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Sample records for meth-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity

  1. nNOS inhibitors attenuate methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity but not hyperthermia in mice.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Martin, J L; Ail, S F

    2000-09-11

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is associated with hyperthermia. We investigated the effect of several neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitors on METH-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Administration of METH (5 mg/kg; q. 3 h x 3) to Swiss Webster mice produced marked hyperthermia and 50-60% depletion of striatal dopaminergic markers 72 h after METH administration. Pretreatment with the nNOS inhibitors S-methylthiocitrulline (SMTC; 10 mg/kg) or 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3-Br-7-NI; 20 mg/kg) before each METH injection did not affect the persistent hyperthermia produced by METH, but afforded protection against the depletion of dopaminergic markers. A low dose (25 mg/kg) of the nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia, but a high dose (50 mg/kg) produced significant hypothermia. These findings indicate that low dose of selective nNOS inhibitors protect against METH-induced neurotoxicity with no effect on body temperature and support the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite have a major role in METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  2. Prevention of dopaminergic neurotoxicity by targeting nitric oxide and peroxynitrite: implications for the prevention of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Imam, S Z; Islam, F; Itzhak, Y; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    2000-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic psychostimulant that produces catecholaminergic brain damage by producing oxidative stress and free radical generation. The role of oxygen and nitrogen radicals is well documented as a cause of METH-induced neurotoxic damage. In this study, we have obtained evidence that METH-induced neurotoxicity is the resultant of interaction between oxygen and nitrogen radicals, and it is mediated by the production of peroxynitrite. We have also assessed the effects of inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) as well as scavenger of nitric oxide and a peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst. Significant protective effects were observed with the inhibitor of nNOS, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), as well as by the selective peroxynitrite scavenger or decomposition catalyst, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,4,6-trimethyl-3,5-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrinato iron III (FeTPPS). However, the use of a nitric oxide scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO), did not provide any significant protection against METH-induced hyperthermia or peroxynitrite generation and the resulting dopaminergic neurotoxicity. In particular, treatment with FeTPPS completely prevented METH-induced hyperthermia, peroxynitrite production, and METH-induced dopaminergic depletion. Together, these data demonstrate that METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is mediated by the generation of peroxynitrite, which can be selectively protected by nNOS inhibitors or peroxynitrite scavenger or decomposition catalysts.

  3. Resistance of neuronal nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Gandia, C; Huang, P L; Ali, S F

    1998-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful psychostimulant that produces dopaminergic neurotoxicity manifested by a decrease in the levels of dopamine, tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine transporter (DAT) binding sites in the nigrostriatal system. We have recently reported that blockade of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) isoform by 7-nitroindazole provides protection against METH-induced neurotoxicity in Swiss Webster mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of a neurotoxic dose of METH on mutant mice lacking the nNOS gene [nNOS(-/-)] and wild-type controls. In addition, we sought to investigate the behavioral outcome of exposure to a neurotoxic dose of METH. Homozygote nNOS(-/-), heterozygote nNOS(+/-) and wild-type animals were administered either saline or METH (5 mg/kg x 3). Dopamine, DOPAC and HVA levels, as well as DAT binding site levels, were determined in striatal tissue derived 72 h after the last METH injection. This regimen of METH given to nNOS(-/-) mice affected neither the tissue content of dopamine and its metabolites nor the number of DAT binding sites. Although a moderate reduction in the levels of dopamine (35%) and DAT binding sites (32%) occurred in striatum of heterozygote nNOS(+/-) mice, a more profound depletion of the dopaminergic markers (up to 68%) was observed in the wild-type animals. METH-induced hyperthermia was observed in all animal strains examined except the nNOS(-/-) mice. Investigation of the animals' spontaneous locomotor activity before and after administration of the neurotoxic dose of METH (5 mg/kg x 3) revealed no differences. A low dose of METH (1.0 mg/kg) administered to naive animals (nNOS(-/-) and wild-type) resulted in a similar intensity of locomotor stimulation. However, 68 to 72 h after exposure to the high-dose METH regimen, a marked sensitized responses to a challenge METH injection was observed in the wild-type mice but not in the nNOS(-/-) mice. Taken together, these results

  4. Methamphetamine- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl- 1,2,3, 6-tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in inducible nitric oxide synthase-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Martin, J L; Ali, S F

    1999-12-15

    Previous studies have suggested a role for the retrograde messenger, nitric oxide (NO), in methamphetamine (METH)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Since evidence supported the involvement of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) isoform in the dopaminergic neurotoxicity, the present study was undertaken to investigate whether the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) isoform is also associated with METH- and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. The administration of METH (5mg/kg x 3) to iNOS deficient mice [homozygote iNOS(-/-)] and wild type mice (C57BL/6) resulted in significantly smaller depletion of striatal dopaminergic markers in the iNOS(-/-) mice compared with the wild-type mice. METH-induced hyperthermia was also significantly lower in the iNOS(-/-) mice than in wild-type mice. In contrast to the outcome of METH administration, MPTP injections (20 mg/kg x 3) resulted in a similar decrease in striatal dopaminergic markers in iNOS(-/-) and wild-type mice. In the set of behavioral experiments, METH-induced locomotor sensitization was investigated. The acute administration of METH (1.0 mg/kg) resulted in the same intensity of locomotor activity in iNOS(-/-) and wild-type mice. Moreover, 68 to 72 h after the exposure to the high-dose METH regimen (5 mg/kg x 3), a marked sensitized response to a challenge injection of METH (1.0 mg/kg) was observed in both the iNOS(-/-) and wild-type mice. The finding that iNOS(-/-) mice were unprotected from MPTP-induced neurotoxicity suggests that the partial protection against METH-induced neurotoxicity observed was primarily associated with the diminished hyperthermic effect of METH seen in the iNOS(-/-) mice. Moreover, in contrast to nNOS deficiency, iNOS deficiency did not affect METH-induced behavioral sensitization. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Protection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity to neostriatal dopaminergic neurons by adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Delle Donne, K T; Sonsalla, P K

    1994-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in experimental animals appears to have a glutamatergic component because blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors prevents the neuropathologic consequences. Because adenosine affords neuroprotection against various forms of glutamate-mediated neuronal damage, the present studies were performed to investigate whether adenosine plays a protective role in METH-induced toxicity. METH-induced decrements in neostriatal dopamine content and tyrosine hydroxylase activity in mice were potentiated by concurrent treatment with caffeine, a nonselective adenosine antagonist that blocks both A1 and A2 adenosine receptors. In contrast, chronic treatment of mice with caffeine through their drinking water for 4 weeks, which increased the number of adenosine A1 receptors in the neostriatum and frontal cortex, followed by drug washout, prevented the neurochemical changes produced by the treatment of mice with METH treatment. In contrast, this treatment did not prevent 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6- tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Furthermore, concurrent administration of cyclopentyladenosine, an adenosine A1 receptor agonist, attenuated the METH-induced neurochemical changes. This protection by cyclopentyladenosine was blocked by cyclopentyltheophylline, an A1 receptor antagonist. These results indicate that activation of A1 receptors can protect against METH-induced neurotoxicity in mice.

  6. Effect of melatonin on methamphetamine- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Martin, J L; Black, M D; Ali, S F

    1998-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is thought to be associated with the formation of free radicals. Since evidence suggests that melatonin may act as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of melatonin on METH- and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. In addition, the effect of melatonin on METH-induced locomotor sensitization was investigated. The administration of METH (5 mg kg(-1) x 3) or MPTP (20 mg kg(-1) x 3) to Swiss Webster mice resulted in 45-57% depletion in the content of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid, and 57-59% depletion in dopamine transporter binding sites. The administration of melatonin (10 mg kg(-1)) before each of the three injections of the neurotoxic agents (on day 1), and thereafter for two additional days, afforded a full protection against METH-induced depletion of dopamine and its metabolites and dopamine transporter binding sites. In addition, melatonin significantly diminished METH-induced hyperthermia. However, the treatment with melatonin had no significant effect on MPTP-induced depletion of the dopaminergic markers tested. In the set of behavioral experiments, we found that the administration of 1 mg kg(-1) METH to Swiss Webster mice for 5 days resulted in marked locomotor sensitization to a subsequent challenge injection of METH, as well as context-dependent sensitization (conditioning). The pretreatment with melatonin (10 mg kg(-1)) prevented neither the sensitized response to METH nor the development of conditioned locomotion. Results of the present study indicate that melatonin has a differential effect on the dopaminergic neurotoxicity produced by METH and MPTP. Since it is postulated that METH-induced hyperthermia is related to its neurotoxic effect, while regulation of body temperature is unrelated to MPTP-induced neurotoxicity or METH-induced

  7. Methamphetamine generates peroxynitrite and produces dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice: protective effects of peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst.

    PubMed

    Imam, S Z; Crow, J P; Newport, G D; Islam, F; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    1999-08-07

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is believed to be produced by oxidative stress and free radical generation. The present study was undertaken to investigate if METH generates peroxynitrite and produces dopaminergic neurotoxicity. We also investigated if this generation of peroxynitrite can be blocked by a selective peroxynitrite decomposition catalyst, 5, 10,15, 20-tetrakis(N-methyl-4'-pyridyl)porphyrinato iron III (FeTMPyP) and protect against METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Administration of METH resulted in the significant formation of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), an in vivo marker of peroxynitrite generation, in the striatum and also caused a significant increase in the body temperature. METH injection also caused a significant decrease in the concentration of dopamine (DA), 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA) by 76%, 53% and 40%, respectively, in the striatum compared with the control group. Treatment with FeTMPyP blocked the formation of 3-NT by 66% when compared with the METH group. FeTMPyP treatment also provided significant protection against the METH-induced hyperthermia and depletion of DA, DOPAC and HVA. Administration of FeTMPyP alone neither resulted in 3-NT formation nor had any significant effect on DA or its metabolite concentrations. These findings indicate that peroxynitrite plays a role in METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and also suggests that peroxynitrite decomposition catalysts may be beneficial for the management of psychostimulant abuse. Copyright 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  8. σ Receptor antagonist attenuation of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity is correlated to body temperature modulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Matthew J; Seminerio, Michael J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Coop, Andrew; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) causes hyperthermia and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the rodent striatum. METH interacts with σ receptors and σ receptor antagonists normally mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The present study was undertaken because in two experiments, pretreatment with σ receptor antagonists failed to attenuate METH-induced hyperthermia in mice. This allowed us to determine whether the ability of σ receptor antagonists (AZ66 and AC927) to mitigate METH-induced neurotoxicity depends upon their ability to modulate METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice were treated using a repeated dosing paradigm and body temperatures recorded. Striatal dopamine was measured one week post-treatment. The data indicate that the ability of σ receptor antagonists to attenuate METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is linked to their ability to block METH-induced hyperthermia. The ability of σ receptor antagonists to mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia may contribute to its neuroprotective actions.

  9. Changes in gene expression linked to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tao; Tong, Liqiong; Barrett, Tanya; Yuan, Jie; Hatzidimitriou, George; McCann, Una D; Becker, Kevin G; Donovan, David M; Ricaurte, George A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of these studies was to examine the role of gene expression in methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopamine (DA) neurotoxicity. First, the effects of the mRNA synthesis inhibitor, actinomycin-D, and the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, were examined. Both agents afforded complete protection against METH-induced DA neurotoxicity and did so independently of effects on core temperature, DA transporter function, or METH brain levels, suggesting that gene transcription and mRNA translation play a role in METH neurotoxicity. Next, microarray technology, in combination with an experimental approach designed to facilitate recognition of relevant gene expression patterns, was used to identify gene products linked to METH-induced DA neurotoxicity. This led to the identification of several genes in the ventral midbrain associated with the neurotoxic process, including genes for energy metabolism [cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1), reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide ubiquinone oxidoreductase chain 2, and phosphoglycerate mutase B], ion regulation (members of sodium/hydrogen exchanger and sodium/bile acid cotransporter family), signal transduction (adenylyl cyclase III), and cell differentiation and degeneration (N-myc downstream-regulated gene 3 and tau protein). Of these differentially expressed genes, we elected to further examine the increase in COX1 expression, because of data implicating energy utilization in METH neurotoxicity and the known role of COX1 in energy metabolism. On the basis of time course studies, Northern blot analyses, in situ hybridization results, and temperature studies, we now report that increased COX1 expression in the ventral midbrain is linked to METH-induced DA neuronal injury. The precise role of COX1 and other genes in METH neurotoxicity remains to be elucidated.

  10. Methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice: pharmacological profile of protective and nonprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Albers, D S; Sonsalla, P K

    1995-12-01

    Neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine (METH) can cause hyperthermia in experimental animals. Damage sustained to dopaminergic nerve terminals by this stimulant can be reduced by environmental cooling or by pharmacological manipulation which attenuates the hyperthermia. Many pharmacological agents with very diverse actions protect against METH-induced neuropathology. Several of these compounds, as well as drugs which do not protect, were investigated to determine if there was a relationship between protection and METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice received METH with or without concurrent administration of other drugs and core (i.e., colonic) temperature was monitored during treatment. The animals were sacrificed > or = 5 days later and neostriatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine were measured. Core temperature was significantly elevated (> or = 2 degrees C) in mice treated with doses of METH which produced > or = 90% losses in striatal dopamine but not in mice less severally affected (only 50% loss of dopamine). Concurrent treatment of mice with METH and pharmacological agents which protected partially or completely from METH-induced toxicity also prevented the hyperthermic response (i.e., dopamine receptor antagonists, fenfluramine, dizocilpine, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, phenytoin, aminooxyacetic acid and propranol). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the hyperthermia produced by METH contributes to its neuropathology. However, studies with reserpine, a compound which dramatically lowers core temperature, demonstrated that hyperthermia per se is not a requirement for METH-induced neurotoxicity. Although core temperature was elevated in reserpinized mice treated with METH as compared with reserpinized control mice, their temperatures remained significantly lower than in nonreserpinized control mice. However, the hypothermic state produced in the reserpinized mice did not provide protection from METH-induced toxicity. These data demonstrate

  11. A Role for D1 Dopamine Receptors in Striatal Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure results in long-term damage to the dopamine system in both human METH abusers and animal models. One factor that has been heavily implicated in this METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system is the activation of D1 Dopamine (DA) receptors. However, a significant caveat to the studies investigating the role of the receptor in such toxicity is that genetic and pharmacological manipulations of the D1 DA receptor also mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia. Importantly, METH-induced hyperthermia is tightly associated with the neurotoxicity, such that simply cooling animals during METH exposure protects against the neurotoxicity. Therefore, it is difficult to determine whether D1 DA receptors per se play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity or whether the protection observed simply resulted from a mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. To answer this important question, the current study infused a D1 DA receptor antagonist into striatum during METH exposure while controlling for METH-induced hyperthermia. Here we found that even when METH-induced hyperthermia is maintained, the coadministration of a D1 DA receptor antagonist protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity, strongly suggesting that D1 DA receptors play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity apart from the mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. PMID:23994061

  12. A role for D1 dopamine receptors in striatal methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Friend, Danielle M; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-10-25

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure results in long-term damage to the dopamine system in both human METH abusers and animal models. One factor that has been heavily implicated in this METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system is the activation of D1 dopamine (DA) receptors. However, a significant caveat to the studies investigating the role of the receptor in such toxicity is that genetic and pharmacological manipulations of the D1 DA receptor also mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia. Importantly, METH-induced hyperthermia is tightly associated with the neurotoxicity, such that simply cooling animals during METH exposure protects against the neurotoxicity. Therefore, it is difficult to determine whether D1 DA receptors per se play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity or whether the protection observed simply resulted from a mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. To answer this important question, the current study infused a D1 DA receptor antagonist into striatum during METH exposure while controlling for METH-induced hyperthermia. Here we found that even when METH-induced hyperthermia is maintained, the coadministration of a D1 DA receptor antagonist protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity, strongly suggesting that D1 DA receptors play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity apart from the mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Current research on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity: animal models of monoamine disruption.

    PubMed

    Kita, Taizo; Wagner, George C; Nakashima, Toshikatsu

    2003-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity is characterized by a long-lasting depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and serotonin as well as damage to striatal dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve terminals. Several hypotheses regarding the mechanism underlying METH-induced neurotoxicity have been proposed. In particular, it is thought that endogenous DA in the striatum may play an important role in mediating METH-induced neuronal damage. This hypothesis is based on the observation of free radical formation and oxidative stress produced by auto-oxidation of DA consequent to its displacement from synaptic vesicles to cytoplasm. In addition, METH-induced neurotoxicity may be linked to the glutamate and nitric oxide systems within the striatum. Moreover, using knockout mice lacking the DA transporter, the vesicular monoamine transporter 2, c-fos, or nitric oxide synthetase, it was determined that these factors may be connected in some way to METH-induced neurotoxicity. Finally a role for apoptosis in METH-induced neurotoxicity has also been established including evidence of protection of bcl-2, expression of p53 protein, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), activity of caspase-3. The neuronal damage induced by METH may reflect neurological disorders such as autism and Parkinson's disease.

  14. Role of microglia in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Enquan; Liu, Jianuo; Liu, Han; Wang, Xiaobei; Xiong, Huangui

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is an addictive psychostimulant widely abused around the world. The chronic use of Meth produces neurotoxicity featured by dopaminergic terminal damage and microgliosis, resulting in serious neurological and behavioral consequences. Ample evidence indicate that Meth causes microglial activation and resultant secretion of pro-inflammatory molecules leading to neural injury. However, the mechanisms underlying Meth-induced microglial activation remain to be determined. In this review, we attempt to address the effects of Meth on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated microglia activation both in vitro and in-vivo. Meth abuse not only increases HIV transmission but also exacerbates progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) through activation of microglia. In addition, the therapeutic potential of anti-inflammatory drugs on ameliorating Meth-induced microglia activation and resultant neuronal injury is discussed. PMID:28694920

  15. Cholecystokinin-8 inhibits methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity via an anti-oxidative stress pathway.

    PubMed

    Wen, Di; An, Meiling; Gou, Hongyan; Liu, Xia; Liu, Li; Ma, Chunling; Cong, Bin

    2016-12-01

    As a powerful addictive psychostimulant drug, coupled with its neurotoxicity, methamphetamine (METH) abuse may lead to long-lasting abnormalities in brain structure and function. We found that pretreatment of cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8) inhibited METH-induced brain cellular dopaminergic (DA) damage in the striatum and substantia nigra, and related behavioural deficits and hyperthermia. However, the mechanism of CCK-8 action on METH-induced toxicity is not clear. The aim of this study was to explore whether the possible protective effect of CCK-8 on METH-induced neurotoxicity involved anti-oxidative stress mechanisms. The subtypes of CCK receptors mediating the regulatory action of CCK-8 were also investigated. The present results revealed that CCK-8 dose-dependently inhibited METH-induced cytotoxic effect by activating the CCK2 receptor subtype in PC12 cells and CCK2 receptor stable transfected-HEK293 cells. Pre-treatment of CCK-8 before METH stimulation significantly attenuated the generation of reactive oxygen species and NADPH oxidase activation in PC12 cells. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a protective effect of CCK-8 on METH-induced neurotoxicity in vitro and suggested that a possible mechanism of this action was dependent on the activation of the CCK2 receptor to reduce the neurotoxicity and oxidative stress induced by METH stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential response of nNOS knockout mice to MDMA ("ecstasy")- and methamphetamine-induced psychomotor sensitization and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Yossef; Anderson, Karen L; Ali, Syed F

    2004-10-01

    It has been shown that mice deficient in neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) gene are resistant to cocaine-induced psychomotor sensitization and methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The present study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that nNOS has a major role in dopamine (DA)- but not serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)-mediated effects of psychostimulants. The response of nNOS knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice to the psychomotor-stimulating and neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy") and METH were investigated. Repeated administration of MDMA for 5 days resulted in psychomotor sensitization in both WT and nNOS KO mice, while repeated administration of METH caused psychomotor sensitization in WT but not in KO mice. Sensitization to both MDMA and METH was persistent for 40 days in WT mice, but not in nNOS KO mice. These findings suggest that the induction of psychomotor sensitization to MDMA and METH is NO independent and NO dependent, respectively, while the persistence of sensitization to both drugs is NO dependent. For the neurochemical studies, a high dose of MDMA caused marked depletion of 5-HT in several brain regions of both WT and KO mice, suggesting that the absence of the nNOS gene did not afford protection against MDMA-induced depletion of 5-HT. Striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity caused by high doses of MDMA and METH in WT mice was partially prevented in KO mice administered with MDMA, but it was fully precluded in KO mice administered with METH. The differential response of nNOS KO mice to the behavioral and neurotoxic effects of MDMA and METH suggests that the nNOS gene is required for the expression and persistence of DA-mediated effects of METH and MDMA, while 5-HT-mediated effects of MDMA (induction of sensitization and 5-HT depletion) are not dependent on nNOS.

  17. Dopaminergic neuronal injury in the adult rat brain following neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide and the silent neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lir-Wan; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zheng, Baoying; Pang, Yi; Lin, Rick C. S.; Simpson, Kimberly L.; Ma, Tangeng; Rhodes, Philip G.; Cai, Zhengwei

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that neonatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) resulted in motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal injury in the juvenile rat brain. To further examine whether neonatal LPS exposure has persisting effects in adult rats, motor behaviors were examined from postnatal day 7 (P7) to P70 and brain injury was determined in P70 rats following an intracerebral injection of LPS (1 mg/kg) in P5 Sprague-Dawley male rats. Although neonatal LPS exposure resulted in hyperactivity in locomotion and stereotyped tasks, and other disturbances of motor behaviors, the impaired motor functions were spontaneously recovered by P70. On the other hand, neonatal LPS-induced injury to the dopaminergic system such as the loss of dendrites and reduced tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the substantia nigra persisted in P70 rats. Neonatal LPS exposure also resulted in sustained inflammatory responses in the P70 rat brain, as indicated by an increased number of activated microglia and elevation of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 content in the rat brain. In addition, when challenged with methamphetamine (METH, 0.5 mg/kg) subcutaneously, rats with neonatal LPS exposure had significantly increased responses in METH-induced locomotion and stereotypy behaviors as compared to those without LPS exposure. These results indicate that although neonatal LPS-induced neurobehavioral impairment is spontaneously recoverable, the LPS exposure-induced persistent injury to the dopaminergic system and the chronic inflammation may represent the existence of silent neurotoxicity. Our data further suggest that the compromised dendritic mitochondrial function might contribute, at least partially, to the silent neurotoxicity. PMID:20875849

  18. Recombinant AAV8-mediated intrastriatal gene delivery of CDNF protects rats against methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Xu, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Rui; Bi, Jinpeng; Liu, Wenmo; Feng, Xinyao; Wu, Hui; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Jiaxin; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exerts significant neurotoxicity in experimental animals and humans when taken at high doses or abused chronically. Long-term abusers have decreased dopamine levels, and they are more likely to develop Parkinson's disease (PD). To date, few medications are available to treat the METH-induced damage of neurons. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has been previously shown to reduce the dopamine-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH. However, the effect of cerebral dopamine neurotrophic factor (CDNF), which has been reported to be more specific and efficient than GDNF in protecting dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity, in attenuating METH neurotoxicity has not been determined. Thus, the present study aimed to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of CDNF against METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, CDNF protein increased the survival rate and reduced the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) loss of METH-treated PC12 cells. In vivo, METH was administered to rats following human CDNF overexpression mediated by the recombinant adeno-associated virus. Results demonstrated that CDNF overexpression in the brain could attenuate the METH-induced dopamine and TH loss in the striatum but could not lower METH-induced hyperthermia. PMID:28553166

  19. Methamphetamine induces autophagy and apoptosis in a mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal culture model: role of cathepsin-D in methamphetamine-induced apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, V; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, A G

    2006-08-01

    Autophagy is a phylogenetically conserved process that plays a critical role in the degradation of oxidatively damaged proteins and organelle turnover. The role of oxidative stress and apoptosis in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity is well known; however, the potential contribution of autophagy to METH-induced oxidative damage in dopaminergic neuronal systems remains unclear. The goals of the present article were twofold: (a) to develop an in vitro dopaminergic cell culture model to study cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis, and (b) to determine whether lysosomal protease cathepsin-D activation, resulting from the loss of lysosomal membrane integrity, contributes to METH-induced apoptosis. To accomplish these goals, we characterized morphological and biochemical changes in an immortalized mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal cell line (N27 cells) following treatment with METH. Exposure of METH (2 mM) to N27 cells resulted in the appearance of cytoplasmic vacuolar structures reminiscent of autophagic vacuoles within 3 h. In order to ascertain the identity of the vacuolar structures that are formed following METH exposure, immunohistochemical staining for markers of autophagy were performed. LAMP 2, a classical marker of autophagolysosomes, revealed an extensive punctuate pattern of distribution on the vacuolar membrane surface, with exclusive localization in the cytoplasm. Additionally, using DNA fragmentation analysis we showed a dose-dependent increase in fragmented DNA in METH treated N27 cells. Since METH-induced autophagy preceded DNA fragmentation, we tested whether dysfunction of the autophagolysosomal system contributes to nuclear damage. Immunofluorescence studies with cathepsin-d demonstrated a granular pattern of staining in untreated cells, whereas an increased cathepsin- D immunoreactivity with a globular pattern of staining was observed in METH-treated cells. Nevertheless, blockade of cathepsin

  20. Competitive and noncompetitive antagonists at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors protect against methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Sonsalla, P K; Riordan, D E; Heikkila, R E

    1991-02-01

    The administration of methamphetamine (METH) to experimental animals results in damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. We have demonstrated previously that the excitatory amino acids may be involved in this neurotoxicity. For example, several compounds which bind to the phenyclidine site within the ion channel linked to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor protected mice from the METH-induced loss of neostriatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity and dopamine content. The present study was conducted to characterize further the role of the excitatory amino acids in mediating the neurotoxic effects of METH. The administration of three or four injections of METH (10 mg/kg) every 2 hr to mice produced large decrements in neostriatal dopamine content (80-84%) and in tyrosine hydroxylase activity (65-74%). A dose-dependent protection against these METH-induced decreases was seen with two noncompetitive NMDA antagonists, ifenprodil and SL 82.0715 (25-50 mg/kg/injection), both of which are thought to bind to a polyamine or sigma site associated with the NMDA receptor complex, and with two competitive NMDA antagonists, CGS 19755 (25-50 mg/kg/injection) and NPC 12626 (150-300 mg/kg/injection). Moreover, an intrastriatal infusion of NMDA (0.1 mumol) produced a slight but significant loss of neostriatal dopamine which was potentiated in mice that also received a systemic injection of METH. The results of these studies strengthen the hypothesis that the excitatory amino acids play a critical role in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic damage induced by METH.

  1. Nrf2 deficiency potentiates methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic axonal damage and gliosis in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Granado, Noelia; Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Ares-Santos, Sara; Oliva, Idaira; Martin, Eduardo; Cuadrado, Antonio; Moratalla, Rosario

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress that correlates with damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and reactive gliosis in the basal ganglia is a hallmark of methamphetamine (METH) toxicity. In this study, we analyzed the protective role of the transcription factor Nrf2 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2), a master regulator of redox homeostasis, in METH-induced neurotoxicity. We found that Nrf2 deficiency exacerbated METH-induced damage to dopamine neurons, shown by an increase in loss of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)- and dopamine transporter (DAT)-containing fibers in striatum. Consistent with these effects, Nrf2 deficiency potentiated glial activation, indicated by increased striatal expression of markers for microglia (Mac-1 and Iba-1) and astroglia (GFAP) one day after METH administration. At the same time, Nrf2 inactivation dramatically potentiated the increase in TNFα mRNA and IL-15 protein expression in GFAP+ cells in the striatum. In sharp contrast to the potentiation of striatal damage, Nrf2 deficiency did not affect METH-induced dopaminergic neuron death or expression of glial markers or proinflammatory molecules in the substantia nigra. This study uncovers a new role for Nrf2 in protection against METH-induced inflammatory and oxidative stress and striatal degeneration. Copyright © 2011 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

  2. Asiatic acid attenuates methamphetamine-induced neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity through blocking of NF-kB/STAT3/ERK and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Hyun; Seo, Young Ho; Jang, Jung-Hee; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lee, Sooyeun; Park, Byoungduck

    2017-12-11

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a commonly abused drug that may result in neurotoxic effects. Recent studies have suggested that involvement of neuroinflammatory processes in brain dysfunction is induced by misuse of this drug. However, the mechanism underlying METH-induced inflammation and neurotoxicity in neurons is still unclear. In this study, we investigated whether asiatic acid (AA) effected METH-mediated neuroinflammation and neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neuronal cells. And we further determined whether the effect involved in the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT)3 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. We used the human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line, murine microglial BV2 cell line, and primary culture of rat embryo mesencephalic neurons. Pro-inflammatory cytokine production was monitored by ELISA and RT/real-time PCR. The cell cycle distribution and mitochondrial membrane integrity was analyzed by flow cytometry. We used immunoblotting, DNA-binding activity, and immunofluorescence staining to analyze the effect of AA on activation of the NF-κB, STAT3, MAPK-ERK, and apoptosis signaling pathways. METH induced TNF receptor (TNFR) expression and led to morphological changes of cells. Additionally, this drug increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) expression. AA significantly suppressed METH-induced TNFR expression in concentration dependent. Increased secretion of TNFα and IL-6 was inhibited in METH-stimulated neuronal cells by AA administration. AA showed significant protection against METH-induced translocation of NF-κB/STAT3 and ERK phosphorylation. AA inhibited METH-induced proteolytic fragmentation of caspase-3 and PARP. The pro-apoptotic protein Bax was significantly decreased, while the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL was increased by AA treatment in METH-stimulated cells. A similar protective effect of AA on

  3. Effects of 7-Nitroindazole, an NOS Inhibitor on Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Neurotoxicity in Micea.

    PubMed

    Ali, Syed F; Itzhak, Yossef

    1998-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the major drugs of abuse that is postulated to cause neurotoxicity by depleting dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, high-affinity DA uptake sites, and the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the relatively selective, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity. Male Swiss Webster mice received the following injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) 3 times (every 3 hr): (i) vehicle/saline, (ii) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/saline, (iii) vehicle/METH (5 mg/kg), and (iv) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/METH (5 mg/kg). On the second day, groups (i) and (iii) received two vehicle injections and groups (ii) and (iv) received two 7-NI injections (25 mg/kg each). The administration of vehicle/METH resulted in 68, 44 and 55% decreases in the concentration of DA, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA), respectively, and a 48% decrease in the number of [ 3 H]mazindol binding sites in the striatum compared to control values. The treatment with 7-NI (group iv) provided a full protection against the depletion of DA and its metabolites, and the loss of dopamine transporter binding sites. Multiple injection of METH caused a significant decrease in the concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA). Treatment with 7-NI partially blocked the depletion of 5-HT and completely blocked the reduction in 5-HIAA levels. The administration of 7-NI/saline (group ii) affected neither the tissue concentration of DA, 5-HT and their metabolites (DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA) nor the binding parameters of [ 3 H]-mazindol compared to control (vehicle/saline) values. 7-NI had no significant effect on the animals' body temperature, and it did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia. These findings indicate a role for nitric oxide in METH-induced neurotoxicity and also suggest that blockage of NOS may be beneficial for

  4. Effects of 7-nitroindazole, an NOS inhibitor on methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, S F; Itzhak, Y

    1998-05-30

    Methamphetamine (METH) is one of the major drugs of abuse that is postulated to cause neurotoxicity by depleting dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, high-affinity DA uptake sites, and the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase. The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the relatively selective, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity. Male Swiss Webster mice received the following injections intraperitoneally (i.p.) 3 times (every 3 hr): (i) vehicle/saline, (ii) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/saline, (iii) vehicle/METH (5 mg/kg), and (iv) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/METH (5 mg/kg). On the second day, groups (i) and (iii) received two vehicle injections and groups (ii) and (iv) received two 7-NI injections (25 mg/kg each). The administration of vehicle/METH resulted in 68, 44 and 55% decreases in the concentration of DA, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), and homovanillic acid (HVA), respectively, and a 48% decrease in the number of [3H]mazindol binding sites in the striatum compared to control values. The treatment with 7-NI (group iv) provided a full protection against the depletion of DA and its metabolites, and the loss of dopamine transporter binding sites. Multiple injection of METH caused a significant decrease in the concentration of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA). Treatment with 7-NI partially blocked the depletion of 5-HT and completely blocked the reduction in 5-HIAA levels. The administration of 7-NI/saline (group ii) affected neither the tissue concentration of DA, 5-HT and their metabolites (DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA) nor the binding parameters of [3H]-mazindol compared to control (vehicle/saline) values. 7-NI had no significant effect on the animals' body temperature, and it did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia. These findings indicate a role for nitric oxide in METH-induced neurotoxicity and also suggest that blockage of NOS may be beneficial for the

  5. Effect of crowding, temperature and age on glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Frau, Lucia; Simola, Nicola; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Morelli, Micaela

    2016-09-01

    3,4-methylenedyoxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy"), a recreational drug of abuse, can induce glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Since MDMA is often consumed in crowded environments featuring high temperatures, we studied how these factors influenced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. C57BL/6J adolescent (4 weeks old) and adult (12 weeks old) mice received MDMA (4×20mg/kg) in different conditions: 1) while kept 1, 5, or 10×cage at room temperature (21°C); 2) while kept 5×cage at either room (21°C) or high (27°C) temperature. After the last MDMA administration, immunohistochemistry was performed in the caudate-putamen for CD11b and GFAP, to mark microglia and astroglia, and in the substantia nigra pars compacta for tyrosine hydroxylase, to mark dopaminergic neurons. MDMA induced glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, compared with vehicle administration. Crowding (5 or 10 mice×cage) amplified MDMA-induced glia activation (in adult and adolescent mice) and dopaminergic neurotoxicity (in adolescent mice). Conversely, exposure to a high environmental temperature (27°C) potentiated MDMA-induced glia activation in adult and adolescent mice kept 5×cage, but not dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Crowding and exposure to a high environmental temperature amplified MDMA-induced hyperthermia, and a positive correlation between body temperature and activation of either microglia or astroglia was found in adult and adolescent mice. These results provide further evidence that the administration setting influences the noxious effects of MDMA in the mouse brain. However, while crowding amplifies both glia activation and dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a high environmental temperature exacerbates glia activation only. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The newly synthesized pool of dopamine determines the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2008-05-01

    The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has long been implicated as a participant in the neurotoxicity caused by methamphetamine (METH), yet, its mechanism of action in this regard is not fully understood. Treatment of mice with the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) inhibitor alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (AMPT) lowers striatal cytoplasmic DA content by 55% and completely protects against METH-induced damage to DA nerve terminals. Reserpine, by disrupting vesicle amine storage, depletes striatal DA by more than 95% and accentuates METH-induced neurotoxicity. l-DOPA reverses the protective effect of AMPT against METH and enhances neurotoxicity in animals with intact TH. Inhibition of MAO-A by clorgyline increases pre-synaptic DA content and enhances METH striatal neurotoxicity. In all conditions of altered pre-synaptic DA homeostasis, increases or decreases in METH neurotoxicity paralleled changes in striatal microglial activation. Mice treated with AMPT, l-DOPA, or clorgyline + METH developed hyperthermia to the same extent as animals treated with METH alone, whereas mice treated with reserpine + METH were hypothermic, suggesting that the effects of alterations in cytoplasmic DA on METH neurotoxicity were not strictly mediated by changes in core body temperature. Taken together, the present data reinforce the notion that METH-induced release of DA from the newly synthesized pool of transmitter into the extracellular space plays an essential role in drug-induced striatal neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Subtle alterations in intracellular DA content can lead to significant enhancement of METH neurotoxicity. Our results also suggest that reactants derived from METH-induced oxidation of released DA may serve as neuronal signals that lead to microglial activation early in the neurotoxic process associated with METH.

  7. Protection against MDMA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice by methyllycaconitine: involvement of nicotinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Chipana, C; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2006-09-01

    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a relatively selective dopaminergic neurotoxin in mice. Previous studies demonstrated the participation of alpha-7 nicotinic receptors (nAChR) in the neurotoxic effect of methamphetamine. The aim of this paper was to study the role of this receptor type in the acute effects and neurotoxicity of MDMA in mice. In vivo, methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific alpha-7 nAChR antagonist, significantly prevented MDMA-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic but not at serotonergic level, without affecting MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Glial activation was also fully prevented by MLA. In vitro, MDMA induced intrasynaptosomal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which was calcium-, nitric-oxide synthase-, and protein kinase C-dependent. Also, the increase in ROS was prevented by MLA and alpha-bungarotoxin. Experiments with reserpine point to endogenous dopamine (DA) as the main source of MDMA-induced ROS. MLA also brought the MDMA-induced inhibition of [3H]DA uptake down, from 73% to 11%. We demonstrate that a coordinated activation of alpha-7 nAChR, blockade of DA transporter function and displacement of DA from intracellular stores induced by MDMA produces a neurotoxic effect that can be prevented by MLA, suggesting that alpha-7 nAChR have a key role in the MDMA neurotoxicity in mice; however, the involvement of nicotinic receptors containing the beta2 subunit cannot be conclusively ruled out.

  8. Chronic Nicotine Exposure Attenuates Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; McFadden, Lisa M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Walters, Elliot T.; Stout, Kristen A.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administrations cause persistent dopaminergic deficits resembling aspects of Parkinson’s disease. Many METH abusers smoke cigarettes and thus self-administer nicotine; yet few studies have investigated the effects of nicotine on METH-induced dopaminergic deficits. This interaction is of interest because preclinical studies demonstrate that nicotine can be neuroprotective, perhaps owing to effects involving α4β2 and α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). This study revealed that oral nicotine exposure beginning in adolescence [postnatal day (PND) 40] through adulthood [PND 96] attenuated METH-induced striatal dopaminergic deficits when METH was administered at PND 89. This protection did not appear to be due to nicotine-induced alterations in METH pharmacokinetics. Short-term (i.e., 21-day) high-dose nicotine exposure also protected when administered from PND 40 to PND 61 (with METH at PND 54), but this protective effect did not persist. Short-term (i.e., 21-day) high-dose nicotine exposure did not protect when administered postadolescence (i.e., beginning at PND 61, with METH at PND 75). However, protection was engendered if the duration of nicotine exposure was extended to 39 days (with METH at PND 93). Autoradiographic analysis revealed that nicotine increased striatal α4β2 expression, as assessed using [125I]epibatidine. Both METH and nicotine decreased striatal α6β2 expression, as assessed using [125I]α-conotoxin MII. These findings indicate that nicotine protects against METH-induced striatal dopaminergic deficits, perhaps by affecting α4β2 and/or α6β2 expression, and that both age of onset and duration of nicotine exposure affect this protection. PMID:26391161

  9. 17β-estradiol and tamoxifen protect mice from manganese-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pajarillo, Edward; Johnson, James; Kim, Judong; Karki, Pratap; Son, Deok-Soo; Aschner, Michael; Lee, Eunsook

    2018-03-01

    Chronic exposure to manganese (Mn) causes neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism, with common clinical features of parkinsonism. 17β-estradiol (E2) and tamoxifen (TX), a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), afford neuroprotection in several neurological disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). In the present study, we tested if E2 and TX attenuate Mn-induced neurotoxicity in mice, assessing motor deficit and dopaminergic neurodegeneration. We implanted E2 and TX pellets in the back of the neck of ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice two weeks prior to a single injection of Mn into the striatum. One week later, we assessed locomotor activity and molecular mechanisms by immunohistochemistry, real-time quantitative PCR, western blot and enzymatic biochemical analyses. The results showed that both E2 and TX attenuated Mn-induced motor deficits and reversed the Mn-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. At the molecular level, E2 and TX reversed the Mn-induced decrease of (1) glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) and glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) mRNA and protein levels; (2) transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) protein levels; and (3) catalase (CAT) activity and glutathione (GSH) levels, and Mn-increased (1) malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and (2) the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. These results indicate that E2 and TX afford protection against Mn-induced neurotoxicity by reversing Mn-reduced GLT1/GLAST as well as Mn-induced oxidative stress. Our findings may offer estrogenic agents as potential candidates for the development of therapeutics to treat Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Nitric oxide is a mediator of methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. In vitro evidence from primary cultures of mesencephalic cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, P; Cerruti, C; Ali, S; Cadet, J L

    1996-10-31

    METH is a monoaminergic toxic that destroys dopamine terminals in vivo. Oxidative mechanisms associated with DA metabolism are thought to play an important role in its toxic effects. These ideas were supported by the demonstration that CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) transgenic mice were protected against the toxic effects of the drug. In the present study, we sought to determine if nitric oxide (NO) production was also involved in METH-induced neurotoxicity using primary cultures obtained from fetal rat mesencephalon. METH caused dose- and time-dependent cell death in vitro. Blockade of nitric oxide (NO) formation with several nitric oxide (NO) synthase blockers attenuated METH-mediated toxicity. Moreover, inhibition of ADP-ribosylation with nicotinamide and benzamide also provided protection against the toxicity of the drug. These results, together with our previous results in transgenic mice, support a role for free radicals in METH-induced toxic effects.

