perimeters. Relative levels of DCLK1/Lgr5/CD44 and AnnexinA2/β-catenin/pNFκBp65/metalloproteinases were significantly increased in HEKmGAS vs HEKC-cells, growing either as mono-layer cultures, 3D-spheroids (in vitro), or xenografts (in vivo). Interestingly, HEKC-cells enriched for CS-ANXA2, developed amorphous spheroids, while down-regulation of ANXA2 in HEKmGAS-clones, resulted in loss of matrixmetalloproteinases and re-formation of rounded spheroids, suggesting high levels of CS-ANXA2/matrixmetalloproteinases may impact spheroid morphology. Down-regulation of DCLK1 significantly attenuated activation of β-catenin, with loss of proliferation of HEKmGAS and HEKC-cells, suggesting DCLK1 is required for maintaining proliferation of cells. Conclusions Our results suggest the novel possibility that transformed stem-cells

  17. MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy increases the efficacy of cytokine-induced killer cell immunotherapy in metastatic renal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zibing; Liu, Yuqing; Zhang, Yong; Shang, Yiman; Gao, Quanli

    2016-01-26

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells is a promising cancer treatment, but its efficacy is restricted by various factors, including the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). In this study, we determine whether chemotherapeutic drugs that reduce MDSC levels enhance the efficacy of CIK cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors. Fifty-three patients were included in this study; 17 were diagnosed with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC), 10 with advanced pancreatic cancer (PC), and 26 with metastatic melanoma (MM). These patients were divided into two groups: CIK cell therapy alone and CIK cell therapy combined with chemotherapy. Combining CIK cell therapy and chemotherapy increased 1-year survival rates and median survival times in MRCC and PC patients, but not in MM patients. The disease control rate did not differ between treatment groups for MRCC or MM patients, but was higher in PC patients receiving combined treatment than CIK cell treatment alone. These data suggest that addition of MDSC-decreasing chemotherapy to CIK cell therapy improves survival in MRCC and PC patients.

  18. Suppression subtractive hybridization profiles of radial growth phase and metastatic melanoma cell lines reveal novel potential targets

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Josane F; Espreafico, Enilza M

    2008-01-01

    Background Melanoma progression occurs through three major stages: radial growth phase (RGP), confined to the epidermis; vertical growth phase (VGP), when the tumor has invaded into the dermis; and metastasis. In this work, we used suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) to investigate the molecular signature of melanoma progression, by comparing a group of metastatic cell lines with an RGP-like cell line showing characteristics of early neoplastic lesions including expression of the metastasis suppressor KISS1, lack of αvβ3-integrin and low levels of RHOC. Methods Two subtracted cDNA collections were obtained, one (RGP library) by subtracting the RGP cell line (WM1552C) cDNA from a cDNA pool from four metastatic cell lines (WM9, WM852, 1205Lu and WM1617), and the other (Met library) by the reverse subtraction. Clones were sequenced and annotated, and expression validation was done by Northern blot and RT-PCR. Gene Ontology annotation and searches in large-scale melanoma expression studies were done for the genes identified. Results We identified 367 clones from the RGP library and 386 from the Met library, of which 351 and 368, respectively, match human mRNA sequences, representing 288 and 217 annotated genes. We confirmed the differential expression of all genes selected for validation. In the Met library, we found an enrichment of genes in the growth factors/receptor, adhesion and motility categories whereas in the RGP library, enriched categories were nucleotide biosynthesis, DNA packing/repair, and macromolecular/vesicular trafficking. Interestingly, 19% of the genes from the RGP library map to chromosome 1 against 4% of the ones from Met library. Conclusion This study identifies two populations of genes differentially expressed between melanoma cell lines from two tumor stages and suggests that these sets of genes represent profiles of less aggressive versus metastatic melanomas. A search for expression profiles of melanoma in available expression study

  19. New human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line with highly metastatic potential (MHCC97) and its expressions of the factors associated with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, J; Tang, Z Y; Ye, S L; Liu, Y K; Lin, Z Y; Chen, J; Xue, Q

    1999-01-01

    A new human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line with a highly metastatic potential was established from subcutaneous xenograft of a metastatic model of human HCC in nude mice (LCI-D20) by means of alternating cell culture in vitro and growth in nude mice. The line, designated MHCC97, has been cultivated for 18 months and subcultured for more than 90 passages. The line was showed to be of human origin by karyotype analysis. The cells were either grown as compact colonies (in clusters) or as a monolayered sheet with about 31 h of population-doubling time, exhibited typical malignant epithelial in morphology and were positive for α-fetoprotein (AFP). Flow cytometric analysis of the cell DNA content showed an aneuploid pattern, and its index was 1.5 as compared to that of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Karyotypic analyses of G- and C-banding techniques revealed that all cells presented chromosome abnormalities in number and structure. The number of cell line MHCC97 chromosome ranged from 59 to 65 with a modal number of 60 and 61. At least two common chromosome markers, i(1q) and der(4)t(4;?)(4pter→q35::?), were present in all cells, and deletion of Y chromosome also occurred in all cells. The subcutaneous and intrahepatic xenografts were formed and metastatic lesions in lungs were found after the cells were inoculated into nude mice. The rate of metastasis to lungs was 100% using orthotopic inoculation. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products revealed positive expressions of integrin α5 and β1, urokinase type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), vascular endothelial growth factor and nm23-H1 mRNAs of cell line MHCC97. Immunostaining of c-Met, uPAR showed strongly positive in both subcutaneous xenografts and lung metastatic lesions; while positive in xenografts and negative in metastatic lesions for integrin α5, β1. E-cadherin and P53 was not expressed either in xenograft or in the metastatic lesions. PCR products of HBsAg and

  20. CCR5 receptor antagonists block metastasis to bone of v-Src-oncogene-transformed metastatic prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sicoli, Daniela; Jiao, Xuanmao; Ju, Xiaoming; Velasco-Velazquez, Marco; Ertel, Adam; Addya, Sankar; Li, Zhiping; Ando, Sebastiano; Fatatis, Alessandro; Paudyal, Bishnuhari; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Thakur, Mathew L.; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Src family kinases (SFKs) integrate signal transduction for multiple receptors, regulating cellular proliferation invasion and metastasis in human cancer. Although Src is rarely mutated in human prostate cancer, SFK activity is increased in the majority of human prostate cancers. In order to determine the molecular mechanisms governing prostate cancer bone metastasis, FVB murine prostate epithelium was transduced with oncogenic v-Src. The prostate cancer cell lines metastasized in FVB mice to brain and bone. Gene expression profiling of the tumors identified activation of a CCR5 signaling module when the prostate epithelial cells (PEC) lines were grown in vivo vs. tissue cultures. The whole body, bone and brain metastatic prostate cancer burden was reduced by oral CCR5 antagonist. Clinical trials of CCR5 inhibitors may warrant consideration in patients with CCR5 activation in their tumors. PMID:25452256

  1. Radiation-induced glioma following CyberKnife® treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Post-stereotactic radiation-induced neoplasms, although relatively rare, have raised the question of benefit regarding CyberKnife® treatments versus the risk of a secondary malignancy. The incidence of such neoplasms arising in the nervous system is thought to be low, given the paucity of case reports regarding such secondary lesions. Case presentation Here we describe a case of a 43-year-old Middle Eastern woman with primary clear cell renal cell carcinoma and a metastatic focus to the left brain parenchyma who presented with focal neurologic deficits. Following post-surgical stereotactic radiation in the region of the brain metastasis, the patient developed a secondary high-grade astrocytoma nearly 5 years after the initial treatment. Conclusion Although the benefit of CyberKnife® radiotherapy treatments continues to outweigh the relatively low risk of a radiation-induced secondary malignancy, knowledge of such risks and a review of the literature are warranted. PMID:22943305

  2. Eradication of metastatic mouse cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade by suppression of myeloid-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, KiBem; Skora, Andrew D; Li, Zhaobo; Liu, Qiang; Tam, Ada J; Blosser, Richard L; Diaz, Luis A; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2014-08-12

    Impressive responses have been observed in patients treated with checkpoint inhibitory anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) or anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) antibodies. However, immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic cancers remains a challenge. Here we report that treatment with both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA-4 antibodies was unable to eradicate large, modestly immunogenic CT26 tumors or metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cotreatment with epigenetic-modulating drugs and checkpoint inhibitors markedly improved treatment outcomes, curing more than 80% of the tumor-bearing mice. Functional studies revealed that the primary targets of the epigenetic modulators were myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). A PI3K inhibitor that reduced circulating MDSCs also eradicated 4T1 tumors in 80% of the mice when combined with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Thus, cancers resistant to immune checkpoint blockade can be cured by eliminating MDSCs.