  11. Dopamine D(1) receptor deletion strongly reduces neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ares-Santos, S; Granado, N; Oliva, I; O'Shea, E; Martin, E D; Colado, M I; Moratalla, R

    2012-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent, highly addictive psychostimulant consumed worldwide. In humans and experimental animals, repeated exposure to this drug induces persistent neurodegenerative changes. Damage occurs primarily to dopaminergic neurons, accompanied by gliosis. The toxic effects of METH involve excessive dopamine (DA) release, thus DA receptors are highly likely to play a role in this process. To define the role of D(1) receptors in the neurotoxic effects of METH we used D(1) receptor knock-out mice (D(1)R(-/-)) and their WT littermates. Inactivation of D(1)R prevented METH-induced dopamine fibre loss and hyperthermia, and increases in gliosis and pro-inflammatory molecules such as iNOS in the striatum. In addition, D(1)R inactivation prevented METH-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. To explore the relationship between hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, METH was given at high ambient temperature (29 °C). In this condition, D(1)R(-/-) mice developed hyperthermia following drug delivery and the neuroprotection provided by D(1)R inactivation at 23 °C was no longer observed. However, reserpine, which empties vesicular dopamine stores, blocked hyperthermia and strongly potentiated dopamine toxicity in D(1)R(-/-) mice, suggesting that the protection afforded by D(1)R inactivation is due to both hypothermia and higher stored vesicular dopamine. Moreover, electrical stimulation evoked higher DA overflow in D(1)R(-/-) mice as demonstrated by fast scan cyclic voltammetry despite their lower basal DA content, suggesting higher vesicular DA content in D(1)R(-/-) than in WT mice. Altogether, these results indicate that the D(1)R plays a significant role in METH-induced neurotoxicity by mediating drug-induced hyperthermia and increasing the releasable cytosolic DA pool. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Glial Reactivity in Resistance to Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine (METH) result in reactive microglia and astrocytes in striatum. Prior data indicate that rats with partial dopamine (DA) loss resulting from prior exposure to METH are resistant to further decreases in striatal DA when re-exposed to METH 30 days later. Such resistant animals also do not show an activated microglia phenotype, suggesting a relation between microglial activation and METH-induced neurotoxicity. To date, the astrocyte response in such resistance has not been examined. Thus, this study examined glial-fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and CD11b protein expression in striata of animals administered saline or a neurotoxic regimen of METH on postnatal days 60 and/or 90 (Saline:Saline, Saline:METH, METH:Saline, METH:METH). Consistent with previous work, animals experiencing acute toxicity (Saline:METH) showed both activated microglia and astocytes, whereas those resistant to the acute toxicity (METH:METH) did not show activated microglia. Interestingly, GFAP expression remained elevated in rats exposed to METH at PND60 (METH:Saline), and was not elevated further in resistant rats treated for the second time with METH (METH:METH). These data suggest that astrocytes remain reactive up to 30 days post-METH exposure. Additionally, these data indicate that astrocyte reactivity does not reflect acute, METH-induced DA terminal toxicity, whereas microglial reactivity does. PMID:23414433

  13. Vanadium Induces Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity Via Protein Kinase C-Delta Dependent Oxidative Signaling Mechanisms: Relevance to Etiopathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Song, Chunjuan; Witte, Travis; Houk, R. S.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental exposure to neurotoxic metals through various sources including exposure to welding fumes has been linked to an increased incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD). Welding fumes contain many different metals including vanadium typically present as particulates containing vanadium pentoxide (V2O5). However, possible neurotoxic effects of this metal oxide on dopaminergic neuronal cells are not well studied. In the present study, we characterized vanadium-induced oxidative stress-dependent cellular events in cell culture models of PD. V2O5 was neurotoxic to dopaminergic neuronal cells including primary nigral dopaminergic neurons and the EC50 was determined to be 37 μM in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cell model. The neurotoxic effect was accompanied by a time-dependent uptake of vanadium and upregulation of metal transporter proteins Tf and DMT1 in N27 cells. Additionally, vanadium resulted in a threefold increase in reactive oxygen species generation, followed by release of mitochondrial cytochrome c into cytoplasm and subsequent activation of caspase-9 (>fourfold) and caspase-3 (>ninefold). Interestingly, vanadium exposure induced proteolytic cleavage of native protein kinase Cdelta (PKCδ, 72-74 kDa) to yield a 41 kDa catalytically active fragment resulting in a persistent increase in PKCδ kinase activity. Co-treatment with pan-caspase inhibitor ZVAD-FMK significantly blocked vanadium-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation, indicating that caspases mediate PKCδ cleavage. Also, co-treatment with Z-VAD-FMK almost completely inhibited V2O5-induced DNA fragmentation. Furthermore, PKCδ knockdown using siRNA protected N27 cells from V2O5-induced apoptotic cell death. Collectively, these results demonstrate vanadium can exert neurotoxic effects in dopaminergic neuronal cells via caspase-3-dependent PKCδ cleavage, suggesting that metal exposure may promote nigral dopaminergic degeneration. PMID:19646462

  14. Methamphetamine treatment during development attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by subsequent high-dose methamphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Stout, Kristen A; Sawada, Nicole M; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Walters, Elliot T; Nielsen, Shannon M; Gibb, James W; Alburges, Mario E; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-08-01

    Administration of high doses of methamphetamine (METH) causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in both nonhuman preclinical models and METH-dependent persons. Noteworthy, adolescent [i.e., postnatal day (PND) 40] rats are less susceptible to this damage than young adult (PND90) rats. In addition, biweekly treatment with METH, beginning at PND40 and continuing throughout development, prevents the persistent dopaminergic deficits caused by a "challenge" high-dose METH regimen when administered at PND90. Mechanisms underlying this "resistance" were thus investigated. Results revealed that biweekly METH treatment throughout development attenuated both the acute and persistent deficits in VMAT2 function, as well as the acute hyperthermia, caused by a challenge METH treatment. Pharmacokinetic alterations did not appear to contribute to the protection afforded by the biweekly treatment. Maintenance of METH-induced hyperthermia abolished the protection against both the acute and persistent VMAT2-associated deficits suggesting that alterations in thermoregulation were caused by exposure of rats to METH during development. These findings suggest METH during development prevents METH-induced hyperthermia and the consequent METH-related neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol prevents methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Castelli, M Paola; Madeddu, Camilla; Casti, Alberto; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4 × 10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-19% and -28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -25% and -21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (-50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (-53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (-34% and -47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; -37% and -29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the PFC and CPu. Our

  16. From the Cover: Harmane-Induced Selective Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Cannon, Jason R

    2018-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Although numerous exposures have been linked to PD etiology, causative factors for most cases remain largely unknown. Emerging data on the neurotoxicity of heterocyclic amines suggest that this class of compounds should be examined for relevance to PD. Here, using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model system, we tested whether harmane exposure produced selective toxicity to dopamine neurons that is potentially relevant to PD. Harmane is a known tremorigenic β-carboline (a type of heterocyclic amine) found in cooked meat, roasted coffee beans, and tobacco. Thus, this compound represents a potentially important exposure. In the nematode model, we observed dopaminergic neurons to be selectively vulnerable, showing significant loss in terms of structure and function at lower doses than other neuronal populations. In examining mechanisms of toxicity, we observed significant harmane-induced decreases in mitochondrial viability and increased reactive oxygen species levels. Blocking transport through the dopamine transporter (DAT) was not neuroprotective, suggesting that harmane is unlikely to enter the cell through DAT. However, a mitochondrial complex I activator did partially ameliorate neurodegeneration. Further, mitochondrial complex I activator treatment reduced harmane-induced dopamine depletion, measured by the 1-nonanol assay. In summary, we have shown that harmane exposure in C. elegans produces selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity that may bear relevance to PD, and that neurotoxicity may be mediated through mitochondrial mechanisms. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Lactulose attenuates METH-induced neurotoxicity by alleviating the impaired autophagy, stabilizing the perturbed antioxidant system and suppressing apoptosis in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Li; He, Jie-Tao; Wang, Zheng-Tao; Xiao, Huan-Qin; Zhou, Wen-Tao; Du, Si-Hao; Xue, Ye; Wang, Qi

    2018-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant. Lactulose is a non-absorbable sugar, which effectively decreases METH-induced neurotoxicity in rat. However, the exact mechanisms need further investigation. In this study, 5-week-old male Sprague Dawley rats received METH (15 mg/kg, 8 intraperitoneal injections, 12-h interval) or saline and received lactulose (5.3 g/kg, oral gavage, 12-h interval) or vehicle 2 days prior to the METH administration. Compared to the control group, in the METH alone group, cytoplasmic vacuolar degeneration in hepatocytes, higher levels of alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase and ammonia, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increase of superoxide dismutase activity in the blood were observed. Moreover, in rat striatum, expressions of nuclear factor erythroid 2-relatted factor-2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 were suppressed in the nucleus, although over-expression of Nrf2 were observed in cytoplasm. Over-expressions of BECN1 and LC3-II indicated initiation of autophagy, while overproduction of p62 might suggest deficient autophagic vesicle turnover and impaired autophagy. Furthermore, accumulation of p62 cloud interact with Keap1 and then aggravate cytoplasmic accumulation of Nrf2. Consistently, over-expressions of cleaved caspase 3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 suggested the activation of apoptosis. The pretreatment with lactulose significantly decreased rat hepatic injury, suppressed hyperammonemia and ROS generation, alleviated the impaired autophagy in striatum, rescued the antioxidant system and repressed apoptosis. Taken together, with decreased blood ammonia, lactulose pretreatment reduced METH-induced neurotoxicity through alleviating the impaired autophagy, stabilizing the perturbed antioxidant system and suppressing apoptosis in rat striatum. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of system Xc- in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duy-Khanh; Shin, Eun-Joo; Tran, Hai-Quyen; Kim, Dae-Joong; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Sato, Hideyo; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2017-09-01

    The cystine/glutamate antiporter (system Xc - , Sxc) transports cystine into cell in exchange for glutamate. Since xCT is a specific subunit of Sxc, we employed xCT knockout mice and investigated whether this antiporter affected methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. MA treatment significantly increased striatal oxidative burdens in wild type mice. xCT inhibitor [i.e., S-4-carboxy-phenylglycine (CPG), sulfasalazine] or an xCT knockout significantly protected against these oxidative burdens. MA-induced increases in Iba-1 expression and Iba-1-labeled microglial immunoreactivity (Iba-1-IR) were significantly attenuated by CPG or sulfasalazine administration or xCT knockout. CPG or sulfasalazine significantly attenuated MA-induced TUNEL-positive cell populations in the striatum of Taconic ICR mice. The decrease in excitatory amino acid transporter-2 (or glutamate transporter-1) expression and increase in glutamate release were attenuated by CPG, sulfasalazine or xCT knockout. In addition, CPG, sulfasalazine or xCT knockout significantly protected against dopaminergic loss (i.e., decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and immunoreactivity, and an increase in dopamine turnover rate) induced by MA. However, CPG, sulfasalazine or xCT knockout did not significantly affect the impaired glutathione system [i.e., decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) and increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG)] induced by MA. Our results suggest that Sxc mediates MA-induced neurotoxicity via facilitating oxidative stress, microgliosis, proapoptosis, and glutamate-related toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Overexpression of parkin in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system protects against methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bin; Traini, Roberta; Killinger, Bryan; Schneider, Bernard; Moszczynska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a central nervous system psychostimulant with a high potential for abuse. At high doses, METH causes a selective degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, sparing other striatal terminals and cell bodies. We previously detected a deficit in parkin after binge METH in rat striatal synaptosomes. Parkin is an ubiquitin-protein E3 ligase capable of protecting dopamine neurons from diverse cellular insults. Whether the deficit in parkin mediates the toxicity of METH and whether parkin can protect from toxicity of the drug is unknown. The present study investigated whether overexpression of parkin attenuates degeneration of striatal dopaminergic terminals exposed to binge METH. Parkin overexpression in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system was achieved by microinjection of adeno-associated viral transfer vector 2/6 encoding rat parkin (AAV2/6-parkin) into the substantia nigra pars compacta. The microinjections of AAV2/6-parkin dose-dependently increased parkin levels in both the substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. The levels of dopamine synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, remained at the control levels; therefore, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was used as an index of dopaminergic terminal integrity. In METH-exposed rats, the increase in parkin levels attenuated METH-induced decreases in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that parkin can protect striatal dopaminergic terminals against METH neurotoxicity. PMID:23313192

  20. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Prevents Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Castelli, M. Paola; Casu, Angelo; Casti, Paola; Scherma, Maria; Fattore, Liana; Fadda, Paola; Ennas, M. Grazia

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a potent psychostimulant with neurotoxic properties. Heavy use increases the activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), production of peroxynitrites, microglia stimulation, and induces hyperthermia and anorectic effects. Most METH recreational users also consume cannabis. Preclinical studies have shown that natural (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, Δ9-THC) and synthetic cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists exert neuroprotective effects on different models of cerebral damage. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of Δ9-THC on METH-induced neurotoxicity by examining its ability to reduce astrocyte activation and nNOS overexpression in selected brain areas. Rats exposed to a METH neurotoxic regimen (4×10 mg/kg, 2 hours apart) were pre- or post-treated with Δ9-THC (1 or 3 mg/kg) and sacrificed 3 days after the last METH administration. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against nNOS and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP). Results showed that, as compared to corresponding controls (i) METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the caudate-putamen (CPu) was significantly attenuated by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−19% and −28% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −25% and −21% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals); (ii) METH-induced GFAP-immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly reduced in the CPu by post-treatment with 1 mg/kg Δ9-THC1 (−50%) and by pre-treatment with 3 mg/kg Δ9-THC (−53%); (iii) METH-induced GFAP-IR was significantly decreased in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) by pre- and post-treatment with both doses of Δ9-THC (−34% and −47% for 1 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals; −37% and −29% for 3 mg/kg pre- and post-treated animals). The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A attenuated METH-induced nNOS overexpression in the CPu, but failed to counteract the Δ9-THC-mediated reduction of METH-induced GFAP-IR both in the

  1. Overexpression of parkin in the rat nigrostriatal dopamine system protects against methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Traini, Roberta; Killinger, Bryan; Schneider, Bernard; Moszczynska, Anna

    2013-09-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a central nervous system psychostimulant with a high potential for abuse. At high doses, METH causes a selective degeneration of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, sparing other striatal terminals and cell bodies. We previously detected a deficit in parkin after binge METH in rat striatal synaptosomes. Parkin is an ubiquitin-protein E3 ligase capable of protecting dopamine neurons from diverse cellular insults. Whether the deficit in parkin mediates the toxicity of METH and whether parkin can protect from toxicity of the drug is unknown. The present study investigated whether overexpression of parkin attenuates degeneration of striatal dopaminergic terminals exposed to binge METH. Parkin overexpression in rat nigrostriatal dopamine system was achieved by microinjection of adeno-associated viral transfer vector 2/6 encoding rat parkin (AAV2/6-parkin) into the substantia nigra pars compacta. The microinjections of AAV2/6-parkin dose-dependently increased parkin levels in both the substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum. The levels of dopamine synthesizing enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase, remained at the control levels; therefore, tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity was used as an index of dopaminergic terminal integrity. In METH-exposed rats, the increase in parkin levels attenuated METH-induced decreases in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that parkin can protect striatal dopaminergic terminals against METH neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Environment-, drug- and stress-induced alterations in body temperature affect the neurotoxicity of substituted amphetamines in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    Miller, D B; O'Callaghan, J P

    1994-08-01

    In the companion paper we demonstrated that d-methamphetamine (d-METH), d-methylenedioxyamphetamine (d-MDA) and d-methylenedioxymethamephetamine (d-MDMA), but not d-fenfluramine (d-FEN), appear to damage dopaminergic projections to the striatum of the mouse. An elevation in core temperature also was associated with exposure to d-METH, d-MDA and d-MDMA, whereas exposure to d-FEN lowered core temperature. Given these findings, we examined the effects of temperature on substituted amphetamine (AMP)-induced neurotoxicity in the C57BL/6J mouse. Levels of striatal dopamine (DA) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were taken as indicators of neurotoxicity. Alterations in ambient temperature, pretreatment with drugs reported to cause hypothermia in the mouse and hypothermia induced by restraint stress were used to affect AMP-induced neurotoxicity. Mice received d-METH (10 mg/kg), d-MDA (20 mg/kg) or d-MDMA (20 mg/kg) every 2 hr for a total of four s.c. injections. All three AMPs increased core temperature and caused large (> 75%) decreases in striatal dopamine and large (> 300%) increases in striatal glial fibrillary acidic protein 72 hr after the last injection. Lowering ambient temperature from 22 degrees C to 15 degrees C blocked (d-MDA and d-MDMA) or severely attenuated (d-METH) these effects. Pretreatment with MK-801 lowered core temperature and blocked AMP-induced neurotoxicity; elevation of ambient temperature during this regimen elevated core temperature and markedly attenuated the neuroprotective effects of MK-801. Pretreatment with MK-801 also lowered core temperature in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice but did not block 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced neurotoxicity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Attenuation of methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice by lipopolysaccharide pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin Chiu; Kuo, Yu-Min; Liao, Pao-Chi; Cherng, Chianfang G; Su, Su-Wen; Yu, Lung

    2007-04-30

    Immunological activation has been proposed to play a role in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic terminal damage. In this study, we examined the roles of lipopolysaccharide, a pro-inflammatory and inflammatory factor, treatment in modulating the methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal dopamine neurotoxicity. Lipopolysaccharide pretreatment did not affect the basal body temperature or methamphetamine-elicited hyperthermia three days later. Such systemic lipopolysaccharide treatment mitigated methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid depletions in a dose-dependent manner. As the most potent dose (1 mg/kg) of lipopolysaccharide was administered two weeks, one day before or after the methamphetamine dosing regimen, methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid depletions remained unaltered. Moreover, systemic lipopolysaccharide pretreatment (1 mg/kg) attenuated local methamphetamine infusion-produced dopamine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid depletions in the striatum, indicating that the protective effect of lipopolysaccharide is less likely due to interrupted peripheral distribution or metabolism of methamphetamine. We concluded a critical time window for systemic lipopolysaccharide pretreatment in exerting effective protection against methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal dopamine neurotoxicity.

  4. Neurotoxicity induced by methamphetamine-heroin combination in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiang; Ru, Qin; Xiong, Qi; Yue, Kai; Chen, Lin; Ma, Baomiao; Gan, Weimin; Si, Yuanren; Xiao, Huqiao; Li, Chaoying

    2017-04-24

    Simultaneous administration of psychostimulants and opioids is a major drug abuse problem worldwide. The combination of psychostimulants and opioids produces more serious effects than either drug alone and is responsible for numerous deaths. In recent years, owing to its increased use, methamphetamine (METH), a psychostimulant, has become a popular choice for use in combination with opioids, especially heroin. However, little is known about the neurotoxicity of METH/heroin combination. The aims of this study were to evaluate whether METH/heroin combination was more neurotoxic than either drug alone and analyze the possible neurotoxic mechanisms using rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Our data showed that METH/heroin combination exhibited a significant decrease in cell viability than either drug alone, and the coefficient of drug interaction (CDI) indicated that the combination appeared to produce synergistic effects. Further studies showed that METH/heroin combination induced apoptosis and decreased the mitochondrial potential significantly, compared to either drug alone. This was demonstrated by a significant decrease in the expression of Bcl-2 and an increase in expression of Bax, accompanied by increase in the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9. These results suggest that the combination of METH and heroin is more neurotoxic than either drug alone, and it induces apoptosis via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired Formation of Stimulus–Response, But Not Action–Outcome, Associations in Rats with Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jong-Hyun; Latimer, Christine; Keefe, Kristen A

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) induces neurotoxic changes, including partial striatal dopamine depletions, which are thought to contribute to cognitive dysfunction in rodents and humans. The dorsal striatum is implicated in action–outcome (A–O) and stimulus–response (S–R) associations underlying instrumental learning. Thus, the present study examined the long-term consequences of METH-induced neurotoxicity on A–O and S–R associations underlying appetitive instrumental behavior. Rats were pretreated with saline or a neurotoxic regimen of METH (4 × 7.5–10 mg/kg). Rats trained on random ratio (RR) or random interval (RI) schedules of reinforcement were then subjected to outcome devaluation or contingency degradation, followed by an extinction test. All rats then were killed, and brains removed for determination of striatal dopamine loss. The results show that: (1) METH pretreatment induced a partial 45–50% decrease in striatal dopamine tissue content in dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum; (2) METH-induced neurotoxicity did not alter acquisition of instrumental behavior on either RR or RI schedules; (3) outcome devaluation and contingency degradation similarly decreased responding in saline- and METH-pretreated rats trained on the RR schedule, suggesting intact A–O associations guiding behavior; (4) outcome devaluation after training on the RI schedule decreased extinction responding only in METH-pretreated rats, suggesting impaired S–R associations. Overall, these data suggest that METH-induced neurotoxicity, possibly due to impairment of the function of dorsolateral striatal circuitry, may decrease cognitive flexibility by impairing the ability to automatize behavioral patterns. PMID:21775980

  6. Methamphetamine induces apoptosis in immortalized neural cells: protection by the proto-oncogene, bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Cadet, J L; Ordonez, S V; Ordonez, J V

    1997-02-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine analog that produces degeneration of the dopaminergic system in mammals. The neurotoxic effects of the drug are thought to be mediated by oxygen-based free radicals. In the present report, we have used immortalized neural cells obtained from rat mesencephalon in order to further assess the role of oxidative stress in METH-induced neurotoxicity. We thus tested if the anti-death proto-oncogene, bcl-2 could protect against METH-induced cytotoxicity. METH caused dose-dependent loss of cellular viability in control cells while bcl-2-expressing cells were protected against these deleterious effects. Using flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, and DNA electrophoresis, we also show that METH exposure can cause DNA strand breaks, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, and DNA laddering. All these changes were prevented by bcl-2 expression. These observations provide further support for the involvement of oxidative stress in the toxic effects of amphetamine analogs. They also document that METH-induced cytotoxicity is secondary to apoptosis. These findings may be of relevance to the cause(s) of Parkinson's disease which involves degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway.

  7. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-I in copper-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats: A possible link with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Abbaoui, Abdellatif; Chatoui, Hicham; El Hiba, Omar; Gamrani, Halima

    2017-11-01

    Numerous findings indicate an involvement of heavy metals in the neuropathology of several neurodegenerative disorders, especially Parkinson's disease (PD). Previous studies have demonstrated that Copper (Cu) exhibits a potent neurotoxic effect on dopaminergic neurons and triggers profound neurobehavioral alterations. Curcumin is a major component of Curcuma longa rhizomes and a powerful medicinal plant that exerts many pharmacological effects. However, the neuroprotective action of curcumin on Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is yet to be investigated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of acute Cu-intoxication (10mg/kg B.W. i.p) for 3days on the dopaminergic system and locomotor performance as well as the possible therapeutic efficacy of curcumin I (30mg/kg B.W.). Intoxicated rats showed a significant loss of Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH) expression within substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and the striatal outputs. This was correlated with a clear decrease in locomotor performance. Critically, curcumin-I co-treatment reversed these changes and showed a noticeable protective effect; both TH expression and locomotor performance was reinstated in intoxicated rats. These results demonstrate altered dopaminergic innervations following Cu intoxication and a new therapeutic potential of curcumin against Cu-induced dopaminergic neurotransmission failure. Curcumin may therefore prevent heavy metal related Parkinsonism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Role of Endogenous Serotonin in Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity to Dopamine Nerve Endings of the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Shah, Mrudang M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by ROS to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5HTP do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that PCPA largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum. PMID:20722968

  9. Molecular bases of methamphetamine-induced neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Krasnova, Irina N

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug, whose abuse has reached epidemic proportions worldwide. The addiction to METH is a major public concern because its chronic abuse is associated with serious health complications including deficits in attention, memory, and executive functions in humans. These neuropsychiatric complications might, in part, be related to drug-induced neurotoxic effects, which include damage to dopaminergic and serotonergic terminals, neuronal apoptosis, as well as activated astroglial and microglial cells in the brain. Thus, the purpose of the present paper is to review cellular and molecular mechanisms that might be responsible for METH neurotoxicity. These include oxidative stress, activation of transcription factors, DNA damage, excitotoxicity, blood-brain barrier breakdown, microglial activation, and various apoptotic pathways. Several approaches that allow protection against METH-induced neurotoxic effects are also discussed. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH toxicity should help to generate modern therapeutic approaches to prevent or attenuate the long-term consequences of psychostimulant use disorders in humans.

  10. Role of Mitochondria in Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity: Involvement in Oxidative Stress, Neuroinflammation, and Pro-apoptosis-A Review.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Tran, Hai-Quyen; Nguyen, Phuong-Tram; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Jang, Choon-Gon; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2018-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA), an amphetamine-type psychostimulant, is associated with dopaminergic toxicity and has a high abuse potential. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have suggested that impaired mitochondria are critical in dopaminergic toxicity induced by MA. Mitochondria are important energy-producing organelles with dynamic nature. Evidence indicated that exposure to MA can disturb mitochondrial energetic metabolism by inhibiting the Krebs cycle and electron transport chain. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamic processes, including mitochondrial biogenesis, mitophagy, and fusion/fission, have recently been shown to contribute to dopaminergic toxicity induced by MA. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that MA-induced mitochondrial impairment enhances susceptibility to oxidative stress, pro-apoptosis, and neuroinflammation in a positive feedback loop. Protein kinase Cδ has emerged as a potential mediator between mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress, pro-apoptosis, or neuroinflammation in MA neurotoxicity. Understanding the role and underlying mechanism of mitochondrial impairment could provide a molecular target to prevent or alleviate dopaminergic toxicity induced by MA.

  11. Role of nitric oxide in methamphetamine neurotoxicity: protection by 7-nitroindazole, an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Di Monte, D A; Royland, J E; Jakowec, M W; Langston, J W

    1996-12-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO.) in the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH) was evaluated using 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), a potent inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Treatment of mice with 7-NI (50 mg/kg) almost completely counteracted the loss of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity observed 5 days after four injections of 10 or 7.5 mg/kg METH. With the higher dose of METH, this protection at 5 days occurred despite the fact that combined administration of METH and 7-NI significantly increased lethality and exacerbated METH-induced dopamine release (as indicated by a greater dopamine depletion at 90 min and 1 day). Combined treatment with 4 x 10 mg/kg METH and 7-NI also slightly increased the body temperature of mice as compared with METH alone. Thus, the neuroprotective effects of 7-NI are independent from lethality, are not likely to be related to a reduction of METH-induced dopamine release, and are not due to a decrease in body temperature. These results indicate that NO. formation is an important step leading to METH neurotoxicity, and suggest that the cytotoxic properties of NO. may be directly involved in dopaminergic terminal damage.

  12. The role of endogenous serotonin in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Angoa Pérez, Mariana; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Shah, Mrudang M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2010-11-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the striatum where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are maximal. Endogenous DA has been implicated as a critical participant in METH-induced neurotoxicity, most likely as a substrate for non-enzymatic oxidation by METH-generated reactive oxygen species. The striatum is also extensively innervated by serotonin (5HT) nerve endings and this neurochemical system is modified by METH in much the same manner as seen in DA nerve endings (i.e., increased release of 5HT, loss of function in tryptophan hydroxylase and the serotonin transporter, long-term depletion of 5HT stores). 5HT can also be modified by reactive oxygen species to form highly reactive species that damage neurons but its role in METH neurotoxicity has not been assessed. Increases in 5HT levels with 5-hydroxytryptophan do not change METH-induced neurotoxicity to the DA nerve endings as revealed by reductions in DA, tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter levels. Partial reductions in 5HT with p-chlorophenylalanine are without effect on METH toxicity, despite the fact that p-chlorophenylalanine largely prevents METH-induced hyperthermia. Mice lacking the gene for brain tryptophan hydroxylase 2 are devoid of brain 5HT and respond to METH in the same manner as wild-type controls, despite showing enhanced drug-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, the present results indicate that endogenous 5HT does not appear to play a role in METH-induced damage to DA nerve endings of the striatum. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. Co-administration of betulinic acid and methamphetamine causes toxicity to dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve terminals in the striatum of late adolescent rats

    PubMed Central

    Killinger, Bryan; Shah, Mrudang; Moszczynska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Psychostimulant methamphetamine (METH) is toxic to dopaminergic and serotonergic striatal nerve terminals in adult, but not in adolescent, brain. Betulinic acid (BA) and its derivatives are promising anti-HIV agents with some toxic properties. Many METH users, particularly young men, are HIV-positive; therefore, they might be treated with BA or its derivative for HIV infection. It is not known whether BA, or any of its derivatives, is neurotoxic in combination with METH in adolescent brain. The present study investigated the effects of BA and binge METH in the striatum in late adolescent rats. BA or METH alone did not decrease the levels of dopaminergic or serotonergic markers in the striatum whereas BA and METH together decreased these markers in a BA dose-dependent manner. BA and METH combination also caused decreases in the levels of mitochondrial complex I in the same manner; BA alone only slightly decreased the levels of the enzyme in striatal synaptosomes. BA or METH alone increased cytochrome c. METH alone decreased parkin, increased complex II and striatal BA levels. These results suggest that METH in combination with BA can be neurotoxic to dopaminergic and serotonergic striatal nerve terminals in late adolescent brain via mitochondrial dysfunction and parkin deficit. PMID:24151877

  14. Neurotoxicity of drugs of abuse--the case of methylenedioxyamphetamines (MDMA, ecstasy), and amphetamines.

    PubMed

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA, 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) and the stimulants methamphetamine (METH, speed) and amphetamine are popular drugs among young people, particularly in the dance scene. When given in high doses both MDMA and the stimulant amphetamines are clearly neurotoxic in laboratory animals. MDMA causes selective and persistent lesions of central serotonergic nerve terminals, whereas amphetamines damage both the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. In recent years, the question of ecstasy-induced neurotoxicity and possible functional sequelae has been addressed in several studies in drug users. Despite large methodological problems, the bulk of evidence suggests residual alterations of serotonergic transmission in MDMA users, although at least partial recovery may occur after long-term abstinence. However, functional sequelae may persist even after longer periods of abstinence. To date, the most consistent findings associate subtle cognitive impairments with ecstasy use, particularly with memory. In contrast, studies on possible long-term neurotoxic effects of stimulant use have been relatively scarce. Preliminary evidence suggests that alterations of the dopaminergic system may persist even after years of abstinence from METH, and may be associated with deficits in motor and cognitive performance. In this paper, we will review the literature focusing on human studies.

  15. Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and microglial activation are not mediated by fractalkine receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) damages dopamine (DA) nerve endings by a process that has been linked to microglial activation but the signaling pathways that mediate this response have not yet been delineated. Cardona et al. [Nat. Neurosci. 9 (2006), 917] recently identified the microglial-specific fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) as an important mediator of MPTP-induced neurodegeneration of DA neurons. Because the CNS damage caused by METH and MPTP is highly selective for the DA neuronal system in mouse models of neurotoxicity, we hypothesized that the CX3CR1 plays a role in METH-induced neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Mice in which the CX3CR1 gene has been deleted and replaced with a cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) were treated with METH and examined for striatal neurotoxicity. METH depleted DA, caused microglial activation, and increased body temperature in CX3CR1 knockout mice to the same extent and over the same time course seen in wild-type controls. The effects of METH in CX3CR1 knockout mice were not gender-dependent and did not extend beyond the striatum. Striatal microglia expressing eGFP constitutively show morphological changes after METH that are characteristic of activation. This response was restricted to the striatum and contrasted sharply with unresponsive eGFP-microglia in surrounding brain areas that are not damaged by METH. We conclude from these studies that CX3CR1 signaling does not modulate METH neurotoxicity or microglial activation. Furthermore, it appears that striatal-resident microglia respond to METH with an activation cascade and then return to a surveying state without undergoing apoptosis or migration. PMID:18410508

  16. Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and microglial activation are not mediated by fractalkine receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2008-07-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) damages dopamine (DA) nerve endings by a process that has been linked to microglial activation but the signaling pathways that mediate this response have not yet been delineated. Cardona et al. [Nat. Neurosci. 9 (2006), 917] recently identified the microglial-specific fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) as an important mediator of MPTP-induced neurodegeneration of DA neurons. Because the CNS damage caused by METH and MPTP is highly selective for the DA neuronal system in mouse models of neurotoxicity, we hypothesized that the CX3CR1 plays a role in METH-induced neurotoxicity and microglial activation. Mice in which the CX3CR1 gene has been deleted and replaced with a cDNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) were treated with METH and examined for striatal neurotoxicity. METH depleted DA, caused microglial activation, and increased body temperature in CX3CR1 knockout mice to the same extent and over the same time course seen in wild-type controls. The effects of METH in CX3CR1 knockout mice were not gender-dependent and did not extend beyond the striatum. Striatal microglia expressing eGFP constitutively show morphological changes after METH that are characteristic of activation. This response was restricted to the striatum and contrasted sharply with unresponsive eGFP-microglia in surrounding brain areas that are not damaged by METH. We conclude from these studies that CX3CR1 signaling does not modulate METH neurotoxicity or microglial activation. Furthermore, it appears that striatal-resident microglia respond to METH with an activation cascade and then return to a surveying state without undergoing apoptosis or migration.

  17. Nucleus Accumbens Invulnerability to Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Donald M.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:23382149

  18. Nucleus accumbens invulnerability to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Thomas, David M

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages neurons and nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. Emerging studies of human Meth addicts using both postmortem analyses of brain tissue and noninvasive imaging studies of intact brains have confirmed that Meth causes persistent structural abnormalities. Animal and human studies have also defined a number of significant functional problems and comorbid psychiatric disorders associated with long-term Meth abuse. This review summarizes the salient features of Meth-induced neurotoxicity with a focus on the dopamine (DA) neuronal system. DA nerve endings in the caudate-putamen (CPu) are damaged by Meth in a highly delimited manner. Even within the CPu, damage is remarkably heterogeneous, with ventral and lateral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared the damage that accompanies binge Meth intoxication, but relatively subtle changes in the disposition of DA in its nerve endings can lead to dramatic increases in Meth-induced toxicity in the CPu and overcome the normal resistance of the NAc to damage. In contrast to the CPu, where DA neuronal deficiencies are persistent, alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery. Animal models have been indispensable in studies of the causes and consequences of Meth neurotoxicity and in the development of new therapies. This research has shown that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of Meth to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage. The resistance of the NAc to Meth-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of Meth neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the numerous important roles played by this brain structure.

  19. Neurotoxicity of drugs of abuse - the case of methylenedioxy amphetamines (MDMA, ecstasy ), and amphetamines

    PubMed Central

    Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, Euphrosyne; Daumann, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Ecstasy (MDMA, 3,4-methylendioxymethamphetamine) and the stimulants methamphetamine (METH, speed) and amphetamine are popular drugs among young people, particularly in the dance scene. When given in high doses both MDMA and the stimulant amphetamines are clearly neurotoxic in laboratory animals. MDMA causes selective and persistent lesions of central serotonergic nerve terminals, whereas amphetamines damage both the serotonergic and dopaminergic systems. In recent years, the question of ecstasy-induced neurotoxicity and possible functional sequelae has been addressed in several studies in drug users. Despite large methodological problems, the bulk of evidence suggests residual alterations of serotonergic transmission in MDMA users, although at least partial recovery may occur after long-term abstinence. However, functional sequelae may persist even after longer periods of abstinence. To date, the most consistent findings associate subtle cognitive impairments with ecstasy use, particularly with memory. In contrast, studies on possible long-term neurotoxic effects of stimulant use have been relatively scarce. Preliminary evidence suggests that alterations of the dopaminergic system may persist even after years of abstinence from METH, and may be associated with deficits in motor and cognitive performance. In this paper, we will review the literature focusing on human studies. PMID:19877498

  20. D-deprenyl protects nigrostriatal neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Muralikrishnan, Dhanasekharan; Samantaray, Supriti; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2003-10-01

    Selegiline (L-deprenyl) is believed to render protection against l-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-neurotoxicity to a significant extent via a free radical scavenging mechanism, which is independent of its ability to inhibit monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B) in the brain. We investigated the hydroxyl radical (.OH) scavenging action and neuroprotective effect of D-deprenyl, its less active isomer, in MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice to test whether the chemical structure of the molecule or its biological effects contribute to this property. To achieve this goal we studied the effects of D-deprenyl on: (1).OH production in a Fenton reaction; (2) MPTP-induced.OH generation and dopamine (DA) depletion in vivo, employing a sensitive HPLC-electrochemical procedure; and (3) formation of MPP(+) in vivo in the striatum following systemic administration of MPTP, employing an HPLC-photodiode array detection system. D-deprenyl inhibited ferrous citrate-induced.OH in vitro (0.45 microM) and MPTP-induced.OH in vivo in substantia nigra (SN) and in the striatum (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.). D-deprenyl did not, but L-deprenyl (0.5 mg/kg dose) did significantly inhibit formation of MPP(+) in the striatum 90 min following systemic MPTP injection. It failed to affect MAO-B activity at 0.5 mg/kg in the striatum, but effectively blocked MPTP-induced striatal DA depletion. The potency of D-deprenyl to scavenge MPTP-induced.OH in vivo and to render protection against the dopaminergic neurotoxicity without affecting dopamine turnover, MAO-B activity, or formation of MPP(+) in the brain indicates a direct involvement of.OH in the neurotoxic action of MPTP and antioxidant effect in the neuroprotective action of deprenyl. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity is attenuated in transgenic mice with a null mutation for interleukin-6.

    PubMed

    Ladenheim, B; Krasnova, I N; Deng, X; Oyler, J M; Polettini, A; Moran, T H; Huestis, M A; Cadet, J L

    2000-12-01

    Increasing evidence implicates apoptosis as a major mechanism of cell death in methamphetamine (METH) neurotoxicity. The involvement of a neuroimmune component in apoptotic cell death after injury or chemical damage suggests that cytokines may play a role in METH effects. In the present study, we examined if the absence of IL-6 in knockout (IL-6-/-) mice could provide protection against METH-induced neurotoxicity. Administration of METH resulted in a significant reduction of [(125)I]RTI-121-labeled dopamine transporters in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and cortex as well as depletion of dopamine in the CPu and frontal cortex of wild-type mice. However, these METH-induced effects were significantly attenuated in IL-6-/- animals. METH also caused a decrease in serotonin levels in the CPu and hippocampus of wild-type mice, but no reduction was observed in IL-6-/- animals. Moreover, METH induced decreases in [(125)I]RTI-55-labeled serotonin transporters in the hippocampal CA3 region and in the substantia nigra-reticulata but increases in serotonin transporters in the CPu and cingulate cortex in wild-type animals, all of which were attenuated in IL-6-/- mice. Additionally, METH caused increased gliosis in the CPu and cortices of wild-type mice as measured by [(3)H]PK-11195 binding; this gliotic response was almost completely inhibited in IL-6-/- animals. There was also significant protection against METH-induced DNA fragmentation, measured by the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end-labeled (TUNEL) cells in the cortices. The protective effects against METH toxicity observed in the IL-6-/- mice were not caused by differences in temperature elevation or in METH accumulation in wild-type and mutant animals. Therefore, these observations support the proposition that IL-6 may play an important role in the neurotoxicity of METH.

  2. Dopamine disposition in the presynaptic process regulates the severity of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Thomas, David M

    2008-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is well known for its ability to cause damage to dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. The mechanisms by which METH causes neurotoxicity are not fully understood, but likely candidates are increased oxidative and nitrosative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Microglial activation is also emerging as an important element of the METH neurotoxic cascade, and it appears that extensive cross-talk between these cells and DA nerve endings is an early event in this process. It may seem paradoxical, but DA itself is also thought to be an essential factor in the neuronal damaging effects of METH, but issues relating to its precise role in this regard remain unanswered. We present in this overview a summary of studies that tested how alterations in the disposition of presynaptic DA (injections of reserpine, L-DOPA, or clorgyline) modulate METH neurotoxicity. In all cases, these drugs significantly increased the magnitude of microglial activation as well as the severity of damage to striatal DA nerve endings caused by METH. The enhancement of METH effects in striatum by reserpine, L-DOPA, and clorgyline persisted for 14 days and showed no evidence of recovery. These data establish that subtle shifts in the newly synthesized pool of DA can cause substantial changes in the severity of METH-induced neurotoxicity. DA released into the synapse by METH is very likely the source of downstream reactants that provoke microglial activation and the ensuing damage to DA nerve endings.

  3. p73 gene in dopaminergic neurons is highly susceptible to manganese neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Suk; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Gordon, Richard; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of manganese (Mn) has been linked to a Parkinsonian-like movement disorder, resulting from dysfunction of the extrapyramidal motor system within the basal ganglia. However, the exact cellular and molecular mechanisms of Mn-induced neurotoxicity remain elusive. In this study, we treated C57BL/6J mice with 30mg/kg Mn via oral gavage for 30 days. Interestingly, in nigral tissues of Mn-exposed mice, we found a significant downregulation of the truncated isoform of p73 protein at the N-terminus (ΔNp73). To further determine the functional role of Mn-induced p73 downregulation in Mn neurotoxicity, we examined the interrelationship between the effect of Mn on p73 gene expression and apoptotic cell death in an N27 dopaminergic neuronal model. Consistent with our animal study, 300μM Mn treatment significantly suppressed p73 mRNA expression in N27 dopaminergic cells. We further determined that protein levels of the ΔNp73 isoform was also reduced in Mn-treated N27 cells and primary striatal cultures. Furthermore, overexpression of ΔNp73 conferred modest cellular protection against Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Mn exposure downregulates p73 gene expression resulting in enhanced susceptibility to apoptotic cell death. Thus, further characterization of the cellular mechanism underlying p73 gene downregulation will improve our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of Mn neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells during methamphetamine induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C.-W.; Ping, Y.-H.; Department of Education and Research, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    2007-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an abused drug that may cause psychiatric and neurotoxic damage, including degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and apoptosis of non-monoaminergic cells in Brain. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these METH-induced neurotoxic effects remain to be clarified. In this study, we performed a time course assessment to investigate the effects of METH on intracellular oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations in a human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line. We characterized that METH induces a temporal sequence of several cellular events including, firstly, a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential within 1 h of the METH treatment, secondly, an extensive declinemore » in mitochondrial membrane potential and increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after 8 h of the treatment, thirdly, an increase in mitochondrial mass after the drug treatment for 24 h, and finally, a decrease in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial proteins per mitochondrion as well as the occurrence of apoptosis after 48 h of the treatment. Importantly, vitamin E attenuated the METH-induced increases in intracellular ROS level and mitochondrial mass, and prevented METH-induced cell death. Our observations suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and aberrant mitochondrial biogenesis may play critical roles in METH-induced neurotoxic effects.« less

  5. Dopamine quinones activate microglia and induce a neurotoxic gene expression profile: relationship to methamphetamine-induced nerve ending damage.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Donald M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Thomas, David M

    2006-08-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) intoxication leads to persistent damage of dopamine (DA) nerve endings of the striatum. Recently, we and others have suggested that the neurotoxicity associated with METH is mediated by extensive microglial activation. DA itself has been shown to play an obligatory role in METH neurotoxicity, possibly through the formation of quinone species. We show presently that DA-quinones (DAQ) cause a time-dependent activation of cultured microglial cells. Microarray analysis of the effects of DAQ on microglial gene expression revealed that 101 genes were significantly changed in expression, with 73 genes increasing and 28 genes decreasing in expression. Among those genes differentially regulated by DAQ were those often associated with neurotoxic conditions including inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, and prostaglandins. In addition, microglial genes associated with a neuronally protective phenotype were among those that were downregulated by DAQ. These results implicate DAQ as one species that could cause early activation of microglial cells in METH intoxication, manifested as an alteration in the expression of a broad biomarker panel of genes. These results also link oxidative stress, chemical alterations in DA to its quinone, and microglial activation as part of a cascade of glial-neuronal crosstalk that can amplify METH-induced neurotoxicity.

  6. PKCδ-dependent p47phox activation mediates methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Dang, Duy-Khanh; Shin, Eun-Joo; Kim, Dae-Joong; Tran, Hai-Quyen; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Jang, Choon-Gon; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2018-02-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) has been recognized to activate NADPH oxidase (PHOX). However, the interaction between PKC and PHOX in vivo remains elusive. Treatment with methamphetamine (MA) resulted in a selective increase in PKCδ expression out of PKC isoforms. PKCδ co-immunoprecipitated with p47phox, and facilitated phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox. MA-induced increases in PHOX activity and reactive oxygen species were attenuated by knockout of p47phox or PKCδ. In addition, MA-induced impairments in the Nrf-2-related glutathione synthetic system were also mitigated by knockout of p47phox or PKCδ. Glutathione-immunoreactivity was co-localized in Iba-1-labeled microglial cells and in NeuN-labeled neurons, but not in GFAP-labeled astrocytes, reflecting the necessity for self-protection against oxidative stress by mainly microglia. Buthionine-sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, potentiated microglial activation and pro-apoptotic changes, leading to dopaminergic losses. These neurotoxic processes were attenuated by rottlerin, a pharmacological inhibitor of PKCδ, genetic inhibitions of PKCδ [i.e., PKCδ knockout mice (KO) and PKCδ antisense oligonucleotide (ASO)], or genetic inhibition of p47phox (i.e., p47phox KO or p47phox ASO). Rottlerin did not exhibit any additive effects against the protective activity offered by genetic inhibition of p47phox. Therefore, we suggest that PKCδ is a critical regulator for p47phox activation induced by MA, and that Nrf-2-dependent GSH induction via inhibition of PKCδ or p47phox, is important for dopaminergic protection against MA insult. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Geldanamycin induces heat shock protein 70 and protects against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Ying; He, Jin-Cai; Wang, Yumei; Huang, Qing-Yuan; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2005-12-02

    As key molecular chaperone proteins, heat shock proteins (HSPs) represent an important cellular protective mechanism against neuronal cell death in various models of neurological disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect as well as the molecular mechanism of geldanamycin (GA), an inhibitor of Hsp90, on 1-methyl-4-pheny-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity, a mouse model of Parkinson disease. Neurochemical analysis showed that pretreatment with GA (via intracerebral ventricular injection 24 h prior to MPTP treatment) increased residual dopamine content and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the striatum 24 h after MPTP treatment. To dissect out the molecular mechanism underlying this neuroprotection, we showed that the GA-mediated protection against MPTP was associated with a reduction of cytosolic Hsp90 and an increase in Hsp70, with no significant changes in Hsp40 and Hsp25 levels. Furthermore, in parallel with the induction of Hsp70, striatal nuclear HSF1 levels and HSF1 binding to heat shock element sites in the Hsp70 promoter were significantly enhanced by the GA pretreatment. Together these results suggested that the molecular cascade leading to the induction of Hsp70 is critical to the neuroprotection afforded by GA against MPTP-induced neurotoxicity in the brain and that pharmacological inhibition of Hsp90 may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for Parkinson disease.

  8. L-Ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of L-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measuredmore » using the fluorochrome 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. -- Highlights: ► Besides the anti-oxidant effect, Vit. C also induces HO-1 expression in brain cells. ► Vit. C reduces METH neurotoxicity and ROS

  9. Neurotoxicity profiles of substituted amphetamines in the C57BL/6J mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, J P; Miller, D B

    1994-08-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) and serotonergic (5-HT) projections to striatum and cortex have been implicated as the primary targets of substituted amphetamine (AMP)-induced neurotoxicity, largely on the basis of the propensity of these compounds to cause protracted decrements in DA and 5-HT rather than on the basis of AMP-induced alterations of indices linked to neural damage. Moreover, most studies of AMP-induced neurotoxicity, regardless of the endpoints assessed, have been conducted using a rat model; relatively little attention has been focused on the effects of these compounds in the mouse. Here, we evaluated the potential neurotoxic effects of d-methamphetamine (d-METH), d-methylenedioxyamphetamine (d-MDA), d-methylene-dioxymethamphetamine (d-MDMA) and d-fenfluramine (d-FEN) in the C57BL6/J mouse. Astrogliosis, assessed by quantification of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), was taken as the main index of AMP-induced neural damage. A silver degeneration stain also was used to obtain direct evidence of AMP-induced neuronal damage. Assays of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), DA and 5-HT were used to assess effects on DA and 5-HT systems. Mice received d-METH (10 mg/kg), d-MDA (20 mg/kg), d-MDMA (20 mg/kg) or d-FEN (25 mg/kg) every 2 hr for a total of four s.c. injections. d-METH, d-MDA and d-MDMA caused a large (300%) increase in striatal GFAP that resolved by 3 weeks and a 50 to 75% decrease in TH and DA that did not resolve. d-METH, d-MDA and d-MDMA also caused fiber and terminal degeneration in striatum as revealed by silver staining. d-FEN did not affect any parameters in striatum. d-METH, d-MDA and d-MDMA also increased GFAP in cortex, effects that were associated with small (10-25%) and transient decrements in cortical 5-HT. d-FEN caused prolonged (weeks) decrements (20%) in cortical 5-HT but did not affect cortical GFAP. The effects of d-METH, d-MDA and d-MDMA were stereoselective and were blocked by pretreatment with MK-801. Core temperature was slightly elevated by

  10. L-Ascorbate Protects Against Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity of Cortical Cells via Inhibiting Oxidative Stress, Autophagy, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Yang, Ling-Yu; Wang, Jing-Ya; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Chiu, Chien-Tsai; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced cell death contributes to the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity; however, the relative roles of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy remain unclear. L-Ascorbate, also called vitamin (Vit.) C, confers partial protection against METH neurotoxicity via induction of heme oxygenase-1. We further investigated the role of Vit. C in METH-induced oxidative stress, apoptosis, and autophagy in cortical cells. Exposure to lower concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1 mM) of METH had insignificant effects on ROS production, whereas cells exposed to 5 mM METH exhibited ROS production in a time-dependent manner. We confirmed METH-induced apoptosis (by nuclear morphology revealed by Hoechst 33258 staining and Western blot showing the protein levels of pro-caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3) and autophagy (by Western blot showing the protein levels of Belin-1 and conversion of microtubule-associated light chain (LC)3-I to LC3-II and autophagosome staining by monodansylcadaverine). The apoptosis as revealed by cleaved caspase-3 expression marked an increase at 18 h after METH exposure while both autophagic markers, Beclin 1 and LC3-II, marked an increase in cells exposed to METH for 6 and 24 h, respectively. Treating cells with Vit. C 30 min before METH exposure time-dependently attenuated the production of ROS. Vitamin C also attenuated METH-induced Beclin 1 and LC3-II expression and METH toxicity. Treatment of cells with Vit. C before METH exposure attenuated the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and reduced the number of METH-induced apoptotic cells. We suggest that the protective effect of Vit. C against METH toxicity might be through attenuation of ROS production, autophagy, and apoptosis.

  11. Treg Cells Protect Dopaminergic Neurons against MPP+ Neurotoxicity via CD47-SIRPA Interaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have been associated with neuroprotection by inhibiting microglial activation in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the nigrostriatal system. Herein, we show that Treg cells directly protect dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) neurotoxicity via an interaction between the two transmembrane proteins CD47 and signal regulatory protein α (SIRPA). Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cells or VM neurons were pretreated with Treg cells before MPP+ treatment. Transwell co-culture of Treg cells and VM neurons was used to assess the effects of the Treg cytokines transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and interleukin (IL)-10 on dopaminergic neurons. Live cell imaging system detected a dynamic contact of Treg cells with VM neurons that were stained with CD47 and SIRPA, respectively. Dopaminergic neuronal loss, which was assessed by the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive cells, was examined after silencing CD47 in Treg cells or silencing SIRPA in VM neurons. Treg cells prevented MPP+-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss and glial inflammatory responses. TGF-β1 and IL-10 secreted from Treg cells did not significantly prevent MPP+-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss in transwell co-culture of Treg cells and VM neurons. CD47 and SIRPA were expressed by Treg cells and VM neurons, respectively. CD47-labeled Treg cells dynamically contacted with SIRPA-labeled VM neurons. Silencing CD47 gene in Treg cells impaired the ability of Treg cells to protect dopaminergic neurons against MPP+ toxicity. Similarly, SIRPA knockdown in VM neurons reduced the ability of Treg cell neuroprotection. Rac1/Akt signaling pathway in VM neurons was activated by CD47-SIRPA interaction between Treg cells and the neurons. Inhibiting Rac1/Akt signaling in VM neurons compromised Treg cell neuroprotection. Treg cells protect dopaminergic neurons against

  12. Nupr1 Modulates Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neuronal Apoptosis and Autophagy through CHOP-Trib3-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiang; Huang, Enping; Tai, Yunchun; Zhao, Xu; Chen, Xuebing; Chen, Chuanxiang; Chen, Rui; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Wang, Huijun; Xie, Wei-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illegal and widely abused psychoactive stimulant. METH exposure causes detrimental effects on multiple organ systems, primarily the nervous system, especially dopaminergic pathways, in both laboratory animals and humans. In this study, we hypothesized that Nuclear protein 1 (Nupr1/com1/p8) is involved in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis and autophagy through endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling pathway. To test this hypothesis, we measured the expression levels of Nupr1, ER stress protein markers CHOP and Trib3, apoptosis-related protein markers cleaved-caspase3 and PARP, as well as autophagy-related protein markers LC3 and Beclin-1 in brain tissues of adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, rat primary cultured neurons and the rat adrenal pheochromocytoma cells (PC12 cells) after METH exposure. We also determined the effects of METH exposure on the expression of these proteins after silencing Nupr1, CHOP, or Trib3 expression with synthetic small hairpin RNA (shRNA) or siRNA in vitro, and after silencing Nupr1 in the striatum of rats by injecting lentivirus containing shRNA sequence targeting Nupr1 gene to rat striatum. The results showed that METH exposure increased Nupr1 expression that was accompanied with increased expression of ER stress protein markers CHOP and Trib3, and also led to apoptosis and autophagy in rat primary neurons and in PC12 cells after 24 h exposure (3.0 mM), and in the prefrontal cortex and striatum of rats after repeated intraperitoneal injections (15 mg/kg × 8 injections at 12 h intervals). Silencing of Nupr1 expression partly reduced METH-induced apoptosis and autophagy in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that Nupr1 plays an essential role in METH-caused neuronal apoptosis and autophagy at relatively higher doses and may be a potential therapeutic target in high-dose METH-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:28694771

  13. Role and Mechanism of Microglial Activation in Iron-Induced Selective and Progressive Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Zhao-fen; Gao, Jun-hua; Sun, Li; Huang, Xi-yan; Liu, Zhuo; Yu, Shu-yang; Cao, Chen-Jie; Zuo, Li-jun; Chen, Ze-Jie; Hu, Yang; Wang, Fang; Hong, Jau-shyong; Wang, Xiao-min

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have excessive iron depositions in substantia nigra (SN). Neuroinflammation characterized by microglial activation is pivotal for dopaminergic neurodegeneration in PD. However, the role and mechanism of microglial activation in iron-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in SN remain unclear yet. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of microglial β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase 2 (NOX2) activation in iron-induced selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Multiple primary midbrain cultures from rat, NOX2+/+ and NOX2−/− mice were used. Dopaminergic neurons, total neurons, and microglia were visualized by immunostainings. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Superoxide (O2·−) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS) were determined by measuring SOD-inhibitable reduction of tetrazolium salt WST-1 and DCFH-DA assay. mRNA and protein were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Iron induces selective and progressive dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rat neuron–microglia–astroglia cultures and microglial activation potentiates the neurotoxicity. Activated microglia produce a magnitude of O2·− and iROS, and display morphological alteration. NOX2 inhibitor diphenylene iodonium protects against iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity through decreasing microglial O2·− generation, and NOX2−/− mice are resistant to the neurotoxicity by reducing microglial O2·− production, indicating that iron-elicited dopaminergic neurotoxicity is dependent of NOX2, a O2·−-generating enzyme. NOX2 activation is indicated by the increased mRNA and protein levels of subunits P47 and gp91. Molecules relevant to NOX2 activation include PKC-σ, P38, ERK1/2, JNK, and NF-ΚBP65 as their mRNA and protein levels are enhanced by NOX2 activation. Iron causes selective and progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and microglial NOX2 activation potentiates the

  14. L-ascorbate attenuates methamphetamine neurotoxicity through enhancing the induction of endogenous heme oxygenase-1.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ni; Wang, Jiz-Yuh; Lee, Ching-Tien; Lin, Chih-Hung; Lai, Chien-Cheng; Wang, Jia-Yi

    2012-12-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse which causes neurotoxicity and increased risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. We previously found that METH induces heme oxygenase (HO)-1 expression in neurons and glial cells, and this offers partial protection against METH toxicity. In this study, we investigated the effects of l-ascorbate (vitamin C, Vit. C) on METH toxicity and HO-1 expression in neuronal/glial cocultures. Cell viability and damage were evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthianol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) reduction and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, respectively. Neuronal and glial localization of HO-1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured using the fluorochrome 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. HO-1 mRNA and protein expression were examined by RT-qPCR and Western blotting, respectively. Results show that Vit. C induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions in time- and concentration-dependent manners. Inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) significantly blocked induction of HO-1 by Vit. C. HO-1 mRNA and protein expressions were significantly elevated by a combination of Vit. C and METH, compared to either Vit. C or METH alone. Pretreatment with Vit. C enhanced METH-induced HO-1 expression and attenuated METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity. Pharmacological inhibition of HO activity abolished suppressive effects of Vit. C on METH-induced ROS production and attenuated neurotoxicity. We conclude that induction of HO-1 expression contributes to the attenuation of METH-induced ROS production and neurotoxicity by Vit. C. We suggest that HO-1 induction by Vit. C may serve as a strategy to alleviate METH neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY DISRUPTS NATURALLY OCCURRING PHASIC DOPAMINE SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Christopher D.; Daberkow, David P.; Ramsson, Eric S.; Keefe, Kristen A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug that is also neurotoxic to central dopamine (DA) systems. Although striatal DA depletions induced by METH are associated with behavioral and cognitive impairments, the link between these phenomena remains poorly understood. Previous work in both METH-pretreated animals and the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson’s disease suggests that a disruption of phasic DA signaling, which is important for learning and goal-directed behavior, may be such a link. However, prior studies used electrical stimulation to elicit phasic-like DA responses and were also performed under anesthesia, which alters DA neuron activity and presynaptic function. Here we investigated the consequences of METH-induced DA terminal loss on both electrically evoked phasic-like DA signals and so-called “spontaneous” phasic DA transients measured by voltammetry in awake rats. Not ostensibly attributable to discrete stimuli, these sub-second DA changes may play a role in enhancing reward-cue associations. METH-pretreatment reduced tissue DA content in the dorsomedial striatum and nucleus accumbens by ~55%. Analysis of phasic-like DA responses elicited by reinforcing stimulation revealed that METH pretreatment decreased their amplitude and underlying mechanisms for release and uptake to a similar degree as DA content in both striatal subregions. Most importantly, characteristics of DA transients were altered by METH-induced DA terminal loss, with amplitude and frequency decreased and duration increased. These results demonstrate for the first time that denervation of DA neurons alters naturally occurring DA transients and are consistent with diminished phasic DA signaling as a plausible mechanism linking METH-induced striatal DA depletions and cognitive deficits. PMID:23574406

  16. Role for excitatory amino acids in methamphetamine-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sonsalla, P K; Nicklas, W J; Heikkila, R E

    1989-01-20

    The systemic administration of either methamphetamine or 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) to experimental animals produces degenerative changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons or their axon terminals. This study was conducted to determine if excitatory amino acids, which appear to be involved in various neurodegenerative disorders, might also contribute to the dopaminergic neurotoxicity produced in mice by either methamphetamine or MPTP. MK-801, phencyclidine, and ketamine, noncompetitive antagonists of one subtype of excitatory amino acid receptor, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, provided substantial protection against neurotoxicity produced by methamphetamine but not that produced by MPTP. These findings indicate that excitatory amino acids play an important role in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic damage induced by methamphetamine.

  17. Neurotoxicity of "ecstasy" and its metabolites in human dopaminergic differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Patrícia Silva; Nogueira, Tiago Bernandes; Costa, Vera Marisa; Branco, Paula Sério; Ferreira, Luísa Maria; Fernandes, Eduarda; Bastos, Maria Lourdes; Meisel, Andreas; Carvalho, Félix; Capela, João Paulo

    2013-02-04

    "Ecstasy" (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine or MDMA) is a widely abused recreational drug, reported to produce neurotoxic effects, both in laboratory animals and in humans. MDMA metabolites can be major contributors for MDMA neurotoxicity. This work studied the neurotoxicity of MDMA and its catechol metabolites, α-methyldopamine (α-MeDA) and N-methyl-α-methyldopamine (N-Me-α-MeDA) in human dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells differentiated with retinoic acid and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate. Differentiation led to SH-SY5Y neurons with higher ability to accumulate dopamine and higher resistance towards dopamine neurotoxicity. MDMA catechol metabolites were neurotoxic to SH-SY5Y neurons, leading to caspase 3-independent cell death in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. MDMA did not show a concentration- and time-dependent death. Pre-treatment with the antioxidant and glutathione precursor, N-acetylcysteine (NAC), resulted in strong protection against the MDMA metabolites' neurotoxicity. Neither the superoxide radical scavenger, tiron, nor the inhibitor of the dopamine (DA) transporter, GBR 12909, prevented the metabolites' toxicity. Cells exposed to α-MeDA showed an increase in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, which, at the 48 h time-point, was not dependent in the activity increase of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), revealing a possible transient effect. Importantly, pre-treatment with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of γ-GCS, prevented α-MeDA induced increase in GSH levels, but did not augment this metabolite cytotoxicity. Even so, BSO pre-treatment abolished NAC protective effects against α-MeDA neurotoxicity, which were, at least partially, due to GSH de novo synthesis. Inversely, pre-treatment of cells with BSO augmented N-Me-α-MeDA-induced neurotoxicity, but only slightly affected NAC neuroprotection. In conclusion, MDMA catechol metabolites promote differential toxic effects to differentiated dopaminergic human SH

  18. 3-hydroxymorphinan is neurotrophic to dopaminergic neurons and is also neuroprotective against LPS-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Qin, Liya; Wang, Tongguang; Wei, Sung-Jen; Gao, Hui-ming; Liu, Jie; Wilson, Belinda; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Wanqin; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a novel therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported that dextromethorphan (DM), an active ingredient in a variety of widely used anticough remedies, protected dopaminergic neurons in rat primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated degeneration and provided potent protection for dopaminergic neurons in a MPTP mouse model. The underlying mechanism for the protective effect of DM was attributed to its anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of microglia activation. In an effort to develop more potent compounds for the treatment of PD, we have screened a series of analogs of DM, and 3-hydroxymorphinan (3-HM) emerged as a promising candidate for this purpose. Our study using primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures showed that 3-HM provided more potent neuroprotection against LPS-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity than its parent compound. The higher potency of 3-HM was attributed to its neurotrophic effect in addition to the anti-inflammatory effect shared by both DM and 3-HM. First, we showed that 3-HM exerted potent neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects on dopaminergic neurons in rat primary mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures treated with LPS. The neurotrophic effect of 3-HM was glia-dependent since 3-HM failed to show any protective effect in the neuron-enriched cultures. We subsequently demonstrated that it was the astroglia, not the microglia, that contributed to the neurotrophic effect of 3-HM. This conclusion was based on the reconstitution studies, in which we added different percentages of microglia (10-20%) or astroglia (40-50%) back to the neuron-enriched cultures and found that 3-HM was neurotrophic after the addition of astroglia, but not microglia. Furthermore, 3-HM-treated astroglia-derived conditioned media exerted a significant neurotrophic effect on dopaminergic neurons. It appeared likely that 3-HM caused the release of neurotrophic factor

  19. Toll-Like Receptor 4 Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Neuroinflammation through Caspase-11 Signaling Pathway in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Du, Si-Hao; Qiao, Dong-Fang; Chen, Chuan-Xiang; Chen, Si; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Wang, Huijun; Xie, Wei-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine-typed stimulant drug that is increasingly being abused worldwide. Previous studies have shown that METH toxicity is systemic, especially targeting dopaminergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). However, the role of neuroinflammation in METH neurotoxicity remains unclear. We hypothesized that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and Caspase-11 are involved in METH-induced astrocyte-related neuroinflammation. We tested our hypothesis by examining the changes of TLR4 and Caspase-11 protein expression in primary cultured C57BL/6 mouse astrocytes and in the midbrain and striatum of mice exposed to METH with western blot and double immunofluorescence labeling. We also determined the effects of blocking Caspase-11 expression with wedelolactone (a specific inhibitor of Caspase-11) or siRNA on METH-induced neuroinflammation in astrocytes. Furthermore, we determined the effects of blocking TLR4 expression with TAK-242 (a specific inhibitor of TLR4) or siRNA on METH-induced neuroinflammation in astrocytes. METH exposure increased Caspase-11 and TLR4 expression both in vitro and in vivo, with the effects in vitro being dose-dependent. Inhibition of Caspase-11 expression with either wedelolactone or siRNAs reduced the expression of inflammasome NLRP3 and pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, blocking TLR4 expression inhibited METH-induced activation of NF-κB and Caspase-11 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that TLR4-Caspase-11 pathway is involved in METH-induced neuroinflammation. These results indicate that Caspase-11 and TLR4 play an important role in METH-induced neuroinflammation and may be potential gene targets for therapeutics in METH-caused neurotoxicity. PMID:29311802

  20. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Itzhak, Y; Ali, S F

    1996-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate whether the relatively selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI), protects against methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. Male Swiss Webster mice received the following treatments (i.p.; q 3 h x 3): (a) vehicle/saline, (b) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/saline, (c) vehicle/METH (5 mg/kg), and (d) 7-NI (25 mg/kg)/METH (5 mg/kg). On the second day, groups (a) and (b) received two vehicle injections, and groups (c) and (d) received two 7-NI injections (25 mg/kg, each). Administration of vehicle/METH resulted in 68, 44, and 55% decreases in the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid, respectively, and a 48% decrease in the number of [3H]mazindol binding sites in the striatum compared with control values. Treatment with 7-NI (group d) provided full protection against the depletion of dopamine and its metabolites and the loss of dopamine transporter binding sites. Administration of 7-NI/saline (group b) affected neither the tissue concentration of dopamine and its metabolites nor the binding parameters of [3H] mazindol compared with control values. 7-NI had no significant effect on animals' body temperature, and it did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia. These findings indicate a role for nitric oxide in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and also suggest that blockade of NOS may be beneficial for the management of Parkinson's disease.

  1. Neuroprotective effect of curcumin-loaded lactoferrin nano particles against rotenone induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bollimpelli, V Satish; Kumar, Prashant; Kumari, Sonali; Kondapi, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Curcumin is known to have neuroprotective role and possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory activities. Rotenone, a flavonoid induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells is being widely studied in Parkinson's Disease (PD) research. In the present study, curcumin loaded lactoferrin nano particles prepared by sol-oil chemistry were used to protect dopaminergic cell line SK-N-SH against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. These curcumin loaded nano particles were of 43-60 nm diameter size and around 100 nm hydrodynamic size as assessed by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis respectively. The encapsulation efficiency was 61.3% ± 2.4%. Cellular uptake of curcumin through these nano particles was confirmed by confocal imaging and spectrofluorimetric analysis. The curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles showed greater intracellular drug uptake, sustained retention and greater neuroprotection than soluble counterpart. Neuroprotective activity was characterized through viability assays and by estimating ROS levels. Furthermore rotenone induced PD like features were characterized by decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and increase in α-synuclein expression. Taken together curcumin loaded lactoferrin nanoparticles could be a promising drug delivery strategy against neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity disrupts pharmacologically evoked dopamine transients in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Robinson, John D; Howard, Christopher D; Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Byers, Diane L; Keefe, Kristen A; Garris, Paul A

    2014-08-01

    Phasic dopamine (DA) signaling, during which burst firing by DA neurons generates short-lived elevations in extracellular DA in terminal fields called DA transients, is implicated in reinforcement learning. Disrupted phasic DA signaling is proposed to link DA depletions and cognitive-behavioral impairment in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. Here, we further investigated this disruption by assessing effects of METH pretreatment on DA transients elicited by a drug cocktail of raclopride, a D2 DA receptor antagonist, and nomifensine, an inhibitor of the dopamine transporter (DAT). One advantage of this approach is that pharmacological activation provides a large, high-quality data set of transients elicited by endogenous burst firing of DA neurons for analysis of regional differences and neurotoxicity. These pharmacologically evoked DA transients were measured in the dorsomedial (DM) and dorsolateral (DL) striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Electrically evoked DA levels were also recorded to quantify DA release and uptake, and DAT binding was determined by means of autoradiography to index DA denervation. Pharmacologically evoked DA transients in intact animals exhibited a greater amplitude and frequency and shorter duration in the DM compared to the DL striatum, despite similar pre- and post-drug assessments of DA release and uptake in both sub-regions as determined from the electrically evoked DA signals. METH pretreatment reduced transient activity. The most prominent effect of METH pretreatment on transients across striatal sub-region was decreased amplitude, which mirrored decreased DAT binding and was accompanied by decreased DA release. Overall, these results identify marked intrastriatal differences in the activity of DA transients that appear independent of presynaptic mechanisms for DA release and uptake and further support disrupted phasic DA signaling mediated by decreased DA release in rats with METH-induced

  3. METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED NEUROTOXICITY DISRUPTS PHARMACOLOGICALLY EVOKED DOPAMINE TRANSIENTS IN THE DORSOMEDIAL AND DORSOLATERAL STRIATUM

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, John D.; Howard, Christopher D.; Pastuzyn, Elissa D.; Byers, Diane L.; Keefe, Kristen A.; Garris, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Phasic dopamine (DA) signaling, during which burst firing by dopamine neurons generates short-lived elevations in extracellular DA in terminal fields called DA transients, is implicated in reinforcement learning. Disrupted phasic DA signaling is proposed to link DA depletions and cognitive-behavioral impairment in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity. Here we further investigated this disruption by assessing effects of METH pretreatment on DA transients elicited by a drug cocktail of raclopride, a D2 DA receptor antagonist, and nomifensine, an inhibitor of the dopamine transporter (DAT). One advantage of this approach is that pharmacological activation provides a large, high-quality data set of transients elicited by endogenous burst firing of DA neurons for analysis of regional differences and neurotoxicity. These pharmacologically evoked DA transients were measured in the dorsomedial (DM) and dorsolateral (DL) striatum of urethane-anesthetized rats by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Electrically evoked DA levels were also recorded to quantify DA release and uptake, and DAT binding was determined by autoradiography to index DA denervation. Pharmacologically evoked DA transients in intact animals exhibited a greater amplitude and frequency and shorter duration in the DM compared to the DL striatum, despite similar pre- and post-drug assessments of DA release and uptake in both sub-regions as determined from the electrically evoked DA signals. METH pretreatment reduced transient activity. The most prominent effect of METH pretreatment on transients across striatal sub-region was decreased amplitude, which mirrored decreased DAT binding and was accompanied by decreased DA release. Overall, these results identify marked intrastriatal differences in the activity of DA transients that appear independent of presynaptic mechanisms for DA release and uptake and further support disrupted phasic DA signaling mediated by decreased DA release in rats with METH-induced

  4. Autoradiographic evidence for methamphetamine-induced striatal dopaminergic loss in mouse brain: attenuation in CuZn-superoxide dismutase transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, H; Ladenheim, B; Carlson, E; Epstein, C; Cadet, J L

    1996-04-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) has long-lasting neurotoxic effects on the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system of rodents. METH-induced neurotoxicity is thought to involve release of DA in presynaptic DA terminals, which is associated with increased formation of oxygen-based free radicals. We have recently shown that METH-induced striatal DA depletion is attenuated in transgenic (Tg) mice that express the human CuZn-superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme. That study did not specifically address the issue of loss of DA terminals. In the present study, we have used receptor autoradiographic studies of [(125)I]RTI-121-labeled DA uptake sites to evaluate the effects of several doses of METH on striatal DA terminals of Non-Tg as well as of heterozygous and homozygous SOD-Tg mice. In Non-Tg mice, METH caused decreases in striatal DA uptake sites in a dose-dependent fashion. The loss of DA terminals was more prominent in the lateral region than in the medial subdivisions of the striatum. In SOD-Tg mice, the loss of DA terminals caused by METH was attenuated in a gene dosage-dependent fashion, with the homozygous mice showing the greatest protection. Female mice were somewhat more resistant than male mice against these deleterious effects of METH. These results provide further evidence for a role of superoxide radicals in the long-term effects of METH. They also suggest the notion of a gender-specific handling of oxidative stress.

  5. RNA interference targeting α-synuclein attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Huang, Enping; Wang, Huijun; Qiu, Pingming; Liu, Chao

    2013-07-12

    The protein α-synuclein (α-syn) is abundant in neurons and has been claimed to play critical roles in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease. Overexpression of α-syn has been shown to be toxicity in methamphetamine (METH)-induced model in vivo and in vitro which has Parkinson's-like pathology. However, the exact mechanisms underlying toxicity of α-syn mediated METH-induced neuron remain unknown. In the present study, human dopaminergic-like neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were used as METH-induced model in vitro. Cell viability was found to be dramatically increased after silencing α-syn expression followed by METH treatment compared with a-syn wild-type cells and the morphological damage to cells after METH treatment was abated through knockdown of α-syn expression in this model. The expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2(VMAT-2) were significantly decreased and the activity/levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitrogen (NO) were notably increased after METH treatment. However, the changes of these expression levels were reversed in cells transfected with α-syn-shRNA. These results suggested that TH, DAT, VMAT-2, ROS and NOS maybe involved in α-syn mediated METH-induced neuronal toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Lipopolysaccharide-induced dopaminergic cell death in rat midbrain slice cultures: role of inducible nitric oxide synthase and protection by indomethacin.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Haruki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Nishiwaki, Mayumi; Kume, Toshiaki; Kaneko, Shuji; Akaike, Akinori

    2003-09-01

    Glial cell activation associated with inflammatory reaction may contribute to pathogenic processes of neurodegenerative disorders, through production of several cytotoxic molecules. We investigated the consequences of glial activation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)/lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rat midbrain slice cultures. Application of IFN-gamma followed by LPS caused dopaminergic cell death and accompanying increases in nitrite production and lactate dehydrogenase release. Aminoguanidine, an inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), or SB203580, an inhibitor of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, prevented dopaminergic cell loss as well as nitrite production. SB203580 also suppressed expression of iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by IFN-gamma/LPS. A COX inhibitor indomethacin protected dopaminergic neurons from IFN-gamma/LPS-induced injury, whereas selective COX-2 inhibitors such as NS-398 and nimesulide did not. Notably, indomethacin was able to attenuate neurotoxicity of a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Neutralizing antibodies against tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1beta did not inhibit dopaminergic cell death caused by IFN-gamma/LPS, although combined application of these antibodies blocked lactate dehydrogenase release and decrease in the number of non-dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate that iNOS-derived NO plays a crucial role in IFN-gamma/LPS-induced dopaminergic cell death, and that indomethacin exerts protective effect by mechanisms probably related to NO neurotoxicity rather than through COX inhibition.

  7. Methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity linked to UPS dysfunction and autophagy related changes that can be modulated by PKCδ in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mengshien; Shivalingappa, Prashanth Chandramani; Jin, Huajun; Ghosh, Anamitra; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Ali, Syed; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2012-01-01

    A compromised protein degradation machinery has been implicated in methamphetamine (MA)-induced neurodegeneration. However, the signaling mechanisms that induce autophagy and UPS dysfunction are not well understood. The present study investigates the contributions of PKC delta (PKCδ) mediated signaling events in MA-induced autophagy, UPS dysfunction and cell death. Using an in vitro mesencephalic dopaminergic cell culture model, we demonstrate that MA-induced early induction of autophagy is associated with reduction in proteasomal function and concomitant dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), followed by significantly increased of PKCδ activation, caspase-3 activation, accumulation of ubiquitin positive aggregates and microtubule associated light chain-3 (LC3-II) levels. Interestingly, siRNA mediated knockdown of PKCδ or overexpression of cleavage resistant mutant of PKCδ dramatically reduced MA-induced autophagy, proteasomal function, and associated accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates, which closely paralleled cell survival. Importantly, when autophagy was inhibited either pharmacologically (3-MA) or genetically (siRNA mediated silencing of LC3), the dopaminergic cells became sensitized to MA-induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation. Conversely, overexpression of LC3 partially protected against MA-induced apoptotic cell death, suggesting a neuroprotective role for autophagy in MA-induced neurotoxicity. Notably, rat striatal tissue isolated from MA treated rats also exhibited elevated LC3-II, ubiquitinated protein levels, and PKCδ cleavage. Taken together, our data demonstrate that MA-induced autophagy serves as an adaptive strategy for inhibiting mitochondria mediated apoptotic cell death and degradation of aggregated proteins. Our results also suggest that the sustained activation of PKCδ leads to UPS dysfunction, resulting in the activation of caspase-3 mediated apoptotic cell death in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic

  8. Mutual enhancement of central neurotoxicity induced by ketamine followed by methamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, J.-J.; Chen, H.-I.; Jen, C.J.

    2008-03-01

    We hereby report that repeated administration of ketamine (350 mg/kg in total) and methamphetamine (30 mg/kg in total) causes specific glutamatergic and dopaminergic neuron deficits, respectively, in adult mouse brain. Acute ketamine did not affect basal body temperature or the later methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. However, pretreatment with repeated doses of ketamine aggravated methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic terminal loss as evidenced by a drastic decrease in the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and dopamine transporter density as well as poor gait balance performance. In contrast, methamphetamine-induced serotonergic depletion was not altered by ketamine pretreatment. Likewise, the subsequent treatment with methamphetamine exacerbated the ketamine-induced glutamatergicmore » damage as indicated by reduced levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter in hippocampus and striatum and poor memory performance in the Morris water maze. Finally, since activation of the D1 and AMPA/kainate receptors has been known to be involved in the release of glutamate and dopamine, we examined the effects of co-administration of SCH23390, a D1 antagonist, and CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist. Intraventricular CNQX infusion abolished ketamine's potentiation of methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity, while systemic SCH23390 mitigated methamphetamine's potentiation of ketamine-induced glutamatergic toxicity. We conclude that repeated doses of ketamine potentiate methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity via AMPA/kainate activation and that conjunctive use of methamphetamine aggravates ketamine-induced glutamatergic neurotoxicity possibly via D1 receptor activation.« less

  9. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Causes Persistent Striatal Dopaminergic Alterations and Mitigates the Deficits Caused by a Subsequent Methamphetamine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Hadlock, Greg C.; Allen, Scott C.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Stout, Kristen A.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Hoonakker, Amanda J.; Andrenyak, David M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated methamphetamine (METH) injections (referred to herein as a “binge” treatment) cause persistent dopaminergic deficits. A few studies have also examined the persistent neurochemical impact of METH self-administration in rats, but with variable results. These latter studies are important because: 1) they have relevance to the study of METH abuse; and 2) the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure. Accordingly, the present study investigated the impact of METH self-administration on dopaminergic neuronal function. Results revealed that self-administration of METH, given according to a regimen that produces brain METH levels comparable with those reported postmortem in human METH abusers (0.06 mg/infusion; 8-h sessions for 7 days), decreased striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake and/or immunoreactivity as assessed 8 or 30 days after the last self-administration session. Increasing the METH dose per infusion did not exacerbate these deficits. These deficits were similar in magnitude to decreases in DAT densities reported in imaging studies of abstinent METH abusers. It is noteworthy that METH self-administration mitigated the persistent deficits in dopaminergic neuronal function, as well as the increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity, caused by a subsequent binge METH exposure. This protection was independent of alterations in METH pharmacokinetics, but may have been attributable (at least in part) to a pretreatment-induced attenuation of binge-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, these results may provide insight into the neurochemical deficits reported in human METH abusers. PMID:22034657

  10. Neurotoxic Methamphetamine Doses Increase LINE-1 Expression in the Neurogenic Zones of the Adult Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Flack, Amanda; Qiu, Ping; Muotri, Alysson R.; Killinger, Bryan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused psychostimulant with the potential to cause neurotoxicity in the striatum and hippocampus. Several epigenetic changes have been described after administration of METH; however, there are no data regarding the effects of METH on the activity of transposable elements in the adult brain. The present study demonstrates that systemic administration of neurotoxic METH doses increases the activity of Long INterspersed Element (LINE-1) in two neurogenic niches in the adult rat brain in a promoter hypomethylation-independent manner. Our study also demonstrates that neurotoxic METH triggers persistent decreases in LINE-1 expression and increases the LINE-1 levels within genomic DNA in the striatum and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, and that METH triggers LINE-1 retrotransposition in vitro. We also present indirect evidence for the involvement of glutamate (GLU) in LINE-1 activation. The results suggest that LINE-1 activation might occur in neurogenic areas in human METH users and might contribute to METH abuse-induced hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired performance on several cognitive tasks mediated by the striatum. PMID:26463126

  11. Severe Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity in Primates After a Common Recreational Dose Regimen of MDMA (``Ecstasy'')

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricaurte, George A.; Yuan, Jie; Hatzidimitriou, George; Cord, Branden J.; McCann, Una D.

    2002-09-01

    The prevailing view is that the popular recreational drug (+/-)3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, or ``ecstasy'') is a selective serotonin neurotoxin in animals and possibly in humans. Nonhuman primates exposed to several sequential doses of MDMA, a regimen modeled after one used by humans, developed severe brain dopaminergic neurotoxicity, in addition to less pronounced serotonergic neurotoxicity. MDMA neurotoxicity was associated with increased vulnerability to motor dysfunction secondary to dopamine depletion. These results have implications for mechanisms of MDMA neurotoxicity and suggest that recreational MDMA users may unwittingly be putting themselves at risk, either as young adults or later in life, for developing neuropsychiatric disorders related to brain dopamine and/or serotonin deficiency.

  12. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Molkov, Yaroslav I.; Zaretskaia, Maria V.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants. PMID:24500434

  13. Meth math: modeling temperature responses to methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zaretskaia, Maria V; Zaretsky, Dmitry V

    2014-04-15

    Methamphetamine (Meth) can evoke extreme hyperthermia, which correlates with neurotoxicity and death in laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this study was to uncover the mechanisms of a complex dose dependence of temperature responses to Meth by mathematical modeling of the neuronal circuitry. On the basis of previous studies, we composed an artificial neural network with the core comprising three sequentially connected nodes: excitatory, medullary, and sympathetic preganglionic neuronal (SPN). Meth directly stimulated the excitatory node, an inhibitory drive targeted the medullary node, and, in high doses, an additional excitatory drive affected the SPN node. All model parameters (weights of connections, sensitivities, and time constants) were subject to fitting experimental time series of temperature responses to 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/kg Meth. Modeling suggested that the temperature response to the lowest dose of Meth, which caused an immediate and short hyperthermia, involves neuronal excitation at a supramedullary level. The delay in response after the intermediate doses of Meth is a result of neuronal inhibition at the medullary level. Finally, the rapid and robust increase in body temperature induced by the highest dose of Meth involves activation of high-dose excitatory drive. The impairment in the inhibitory mechanism can provoke a life-threatening temperature rise and makes it a plausible cause of fatal hyperthermia in Meth users. We expect that studying putative neuronal sites of Meth action and the neuromediators involved in a detailed model of this system may lead to more effective strategies for prevention and treatment of hyperthermia induced by amphetamine-like stimulants.

  14. Pharmacological imaging as a tool to visualise dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Schrantee, A; Reneman, L

    2014-09-01

    Dopamine abnormalities underlie a wide variety of psychopathologies, including ADHD and schizophrenia. A new imaging technique, pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI), is a promising non-invasive technique to visualize the dopaminergic system in the brain. In this review we explore the clinical potential of phMRI in detecting dopamine dysfunction or neurotoxicity, assess its strengths and weaknesses and identify directions for future research. Preclinically, phMRI is able to detect severe dopaminergic abnormalities quite similar to conventional techniques such as PET and SPECT. phMRI benefits from its high spatial resolution and the possibility to visualize both local and downstream effects of dopaminergic neurotransmission. In addition, it allows for repeated measurements and assessments in vulnerable populations. The major challenge is the complex interpretation of phMRI results. Future studies in patients with dopaminergic abnormalities need to confirm the currently reviewed preclinical findings to validate the technique in a clinical setting. Eventually, based on the current review we expect that phMRI can be of use in a clinical setting involving vulnerable populations (such as children and adolescents) for diagnosis and monitoring treatment efficacy. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Neuroimaging in Neuropharmacology'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Increases in cytoplasmic dopamine compromise the normal resistance of the nucleus accumbens to methamphetamine neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, David M.; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M.; Kuhnt, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the caudate–putamen (CPu) where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are most evident. Even damage within the CPu is remarkably heterogenous with lateral and ventral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared of the damage that accompanies binge METH intoxication. Increases in cytoplasmic DA produced by reserpine, L-DOPA or clorgyline prior to METH uncover damage in the NAc as evidenced by microglial activation and depletion of DA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the DA transporter. These effects do not occur in the NAc after treatment with METH alone. In contrast to the CPu where DA, TH, and DA transporter levels remain depleted chronically, DA nerve ending alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery over time. None of the treatments that enhance METH toxicity in the NAc and CPu lead to losses of TH protein or DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra or the ventral tegmentum. These data show that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of METH to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage by METH alone. The resistance of the NAc to METH-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of METH neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the important roles played by this brain structure. PMID:19457119

  16. Increases in cytoplasmic dopamine compromise the normal resistance of the nucleus accumbens to methamphetamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Francescutti-Verbeem, Dina M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2009-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a neurotoxic drug of abuse that damages the dopamine (DA) neuronal system in a highly delimited manner. The brain structure most affected by METH is the caudate-putamen (CPu) where long-term DA depletion and microglial activation are most evident. Even damage within the CPu is remarkably heterogenous with lateral and ventral aspects showing the greatest deficits. The nucleus accumbens (NAc) is largely spared of the damage that accompanies binge METH intoxication. Increases in cytoplasmic DA produced by reserpine, L-DOPA or clorgyline prior to METH uncover damage in the NAc as evidenced by microglial activation and depletion of DA, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the DA transporter. These effects do not occur in the NAc after treatment with METH alone. In contrast to the CPu where DA, TH, and DA transporter levels remain depleted chronically, DA nerve ending alterations in the NAc show a partial recovery over time. None of the treatments that enhance METH toxicity in the NAc and CPu lead to losses of TH protein or DA cell bodies in the substantia nigra or the ventral tegmentum. These data show that increases in cytoplasmic DA dramatically broaden the neurotoxic profile of METH to include brain structures not normally targeted for damage by METH alone. The resistance of the NAc to METH-induced neurotoxicity and its ability to recover reveal a fundamentally different neuroplasticity by comparison to the CPu. Recruitment of the NAc as a target of METH neurotoxicity by alterations in DA homeostasis is significant in light of the important roles played by this brain structure.

  17. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in neurotoxicity of MPP+: partial protection of PC12 cells by acetyl-L-carnitine.

    PubMed

    Virmani, Ashraf; Gaetani, Franco; Binienda, Zbigniew; Xu, Alex; Duhart, Helen; Ali, Syed F

    2004-10-01

    The damage to the central nervous system that is observed after administration of either methamphetamine (METH) or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+), the neurotoxic metabolite of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), is known to be linked to dopamine (DA). The underlying neurotoxicity mechanism for both METH and MPP+ seem to involve free radical formation and impaired mitochondrial function. The MPP+ is thought to selectively kill nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I, with cell death being attributed to oxidative stress damage to these vulnerable DA neurons. In the present study, MPP+ was shown to significantly inhibit the response to MTT by cultured PC12 cells. This inhibitory action of MPP+ could be partially reversed by the co-incubation of the cells with the acetylated form of carnitine, acetyl-L-carnitine (ALC). Since at least part of the toxic action of MPP+ is related to mitochondrial inhibition, the partial reversal of the inhibition of MTT response by ALC could involve a partial restoration of mitochondrial function. The role carnitine derivatives, such as ALC, play in attenuating MPP+ and METH-evoked toxicity is still under investigation to elucidate the contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction in mechanisms of neurotoxicity.

  18. NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    NANOMETER DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICLES ARE NEUROTOXIC TO DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS THROUGH MICROGLIAL ACTIVATION. M.L. Block1,2, X. Wu1, P. Zhong1, G. Li1, T. Wang1, J.S. Hong1 & B.Veronesi.2
    1The Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, NIEHS, RTP, NC and 2 National Health and Envi...

  19. Prior Methamphetamine Self-Administration Attenuates the Dopaminergic Deficits Caused by a Subsequent Methamphetamine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2015-01-01

    Others and we have reported that prior methamphetamine (METH) exposure attenuates the persistent striatal dopaminergic deficits caused by a subsequent high-dose “binge” METH exposure. The current study investigated intermediate neurochemical changes that may contribute to, or serve to predict, this resistance. Rats self-administered METH or saline for 7 d. On the following day (specifically, 16 h after the conclusion of the final METH self-administration session), rats received a binge exposure of METH or saline (so as to assess the impact of prior METH self-administration), or were sacrificed without a subsequent METH exposure (i.e., to assess the status of the rats at what would have been the initiation of the binge METH treatment). Results revealed that METH self-administration per se decreased striatal dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function and DA content, as assessed 16 h after the last self-administration session. Exposure to a binge METH treatment beginning at this 16-h time point decreased DAT function and DA content as assessed 1 h after the binge METH exposure: this effect on DA content (but not DAT function) was attenuated if rats previously self-administered METH. In contrast, 24 h after the binge METH treatment prior METH self-administration: 1) attenuated deficits in DA content, DAT function and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function; and 2) prevented increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein and DAT complex immunoreactivity. These data suggest that changes 24 h, but not 1 h, after binge METH exposure are predictive of tolerance against the persistence of neurotoxic changes following binge METH exposures. PMID:25645392

  20. Evidence for hydroxyl radical scavenging action of nitric oxide donors in the protection against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rebecca; Saravanan, Karuppagounder S; Thomas, Bobby; Sindhu, Kizhake M; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2008-06-01

    In the present study we provide evidence for hydroxyl radical (*OH) scavenging action of nitric oxide (NO*), and subsequent dopaminergic neuroprotection in a hemiparkinsonian rat model. Reactive oxygen species are strongly implicated in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity caused by the parkinsonian neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Since the role of this free radical as a neurotoxicant or neuroprotectant is debatable, we investigated the effects of some of the NO* donors such as S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), 3-morpholinosydnonimine hydrochloride (SIN-1), sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitroglycerin (NG) on in vitro *OH generation in a Fenton-like reaction involving ferrous citrate, as well as in MPP+-induced *OH production in the mitochondria. We also tested whether co-administration of NO* donor and MPP+ could protect against MPP+-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats. While NG, SNAP and SIN-1 attenuated MPP+-induced *OH generation in the mitochondria, and in a Fenton-like reaction, SNP caused up to 18-fold increase in *OH production in the latter reaction. Striatal dopaminergic depletion following intranigral infusion of MPP+ in rats was significantly attenuated by NG, SNAP and SIN-1, but not by SNP. Solutions of NG, SNAP and SIN-1, exposed to air for 48 h to remove NO*, when administered similarly failed to attenuate MPP+-induced neurotoxicity in vivo. Conversely, long-time air-exposed SNP solution when administered in rats intranigrally, caused a dose-dependent depletion of the striatal dopamine. These results confirm the involvement of *OH in the nigrostriatal degeneration caused by MPP+, indicate the *OH scavenging ability of NO*, and demonstrate protection by NO* donors against MPP+-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rats.

  1. An autophagic mechanism is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Yuan, Wei; Li, Zijian; Feng, Juan

    2017-10-05

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is one of the most common agents for modeling dopaminergic neuron degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). So far, the role of autophagy in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity remains controversial and most evidence is collected from in vitro studies. In this study, we determined the role of autophagy activation in 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in a rat model of PD. Following 6-OHDA treatment, we observed a concomitant activation of autophagy and apoptosis. To further explore the interaction between autophagy and apoptosis induced by 6-OHDA, autophagy inhibitor 3-methylademine (3-MA) or cysteine protease inhibitor Z-FA-fmk was applied. We found that both 3-MA and Z-FA-fmk could not only exert immediate protection against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal apoptosis, but also prevent dopaminergic neuron loss in the long-term, which was related to reduced autophagosome formation. Furthermore, by monitoring the sequential changes of mTOR-related signaling pathways, we found that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated AKT/AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway participated in but was not the initial cause of autophagy activation by 6-OHDA. Collectively, our data suggest that 6-OHDA-induced autophagy activation contributes to its neurotoxicity and targeting autophagy activation or cysteine proteases could be promising for developing neuroprotective agents for PD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. N-Acetylcysteine amide protects against methamphetamine-induced oxidative stress and neurotoxicity in immortalized human brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinsheng; Banerjee, Atrayee; Banks, William A; Ercal, Nuran

    2009-06-12

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine analog that causes degeneration of the dopaminergic system in mammals and subsequent oxidative stress. In our present study, we have used immortalized human brain microvascular endothelial (HBMVEC) cells to test whether N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel antioxidant, prevents METH-induced oxidative stress in vitro. Our studies showed that NACA protects against METH-induced oxidative stress in HBMVEC cells. NACA significantly protected the integrity of our blood brain barrier (BBB) model, as shown by permeability and trans-endothelial electrical resistance (TEER) studies. NACA also significantly increased the levels of intracellular glutathione (GSH) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels increased dramatically after METH exposure, but this increase was almost completely prevented when the cells were treated with NACA. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) also increased after METH exposure, but was reduced to control levels with NACA treatment, as measured by dichlorofluorescin (DCF). These results suggest that NACA protects the BBB integrity in vitro, which could prevent oxidative stress-induced damage; therefore, the effectiveness of this antioxidant should be evaluated for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases in the future.

  3. Altered Learning and Arc-Regulated Consolidation of Learning in Striatum by Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Chapman, David E; Wilcox, Karen S; Keefe, Kristen A

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) causes partial depletion of central monoamine systems and cognitive dysfunction in rats and humans. We have previously shown and now further show that the positive correlation between expression of the immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated) in the dorsomedial (DM) striatum and learning on a response reversal task is lost in rats with METH-induced striatal dopamine loss, despite normal behavioral performance and unaltered N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents, suggesting intact excitatory transmission. This discrepancy suggests that METH-pretreated rats may no longer be using the dorsal striatum to solve the reversal task. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with a neurotoxic regimen of METH or saline. Guide cannulae were surgically implanted bilaterally into the DM striatum. Three weeks after METH treatment, rats were trained on a motor response version of a T-maze task, and then underwent reversal training. Before reversal training, the NMDA receptor antagonist -2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) or an Arc antisense oligonucleotide was infused into the DM striatum. Acute disruption of DM striatal function by infusion of AP5 impaired reversal learning in saline-, but not METH-, pretreated rats. Likewise, acute disruption of Arc, which is implicated in consolidation of long-term memory, disrupted retention of reversal learning 24 h later in saline-, but not METH-, pretreated rats. These results highlight the critical importance of Arc in the striatum in consolidation of basal ganglia-mediated learning and suggest that long-term toxicity induced by METH alters the cognitive strategies/neural circuits used to solve tasks normally mediated by dorsal striatal function. PMID:22071872

  4. Altered learning and Arc-regulated consolidation of learning in striatum by methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Chapman, David E; Wilcox, Karen S; Keefe, Kristen A

    2012-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) causes partial depletion of central monoamine systems and cognitive dysfunction in rats and humans. We have previously shown and now further show that the positive correlation between expression of the immediate-early gene Arc (activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated) in the dorsomedial (DM) striatum and learning on a response reversal task is lost in rats with METH-induced striatal dopamine loss, despite normal behavioral performance and unaltered N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents, suggesting intact excitatory transmission. This discrepancy suggests that METH-pretreated rats may no longer be using the dorsal striatum to solve the reversal task. To test this hypothesis, male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with a neurotoxic regimen of METH or saline. Guide cannulae were surgically implanted bilaterally into the DM striatum. Three weeks after METH treatment, rats were trained on a motor response version of a T-maze task, and then underwent reversal training. Before reversal training, the NMDA receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) or an Arc antisense oligonucleotide was infused into the DM striatum. Acute disruption of DM striatal function by infusion of AP5 impaired reversal learning in saline-, but not METH-, pretreated rats. Likewise, acute disruption of Arc, which is implicated in consolidation of long-term memory, disrupted retention of reversal learning 24 h later in saline-, but not METH-, pretreated rats. These results highlight the critical importance of Arc in the striatum in consolidation of basal ganglia-mediated learning and suggest that long-term toxicity induced by METH alters the cognitive strategies/neural circuits used to solve tasks normally mediated by dorsal striatal function.