  3. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-14

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  5. Probing the behaviors of gold nanorods in metastatic breast cancer cells based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiqi; Ji, Yinglu; Meng, Jie; Wu, Xiaochun; Xu, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    In this work, behaviors of positively-charged AuNRs in a highly metastatic tumor cell line MDA-MB-231 are examined based on UV-vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dark-field microscopic observation. It is found that characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peaks of AuNRs can be detected using spectroscopic method within living cells that have taken up AuNRs. The peak area of transverse SPR band is shown to be proportionally related to the amount of AuNRs in the cells determined with ICP-MS, which suggests a facile and real time quantification method for AuNRs in living cells. The shape of longitudinal SPR band in UV-vis-NIR spectrum reflects the aggregation state of AuNRs in the cells during the incubation period, which is proved by TEM and microscopic observations. Experimental results reveal that AuNRs are internalized by the cells rapidly; the accumulation, distribution and aggregation of AuNRs in the cells compartments are time and dose dependent. The established spectroscopic analysis method can not only monitor the behaviors of AuNRs in living cells but may also be helpful in choosing the optimum laser stimulation wavelength for anti-tumor thermotherapy.

  6. Hypoxic Tumor Cell Modulates Its Microenvironment to Enhance Angiogenic and Metastatic Potential by Secretion of Proteins and Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:20124223

  7. Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Echarri, María José; Lopez-Martin, Ana; Hitt, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. PMID:26927178

  8. miR-27a and miR-27a* contribute to metastatic properties of osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Arafeh, Rand; Maximov, Vadim; Galasso, Marco; Khawaled, Saleh; Abou-Sharieha, Samah; Volinia, Stefano; Jones, Kevin B; Croce, Carlo M; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2015-03-10

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. The essential mechanisms underlying osteosarcomagenesis and progression continue to be obscure. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have far-reaching effects on the cellular biology of development and cancer. We recently reported that unique miRNA signatures associate with the pathogenesis and progression of OS. Of particular interest, we found that higher expression of miR-27a is associated with clinical metastatic disease. We report here that overexpression of miR-27a/miR-27a*, a microRNA pair derived from a single precursor, promotes pulmonary OS metastases formation. By contrast, sequestering miR-27a/miR-27a* by sponge technology suppressed OS cells invasion and metastases formation. miR-27a/miR-27a* directly repressed CBFA2T3 expression among other target genes. We demonstrated that CBFA2T3 is downregulated in majority of OS samples and its over expression significantly attenuated OS metastatic process mediated by miR-27a/miR-27a* underscoring CBFA2T3 functions as a tumor suppressor in OS. These findings establish that miR-27a/miR-27a* pair plays a significant role in OS metastasis and proposes it as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target in managing OS metastases.

  9. miR-27a and miR-27a* contribute to metastatic properties of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Maximov, Vadim; Galasso, Marco; Khawaled, Saleh; Abou-Sharieha, Samah; Volinia, Stefano; Jones, Kevin B.; Croce, Carlo M.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in adolescents and young adults. The essential mechanisms underlying osteosarcomagenesis and progression continue to be obscure. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have far-reaching effects on the cellular biology of development and cancer. We recently reported that unique miRNA signatures associate with the pathogenesis and progression of OS. Of particular interest, we found that higher expression of miR-27a is associated with clinical metastatic disease. We report here that overexpression of miR-27a/miR-27a*, a microRNA pair derived from a single precursor, promotes pulmonary OS metastases formation. By contrast, sequestering miR-27a/miR-27a* by sponge technology suppressed OS cells invasion and metastases formation. miR-27a/miR-27a* directly repressed CBFA2T3 expression among other target genes. We demonstrated that CBFA2T3 is downregulated in majority of OS samples and its over expression significantly attenuated OS metastatic process mediated by miR-27a/miR-27a* underscoring CBFA2T3 functions as a tumor suppressor in OS. These findings establish that miR-27a/miR-27a* pair plays a significant role in OS metastasis and proposes it as a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target in managing OS metastases. PMID:25749032

  10. Treatment monitoring in metastatic colorectal cancer patients by quantification and KRAS genotyping of circulating cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Andreas W.; Schwerdel, Daniel; Welz, Hanna; Marienfeld, Ralf; Schmidt, Stefan A.; Kleger, Alexander; Ettrich, Thomas J.; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC) has continuously improved over the last decade. However, disease monitoring remains underdeveloped and mostly dependent on imaging e.g. RECIST 1.1 criteria. The genetic landscape of individual cancers and subsequently occurring treatment-induced evolution remain neglected in current surveillance strategies. Novel biomarkers demand minimally invasive and repetitive tracking of the cancer mutagenome for therapy stratification and to make prognostic predictions. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a routinely used tumor marker for CRC, does not meet these goals and thus prevents its use as a reliable monitoring tool. A tumor-derived fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from blood samples, may bypass the limitations of currently available biomarkers and could be a tool for noninvasive disease monitoring. Here, total cfDNA levels differentiated a cohort of metastatic CRC patients from healthy controls. Furthermore, we correlated cfDNA during chemotherapy of 27 stage IV patients with clinical parameters to establish its prognostic and predictive value. Indeed, cfDNA levels in chemotherapy naive patients correlate with the tumor burden and CEA values at diagnosis and increase upon disease progression during 1st and 2nd line treatment. Moreover, we confirm the possibility of cfDNA-based genotyping of KRAS to early detect the emergence of resistance during chemotherapy. These data indicate that repetitive quantitative and mutational analysis of cfDNA might complement current treatment standards but may have also limited value in some patients. PMID:28328955

  11. Severe papillomavirus infection progressing to metastatic squamous cell carcinoma in bone marrow-transplanted X-linked SCID dogs.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Michael H; Kennedy, Jeffrey S; Kennedy, Douglas R; Yuan, Hang; Holt, David E; Casal, Margret L; Traas, Anne M; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Moore, Peter F; Henthorn, Paula S; Hartnett, Brian J; Weinberg, Kenneth I; Schlegel, Richard; Felsburg, Peter J

    2006-07-01

    Canine X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) is due to mutations in the common gamma chain (gammac) gene and is identical clinically and immunologically to human XSCID, making it a true homologue of the human disease. Bone marrow-transplanted (BMT) XSCID dogs not only engraft donor T cells and reconstitute normal T-cell function but, in contrast to the majority of transplanted human XSCID patients, also engraft donor B cells and reconstitute normal humoral immune function. Shortly after our initial report of successful BMT of XSCID dogs, it soon became evident that transplanted XSCID dogs developed late-onset severe chronic cutaneous infections containing a newly described canine papillomavirus. This is analogous to the late-onset cutaneous papillomavirus infection recently described for human XSCID patients following BMT. Of 24 transplanted XSCID dogs followed for at least 1 year post-BMT, 71% developed chronic canine papillomavirus infection. Six of the transplanted dogs that developed cutaneous papillomas were maintained for >3 1/2 years post-BMT for use as breeders. Four of these six dogs (67%) developed invasive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), with three of the dogs (75%) eventually developing metastatic SCC, an extremely rare consequence of SCC in the dog. This finding raises the question of whether SCC will develop in transplanted human XSCID patients later in life. Canine XSCID therefore provides an ideal animal model with which to study the role of the gammac-dependent signaling pathway in the response to papillomavirus infections and the progression of these viral infections to metastatic SCC.