  5. Protective effect of orexin-A on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Vazifekhah, Somayeh; Pasban-Aliabadi, Hamzeh; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Sheibani, Vahid

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive and selective death of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Pharmacologic treatment of PD can be divided into symptomatic and neuroprotective therapies. Orexin-A (hypocretin-1) is a hypothalamic peptide that exerts its biological effects by stimulation of two specific, membrane-bound orexin receptors. Recent studies have shown that orexin-A has a protective role during neuronal damage. Here, we investigated the effects of orexin-A on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease. Cell damage was induced by 150μM 6-OHDA and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblotting and DNA analysis were also employed to determine the levels of biochemical markers of apoptosis in the cells. The data showed that 6-OHDA could decrease the viability of the cells. In addition, intracellular ROS, activated caspase 3, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, cytochrome c as well as DNA fragmentation were significantly increased in 6-OHDA-treated cells. Pretreatment of cells with orexin-A (80pM) elicited protective effect and reduced biochemical markers of cell death. The results suggest that orexin-A has protective effects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity and its protective effects are accompanied by its antioxidant and anti-apoptotic properties and contribute to our knowledge of the pharmacology of orexin-A. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential regional expression patterns of α-synuclein, TNF-α, and IL-1β; and variable status of dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mouse brain after Paraquat treatment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Paraquat (1, 1-dimethyl-4, 4-bipyridium dichloride; PQ) causes neurotoxicity, especially dopaminergic neurotoxicity, and is a supposed risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of PQ-induced neurodegeneration are far from clear. Previous studies have shown that PQ induces neuroinflammation and dopaminergic cell loss, but the prime cause of those events is still in debate. Methods We examined the neuropathological effects of PQ not only in substantia nigra (SN) but also in frontal cortex (FC) and hippocampus of the progressive mouse (adult Swiss albino) model of PD-like neurodegeneration, using immunohistochemistry, western blots, and histological and biochemical analyses. Results PQ caused differential patterns of changes in cellular morphology and expression of proteins related to PD and neuroinflammation in the three regions examined (SN, FC and hippocampus). Coincident with behavioral impairment and brain-specific ROS generation, there was differential immunolocalization and decreased expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the three regions, whereas α-synuclein immunopositivity increased in hippocampus, increased in FC and decreased in SN. PQ-induced neuroinflammation was characterized by area-specific changes in localization and appearances of microglial cells with or without activation and increment in expression patterns of tumor necrosis factor-α in the three regions of mouse brain. Expression of interleukin-1β was increased in FC and hippocampus but not significantly changed in SN. Conclusion The present study demonstrates that PQ induces ROS production and differential α-synuclein expression that promotes neuroinflammation in microglia-dependent or -independent manners, and produces different patterns of dopaminergic neurotoxicity in three different regions of mouse brain. PMID:22112368

  7. Prior methamphetamine self-administration attenuates the dopaminergic deficits caused by a subsequent methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Lisa M; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2015-06-01

    Others and we have reported that prior methamphetamine (METH) exposure attenuates the persistent striatal dopaminergic deficits caused by a subsequent high-dose "binge" METH exposure. The current study investigated intermediate neurochemical changes that may contribute to, or serve to predict, this resistance. Rats self-administered METH or saline for 7 d. On the following day (specifically, 16 h after the conclusion of the final METH self-administration session), rats received a binge exposure of METH or saline (so as to assess the impact of prior METH self-administration), or were sacrificed without a subsequent METH exposure (i.e., to assess the status of the rats at what would have been the initiation of the binge METH treatment). Results revealed that METH self-administration per se decreased striatal dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function and DA content, as assessed 16 h after the last self-administration session. Exposure to a binge METH treatment beginning at this 16-h time point decreased DAT function and DA content as assessed 1 h after the binge METH exposure: this effect on DA content (but not DAT function) was attenuated if rats previously self-administered METH. In contrast, 24 h after the binge METH treatment prior METH self-administration: 1) attenuated deficits in DA content, DAT function and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function; and 2) prevented increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein and DAT complex immunoreactivity. These data suggest that changes 24 h, but not 1 h, after binge METH exposure are predictive of tolerance against the persistence of neurotoxic changes following binge METH exposures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Protection by GDNF and other trophic factors against the dopamine-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Cass, Wayne A; Peters, Laura E; Harned, Michael E; Seroogy, Kim B

    2006-08-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administration to animals can result in long-lasting decreases in striatal dopamine (DA) content. It has previously been shown that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can reduce the DA-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH. However, there are several other trophic factors that are protective against dopaminergic toxins. Thus, the present experiments further investigated the protective effect of GDNF as well as the protective effects of several other trophic factors. Male Fischer-344 rats were given an intracerebral injection of trophic factor (2-10 microg) 1 day before METH (5 mg/kg, s.c., 4 injections at 2-h intervals). Seven days later DA levels in the striatum were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Initial experiments indicated that only intrastriatal GDNF, and not intranigral GDNF, was protective. Thereafter, all other trophic factors were administered into the striatum. Members of the GDNF family (GDNF, neurturin, and artemin) all provided significant protection against the DA-depleting effects of METH, with GDNF providing the greatest protection. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-3, acidic fibroblast growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha), heregulin beta1 (HRG-beta1), and amphiregulin (AR) provided no significant protection at the doses examined. These results suggest that the GDNF family of trophic factors can provide significant protection against the DA-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of METH.

  9. Neurotoxicity of amphetamine derivatives is mediated by caspase pathway activation in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Andrés; Jordà, Elvira G; Verdaguer, Ester; Pubill, David; Sureda, Francesc X; Canudas, Anna M; Escubedo, Elena; Camarasa, Jordi; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè

    2004-04-15

    The neurotoxic action of the abuse drugs methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) on cerebellar granule neurones (CGNs) culture was examined. Treatment for 48 h with METH or MDMA (1-5 mM) induced a higher decrease in viability than 24 h treatment. z.VAD.fmk (100 microM) but not MK-801 nor NBQX recovered control viability values. In both cases, cell death was characterised as apoptotic rather than necrotic by morphology cell observation. Apoptosis measured by flow cytometry indicated an increase in the hypodiploid population after 48 h treatment with METH and MDMA. Apoptosis was reverted by the presence of z.VAD.fmk (100 microM) but not by 10 microM MK-801 or NBQX. Similar results were obtained by analysing nuclear chromatine condensation. These results ruled out excitotoxic participation in amphetamine derivative-induced neurotoxicity in CGNs. Participation of radical oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using alpha-tocopherol (1-15 microM) and cytometric studies. The co-treatment with 4 mM METH or MDMA for 48 h partially reverted neurotoxic action and apoptotic features, indicating ROS implication in CGNs death by amphetamine derivatives. Alteration of mitochondrial function induced cytochrome C (Cyt C) release after 48-h treatment with METH and MDMA (4 mM). There was also indication of caspase-3-like activation, measured by immunoanalysis and biochemically. Finally, neurodegenerative action caused by amphetamine derivatives may be prevented by using caspase inhibitors.

  10. Heptachlor induced nigral dopaminergic neuronal loss and Parkinsonism-like movement deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seokheon; Hwang, Joohyun; Kim, Joo Yeon; Shin, Ki Soon; Kang, Shin Jung

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested an association between pesticide exposure and Parkinson's disease. In this study, we examined the neurotoxicity of an organochlorine pesticide, heptachlor, in vitro and in vivo. In cultured SH-SY5Y cells, heptachlor induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. When injected into mice intraperitoneally on a subchronic schedule, heptachlor induced selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. In addition, the heptachlor injection induced gliosis of microglia and astrocytes selectively in the ventral midbrain area. When the general locomotor activities were monitored by open field test, the heptachlor injection did not induce any gross motor dysfunction. However, the compound induced Parkinsonism-like movement deficits when assessed by a gait and a pole test. These results suggest that heptachlor can induce Parkinson's disease-related neurotoxicities in vivo. PMID:24577234

  11. Acute D2/D3 dopaminergic agonism but chronic D2/D3 antagonism prevents NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Farber, Nuri B; Nemmers, Brian; Noguchi, Kevin K

    2006-09-15

    Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, most likely by producing disinhibtion in complex circuits, acutely produce psychosis and cognitive disturbances in humans, and neurotoxicity in rodents. Studies examining NMDA Receptor Hypofunction (NRHypo) neurotoxicity in animals, therefore, may provide insights into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Dopaminergic D2 and/or D3 agents can modify psychosis over days to weeks, suggesting involvement of these transmitter system(s). We studied the ability of D2/D3 agonists and antagonists to modify NRHypo neurotoxicity both after a one-time acute exposure and after chronic daily exposure. Here we report that D2/D3 dopamine agonists, probably via D3 receptors, prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely. The protective effect with D2/D3 agonists is not seen after chronic daily dosing. In contrast, the antipsychotic haloperidol does not affect NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely at D2/D3 doses. However, after chronic daily dosing of 1, 3, or 5 weeks, haloperidol does prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity with longer durations producing greater protection. Understanding the changes that occur in the NRHypo circuit after chronic exposure to dopaminergic agents could provide important clues into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders.

  12. Expression and Activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms in Methamphetamine-Induced Striatal Dopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Son, Jong H.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is implicated in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity; however, the source of the nitric oxide has not been identified. Previous work has also revealed that animals with partial dopamine loss induced by a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine fail to exhibit further decreases in striatal dopamine when re-exposed to methamphetamine 7–30 days later. The current study examined nitric oxide synthase expression and activity and protein nitration in striata of animals administered saline or neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine at postnatal days 60 and/or 90, resulting in four treatment groups: Saline:Saline, METH:Saline, Saline:METH, and METH:METH. Acute administration of methamphetamine on postnatal day 90 (Saline:METH and METH:METH) increased nitric oxide production, as evidenced by increased protein nitration. Methamphetamine did not, however, change the expression of endothelial or inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, nor did it change the number of cells positive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression or the amount of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA per cell. However, nitric oxide synthase activity in striatal interneurons was increased in the Saline:METH and METH:METH animals. These data suggest that increased nitric oxide production after a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine results from increased nitric oxide synthase activity, rather than an induction of mRNA, and that constitutively expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase is the most likely source of nitric oxide after methamphetamine administration. Of interest, animals rendered resistant to further methamphetamine-induced dopamine depletions still show equivalent degrees of methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide production, suggesting that nitric oxide production alone in response to methamphetamine is not sufficient to induce acute neurotoxic injury. PMID:23230214

  13. Peripheral Ammonia as a Mediator of Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, Laura E.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is metabolized by the liver and has established neurological effects. The current study examined the possibility that ammonia contributes to the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (METH). The results show that a binge dosing regimen of METH to the rat increased plasma and brain ammonia concentrations that were paralleled by evidence of hepatotoxicity. The role of peripheral ammonia in the neurotoxic effects of METH was further substantiated by the demonstration that the enhancement of peripheral ammonia excretion blocked the increases in brain and plasma ammonia and attenuated the long term depletions of dopamine and serotonin typically produced by METH. Conversely, the localized perfusion of ammonia in combination with METH, but not METH alone or ammonia alone, into the striatum recapitulated the neuronal damage produced by the systemic administration of METH. Furthermore, this damage produced by the local administration of ammonia and METH was blocked by the GYKI 52466, an AMPA receptor antagonist. These findings highlight the importance of ammonia derived from the periphery as a small molecule mediator of METH neurotoxicity and more broadly emphasize the importance of peripheral organ damage as a possible mechanism that mediates the neuropathology produced by drugs of abuse and other neuroactive molecules. PMID:22993432

  14. Dopaminergic Neuron-Specific Deletion of p53 Gene Attenuates Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tao; Kim, Paul P; Greig, Nigel H; Luo, Yu

    2017-08-01

    p53 plays an essential role in the regulation of cell death in dopaminergic (DA) neurons and its activation has been implicated in the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine (MA). However, how p53 mediates MA neurotoxicity remains largely unknown. In this study, we examined the effect of DA-specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. Whereas in vivo MA binge exposure reduced locomotor activity in wild-type (WT) mice, this was significantly attenuated in DAT-p53KO mice and associated with significant differences in the levels of the p53 target genes BAX and p21 between WT and DAT-p53KO. Notably, DA-specific deletion of p53 provided protection of substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive fibers following binge MA, with DAT-p53KO mice having less decline of TH protein levels in striatum versus WT mice. Whereas DAT-p53KO mice demonstrated a consistently higher density of TH fibers in striatum compared to WT mice at 10 days after MA exposure, DA neuron counts within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) were similar. Finally, supportive of these results, administration of a p53-specific inhibitor (PFT-α) provided a similarly protective effect on MA binge-induced behavioral deficits. Neither DA specific p53 deletion nor p53 pharmacological inhibition affected hyperthermia induced by MA binge. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in behavioral deficits and DA neuronal terminal loss by MA binge exposure.

  15. Genome-wide profiling identifies a subset of methamphetamine (METH)-induced genes associated with METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding in the rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; McCoy, Michael T; Ladenheim, Bruce; Saint-Preux, Fabienne; Lehrmann, Elin; De, Supriyo; Becker, Kevin G; Brannock, Christie

    2013-08-12

    METH is an illicit drug of abuse that influences gene expression in the rat striatum. Histone modifications regulate gene transcription. We therefore used microarray analysis and genome-scale approaches to examine potential relationships between the effects of METH on gene expression and on DNA binding of histone H4 acetylated at lysine 4 (H4K5Ac) in the rat dorsal striatum of METH-naïve and METH-pretreated rats. Acute and chronic METH administration caused differential changes in striatal gene expression. METH also increased H4K5Ac binding around the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes in the rat striatum. In order to relate gene expression to histone acetylation, we binned genes of similar expression into groups of 100 genes and proceeded to relate gene expression to H4K5Ac binding. We found a positive correlation between gene expression and H4K5Ac binding in the striatum of control rats. Similar correlations were observed in METH-treated rats. Genes that showed acute METH-induced increased expression in saline-pretreated rats also showed METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding. The acute METH injection caused similar increases in H4K5Ac binding in METH-pretreated rats, without affecting gene expression to the same degree. Finally, genes that showed METH-induced decreased expression exhibited either decreases or no changes in H4K5Ac binding. Acute METH injections caused increased gene expression of genes that showed increased H4K5Ac binding near their transcription start sites.

  16. Dopamine transporter down-regulation following repeated cocaine: implications for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced acute effects and long-term neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Peraile, I; Torres, E; Mayado, A; Izco, M; Lopez-Jimenez, A; Lopez-Moreno, J A; Colado, M I; O'Shea, E

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and cocaine are two widely abused psychostimulant drugs targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT). DAT availability regulates dopamine neurotransmission and uptake of MDMA-derived neurotoxic metabolites. We aimed to determine the effect of cocaine pre-exposure on the acute and long-term effects of MDMA in mice. Mice received a course of cocaine (20 mg*kg(-1), x2 for 3 days) followed by MDMA (20 mg*kg(-1), x2, 3 h apart). Locomotor activity, extracellular dopamine levels and dopaminergic neurotoxicity were determined. Furthermore, following the course of cocaine, DAT density in striatal plasma membrane and endosome fractions was measured. Four days after the course of cocaine, challenge with MDMA attenuated the MDMA-induced striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Co-administration of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor NPC 15437 prevented cocaine protection. At the same time, after the course of cocaine, DAT density was reduced in the plasma membrane and increased in the endosome fraction, and this effect was prevented by NPC 15437. The course of cocaine potentiated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular dopamine and locomotor activity, following challenge 4 days later, compared with those pretreated with saline. Repeated cocaine treatment followed by withdrawal protected against MDMA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity by internalizing DAT via a mechanism which may involve PKC. Furthermore, repeated cocaine followed by withdrawal induced behavioural and neurochemical sensitization to MDMA, measures which could be indicative of increased rewarding effects of MDMA.

  17. Prior stimulation of the endocannabinoid system prevents methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the striatum through activation of CB2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nader, Joëlle; Rapino, Cinzia; Gennequin, Benjamin; Chavant, Francois; Francheteau, Maureen; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Duranti, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; Solinas, Marcello; Thiriet, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine toxicity is associated with cell death and loss of dopamine neuron terminals in the striatum similar to what is found in some neurodegenerative diseases. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been suggested to be neuroprotective in the brain, and new pharmacological tools have been developed to increase their endogenous tone. In this study, we evaluated whether ECS stimulation could reduce the neurotoxicity of high doses of methamphetamine on the dopamine system. We found that methamphetamine alters the levels of the major endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) in the striatum, suggesting that the ECS participates in the brain responses to methamphetamine. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabis-derived agonist of both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, or inhibitors of the main enzymes responsible for the degradation of AEA and 2-AG (URB597 and JZL184, respectively), blunted the decrease in striatal protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase induced by methamphetamine. In addition, antagonists of CB2, but not of CB1, blocked the preventive effects of URB597 and JZL184, suggesting that only the former receptor subtype is engaged in neuroprotection exerted by ECS stimulation. Finally, we found that methamphetamine increases striatal levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha, an effect that was blocked by ECS stimulation. Altogether, our results indicate that stimulation of ECS prior to the administration of an overdose of meth-amphetamine considerably reduces the neurotoxicity of the drug through CB2 receptor activation and highlight a protective function for the ECS against the toxicity induced by drugs and other external insults to the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled ‘CNS Stimulants’. PMID:24709540

  18. Genome-wide profiling identifies a subset of methamphetamine (METH)-induced genes associated with METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding in the rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background METH is an illicit drug of abuse that influences gene expression in the rat striatum. Histone modifications regulate gene transcription. Methods We therefore used microarray analysis and genome-scale approaches to examine potential relationships between the effects of METH on gene expression and on DNA binding of histone H4 acetylated at lysine 4 (H4K5Ac) in the rat dorsal striatum of METH-naïve and METH-pretreated rats. Results Acute and chronic METH administration caused differential changes in striatal gene expression. METH also increased H4K5Ac binding around the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) of genes in the rat striatum. In order to relate gene expression to histone acetylation, we binned genes of similar expression into groups of 100 genes and proceeded to relate gene expression to H4K5Ac binding. We found a positive correlation between gene expression and H4K5Ac binding in the striatum of control rats. Similar correlations were observed in METH-treated rats. Genes that showed acute METH-induced increased expression in saline-pretreated rats also showed METH-induced increased H4K5Ac binding. The acute METH injection caused similar increases in H4K5Ac binding in METH-pretreated rats, without affecting gene expression to the same degree. Finally, genes that showed METH-induced decreased expression exhibited either decreases or no changes in H4K5Ac binding. Conclusion Acute METH injections caused increased gene expression of genes that showed increased H4K5Ac binding near their transcription start sites. PMID:23937714

  19. Functional neuroimaging of amphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse model.

    PubMed

    Soto-Montenegro, María Luisa; Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Pérez-García, Carmen; Gramage, Esther; Desco, Manuel; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2015-03-30

    Amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects have traditionally been studied using immunohistochemistry and other post-mortem techniques, which have proven invaluable for the definition of amphetamine-induced dopaminergic damage in the nigrostriatal pathway. However, these approaches are limited in that they require large numbers of animals and do not provide the temporal data that can be collected in longitudinal studies using functional neuroimaging techniques. Unfortunately, functional imaging studies in rodent models of drug-induced neurotoxicity are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vivo the changes in brain glucose metabolism caused by amphetamine in the pleiotrophin knockout mouse (PTN-/-), a genetic model with increased vulnerability to amphetamine-induced neurotoxic effects. We showed that administration of amphetamine causes a significantly greater loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase content in PTN-/- mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. In addition, [(18)F]-FDG-PET shows that amphetamine produces a significant decrease in glucose metabolism in the striatum and prefrontal cortex in the PTN-/- mice, compared to WT mice. These findings suggest that [(18)F]-FDG uptake measured by PET is useful for detecting amphetamine-induced changes in glucose metabolism in vivo in specific brain areas, including the striatum, a key feature of amphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dopamine transporter down-regulation following repeated cocaine: implications for 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced acute effects and long-term neurotoxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Peraile, I; Torres, E; Mayado, A; Izco, M; Lopez-Jimenez, A; Lopez-Moreno, JA; Colado, MI; O'Shea, E

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and cocaine are two widely abused psychostimulant drugs targeting the dopamine transporter (DAT). DAT availability regulates dopamine neurotransmission and uptake of MDMA-derived neurotoxic metabolites. We aimed to determine the effect of cocaine pre-exposure on the acute and long-term effects of MDMA in mice. Experimental approach: Mice received a course of cocaine (20 mg·kg−1, ×2 for 3 days) followed by MDMA (20 mg·kg−1, ×2, 3 h apart). Locomotor activity, extracellular dopamine levels and dopaminergic neurotoxicity were determined. Furthermore, following the course of cocaine, DAT density in striatal plasma membrane and endosome fractions was measured. Key results: Four days after the course of cocaine, challenge with MDMA attenuated the MDMA-induced striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Co-administration of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor NPC 15437 prevented cocaine protection. At the same time, after the course of cocaine, DAT density was reduced in the plasma membrane and increased in the endosome fraction, and this effect was prevented by NPC 15437. The course of cocaine potentiated the MDMA-induced increase in extracellular dopamine and locomotor activity, following challenge 4 days later, compared with those pretreated with saline. Conclusions and implications: Repeated cocaine treatment followed by withdrawal protected against MDMA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity by internalizing DAT via a mechanism which may involve PKC. Furthermore, repeated cocaine followed by withdrawal induced behavioural and neurochemical sensitization to MDMA, measures which could be indicative of increased rewarding effects of MDMA. PMID:20015297

  1. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John; Yang, Yirong; Purvis, Rebecca; Weatherwax, Theodore; Rosen, Gerald M.; Liu, Ke Jian

    2014-01-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O2 may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O2 is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO2 in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissue pO2 changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO2 in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO2 was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO2 to 64%. More importantly, pO2 did not recover fully to control levels even 24 hrs after administration of a single dose of METH. and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO2 indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO2, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. PMID:24412707

  2. Epothilone D Prevents Binge Methamphetamine-Mediated Loss of Striatal Dopaminergic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Killinger, Bryan A.; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to binge methamphetamine (METH) can result in a permanent or transient loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) markers such as dopamine (DA), dopamine transporter (DAT), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum. We hypothesized that the METH-induced loss of striatal DAergic markers was, in part, due to destabilization of microtubules (MTs) in the nigrostriatal DA pathway that ultimately impedes anterograde axonal transport of these markers. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague Dawley rats were treated with binge METH or saline in the presence or absence of epothilone D (EpoD), a MT-stabilizing compound, and assessed for the levels of several DAergic markers as well as for the levels of tubulins and their posttranslational modifications (PMTs) at 3 days after the treatments. Binge METH induced a loss of stable long-lived MTs within the striatum but not within the SNpc. Treatment with a low dose of EpoD increased the levels of markers of stable MTs and prevented METH-mediated deficits in several DAergic markers in the striatum. By contrast, administration of a high dose of EpoD appeared to destabilize MTs and potentiated the METH-induced deficits in several DAergic markers. The low-dose EpoD also prevented the METH-induced increase in striatal DA turnover and increased behavioral stereotypy during METH treatment. Together, these results demonstrate that MT dynamics plays a role in the development of METH-induced losses of several DAergic markers in the striatum and may mediate METH-induced degeneration of terminals in the nigrostriatal DA pathway. Our study also demonstrates that MT-stabilizing drugs, such as EpoD have a potential to serve as useful therapeutic agents to restore function of DAergic nerve terminals following METH exposure when administered at low doses. PMID:26465779

  3. Methamphetamine, d-amphetamine and p-chloroamphetamine induced neurotoxicity differentially effect impulsive responding on the stop-signal task in rats

    PubMed Central

    Furlong, Teri M.; Leavitt, Lee S.; Keefe, Kristen A.; Son, Jong-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Abused amphetamines, such as d-amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH), are highly addictive and destructive to health and productive lifestyles. The abuse of these drugs is associated with impulsive behavior, which is likely to contribute to addiction. The amphetamines also differentially damage dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) systems, which regulate impulsive behavior; therefore, exposure to these drugs may differentially alter impulsive behavior to effect the progression of addiction. We examined the impact of neurotoxicity induced by three amphetamines on impulsive action using a stop-signal task in rats. Animals were rewarded with a food pellet after lever pressing (i.e. a go trial), unless an auditory cue was presented and withholding lever press gained reward (i.e. a stop trial). Animals were trained on the task and then exposed to a neurotoxic regimen of either AMPH, p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), or METH. These regimens preferentially reduced DA transporter levels in striatum, 5-HT transporter levels in prefrontal cortex, or both, respectively. Assessment of performance on the stop-signal task beginning one week after the treatment revealed that AMPH produced a deficit in go-trial performance, whereas PCA did not alter performance on either trial type. In contrast, METH produced a deficit in stop-trial performance (i.e. impulsive action) but not go-trial performance. These findings suggest that the different neurotoxic consequences of substituted amphetamines are associated with different effects on inhibitory control over behavior. Thus, the course of addiction and maladaptive behavior resulting from exposure to these substances is likely to differ. PMID:26846719

  4. Methamphetamine-induced alterations in monoamine transport: implications for neurotoxicity, neuroprotection and treatment.

    PubMed

    Volz, Trent J; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2007-04-01

    To review studies delineating the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on monoamine transport in dopaminergic neurons of the striatum and nucleus accumbens. The scope of this review includes the English language dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 primary literature to April 2006 identified by Pubmed, Science Citation Index and SciFinder Scholar literature searches. Changes in the function of the plasmalemmal dopamine transporter and the vesicular monoamine transporter-2 are key components of methamphetamine-induced persistent dopaminergic deficits. These deficits include persistent reductions in dopamine content, dopamine transporter density and tyrosine hydroxylase activity. The striatum is susceptible to these effects of methamphetamine while the nucleus accumbens is resistant. Differences in dopamine transporter density and activity, extracellular dopamine levels and antioxidant levels in these two brain regions may, in part, account for the resistance of the nucleus accumbens. These findings concerning the nature of methamphetamine-induced changes in plasmalemmal and vesicular dopamine transport have very important implications for drug targets and for understanding the etiology of dopaminergic neurodegenerative processes, such as those associated with methamphetamine addiction and Parkinson's disease.

  5. Pretreatment with nomifensine or nomifensine analogue 4-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline augments methamphetamine-induced stereotypical behavior in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. Scott; Uhl, George R.; Asano, Hiromi; Chatani, Ryuki; Hayata, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Hiroko; Tanaka, Koh-ichi; Nishiyama, Nobuyoshi; Takemura, Motohiko

    2014-01-01

    Nomifensine is a dopamine/norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. Nomifensine and some of its structural analogues produce behavioral effects indicative of indirect dopaminergic agonist properties, such as hyperlocomotion. By contrast, the deaminated and demethylated nomifensine analogue 4-phenyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (PTIQ) is reported to have amphetamine-antagonistic properties, as demonstrated by inhibition of methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and METH-induced hyperlocomotion in rats. In the present study, we examined the effect of PTIQ (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and nomifensine (3 mg/kg, i.p.) on METH (5 or 10 mg/kg ,i.p.)-induced stereotypical behavior in mice in order to determine whether PTIQ and nomifensine inhibit and augment, respectively, METH-induced stereotypical behavior. Unexpectedly, our observations demonstrated that both PTIQ and nomifensine significantly augmented METH-induced stereotypical behavior and locomotion in mice. This augmentation is likely the result of additive effects on dopaminergic function by METH in combination with PTIQ or nomifensine. These results suggest that, contrary to some reports, PTIQ may display dopaminergic agonist properties in mice. PMID:22265332

  6. Methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity prevented owing to the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Thrash-Williams, Bessy; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2016-06-01

    Methamphetamine (Schedule-II drug, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration) is one of the most abused illicit drug following cocaine, marijuana, and heroin in the USA. There are numerous health impairments and substantial economic burden caused by methamphetamine abuse. Salicylic acid, potent anti-inflammatory drug and a known neuroprotectant has shown to protect against toxicity-induced by other dopaminergic neurotoxins. Hence, in this study we investigated the neuroprotective effects of salicylic acid against methamphetamine-induced toxicity in mice. The current study investigated the effects of sodium salicylate and/or methamphetamine on oxidative stress, monoamine oxidase, mitochondrial complex I & IV activities using spectrophotometric and fluorimetric methods. Behavioral analysis evaluated the effect on movement disorders-induced by methamphetamine. Monoaminergic neurotransmitter levels were evaluated using high pressure liquid chromatography-electrochemical detection. Methamphetamine caused significant generation of reactive oxygen species and decreased complex-I activity leading to dopamine depletion. Striatal dopamine depletion led to significant behavioral changes associated with movement disorders. Sodium salicylate (50 & 100mg/kg) significantly scavenged reactive oxygen species, blocked mitochondrial dysfunction and exhibited neuroprotection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. In addition, sodium salicylate significantly blocked methamphetamine-induced behavioral changes related to movement abnormalities. One of the leading causative theories in nigral degeneration associated with movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease is exposure to stimulants, drugs of abuse, insecticide and pesticides. These neurotoxic substances can induce dopaminergic neuronal insult by oxidative stress, apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation. Salicylic acid due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects could provide neuroprotection against the

  7. Emerging Neurotoxic Mechanisms in Environmental Factors-Induced Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Sondarva, Gautam; Rangasamy, Velusamy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to environmental neurotoxic metals, pesticides and other chemicals is increasingly recognized as a key risk factor in the pathogenesis of chronic neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. Oxidative stress and apoptosis have been actively investigated as neurotoxic mechanisms over the past two decades, resulting in a greater understanding of neurotoxic processes. Nevertheless, emerging evidence indicates that epigenetic changes, protein aggregation and autophagy are important cellular and molecular correlates of neurodegenerative diseases resulting from chronic neurotoxic chemical exposure. During the Joint Conference of the 13th International Neurotoxicology Association and the 11th International Symposium on Neurobehavioral Methods and Effects in Occupational and Environmental Health, the recent progress made toward understanding epigenetic mechanisms, protein aggregation, autophagy, and deregulated kinase activation following neurotoxic chemical exposure and the relevance to neurodegenerative conditions were one of the themes of the symposium. Dr. Anumantha G. Kanthasamy described the role of acetylation of histones and non-histone proteins in neurotoxicant-induced neurodegenerative processes in the nigral dopaminergic neuronal system. Dr. Arthi Kanthasamy illustrated the role of autophagy as a key determinant in cell death events during neurotoxic insults. Dr. Ajay Rana provided evidence for posttranslational modification of α-synuclein protein by the Mixed Linage Kinase (MLK) group of kinases to initiate protein aggregation in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson’s disease. These presentations outlined emerging cutting edge mechanisms that might set the stage for future mechanistic investigations into new frontiers of molecular neurotoxicology. This report summarizes the views of symposium participants, with emphasis on future directions for study of environmentally and occupationally linked chronic

  8. Epothilone D prevents binge methamphetamine-mediated loss of striatal dopaminergic markers.

    PubMed

    Killinger, Bryan A; Moszczynska, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to binge methamphetamine (METH) can result in a permanent or transient loss of dopaminergic (DAergic) markers such as dopamine (DA), dopamine transporter, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the striatum. We hypothesized that the METH-induced loss of striatal DAergic markers was, in part, due to a destabilization of microtubules (MTs) in the nigrostriatal DA pathway that ultimately impedes anterograde axonal transport of these markers. To test this hypothesis, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with binge METH or saline in the presence or absence of epothilone D (EpoD), a MT-stabilizing compound, and assessed 3 days after the treatments for the levels of several DAergic markers as well as for the levels of tubulins and their post-translational modifications (PMTs). Binge METH induced a loss of stable long-lived MTs within the striatum but not within the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Treatment with a low dose of EpoD increased the levels of markers of stable MTs and prevented METH-mediated deficits in several DAergic markers in the striatum. In contrast, administration of a high dose of EpoD appeared to destabilize MTs and potentiated the METH-induced deficits in several DAergic markers. The low-dose EpoD also prevented the METH-induced increase in striatal DA turnover and increased behavioral stereotypy during METH treatment. Together, these results demonstrate that MT dynamics plays a role in the development of METH-induced losses of several DAergic markers in the striatum and may mediate METH-induced degeneration of terminals in the nigrostriatal DA pathway. Our study also demonstrates that MT-stabilizing drugs such as EpoD have a potential to serve as useful therapeutic agents to restore function of DAergic nerve terminals following METH exposure when administered at low doses. Administration of binge methamphetamine (METH) negatively impacts neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system. The effects of METH include

  9. The effects of GABAA and NMDA receptors in the shell-accumbens on spatial memory of METH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Heysieattalab, Soomaayeh; Naghdi, Nasser; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Haghparast, Abbas; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive and neurotoxic psychostimulant. Its use in humans is often associated with neurocognitive impairment and deficits in hippocampal plasticity. Striatal dopamine system is one of the main targets of METH. The dopamine neurons in the striatum directly or indirectly regulate the GABA and glutamatergic signaling in this region and thus their outputs. This is consistent with previous reports showing modification of neuronal activity in the striatum modulates the expression of hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent memory tasks such as Morris water maze (MWM). Therefore, reversing or preventing METH-induced synaptic modifications via pharmacological manipulations of the shell-nucleus accumbens (shell-NAc) may introduce a viable therapeutic target to attenuate the METH-induced memory deficits. This study is designed to investigate the role of intra-shell NAc manipulation of GABAA and NMDA receptors and their interaction with METH on memory performance in MWM task. Pharmacological manipulations were performed in rats received METH or saline. We found systemic saline plus intra-shell NAc infusions of muscimol dose-dependently impaired performance, while bicuculline had no effect. Surprisingly, the intra-NAc infusions of 0.005μg/rat muscimol that has no effect on memory performance (ineffective dose) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. In the contrary, the intra-NAc infusions of bicuculline (0.2μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. However, pre-training intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 dose-dependently impaired performance, while NMDA had no effect in rats received systemic saline (control group). The intra-NAc infusions with an ineffective dose of NMDA (0.1μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. Furthermore, intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 with an ineffective dose (0.1μg/rat) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. Our result is consistent with the interpretation that METH-mediated learning deficit

  10. Neurotoxicity of cerebro-spinal fluid from patients with Parkinson's disease on mesencephalic primary cultures as an in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kong, Ping; Zhang, Ben-Shu; Lei, Ping; Kong, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Shi-Shuang; Li, Dai; Zhang, Yun

    2015-08-01

    Parkinson's disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system. In spite of extensive research, neither the cause nor the mechanisms have been firmly established thus far. One assumption is that certain toxic substances may exist in the cerebro-spinal fluid (CSF) of Parkinson's disease patients. To confirm the neurotoxicity of CSF and study the potential correlation between neurotoxicity and the severity of Parkinson's disease, CSF was added to cultured cells. By observation of cell morphology, changes in the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, the ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells, and the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein, the differences between the two groups were shown. The created in vitro model of dopaminergic neurons using primary culture of mouse embryonic mesencephalic tissue is suitable for the study of neurotoxicity. The observations of the present study indicated that CSF from Parkinson's disease patients contains factors that can cause specific injury to cultured dopaminergic neurons. However, no obvious correlation was found between the neurotoxicity of CSF and the severity of Parkinson's disease.

  11. Amentoflavone protects dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease model mice through PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qin; Qin, Liyue; Huang, Fei, E-mail: Fei_H@ho

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by the progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis are suggested to be actively involved in the pathogenesis of PD. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of amentoflavone (AF), a naturally occurring biflavonoid from Selaginella tamariscina, was examined in PD models both in vitro and in vivo. On SH-SY5Y cells, AF treatment dose-dependently reduced 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +})-induced nuclear condensation and loss of cell viability without obvious cytotoxicity. It inhibited the activation of caspase-3 and p21 but increased the Bcl-2/Bax ratio. Further study disclosed that AFmore » enhanced the phosphorylation of PI3K, Akt and ERK1/2 down-regulated by MPP{sup +} in SH-SY5Y cells, the effect of which could be blocked by LY294002, the inhibitor of PI3K. Consistently, AF alleviated the behavioral deterioration in pole and traction tests and rescued the loss of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc and fibers in striatum in methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) induced mice. It also could enhance the activation of PI3K and Akt as well as Bcl-2/Bax ratio in SN. Moreover, AF alleviated gliosis as well as the gene expression levels of IL-1β and iNOS in SN. Collectively, these results suggested that AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP{sup +}-induced neurotoxicity, which might be mediated through activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways in dopaminergic neurons and attenuation of neuroinflammation. - Highlights: • AF protected dopaminergic neurons against MPTP/MPP{sup +}-induced neurotoxicity. • AF modulated PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathways. • AF could alleviate neuroinflammation in SN.« less

  12. METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED CELL DEATH: SELECTIVE VULNERABILITY IN NEURONAL SUBPOPULATIONS OF THE STRIATUM IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, J. P. Q.; XU, W.; ANGULO, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit and potent psychostimulant, which acts as an indirect dopamine agonist. In the striatum, METH has been shown to cause long lasting neurotoxic damage to dopaminergic nerve terminals and recently, the degeneration and death of striatal cells. The present study was undertaken to identify the type of striatal neurons that undergo apoptosis after METH. Male mice received a single high dose of METH (30 mg/kg, i.p.) and were killed 24 h later. To demonstrate that METH induces apoptosis in neurons, we combined terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining with immunohistofluorescence for the neuronal marker neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN). Staining for TUNEL and NeuN was colocalized throughout the striatum. METH induces apoptosis in approximately 25% of striatal neurons. Cell counts of TUNEL-positive neurons in the dorsomedial, ventromedial, dorsolateral and ventrolateral quadrants of the striatum did not reveal anatomical preference. The type of striatal neuron undergoing cell death was determined by combining TUNEL with immunohistofluorescence for selective markers of striatal neurons: dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, of apparent Mr 32,000, parvalbumin, choline acetyltransferase and somatostatin (SST). METH induces apoptosis in approximately 21% of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein, of apparent Mr 32,000-positive neurons (projection neurons), 45% of GABA-parvalbumin-positive neurons in the dorsal striatum, and 29% of cholinergic neurons in the dorsal–medial striatum. In contrast, the SST-positive interneurons were refractory to METH-induced apoptosis. Finally, the amount of cell loss determined with Nissl staining correlated with the amount of TUNEL staining in the striatum of METH-treated animals. In conclusion, some of the striatal projection neurons and the GABA-parvalbumin and cholinergic interneurons were removed by apoptosis in the aftermath of METH. This

  13. Protective Effect of Neuropeptide Apelin-13 on 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Dopaminergic Cells: Involvement of Its Antioxidant and Antiapoptotic Properties.

    PubMed

    Pouresmaeili-Babaki, Elham; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Abbasnejad, Mehdi; Ravan, Hadi

    2018-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of brain dopaminergic neurons. Beside pharmacologic and symptomatic treatment of PD the neuroprotective therapy has recently attracted more attention. Apelin, a novel neuropeptide, and its receptors have numerous reported roles in regulating brain functions. In addition, this peptide has potent neuroprotective effects in some neurodegenerative situations. In this study, the effects of apelin-13 were investigated in a cell model of PD. Human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometry method. Immunoblotting analysis was also employed to evaluate cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activity. Data showed that 6-OHDA could decrease cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increase intracellular ROS, cytochrome c, and cleaved caspase-3 levels. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with apelin-13 (5 and 10 nM) significantly prevented the mentioned biochemical and molecular markers of 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, the results showed that apelin receptor and PI3K signaling contributed to the observed protective effects of apelin. The results suggest that apelin-13 has protective effects against dopaminergic neural toxicity and its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties are involved, at least in part, in such protection.

  14. Induction of cross-tolerance between protective effect of morphine and nicotine in 6-hydroxydopamine-induce neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Elyasi, Leila; Eftekhar-Vaghefi, Seyed Hassan; Asadi-Shekaaria, Majid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed

    2018-06-27

    Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive and selective death of dopaminergic neurons. It has been reported that nicotine and morphine have protective roles during neuronal damage in Parkinson's disease. In addition, the induction of cross-tolerance between their biological effects has been shown in numerous reports. Here, we investigated the effects of nicotine and morphine on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line as an in vitro model of Parkinson's disease. Cell damage was induced by 150 μM 6-OHDA and the cells viability was examined by MTT assay. Intracellular reactive oxygen species, calcium level and mitochondrial membrane potential were determined by fluorescence spectrophotometer method. Biochemical markers of apoptosis were also evaluated by immunoblotting. The data showed that morphine and nicotine prevent 6-OHDA- induced cell damage and apoptosis. However, the protective effects of nicotine were not observed in chronic morphine-pretreated cells. Morphine had no protective effects in chronic nicotine-incubated cells. A cross-tolerance between protective effects of morphine and nicotine was occurred in 6-OHDA-induced SH-SY5Y cell toxicity.

  15. Non-fibrillar amyloid-{beta} peptide reduces NMDA-induced neurotoxicity, but not AMPA-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Niidome, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: tniidome@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Goto, Yasuaki; Kato, Masaru

    2009-09-04

    Amyloid-{beta} peptide (A{beta}) is thought to be linked to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies suggest that A{beta} has important physiological roles in addition to its pathological roles. We recently demonstrated that A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, but the relationship between A{beta}42 assemblies and their neuroprotective effects remains largely unknown. In this study, we prepared non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 based on the results of the thioflavin T assay, Western blot analysis, and atomic force microscopy, and examined the effects of non-fibrillar and fibrillar A{beta}42 on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Non-fibrillar A{beta}42, but not fibrillar A{beta}42, protected hippocampal neurons frommore » glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore, non-fibrillar A{beta}42 decreased both neurotoxicity and increases in the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), but not by {alpha}-amino-3-hydrozy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA). Our results suggest that non-fibrillar A{beta}42 protects hippocampal neurons from glutamate-induced neurotoxicity through regulation of the NMDA receptor.« less

  16. Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics induced by tebufenpyrad and pyridaben in a dopaminergic neuronal cell culture model

    PubMed Central

    Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2015-01-01

    Tebufenpyrad and pyridaben are two agro-chemically important acaricides that function like the known mitochondrial toxicant rotenone. Although these two compounds have been commonly used to kill populations of mites and ticks in commercial greenhouses, their neurotoxic profiles remain largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effects of these two pesticides on mitochondrial structure and function in an in vitro cell culture model using the Seahorse bioanalyzer and confocal fluorescence imaging. The effects were compared with rotenone. Exposing rat dopaminergic neuronal cells (N27 cells) to tebufenpyrad and pyridaben for 3 h induced dose-dependent cell death with an EC50 of 3.98 μM and 3.77 μM, respectively. Also, tebufenpyrad and pyridaben (3 μM) exposure induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and m-aconitase damage, suggesting that the pesticide toxicity is associated with oxidative damage. Morphometric image analysis with the MitoTracker red fluorescent probe indicated that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben, as well as rotenone, caused abnormalities in mitochondrial morphology, including reduced mitochondrial length and circularity. Functional bioenergetic experiments using the Seahorse XF96 analyzer revealed that tebufenpyrad and pyridaben very rapidly suppressed the basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rate similar to that of rotenone. Further analysis of bioenergetic curves also revealed dose-dependent decreases in ATP-linked respiration and respiratory capacity. The luminescence-based ATP measurement further confirmed that pesticide-induced mitochondrial inhibition of respiration is accompanied by the loss of cellular ATP. Collectively, our results suggest that exposure to the pesticides tebufenpyrad and pyridaben induces neurotoxicity by rapidly initiating mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damage in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Our findings also reveal that monitoring the kinetics of mitochondrial respiration with Seahorse could be used

  17. The role of dopamine receptors in the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Ares-Santos, S; Granado, N; Moratalla, R

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine is a synthetic drug consumed by millions of users despite its neurotoxic effects in the brain, leading to loss of dopaminergic fibres and cell bodies. Moreover, clinical reports suggest that methamphetamine abusers are predisposed to Parkinson's disease. Therefore, it is important to elucidate the mechanisms involved in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Dopamine receptors may be a plausible target to prevent this neurotoxicity. Genetic inactivation of dopamine D1 or D2 receptors protects against the loss of dopaminergic fibres in the striatum and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Protection by D1 receptor inactivation is due to blockade of hypothermia, reduced dopamine content and turnover and increased stored vesicular dopamine in D1R(-/-) mice. However, the neuroprotective impact of D2 receptor inactivation is partially dependent on an effect on body temperature, as well as on the blockade of dopamine reuptake by decreased dopamine transporter activity, which results in reduced intracytosolic dopamine levels in D2R(-/-) mice. © 2013 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  18. Maternal Omega-3 Supplement Improves Dopaminergic System in Pre- and Postnatal Inflammation-Induced Neurotoxicity in Parkinson's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Delattre, Ana Marcia; Carabelli, Bruno; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Kempe, Paula G; Rizzo de Souza, Luiz E; Zanata, Silvio M; Machado, Ricardo B; Suchecki, Deborah; Andrade da Costa, Belmira L S; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ferraz, Anete C

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is the consequence of a neurodevelopmental disruption, rather than strictly a consequence of aging. Thus, we hypothesized that maternal supplement of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) may be associated with neuroprotection mechanisms in a self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-model of PD. To test this hypothesis, behavioral and neurochemical assay were performed in prenatally LPS-exposed offspring at postnatal day 21. To further determine whether prenatal LPS exposure and maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation had persisting effects, brain injury was induced on PN 90 rats, following bilateral intranigral LPS injection. Pre- and postnatal inflammation damage not only affected dopaminergic neurons directly, but it also modified critical features, such as activated microglia and astrocyte cells, disrupting the support provided by the microenvironment. Unexpectedly, our results failed to show any involvement of caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis pathway in neuronal death mechanisms. On the other hand, learning and memory deficits detected with a second toxic exposure were significantly attenuated in maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation group. In addition, ω-3 PUFAs promote beneficial effect on synaptic function, maintaining the neurochemical integrity in remaining neurons, without necessarily protect them from neuronal death. Thus, our results suggest that ω-3 PUFAs affect the functional ability of the central nervous system in a complex way in a multiple inflammation-induced neurotoxicity animal model of PD and they disclose new ways of understanding how these fatty acids control responses of the brain to different challenges.

  19. MK-801, but not drugs acting at strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors, attenuate methamphetamine nigrostriatal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Layer, R T; Bland, L R; Skolnick, P

    1993-10-15

    Repeated administration of methamphetamine (METH) results in damage to nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Both competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists and use-dependent cation channel blockers attenuate METH-induced damage. The objectives of the present study were to examine whether comparable reductions in METH-induced damage could be obtained by compounds acting at strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors on the NMDA receptor complex. Four injections of METH (5 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in a approximately 70.9% depletion of striatal dopamine (DA) and approximately 62.7% depletion of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) content, respectively. A significant protection against METH-induced DA and DOPAC depletion was afforded by the use-dependent channel blocker, MK-801. The competitive glycine antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7-Cl-KA), the low efficacy glycine partial agonist (+)-3-amino-1-hydroxy-2-pyrrolidone ((+)-HA-966), and the high efficacy partial glycine agonist 1-aminocyclopropane-carboxylic acid (ACPC) were ineffective against METH-induced toxicity despite their abilities to attenuate glutamate-induced neurotoxicity under both in vivo and in vitro conditions. These results indicate that glycinergic ligands do not possess the same broad neuroprotective spectrum as other classes of NMDA antagonists.

  20. Functional expression of SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) protects retinal dopaminergic cells from neurotoxin-induced degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingling; Li, Ping; Carr, Aprell; Wang, Xiaokai; DeLaPaz, April; Sun, Lei; Lee, Eric; Tomei, Erika; Li, Lei

    2013-01-11

    We previously isolated a dominant mutation, night blindness b (nbb), which causes a late onset of retinal dopaminergic cell degeneration in zebrafish. In this study, we cloned the zebrafish nbb locus. Sequencing results revealed that nbb is a homolog of the vertebrate SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil). The Stil gene has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of vertebrate embryonic neural development and human cancer cell proliferation. In this study, we demonstrate that functional expression of Stil is also required for neural survival. In zebrafish, decreased expression of Stil resulted in increased toxic susceptibility of retinal dopaminergic cells to 6-hydroxydopamine. Increases in Stil-mediated Shh signaling transduction (i.e. by knocking down the Shh repressor Sufu) prevented dopaminergic cell death induced by neurotoxic insult. The data suggest that the oncogene Stil also plays important roles in neural protection.

  1. Chrysotoxine, a novel bibenzyl compound selectively antagonizes MPP⁺, but not rotenone, neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Ju-Xian; Shaw, Pang-Chui; Wong, Ngok-Shun; Sze, Cho-Wing; Yao, Xin-Sheng; Tang, Chi-Wai; Tong, Yao; Zhang, Yan-Bo

    2012-07-11

    Chrysotoxine is a naturally occurring bibenzyl compound found in medicinal Dendrobium species. We previously reported that chrysotoxine structure-specifically suppressed 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced dopaminergic cell death. Whether chrysotoxine and other structurally similar bibenzyl compounds could also inhibit the neurotoxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium (MPP(+)) and rotenone has not been investigated. We showed herein that chrysotoxine inhibited MPP(+), but not rotenone, induced dopaminergic cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction as indexed by the decrease in membrane potential, increase in calcium concentration and NF-κB activation triggered by MPP(+) were blocked by chrysotoxine pretreatment. The imbalance between the pro-apoptotic signals (Bax, caspase-3, ERK and p38 MAPK) and the pro-survival signals (Akt/PI3K/GSK-3β) induced by MPP(+) was partially or totally rectified by chrysotoxine. The results indicated that ROS inhibition, mitochondria protection, NF-κB modulation and regulation of multiple signals determining cell survival and cell death were involved in the protective effects of chrysotoxine against MPP(+) toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Given the different toxic profiles of 6-OHDA and MPP(+) as compared to rotenone, our results also indicated that DAT inhibition may partially account for the neuroprotective effects of chrysotoxine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Melatonin Protects SH-SY5Y Neuronal Cells Against Methamphetamine-Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Apoptotic Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Wongprayoon, Pawaris; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), a psychostimulant with highly neurotoxic effects, has been known to induce neuronal apoptosis in part through an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. Melatonin is an endogenous antioxidant compound that exerts protective effects against several neurodegenerative conditions, including METH-induced neurotoxicity, via various mechanisms. However, the role of melatonin in ER stress is still relatively unclear. In the present study, we investigated ER stress and neuronal apoptosis following METH treatment and the role of melatonin in METH-mediated ER stress-induced cell death in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. We found that METH caused the overexpression of ER stress-related genes, including C/EBP homologous protein and spliced X-box binding protein 1, in dose- and time-dependent manners. Moreover, METH time-dependently activated caspase-12 and -3, leading to cellular apoptosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pretreatment with melatonin attenuated the overexpression of ER stress-related genes and the cleavages of caspase-12 and -3 caused by METH exposure. Flow cytometry revealed that METH-mediated neuronal apoptosis was also prevented by melatonin. These findings suggest the protective effects of melatonin against ER stress and apoptosis caused by METH and other harmful agents.

  3. Fragment C Domain of Tetanus Toxin Mitigates Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity and Its Motor Consequences in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mendieta, Liliana; Granado, Noelia; Aguilera, José; Tizabi, Yousef

    2016-01-01

    Background: The C-terminal domain of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin (Hc-TeTx) is a nontoxic peptide with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects against striatal dopaminergic damage induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydoxydopamine, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential in Parkinson’s disease. Methamphetamine, a widely abused psychostimulant, has selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rodents, monkeys, and humans. This study was undertaken to determine whether Hc-TeTx might also protect against methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and the consequent motor impairment. Methods: For this purpose, we treated mice with a toxic regimen of methamphetamine (4mg/kg, 3 consecutive i.p. injections, 3 hours apart) followed by 3 injections of 40 ug/kg of Hc-TeTx into grastrocnemius muscle at 1, 24, and 48 hours post methamphetamine treatment. Results: We found that Hc-TeTx significantly reduced the loss of dopaminergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and the increases in silver staining (a well stablished degeneration marker) induced by methamphetamine in the striatum. Moreover, Hc-TeTx prevented the increase of neuronal nitric oxide synthase but did not affect microglia activation induced by methamphetamine. Stereological neuronal count in the substantia nigra indicated loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons after methamphetamine that was partially prevented by Hc-TeTx. Importantly, impairment in motor behaviors post methamphetamine treatment were significantly reduced by Hc-TeTx. Conclusions: Here we demonstrate that Hc-TeTx can provide significant protection against acute methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and motor impairment, suggesting its therapeutic potential in methamphetamine abusers. PMID:26945022

  4. A dopamine receptor contributes to paraquat-induced neurotoxicity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Cassar, Marlène; Issa, Abdul-Raouf; Riemensperger, Thomas; Petitgas, Céline; Rival, Thomas; Coulom, Hélène; Iché-Torres, Magali; Han, Kyung-An; Birman, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Long-term exposure to environmental oxidative stressors, like the herbicide paraquat (PQ), has been linked to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), the most frequent neurodegenerative movement disorder. Paraquat is thus frequently used in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and other animal models to study PD and the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons (DNs) that characterizes this disease. Here, we show that a D1-like dopamine (DA) receptor, DAMB, actively contributes to the fast central nervous system (CNS) failure induced by PQ in the fly. First, we found that a long-term increase in neuronal DA synthesis reduced DAMB expression and protected against PQ neurotoxicity. Secondly, a striking age-related decrease in PQ resistance in young adult flies correlated with an augmentation of DAMB expression. This aging-associated increase in oxidative stress vulnerability was not observed in a DAMB-deficient mutant. Thirdly, targeted inactivation of this receptor in glutamatergic neurons (GNs) markedly enhanced the survival of Drosophila exposed to either PQ or neurotoxic levels of DA, whereas, conversely, DAMB overexpression in these cells made the flies more vulnerable to both compounds. Fourthly, a mutation in the Drosophila ryanodine receptor (RyR), which inhibits activity-induced increase in cytosolic Ca2+, also strongly enhanced PQ resistance. Finally, we found that DAMB overexpression in specific neuronal populations arrested development of the fly and that in vivo stimulation of either DNs or GNs increased PQ susceptibility. This suggests a model for DA receptor-mediated potentiation of PQ-induced neurotoxicity. Further studies of DAMB signaling in Drosophila could have implications for better understanding DA-related neurodegenerative disorders in humans. PMID:25158689

  5. In vivo evidence of methamphetamine induced attenuation of brain tissue oxygenation as measured by EPR oximetry

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, John, E-mail: jmweaver@salud.unm.edu; Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, NM 87131; Yang, Yirong

    2014-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (METH) is a major and significant societal problem in the US, as a number of studies have suggested that METH is associated with increased cerebrovascular events, hemorrhage or vasospasm. Although cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in METH-induced toxicity are not completely understood, changes in brain O{sub 2} may play an important role and contribute to METH-induced neurotoxicity including dopaminergic receptor degradation. Given that O{sub 2} is the terminal electron acceptor for many enzymes that are important in brain function, the impact of METH on brain tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo remains largely uncharacterized. This study investigated striatal tissuemore » pO{sub 2} changes in male C57BL/6 mice (16–20 g) following METH administration using EPR oximetry, a highly sensitive modality to measure pO{sub 2}in vivo, in situ and in real time. We demonstrate that 20 min after a single injection of METH (8 mg/kg i.v.), the striatal pO{sub 2} was reduced to 81% of the pretreatment level and exposure to METH for 3 consecutive days further attenuated striatal pO{sub 2} to 64%. More importantly, pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after administration of a single dose of METH and continual exposure to METH exacerbates the condition. We also show a reduction in cerebral blood flow associated with a decreased brain pO{sub 2} indicating an ischemic condition. Our findings suggests that administration of METH can attenuate brain tissue pO{sub 2}, which may lead to hypoxic insult, thus a risk factor for METH-induced brain injury and the development of stroke in young adults. - Highlights: • Explored striatal tissue pO{sub 2}in vivo after METH administration by EPR oximetry. • pO{sub 2} was reduced by 81% after a single dose and 64% after 3 consecutive daily doses. • pO{sub 2} did not recover fully to control levels even 24 h after a single dose. • Decrease in brain tissue pO{sub 2} may be associated with a

  6. GSTpi expression in MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration of C57BL/6 mouse midbrain and striatum.

    PubMed

    Castro-Caldas, Margarida; Neves Carvalho, Andreia; Peixeiro, Isabel; Rodrigues, Elsa; Lechner, Maria Celeste; Gama, Maria João

    2009-06-01

    MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity involves major biochemical processes such as oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, leading to a significant reduction in the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Glutathione S-transferase pi (GSTpi) is a phase II detoxifying enzyme that provides protection of cells from injury by toxic chemicals and products of oxidative stress. In humans, polymorphisms of GSTP1 affect substrate selectivity and stability increasing the susceptibility to parkinsonism-inducing effects of environmental toxins. Given the ability of MPTP to increase the levels of reactive oxygen species and the link between altered redox potential and the expression and activity of GSTpi, we investigated the effect of MPTP on GSTpi cellular concentration in an in vivo model of Parkinson's disease. The present study demonstrates that GSTpi is actively expressed in both substantia nigra pars compacta and striatum of C57BL/6 mice brain, mostly in oligodendrocytes and astrocytes. After systemic administration of MPTP, GSTpi expression is significantly increased in glial cells in the vicinity of dopaminergic neurons cell bodies and fibers. The results suggest that GSTpi expression may be part of the mechanism underlying the ability of glial cells to elicit protection against the mechanisms involved in MPTP-induced neuronal death.

  7. Fragment C Domain of Tetanus Toxin Mitigates Methamphetamine Neurotoxicity and Its Motor Consequences in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mendieta, Liliana; Granado, Noelia; Aguilera, José; Tizabi, Yousef; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    The C-terminal domain of the heavy chain of tetanus toxin (Hc-TeTx) is a nontoxic peptide with demonstrated in vitro and in vivo neuroprotective effects against striatal dopaminergic damage induced by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium and 6-hydoxydopamine, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential in Parkinson's disease. Methamphetamine, a widely abused psychostimulant, has selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity in rodents, monkeys, and humans. This study was undertaken to determine whether Hc-TeTx might also protect against methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity and the consequent motor impairment. For this purpose, we treated mice with a toxic regimen of methamphetamine (4mg/kg, 3 consecutive i.p. injections, 3 hours apart) followed by 3 injections of 40 ug/kg of Hc-TeTx into grastrocnemius muscle at 1, 24, and 48 hours post methamphetamine treatment. We found that Hc-TeTx significantly reduced the loss of dopaminergic markers tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter and the increases in silver staining (a well stablished degeneration marker) induced by methamphetamine in the striatum. Moreover, Hc-TeTx prevented the increase of neuronal nitric oxide synthase but did not affect microglia activation induced by methamphetamine. Stereological neuronal count in the substantia nigra indicated loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons after methamphetamine that was partially prevented by Hc-TeTx. Importantly, impairment in motor behaviors post methamphetamine treatment were significantly reduced by Hc-TeTx. Here we demonstrate that Hc-TeTx can provide significant protection against acute methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and motor impairment, suggesting its therapeutic potential in methamphetamine abusers. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  8. Trace amine-associated receptor 1 regulation of methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Miner, Nicholas B; Elmore, Josh S; Baumann, Michael H; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2017-12-01

    Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1) is activated by methamphetamine (MA) and modulates dopaminergic (DA) function. Although DA dysregulation is the hallmark of MA-induced neurotoxicity leading to behavioral and cognitive deficits, the intermediary role of TAAR1 has yet to be characterized. To investigate TAAR1 regulation of MA-induced neurotoxicity, Taar1 transgenic knock-out (KO) and wildtype (WT) mice were administered saline or a neurotoxic regimen of 4 i.p. injections, 2h apart, of MA (2.5, 5, or 10mg/kg). Temperature data were recorded during the treatment day. Additionally, striatal tissue was collected 2 or 7days following MA administration for analysis of DA, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, as well as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression. MA elicited an acute hypothermic drop in body temperature in Taar1-WT mice, but not in Taar1-KO mice. Two days following treatment, DA and TH levels were lower in Taar1-KO mice compared to Taar1-WT mice, regardless of treatment, and were dose-dependently decreased by MA. GFAP expression was significantly increased by all doses of MA at both time points and greater in Taar1-KO compared to Taar1-WT mice receiving MA 2.5 or 5mg/kg. Seven days later, DA levels were decreased in a similar pattern: DA was significantly lower in Taar1-KO compared to Taar1-WT mice receiving MA 2.5 or 5mg/kg. TH levels were uniformly decreased by MA, regardless of genotype. These results indicate that activation of TAAR1 potentiates MA-induced hypothermia and TAAR1 confers sustained neuroprotection dependent on its thermoregulatory effects. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Manganese Nanoparticle Activates Mitochondrial Dependent Apoptotic Signaling and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2011-01-01

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles (~25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25–400 µg/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. PMID:21856324

  10. Pharmacological evaluation of SN79, a sigma (σ) receptor ligand, against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Nidhi; Seminerio, Michael J.; Robson, Matthew J.; McCurdy, Christopher R.; Matsumoto, Rae R.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse, causing hyperthermia and neurotoxicity at high doses. Currently, there is no clinically proven pharmacotherapy to treat these effects of methamphetamine, necessitating identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Earlier studies showed that methamphetamine binds to sigma (σ) receptors in the brain at physiologically relevant concentrations, where it acts in part as an agonist. SN79 (6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-florophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one) was synthesized as a putative σ receptor antagonist with nanomolar affinity and selectivity for σ receptors over 57 other binding sites. SN79 pretreatment afforded protection against methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity in male, Swiss Webster mice (measured as depletions in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels, and reductions in striatal dopamine and serotonin transporter expression levels). In contrast, di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), a well established σ receptor agonist, increased the lethal effects of methamphetamine, although it did not further exacerbate methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. Together, the data implicate σ receptors in the direct modulation of some effects of methamphetamine such as lethality, while having a modulatory role which can mitigate other methamphetamine-induced effects such as hyperthermia and neurotoxicity. PMID:22921523

  11. Pharmacological evaluation of SN79, a sigma (σ) receptor ligand, against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Nidhi; Seminerio, Michael J; Robson, Matthew J; McCurdy, Christopher R; Matsumoto, Rae R

    2013-08-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse, causing hyperthermia and neurotoxicity at high doses. Currently, there is no clinically proven pharmacotherapy to treat these effects of methamphetamine, necessitating identification of potential novel therapeutic targets. Earlier studies showed that methamphetamine binds to sigma (σ) receptors in the brain at physiologically relevant concentrations, where it "acts in part as an agonist." SN79 (6-acetyl-3-(4-(4-(4-florophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)butyl)benzo[d]oxazol-2(3H)-one) was synthesized as a putative σ receptor antagonist with nanomolar affinity and selectivity for σ receptors over 57 other binding sites. SN79 pretreatment afforded protection against methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic and serotonergic neurotoxicity in male, Swiss Webster mice (measured as depletions in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels, and reductions in striatal dopamine and serotonin transporter expression levels). In contrast, di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG), a well established σ receptor agonist, increased the lethal effects of methamphetamine, although it did not further exacerbate methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. Together, the data implicate σ receptors in the direct modulation of some effects of methamphetamine such as lethality, while having a modulatory role which can mitigate other methamphetamine-induced effects such as hyperthermia and neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Methamphetamine induces heme oxygenase-1 expression in cortical neurons and glia to prevent its toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.-N.; Wu, C.-H.; Department of Biology and Anatomy, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan 114

    2009-11-01

    The impairment of cognitive and motor functions in humans and animals caused by methamphetamine (METH) administration underscores the importance of METH toxicity in cortical neurons. The heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) exerts a cytoprotective effect against various neuronal injures; however, it remains unclear whether HO-1 is involved in METH-induced toxicity. We used primary cortical neuron/glia cocultures to explore the role of HO-1 in METH-induced toxicity. Exposure of cultured cells to various concentrations of METH (0.1, 0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mM) led to cytotoxicity in a concentration-dependent manner. A METH concentration of 5 mM, which caused 50% of neuronal death andmore » glial activation, was chosen for subsequent experiments. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that METH significantly induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression, both preceded cell death. Double and triple immunofluorescence staining further identified HO-1-positive cells as activated astrocytes, microglia, and viable neurons, but not dying neurons. Inhibition of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway significantly blocked HO-1 induction by METH and aggravated METH neurotoxicity. Inhibition of HO activity using tin protoporphyrine IX significantly reduced HO activity and exacerbated METH neurotoxicity. However, prior induction of HO-1 using cobalt protoporphyrine IX partially protected neurons from METH toxicity. Taken together, our results suggest that induction of HO-1 by METH via the p38 signaling pathway may be protective, albeit insufficient to completely protect cortical neurons from METH toxicity.« less

  13. Astragalus Polysaccharide Suppresses 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Li, Haifeng; Shi, Ruona; Ding, Fei; Wang, Hongyu; Han, Wenjing; Ma, Fangli; Hu, Minghua; Ma, Chung Wah; Huang, Zebo

    2016-01-01

    Astragalus membranaceus is a medicinal plant traditionally used in China for a variety of conditions, including inflammatory and neural diseases. Astragalus polysaccharides are shown to reduce the adverse effect of levodopa which is used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the neuroprotective effect of Astragalus polysaccharides per se in PD is lacking. Using Caenorhabditis elegans models, we investigated the protective effect of astragalan, an acidic polysaccharide isolated from A. membranaceus , against the neurotoxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a neurotoxin that can induce parkinsonism. We show that 6-OHDA is able to degenerate dopaminergic neurons and lead to the deficiency of food-sensing behavior and a shorter lifespan in C. elegans . Interestingly, these degenerative symptoms can be attenuated by astragalan treatment. Astragalan is also shown to alleviate oxidative stress through reducing reactive oxygen species level and malondialdehyde content and increasing superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities and reduce the expression of proapoptotic gene egl-1 in 6-OHDA-intoxicated nematodes. Further studies reveal that astragalan is capable of elevating the decreased acetylcholinesterase activity induced by 6-OHDA. Together, our results demonstrate that the protective effect of astragalan against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity is likely due to the alleviation of oxidative stress and regulation of apoptosis pathway and cholinergic system and thus provide an important insight into the therapeutic potential of Astragalus polysaccharide in neurodegeneration.

  14. Toward development of an in vitro model of methamphetamine-induced dopamine nerve terminal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, S; Westphalen, R; Callahan, B; Hatzidimitriou, G; Yuan, J; Ricaurte, G A

    2000-05-01

    To develop an in vitro model of methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopamine (DA) neurotoxicity, striatal synaptosomes were incubated at 37 degrees C with METH for different periods of time (10-80 min), washed once, then tested for DA transporter function at 37 degrees C. METH produced time- and dose-dependent reductions in the V(max) of DA uptake, without producing any change in K(m). Incubation of synaptosomes with the DA neurotoxins 1-methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium ion, 6-hydroxydopamine, and amphetamine under similar conditions produced comparable effects. In contrast, incubation with fenfluramine, a serotonin neurotoxin, did not. METH-induced decreases in DA uptake were selective, insofar as striatal glutamate uptake was unaffected. Various DA transporter blockers (cocaine, methylphenidate, and bupropion) afforded complete protection against METH-induced decreases in DA uptake, without producing any effect themselves. METH's effects were also temperature dependent, with greater decreases in DA uptake occurring at higher temperatures. Tests for residual drug revealed small amounts (0.1-0.2 microM) of remaining METH, but kinetic studies indicated that decreases in DA uptake were not likely to be due to METH acting as a competitive inhibitor of DA uptake. Decreases in the V(max) of DA uptake were not accompanied by decreases in B(max) of [(3)H]WIN 35,428 binding, possibly because there is no mechanism for removing damaged DA nerve endings from the in vitro preparation Collectively, these results give good support to the development of a valid in vitro model that may prove helpful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying METH-induced DA neurotoxicity.

  15. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (–/–) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (–/–) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (–/–) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22512859

  16. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Duong, Chu Xuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (-/-) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (-/-) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (-/-) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Corticosterone and exogenous glucose alter blood glucose levels, neurotoxicity, and vascular toxicity produced by methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Bowyer, John F; Tranter, Karen M; Sarkar, Sumit; George, Nysia I; Hanig, Joseph P; Kelly, Kimberly A; Michalovicz, Lindsay T; Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2017-10-01

    Our previous studies have raised the possibility that altered blood glucose levels may influence and/or be predictive of methamphetamine (METH) neurotoxicity. This study evaluated the effects of exogenous glucose and corticosterone (CORT) pretreatment alone or in combination with METH on blood glucose levels and the neural and vascular toxicity produced. METH exposure consisted of four sequential injections of 5, 7.5, 10, and 10 mg/kg (2 h between injections) D-METH. The three groups given METH in combination with saline, glucose (METH+Glucose), or CORT (METH+CORT) had significantly higher glucose levels compared to the corresponding treatment groups without METH except at 3 h after the last injection. At this last time point, the METH and METH+Glucose groups had lower levels than the non-METH groups, while the METH+CORT group did not. CORT alone or glucose alone did not significantly increase blood glucose. Mortality rates for the METH+CORT (40%) and METH+Glucose (44%) groups were substantially higher than the METH (< 10%) group. Additionally, METH+CORT significantly increased neurodegeneration above the other three METH treatment groups (≈ 2.5-fold in the parietal cortex). Thus, maintaining elevated levels of glucose during METH exposure increases lethality and may exacerbate neurodegeneration. Neuroinflammation, specifically microglial activation, was associated with degenerating neurons in the parietal cortex and thalamus after METH exposure. The activated microglia in the parietal cortex were surrounding vasculature in most cases and the extent of microglial activation was exacerbated by CORT pretreatment. Our findings show that acute CORT exposure and elevated blood glucose levels can exacerbate METH-induced vascular damage, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and lethality. Cover Image for this issue: doi. 10.1111/jnc.13819. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. Chronic methamphetamine administration causes differential regulation of transcription factors in the rat midbrain.

    PubMed

    Krasnova, Irina N; Ladenheim, Bruce; Hodges, Amber B; Volkow, Nora D; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2011-04-25

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive and neurotoxic psychostimulant widely abused in the USA and throughout the world. When administered in large doses, METH can cause depletion of striatal dopamine terminals, with preservation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Because alterations in the expression of transcription factors that regulate the development of dopaminergic neurons might be involved in protecting these neurons after toxic insults, we tested the possibility that their expression might be affected by toxic doses of METH in the adult brain. Male Sprague-Dawley rats pretreated with saline or increasing doses of METH were challenged with toxic doses of the drug and euthanized two weeks later. Animals that received toxic METH challenges showed decreases in dopamine levels and reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase protein concentration in the striatum. METH pretreatment protected against loss of striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase. In contrast, METH challenges caused decreases in dopamine transporters in both saline- and METH-pretreated animals. Interestingly, METH challenges elicited increases in dopamine transporter mRNA levels in the midbrain in the presence but not in the absence of METH pretreatment. Moreover, toxic METH doses caused decreases in the expression of the dopamine developmental factors, Shh, Lmx1b, and Nurr1, but not in the levels of Otx2 and Pitx3, in saline-pretreated rats. METH pretreatment followed by METH challenges also decreased Nurr1 but increased Otx2 and Pitx3 expression in the midbrain. These findings suggest that, in adult animals, toxic doses of METH can differentially influence the expression of transcription factors involved in the developmental regulation of dopamine neurons. The combined increases in Otx2 and Pitx3 expression after METH preconditioning might represent, in part, some of the mechanisms that served to protect against METH-induced striatal dopamine depletion observed after METH preconditioning.

  19. Epigallocatechin gallate protects dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4- phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced neurotoxicity by inhibiting microglial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Peng, Ning; Du, Fang; Li, Xu-ping; Le, Wei-dong

    2006-04-01

    To observe whether the dopaminergic neuroprotective effect of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) is associated with its inhibition of microglial cell activation in vivo. The effects of EGCG at different doses on dopaminergic neuronal survival were tested in a methyl-4-phenyl-pyridinium (MPP+)-induced dopaminergic neuronal injury model in the primary mesencephalic cell cultures. With unbiased stereological method, tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) cells were counted in the A8, A9 and A10 regions of the substantia nigra (SN) in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated C57BL/6 mice. The effect of EGCG on microglial activation in the SN was also investigated. Pretreatment with EGCG (1 to 100 micromol/L) significantly attenuated MPP+-induced TH-ir cell loss by 22.2% to 80.5% in the mesencephalic cell cultures. In MPTP-treated C57BL/6 mice, EGCG at a low concentration (1 mg/kg) provided significant protection against MPTP-induced TH-ir cell loss by 50.9% in the whole nigral area and by 71.7% in the A9 region. EGCG at 5 mg/kg showed more prominent protective effect than at 1 or 10 mg/kg. EGCG pretreatment significantly inhibited microglial activation and CD11b expression induced by MPTP. EGCG exerts potent dopaminergic neuroprotective activity by means of microglial inhibition, which shed light on the potential use of EGCG in treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Contribution of dopamine to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and dopaminergic deficits caused by methylenedioxymethamphetamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Barros-Miñones, L; Goñi-Allo, B; Suquia, V; Beitia, G; Aguirre, N; Puerta, E

    2015-06-01

    Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity is mediated by oxidative stress probably due to the inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity. In this study we investigated the contribution of dopamine (DA) to such effects. For this, we modulated the dopaminergic system of mice at the synthesis, uptake or metabolism levels. Striatal mitochondrial complex I activity was decreased 1 h after MDMA; an effect not observed in the striatum of DA depleted mice or in the hippocampus, a dopamine spare region. The DA precursor, L-dopa, caused a significant reduction of mitochondrial complex I activity by itself and exacerbated the dopaminergic deficits when combined with systemic MDMA. By contrast, no damage was observed when L-dopa was combined with intrastriatal injections of MDMA. On the other hand, dopamine uptake blockade using GBR 12909, inhibited both, the acute inhibition of complex I activity and the long-term dopaminergic toxicity caused by MDMA. Moreover, the inhibition of DA metabolism with the monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor, pargyline, afforded a significant protection against MDMA-induced complex I inhibition and neurotoxicity. Taken together, these findings point to the formation of hydrogen peroxide subsequent to DA metabolism by MAO, rather than a direct DA-mediated mitochondrial complex I inhibition, and the contribution of a peripheral metabolite of MDMA, as the key steps in the chain of biochemical events leading to DA neurotoxicity caused by MDMA in mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Acrolein acts as a neurotoxin in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of rat: involvement of α-synuclein aggregation and programmed cell death

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Lin, Hui-Ching; Zhao, Wei-Zhong; Huang, Hui-Ju; Lo, Yu-Li; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Maan-Yuh Lin, Anya

    2017-01-01

    Clinical studies report significant increases in acrolein (an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde) in the substantia nigra (SN) of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system was investigated by local infusion of acrolein (15, 50, 150 nmoles/0.5 μl) in the SN of Sprague-Dawley rats. Acrolein-induced neurodegeneration of nigrostriatal dopaminergic system was delineated by reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, dopamine transporter levels and TH-positive neurons in the infused SN as well as in striatal dopamine content. At the same time, apomorphine-induced turning behavior was evident in rats subjected to a unilateral infusion of acrolein in SN. Acrolein was pro-oxidative by increasing 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and heme oxygenase-1 levels. Furthermore, acrolein conjugated with proteins at lysine residue and induced α-synuclein aggregation in the infused SN. Acrolein was pro-inflammatory by activating astrocytes and microglia. In addition, acrolein activated caspase 1 in the infused SN, suggesting acrolein-induced inflammasome formation. The neurotoxic mechanisms underlying acrolein-induced neurotoxicity involved programmed cell death, including apoptosis and necroptosis. Compared with well-known Parkinsonian neurotoxins, including 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and rotenone which do not exist in the SN of PD patients, our in vivo study shows that acrolein acts as a Parkinsonian neurotoxin in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of rat brain. PMID:28401906

  2. Neurotoxic Doses of Chronic Methamphetamine Trigger Retrotransposition of the Identifier Element in Rat Dorsal Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Moszczynska, Anna; Burghardt, Kyle J.; Yu, Dongyue

    2017-01-01

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are typically silenced by DNA hypermethylation in somatic cells, but can retrotranspose in proliferating cells during adult neurogenesis. Hypomethylation caused by disease pathology or genotoxic stress leads to genomic instability of SINEs. The goal of the present investigation was to determine whether neurotoxic doses of binge or chronic methamphetamine (METH) trigger retrotransposition of the identifier (ID) element, a member of the rat SINE family, in the dentate gyrus genomic DNA. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline or high doses of binge or chronic METH and sacrificed at three different time points thereafter. DNA methylation analysis, immunohistochemistry and next-generation sequencing (NGS) were performed on the dorsal dentate gyrus samples. Binge METH triggered hypomethylation, while chronic METH triggered hypermethylation of the CpG-2 site. Both METH regimens were associated with increased intensities in poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1, a SINE regulatory protein)-like immunohistochemical staining in the dentate gyrus. The amplification of several ID element sequences was significantly higher in the chronic METH group than in the control group a week after METH, and they mapped to genes coding for proteins regulating cell growth and proliferation, transcription, protein function as well as for a variety of transporters. The results suggest that chronic METH induces ID element retrotransposition in the dorsal dentate gyrus and may affect hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:28272323

  3. Pharmacologic Treatment with GABAB Receptor Agonist of Methamphetamine-Induced Cognitive Impairment in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive drug, and addiction to METH has increased to epidemic proportions worldwide. Chronic use of METH causes psychiatric symptoms, such as hallucinations and delusions, and long-term cognitive deficits, which are indistinguishable from paranoid schizophrenia. The GABA receptor system is known to play a significant role in modulating the dopaminergic neuronal system, which is related to behavioral changes induced by drug abuse. However, few studies have investigated the effects of GABA receptor agonists on cognitive deficits induced by METH. In the present review, we show that baclofen, a GABA receptor agonist, is effective in treating METH-induced impairment of object recognition memory and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex, a measure of sensorimotor gating in mice. Acute and repeated treatment with METH induced a significant impairment of PPI. Furthermore, repeated but not acute treatment of METH resulted in a long-lasting deficit of object recognition memory. Baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, dose-dependently ameliorated the METH-induced PPI deficits and object recognition memory impairment in mice. On the other hand, THIP, a GABAA receptor agonist, had no effect on METH-induced cognitive deficits. These results suggest that GABAB receptors may constitute a putative new target in treating cognitive deficits in chronic METH users. PMID:21886573

  4. Shikonin protects dopaminergic cell line PC12 against 6-hydroxydopamine-mediated neurotoxicity via both glutathione-dependent and independent pathways and by inhibiting apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilzadeh, Emran; Gardaneh, Mossa; Gharib, Ehsan; Sabouni, Farzaneh

    2013-08-01

    We have investigated the mechanism of shikonin function on protection of dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 by serial dilutions of shikonin determined 10 μM of the compound as its optimum concentration for protection saving nearly 70 % of the cells against toxicity. Reverse transcription-PCR analysis of shikonin-treated cells showed threefold increase in mRNA levels of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) as a representative component of the intracellular anti-oxidant defense system. To elucidate shikonin-GPX1 relationships and maximize protection, we transduced PC12 cells using recombinant lentivirus vectors that harbored GPX-1 coding sequence. This change upregulated GPX-1 expression, increased peroxidase activity and made neuronal cells resistant to 6-OHDA-mediated toxicity. More importantly, addition of shikonin to GPX1-overexpressing PC12 cells augmented GPX-1 protein content by eightfold leading to fivefold increase of enzymatic activity, 91 % cell survival against neurotoxicity and concomitant increases in intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels. Depletion of intracellular GSH rendered all cell groups highly susceptible to toxicity; however, shikonin was capable of partially saving them. Subsequently, GSH-independent superoxide dismutase mRNA was found upregulated by shikonin. As signs of apoptosis inhibition, the compound upregulated Bcl-2, downregulated Bax, and prevented cell nuclei from undergoing morphological changes typical of apoptosis. Also, a co-staining method demonstrated GPX-1 overexpression significantly increases the percent of live cells that is maximized by shikonin treatment. Our data indicate that shikonin as an antioxidant compound protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA toxicity and enhances their survival via both glutathione-dependent and direct anti-apoptotic pathways.

  5. MicroRNAs: New Players in Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Twaroski, Danielle; Bosnjak, Zeljko J.; Bai, Xiaowen

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates that prolonged exposure to general anesthetics during brain development induces widespread neuronal cell death followed by long-term memory and learning disabilities in animal models. These studies have raised serious concerns about the safety of anesthetic use in pregnant women and young children. However, the underlying mechanisms of anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity are complex and are not well understood. MicroRNAs are endogenous, small, non-coding RNAs that have been implicated to play important roles in many different disease processes by negatively regulating target gene expression. A possible role for microRNAs in anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity has recently been identified, suggesting that microRNA-based signaling might be a novel target for preventing the neurotoxicity. Here we provide an overview of anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity and focus on the role of microRNAs in the neurotoxicity observed in both human stem cell-derived neuron and animal models. Aberrant expression of some microRNAs has been shown to be involved in anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity, revealing the potential of microRNAs as therapeutic or preventive targets against the toxicity. PMID:26146587

  6. 3-(Fur-2-yl)-10-(2-phenylethyl)-[1,2,4]triazino[4,3-a]benzimidazol-4(10H)-one, a novel adenosine receptor antagonist with A(2A)-mediated neuroprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Scatena, Alessia; Fornai, Francesco; Trincavelli, Maria Letizia; Taliani, Sabrina; Daniele, Simona; Pugliesi, Isabella; Cosconati, Sandro; Martini, Claudia; Da Settimo, Federico

    2011-09-21

    In this study, compound FTBI (3-(2-furyl)-10-(2-phenylethyl)[1,2,4]triazino[4,3-a]benzimidazol-4(10H)-one) was selected from a small library of triazinobenzimidazole derivatives as a potent A(2A) adenosine receptor (AR) antagonist and tested for its neuroprotective effects against two different kinds of dopaminergic neurotoxins, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) and methamphetamine (METH), in rat PC12 and in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell lines. FTBI, in a concentration range corresponding to its affinity for A(2A) AR subtype, significantly increased the number of viable PC12 cells after their exposure to METH and, to a similar extent, to MPP+, as demonstrated in both trypan blue exclusion assay and in cytological staining. These neuroprotective effects were also observed with a classical A(2A) AR antagonist, ZM241385, and appeared to be completely counteracted by the AR agonist, NECA, supporting A(2A) ARs are directly involved in FTBI-mediated effects. Similarly, in human SH-SY5Y cells, FTBI was able to prevent cell toxicity induced by MPP+ and METH, showing that this A(2A) AR antagonist has a neuroprotective effect independently by the specific cell model. Altogether these results demonstrate that the A(2A) AR blockade mediates cell protection against neurotoxicity induced by dopaminergic neurotoxins in dopamine containing cells, supporting the potential use of A(2A) AR antagonists in dopaminergic degenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of glyceryl nonivamide against microglia-like cells and 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chin; Uang, Hao-Wei; Lin, Rong-Jyh; Chen, Ing-Jun; Lo, Yi-Ching

    2007-12-01

    Glyceryl nonivamide (GLNVA), a vanilloid receptor (VR) agonist, has been reported to have calcitonin gene-related peptide-associated vasodilatation and to prevent subarachnoid hemorrhage-induced cerebral vasospasm. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of GLNVA on activated microglia-like cell mediated- and proparkinsonian neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. In coculture conditions, we used lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells as a model of activated microglia. LPS-induced neuronal death was significantly inhibited by diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. However, capsazepine, the selective VR1 antagonist, did not block the neuroprotective effects of GLNVA. GLNVA reduced LPS-activated microglia-mediated neuronal death, but it lacked protection in DPI-pretreated cultures. GLNVA also decreased LPS activated microglia induced overexpression of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase (nNOS) and glycoprotein 91 phagocyte oxidase (gp91(phox)) on SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of BV-2 cells with GLNVA diminished LPS-induced nitric oxide production, overexpression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), and gp91(phox) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS). GLNVA also reduced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression, inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB (IkappaB)alpha/IkappaBbeta degradation, NF-kappaB activation, and the overproduction of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1beta, and prostaglandin E2 in BV-2 cells. However, GLNVA augmented anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production on LPS-stimulated BV-2 cells. Furthermore, in 6-OHDA-treated SH-SY5Y cells, GLNVA rescued the changes in condensed nuclear and apoptotic bodies, prevented the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced cells death. GLNVA also suppressed accumulation of iROS and up-regulated heme oxygenase-1 expression. 6-OHDA-induced overexpression of nNOS, i

  8. Naringenin protects against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity via activation of the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Lou, Haiyan; Jing, Xu; Wei, Xinbing; Shi, Huanying; Ren, Dongmei; Zhang, Xiumei

    2014-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is critically involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), suggesting that pharmacological targeting of the antioxidant machinery may have therapeutic value. Naringenin, a natural flavonoid compound, has been reported to possess neuroprotective effect against PD related pathology; however the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are poorly defined. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective role of naringenin and to delineate its mechanism of action against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in models of PD both in vitro and in vivo. Naringenin treatment resulted in an increase in nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels and subsequent activation of antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway genes in SH-SY5Y cells and in mice. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to naringenin provided protection against 6-OHDA-induced oxidative insults that was dependent on Nrf2, since treatment with Nrf2 siRNA failed to block against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity or induce Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective genes in SH-SY5Y cells. In mice, oral administration of naringenin resulted in significant protection against 6-OHDA-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and oxidative damage. Our results indicate that activation of Nrf2/ARE signaling by naringenin is strongly associated with its neuroprotective effects against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity and suggest that targeting the Nrf2/ARE pathway may be a promising approach for therapeutic intervention in PD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Pleiotrophin overexpression regulates amphetamine-induced reward and striatal dopaminergic denervation without changing the expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: Implications for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Rojo Gonzalez, Loreto; Gramage, Esther; Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Chen, Ying; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Bailey, Alexis; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    It was previously shown that mice with genetic deletion of the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN-/-) show enhanced amphetamine neurotoxicity and impair extinction of amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP), suggesting a modulatory role of PTN in amphetamine neurotoxicity and reward. We have now studied the effects of amphetamine (10mg/kg, 4 times, every 2h) in the striatum of mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain and in wild type (WT) mice. Amphetamine caused an enhanced loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, together with a highly significant aggravation of amphetamine-induced increase in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice compared to WT mice. Given the known contribution of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine, we also performed quantitative receptor autoradiography of both receptors in the brains of PTN-Tg and WT mice. D1 and D2 receptors binding in the striatum and other regions of interest was not altered by genotype or treatment. Finally, we found that amphetamine CPP was significantly reduced in PTN-Tg mice. The data demonstrate that PTN overexpression in the brain blocks the conditioning effects of amphetamine and enhances the characteristic striatal dopaminergic denervation caused by this drug. These results indicate for the first time deleterious effects of PTN in vivo by mechanisms that are probably independent of changes in the expression of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. The data also suggest that PTN-induced neuroinflammation could be involved in the enhanced neurotoxic effects of amphetamine in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Metallothionein provides zinc-mediated protective effects against methamphetamine toxicity in SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Ajjimaporn, Amornpan; Swinscoe, John; Shavali, Shaik; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Ebadi, Manuchair

    2005-11-30

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a drug of abuse and neurotoxin that induces Parkinson's-like pathology after chronic usage by targeting dopaminergic neurons. Elucidation of the intracellular mechanisms that underlie METH-induced dopaminergic neuron toxicity may help in understanding the mechanism by which neurons die in Parkinson's disease. In the present study, we examined the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the METH-induced death of human dopaminergic SK-N-SH cells and further assessed the neuroprotective effects of zinc and metallothionein (MT) against METH-induced toxicity in culture. METH significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, decreased intracellular ATP levels and reduced the cell viability. Pre-treatment with zinc markedly prevented the loss of cell viability caused by METH treatment. Zinc pre-treatment mainly increased the expression of metallothionein and prevented the generation of reactive oxygen species and ATP depletion caused by METH. Chelation of zinc by CaEDTA caused a significant decrease in MT expression and loss of protective effects of MT against METH toxicity. These results suggest that zinc-induced MT expression protects dopaminergic neurons via preventing the accumulation of toxic reactive oxygen species and halting the decrease in ATP levels. Furthermore, MT may prevent the loss of mitochondrial functions caused by neurotoxins. In conclusion, our study suggests that MT, a potent scavenger of free radicals is neuroprotective against dopaminergic toxicity in conditions such as drug of abuse and in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson’s disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation. PMID:26729090

  12. Interleukin-10 Protection against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neuro-Inflammation and Neurotoxicity in Ventral Mesencephalic Cultures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Chen, Xiao; Liu, Zhan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua

    2015-12-28

    Interleukin (IL)-10, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, is expressed in the brain and can inhibit microglial activation. Herein, we utilized lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory Parkinson's disease (PD) cell model to determine whether microglia and astrocytes are necessary targets for IL-10 neuroprotection. Primary ventral mesencephalic (VM) cultures with different composition of neurons, microglia and astrocytes were prepared. The cells were exposed to IL-10 (15, 50 or 150 ng/mL) 1 h prior to LPS (50 ng/mL) treatment. LPS induced dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuronal loss in VM cultures, VM neuron-enriched cultures, and neuron-microglia co-cultures, but not in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures. IL-10 reduced LPS-induced neuronal loss particularly in single VM neuron cultures. Pro-inflammatory mediators (TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2) were upregulated in both neuron-microglia and neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. In contrast, neurotrophic factors (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 or glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor) were downregulated in neuron-microglia co-cultures, but upregulated in neuron-astrocyte co-cultures by LPS. IL-10 reduced both the increase in production of the pro-inflammatory mediators and the decrease in production of the neurotrophic factors induced by LPS. These results suggest that astrocytes can balance LPS neurotoxicity by releasing more neurotrophic factors and that IL-10 exerts neuroprotective property by an extensive action including direct on neurons and indirect via inhibiting microglial activation.

  13. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W.; Stevens, Markus F.; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor. PMID:26959012

  14. Local Anesthetic-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Verlinde, Mark; Hollmann, Markus W; Stevens, Markus F; Hermanns, Henning; Werdehausen, Robert; Lirk, Philipp

    2016-03-04

    This review summarizes current knowledge concerning incidence, risk factors, and mechanisms of perioperative nerve injury, with focus on local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Perioperative nerve injury is a complex phenomenon and can be caused by a number of clinical factors. Anesthetic risk factors for perioperative nerve injury include regional block technique, patient risk factors, and local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity. Surgery can lead to nerve damage by use of tourniquets or by direct mechanical stress on nerves, such as traction, transection, compression, contusion, ischemia, and stretching. Current literature suggests that the majority of perioperative nerve injuries are unrelated to regional anesthesia. Besides the blockade of sodium channels which is responsible for the anesthetic effect, systemic local anesthetics can have a positive influence on the inflammatory response and the hemostatic system in the perioperative period. However, next to these beneficial effects, local anesthetics exhibit time and dose-dependent toxicity to a variety of tissues, including nerves. There is equivocal experimental evidence that the toxicity varies among local anesthetics. Even though the precise order of events during local anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity is not clear, possible cellular mechanisms have been identified. These include the intrinsic caspase-pathway, PI3K-pathway, and MAPK-pathways. Further research will need to determine whether these pathways are non-specifically activated by local anesthetics, or whether there is a single common precipitating factor.