  12. Curcumin analog UBS109 prevents bone marrow osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Zhu, Shijun; Weitzmann, M Neale; Snyder, James P; Shoji, Mamoru

    2015-03-01

    UBS109 is a curcumin analog that possesses antitumor properties has been shown to stimulate osteoblastogenesis and suppress osteoclastogenesis in vitro. This study was undertaken to determine whether UBS109 might alleviate the inhibitory activity of breast cancer cells on osteoblastic mineralization and stimulatory effects on osteoclastogenesis. Mouse bone marrow cells were cocultured with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. UBS109 stimulated osteoblastic mineralization and suppressed adipogenesis and osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed osteoblastic mineralization and enhanced osteoclastogenesis in bone marrow culture. Effects that were reserved by UBS109 (50-200 nM). Mineralization in preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was suppressed by coculture with MDA-MB-231 cells, while MDA-MB-231 cells did not have effects on osteoclastogenesis of RAW267.4 cells in vitro. UBS109 (500 nM) revealed toxic effects on MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells. This study demonstrates that UBS109, which is an antitumor agent, reveals restorative effects on bone marrow cell differentiation disordered by coculture with breast cancer MDA-MB-231 bone metastatic cells in vitro. This in vitro model may be a useful tool to evaluate the mechanism of breast cancer cell bone metastasis.

  13. Glucocorticoid Receptor Knockdown Decreases the Antioxidant Protection of B16 Melanoma Cells: An Endocrine System-Related Mechanism that Compromises Metastatic Cell Resistance to Vascular Endothelium-Induced Tumor Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L.; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J. Antoni; Pellicer, José A.; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F.; Estrela, José M.

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2−-generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium. PMID:24802641

  14. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  15. Self-renewal of CD133(hi) cells by IL6/Notch3 signalling regulates endocrine resistance in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Berishaj, Marjan; Chang, Qing; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K; Perna, Fabiana; Bowman, Robert L; Vidone, Michele; Daly, Laura; Nnoli, Jennifer; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Shih, Natalie N C; Feldman, Michael; Mao, Jun J; Colameco, Christopher; Chen, Jinbo; DeMichele, Angela; Fabbri, Nicola; Healey, John H; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Lyden, David; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2016-02-09

    The mechanisms of metastatic progression from hormonal therapy (HT) are largely unknown in luminal breast cancer. Here we demonstrate the enrichment of CD133(hi)/ER(lo) cancer cells in clinical specimens following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and in HT refractory metastatic disease. We develop experimental models of metastatic luminal breast cancer and demonstrate that HT can promote the generation of HT-resistant, self-renewing CD133(hi)/ER(lo)/IL6(hi) cancer stem cells (CSCs). HT initially abrogates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) generating self-renewal-deficient cancer cells, CD133(hi)/ER(lo)/OXPHOS(lo). These cells exit metabolic dormancy via an IL6-driven feed-forward ER(lo)-IL6(hi)-Notch(hi) loop, activating OXPHOS, in the absence of ER activity. The inhibition of IL6R/IL6-Notch pathways switches the self-renewal of CD133(hi) CSCs, from an IL6/Notch-dependent one to an ER-dependent one, through the re-expression of ER. Thus, HT induces an OXPHOS metabolic editing of luminal breast cancers, paradoxically establishing HT-driven self-renewal of dormant CD133(hi)/ER(lo) cells mediating metastatic progression, which is sensitive to dual targeted therapy.

  16. Resveratrol: inhibitory effects on metastatic cell behaviors and voltage-gated Na⁺ channel activity in rat prostate cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott Paton; Peters, Alex; Fleming-Jones, Sian; Mukhey, Dev; Djamgoz, Mustafa Bilgin Ali

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural plant phenolic found at high concentration in red grapes, has been suggested to have a range of health benefits. Here, we tested its effects on metastatic cell behaviors. The strongly metastatic rat prostate MAT-LyLu cells were used as a model. At 20 μM, resveratrol had no effect on cellular proliferation or viability. However, it suppressed significantly 1) lateral motility by up to 25%; 2) transverse motility by 31%; and invasion by 37%. It also increased the cells' adhesion to substrate by 55%. Electrophysiologically, resveratrol inhibited voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) activity that has been shown previously to promote metastatic cell behaviors. This effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of ∼50 μM. Voltage dependencies of current activation and peak were not affected but steady-state inactivation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials and recovery from inactivation was slowed. Coapplication of resveratrol with the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin did not result in any additive effect on inhibition of both 1) VGSC activity and 2) metastatic cell behaviors. These results suggest 1) that a significant mode of action of resveratrol is VGSC blockage and 2) that resveratrol has promise as a natural antimetastatic agent.

  17. Self-renewal of CD133hi cells by IL6/Notch3 signalling regulates endocrine resistance in metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sansone, Pasquale; Ceccarelli, Claudio; Berishaj, Marjan; Chang, Qing; Rajasekhar, Vinagolu K.; Perna, Fabiana; Bowman, Robert L.; Vidone, Michele; Daly, Laura; Nnoli, Jennifer; Santini, Donatella; Taffurelli, Mario; Shih, Natalie N. C.; Feldman, Michael; Mao, Jun J.; Colameco , Christopher; Chen, Jinbo; DeMichele, Angela; Fabbri, Nicola; Healey, John H.; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe; Lyden, David; Bonafé, Massimiliano; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms of metastatic progression from hormonal therapy (HT) are largely unknown in luminal breast cancer. Here we demonstrate the enrichment of CD133hi/ERlo cancer cells in clinical specimens following neoadjuvant endocrine therapy and in HT refractory metastatic disease. We develop experimental models of metastatic luminal breast cancer and demonstrate that HT can promote the generation of HT-resistant, self-renewing CD133hi/ERlo/IL6hi cancer stem cells (CSCs). HT initially abrogates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) generating self-renewal-deficient cancer cells, CD133hi/ERlo/OXPHOSlo. These cells exit metabolic dormancy via an IL6-driven feed-forward ERlo-IL6hi-Notchhi loop, activating OXPHOS, in the absence of ER activity. The inhibition of IL6R/IL6-Notch pathways switches the self-renewal of CD133hi CSCs, from an IL6/Notch-dependent one to an ER-dependent one, through the re-expression of ER. Thus, HT induces an OXPHOS metabolic editing of luminal breast cancers, paradoxically establishing HT-driven self-renewal of dormant CD133hi/ERlo cells mediating metastatic progression, which is sensitive to dual targeted therapy. PMID:26858125

  18. Regulation of Motility, Invasion and Metastatic Potential of Squamous Cell Carcinoma by 1,25D3

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yingyu; Yu, Wei-Dong; Su, Bing; Seshadri, Mukund; Luo, Wei; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND 1,25D3, the active metabolite of vitamin D, has been shown to exhibit broad spectrum anti-tumor activity in xenograft animal models. However, its activity against metastatic disease has not been extensively investigated. METHODS Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or 1,25D3-resistant variant SCC-DR cells were treated with 1,25D3. Actin organization was examined by immunofluorescence assay. Cell migration was assessed by “wound” healing and chemotactic migration assay. Cell invasion was assessed by Matrigel-based invasion assay and in situ zymography. MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and secretion was examined by immunoblot analysis and ELISA, respectively. E-cadherin expression was assessed by flow cytometry, immunoblot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Knockdown of E-cadherin was achieved by siRNA. Experimental metastasis mouse model was done by intravenous injection of tumor cells. Lung tumor development was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging, gross observation and histology. RESULTS SCC cellular morphology and actin organization were altered by 10 nM of 1,25D3. 1,25D3 inhibited SCC cell motility and invasion, which was associated with reduced expression and secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. 1,25D3 promoted the expression of E-cadherin. These findings were not observed in SCC-DR cells. Knock down of E-cadherin rescued 1,25D3-inhibited cell migration. Intravenous injection of SCC or SCC-DR cells resulted in the establishment of extensive pulmonary lesions in saline-treated C3H mice. Treatment with 1,25D3 resulted in a marked reduction in the formation of lung tumor colonies in animals injected with SCC but not SCC-DR cells. CONCLUSIONS 1,25D3 suppresses SCC cell motility, invasion and metastasis, partially through the promotion of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22833444