  15. Cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia aggravates peripheral sensory neurotoxicity caused by oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    Satomi, Machiko; Asama, Toshiyuki; Ebisawa, Yoshiaki; Chisato, Naoyuki; Suno, Manabu; Karasaki, Hidenori; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    Calcium and magnesium replacement is effective in reducing oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. However, cetuximab treatment has been associated with severe hypomagnesaemia. Therefore, we retrospectively investigated whether cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity. Six patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who were previously treated with oxaliplatin-fluorouracil combination therapy were administered cetuximab in combination with irinotecan alone or irinotecan and fluorouracil as a second-line treatment. All patients had normal magnesium levels before receiving cetuximab. The Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 was used to evaluate the grade of neurotoxicity, hypomagnesaemia, hypocalcaemia, and hypokalemia every week. All six patients had grade 1 or higher hypomagnesaemia after starting cetuximab therapy. The serum calcium and potassium levels were within the normal range at the onset of hypomagnesaemia. Oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity occurred in all patients at the beginning of cetuximab therapy, with grade 1 neurotoxicity in five patients and grade 2 in one patient. After cetuximab administration, the neurotoxicity worsened in all six patients, and three progressed to grade 3. Among the three patients with grade 3 neurotoxicity, two required a dose reduction and one had to discontinue cetuximab therapy. A discontinuation or dose reduction in cetuximab therapy was associated with exacerbated oxaliplatin-induced neurotoxicity due to cetuximab-induced hypomagnesaemia in half of patients who had previously received oxaliplatin. Therefore, when administering cetuximab after oxaliplatin therapy, we suggest serially evaluating serum magnesium levels and neurotoxicity. PMID:22811813

  16. Lithium protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells via Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jintao; Zhu, Dexiao; Zhang, Jing

    Methamphetamine (MA) is neurotoxic, especially in dopaminergic neurons. Long-lasting exposure to MA causes psychosis and increases the risk of Parkinson's disease. Lithium (Li) is a known mood stabilizer and has neuroprotective effects. Previous studies suggest that MA exposure decreases the phosphorylation of Akt/GSK3β pathway in vivo, whereas Li facilitates the phosphorylation of Akt/GSK3β pathway. Moreover, GSK3β and mTOR are implicated in the locomotor sensitization induced by psychostimulants and mTOR plays a critical role in MA induced toxicity. However, the effect of MA on Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway has not been fully investigated in vitro. Here, we found that MA exposure significantly dephosphorylated Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathwaymore » in PC12 cells. In addition, Li remarkably attenuated the dephosphorylation effect of MA exposure on Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway. Furthermore, Li showed obvious protective effects against MA toxicity and LY294002 (Akt inhibitor) suppressed the protective effects of Li. Together, MA exposure dephosphorylates Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway in vitro, while lithium protects against MA-induced neurotoxicity via phosphorylation of Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway. - Highlights: • Lithium protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in vitro. • Methamphetamine exposure dephosphorylates Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway. • Lithium attenuates methamphetamine-induced toxicity via phosphorylating Akt/GSK3β/mTOR pathway.« less

  17. Amphetamine-metabolites of deprenyl involved in protection against neurotoxicity induced by MPTP and 2'-methyl-MPTP.

    PubMed

    Sziráki, I; Kardos, V; Patthy, M; Pátfalusi, M; Gaál, J; Solti, M; Kollár, E; Singer, J

    1994-01-01

    The ability of 1-deprenyl to protect against the parkinsonian effects of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) has been attributed to the inhibition of conversion of MPTP to MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium) catalyzed by MAO-B. We report here that deprenyl-treatment in mice has an additional neuroprotective element associated with the rapid metabolization of 1-deprenyl to 1-methamphetamine and 1-amphetamine. 1-Methamphetamine and 1-amphetamine inhibit MPP(+)-uptake into striatal synaptosomes prepared from rats. Post-treatment by 1-deprenyl, 1-methamphetamine, 1-amphetamine (at times when MPTP is no longer present in the striatum of mice) protects against neurotoxicity in C57BL mice by blocking the uptake of MPP+ into dopaminergic neurons, and even against the neurotoxicity induced by 2'CH3-MPTP, which is partly bioactivated by MAO-A. These findings may have clinical implications since deprenyl has recently been found to delay the progression of Parkinson's disease.

  18. Ago2 and Dicer1 are involved in METH-induced locomotor sensitization in mice via biogenesis of miRNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhu, Li; Ni, Tong; Guan, Fang-Lin; Chen, Yan-Jiong; Ma, Dong-Liang; Goh, Eyleen L K; Chen, Teng

    2018-03-08

    microRNA (miRNA) play important roles in drug addiction and act as a post-transcriptional regulator of gene expression. We previously reported extensive downregulation of miRNAs in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of methamphetamine (METH)-sensitized mice. However, the regulatory mechanism of this METH-induced downregulation of miRNAs has yet to be elucidated. Thus, we examined METH-induced changes in the expression of miRNAs and their precursors, as well as the expression levels of mRNA and the proteins involved in miRNA biogenesis such as Dicer1 and Ago2, in the nucleus accumbens of METH-induced locomotor sensitized mice. miRNAs and Ago2 were significantly downregulated, while the expression of miRNA precursors remained unchanged or upregulated, which suggests that the downregulation of miRNAs was likely due to a reduction in Ago2-mediated splicing but unlikely to be regulated at the transcription level. Interestingly, the expression level of Dicer1, which is a potential target of METH-induced decreased miRNAs, such as miR-124, miR-212 and miR-29b, was significantly increased. In conclusion, this study indicates that miRNA biogenesis (such as Ago2 and Dicer1) and their miRNA products may have a role in the development of METH addiction. © 2018 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. 2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) Is Selectively Toxic to Primary Dopaminergic Neurons In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Amy M.; Agim, Zeynep S.; Mishra, Vartika R.; Tambe, Mitali A.; Director-Myska, Alison E.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; McCabe, George P.; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Cannon, Jason R.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease. Much data has linked the etiology of PD to a variety of environmental factors. The majority of cases are thought to arise from a combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental factors. Chronic exposures to dietary factors, including meat, have been identified as potential risk factors. Although heterocyclic amines that are produced during high-temperature meat cooking are known to be carcinogenic, their effect on the nervous system has yet to be studied in depth. In this study, we investigated neurotoxic effects of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP), a highly abundant heterocyclic amine in cooked meat, in vitro. We tested toxicity of PhIP and the two major phase I metabolites, N-OH-PhIP and 4′-OH-PhIP, using primary mesencephalic cultures from rat embryos. This culture system contains both dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neurons, which allows specificity of neurotoxicity to be readily examined. We find that exposure to PhIP or N-OH-PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons in primary cultures, resulting in a decreased percentage of dopaminergic neurons. Neurite length is decreased in surviving dopaminergic neurons. Exposure to 4′-OH-PhIP did not produce significant neurotoxicity. PhIP treatment also increased formation of oxidative damage markers, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) and 3-nitrotyrosine in dopaminergic neurons. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine was protective. Finally, treatment with blueberry extract, a dietary factor with known antioxidant and other protective mechanisms, prevented PhIP-induced toxicity. Collectively, our study suggests, for the first time, that PhIP is selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons likely through inducing oxidative stress. PMID:24718704

  20. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Methamphetamine-Induced Behavioral Changes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chiang-Wen; Lu, Zi-Yun; Lane, Hsien-Yuan; Tsai, Ming-Horng; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a major drug of abuse worldwide, and no efficient therapeutic strategies for treating METH addiction are currently available. Continuous METH use can cause behavioral upregulation or psychosis. The dopaminergic pathways, particularly the neural circuitry from the ventral tegmental area to the nucleus accumbens (NAc), have a critical role in this behavioral stage. Acupuncture has been used for treating diseases in China for more than 2000 years. According to a World Health Organization report, acupuncture can be used to treat several functional disorders, including substance abuse. In addition, acupuncture is effective against opioids addiction. In this study, we used electroacupuncture (EA) for treating METH-induced behavioral changes and investigated the possible therapeutic mechanism. Results showed that EA at the unilateral Zhubin (KI9)–Taichong (LR3) significantly reduced METH-induced behavioral sensitization and conditioned place preference. In addition, both dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels decreased but monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) levels increased in the NAc of the METH-treated mice receiving EA compared with those not receiving EA. EA may be a useful nonpharmacological approach for treating METH-induced behavioral changes, probably because it reduces the METH-induced TH expression and dopamine levels and raises MAO-A expression in the NAc. PMID:28400844

  1. Methamphetamine exposure triggers apoptosis and autophagy in neuronal cells by activating the C/EBPβ-related signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiang; Huang, Enping; Luo, Baoying; Cai, Dunpeng; Zhao, Xu; Luo, Qin; Jin, Yili; Chen, Ling; Wang, Qi; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2018-06-25

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abused psychoactive drug that primarily damages the nervous system, notably causing dopaminergic neuronal apoptosis. CCAAT-enhancer binding protein (C/EBPβ) is a transcription factor and an important regulator of cell apoptosis and autophagy. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP5) is a proapoptotic factor that mediates Meth-induced neuronal apoptosis, and Trib3 (tribbles pseudokinase 3) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-inducible gene involved in autophagic cell death through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. To test the hypothesis that C/EBPβ is involved in Meth-induced IGFBP5-mediated neuronal apoptosis and Trib3-mediated neuronal autophagy, we measured the protein expression of C/EBPβ after Meth exposure and evaluated the effects of silencing C/EBPβ, IGFBP5, or Trib3 on Meth-induced apoptosis and autophagy in neuronal cells and in the rat striatum after intrastriatal Meth injection. We found that, at relatively high doses, Meth exposure increased C/EBPβ protein expression, which was accompanied by increased neuronal apoptosis and autophagy; triggered the IGFBP5-mediated, p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA)-related mitochondrial apoptotic signaling pathway; and stimulated the Trib3-mediated ER stress signaling pathway through the Akt-mTOR signaling axis. We also found that autophagy is an early response to Meth-induced stress upstream of apoptosis and plays a detrimental role in Meth-induced neuronal cell death. These results suggest that Meth exposure induces C/EBPβ expression, which plays an essential role in the neuronal apoptosis and autophagy induced by relatively high doses of Meth; however, relatively low concentrations of Meth did not change the expression of C/EBPβ in vitro. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of C/EBPβ in low-dose Meth-induced neurotoxicity.-Xu, X., Huang, E., Luo, B., Cai, D., Zhao, X., Luo, Q., Jin, Y., Chen, L., Wang, Q

  2. Vanadium Exposure Induces Olfactory Dysfunction in an Animal Model of Metal Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicates chronic environmental exposure to transition metals may play a role in chronic neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). Chronic inhalation exposure to welding fumes containing metal mixtures may be associated with development of PD. A significant amount of vanadium is present in welding fumes, as vanadium pentoxide (V2O5), and incorporation of vanadium in the production of high strength steel has become more common. Despite the increased vanadium use in recent years, the neurotoxicological effects of this metal are not well characterized. Recently, we demonstrated that V2O5 induces dopaminergic neurotoxicity via protein kinase C delta (PKCδ)-dependent oxidative signaling mechanisms in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Since anosmia (inability to perceive odors) and non-motor deficits are considered to be early symptoms of neurological diseases, in the present study, we examined the effect of V2O5 on the olfactory bulb in animal models. To mimic the inhalation exposure, we intranasally administered C57 black mice a low-dose of 182 µg of V2O5 three times a week for one month, and behavioral, neurochemical and biochemical studies were performed. Our results revealed a significant decrease in olfactory bulb weights, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels, levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolite, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and increases in astroglia of the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb in the treatment groups relative to vehicle controls. Neurochemical changes were accompanied by impaired olfaction and locomotion. These findings suggest that nasal exposure to V2O5 adversely affects olfactory bulbs, resulting in neurobehavioral and neurochemical impairments. These results expand our understanding of vanadium neurotoxicity in environmentally-linked neurological conditions. PMID:24362016

  3. Dopaminergic neurotoxicity of S-ethyl N,N-dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC), molinate, and S-methyl-N,N-diethylthiocarbamate (MeDETC) in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.; Valentine, William M.; Aschner, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies corroborate a correlation between pesticide use and Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thiocarbamate and dithiocarbamate pesticides are widely used and produce neurotoxicity in the peripheral nervous system. Recent evidence from rodent studies suggests that these compounds also cause dopaminergic (DAergic) dysfunction and altered protein processing, two hallmarks of PD. However, DAergic neurotoxicity has yet to be documented. We assessed DAergic dysfunction in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) to investigate the ability of thiocarbamate pesticides to induce DAergic neurodegeneration. Acute treatment with either S-ethyl N,N-dipropylthiocarbamate (EPTC), molinate, or a common reactive intermediate of dithiocarbamate and thiocarbamate metabolism, S-methyl-N,N-diethylthiocarbamate (MeDETC), to gradual loss of DAergic cell morphology and structure over the course of 6 days in worms expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under a DAergic cell specific promoter. HPLC analysis revealed decreased DA content in the worms immediately following exposure to MeDETC, EPTC, and molinate. Additionally, worms treated with the three test compounds showed a drastic loss of DAergic-dependent behavior over a time course similar to changes in DAergic cell morphology. Alterations in the DAergic system were specific, as loss of cell structure and neurotransmitter content was not observed in cholinergic, glutamatergic, or GABAergic systems. Overall, our data suggest that thiocarbamate pesticides promote neurodegeneration and DAergic cell dysfunction in C. elegans, and may be an environmental risk factor for PD. PMID:23786526

  4. Differential effects of environment-induced changes in body temperature on modafinil’s actions against methamphetamine-induced striatal toxicity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Raineri, Mariana; González, Betina; Echeto, Celeste Rivero; Muñiz, Javier A.; Gutierrez, María Laura; Ghanem, Carolina I.; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J.; Veronica, Bisagno

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure can produce hyperthermia that might lead to toxicity and death. Modafinil is a wake-promoting compound that is also been prescribed off-label to treat METH dependence. Modafinil has shown neuroprotective properties against METH harmful effects in animal models. The goal of the present study was to test if the prevention of hyperthermia might play a role on the neuroprotective actions of modafinil against METH toxicity using various ambient temperatures. METH was administered to female C57BL/6 mice in a binge regimen: 4 × 5 mg/kg , 2h apart; modafinil (90mg/kg) was injected twice, 1h before first and fourth METH injections. Drugs were given at cold ambient temperature (14 °C) or hot ambient temperature (29 °C). Body temperature was measured during treatments. Brains were dissected out six days after treatments and processed for TH, DAT, GFAP and c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Exposure to hot ambient temperature exacerbated METH toxicity evidenced by sriatal reductions in TH and DAT and increased GFAP immmunoreactivity. Modafinil counteracted reductions in TH and DAT, but failed to block astroglial activation. At both ambient temperatures tested modafinil did induce increments in GFAP, but the magnitude was significantly lower than the one induced by METH. Both drugs induced increases in c-Fos positive nuclei; modafinil did not block this effect. Our results suggest that protective effects of modafinil against METH-induced neurotoxicity may be dependent, in part, to its hypothermic effects. Nevertheless, modafinil maintained some protective properties on METH-induced alterations in the striatum at different ambient temperatures. PMID:25261212

  5. Buyang Huanwu Decoction Vigorously Rescues PC12 Cells Against 6-OHDA-Induced Neurotoxicity via Akt/GSK3β Pathway Based on Serum Pharmacology Methodology.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeyan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Qian; Sun, Jinhao

    2016-12-01

    Buyang Huanwu decoction (BYHWD), as a popular traditional Chinese medicine formula, was widely used for treating ischemic diseases. However, in the area of neurodegenerative diseases, the researches focused on BYHWD are rare but promising, and molecular mechanisms underlying are largely elusive. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), a dopaminergic-specific neurotoxin, is extensively used to establish neurotoxic model in vivo and in vitro. In our present study, we prepared drug-containing serum of BYHWD (Buyang Huanwu drug-containing serum [BYHWS]) based on serum pharmacology methodology. Neurotoxic model in vitro was established in PC12 cells, and innovative experimental grouping method was adopted to investigate neuroprotective effects of BYHWS on neurotoxicity induced by 6-OHDA exposure. Remarkably, BYHWS vigorously rescued PC12 cells from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity even to surpass 100% in cell viability. Moreover, Hoechst/propidium iodide (PI) staining revealed that cell apoptotic rate was reduced significantly after incubation of BYHWS. Besides, BYHWS effectively restored the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and attenuated the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species level caused by 6-OHDA insult. Furthermore, BYHWS remarkably reversed the dephosphorylation of Akt (protein kinase B) and glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) evoked by 6-OHDA. The above protective effects were attenuated by coculturing with Akt inhibitor LY294002. In summary, we concluded that the BYHWS vigorously blocked 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity via Akt/GSK3β pathway and provided a novel insight into roles of BYHWD in the clinical practices on neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Aminochrome as a preclinical experimental model to study degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paris, Irmgard; Cardenas, Sergio; Lozano, Jorge; Perez-Pastene, Carolina; Graumann, Rebecca; Riveros, Alejandra; Caviedes, Pablo; Segura-Aguilar, Juan

    2007-09-01

    Four decades after L-dopa introduction to PD therapy, the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains unknown despite the intensive research and the discovery of a number of gene mutations and deletions in the pathogenesis of familial PD. Different model neurotoxins have been used as preclinical experimental models to study the neurodegenerative process in PD, such as 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), and rotenone. The lack of success in identifying the molecular mechanism for the degenerative process in PD opens the question whether the current preclinical experimental models are suitable to understand the degeneration of neuromelanin-containing dopaminergic neurons in PD. We propose aminochrome as a model neurotoxin to study the neurodegenerative processes occurring in neuromelanin-containing dopaminergic neurons in PD. Aminochrome is an endogenous compound formed during dopamine oxidation and it is the precursor of neuromelanin, a substance whose formation is a normal process in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. However, aminochrome itself can induce neurotoxicity under certain aberrant conditions such as (i) one-electron reduction of aminochrome catalyzed by flavoenzymes to leukoaminochrome o-semiquinone radical, which is a highly reactive neurotoxin; or (ii) the formation of aminochrome adducts with alpha-synuclein, enhancing and stabilizing the formation of neurotoxic protofibrils. These two neurotoxic pathways of aminochrome are prevented by DT-diaphorase, an enzyme that effectively reduces aminochrome with two-electrons preventing both aminochrome one-electron reduction or formation alpha synuclein protofibrils. We propose to use aminochrome as a preclinical experimental model to study the neurodegenerative process of neuromelanin containing dopaminergic neurons in PD.

  7. Manganese-induced Neurotoxicity: From C. elegans to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Peres, Tanara V.; Bowman, Aaron B.; Aschner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is one of the most abundant metals on the earth. It is required for normal cellular activities, but overexposure leads to toxicity. Neurons are more susceptible to Mn-induced toxicity than other cells, and accumulation of Mn in the brain results in Manganism that presents with Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms. In the last decade, a number of Mn transporters have been identified, which improves our understanding of Mn transport in and out of cells. However, the mechanism of Mn-induced neurotoxicity is only partially uncovered, with further research needed to explore the whole picture of Mn-induced toxicity. In this review, we will address recent progress in Mn-induced neurotoxicity from C. elegans to humans, and explore future directions that will help understand the mechanisms of its neurotoxicity. PMID:25893090

  8. Bis(6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)-meth-yl]-imino-meth-yl}phenolato)-copper(II) dihydrate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiutang; Wei, Peihai; Dou, Jianmin; Li, Bin; Hu, Bo

    2009-01-08

    In the title compound, [Cu(C(12)H(16)NO(5))(2)]·2H(2)O, the Cu(II) ion adopts a trans-CuN(2)O(4) octa-hedral geometry arising from two N,O,O'-tridentate 6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hydroxy-meth-yl)meth-yl]-imino-meth-yl}phenolate ligands. The Jahn-Teller distortion of the copper centre is unusally small. In the crystal structure, O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, some of which are bifurcated, link the component species.

  9. Differential effects of environment-induced changes in body temperature on modafinil's actions against methamphetamine-induced striatal toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Raineri, Mariana; González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, Celeste; Muñiz, Javier A; Gutiérrez, María Laura; Ghanem, Carolina I; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure can produce hyperthermia that might lead to toxicity and death. Modafinil is a wake-promoting compound that is also been prescribed off-label to treat METH dependence. Modafinil has shown neuroprotective properties against METH harmful effects in animal models. The goal of the present study was to test if the prevention of hyperthermia might play a role on the neuroprotective actions of modafinil against METH toxicity using various ambient temperatures. METH was administered to female C57BL/6 mice in a binge regimen: 4 × 5 mg/kg, 2 h apart; modafinil (90 mg/kg) was injected twice, 1 h before first and fourth METH injections. Drugs were given at cold ambient temperature (14 °C) or hot ambient temperature (29 °C). Body temperature was measured during treatments. Brains were dissected out 6 days after treatments and processed for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine transporter (DAT), GFAP and c-Fos immunohistochemistry. Exposure to hot ambient temperature exacerbated METH toxicity evidenced by striatal reductions in TH and DAT and increased GFAP immmunoreactivity. Modafinil counteracted reductions in TH and DAT, but failed to block astroglial activation. At both ambient temperatures tested modafinil did induce increments in GFAP, but the magnitude was significantly lower than the one induced by METH. Both drugs induced increases in c-Fos positive nuclei; modafinil did not block this effect. Our results suggest that protective effects of modafinil against METH-induced neurotoxicity may be dependent, in part, to its hypothermic effects. Nevertheless, modafinil maintained some protective properties on METH-induced alterations in the striatum at different ambient temperatures.

  10. Resveratrol Protects Dopamine Neurons Against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Neurotoxicity through Its Anti-Inflammatory Actions

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Shi, Jing-Shan; Zhou, Hui; Wilson, Belinda; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2010-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease characterized by a progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. Accumulating evidence indicates that inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation may become a reliable protective strategy for PD. Resveratrol, a nonflavonoid polyphenol naturally found in red wine and grapes, has been known to possess antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. Although recent studies have shown that resveratrol provided neuroprotective effects against ischemia, seizure, and neurodegenerative disorders, the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects on dopaminergic neurodegeneration are poorly defined. In this study, rat primary midbrain neuron-glia cultures were used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying resveratrol-mediated neuroprotection. The results clearly demonstrated that resveratrol protected DA neurons against lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced neurotoxicity in concentration- and time-dependent manners through the inhibition of microglial activation and the subsequent reduction of proinflammatory factor release. Mechanistically, resveratrol-mediated neuroprotection was attributed to the inhibition of NADPH oxidase. This conclusion is supported by the following observations. First, resveratrol reduced NADPH oxidase-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species. Second, LPS-induced translocation of NADPH oxidase cytosolic subunit p47 to the cell membrane was significantly attenuated by resveratrol. Third and most importantly, resveratrol failed to exhibit neuroprotection in cultures from NADPH oxidase-deficient mice. Furthermore, this neuroprotection was also related to an attenuation of the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways in microglia. These findings suggest that resveratrol exerts neuroprotection against LPS-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration, and NADPH oxidase may be a major player

  11. Methamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine interact with central nicotinic receptors and induce their up-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Rates, Sara; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena

    2007-09-15

    Previous work from our group indicated that {alpha}7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors ({alpha}7 nAChR) potentially play a role in methamphetamine (METH) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) neurotoxicity. The aims of the present study were two-fold: (1) to demonstrate the interaction of METH and MDMA with homomeric {alpha}7 nAChR ([{sup 3}H]methyllycaconitine binding) and other heteromeric subtypes ([{sup 3}H]epibatidine binding); and (2) to show the effects of amphetamine derivative pretreatment on the density of binding sites. METH and MDMA displaced [{sup 3}H]methyllycaconitine and [{sup 3}H]epibatidine binding in membranes from NGF-differentiated PC 12 cells and mouse brain, with K{sub i} values in the micromolar range, MDMAmore » revealing a greater affinity than METH. In addition, METH and MDMA induced a time- and concentration-dependent increase in [{sup 3}H]methyllycaconitine and [{sup 3}H]epibatidine binding; which had already been apparent after 6 h of pretreatment, and which peaked in differentiated PC 12 cells after 48 h. The highest increases were found in [{sup 3}H]epibatidine binding, with MDMA inducing higher increases than METH. Treatment with METH and MDMA increased B{sub max} of high-affinity sites for both radioligands without affecting K{sub d}. The heightened binding was inhibited by pretreatment with cycloheximide, suggesting the participation of newly synthesised proteins while inhibition of protein trafficking to plasma membrane did not block up-regulation. The effects of protein kinase and cyclophilin inhibitors on such up-regulation were explored, revealing a rapid, differential and complex regulation, similar to that described for nicotinic ligands. All of these results demonstrate that METH and MDMA have affinity for, and can interact with, nAChR, inducing their up-regulation, specially when higher doses are used. Such effects may have a role in METH- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, cholinergic neurotransmission, and in

  12. Methamphetamine-induced striatal apoptosis in the mouse brain: Comparison of a binge to an acute bolus drug administration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Judy P.Q.; Xu, Wenjing; Angulo, Nieves; Angulo, Jesus A.

    2010-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant that induces neural damage in experimental animals and humans. A binge (usually in the 5–10 mg/kg dose range 4× at 2 h intervals) and the acute bolus drug administration (20–40 mg/kg) of METH have been employed frequently to study neurotoxicity in the brain. In this study we have compared these drug delivery schedules to determine their efficacy to induce striatal apoptosis. Exposure of male mice to a binge of METH at 10 mg/kg 4× at 2 h intervals (cumulative dose of 40 mg/kg) was approximately four times less effective in inducing apoptotic cell death (TUNEL staining) 24 h after METH treatment in the striatum than a single bolus administration of 30 mg/kg of METH. The residual TUNEL staining observed three days after METH treatment is proportionately equivalent between a binge and the acute bolus drug administration. Interestingly, a binge of METH induces a hyperthermic response of longer duration. This study demonstrates that an acute bolus drug administration of METH is more effective inducing striatal apoptosis in mice, and therefore, is more suitable for studies assessing the impact of METH on sites post-synaptic to the striatonigral dopamine terminals. PMID:16165214

  13. The role of the neuropeptide somatostatin on methamphetamine and glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in the striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Afanador, Lauriaselle; Mexhitaj, Ina; Diaz, Carolyn; Ordonez, Dalila; Baker, Lisa; Angulo, Jesus A

    2013-05-13

    A large body of evidence shows that methamphetamine (METH) causes sustained damage to the brain in animal models and human METH users. In chronic users there are indications of cognitive and motor deficits. Striatal neuropeptides are in a position to modulate the neurochemical effects of METH and consequently striatal neural damage. Somatostatin (SST) is an intrinsic striatal neuropeptide that has been shown to inhibit glutamate transmission; glutamate is integral to METH toxicity and contributes to nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesize that SST will protect from METH by inhibition of NO synthesis and thus reducing oxidative stress. To this end, the SST analogue octreotide (OCT) was microinjected into the striatum prior to a systemic injection of METH (30mg/kg). We then assessed 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), an indirect index of NO production, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels (dopamine terminal marker) and Fluoro-Jade C positive cells (degenerating cells). The SST agonist OCT dose dependently attenuated the METH-induced accumulation of striatal 3-NT. Moreover, pretreatment with OCT effectively mitigated cell death but failed to protect dopamine terminals. Next we co-infused OCT and NMDA and measured 3-NT and Fluoro-Jade C staining. Treatment with OCT had no effect on these parameters. The data demonstrate that SST attenuates the METH-induced production of NO protecting the striatum from the METH-induced cell loss. However, SST failed to prevent the toxicity of the dopamine terminals suggesting that pre- and post-synaptic striatal damage occur via independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of the Neuropeptide Somatostatin on Methamphetamine and Glutamate-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Striatum of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Afanador, Lauriaselle; Mexhitaj, Ina; Diaz, Carolyn; Ordonez, Dalila; Baker, Lisa; Angulo, Jesus A.

    2014-01-01

    A large body of evidence shows that methamphetamine (METH) causes sustained damage to the brain in animal models and human METH users. In chronic users there are indications of cognitive and motor deficits. Striatal neuropeptides are in a position to modulate the neurochemical effects of METH and consequently striatal neural damage. Somatostatin (SST) is an intrinsic striatal neuropeptide that has been shown to inhibit glutamate transmission; glutamate is integral to METH toxicity and contributes to nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. We hypothesize that SST will protect from METH by inhibition of NO synthesis and thus reducing oxidative stress. To this end, the SST analogue octreotide (OCT) was microinjected into the striatum prior to a systemic injection of METH (30 mg/kg). We then assessed 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT), an indirect index of NO production, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels (dopamine terminal marker) and Fluoro-Jade C positive cells (degenerating cells). The SST agonist OCT dose dependently attenuated the METH-induced accumulation of striatal 3-NT. Moreover, pretreatment with OCT effectively mitigated cell death but failed to protect dopamine terminals. Next we co-infused OCT and NMDA and measured 3-NT and Fluoro-Jade C staining. Treatment with OCT had no effect on these parameters. The data demonstrate that SST attenuates the METH-induced production of NO protecting the striatum from the METH-induced cell loss. However, SST failed to prevent the toxicity of the dopamine terminals suggesting that pre- and post-synaptic striatal damage occur via independent mechanisms. PMID:23524190

  15. Attenuation of MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity by TV3326, a cholinesterase-monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Yotam; Weinstock, Marta; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2003-07-01

    (R)-[(N-propargyl-(3R) aminoindan-5-yl) ethyl methyl carbamate] (TV3326) is a novel cholinesterase and brain-selective monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A/-B inhibitor. It was developed for the treatment of dementia co-morbid with extra pyramidal disorders (parkinsonism), and depression. On chronic treatment in mice it attenuated striatal dopamine depletion induced by MPTP and prevented the reduction in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase activity, like selective B and non-selective MAO inhibitors. TV3326 preferentially inhibits MAO-B in the striatum and hippocampus, and the degree of MAO-B inhibition correlates with the prevention of MPTP-induced dopamine depletion. Complete inhibition of MAO-B is not necessary for full protection from MPTP neurotoxicity. Unlike that seen after treatment with other MAO-A and -B inhibitors, recovery of striatal and hippocampal MAO-A and -B activities from inhibition by TV3326 did not show first-order kinetics. This has been attributed to the generation of a number of metabolites by TV3326 that cause differential inhibition of these enzymes. Inhibition of brain MAO-A and -B by TV3326 resulted in significant elevations of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin in the striatum and hippocampus. This may explain its antidepressant-like activity, resembling that of moclobemide in the forced-swim test in rats.

  16. HIV-1 gp120 neurotoxicity proximally and at a distance from the point of exposure: protection by rSV40 delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Agrawal, Lokesh; Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J; Strayer, David S

    2009-06-01

    Toxicity of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120) for substantia nigra (SN) neurons may contribute to the Parkinsonian manifestations often seen in HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD). We studied the neurotoxicity of gp120 for dopaminergic neurons and potential neuroprotection by antioxidant gene delivery. Rats were injected stereotaxically into their caudate-putamen (CP); CP and (substantia nigra) SN neuron loss was quantified. The area of neuron loss extended several millimeters from the injection site, approximately 35% of the CP area. SN neurons, outside of this area of direct neurotoxicity, were also severely affected. Dopaminergic SN neurons (expressing tyrosine hydroxylase, TH, in the SN and dopamine transporter, DAT, in the CP) were mostly affected: intra-CP gp120 caused approximately 50% DAT+ SN neuron loss. Prior intra-CP gene delivery of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) or glutathione peroxidase (GPx1) protected SN neurons from intra-CP gp120. Thus, SN dopaminergic neurons are highly sensitive to HIV-1 gp120-induced neurotoxicity, and antioxidant gene delivery, even at a distance, is protective.

  17. Prospective associations between meth/amphetamine (speed) and MDMA (ecstasy) use and depressive symptoms in secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Brière, Frédéric N; Fallu, Jean-Sébastien; Janosz, Michel; Pagani, Linda S

    2012-11-01

    Research has raised significant concern regarding the affective consequences of synthetic drug use. However, little evidence from well-controlled longitudinal studies exists on these consequences. The aim of this study was to determine whether use of meth/amphetamine (speed) and ±3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) is independently predictive of subsequent depressive symptoms in adolescents. A sample of 3880 adolescents from secondary schools in disadvantaged areas of Quebec, Canada, were followed over time (2003-2008). Logistic regression was used to test the association between meth/amphetamine and MDMA use in grade 10 (ages 15-16 years) and elevated depressive symptoms on an abridged Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale in grade 11, controlling for pre-existing individual and contextual characteristics. After adjustment, both MDMA use (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6) and meth/amphetamine use (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.3) in grade 10 significantly increased the odds of elevated depressive symptoms in grade 11. These relationships did not vary by gender or pre-existing depressive symptoms. Increased risk was particularly observed in concurrent usage (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.9). Adolescent use of meth/amphetamine and MDMA (particularly concurrent use) is independently associated with subsequent depressive symptoms. Further enquiry must determine whether these associations reflect drug-induced neurotoxicity and whether adolescence is a period of increased vulnerability to the hazards of synthetic drug exposure.

  18. FLZ Attenuates α-Synuclein-Induced Neurotoxicity by Activating Heat Shock Protein 70.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease. The pathology of PD is caused by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and is characterized by the presence of intracellular inclusions known as Lewy bodies, composed mainly of α-synuclein. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are crucial in protein quality control in cells. HSP70 in particular prevents the aggregation of protein aggregation, such as α-synuclein, providing a degree of protection against PD. The compound FLZ has been shown to protect several PD models in previous studies and was reported as an HSP inducer to protect against MPP + -induced neurotoxicity, but the mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of FLZ-mediated HSP70 induction in α-synuclein transgenic mice and cells. FLZ treatment alleviated motor dysfunction and improved dopaminergic neuronal function in α-synuclein transgenic mice. HSP70 protein expression and transcriptional activity were increased by FLZ treatment, eliciting a reduction of α-synuclein aggregation and associated toxicity. The inhibition of HSP70 by quercetin or HSP70 siRNA markedly attenuated the neuroprotective effects of FLZ, confirming that FLZ exerted a neuroprotective effect through HSP70. We revealed that FLZ directly bound to and increased the expression of Hip, a cochaperone of HSP70, which in turn enhanced HSP70 activity. In conclusion, we defined a critical role for HSP70 and its cochaperones activated by FLZ in preventing neurodegeneration and proposed that targeting the HSP70 system may represent a potential therapy for α-synuclein-related diseases, such as PD.

  19. Long-term protective effects of methamphetamine preconditioning against single-day methamphetamine toxic challenges.

    PubMed

    Hodges, A B; Ladenheim, B; McCoy, M T; Beauvais, G; Cai, N; Krasnova, I N; Cadet, J L

    2011-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neurotoxic effects which include decreased levels of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the brain. We have shown that escalating METH dosing can protect against METH induced neurotoxicity in rats sacrificed within 24 hours after a toxic METH challenge. The purpose of the current study was to investigate if the protective effects of METH persisted for a long period of time. We also tested if a second challenge with a toxic dose of METH would cause further damage to monoaminergic terminals. Saline-pretreated rats showed significant METH-induced decreases in striatal DA and 5-HT levels in rats sacrificed 2 weeks after the challenge. Rats that received two METH challenges showed no further decreases in striatal DA or 5-HT levels in comparison to the single METH challenge. In contrast, METH-pretreated rats showed significant protection against METH-induced striatal DA and 5-HT depletion. In addition, the METH challenge causes substantial decreases in cortical 5-HT levels which were not further potentiated by a second drug challenge. METH preconditioning provided almost complete protection against METH -induced 5-HT depletion. These results are consistent with the idea that METH pretreatment renders the brain refractory to METH-induced degeneration of brain monoaminergic systems.

  20. Elucidating the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S; Bhattacharya, Dwipayan; Ahuja, Manuj; Suppiramaniam, Vishnu; Deruiter, Jack; Clark, Randall; Dhanasekaran, Muralikrishnan

    2014-04-17

    There is a rapid increase in the use of methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and its structural congeners/analogs globally. MDMA and MDMA-analogs have been synthesized illegally in furtive dwellings and are abused due to its addictive potential. Furthermore, MDMA and MDMA-analogs have shown to have induced several adverse effects. Hence, understanding the mechanisms mediating this neurotoxic insult of MDMA-analogs is of immense importance for the public health in the world. We synthesized and investigated the neurotoxic effects of MDMA and its analogs [4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA), 2, 6-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDMA), and N-ethyl-3, 4-methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDEA)]. The stimulatory or the dopaminergic agonist effects of MDMA and MDMA-analogs were elucidated using the established 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned animal model. Additionally, we also investigated the neurotoxic mechanisms of MDMA and MDMA-analogs on mitochondrial complex-I activity and reactive oxygen species generation. MDMA and MDMA-analogs exhibited stimulatory activity as compared to amphetamines and also induced several behavioral changes in the rodents. MDMA and MDMA-analogs enhanced the reactive oxygen generation and inhibited mitochondrial complex-I activity which can lead to neurodegeneration. Hence the mechanism of neurotoxicity, MDMA and MDMA-analogs can enhance the release of monoamines, alter the monoaminergic neurotransmission, and augment oxidative stress and mitochondrial abnormalities leading to neurotoxicity. Thus, our study will help in developing effective pharmacological and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of MDMA and MDMA-analog abuse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED DOPAMINE TERMINAL DEFICITS IN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS ARE EXACERBATED BY REWARD-ASSOCIATED CUES AND ATTENUATED BY CB1 RECEPTOR ANTAGONISM

    PubMed Central

    Loewinger, Gabriel C.; Beckert, Michael V.; Tejeda, Hugo A.; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure is primarily associated with deleterious effects to dopaminergic neurons. While several studies have implicated the endocannabinoid system in METH’s locomotor, rewarding and neurochemical effects, a role for this signaling system in METH’s effects on dopamine terminal dynamics has not been elucidated. Given that CB1 receptor blockade reduces the acute potentiation of phasic extracellular dopamine release from other psychomotor stimulant drugs and that the degree of acute METH-induced increases in extracellular dopamine levels is related to the severity of dopamine depletion, we predicted that pretreatment with the CB1 receptor antagonist rimonabant would reduce METH-induced alterations at dopamine terminals. Furthermore, we hypothesized that administration of METH in environments where reward associated-cues were present would potentiate METH’s acute effects on dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and exacerbate changes in dopamine terminal activity. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to measure electrically-evoked dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens and revealed markers of compromised dopamine terminal integrity nine days after a single dose of METH. These were exacerbated in animals that received METH in the presence of reward-associated cues, and attenuated in rimonabant-pretreated animals. While these deficits in dopamine dynamics were associated with reduced operant responding on days following METH administration in animals treated with only METH, rimonabant-pretreated animals exhibited levels of operant responding comparable to control. Moreover, dopamine release correlated significantly with changes in lever pressing behavior that occurred on days following METH administration. Together these data suggest that the endocannabinoid system is involved in the subsecond dopaminergic response to METH. PMID:22306525

  2. Methamphetamine-Induced Locomotor Changes are Dependent on Age, Dose and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Good, Renee L.; Radcliffe, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Adolescence is a critical age for addiction formation as a large percentage of pathological drug-seeking behaviors manifest during this time. The extent to which neurotoxic effects of drugs of abuse influence subsequent drug seeking behaviors and impulsivity is an understudied area of research. Methamphetamine (METH) is a widely abused drug that produces locomotor responses ranging from behavioral sensitization to tolerance, both of which are behaviors that may relate to risk of abuse. Here we investigated the effects of age, genotype, METH dose, including a neurotoxic dose, and METH metabolism on open-field activity (OFA) to gain insight into the complex disease of drug abuse. C57Bl/6 (B6), DBA/2 (D2), and 129S6SvEv/Tac (129) mouse strains were administered saline or either a high dose (4 × 5 mg/kg in 2h intervals for 2 days) or low dose (2 × 1 mg/kg in 24h intervals) METH pretreatment during adolescence (post natal day (PND) 40) or early adulthood (PND 80) followed by behavioral testing with a METH (1 mg/kg) or saline challenge 40 days later. Striatal concentrations of METH and AMPH were also determined. Significant findings include: 1) METH pretreated adolescent B6 mice displayed significant sensitization for horizontal locomotion due to high dose METH pretreatment; 2) METH pretreated B6 adults showed significant tolerance for the vertical activity measure caused by low dose METH pretreatment; 3) METH pretreated adult D2 mice exhibited significant sensitization for vertical activity induced by low dose METH pretreatment, and 4) 129 mice metabolized METH significantly faster than the B6 and D2 mice, but METH pretreatment did not alter metabolism. No significant behavioral responses to either METH pretreatment dose were observed for the D2 adolescent studies or either 129 age group. Our results highlight the importance of the interactions of age, strain and METH dose on locomotor behavioral outcomes. PMID:21163294

  3. Cumulative Genetic Risk Predicts Platinum/Taxane-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McWhinney-Glass, Sarah; Winham, Stacey J.; Hertz, Daniel L.; Revollo, Jane Yen; Paul, Jim; He, Yijing; Brown, Robert; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; McLeod, Howard L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The combination of a platinum and taxane are standard of care for many cancers, but the utility is often limited due to debilitating neurotoxicity. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from annotated candidate genes will identify genetic risk for chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity. Patients and Methods A candidate-gene association study was conducted to validate the relevance of 1261 SNPs within 60 candidate genes in 404 ovarian cancer patients receiving platinum/taxane chemotherapy on the SCOTROC1 trial. Statistically significant variants were then assessed for replication in a separate 404 patient replication cohort from SCOTROC1. Results Significant associations with chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity were identified and replicated for four SNPs in SOX10, BCL2, OPRM1, and TRPV1. The Population Attributable Risk for each of the four SNPs ranged from 5–35%, with a cumulative risk of 62%. According to the multiplicative model, the odds of developing neurotoxicity increase by a factor of 1.64 for every risk genotype. Patients possessing 3 risk variants have an estimated odds ratio of 4.49 (2.36–8.54) compared to individuals with 0 risk variants. Neither the four SNPs nor the risk score were associated with progression free survival or overall survival. Conclusions This study demonstrates that SNPs in four genes have a significant cumulative association with increased risk for the development of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity, independent of patient survival. PMID:23963862

  4. Gallic Acid Protects 6-OHDA Induced Neurotoxicity by Attenuating Oxidative Stress in Human Dopaminergic Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Y; Phani Kumar, G; Ramya, E M; Anilakumar, K R

    2018-06-01

    Gallic acid is one of the most important polyphenolic compounds, which is considered an excellent free radical scavenger. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is a neurotoxin, which has been implicated in mainly Parkinson's disease (PD). In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism of the neuroprotective effects of gallic acid on 6-OHDA induced apoptosis in human dopaminergic cells, SH-SY5Y. Our results showed that 6-OHDA induced cytotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells was suppressed by pre-treatment with gallic acid. The percentage of live cells (90%) was high in the pre-treatment of gallic acid when compared with 6-OHDA alone treated cell line. Moreover, gallic acid was very effective in attenuating the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevated levels of intracellular ROS and apoptotic cell death induced by 6-OHDA. Gallic acid also lowered the ratio of the pro-apoptotic Bax protein and the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein in SH-SY5Y cells. 6-OHDA exposure was up-regulated caspase-3 and Keap-1 and, down-regulated Nrf2, BDNF and p-CREB, which were sufficiently reverted by gallic acid pre-treatment. These findings indicate that gallic acid is able to protect the neuronal cells against 6-OHDA induced injury and proved that gallic acid might potentially serve as an agent for prevention of several human neurodegenerative diseases caused by oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  5. Vitexin protects dopaminergic neurons in MPTP-induced Parkinson’s disease through PI3K/Akt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming; Li, Fangming; Wang, Weidong

    2018-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease which is characterized by the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Methods In this study, the neuroprotective effect of vitexin (Vit), a flavonoid compound isolated from Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge was examined in PD models both in vitro and in vivo. Results On SH-SY5Y cells, methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) treatment suppressed cell viability, induced apoptosis, and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase-3 activity. However, Vit improved these parameters induced by MPP+ treatment significantly. Further study disclosed that Vit enhanced the phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt which was downregulated by MPP+ in SH-SY5Y cells, the effect of which could be blocked by PI3K inhibitor LY294002 and activated by PI3K activator IGF-1. Moreover, results from the pole test and traction test suggested that Vit pretreatment prevented bradykinesia and alleviated the initial lesions caused by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in MPTP-treated mouse PD model. Vit also enhanced the activation of PI3K and Akt and suppressed the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3 activity in MPTP-treated mice. Conclusion Taken together, this study demonstrated that Vit protected dopaminergic neurons against MPP+/MPTP-induced neurotoxicity through the activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Our findings may facilitate the clinical application of Vit in the therapy of PD. PMID:29588573

  6. Effect of quercetin and desferrioxamine on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) induced neurotoxicity in striatum of rats.

    PubMed

    Haleagrahara, Nagaraja; Siew, Cheng Jun; Ponnusamy, Kumar

    2013-02-01

    The catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine is used to lesion dopaminergic pathways in the experimental animal models of Parkinson's disease. The present study was aimed to evaluate the combined treatment with bioflavonoid quercetin (QN) and desferrioxamine (DFO) on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) - induced neurotoxicity in the striatum of rats. Adult, male Sprague - Dawley rats were divided into control, sham lesion, 6-OHDA treated (300 µg, intracisternal), 6-OHDA with QN (50 mg/kg) treated, 6-OHDA with DFO (50 mg/kg) treated and 6-OHDA with QN and DFO treated groups. Striatal dopamine, protein carbonyl content (PCC), glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were estimated. There was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in PCC and decrease in dopamine, GSH and SOD level and striatal neuronal number with 6-OHDA treatment. QN and DFO treatment significantly (p < 0.05) reduced these changes showing a significant neuronal protection. Combined treatment has a more significant effect (p < 0.05) in protecting the neurons and increasing the antioxidant enzymes in the striatum. In conclusion, an antioxidant with iron chelator treatment showed a significant neuroprotective effect against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) by preventing dopaminergic neuronal loss and maintaining the striatal dopamine level.

  7. Intravenous Prenatal Nicotine Exposure Alters METH-Induced Hyperactivity, Conditioned Hyperactivity, and BDNF in Adult Rat Offspring.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Ryan T; Brown, Russell W; Morgan, Amanda J; Mactutus, Charles F; Harrod, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    In the USA, approximately 15% of women smoke tobacco cigarettes during pregnancy. In utero tobacco smoke exposure produces somatic growth deficits like intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight in offspring, but it can also negatively influence neurodevelopmental outcomes in later stages of life, such as an increased incidence of obesity and drug abuse. Animal models demonstrate that prenatal nicotine (PN) alters the development of the mesocorticolimbic system, which is important for organizing goal-directed behavior. In the present study, we determined whether intravenous (IV) PN altered the initiation and/or expression of methamphetamine (METH)-induced locomotor sensitization as a measure of mesocorticolimbic function in adult rat offspring. We also determined whether PN and/or METH exposure altered protein levels of BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) in the nucleus accumbens, the dorsal striatum, and the prefrontal cortex of adult offspring. BDNF was of interest because of its role in the development and maintenance of the mesocorticolimbic pathway and its ability to modulate neural processes that contribute to drug abuse, such as sensitization of the dopamine system. Dams were injected with IV nicotine (0.05 mg/kg/injection) or saline, 3×/day on gestational days 8-21. Testing was conducted when offspring reached adulthood (around postnatal day 90). Following 3 once daily habituation sessions the animals received a saline injection and baseline locomotor activity was measured. PN and prenatal saline (PS)-exposed offspring then received 10 once daily injections of METH (0.3 mg/kg) to induce locomotor sensitization. The animals received a METH injection (0.3 mg/kg) to assess the expression of sensitization following a 14-day period of no injections. A day later, all animals were injected with saline and conditioned hyperactivity was assessed. Brain tissue was harvested 24 h later. PN animals habituated more slowly to the activity chambers

  8. Sodium butyrate rescues dopaminergic cells from alpha-synuclein-induced transcriptional deregulation and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Isabel; Pinho, Raquel; Pavlou, Maria Angeliki; Hennion, Magali; Wales, Pauline; Schütz, Anna-Lena; Rajput, Ashish; Szego, Éva M; Kerimoglu, Cemil; Gerhardt, Ellen; Rego, Ana Cristina; Fischer, André; Bonn, Stefan; Outeiro, Tiago F

    2017-06-15

    Alpha-synuclein (aSyn) is considered a major culprit in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathophysiology. However, the precise molecular function of the protein remains elusive. Recent evidence suggests that aSyn may play a role on transcription regulation, possibly by modulating the acetylation status of histones. Our study aimed at evaluating the impact of wild-type (WT) and mutant A30P aSyn on gene expression, in a dopaminergic neuronal cell model, and decipher potential mechanisms underlying aSyn-mediated transcriptional deregulation. We performed gene expression analysis using RNA-sequencing in Lund Human Mesencephalic (LUHMES) cells expressing endogenous (control) or increased levels of WT or A30P aSyn. Compared to control cells, cells expressing both aSyn variants exhibited robust changes in the expression of several genes, including downregulation of major genes involved in DNA repair. WT aSyn, unlike A30P aSyn, promoted DNA damage and increased levels of phosphorylated p53. In dopaminergic neuronal cells, increased aSyn expression led to reduced levels of acetylated histone 3. Importantly, treatment with sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), rescued WT aSyn-induced DNA damage, possibly via upregulation of genes involved in DNA repair. Overall, our findings provide novel and compelling insight into the mechanisms associated with aSyn neurotoxicity in dopaminergic cells, which could be ameliorated with an HDACi. Future studies will be crucial to further validate these findings and to define novel possible targets for intervention in PD. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Protection of dopaminergic neurons by 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kai-Hsiang; Liou, Horng-Hui; Hour, Mann-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2013-10-01

    Neuroinflammation and oxidative stress are important factors that induce neurodegeneration in age-related neurological disorders. 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is the enzyme responsible for catalysing the synthesis of leukotriene or 5-HETE from arachidonic acid. 5-LOX is expressed in the central nervous system and may cause neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of the pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)/MPP(+)-induced dopaminergic neuronal death in midbrain neuron-glia co-cultures and in mice. It was found that 5-LOX was over-expressed in astrocytes after the injection of MPTP into C57BL6 mice. MK-886, a specific inhibitor of 5-LOX activating protein (FLAP), significantly increased [(3)H]-dopamine uptake, a functional indicator of the integrity of dopaminergic neurons, in midbrain cultures or the SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic cell line following MPP(+) treatment. In addition, LTB₄, one of 5-LOX's downstream products, was increased in the striatum and substantia nigra following MPTP injection in mice. LTB₄ but not LTD₄ and 5-HETE enhanced MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity in primary midbrain cultures. MK-886 administration increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons in the substantia nigra and the dopamine content in the striatum in MPTP-induced parkinsonian mice. Furthermore, the MPTP-induced upregulation of LTB₄ in the striatum and substantia nigra was antagonised by MK-886. These results suggest that 5-LOX inhibitors may be developed as novel neuroprotective agents and LTB₄ may play an important pathological role in Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 1,2,3,4-Tetrahydroisoquinoline protects terminals of dopaminergic neurons in the striatum against the malonate-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lorenc-Koci, Elzbieta; Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Wardas, Jadwiga

    2005-07-27

    Malonate, a reversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, is frequently used as a model neurotoxin to produce lesion of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in animals due to particular sensitivity of dopamine neurons to mild energy impairment. This model of neurotoxicity was applied in our study to explore neuroprotective potential of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (TIQ), an endo- and exogenous substance whose function in the mammalian brain, despite extensive studies, has not been elucidated so far. Injection of malonate at a dose of 3 mumol unilaterally into the rat left medial forebrain bundle resulted in the 54% decrease in dopamine (DA) concentration in the ipsilateral striatum and, depending on the examined striatum regions, caused 24-44% reduction in [3H]GBR12,935 binding to the dopamine transporter (DAT). TIQ (50 mg/kg i.p.) administered 4 h before malonate infusion and next once daily for successive 7 days prevented both these effects of malonate. Such TIQ treatment restored DA content and DAT binding almost to the control level. The results of the present study indicate that TIQ may act as a neuroprotective agent in the rat brain. An inhibition of the enzymatic activities of monoamine oxidase and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase as well as an increase in the striatal levels of glutathione and nitric oxide found after TIQ administration and reported in our earlier studies are considered to be potential factors that may be involved in the TIQ-mediated protection of dopamine terminals from malonate toxicity.

  11. Phosphodiesterase 7 Inhibition Induces Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Garcia, Jose A.; Alonso-Gil, Sandra; Gil, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Santos, Angel

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is characterized by a loss of dopaminergic neurons in a specific brain region, the ventral midbrain. Parkinson’s disease is diagnosed when approximately 50% of the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) have degenerated and the others are already affected by the disease. Thus, it is conceivable that all therapeutic strategies, aimed at neuroprotection, start too late. Therefore, an urgent medical need exists to discover new pharmacological targets and novel drugs with disease-modifying properties. In this regard, modulation of endogenous adult neurogenesis toward a dopaminergic phenotype might provide a new strategy to target Parkinson’s disease by partially ameliorating the dopaminergic cell loss that occurs in this disorder. We have previously shown that a phosphodiesterase 7 (PDE7) inhibitor, S14, exerts potent neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects in different rodent models of Parkinson’s disease, indicating that this compound could represent a novel therapeutic agent to stop the dopaminergic cell loss that occurs during the progression of the disease. In this report we show that, in addition to its neuroprotective effect, the PDE7 inhibitor S14 is also able to induce endogenous neuroregenerative processes toward a dopaminergic phenotype. We describe a population of actively dividing cells that give rise to new neurons in the SNpc of hemiparkinsonian rats after treatment with S14. In conclusion, our data identify S14 as a novel regulator of dopaminergic neuron generation. Significance Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the ventral midbrain. Currently, no cure and no effective disease-modifying therapy are available for Parkinson’s disease; therefore, an urgent medical need exists to discover new pharmacological targets and novel drugs for the treatment of this disorder. The present study reports that an inhibitor of the enzyme

  12. A peptide disrupting the D2R-DAT interaction protects against dopamine neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Su, Ping; Liu, Fang

    2017-09-01

    Dopamine reuptake from extracellular space to cytosol leads to accumulation of dopamine, which triggers neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons. Previous studies have shown that both dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and dopamine transporter (DAT) are involved in dopamine neurotoxicity. However, blockade of either D2R or DAT causes side effects due to antagonism of other physiological functions of these two proteins. We previously found that DAT can form a protein complex with D2R and its cell surface expression is facilitated via D2R-DAT interaction, which regulates dopamine reuptake and intracellular dopamine levels. Here we found that an interfering peptide (DAT-S1) disrupting the D2R-DAT interaction protects neurons against dopamine neurotoxicity, and this effect is mediated by inhibiting DAT cell surface expression and inhibiting both caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage. This study demonstrates the role of the D2R-DAT complex in dopamine neurotoxicity and investigated the potential mechanisms, which might help better understand the mechanisms of dopamine neurotoxicity. The peptide may provide some insights to improve treatments for dopamine neurotoxicity and related diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, as well as methamphetamine- and 3,4-methsylenedioxy methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. PKCδ knockout mice are protected from para-methoxymethamphetamine-induced mitochondrial stress and associated neurotoxicity in the striatum of mice.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Tran, Hai-Quyen; Nam, Yunsung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Lee, Young Hun; Park, Kyung Tae; Lee, Yong Sup; Jang, Choon-Gon; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2016-11-01

    Para-methoxymethamphetamine (PMMA) is a para-ring-substituted amphetamine derivative sold worldwide as an illegal psychotropic drug. Although PMMA use has been reported to lead to severe intoxication and even death, little is known about the mechanism(s) by which PMMA exerts its neurotoxic effects. Here we found that PMMA treatment resulted in phosphorylation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) and subsequent mitochondrial translocation of cleaved PKCδ. PMMA-induced oxidative stress was more pronounced in mitochondria than in the cytosol. Moreover, treatment with PMMA consistently resulted in significant reductions in mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial complex I activity, and mitochondrial Mn superoxide dismutase-immunoreactivity. In contrast, PMMA treatment led to a significant increase in intramitochondrial Ca 2+ level. Treatment with PMMA also significantly increased ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1)-labeled microglial activation and upregulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene expression. PKCδ knockout attenuated these mitochondrial effects and dampened the neurotoxic effects of PMMA. Importantly, TNF-α knockout mice were significantly protected from PMMA-induced increases in phospho-PKCδ expression, mitochondrial translocation of cleaved PKCδ, and Iba-1-labeled microgliosis. Both rottlerin, a pharmacological inhibitor of PKCδ, and etanercept, a pharmacological inhibitor of TNF-α, significantly protected against PMMA-mediated induction of apoptosis, as assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUDP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays. In addition, PKCδ knockout and TNF-α knockout both resulted in decreased PMMA-mediated induction of dopaminergic loss. Therefore, our results suggest that PKCδ mediates PMMA-induced neurotoxicity by facilitating oxidative stress (mitochondria > cytosol), mitochondrial dysfunction, microglial activation, and pro-apoptotic signaling. Our results also indicate that PMMA-induced PKC

  14. Histological evidence supporting a role for the striatal neurokinin-1 receptor in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in the mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Wang, Jing; Cadet, Jean Lud; Angulo, Jesus A.

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have documented the effect of methamphetamine (METH) on the toxicity of the dopamine (DA) terminals of the striatum but only a few studies have assessed the damaging effects of METH on striatal neurons postsynaptic to the nigrostriatal DA terminals. In the present study, we employed histological methods to study the effect of METH on DA terminals and striatal neurons. We also assessed the role of the striatal neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor on pre- and post-synaptic METH-induced damage. Male mice were treated with METH (10 mg/kg) four times at 2-h intervals and were sacrificed 3 days after the treatment. A number of animals received the non-peptide NK-1 receptor antagonist WIN-51,708 (10 mg/kg) 30 min before the first and fourth injections of METH. Immunocytochemical staining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed significant deficits throughout all aspects of the caudate-putamen in animals exposed to METH. Pretreatment with WIN-51,708 prevented the METH-induced loss of TH immunostaining. Sections from a separate set of mice were stained with Fluoro-Jade B (FJB), a fluorochrome that binds specifically to degenerating fibers and cell bodies of neurons. Treatment with METH shows Fluoro-Jade B positive cell bodies in the striatum and pretreatment with WIN-51,708 abolished Fluoro-Jade B staining. Moreover, double labeling with Fluoro-Jade B and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) shows reactive astrocytosis in the area adjacent to the Fluoro-Jade B-positive cells but no Fluoro-Jade B staining of the astrocytes. This observation suggests that the degenerating cells must be striatal neurons and not astrocytes. The data demonstrate that METH induces pre- and post-synaptic damage in the striatum and the damage can be prevented with pharmacological blockade of the NK-1 receptor. These findings represent a new direction in the study of the mechanism of toxicity to METH and could be useful in the treatment of some neurological disorders. PMID:15064143

  15. Genetic correlational analysis reveals no association between MPP+ and the severity of striatal dopaminergic damage following MPTP treatment in BXD mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Byron C; O'Callaghan, James P; Lu, Lu; Williams, Robert W; Alam, Gelareh; Miller, Diane B

    2014-01-01

    1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) is a pro-neurotoxicant that must be metabolized to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and taken up into striatal dopaminergic neurons to produce neurodegeneration. Recently, we showed wide genetic variability in MPTP-associated neuronal damage in a panel of recombinant inbred mouse strains. Here we examined the amount of MPP(+) produced in the striatum in the same strains of inbred BXD mice. This allowed us to determine if the differences in the dopaminergic neurotoxicity and associated astrogliosis among the BXD mouse strains were due to differential metabolism of MPTP to MPP(+). Using the same BXD mouse strains examined previously (Jones et al., 2013) we found that the extent of the striatal damage produced following MPTP treatment is not correlated quantitatively with the production of MPP(+) in the striatum. Our findings also extend those of others regarding strain differences in MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Importantly, our finding suggests that additional factors influence the neurodegenerative response other than the presence and amount of the toxicant at the target site. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Ketogenic diet protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity via up-regulating glutathione in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Baohua; Yang, Xinxin; An, Liangxiang; Gao, Bo; Liu, Xia; Liu, Shuwei

    2009-08-25

    The high-fat ketogenic diet (KD) leads to an increase of blood ketone bodies (KB) level and has been used to treat refractory childhood seizures for over 80 years. Recent reports show that KD, KB and their components (d-beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate and acetone) have neuroprotective for acute and chronic neurological disorders. In our present work, we examined whether KD protected dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra (SN) against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) neurotoxicity in a rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) using Nissl staining and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. At the same time we measured dopamine (DA) and its metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum. To elucidate the mechanism, we also measured the level of glutathione (GSH) of striatum. Our data showed that Nissl and TH-positive neurons increased in rats fed with KD compared to rats with normal diet (ND) after intrastriatal 6-OHDA injection, so did DA and its metabolite DOPAC. While HVA had not changed significantly. The change of GSH was significantly similar to DA. We concluded that KD had neuroprotective against 6-OHDA neurotoxicity and in this period GSH played an important role.

  17. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. ... names for meth are: Crank Ice Crystal Glass Chalk In This Section Signs of Meth Use and ...

  18. Mechanisms of methylmercury-induced neurotoxicity: evidence from experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Marcelo; Rocha, João B. T.; Aschner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Neurological disorders are common, costly, and can cause enduring disability. Although mostly unknown, a few environmental toxicants are recognized causes of neurological disorders and subclinical brain dysfunction. One of the best known neurotoxins is methylmercury (MeHg), a ubiquitous environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. In the aquatic environment, MeHg is accumulated in fish, which represent a major source of human exposure. Although several episodes of MeHg poisoning have contributed to the understanding of the clinical symptoms and histological changes elicited by this neurotoxicant in humans, experimental studies have been pivotal in elucidating the molecular mechanisms that mediate MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The objective of this mini-review is to summarize data from experimental studies on molecular mechanisms of MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. While the full picture has yet to be unmasked, in vitro approaches based on cultured cells, isolated mitochondria and tissue slices, as well as in vivo studies based mainly on the use of rodents, point to impairment in intracellular calcium homeostasis, alteration of glutamate homeostasis and oxidative stress as important events in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity. The potential relationship among these events is discussed, with particular emphasis on the neurotoxic cycle triggered by MeHg-induced excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. The particular sensitivity of the developing brain to MeHg toxicity, the critical role of selenoproteins and the potential protective role of selenocompounds are also discussed. These concepts provide the biochemical bases to the understanding of MeHg neurotoxicity, contributing to the discovery of endogenous and exogenous molecules that counteract such toxicity and provide efficacious means for ablating this vicious cycle. PMID:21683713

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 is an obligatory factor in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2005-05-01

    Methamphetamine causes persistent damage to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum. The mechanisms underlying its neurotoxicity are not fully understood, but considerable evidence points to oxidative stress as a probable mechanism. A recent microarray analysis of gene expression changes caused by methamphetamine revealed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was induced along with its transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (Thomas DM, Francescutti-Verbeem DM, Liu X, and Kuhn DM, 2004). We report presently that methamphetamine increases striatal expression of COX-2 protein. Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) expression was not changed. Mice bearing a null mutation of the gene for COX-2 were resistant to methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. COX-1 knockouts, like wild-type mice, showed extensive dopamine nerve terminal damage. Selective inhibitors of COX-1 [5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-trifluoromethyl pyrazole (SC-560)], COX-2 [N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulfonamide (NS-398), rofecoxib], or COX-3 (antipyrine) or a nonselective inhibitor of the COX-1/2 isoforms (ketoprofen) did not protect mice from neurotoxicity. Finally, methamphetamine did not change striatal prostaglandin E(2) content. Taken together, these data suggest that COX-2 is an obligatory factor in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. The functional aspect of COX-2 that contributes to drug-induced neurotoxicity does not appear to be its prostaglandin synthetic capacity. Instead, the peroxidase activity associated with COX-2, which can lead to the formation of reactive oxygen species and dopamine quinones, can account for its role.

  20. Curcumin Monoglucoside Shows Improved Bioavailability and Mitigates Rotenone Induced Neurotoxicity in Cell and Drosophila Models of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Shrivash, M K; Naveen Kumar, H N; Misra, K; Srinivas Bharath, M M

    2016-11-01

    Curcumin (CUR), a dietary polyphenol has diverse pharmacologic effects, but is limited by poor bioavailability. This is probably due to decreased solubility, cellular uptake and stability. In order to enhance its solubility and bioavailability, we synthesized the CUR bioconjugate curcumin monoglucoside (CMG) and tested its bioavailability, neuroprotective and anti-apoptotic propensity against rotenone (ROT) induced toxicity in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells and Drosophila models. Our results elucidate that CMG showed improved bioavailability than CUR in N27 cells. Pre-treatment with CMG protected against ROT neurotoxicity and exerted antioxidant effects by replenishing cellular glutathione levels and significantly decreasing reactive species. CMG pre-treatment also restored mitochondrial complex I and IV activities inhibited by ROT. ROT-induced nuclear damage was also restored by CMG as confirmed by comet assay. CMG induced anti-apoptotic effects was substantiated by decreased phosporylation of JNK3 and c-jun, which in turn decreased the cleavage of pro-caspase 3. Q-PCR analysis of redox genes showed up-regulation of NOS2 and down-regulation of NQO1 upon ROT exposure and this was attenuated by CMG pre-treatment. Studies in the Drosophila ROT model revealed that, CMG administration showed better survival rate and locomotor activity, improved antioxidant activity and dopamine content than ROT treated group and was comparable with the CUR group. Based on these data, we surmise that CMG has improved bioavailability and offered neuroprotection comparable with CUR, against ROT-induced toxicity both in dopaminergic neuronal cell line and Drosophila models, with therapeutic implications for PD.

  1. The Effects of IGF-1 on Trk Expressing DRG Neurons with HIV-gp120- Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Zhen; Chi, Heng; Bi, Yanwen; Song, Lijun; Liu, Huaxiang

    2016-01-01

    HIV envelope glycoprotein gp120 is the main protein that causes HIVassociated sensory neuropathy. However, the underlying mechanisms of gp120-induced neurotoxicity are still unclear. There are lack effective treatments for relieving HIV-related neuropathic symptoms caused by gp120-induced neurotoxicity. In the present study, tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk)A, TrkB, and TrkC expression in primary cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity was investigated. The effects of IGF-1 on distinct Trk-positive DRG neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity were also determined. The results showed that gp120 not only dose-dependently induced DRG neuronal apoptosis and inhibited neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth, but also decreased distinct Trk expression levels. IGF-1 rescued DRG neurons from apoptosis and improved neuronal survival of gp120 neurotoxic DRG neurons in vitro. IGF-1 also improved TrkA and TrkB, but not TrkC, expression in gp120 neurotoxic conditions. The effects of IGF-1 could be blocked by preincubation with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. These results suggested that gp120 may have a wide range of neurotoxicity on different subpopulations of DRG neurons, while IGF-1 might only relieve some subpopulations of DRG neurons with gp120-induced neurotoxicity. These data provide novel information of mechanisms of gp120 neurotoxicity on primary sensory neurons and the potential therapeutic effects of IGF-1 on gp120-induced neurotoxicity.

  2. 4-Meth-oxy-3-(meth-oxy-meth-yl)benzalde-hyde.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing-Chao; Sun, Jun; Zhang, Juan; Liu, Guang-Lin; Guo, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In the title compound, C10H12O3, the dihedral angle between the benzene ring and the meth-oxy-methyl side chain is 9.7 (2)°. The O atom of the aldehyde group and the C atom of the meth-oxy group deviate from the plane of the ring by 0.039 (3) and 0.338 (4) Å, respectively. The only inter-molecular inter-actions are very weak C-H⋯π inter-actions.

  3. FTY720 Attenuates 6-OHDA-Associated Dopaminergic Degeneration in Cellular and Mouse Parkinsonian Models.

    PubMed

    Ren, Manru; Han, Minxing; Wei, Xinbing; Guo, Ying; Shi, Huanying; Zhang, Xiumei; Perez, Ruth G; Lou, Haiyan

    2017-02-01

    FTY720 (fingolimod) is the first oral drug approved for treating relapsing-remitting forms of multiple sclerosis. It is also protective in other neurological models including ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease and Rett syndrome. However, whether it might protect in a 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) mouse model associated with the dopaminergic pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD), has not been explored. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effects of FTY720 on 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity in cell cultures and mice. Here we show that FTY720 protected against 6-OHDA cytotoxicity and apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells. We also show that prior administration of FTY720 to 6-OHDA lesioned mice ameliorated both motor deficits and nigral dopaminergic neurotoxicity, while also reducing 6-OHDA-associated inflammation. The protective effects of FTY720 were associated with activation of AKT and ERK1/2 pro-survival pathways and an increase in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest that FTY720 holds promise as a PD therapeutic acting, at least in part, through AKT/ERK1/2/P-CREB-associated BDNF expression.

  4. Delta opioid peptide (D-Ala 2, D-Leu 5) enkephalin: linking hibernation and neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Borlongan, Cesario V; Wang, Yun; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2004-09-01

    Hibernation is a potential protective strategy for the peripheral, as well as for the central nervous system. A protein factor termed hibernation induction trigger (HIT) was found to induce hibernation in summer-active ground squirrels. Purification of HIT yielded an 88-kD peptide that is enriched in winter hibernators. Partial sequence of the 88-kD protein indicates that it may be related to the inhibitor of metalloproteinase. Using opioid receptor antagonists to elucidate the mechanisms of HIT, it was found that HIT targeted the delta opioid receptors. Indeed, delta opioid (D-Ala 2, D-Leu 5) enkephalin (DADLE) was shown to induce hibernation. Specifically, HIT and DADLE were found to prolong survival of peripheral organs, such as the lung, the heart, liver, and kidney preserved en bloc or as a single preparation. In addition, DADLE has been recently demonstrated to promote survival of neurons in the central nervous system. Exposure to DADLE dose-dependently enhanced cell viability of cultured primary rat fetal dopaminergic cells. Subsequent transplantation of these DADLE-treated dopaminergic cells into the Parkinsonian rat brain resulted in a two-fold increase in surviving grafted cells. Interestingly, delivery of DADLE alone protected against dopaminergic depletion in a rodent model of Parkinson s disease. Similarly, DADLE blocked and reversed the dopaminergic terminal damage induced by methamphetamine (METH). Such neuroprotective effects of DADLE against METH neurotoxicity was accompanied by attenuation of mRNA expressions of a tumor necrosis factor p53 and an immediate early gene c-fos. In parallel to these beneficial effects of DADLE on the dopaminergic system, DADLE also ameliorated the neuronal damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion following a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. In vitro replication of this ischemia cell death by serum-deprivation of PC12 cells revealed that DADLE exerted neuroprotection in a naltrexone-sensitive manner. These

  5. Mechanistic Insights into Neurotoxicity Induced by Anesthetics in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xi; Guo, Qihao; Zhang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence has shown that exposure to anesthetics used in the clinic can cause neurodegeneration in the mammalian developing brain, but the basis of this is not clear. Neurotoxicity induced by exposure to anesthestics in early life involves neuroapoptosis and impairment of neurodevelopmental processes such as neurogenesis, synaptogenesis and immature glial development. These effects may subsequently contribute to behavior abnormalities in later life. In this paper, we reviewed the possible mechanisms of anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity based on new in vitro and in vivo findings. Also, we discussed ways to protect against anesthetic-induced neurotoxicity and their implications for exploring cellular and molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection. These findings help in improving our understanding of developmental neurotoxicology and in avoiding adverse neurological outcomes in anesthesia practice. PMID:22837663

  6. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-02-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

  7. Dysregulation of the Mitochondrial Unfolded Protein Response Induces Non-Apoptotic Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration in C. elegans Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Bryan A.; Petersen, Daniel A.; Gaeta, Anthony L.

    2017-01-01

    Due to environmental insult or innate genetic deficiency, protein folding environments of the mitochondrial matrix are prone to dysregulation, prompting the activation of a specific organellar stress-response mechanism, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRMT). In Caenorhabditis elegans, mitochondrial damage leads to nuclear translocation of the ATFS-1 transcription factor to activate the UPRMT. After short-term acute stress has been mitigated, the UPRMT is eventually suppressed to restore homeostasis to C. elegans hermaphrodites. In contrast, and reflective of the more chronic nature of progressive neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD), here, we report the consequences of prolonged, cell-autonomous activation of the UPRMT in C. elegans dopaminergic neurons. We reveal that neuronal function and integrity decline rapidly with age, culminating in activity-dependent, non-apoptotic cell death. In a PD-like context wherein transgenic nematodes express the Lewy body constituent protein α-synuclein (αS), we not only find that this protein and its PD-associated disease variants have the capacity to induce the UPRMT, but also that coexpression of αS and ATFS-1-associated dysregulation of the UPRMT synergistically potentiate dopaminergic neurotoxicity. This genetic interaction is in parallel to mitophagic pathways dependent on the C. elegans PINK1 homolog, which is necessary for cellular resistance to chronic malfunction of the UPRMT. Given the increasingly recognized role of mitochondrial quality control in neurodegenerative diseases, these studies illustrate, for the first time, an insidious aspect of mitochondrial signaling in which the UPRMT pathway, under disease-associated, context-specific dysregulation, exacerbates disruption of dopaminergic neurons in vivo, resulting in the neurodegeneration characteristic of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Disruptions or alterations in the activation of pathways that regulate mitochondrial quality

  8. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Case, A. J.; Agraz, D.; Ahmad, I. M.; Zimmerman, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:26770655

  9. Low-Dose Aronia melanocarpa Concentrate Attenuates Paraquat-Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Case, A J; Agraz, D; Ahmad, I M; Zimmerman, M C

    2016-01-01

    Herbicides containing paraquat may contribute to the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Paraquat induces reactive oxygen species-mediated apoptosis in neurons, which is a primary mechanism behind its toxicity. We sought to test the effectiveness of a commercially available polyphenol-rich Aronia melanocarpa (aronia berry) concentrate in the amelioration of paraquat-induced neurotoxicity. Considering the abundance of antioxidants in aronia berries, we hypothesized that aronia berry concentrate attenuates the paraquat-induced increase in reactive oxygen species and protects against paraquat-mediated neuronal cell death. Using a neuronal cell culture model, we observed that low doses of aronia berry concentrate protected against paraquat-mediated neurotoxicity. Additionally, low doses of the concentrate attenuated the paraquat-induced increase in superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and oxidized glutathione levels. Interestingly, high doses of aronia berry concentrate increased neuronal superoxide levels independent of paraquat, while at the same time decreasing hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, high-dose aronia berry concentrate potentiated paraquat-induced superoxide production and neuronal cell death. In summary, aronia berry concentrate at low doses restores the homeostatic redox environment of neurons treated with paraquat, while high doses exacerbate the imbalance leading to further cell death. Our findings support that moderate levels of aronia berry concentrate may prevent reactive oxygen species-mediated neurotoxicity.

  10. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5–5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012

  11. Down-regulation of natural resistance-associated macrophage protein-1 (Nramp1) is associated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)/1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ )-induced α-synuclein accumulation and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, K-C; Liou, H-H; Lee, C-Y; Lin, C-J

    2018-04-21

    The accumulation of α-synuclein is a hallmark in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Natural resistance-associated macrophage protein-1 (Nramp1) was previously shown to contribute to the degradation of extracellular α-synuclein in microglia under conditions of iron overload. This study was aimed at investigating the role of Nramp1 in α-synuclein pathology in the neurone under 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)/1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + ) treatment. The expression of Nramp1 and pathological features (including iron and α-synuclein accumulation) were examined in the dopaminergic neurones of humans (with and without PD) and of mice [with and without receiving chronic MPTP intoxication]. The effects of Nramp1 expression on low-dose MPP + -induced α-synuclein expression and neurotoxicity were determined in human dopaminergic neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Similar to the findings in the substantia nigra of human PD, lower expression of Nramp1 but higher levels of iron and α-synuclein were identified in the dopaminergic neurones of mice receiving chronic MPTP intoxication, compared to controls. In parallel to the loss of dopaminergic neurones, the numbers of glial fibrillary acidic protein- and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule-1-positive cells were significantly increased in the substantia nigra of MPTP-treated mice. Likewise, in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exposed to low-dose MPP + , Nramp1 expression and cathepsin D activity were decreased, along with an increase in α-synuclein protein expression and aggregation. Overexpression of functional Nramp1 restored cathepsin D activity and attenuated α-synuclein up-regulation and neuronal cell death caused by MPP + treatment. These data suggest that the neuronal expression of Nramp1 is important for protecting against the development of MPTP/MPP + -induced α-synuclein pathology and neurotoxicity. © 2018 British Neuropathological Society.

  12. Minocycline Rescues from Zinc-Induced Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration: Biochemical and Molecular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Brajesh Kumar; Chauhan, Amit Kumar; Singh, Deepali; Patel, Devendra Kumar; Singh, Chetna

    2016-07-01

    Accumulation of zinc (Zn) in dopaminergic neurons is implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), and microglial activation plays a critical role in toxin-induced Parkinsonism. Oxidative stress is accused in Zn-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration; however, its connection with microglial activation is still not known. This study was undertaken to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of microglial activation in Zn-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Male Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally with/without zinc sulphate (20 mg/kg) in the presence/absence of minocycline (30 mg/kg), a microglial activation inhibitor, for 2-12 weeks. While neurobehavioral and biochemical indexes of PD and number of dopaminergic neurons were reduced, the number of microglial cells was increased in the substantia nigra of the Zn-exposed animals. Similarly, Zn elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase; however, catalase activity was reduced. Besides, Zn increased an association of NADPH oxidase subunit p67(phox) with membrane, cytochrome c release from the mitochondria and cleavage of pro-caspase 3. Zn attenuated the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) while augmented the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Minocycline alleviated Zn-induced behavioural impairments, loss of TH-positive neurons, activated microglial cells and biochemical indexes and modulated the expression of studied genes/proteins towards normalcy. The results demonstrate that minocycline reduces the number of activated microglial cells and oxidative stress, which rescue from Zn-induced changes in the expression of monoamine transporter and nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

  13. Resveratrol Confers Protection against Rotenone-Induced Neurotoxicity by Modulating Myeloperoxidase Levels in Glial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi Young; Choi, Dong-Kug; Lee, Dae Kee; Hong, Young Jun; Park, Eun Jung

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) functions as a key molecular component of the host defense system against diverse pathogens. We have previously reported that increased MPO levels and activity is a distinguishing feature of rotenone-exposed glial cells, and that either overactivation or deficiency of MPO leads to pathological conditions in the brain. Here, we provide that modulation of MPO levels in glia by resveratrol confers protective effects on rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. We show that resveratrol significantly reduced MPO levels but did not trigger abnormal nitric oxide (NO) production in microglia and astrocytes. Resveratrol-induced down-regulation of MPO, in the absence of an associated overproduction of NO, markedly attenuated rotenone-triggered inflammatory responses including phagocytic activity and reactive oxygen species production in primary microglia and astrocytes. In addition, impaired responses of primary mixed glia from Mpo −/− mice to rotenone were relieved by treatment with resveratrol. We further show that rotenone-induced neuronal injury, particularly dopaminergic cell death, was attenuated by resveratrol in neuron-glia co-cultures, but not in neurons cultured alone. Similar regulatory effects of resveratrol on MPO levels were observed in microglia treated with MPP+, another Parkinson’s disease-linked neurotoxin, supporting the beneficial effects of resveratrol on the brain. Collectively, our findings provide that resveratrol influences glial responses to rotenone by regulating both MPO and NO, and thus protects against rotenone-induced neuronal injury. PMID:23593274

  14. α-Synuclein-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a rat model of Parkinson's disease occurs independent of ATP13A2 (PARK9).

    PubMed

    Daniel, Guillaume; Musso, Alessandra; Tsika, Elpida; Fiser, Aris; Glauser, Liliane; Pletnikova, Olga; Schneider, Bernard L; Moore, Darren J

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the ATP13A2 (PARK9) gene cause early-onset, autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (PD) and Kufor-Rakeb syndrome. ATP13A2 mRNA is spliced into three distinct isoforms encoding a P5-type ATPase involved in regulating heavy metal transport across vesicular membranes. Here, we demonstrate that three ATP13A2 mRNA isoforms are expressed in the normal human brain and are modestly increased in the cingulate cortex of PD cases. ATP13A2 can mediate protection toward a number of stressors in mammalian cells and can protect against α-synuclein-induced toxicity in cellular and invertebrate models of PD. Using a primary cortical neuronal model combined with lentiviral-mediated gene transfer, we demonstrate that human ATP13A2 isoforms 1 and 2 display selective neuroprotective effects toward toxicity induced by manganese and hydrogen peroxide exposure through an ATPase-independent mechanism. The familial PD mutations, F182L and G504R, abolish the neuroprotective effects of ATP13A2 consistent with a loss-of-function mechanism. We further demonstrate that the AAV-mediated overexpression of human ATP13A2 is not sufficient to attenuate dopaminergic neurodegeneration, neuropathology, and striatal dopamine and motoric deficits induced by human α-synuclein expression in a rat model of PD. Intriguingly, the delivery of an ATPase-deficient form of ATP13A2 (D513N) to the substantia nigra is sufficient to induce dopaminergic neuronal degeneration and motor deficits in rats, potentially suggesting a dominant-negative mechanism of action. Collectively, our data demonstrate a distinct lack of ATP13A2-mediated protection against α-synuclein-induced neurotoxicity in the rat nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, and limited neuroprotective capacity overall, and raise doubts about the potential of ATP13A2 as a therapeutic target for PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Substance P Exacerbates Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration through Neurokinin-1 Receptor-Independent Activation of Microglial NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chun-Hsien; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Jiang, Lulu; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Although dysregulated substance P (SP) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), how SP affects the survival of dopaminergic neurons remains unclear. Here, we found that mice lacking endogenous SP (TAC1−/−), but not those deficient in the SP receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor, NK1R), were more resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration than wild-type controls, suggesting a NK1R-independent toxic action of SP. In vitro dose–response studies revealed that exogenous SP enhanced LPS- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a bimodal manner, peaking at submicromolar and subpicomolar concentrations, but was substantially less effective at intermediate concentrations. Mechanistically, the actions of submicromolar levels of SP were NK1R-dependent, whereas subpicomolar SP-elicited actions required microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2), the key superoxide-producing enzyme, but not NK1R. Subpicomolar concentrations of SP activated NOX2 by binding to the catalytic subunit gp91phox and inducing membrane translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47phox and p67phox. The importance of NOX2 was further corroborated by showing that inhibition or disruption of NOX2 blocked subpicomolar SP-exacerbated neurotoxicity. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of microglial NOX2 in mediating the neuroinflammatory and dopaminergic neurodegenerative effects of SP, which may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:25209287

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1 as a neuroprotective agent: promotion of the morphological development of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Collins, Louise M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W; Long-Smith, Caitriona M; Wyatt, Sean L; Sullivan, Aideen M; Toulouse, André; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2013-06-01

    A greater understanding of the mechanisms that promote the survival and growth of dopaminergic neurons is essential for the advancement of cell replacement therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD). Evidence supports a role for the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38 in the demise of dopaminergic neurons, while mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), which negatively regulates p38 activity, has not yet been investigated in this context. Here, we show that MKP-1 is expressed in dopaminergic neurons cultured from E14 rat ventral mesencephalon (VM). When dopaminergic neurons were transfected to overexpress MKP-1, they displayed a more complex morphology than their control counterparts in vitro. Specifically, MKP-1-transfection induced significant increases in neurite length and branching with a maximum increase observed in primary branches. We demonstrate that inhibition of dopaminergic neurite growth induced by treatment of rat VM neurons with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in vitro is mediated by p38 and is concomitant with a significant and selective decrease in MKP-1 expression in these neurons. We further show that overexpression of MKP-1 in dopaminergic neurons contributes to neuroprotection against the effects of 6-OHDA. Collectively, we report that MKP-1 can promote the growth and elaboration of dopaminergic neuronal processes and can help protect them from the neurotoxic effects of 6-OHDA. Thus, we propose that strategies aimed at augmenting MKP-1 expression or activity may be beneficial in protecting dopaminergic neurons and may provide potential therapeutic approaches for PD.

  17. Hydrogen Peroxide responsive miR153 targets Nrf2/ARE cytoprotection in paraquat induced dopaminergic neurotoxicitya

    PubMed Central

    Narasimhan, Madhusudhanan; Riar, Amanjot Kaur; Rathinam, Mary Latha; Vedpathak, Dhanashree; Henderson, George; Mahimainathan, Lenin

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies suggest that environmental toxins including paraquat (PQ) increase the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD) by damaging nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. We previously showed that overexpression of a group of microRNAs (miRs) affects the antioxidant promoting factor, Nrf2 and related glutathione-redox homeostasis in SH-SY5Y dopaminergic neurons. Although, dysregulation of redox balance by PQ is well documented, the role for miRs and their impact have not been elucidated. In the current study we investigated whether PQ impairs Nrf2 and its related cytoprotective machinery by misexpression of specific fine tune miRs in SH-SY5Y neurons. Real time PCR analysis revealed that PQ significantly (p<0.05) increased the expression of brain enriched miR153 with an associated decrease in Nrf2 and its function as revealed by decrease in 4× ARE activity and expression of GCLC and NQO1. Also, PQ and H2O2-induced decrease in Nrf2 3′ UTR activity was restored on miR153 site mutation suggesting a 3′ UTR interacting role. Overexpression of either anti-miR153 or Nrf2 cDNA devoid of 3′ UTR prevented PQ and H2O2-induced loss in Nrf2 activity confirming that PQ could cause miR153 to bind to and target Nrf2 3′ UTR thereby weakening the cellular antioxidant defense. Adenovirus mediated overexpression of cytoplasmic catalase (Ad cCAT) confirmed that PQ induced miR153 is hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) dependent. In addition, Ad cCAT significantly (p<0.05) negated the PQ induced dysregulation of Nrf2 and function along with minimizing ROS, caspase 3/7 activation and neuronal death. Altogether, these results suggest a critical role for oxidant mediated miR153-Nrf2/ARE pathway interaction in paraquat neurotoxicity. This novel finding facilitates the understanding of molecular mechanisms and to develop appropriate management alternatives to counteract PQ-induced neuronal pathogenesis. PMID:24866057

  18. Verapamil Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Damage through a Novel Anti-inflammatory Mechanism by Inhibition of Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuxin; Lo, Yi-Ching; Qian, Li; Crews, Fulton Tim; Wilson, Belinda; Chen, Hui-Ling; Wu, Hung-Ming; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wei, Ke; Lu, Ru-Band; Ali, Syed; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2010-01-01

    Verapamil has been shown to be neuroprotective in several acute neurotoxicity models due to blockade of calcium entry into neurons. However, the potential use of verapamil to treat chronic neurodegenerative diseases has not been reported. Using rat primary mesencephalic neuron/glia cultures, we report that verapamil significantly inhibited LPS-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in both pre- and post-treatment experiments. Reconstituted culture studies revealed that the presence of microglia was essential in verapamil-elicited neuroprotection. Mechanistic studies showed that decreased production of inflammatory mediators from LPS-stimulated microglia underlay neuroprotective property of verapamil. Further studies demonstrated that microglial NADPH oxidase (PHOX), the key superoxide-producing enzyme, but not calcium channel in neurons, is the site of action for the neuroprotective effect of verapamil. This conclusion was supported by the following two observations: 1) Verapamil failed to show protective effect on LPS-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in PHOX-deficient (deficient in the catalytic subunit of gp91phox) neuron/glia cultures; 2) Ligand binding studies showed that the binding of [3H]Verapamil onto gp91phox transfected COS-7 cell membranes was higher than the non-transfected control. The calcium channel-independent neuroprotective property of verapamil was further supported by the finding that R(+)-verapamil, a less active form in blocking calcium channel, showed the same potency in neuroprotection, inhibition of pro-inflammatory factors production and binding capacity to gp91phox membranes as R(-)-verapamil, the active isomer of calcium channel blocker. In conclusion, our results demonstrate a new indication of verapamil-mediated neuroprotection through a calcium channel-independent pathway and provide a valuable avenue for the development of therapy for inflammation-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20950631

  19. Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Jungewelter, Soile; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Kuuliala, Outi; Jolanki, Riitta

    2009-07-01

    Contact allergy to epoxy (meth)acrylates, 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]propane (bis-GMA), 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-acryloxypropoxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-GA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryl-oxyethoxy)phenyl] propane (bis-EMA), 2,2-bis[4-(methacryloxy)phenyl]-propane (bis-MA), and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) is often manifested together with contact allergy to diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin. To analyse patterns of concomitant allergic reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates in relation to exposure. We reviewed the 1994-2008 patch test files at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health (FIOH) for reactions to the five epoxy (meth)acrylates, and examined the patients' medical records for exposure. Twenty-four patients had an allergic reaction to at least one of the studied epoxy (meth)acrylates, but specific exposure was found only in five patients: two bis-GMA allergies from dental products, two bis-GA allergies from UV-curable printing inks, and one bis-GA allergy from an anaerobic glue. Only 25% of the patients were negative to DGEBA epoxy resin. The great majority of allergic patch test reactions to bis-GMA, bis-GA, GMA and bis-EMA were not associated with specific exposure, and cross-allergy to DGEBA epoxy resin remained a probable explanation. However, independent reactions to bis-GA indicated specific exposure. Anaerobic sealants may induce sensitization not only to aliphatic (meth)acrylates but also to aromatic bis-GA.