  19. Expression of metadherin/AEG-1 gene is positively related to orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines of different metastatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenzhen; Deng, Huan; Yan, Wei; Huang, Huanjun; Deng, Yueling; Li, Yuan; Tian, De'an

    2012-06-01

    Metastasis contributes to the poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism through which a primary HCC cell develops into a metastatic phenotype is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between metadherin (MTDH)/astrocyte elevated gene-1 (AEG-1) expression in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials and such metastatic phenotypes as orientation chemotaxis and adhesion. MTDH/AEG-1 expression was detected by RT-PCR and western blotting in HCC cell lines (HepG2, Huh7, Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H). Distribution of MTDH/AEG-1 was observed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion and the index of interaction between HCC cell lines and microvascular endothelial cell lines (MVECs, including HUVECs and HPMECs) were measured by chemotaxis assay and adhesion assay, respectively. The results showed that MTDH/AEG-1 protein expression was significantly higher in high metastatic potential cancer cell lines (Sk-HEP-1, MHCC-97H) than in low metastatic potential cell lines (HepG2, Huh7) (P<0.05). The MTDH/AEG-1 protein was localized in the perinuclear region of HCC cells. Furthermore, the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells to HPMECs were increased as compared with those of HCC cells to HUVECs (P<0.05). The abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion were much stronger in Sk-HEP-1 and MHCC-97H cells with MTDH/AEG-1 highly expressed than in HepG2 and Huh7 cells with MTDH/AEG-1 lowly expressed (P<0.05). These results suggested that the expression of MTDH/AEG-1 gene in HCC cell lines of different metastatic potentials was closely positively related to the abilities of orientation chemotaxis and adhesion of HCC cells. It was deduced that MTDH/AEG-1 might play a pivotal role in the lung-specific metastasis of HCC, which may be mediated through orientation chemotaxis and adhesion abilities of HCC cells. MTDH

  20. Suppression of the metastatic phenotype of a mouse skin carcinoma cell line independent of E-cadherin expression and correlated with reduced Ha-ras oncogene products.

    PubMed

    Caulín, C; López-Barcons, L; Gonzáles-Garrigues, M; Navarro, P; Lozano, E; Rodrigo, I; Gamallo, C; Cano, A; Fabra, A; Quintanilla, M

    1996-02-01

    The HaCa4 cell line, derived from a mouse skin carcinoma induced by Harvey murine sarcoma virus, is highly tumorigenic when injected into nude mice and produces multiple metastases in the lungs. HaCa4 cells express high levels of viral Ha-ras oncogene products, anomalously synthesize the embryonic/simple epithelial keratin K8, and have lost the expression of the cell-cell adhesion receptor E-cadherin (E-CD). E-CD(+) cell clones (E62 and E24), obtained by transfection of an exogenous E-CD cDNA into HaCa4 cells, had a decreased ability to migrate through type IV collagen matrices. However, the E-CD (+) E62 clone remained as metastatic as the parental cell line, whereas the E24 clone, which does not take up the exogenous cDNA but spontaneously switches on the endogenous E-CD gene, suppressed the metastatic phenotype although it maintained its tumorigenicity. E24 cells had fivefold to sixfold lower levels of viral Ha-ras mRNA and p21 protein than the other cell lines. In addition, they did not synthesize K8 but rather switched on keratin K19. The comparison of E-CD proteins synthesized by E62 and E24 cell lines revealed no structural or functional differences because both localized at cell-cell contacts and associated with alpha-catenin, beta-catenin, and plakoglobin. Furthermore, E-CD was still expressed in metastatic lung nodules produced by E62 cells. These results suggest that suppression of the metastatic phenotype in E24 cells occurs independently of E-CD expression and correlates with decreased levels of the oncogenic ras p21 protein.

  1. Phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity of tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic castrationresistant prostate cancer: a report from the PETRUS prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Massard, Christophe; Oulhen, Marianne; Le Moulec, Sylvestre; Auger, Nathalie; Foulon, Stéphanie; Abou-Lovergne, Aurélie; Billiot, Fanny; Valent, Alexander; Marty, Virginie; Loriot, Yohann; Fizazi, Karim; Vielh, Philippe; Farace, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    Molecular characterization of cancer samples is hampered by tumor tissue availability in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. We reported the results of prospective PETRUS study of biomarker assessment in paired primary prostatic tumors, metastatic biopsies and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Among 54 mCRPC patients enrolled, 38 (70%) had biopsies containing more than 50% tumour cells. 28 (52%) patients were analyzed for both tissue samples and CTCs. FISH for AR-amplification and TMPRSS2-ERG translocation were successful in 54% and 32% in metastatic biopsies and primary tumors, respectively. By comparing CellSearch and filtration (ISET)-enrichment combined to four color immunofluorescent staining, we showed that CellSearch and ISET isolated distinct subpopulations of CTCs: CTCs undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, CTC clusters and large CTCs with cytomorphological characteristics but no detectable markers were isolated using ISET. Epithelial CTCs detected by the CellSearch were mostly lost during the ISET-filtration. AR-amplification was detected in CellSearch-captured CTCs, but not in ISET-enriched CTCs which harbor exclusively AR gain of copies. Eighty-eight percent concordance for ERG-rearrangement was observed between metastatic biopsies and CTCs even if additional ERG-alteration patterns were detected in ISET-enriched CTCs indicating a higher heterogeneity in CTCs. Molecular screening of metastatic biopsies is achievable in a multicenter context. Our data indicate that CTCs detected by the CellSearch and the ISET-filtration systems are not only phenotypically but also genetically different. Close attention must be paid to CTC characterization since neither approach tested here fully reflects the tremendous phenotypic and genetic heterogeneity present in CTCs from mCRPC patients. PMID:27391263

  2. Evaluation of normal and metastatic mammary cells grown in different biomaterial matrices: establishing potential tissue test systems.

    PubMed

    Booth, Brian W; Park, Jang Pyo; Burg, Karen J L

    2013-01-01

    The in vitro growth and differentiation of normal mammalian cells is quite different than the growth of cells derived from tumors. Additionally, cells of the same origin (tissue) behave differently depending on the biomaterial matrix in or on which they are grown in vitro. We examined both Matrigel(TM) and a collagen/agarose blend and demonstrated that two murine mammary derived cells lines, 4T1 and NMuMG, derived from a metastatic mammary tumor or a normal mammary gland, respectively, exhibit different growth and differentiation patterns depending on the three-dimensional matrix in which they are grown. The shape and size of the colonies that formed were matrix dependent. The two cell lines produced different levels of growth factors and metalloproteinases, and expressed differentiation markers specific to a matrix. Through the classification of different cell behaviors in different growth matrices, we will be able to intelligently design and tune tissue test systems to ask and answer specific challenging scientific questions.

  3. Molecular characterization of permanent cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) with underlying neurofibromatosis-1.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yuqiang; Elahi, Abul; Denley, Ryan C; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Brennan, Murray F; Jhanwar, Suresh C

    2009-04-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) develop in patients with underlying NF1, and usually arise as a result of malignant transformation of a pre-existing plexiform neurofibroma. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities reported in primary MPNST include complex karyotypes with chromosome numbers in the triploid or tetraploid range with recurrent abnormalities of several chromosomes including losses or imbalances. As a prelude to cell biological, pharmacological, and functional studies to investigate pathways and gene(s) associated with multistep tumorigenesis, which includes progression, metastasis and resistance to therapy in MPNST, detailed molecular cytogenetic and genetic analyses of cell lines from primary, metastatic and recurrent MPNST with underlying NF1 disorder have been performed. The clonal cytogenetic abnormalities detected in the primary tumor cell line were similar to those observed in primary cultures of this tumor. Due to the complexity of the rearrangements seen by G-banded karyotype analysis, further characterization of the clonal abnormalities in these three cell lines was performed by molecular cytogenetic techniques, including CGH and SKY. CGH analysis detected recurrent deletions of 9p, 12q21-q32, complete losses of the X-chromosome, and gains of the chromosomal segment 17q25 in all three cell lines. SKY analysis detected extensive clonal abnormalities in these cell lines. The nature and the alterations of the cell cycle regulators, particularly those associated with G1-S checkpoints and known to be deregulated in MPNST, were studied. These cell cycle regulators included those associated with Rb1-cyclin D1 and the p53 pathways. The findings are consistent with the argument that an imbalance between the cyclin activators of CDKs and inhibitory proteins such as p16 result in uncontrollable proliferation in the cell lines, associated with progression of the disease. LOH and expression of the p53 gene in metastatic and recurrent cell

  4. Fatal deep vein thrombosis after allogeneic reduced intensity hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for the treatment of metastatic gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamitsuji, Yuri; Mori, Shin-Ichiro; Kami, Masahiro; Yamada, Hirofumi; Shirakawa, Kazuo; Kishi, Yukiko; Murashige, Naoko; Kim, Sung-Won; Heike, Yuji; Takaue, Yoichi

    2004-08-01

    A 61-year-old man received reduced intensity stem cell transplantation (RIST) for the treatment of metastatic gastric cancer. The cytoreductive course of RIST was uneventful until day 0, when fever suddenly developed and his performance status deteriorated. Edema developed in the bilateral lower extremities by day 7, which was diagnosed by Doppler ultrasonography as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) involving the femoral veins to the inferior vena cava. While the edema improved with anticoagulation treatment, gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) followed on day 13. Diarrhea subsided spontaneously, but hypoalbuminemia persisted, with the subsequent development of oliguria and jaundice on day 18. He died of sepsis on day 30, without any evidence of cancer progression. This case demonstrates that DVT is a potentially significant problem following RIST for solid tumors.

  5. Cancer-related ectopic expression of the bone-related transcription factor RUNX2 in non-osseous metastatic tumor cells is linked to cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Metastatic breast cancer cells frequently and ectopically express the transcription factor RUNX2, which normally attenuates proliferation and promotes maturation of osteoblasts. RUNX2 expression is inversely regulated with respect to cell growth in osteoblasts and deregulated in osteosarcoma cells. Methods Here, we addressed whether the functional relationship between cell growth and RUNX2 gene expression is maintained in breast cancer cells. We also investigated whether the aberrant expression of RUNX2 is linked to phenotypic parameters that could provide a selective advantage to cells during breast cancer progression. Results We find that, similar to its regulation in osteoblasts, RUNX2 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells is enhanced upon growth factor deprivation, as well as upon deactivation of the mitogen-dependent MEK-Erk pathway or EGFR signaling. Reduction of RUNX2 levels by RNAi has only marginal effects on cell growth and expression of proliferation markers in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Thus, RUNX2 is not a critical regulator of cell proliferation in this cell type. However, siRNA depletion of RUNX2 in MDA-MB-231 cells reduces cell motility, while forced exogenous expression of RUNX2 in MCF7 cells increases cell motility. Conclusions Our results support the emerging concept that the osteogenic transcription factor RUNX2 functions as a metastasis-related oncoprotein in non-osseous cancer cells. PMID:21029421

  6. An amperometric nanobiosensor using a biocompatible conjugate for early detection of metastatic cancer cells in biological fluid.

    PubMed

    Pallela, Ramjee; Chandra, Pranjal; Noh, Hui-Bog; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-11-15

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-associated death in humans, and its early diagnosis will help clinicians to develop suitable therapeutic strategies which may save life of cancer patients. In this direction, we designed an amperometric biosensor using a biocompatible conjugate to diagnose cancer metastasis by detecting epithelial cell adhesion molecule expressing metastatic cancer cells (Ep-MCCs). The sensor probe is fabricated by immobilizing monoclonal capture antibody (CapAnti) on the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)/conducting polymer composite layer. The detection relies on a sandwich-type approach using a bioconjugate composed of reporter antibody (RepAnti), nanostructured collagen (nCOL), AuNPs, and hydrazine (Hyd) which served as a nonenzymatic electrocatalyst for the reduction of H2O2. The binding of Ep-MCCs with the sensor probe was confirmed using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry. A dynamic range for the Ep-MCCs detection is determined between 45 and 100,000 Ep-MCCs/mL with the detection limit of 28±3 Ep-MCCs/mL. The proposed immunosensor is successfully applied to detect Ep-MCCs in serum and mixed cell samples and interferences due to nontarget cells and molecules present in the real sample matrix are also examined. The early stage of Ep-MCCs was examined by fluorescence-activated cell sorting assay, which confirms that the developed biosensor has detected Ep-MCCs in its early stage.

  7. The inhibitory effect of roasted licorice extract on human metastatic breast cancer cell-induced bone destruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun Kyoung; Park, Kwang-Kyun; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Lim, Soon Sung; Chung, Won-Yoon

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the ethanol extract of roasted licorice (rLE) could inhibit breast cancer-mediated bone destruction. rLE treatment reduced the viability of MDA-MB-231 human metastatic breast cancer cells but did not show any cytotoxicity in hFOB1.19 human osteoblastic cells and murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). rLE inhibited expression and secretion of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) as well as the mRNA and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in osteoblastic cells exposed to the conditioned medium of breast cancer cells. rLE dramatically inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in BMMs, thereby reducing osteoclast-mediated pit formation. Moreover, treatment with licochalcone A and isoliquiritigenin as the active components, whose contents are increased by the roasting process, remarkably suppressed RANKL-induced osteoclast formation in BMMs, respectively. Furthermore, orally administered rLE substantially blocked tumor growth and bone destruction in mice inoculated with breast cancer cells in the tibiae. Serum levels of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase and C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen and trabecular bone morphometric parameters were reversed to almost the same levels as the control mice by the rLE treatment. In conclusion, rLE may be a beneficial agent for preventing and treating bone destruction in patients with breast cancer.

  8. The initiator methionine tRNA drives cell migration and invasion leading to increased metastatic potential in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Birch, Joanna; Clarke, Cassie J.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Campbell, Kirsteen; Mitchell, Louise; Liko, Dritan; Kalna, Gabriela; Strathdee, Douglas; Sansom, Owen J.; Neilson, Matthew; Blyth, Karen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell's repertoire of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) has been linked to cancer. Recently, the level of the initiator methionine tRNA (tRNAiMet) in stromal fibroblasts has been shown to influence extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion to drive tumour growth and angiogenesis. Here we show that increased tRNAiMet within cancer cells does not influence tumour growth, but drives cell migration and invasion via a mechanism that is independent from ECM synthesis and dependent on α5β1 integrin and levels of the translation initiation ternary complex. In vivo and ex vivo migration (but not proliferation) of melanoblasts is significantly enhanced in transgenic mice which express additional copies of the tRNAiMet gene. We show that increased tRNAiMet in melanoma drives migratory, invasive behaviour and metastatic potential without affecting cell proliferation and primary tumour growth, and that expression of RNA polymerase III-associated genes (which drive tRNA expression) are elevated in metastases by comparison with primary tumours. Thus, specific alterations to the cancer cell tRNA repertoire drive a migration/invasion programme that may lead to metastasis. PMID:27543055

  9. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-01-01

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease. PMID:27173014

  10. CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) Exerts Distinct Functions in the Proliferation and Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by ERK.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Zhou, Guo-Lei

    2016-05-13

    The actin-regulating protein CAP1 is implicated in the invasiveness of human cancers. However, the exact role remains elusive and controversial given lines of conflicting evidence. Moreover, a potential role in the proliferative transformation has largely been overlooked. Further establishing the role and dissecting underlying mechanisms are imperative before targeting CAP1 can become a possibility for cancer treatment. Here we report our findings that CAP1 exerts cell type-dependent functions in the invasiveness of breast cancer cells. Depletion of CAP1 in the metastatic MDA-MB-231 and BT-549 cancer cells stimulated the metastatic potential while it actually inhibited it in the non-metastatic MCF-7 cancer cells or in normal cells. Moreover, we demonstrate functions for CAP1 in cancer cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth, again in a cell context-dependent manner. Importantly, we identify pivotal roles for the ERK-centered signaling in mediating both CAP1 functions. Phosphor mutants of CAP1 at the S307/S309 regulatory site had compromised rescue effects for both the invasiveness and proliferation in CAP1-knockdown cells, suggesting that CAP1 likely mediates upstream cell signals to control both functions. These novel mechanistic insights may ultimately open up avenues for strategies targeting CAP1 in the treatment of breast cancer, tailored for specific types of the highly diverse disease.

  11. GPNMB/OA protein increases the invasiveness of human metastatic prostate cancer cell lines DU145 and PC3 through MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Bodei, Serena; Bedussi, Francesca; Fragni, Martina; Bonini, Sara Anna; Simeone, Claudio; Zani, Danilo; Berruti, Alfredo; Missale, Cristina; Memo, Maurizio; Spano, PierFranco; Sigala, Sandra

    2014-04-15

    Non-metastatic glycoprotein melanoma protein B (GPNMB), also known as osteoactivin (OA) is expressed in a wide array of tumors and represents an emerging target for drug development. In this study, we investigated the role of GPNMB/OA in the progression of human metastatic DU145 and PC3 prostate cancer cells. GPNMB/OA contribution in PCa malignant phenotype has been analyzed by small interfering RNA-induced GPNMB/OA silencing. We found that following GPNMB/OA silencing the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells, evaluated by using in vitro invasivity assay, as well as the metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were equally strongly inhibited. By contrast knocking down GPNMB/OA weakly attenuated cell proliferation rate of DU145, an effect that paralleled with an increase number of apoptotic cells. However, PC3 cell growth seems to be not affected by GPNMB/OA. Together, these data reveal that GPNMB/OA acts as a critical molecular mediator promoting the acquisition of the more aggressive, pro-metastatic phenotype distinctive of human DU145 and PC3 cell lines. - Highlights: • GPNMB/OA expression correlates with DU145 and PC3 cells malignant phenotype. • GPNMB/OA silencing affects the migration capability of both DU145 and PC3 cells. • GPNMB/OA increases invasiveness by up-regulating MMPs activity. • GPNMB/OA promotes DU145 and PC3 cells progression into a more aggressive phenotype.

  12. FTY720 induces apoptosis in B16F10-NEX2 murine melanoma cells, limits metastatic development in vivo, and modulates the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Felipe V.; Arruda, Denise C.; Figueiredo, Carlos R.; Massaoka, Mariana H.; Matsuo, Alisson L.; Bueno, Valquiria; Rodrigues, Elaine G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Available chemotherapy presents poor control over the development of metastatic melanoma. FTY720 is a compound already approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis. It has also been observed that FTY720 inhibits tumor growth in vivo (experimental models) and in vitro (animal and human tumor cells). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of FTY720 on a metastatic melanoma model and in tumor cell lines. METHODS: We analyzed FTY720 efficacy in vivo in a syngeneic murine metastatic melanoma model, in which we injected tumor cells intravenously into C57BL/6 mice and then treated the mice orally with the compound for 7 days. We also treated mice and human tumor cell lines with FTY720 in vitro, and cell viability and death pathways were analyzed. RESULTS: FTY720 treatment limited metastatic melanoma growth in vivo and promoted a dose-dependent decrease in the viability of murine and human tumor cells in vitro. Melanoma cells treated with FTY720 exhibited characteristics of programmed cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, and increased β-catenin expression. In addition, FTY720 treatment resulted in an immunomodulatory effect in vivo by decreasing the percentage of Foxp3+ cells, without interfering with CD8+ T cells or lymphocyte-producing interferon-gamma. CONCLUSION: Further studies are needed using FTY720 as a monotherapy or in combined therapy, as different types of cancer cells would require a variety of signaling pathways to be extinguished. PMID:23917669

  13. Aldo-keto reductase 1C1 induced by interleukin-1β mediates the invasive potential and drug resistance of metastatic bladder cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashige; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In treating bladder cancer, determining the molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance are urgent to improving long-term patient survival. One of the metabolic enzymes, aldo-keto reductase 1C1 (AKR1C1), plays an essential role in cancer invasion/metastasis and chemoresistance. In orthotopic xenograft models of a human bladder cancer cell line, UM-UC-3, metastatic sublines were established from tumors in the liver, lung, and bone. These cells possessed elevated levels of EMT-associated markers, such as Snail, Slug, or CD44, and exhibited enhanced invasion. By microarray analysis, AKR1C1 was found to be up-regulated in metastatic lesions, which was verified in metastatic human bladder cancer specimens. Decreased invasion caused by AKR1C1 knockdown suggests a novel role of AKR1C1 in cancer invasion, which is probably due to the regulation of Rac1, Src, or Akt. An inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, was found to increase AKR1C1 in bladder cancer cell lines. One particular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flufenamic acid, antagonized AKR1C1 and decreased the cisplatin-resistance and invasion potential of metastatic sublines. These data uncover the crucial role of AKR1C1 in regulating both metastasis and drug resistance; as a result, AKR1C1 should be a potent molecular target in invasive bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27698389

  14. Depsipeptide in Unresectable Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-29

    Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx

  15. Reduced Expression of the ROCK Inhibitor Rnd3 Is Associated with Increased Invasiveness and Metastatic Potential in Mesenchymal Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Chiodi, Ilaria; Favero, Francesco; Mello-Grand, Maurizia; Dei Tos, Angelo P.; Giulotto, Elena; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal and amoeboid movements are two important mechanisms adopted by cancer cells to invade the surrounding environment. Mesenchymal movement depends on extracellular matrix protease activity, amoeboid movement on the RhoA-dependent kinase ROCK. Cancer cells can switch from one mechanism to the other in response to different stimuli, limiting the efficacy of antimetastatic therapies. Methodology and Principal Findings We investigated the acquisition and molecular regulation of the invasion capacity of neoplastically transformed human fibroblasts, which were able to induce sarcomas and metastases when injected into immunocompromised mice. We found that neoplastic transformation was associated with a change in cell morphology (from fibroblastic to polygonal), a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, a decrease in the expression of several matrix metalloproteases and increases in cell motility and invasiveness. In a three-dimensional environment, sarcomagenic cells showed a spherical morphology with cortical actin rings, suggesting a switch from mesenchymal to amoeboid movement. Accordingly, cell invasion decreased after treatment with the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, but not with the matrix protease inhibitor Ro 28-2653. The increased invasiveness of tumorigenic cells was associated with reduced expression of Rnd3 (also known as RhoE), a cellular inhibitor of ROCK. Indeed, ectopic Rnd3 expression reduced their invasive ability in vitro and their metastatic potential in vivo. Conclusions These results indicate that, during neoplastic transformation, cells of mesenchymal origin can switch from a mesenchymal mode of movement to an amoeboid one. In addition, they point to Rnd3 as a possible regulator of mesenchymal tumor cell invasion and to ROCK as a potential therapeutic target for sarcomas. PMID:21209796

  16. Drug Development Against Metastatic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Huang, Sui

    2017-01-01

    While combinational diagnostic and treatment strategies over the past decades have significantly improved the overall survival of cancer patients, metastatic cancer remains a leading cause of death in developed countries. The lack of successful treatment strategies for the disease is in large part due to the complexity of the metastatic transformation, which embodies extensive cellular and extracellular alterations, enabling metastatic cancer cells to reach and colonize other organs. The mode of action for the majority of anti-cancer drugs used in clinics today is primarily tumor growth inhibition. While they are effective in destroying cancer cells, they fall short in blocking metastasis. Here we discuss the evolution of past and current anti-cancer drug development, the limits of current strategies, and possible alternative approaches for future drug development against metastatic cancers. PMID:28356899

  17. Activation of Estrogen Receptor Transfected into a Receptor-Negative Brest Cancer Cell Line Decreases the Metastatic and Invasive Potential of the Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marcel; Derocq, Danielle; Freiss, Gilles; Rochefort, Henri

    1992-12-01

    Breast cancers containing estrogen receptors are responsive to antiestrogen treatment and have a better prognosis than estrogen receptor-negative tumors. The loss of estrogen and progesterone receptors appears to be associated with a progression to less-differentiated tumors. We transfected the human estrogen receptor into the estrogen receptor-negative metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 in an attempt to restore their sensitivity to antiestrogens. Two stable sublines of MDA-MB-231 cells (HC1 and HE5) expressing functional estrogen receptors were studied for their ability to grow and invade in vitro and to metastasize in athymic nude mice. The number and size of lung metastases developed by these two sublines in ovariectomized nude mice was not markedly altered by tamoxifen but was inhibited 3-fold by estradiol. Estradiol also significantly inhibited in vitro cell proliferation of these sublines and their invasiveness in Matrigel, a reconstituted basement membrane, whereas the antiestrogens 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 164,384 reversed these effects. These results show that estradiol inhibits the metastatic ability of estrogen receptornegative breast cancer cells following transfection with the estrogen receptor, whereas estrogen receptor-positive breast cancers are stimulated by estrogen, indicating that factors other than the estrogen receptor are involved in progression toward hormone independence. Reactivation or transfer of the estrogen receptor gene can therefore be considered as therapeutic approaches to hormone-independent cancers

  18. Regulation of Metastatic Breast Cancer Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    dissemination into metastatic niches such as the brain, bone and liver . Once attaining the metastatic organ the rate-limiting step in metastasis is that...individual cell motility to disseminate and eventually extravasate into common metastatic niches such as the brain, bone and liver . Once attaining the...What were the major goals of the project? SA1. Determine whether the epithelial phenotype allows for cell seeding, survival and dormancy in the liver

  19. Immunotargeting of Antigen xCT Attenuates Stem-like Cell Behavior and Metastatic Progression in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lanzardo, Stefania; Conti, Laura; Rooke, Ronald; Ruiu, Roberto; Accart, Nathalie; Bolli, Elisabetta; Arigoni, Maddalena; Macagno, Marco; Barrera, Giuseppina; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Aurisicchio, Luigi; Calogero, Raffaele Adolfo; Cavallo, Federica

    2016-01-01

    Resistance to therapy and lack of curative treatments for metastatic breast cancer suggest that current therapies may be missing the subpopulation of chemoresistant and radioresistant cancer stem cells (CSC). The ultimate success of any treatment may well rest on CSC eradication, but specific anti-CSC therapies are still limited. A comparison of the transcriptional profiles of murine Her2(+) breast tumor TUBO cells and their derived CSC-enriched tumorspheres has identified xCT, the functional subunit of the cystine/glutamate antiporter system xc(-), as a surface protein that is upregulated specifically in tumorspheres. We validated this finding by cytofluorimetric analysis and immunofluorescence in TUBO-derived tumorspheres and in a panel of mouse and human triple negative breast cancer cell-derived tumorspheres. We further show that downregulation of xCT impaired tumorsphere generation and altered CSC intracellular redox balance in vitro, suggesting that xCT plays a functional role in CSC biology. DNA vaccination based immunotargeting of xCT in mice challenged with syngeneic tumorsphere-derived cells delayed established subcutaneous tumor growth and strongly impaired pulmonary metastasis formation by generating anti-xCT antibodies able to alter CSC self-renewal and redox balance. Finally, anti-xCT vaccination increased CSC chemosensitivity to doxorubicin in vivo, indicating that xCT immunotargeting may be an effective adjuvant to chemotherapy.

  20. Exceptional antineoplastic activity of a dendritic-cell-targeted vaccine loaded with a Listeria peptide proposed against metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Bronchalo-Vicente, Lucia; Freire, Javier; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Alaez-Alvarez, Lidia; Gomez-Roman, Javier; Yañez-Diaz, Sonsóles; Alvarez-Dominguez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with dendritic cells (DCs) is proposed to induce lasting responses against melanoma but its survival benefit in patients needs to be demonstrated. We propose a DC-targeted vaccine loaded with a Listeria peptide with exceptional anti-tumour activity to prevent metastasis of melanoma. Mice vaccinated with vaccines based on DCs loaded with listeriolysin O peptide (91–99) (LLO91–99) showed clear reduction of metastatic B16OVA melanoma size and adhesion, prevention of lung metastasis, enhanced survival, and reversion of immune tolerance. Robust innate and specific immune responses explained the efficiency of DC-LLO91–99 vaccines against B16OVA melanoma. The noTable features of this vaccine related to melanoma reduction were: expansion of immune-dominant LLO91–99-specific CD8 T cells that helped to expand melanoma-specific CD8+ T cells; high numbers of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes with a cytotoxic phenotype; and a decrease in CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells. This vaccine might be a useful alternative treatment for advanced melanoma, alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26942874

  1. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M; Wadsworth, Marc H; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S; Hughes, Travis K; Ziegler, Carly G K; Kazer, Samuel W; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M; Andreev, Aleksandr Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K; Sullivan, Ryan J; Flaherty, Keith T; Frederick, Dennie T; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A

    2016-04-08

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors, we applied single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to 4645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal, and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug-resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that tumors characterized by high levels of the MITF transcription factor also contained cells with low MITF and elevated levels of the AXL kinase. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor microenvironmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single-cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies.

  2. Dissecting the multicellular ecosystem of metastatic melanoma by single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Tirosh, Itay; Izar, Benjamin; Prakadan, Sanjay M.; Wadsworth, Marc H.; Treacy, Daniel; Trombetta, John J.; Rotem, Asaf; Rodman, Christopher; Lian, Christine; Murphy, George; Fallahi-Sichani, Mohammad; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Lin, Jia-Ren; Cohen, Ofir; Shah, Parin; Lu, Diana; Genshaft, Alex S.; Hughes, Travis K.; Ziegler, Carly G. K.; Kazer, Samuel W.; Gaillard, Aleth; Kolb, Kellie E.; Villani, Alexandra-Chloé; Johannessen, Cory M.; Andreev, Aleksandr Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Bertagnolli, Monica; Sorger, Peter K.; Sullivan, Ryan J.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Frederick, Dennie T.; Jané-Valbuena, Judit; Yoon, Charles H.; Rozenblatt-Rosen, Orit; Shalek, Alex K.; Regev, Aviv; Garraway, Levi A.

    2016-01-01

    To explore the distinct genotypic and phenotypic states of melanoma tumors we applied single-cell RNA-seq to 4,645 single cells isolated from 19 patients, profiling malignant, immune, stromal and endothelial cells. Malignant cells within the same tumor displayed transcriptional heterogeneity associated with the cell cycle, spatial context, and a drug resistance program. In particular, all tumors harbored malignant cells from two distinct transcriptional cell states, such that “MITF-high” tumors also contained “AXL-high” tumor cells. Single-cell analyses suggested distinct tumor micro-environmental patterns, including cell-to-cell interactions. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed exhaustion programs, their connection to T cell activation and to clonal expansion, and their variability across patients. Overall, we begin to unravel the cellular ecosystem of tumors and how single cell genomics offers insights with implications for both targeted and immune therapies. PMID:27124452

  3. Physcion inhibits the metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer SW620 cells in vitro by suppressing the transcription factor SOX2

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yan-tao; Chen, Xue-hong; Gao, Hui; Ye, Jun-li; Wang, Chun-bo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Physcion, an anthraquinone derivative, exhibits hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer activities. In this study we examined whether and how physcion inhibited metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro. Methods: Human colorectal cancer cell line SW620 was tested. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a wound healing and Transwell assay, respectively. The expression levels of transcription factor SOX2 in the cells were modulated with shRNA targeting SOX2 and SOX2 overexpressing plasmid. The expression of target molecules involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and the signaling pathways was determined with Western blots or qRT-PCR. ROS levels were measured using DCF-DA. Results: Physcion (2.5, 5 mol/L) did not affect the cell viability, but dose-dependently inhibited the cell adhesion, migration and invasion. Physcion also inhibited the EMT process in the cells, as evidenced by the increased epithelial marker E-cadherin expression, and by decreased expression of mesenchymal markers N-cadherin, vimentin, fibronectin and α-SMA, as well as transcriptional repressors Snail, Slug and Twist. Physcion suppressed the expression of SOX2, whereas overexpression of SOX2 abrogated the inhibition of physcion on metastatic behaviors. Physcion markedly increased ROS production and phosphorylation of AMPK and GSK3β in the cells, whereas the AMPK inhibitor compound C or the ROS inhibitor NAC abolished the inhibition of physcion on metastatic behaviors. Conclusion: Physcion inhibits the metastatic potential of human colorectal cancer cells in vitro via activating ROS/AMPK/GSK3β signaling pathways and suppressing SOX2. PMID:26707141

  4. A serum metabolomic fingerprint of bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination as first-line treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jobard, Elodie; Blanc, Ellen; Négrier, Sylvie; Escudier, Bernard; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Chevreau, Christine; Elena-Herrmann, Bénédicte; Trédan, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background: Renal cell carcinoma is one of the most chemoresistant cancers, and its metastatic form requires administration of targeted therapies based on angiogenesis or mTOR inhibitors. Understanding how these treatments impact the human metabolism is essential to predict the host response and adjust personalised therapies. We present a metabolomic investigation of serum samples from patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC) to identify metabolic signatures associated with targeted therapies. Methods: Pre-treatment and serial on-treatment sera were available for 121 patients participating in the French clinical trial TORAVA, in which 171 randomised patients with mRCC received a bevacizumab and temsirolimus combination (experimental arm A) or a standard treatment: either sunitinib (B) or interferon-α+bevacizumab (C). Metabolic profiles were obtained using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared on-treatment or between treatments. Results: Multivariate statistical modelling discriminates serum profiles before and after several weeks of treatment for arms A and C. The combination A causes faster changes in patient metabolism than treatment C, detectable after only 2 weeks of treatment. Metabolites related to the discrimination include lipids and carbohydrates, consistently with the known RCC metabolism and side effects of the drugs involved. Comparison of the metabolic profiles for the three arms shows that temsirolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, is responsible for the faster host metabolism modification observed in the experimental arm. Conclusions: In mRCC, metabolomics shows a faster host metabolism modification induced by a mTOR inhibitor as compared with standard treatments. These results should be confirmed in larger cohorts and other cancer types. PMID:26372698

  5. Systemic immune-inflammation index predicts the clinical outcome in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer treated with sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    Lolli, Cristian; Basso, Umberto; Derosa, Lisa; Scarpi, Emanuela; Sava, Teodoro; Santoni, Matteo; Crabb, Simon J.; Massari, Francesco; Aieta, Michele; Conteduca, Vincenza; Maruzzo, Marco; La Russa, Francesca; Wheater, Matthew; Berardi, Rossana; Galli, Luca; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    Background In this retrospective analysis, we explored the prognostic and predictive value of the systemic immune-inflammation index (SII), based on lymphocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts, at baseline and changes at week 6 during first-line sunitinib in patients with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). Results Patients were stratified into high SII (≥ 730) and low SII (< 730) groups. SII was associated with objective response, p < 0.0001. The median PFS was 6.3 months (95% CI 5.5–8.9) in patients with SII ≥ 730 and 18.7 months (95% CI 14.7–22.8) in those with SII < 730, p < 0.0001. The median OS was 43.6 months (95% CI 35.3–52.1) in patients with SII < 730, and 13.5 months (95% CI 9.8–18.5) in those with SII ≥ 730, p < 0.0001. In multivariate analysis, performance status, IMDC score and SII were able to predict OS (HR = 3.29, HR = 1.71 and HR = 1.79, respectively). Materials and Methods We included 335 consecutive RCC patients treated with first-line sunitinib. The X-tile 3.6.1 software (Yale University, New Haven, CT) was used for bioinformatic analysis of the data to determine the cutoff value of SII. Progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and their 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were estimated by Kaplan-Meier method and compared with logrank test. The impact of SII conversion at week 6 of treatment on PFS and OS was evaluated by Cox regression analyses. Conclusions The SII and its changes during treatment represent a powerful prognostic indicator of clinical outcome in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:27409344

  6. Genome-wide methylation sequencing of paired primary and metastatic cell lines identifies common DNA methylation changes and a role for EBF3 as a candidate epigenetic driver of melanoma metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Stockwell, Peter A; Ahn, Antonio; Rodger, Euan J; Leichter, Anna L; Eccles, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations are increasingly implicated in metastasis, whereas very few genetic mutations have been identified as authentic drivers of cancer metastasis. Yet, to date, few studies have identified metastasis-related epigenetic drivers, in part because a framework for identifying driver epigenetic changes in metastasis has not been established. Using reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS), we mapped genome-wide DNA methylation patterns in three cutaneous primary and metastatic melanoma cell line pairs to identify metastasis-related epigenetic drivers. Globally, metastatic melanoma cell lines were hypomethylated compared to the matched primary melanoma cell lines. Using whole genome RRBS we identified 75 shared (10 hyper- and 65 hypomethylated) differentially methylated fragments (DMFs), which were associated with 68 genes showing significant methylation differences. One gene, Early B Cell Factor 3 (EBF3), exhibited promoter hypermethylation in metastatic cell lines, and was validated with bisulfite sequencing and in two publicly available independent melanoma cohorts (n = 40 and 458 melanomas, respectively). We found that hypermethylation of the EBF3 promoter was associated with increased EBF3 mRNA levels in metastatic melanomas and subsequent inhibition of DNA methylation reduced EBF3 expression. RNAi-mediated knockdown of EBF3 mRNA levels decreased proliferation, migration and invasion in primary and metastatic melanoma cell lines. Overall, we have identified numerous epigenetic changes characterising metastatic melanoma cell lines, including EBF3-induced aggressive phenotypic behaviour with elevated EBF3 expression in metastatic melanoma, suggesting that EBF3 promoter hypermethylation may be a candidate epigenetic driver of metastasis. PMID:28030832

  7. Carbonic anhydrase IX promotes myeloid-derived suppressor cell mobilization and establishment of a metastatic niche by stimulating G-CSF production.

    PubMed

    Chafe, Shawn C; Lou, Yuanmei; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Vallejo, Marylou; Hamilton, Melisa J; McDonald, Paul C; Bennewith, Kevin L; Möller, Andreas; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2015-03-15

    The mobilization of bone marrow-derived cells (BMDC) to distant tissues before the arrival of disseminated tumor cells has been shown preclinically to facilitate metastasis through the establishment of metastatic niches. Primary tumor hypoxia has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in the production of chemokines and cytokines responsible for the mobilization of these BMDCs, especially in breast cancer. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, CA9) expression is highly upregulated in hypoxic breast cancer cells through the action of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1). Preclinical evidence has demonstrated that CAIX is required for breast tumor growth and metastasis; however, the mechanism by which CAIX exerts its prometastatic function is not well understood. Here, we show that CAIX is indispensable for the production of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) by hypoxic breast cancer cells and tumors in an orthotopic model. Furthermore, we demonstrate that tumor-expressed CAIX is required for the G-CSF-driven mobilization of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) to the breast cancer lung metastatic niche. We also determined that CAIX expression is required for the activation of NF-κB in hypoxic breast cancer cells and constitutive activation of the NF-κB pathway in CAIX-depleted cells restored G-CSF secretion. Together, these findings identify a novel hypoxia-induced CAIX-NF-κB-G-CSF cellular signaling axis culminating in the mobilization of granulocytic MDSCs to the breast cancer lung metastatic niche.

  8. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of tenascin-W by TGF-beta signaling in the bone metastatic niche of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chiovaro, Francesca; Martina, Enrico; Bottos, Alessia; Scherberich, Arnaud;