  20. MethLAB

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, Varun; Barfield, Richard T; Schroeder, James W; Smith, Alicia K

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that DNA methylation changes may underlie numerous complex traits and diseases. The advent of commercial, array-based methods to interrogate DNA methylation has led to a profusion of epigenetic studies in the literature. Array-based methods, such as the popular Illumina GoldenGate and Infinium platforms, estimate the proportion of DNA methylated at single-base resolution for thousands of CpG sites across the genome. These arrays generate enormous amounts of data, but few software resources exist for efficient and flexible analysis of these data. We developed a software package called MethLAB (http://genetics.emory.edu/conneely/MethLAB) using R, an open source statistical language that can be edited to suit the needs of the user. MethLAB features a graphical user interface (GUI) with a menu-driven format designed to efficiently read in and manipulate array-based methylation data in a user-friendly manner. MethLAB tests for association between methylation and relevant phenotypes by fitting a separate linear model for each CpG site. These models can incorporate both continuous and categorical phenotypes and covariates, as well as fixed or random batch or chip effects. MethLAB accounts for multiple testing by controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at a user-specified level. Standard output includes a spreadsheet-ready text file and an array of publication-quality figures. Considering the growing interest in and availability of DNA methylation data, there is a great need for user-friendly open source analytical tools. With MethLAB, we present a timely resource that will allow users with no programming experience to implement flexible and powerful analyses of DNA methylation data. PMID:22430798

  1. Mechanisms of Mycotoxin-Induced Neurotoxicity through Oxidative Stress-Associated Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Kunio; Uetsuka, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Among many mycotoxins, T-2 toxin, macrocyclic trichothecenes, fumonisin B1 (FB1) and ochratochin A (OTA) are known to have the potential to induce neurotoxicity in rodent models. T-2 toxin induces neuronal cell apoptosis in the fetal and adult brain. Macrocyclic trichothecenes bring about neuronal cell apoptosis and inflammation in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb. FB1 induces neuronal degeneration in the cerebral cortex, concurrent with disruption of de novo ceramide synthesis. OTA causes acute depletion of striatal dopamine and its metabolites, accompanying evidence of neuronal cell apoptosis in the substantia nigra, striatum and hippocampus. This paper reviews the mechanisms of neurotoxicity induced by these mycotoxins especially from the viewpoint of oxidative stress-associated pathways. PMID:21954354

  2. Does Information Matter? The Effect of the Meth Project on Meth Use among Youths*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Are demand-side interventions effective at curbing drug use? To the extent demand-side programs are successful, their cost effectiveness can be appealing from a policy perspective. Established in 2005, the Montana Meth Project (MMP) employs a graphic advertising campaign to deter meth use among teens. Due to the MMP’s apparent success, seven other states have adopted Meth Project campaigns. Using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS), this paper investigates whether the MMP reduced methamphetamine use among Montana’s youth. When accounting for a preexisting downward trend in meth use, effects on meth use are statistically indistinguishable from zero. These results are robust to using related changes of meth use among individuals without exposure to the campaign as controls in a difference-in-difference framework. A complementary analysis of treatment admissions data from the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) confirms the MMP has had no discernable impact on meth use. PMID:20638737

  3. Does information matter? The effect of the Meth Project on meth use among youths.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D Mark

    2010-09-01

    Are demand-side interventions effective at curbing drug use? To the extent demand-side programs are successful, their cost effectiveness can be appealing from a policy perspective. Established in 2005, the Montana Meth Project (MMP) employs a graphic advertising campaign to deter meth use among teens. Due to the MMP's apparent success, seven other states have adopted Meth Project campaigns. Using data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS), this paper investigates whether the MMP reduced methamphetamine use among Montana's youth. When accounting for a preexisting downward trend in meth use, effects on meth use are statistically indistinguishable from zero. These results are robust to using related changes of meth use among individuals without exposure to the campaign as controls in a difference-in-difference framework. A complementary analysis of treatment admissions data from the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS) confirms the MMP has had no discernable impact on meth use. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Caffeic acid, tyrosol and p-coumaric acid are potent inhibitors of 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Vauzour, David; Corona, Giulia; Spencer, Jeremy P E

    2010-09-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by a progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Recent investigations have shown that conjugates such as the 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine, possess strong neurotoxicity and may contribute to the underlying progression of the disease pathology. Although the neuroprotective actions of flavonoids are well reported, that of hydroxycinnamates and other phenolic acids is less established. We show that the hydroxycinnamates caffeic acid and p-coumaric acid, the hydroxyphenethyl alcohol, tyrosol, and a Champagne wine extract rich in these components protect neurons against injury induced by 5-S-cysteinyl-dopamine in vitro. The protection induced by these polyphenols was equal to or greater than that observed for the flavonoids, (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and quercetin. For example, p-coumaric acid evoked significantly more protection at 1muM (64.0+/-3.1%) than both (-)-epicatechin (46.0+/-4.1%, p<0.05) and (+)-catechin (13.1+/-3.0%, p<0.001) at the same concentration. These data indicate that hydroxycinnamates, phenolic acids and phenolic alcohol are also capable of inducing neuroprotective effects to a similar extent to that seen with flavonoids. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Reduction of dopaminergic degeneration and oxidative stress by inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme in a MPTP model of parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Ana; Rey, Pablo; Guerra, Maria J; Mendez-Alvarez, Estefania; Soto-Otero, Ramon; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2006-07-01

    There is growing evidence indicating that oxidative stress is a key contributor to the pathogenesis and progression of Parkinson's disease. The brain, and particularly the basal ganglia, possesses a local rennin-angiotensin system. Angiotensin activates NAD(P)H-dependent oxidases, which are a major intracellular source of superoxide, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) have shown antioxidant properties. We treated mice with MPTP and the ACEI captopril to study the possible neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of the latter on the dopaminergic system. Pre-treatment with captopril induced a significant reduction in the MPTP-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and a significant reduction in the loss of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum. Furthermore, captopril reduced the MPTP-induced increase in the levels of major oxidative stress indicators (i.e. lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) in the ventral midbrain and the striatum. Captopril did not reduce striatal MPP(+) levels, MAO-B activity or dopamine transporter activity, which may reduce MPTP neurotoxicity. Our results suggest that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors may be useful for treatment of Parkinson's disease, and that further investigation should focus on the neuroprotective capacity of these compounds.

  6. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3) Mediates Paraquat- and Rotenone-Induced Dopaminergic Neuron Death

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won Seok; Abel, Glen; Klintworth, Heather; Flavell, Richard A.; Xia, Zhengui

    2011-01-01

    Mechanistic studies underlying dopaminergic neuron death may identify new drug targets for the treatment of Parkinson disease (PD). Epidemiological studies have linked pesticide exposure to increased risk for sporadic PD. Here, we investigated the role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 (JNK3), a neural-specific JNK isoform, in dopaminergic neuron death induced by the pesticides rotenone and paraquat. The role of JNK3 was evaluated using RNA silencing and gene deletion to block JNK3 signaling. Using an antibody that recognizes all isoforms of activated JNKs, we found that paraquat and rotenone stimulate JNK phosphorylation in primary cultured dopaminergic neurons. In cultured neurons transfected with Jnk3-specific siRNA and in neurons from Jnk3−/− mice, JNK phosphorylation was nearly abolished, suggesting that JNK3 is the main JNK isoform activated in dopaminergic neurons by these pesticides. Paraquat- and rotenone-induced death of dopaminergic neurons was also significantly reduced by Jnk3 siRNA or Jnk3 gene deletion and deletion of the Jnk3 gene completely attenuated paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuron death and motor-deficits in vivo. Our data identify JNK3 as a common and critical mediator of dopaminergic neuron death induced by paraquat and rotenone, suggesting that it is a potential drug target for PD treatment. PMID:20418776

  7. Prior stimulation of the endocannabinoid system prevents methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in the striatum through activation of CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Nader, Joëlle; Rapino, Cinzia; Gennequin, Benjamin; Chavant, Francois; Francheteau, Maureen; Makriyannis, Alexandros; Duranti, Andrea; Maccarrone, Mauro; Solinas, Marcello; Thiriet, Nathalie

    2014-12-01

    Methamphetamine toxicity is associated with cell death and loss of dopamine neuron terminals in the striatum similar to what is found in some neurodegenerative diseases. Conversely, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has been suggested to be neuroprotective in the brain, and new pharmacological tools have been developed to increase their endogenous tone. In this study, we evaluated whether ECS stimulation could reduce the neurotoxicity of high doses of methamphetamine on the dopamine system. We found that methamphetamine alters the levels of the major endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) in the striatum, suggesting that the ECS participates in the brain responses to methamphetamine. Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a cannabis-derived agonist of both CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, or inhibitors of the main enzymes responsible for the degradation of AEA and 2-AG (URB597 and JZL184, respectively), blunted the decrease in striatal protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase induced by methamphetamine. In addition, antagonists of CB2, but not of CB1, blocked the preventive effects of URB597 and JZL184, suggesting that only the former receptor subtype is engaged in neuroprotection exerted by ECS stimulation. Finally, we found that methamphetamine increases striatal levels of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha, an effect that was blocked by ECS stimulation. Altogether, our results indicate that stimulation of ECS prior to the administration of an overdose of methamphetamine considerably reduces the neurotoxicity of the drug through CB2 receptor activation and highlight a protective function for the ECS against the toxicity induced by drugs and other external insults to the brain. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dopamine agonist 3-PPP fails to protect against MPTP-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Muralikrishnan, Dhanasekaran; Ebadi, Manuchair; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2004-02-01

    We investigated the neuroprotective effect of the dopamine agonist, 3-PPP [3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-N-propylpiperidine] against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity. MPTP (30 mg/kg, i.p., twice, 16 h apart) causes significant dopamine depletion in nucleus caudatus putamen (NCP) by 1 week. 3-PPP had no effect on the monoamine oxidase-B activity (MAO-B) activity in NCP. 3-PPP did not affect dopamine uptake, whereas mazindol significantly blocked the uptake of dopamine dose dependently. MPTP-induced behavioral changes in mice were not reduced by pretreatment with 3-PPP. This dopamine agonist did not prevent dopamine depletion caused by MPTP. MPP+ (20 microM) significantly inhibited the cell proliferation of SH-SY5Y dopaminergic neuronal cells. 3-PPP had no effect on the SH-SY5Y neuronal cell growth in culture and did not block the MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity. This study shows that the dopamine agonist 3-PPP failed to protect against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  9. A holistic approach to anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity and its implications for future mechanistic studies.

    PubMed

    Zanghi, Christine N; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    The year 2016 marked the 15th anniversary since anesthesia-induced developmental neurotoxicity and its resulting cognitive dysfunction were first described. Since that time, multiple scientific studies have supported these original findings and investigated possible mechanisms behind anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity. This paper reviews the existing mechanistic literature on anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity in the context of a holistic approach that emphasizes the importance of both neuronal and non-neuronal cells during early postnatal development. Sections are divided into key stages in early neural development; apoptosis, neurogenesis, migration, differentiation, synaptogenesis, gliogenesis, myelination and blood brain barrier/cerebrovasculature. In addition, the authors combine the established literature in the field of anesthesia-induced neurotoxicity with literature from other related scientific fields to speculate on the potential role of non-neuronal cells and to generate new future hypotheses for understanding anesthetic toxicity and its application to the practice of pediatric anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CDK5-mediated tau accumulation triggers methamphetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis via endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ning; Zhang, Fu; Zhu, Bofeng; Liu, Chao; Lin, Zhoumeng; Wang, Huijun; Xie, Wei-Bing

    2018-08-01

    Overexposure to methamphetamine (METH) causes apoptosis in a number of cell types, particularly neuronal cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of METH-induced neuronal apoptosis remain to be elucidated. Accumulation of microtubule-associated protein Tau can lead to activation of multiple neurotoxic pathways, which is closely correlated with neuronal apoptosis. The aim of this study was to determine the role of Tau in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. We determined the expression of two phosphorylated Tau proteins (serine 396 and threonine 231) in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells and in the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with vehicle or METH using western blotting, immunohistochemical staining and immunofluorescence staining. We also measured the expression levels of the phosphorylated Tau protein, ubiquitination proteins, the intermediate products of proteasome degradation pathway, CD3-δ (a substrate of proteasome degradation pathway), endoplasmic reticulum stress signal molecule phosphorylated PERK (pPERK), and endoplasmic reticulum stress-specific apoptotic signal molecule caspase-12 in SH-SY5Y cells and in rats after inhibiting the expression of an upstream regulatory factor of phosphorylated Tau protein (CDK5) using siRNA or virus transfection. The results showed that exposure to METH significantly up-regulated the expression of phosphorylated Tau protein in vivo and in vitro and silencing the expression of CDK5 inhibited the up-regulation of phosphorylated Tau induced by METH exposure. METH exposure also significantly increased the expression of ubiquitination protein and CD3-δ and these effects were blocked by CDK5 silencing. In addition, METH exposure significantly elevated the levels of phosphorylated PERK and caspase-12 and these effects were suppressed after CDK5 silencing, which indicates that blockade of CDK5 expression can mitigate METH-induced neuronal apoptosis. These results suggest that METH can impair the endoplasmic

  11. Chronic Hypergravity Induces Changes in the Dopaminergic Neuronal System in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelos, Andrew; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2017-01-01

    Upon atmospheric exitre-entry and during training, astronauts are subjected to temporary periods of hypergravity, which has been implicated in the activation of oxidative stress pathways contributing to mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal degeneration. The pathogenesis of Parkinsons disease and other neurodegenerative disorders is associated with oxidative damage to neurons involved in dopamine systems of the brain. Our study aims to examine the effects of a hypergravitational developmental environment on the degeneration of dopaminergic systems in Drosophila melanogaster. Male and female flies (Gal4-UAS transgenic line) were hatched and raised to adulthood in centrifugal hypergravity (97rpm, 3g). The nuclear expression of the reporter, Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) is driven by the dopaminergic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter, allowing for the targeted visualization of dopamine producing neurons. After being raised to adulthood and kept in hypergravity until 18 days of age, flies were dissected and the expression of TH was measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy. TH expression in the fly brains was used to obtain counts of healthy dopaminergic neurons for flies raised in chronic hypergravity and control groups. Dopaminergic neuron expression data were compared with those of previous studies that limited hypergravity exposure to late life in order to determine the flies adaptability to the gravitational environment when raised from hatching through adulthood. Overall, we observed a significant effect of chronic hypergravity exposure contributing to deficits in dopaminergic neuron expression (p 0.003). Flies raised in 3g had on average lower dopaminergic neuron counts (mean 97.7) when compared with flies raised in 1g (mean 122.8). We suspect these lower levels of TH expression are a result of oxidative dopaminergic cell loss in flies raised in hypergravity. In future studies, we hope to further elucidate the mechanism by which hypergravity-induced

  12. Substance P exacerbates dopaminergic neurodegeneration through neurokinin-1 receptor-independent activation of microglial NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingshan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Qian, Li; Chen, Shih-Heng; Wilson, Belinda; Oyarzabal, Esteban; Jiang, Lulu; Ali, Syed; Robinson, Bonnie; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2014-09-10

    Although dysregulated substance P (SP) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD), how SP affects the survival of dopaminergic neurons remains unclear. Here, we found that mice lacking endogenous SP (TAC1(-/-)), but not those deficient in the SP receptor (neurokinin-1 receptor, NK1R), were more resistant to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced nigral dopaminergic neurodegeneration than wild-type controls, suggesting a NK1R-independent toxic action of SP. In vitro dose-response studies revealed that exogenous SP enhanced LPS- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a bimodal manner, peaking at submicromolar and subpicomolar concentrations, but was substantially less effective at intermediate concentrations. Mechanistically, the actions of submicromolar levels of SP were NK1R-dependent, whereas subpicomolar SP-elicited actions required microglial NADPH oxidase (NOX2), the key superoxide-producing enzyme, but not NK1R. Subpicomolar concentrations of SP activated NOX2 by binding to the catalytic subunit gp91(phox) and inducing membrane translocation of the cytosolic subunits p47(phox) and p67(phox). The importance of NOX2 was further corroborated by showing that inhibition or disruption of NOX2 blocked subpicomolar SP-exacerbated neurotoxicity. Together, our findings revealed a critical role of microglial NOX2 in mediating the neuroinflammatory and dopaminergic neurodegenerative effects of SP, which may provide new insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3412490-14$15.00/0.

  13. Acorus tatarinowii Schott extract protects PC12 cells from amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    An, Hong-Mei; Li, Guo-Wen; Lin, Chen; Gu, Chao; Jin, Miao; Sun, Wen-Xian; Qiu, Ming-Feng; Hu, Bing

    2014-05-01

    Amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity has been identified as a major cause of Alzheimer's disease. Acorus tatarinowii Schott is one of the most frequently used Chinese herbs for Alzheimer's disease treatment. However, the effects of Acorus tatarinowii Schott on amyloid-beta mediated nerve cell damage remains unknown. In the present study, neuronal differentiated PC12 cells were used as a model to evaluate the effects of A. tatarinowii Schott extract (ATSE) against Abeta25-35 induced neurotoxicity. The results showed pretreatment with ATSE significantly protected PC12 cells from Abeta25-35 induced cell death, lactate dehydrogenase release, DNA damage, mitochondrial dysfunction and cytochrome c release from mitochondria. In addition, pretreatment with ATSE also significantly inhibited Abeta25-35 induced caspase-3 activation and reactive oxygen species generation in PC12 cells. These observations suggested that ATSE protects PC12 cells from amyloid-beta induced neurotoxicity.

  14. Cortical ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonism protects against methamphetamine-induced striatal neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gross, N B; Duncker, P C; Marshall, J F

    2011-12-29

    Binge administration of the psychostimulant drug, methamphetamine (mAMPH), produces long-lasting structural and functional abnormalities in the striatum. mAMPH binges produce nonexocytotic release of dopamine (DA), and mAMPH-induced activation of excitatory afferent inputs to cortex and striatum is evidenced by elevated extracellular glutamate (GLU) in both regions. The mAMPH-induced increases in DA and GLU neurotransmission are thought to combine to injure striatal DA nerve terminals of mAMPH-exposed brains. Systemic pretreatment with either competitive or noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonists protects against mAMPH-induced striatal DA terminal damage, but the locus of these antagonists' effects has not been determined. Here, we applied either the NMDA receptor antagonist, (dl)-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5), or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor antagonist, dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), directly to the dura mater over frontoparietal cortex to assess their effects on mAMPH-induced cortical and striatal immediate-early gene (c-fos) expression. In a separate experiment we applied AP5 or DNQX epidurally in the same cortical location of rats during a binge regimen of mAMPH and assessed mAMPH-induced striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) depletions 1 week later. Our results indicate that both ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists reduced the mAMPH-induced Fos expression in cerebral cortex regions near the site of epidural application and reduced Fos immunoreactivity in striatal regions innervated by the affected cortical regions. Also, epidural application of the same concentration of either antagonist during a binge mAMPH regimen blunted the mAMPH-induced striatal DAT depletions with a topography similar to its effects on Fos expression. These findings demonstrate that mAMPH-induced dopaminergic injury depends upon cortical NMDA and AMPA receptor activation and suggest the involvement of the

  15. Recent Insights Into Molecular Mechanisms of Propofol-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity: Implications for the Protective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Zeljko J; Logan, Sarah; Liu, Yanan; Bai, Xiaowen

    2016-11-01

    Mounting evidence has demonstrated that general anesthetics could induce developmental neurotoxicity, including acute widespread neuronal cell death, followed by long-term memory and learning abnormalities. Propofol is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic agent for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia and procedural and critical care sedation in children. Compared with other anesthetic drugs, little information is available on its potential contributions to neurotoxicity. Growing evidence from multiple experimental models showed a similar neurotoxic effect of propofol as observed in other anesthetic drugs, raising serious concerns regarding pediatric propofol anesthesia. The aim of this review is to summarize the current findings of propofol-induced developmental neurotoxicity. We first present the evidence of neurotoxicity from animal models, animal cell culture, and human stem cell-derived neuron culture studies. We then discuss the mechanism of propofol-induced developmental neurotoxicity, such as increased cell death in neurons and oligodendrocytes, dysregulation of neurogenesis, abnormal dendritic development, and decreases in neurotrophic factor expression. Recent findings of complex mechanisms of propofol action, including alterations in microRNAs and mitochondrial fission, are discussed as well. An understanding of the toxic effect of propofol and the underlying mechanisms may help to develop effective novel protective or therapeutic strategies for avoiding the neurotoxicity in the developing human brain.

  16. Platinum-Induced Neurotoxicity and Preventive Strategies: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Abolfazl; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Ceresa, Cecilia; Avan, Amir; Cavaletti, Guido; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxicity is a burdensome side effect of platinum-based chemotherapy that prevents administration of the full efficacious dosage and often leads to treatment withdrawal. Peripheral sensory neurotoxicity varies from paresthesia in fingers to ataxic gait, which might be transient or irreversible. Because the number of patients being treated with these neurotoxic agents is still increasing, the need for understanding the pathogenesis of this dramatic side effect is critical. Platinum derivatives, such as cisplatin and carboplatin, harm mainly peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglia neurons, possibly because of progressive DNA-adduct accumulation and inhibition of DNA repair pathways (e.g., extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinass), which finally mediate apoptosis. Oxaliplatin, with a completely different pharmacokinetic profile, may also alter calcium-sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel kinetics through a calcium ion immobilization by oxalate residue as a calcium chelator and cause acute neurotoxicity. Polymorphisms in several genes, such as voltage-gated sodium channel genes or genes affecting the activity of pivotal metal transporters (e.g., organic cation transporters, organic cation/carnitine transporters, and some metal transporters, such as the copper transporters, and multidrug resistance-associated proteins), can also influence drug neurotoxicity and treatment response. However, most pharmacogenetics studies need to be elucidated by robust evidence. There are supportive reports about the effectiveness of several neuroprotective agents (e.g., vitamin E, glutathione, amifostine, xaliproden, and venlafaxine), but dose adjustment and/or drug withdrawal seem to be the most frequently used methods in the management of platinum-induced peripheral neurotoxicity. To develop alternative options in the treatment of platinum-induced neuropathy, studies on in vitro

  17. Oxidative damage and neurodegeneration in manganese-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Milatovic, Dejan; Zaja-Milatovic, Snjezana; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2009-10-15

    Exposure to excessive manganese (Mn) levels results in neurotoxicity to the extrapyramidal system and the development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like movement disorder, referred to as manganism. Although the mechanisms by which Mn induces neuronal damage are not well defined, its neurotoxicity appears to be regulated by a number of factors, including oxidative injury, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. To investigate the mechanisms underlying Mn neurotoxicity, we studied the effects of Mn on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, changes in high-energy phosphates (HEP), neuroinflammation mediators and associated neuronal dysfunctions both in vitro and in vivo. Primary cortical neuronal cultures showed concentration-dependent alterationsmore » in biomarkers of oxidative damage, F{sub 2}-isoprostanes (F{sub 2}-IsoPs) and mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP), as early as 2 h following Mn exposure. Treatment of neurons with 500 {mu}M Mn also resulted in time-dependent increases in the levels of the inflammatory biomarker, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}). In vivo analyses corroborated these findings, establishing that either a single or three (100 mg/kg, s.c.) Mn injections (days 1, 4 and 7) induced significant increases in F{sub 2}-IsoPs and PGE{sub 2} in adult mouse brain 24 h following the last injection. Quantitative morphometric analyses of Golgi-impregnated striatal sections from mice exposed to single or three Mn injections revealed progressive spine degeneration and dendritic damage of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). These findings suggest that oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation are underlying mechanisms in Mn-induced neurodegeneration.« less

  18. Circadian-dependent effect of melatonin on dopaminergic D2 antagonist-induced hypokinesia and agonist-induced stereotypies in rats.

    PubMed

    Sumaya, I C; Byers, D M; Irwin, L N; Del Val, S; Moss, D E

    2004-08-01

    Although a melatonin/dopamine relationship has been well established in nonmotor systems wherein dopamine and melatonin share an antagonist relationship, less clear is the role melatonin may play in extrapyramidal dopaminergic function. Therefore, the purpose of the present experiments was to examine the relationship between melatonin and the dopaminergic D2 receptor system and behavior. Hypokinesia was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats with fluphenazine (D2 antagonist, 0.4 mg/kg ip) and stereotypies with apomorphine (D2 agonist, 0.6 mg/kg sc) during the light (1200 h) and dark (2200 h) phases. As expected, fluphenazine induced severe hypokinesia during the light phase (482 +/- 176 s); however, unexpectedly, fluphenazine-induced hypokinesia during the dark was almost nonexistent (25 +/- 6 s). Furthermore, melatonin treatment (30 mg/kg ip) produced a strong interaction with fluphenazine in that it reduced fluphenazine-induced hypokinesia by nearly 80% in the light (112 +/- 45 s) but paradoxically increased the minimal fluphenazine-induced hypokinesia in the dark by more than 60% (70 +/- 17 s). Melatonin also reduced apomorphine-induced stereotypies by nearly 40% in the light but had no effect in the dark. Taken together, these data show (1) a strong and unexpected nocturnal effect of fluphenazine on hypokinesia and (2) provide support for an antagonistic melatonin/dopaminergic interaction in the context of motor behavior and D2 receptor function which appears to be critically dependent on the light/dark status of the dopaminergic system. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  19. Resveratrol Suppresses Rotenone-induced Neurotoxicity Through Activation of SIRT1/Akt1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Dong, Xiaoguang; Liu, Zengxun; Zhu, Shaowei; Liu, Haili; Fan, Wenchuang; Hu, Yanlai; Hu, Tao; Yu, Yonghui; Li, Yizhao; Liu, Tianwei; Xie, Chengjia; Gao, Qing; Li, Guibao; Zhang, Jing; Ding, Zhaoxi; Sun, Jinhao

    2018-06-01

    Rotenone is a common pesticide and has been reported as one of the risk factors for Parkinson disease. Rotenone can cause neuronal death or apoptosis through inducing oxidative injury and inhibiting mitochondrial function. As a natural polyphenolic compound, resveratrol possesses the antioxidant capacity and neuroprotective effect. However, the mechanism underlying the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol against rotenone-induced neurotoxicity remains elusive. Here, we treated PC12 cells with rotenone to induce neurotoxicity, and the neurotoxic cells were subjected to resveratrol treatment. The CCK8 and LDH activity assays demonstrated that resveratrol could suppress neurotoxicity induced by rotenone (P < 0.01). The DCFH-DA assay indicated that resveratrol reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). JC-1 and Hoechst 33342/PI staining revealed that resveratrol attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol reversed rotenone-induced decrease in SIRT1 expression and Akt1 phosphorylation (P < 0.05). Furthermore, when the SIRT1 and Akt1 activity was inhibited by niacinamide and LY294002, respectively, the neuroprotective effect of resveratrol was remarkably attenuated, which implied that SIRT1 and Akt1 could mediate this process and may be potential molecular targets for intervening rotenone-induced neurotoxicity. In summary, our study demonstrated that resveratrol reduced rotenone-induced oxidative damage, which was partly mediated through activation of the SIRT1/Akt1 signaling pathway. Our study launched a promising avenue for the potential application of resveratrol as a neuroprotective therapeutic agent in Parkinson disease. Anat Rec, 301:1115-1125, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MK-801 and dextromethorphan block microglial activation and protect against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2005-07-19

    Methamphetamine causes long-term toxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum. Evidence is emerging that microglia can contribute to the neuronal damage associated with disease, injury, or inflammation, but their role in methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity has received relatively little attention. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the neurotoxic HIV Tat protein, which cause dopamine neuronal toxicity after direct infusion into brain, cause activation of cultured mouse microglial cells as evidenced by increased expression of intracellular cyclooxygenase-2 and elevated secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha. MK-801, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist that is known to protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, prevents microglial activation by LPS and HIV Tat. Dextromethorphan, an antitussive agent with NMDA receptor blocking properties, also prevents microglial activation. In vivo, MK-801 and dextromethorphan reduce methamphetamine-induced activation of microglia in striatum and they protect dopamine nerve endings against drug-induced nerve terminal damage. The present results indicate that the ability of MK-801 and dextromethorphan to protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity is related to their common property as blockers of microglial activation.

  1. Sulforaphane-induced autophagy flux prevents prion protein-mediated neurotoxicity through AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, J-K; Park, S-Y

    2014-10-10

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative and infectious disorders that involve accumulation of misfolded scrapie prion protein, and which are characterized by spongiform degeneration. Autophagy, a major homeostatic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, has garnered attention as the potential target for neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease. We focused on protective effects of sulforaphane found in cruciferous vegetables on prion-mediated neurotoxicity and the mechanism of sulforaphane related to autophagy. In human neuroblastoma cells, sulforaphane protected prion protein (PrP) (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and increased autophagy flux marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II protein levels, following a decrease of p62 protein level. Pharmacological and genetical inhibition of autophagy by 3MA, wortmannin and knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) led to block the effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore we demonstrated that both sulforaphane-induced autophagy and protective effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity are dependent on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present results indicated that sulforaphane of cruciferous vegetables enhanced autophagy flux led to the protection effects against prion-mediated neurotoxicity, which was regulated by AMPK signaling pathways in human neuron cells. Our data also suggest that sulforaphane has a potential value as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disease including prion diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Meth Project and Teen Meth Use: New Estimates from the National and State Youth Risk Behavior Surveys.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D Mark; Elsea, David

    2015-12-01

    In this note, we use data from the national and state Youth Risk Behavior Surveys for the period 1999 through 2011 to estimate the relationship between the Meth Project, an anti-methamphetamine advertising campaign, and meth use among high school students. During this period, a total of eight states adopted anti-meth advertising campaigns. After accounting for pre-existing downward trends in meth use, we find little evidence that the campaign curbed meth use in the full sample. We do find, however, some evidence that the Meth Project may have decreased meth use among White high school students. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Protective Efficacy of Selenite against Lead-Induced Neurotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, I-Ling; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Selenium is an essential micronutrient that has a narrow exposure window between its beneficial and toxic effects. This study investigated the protective potential of selenite (IV) against lead (Pb(II))-induced neurotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Principal Findings The results showed that Se(IV) (0.01 µM) pretreatment ameliorated the decline of locomotion behaviors (frequencies of body bends, head thrashes, and reversal ) of C. elegans that are damaged by Pb(II) (100 µM) exposure. The intracellular ROS level of C. elegans induced by Pb(II) exposure was significantly lowered by Se(IV) supplementation prior to Pb(II) exposure. Finally, Se(IV) protects AFD sensory neurons from Pb(II)-induced toxicity. Conclusions Our study suggests that Se(IV) has protective activities against Pb(II)-induced neurotoxicity through its antioxidant property. PMID:23638060

  4. Attenuation of Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity by Cyanidin, a Natural Inhibitor of ROS-Mediated Apoptosis in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Da-wei; Sun, Jing-yi; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Shuai; Hou, Ya-jun; Yang, Ming-feng; Fu, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Zong-yong; Mao, Lei-lei; Yuan, Hui; Fang, Jie; Fan, Cun-dong; Zhu, Mei-jia; Sun, Bao-liang

    2015-10-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy in clinic is severely limited by its adverse effect, including neurotoxicity. Oxidative damage contributes to cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity, but the mechanism remains unclearly. Cyanidin, a natural flavonoid compound, exhibits powerful antioxidant activity. Hence, we investigated the protective effects of cyanidin on PC12 cells against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity and explored the underlying mechanisms. The results showed that cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity was completely reversed by cyanidin through inhibition of PC12 cell apoptosis, as proved by the attenuation of Sub-G1 peak, PARP cleavage, and caspases-3 activation. Mechanistically, cyanidin significantly inhibited reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced DNA damage in cisplatin-treated PC12 cells. Our findings revealed that cyanidin as an apoptotic inhibitor effectively blocked cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity through inhibition of ROS-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis, predicating its therapeutic potential in prevention of chemotherapy-induced neurotoxicity. Cisplatin caused DNA damage, activated p53, and subsequently induced PC12 cells apoptosis by triggering ROS overproduction. However, cyanidin administration effectively inhibited DNA damage, attenuated p53 phosphorylation, and eventually reversed cisplatin-induced PC12 cell apoptosis through inhibition ROS accumulation.

  5. Methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) induce differential cytotoxic effects in bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M; Rice, Kenner C; Gannon, Brenda M; Fantegrossi, William E; Gonzalez, Carmen; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F

    2016-08-26

    Designer drugs such as synthetic psychostimulants are indicative of a worldwide problem of drug abuse and addiction. In addition to methamphetamine (METH), these drugs include 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) and commercial preparations of synthetic cathinones including 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), typically referred to as "bath salts." These psychostimulants exert neurotoxic effects by altering monoamine systems in the brain. Additionally, METH and MDMA adversely affect the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB): there are no current reports on the effects of MDPV on the BBB. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of METH, MDMA and MDPV on bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (bBMVECs), an accepted in vitro model of the BBB. Confluent bBMVEC monolayers were treated with METH, MDMA and MDPV (0.5mM-2.5mM) for 24h. METH and MDMA increased lactate dehydrogenase release only at the highest concentration (2.5mM), whereas MDPV induced cytotoxicity at all concentrations. MDMA and METH decreased cellular proliferation only at 2.5mM, with similar effects observed after MDPV exposures starting at 1mM. Only MDPV increased reactive oxygen species production at all concentrations tested whereas all 3 drugs increased nitric oxide production. Morphological analysis revealed different patterns of compound-induced cell damage. METH induced vacuole formation at 1mM and disruption of the monolayer at 2.5mM. MDMA induced disruption of the endothelial monolayer from 1mM without vacuolization. On the other hand, MDPV induced monolayer disruption at doses ≥0.5mM without vacuole formation; at 2.5mM, the few remaining cells lacked endothelial morphology. These data suggest that even though these synthetic psychostimulants alter monoaminergic systems, they each induce BBB toxicity by different mechanisms with MDPV being the most toxic. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. The effects of D3R on TLR4 signaling involved in the regulation of METH-mediated mast cells activation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Li; Geng, Yan; Li, Ming; Jin, Yao-Feng; Ren, Hui-Xun; Li, Xia; Wu, Feng; Wang, Biao; Cheng, Wei-Ying; Chen, Teng; Chen, Yan-Jiong

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating studies have revealed that the dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) plays an important role in methamphetamine (METH) addiction. However, the action of D3R on METH-mediated immune response and the underlying mechanism remain unclear. Mast cells (MCs) are currently identified as effector cells in many processes of immune responses, and MC activation is induced by various stimuli such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, CD117 and FcεRI are known as MC markers due to their specific expression in MCs. To investigate the effects of D3R on METH-mediated alteration of LPS-induced MCs activation and the underlying mechanism, in this study, we examined the expression of CD117 and FcεRI in the intestines of wild-type (D3R(+/+)) and D3R-deficient (D3R(-/-)) mice. We also measured the production of MC-derived cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, IL-4, IL-13 and CCL-5, in the bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) of WT and D3R(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we explored the effects of D3R on METH-mediated TLR4 and downstream MAPK and NF-κB signaling induced by LPS in mouse BMMCs. We found that METH suppressed MC activation induced by LPS in the intestines of D3R(+/)mice. In contrast, LPS-induced MC activation was less affected by METH in D3R(-/-) mice. Furthermore, METH altered LPS-induced cytokine production in BMMCs of D3R(+/+) mice but not D3R(-/-) mice. D3R was also involved in METH-mediated modulation of LPS-induced expression of TLR4 and downstream MAPK and NF-κB signaling molecules in mouse BMMCs. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the effect of D3R on TLR4 signaling may be implicated in the regulation of METH-mediated MCs activation induced by LPS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Minocycline attenuates colistin-induced neurotoxicity via suppression of apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Chongshan; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Cappai, Roberto; Wang, Yang; Tang, Shusheng; Xiao, Xilong; Velkov, Tony

    2017-01-01

    Background: Neurotoxicity is an adverse effect patients experience during colistin therapy. The development of effective neuroprotective agents that can be co-administered during polymyxin therapy remains a priority area in antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present study investigates the neuroprotective effect of the synergistic tetracycline antibiotic minocycline against colistin-induced neurotoxicity. Methods: The impact of minocycline pretreatment on colistin-induced apoptosis, caspase activation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were investigated using cultured mouse neuroblastoma-2a (N2a) and primary cortical neuronal cells. Results: Colistin-induced neurotoxicity in mouse N2a and primary cortical cells gives rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Pretreatment of the neuronal cells with minocycline at 5, 10 and 20 μM for 2 h prior to colistin (200 μM) exposure (24 h), had an neuroprotective effect by significantly decreasing intracellular ROS production and by upregulating the activities of the anti-ROS enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. Minocycline pretreatment also protected the cells from colistin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation and subsequent apoptosis. Immunohistochemical imaging studies revealed colistin accumulates within the dendrite projections and cell body of primary cortical neuronal cells. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is first study demonstrating the protective effect of minocycline on colistin-induced neurotoxicity by scavenging of ROS and suppression of apoptosis. Our study highlights that co-administration of minocycline kills two birds with one stone: in addition to its synergistic antimicrobial activity, minocycline could potentially ameliorate unwanted neurotoxicity in patients undergoing polymyxin therapy. PMID:28204513

  8. Vasospasm is a significant factor in cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity: case report.

    PubMed

    Braakman, Hilde M H; Lodder, Jan; Postma, Alida A; Span, Lambert F R; Mess, Werner H

    2010-05-11

    The aetiology of central nervous system lesions observed in cerebral cyclosporine neurotoxicity remains controversial. We report a 48-year-old woman with a non-severe aplastic anaemia who presented with stroke-like episodes while on cyclosporine treatment.Transcranial Doppler ultrasound revealed severely elevated flow velocities in several cerebral vessels, consistent with vasospasm. Immediately after reducing the cyclosporine dose, the stroke-like episodes disappeared. Only after cyclosporine withdrawal the transcranial Doppler ultrasound abnormalities fully resolved. This case demonstrates a significant role of vasospasm in the pathway of cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is an effective tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of cyclosporine-induced vasospasm.

  9. Role of platinum DNA damage-induced transcriptional inhibition in chemotherapy-induced neuronal atrophy and peripheral neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Johnson J; Ip, Virginia; Jamieson, Stephen M F; McKeage, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Platinum-based anticancer drugs cause peripheral neurotoxicity by damaging sensory neurons within the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), but the mechanisms are incompletely understood. The roles of platinum DNA binding, transcription inhibition and altered cell size were investigated in primary cultures of rat DRG cells. Click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging of RNA-incorporated 5-ethynyluridine showed high, but wide ranging, global levels of transcription in individual neurons that correlated with their cell body size. Treatment with platinum drugs reduced neuronal transcription and cell body size to an extent that corresponded to the amount of preceding platinum DNA binding, but without any loss of neuronal cells. The effects of platinum drugs on neuronal transcription and cell body size were inhibited by blocking platinum DNA binding with sodium thiosulfate, and mimicked by treatment with a model transcriptional inhibitor, actinomycin D. In vivo oxaliplatin treatment depleted the total RNA content of DRG tissue concurrently with altering DRG neuronal size. These findings point to a mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. DRG neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this mechanism of toxicity because of their requirements for high basal levels of global transcriptional activity. Findings point to a new stepwise mechanism of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neurotoxicity, whereby platinum DNA damage induces global transcriptional arrest leading in turn to neuronal atrophy. Dorsal root ganglion neurons may be particularly vulnerable to this neurotoxicity because of their high global transcriptional outputs, demonstrated in this study by click chemistry quantitative fluorescence imaging. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Protective effects of apomorphine against zinc-induced neurotoxicity in cultured cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hirokazu; Maeda, Asuka; Kamiya, Tetsuro; Adachi, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    There is evidence that excessive zinc (Zn(2+)) release from presynaptic terminals following brain injuries such as ischemia and severe epileptic seizures induces neuronal cell death. Apomorphine (Apo), a dopamine receptor agonist, has been shown to have pleiotropic biological functions. In this study, we investigated whether Apo protects cultured cortical neurons from neurotoxicity provoked by excessive Zn(2+) exposure. Pretreatment with Apo dose- and time-dependently ameliorated Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. In addition, pretreatment with Apo prevented intracellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and ATP depletion caused by Zn(2+) exposure. Dopamine receptor antagonists did not influence Apo protection against Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. Apo is shown to be autoxidized to produce oxidized products such as reactive oxygen species and quinones. N-Acetylcysteine, a thiol compound, partially reduced Apo protection. Entry of Zn(2+) into neurons is thought to be a critical step of Zn(2+) neurotoxicity. Interestingly, we found that pretreatment with Apo decreased elevation of intracellular Zn(2+) levels after Zn(2+) exposure and induced mRNA expression of the zinc transporter ZnT1, which transports intracellular Zn(2+) out of cells, and metallothionein. Taken together, these results suggest that the protective effects of Apo are regulated, at least in part, by its oxidized products, and preventing intracellular accumulation of Zn(2+) contributes to Apo protection against Zn(2+) neurotoxicity.

  11. Reversible metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity after 10 weeks of therapy.

    PubMed

    AlDhaleei, Wafa; AlMarzooqi, Ayesha; Gaber, Nouran

    2018-04-20

    Metronidazole is a commonly used antimicrobial worldwide. The most common side effects that have been reported are nausea, vomiting and hypersensitivity reactions. However, neurotoxicity has been reported with the use of metronidazole but rather rare. The most common neurological manifestation is peripheral neuropathy involvement in the form of sensory loss. It is worth mentioning that central neurotoxicity is a rare side effect of metronidazole use but reversible. The manifestations vary from a headache, altered mental status to focal neurological deficits. The diagnosis is mainly by neuroimaging in the setting of acute neurological change in the patient status. Here, we report a case of metronidazole-induced neurotoxicity in a 38-year-old male patient who was admitted with a brain abscess and was started on metronidazole for more than 10 weeks. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Mitochondrial complex I inhibition is not required for dopaminergic neuron death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Won-Seok; Kruse, Shane E.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Xia, Zhengui

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I is one of the leading hypotheses for dopaminergic neuron death associated with Parkinson's disease (PD). To test this hypothesis genetically, we used a mouse strain lacking functional Ndufs4, a gene encoding a subunit required for complete assembly and function of complex I. Deletion of the Ndufs4 gene abolished complex I activity in midbrain mesencephalic neurons cultured from embryonic day (E) 14 mice, but did not affect the survival of dopaminergic neurons in culture. Although dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive than other neurons in these cultures to cell death induced by rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat treatments, the absence of complex I activity did not protect the dopaminergic neurons, as would be expected if these compounds act by inhibiting complex 1. In fact, the dopaminergic neurons were more sensitive to rotenone. These data suggest that dopaminergic neuron death induced by treatment with rotenone, MPP+, or paraquat is independent of complex I inhibition. PMID:18812510

  13. E-p-Methoxycinnamic acid protects cultured neuronal cells against neurotoxicity induced by glutamate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So Ra; Sung, Sang Hyun; Jang, Young Pyo; Markelonis, George J; Oh, Tae H; Kim, Young Choong

    2002-01-01

    We previously reported that four new phenylpropanoid glycosides and six known cinnamate derivatives isolated from roots of Scrophularia buergeriana Miquel (Scrophulariaceae) protected cultured cortical neurons from neurotoxicity induced by glutamate. Here, we have investigated the structure-activity relationships in the phenylpropanoids using our primary culture system. The α,β-unsaturated ester moiety and the para-methoxy group in the phenylpropanoids appeared to play a vital role in neuroprotective activity. This suggested that E-p-methoxycinnamic acid (E-p-MCA) might be a crucial component for their neuroprotective activity within the phenylpropanoid compounds. E-p-MCA significantly attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity when added prior to an excitotoxic glutamate challenge. The neuroprotective activity of E-p-MCA appeared to be more effective in protecting neurons against neurotoxicity induced by NMDA than from that induced by kainic acid. E-p-MCA inhibited the binding of [propyl-2,3-3H]-CGP39653 and [2-3H]-glycine to their respective binding sites on rat cortical membranes. However, even high concentrations of E-p-MCA failed to inhibit completely [propyl-2,3-3H]-CGP39653 and [2-3H]-glycine binding. Indeed, E-p-MCA diminished the calcium influx that routinely accompanies glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, and inhibited the subsequent overproduction of nitric oxide and cellular peroxide in glutamate-injured neurons. Thus, our results suggest that E-p-MCA exerts significant protective effects against neurodegeneration induced by glutamate in primary cultures of cortical neurons by an action suggestive of partial glutamatergic antagonism. PMID:11877337

  14. GRIN2A polymorphisms and expression levels are associated with lead-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu; Wang, Yiqing; Wang, Miaomiao; Sun, Na; Li, Chunping

    2017-04-01

    Lead acts as an antagonist of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). GRIN2A encodes an important subunit of NMDARs and may be a critical factor in the mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. Changes in GRIN2A expression levels or gene variants may be mechanisms of lead-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we hypothesized that GRIN2A might contribute to lead-induced neurotoxicity. A preliminary HEK293 cell experiment was performed to analyze the association between GRIN2A expression and lead exposure. In addition, in a population-based study, serum GRIN2A levels were measured in both lead-exposed and control populations. To detect further the influence of GRIN2A gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in lead-induced neurotoxicity, 3 tag SNPs (rs2650429, rs6497540, and rs9302415) were genotyped in a case-control study that included 399 lead-exposed subjects and 398 controls. Lead exposure decreased GRIN2A expression levels in HEK293 cells ( p < 0.001) compared with lead-free cells. Lead-exposed individuals had lower serum GRIN2A levels compared with controls ( p < 0.001), and we found a trend of decreasing GRIN2A level with an increase in blood lead level ( p < 0.001). In addition, we found a significant association between rs2650429 CT and TT genotypes and risk of lead poisoning compared with the rs2650429 CC genotype (adjusted odds ratio = 1.42, 95% confidence interval = 1.01-2.00]. Therefore, changes in GRIN2A expression levels and variants may be important mechanisms in the development of lead-induced neurotoxicity.

  15. Dopaminergic system in CA1 modulates MK-801 induced anxiolytic-like responses.

    PubMed

    Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Nasehi, Mohammad; Pournaghshband, Mahnaz; Yekta, Batool Ghorbani

    2012-11-01

    Today, there is relatively no debate on the notion that NMDA receptor antagonist agents in the hippocampus induce anxiolytic-like effects through distinct mechanisms. There is also a bulk of studies showing the involvement of the dopaminergic system in NMDA induced behaviors. Thus, on the basis of the involvement of dopaminergic system in anxiety-related behaviors, the present study aimed to investigate the involvement of the dorsal hippocampal (CA1) dopaminergic system in anxiolytic-like responses induced by MK801 (NMDA receptor antagonist) in male Wistar rats. We used the elevated plus maze to test anxiety. This apparatus has widely been employed to test parameters of anxiety-related behaviors including the open arm time percentage (%OAT), open arm entries percentage (%OAE), locomotor activity, grooming (the rat rubs its face), rearing (the rat maintains an erect posture) and defecation (the number of boli defection). The data showed that, intra-CA1 injection of MK801 (2 μg/rat) increases %OAT and %OAE but not other exploratory behaviors, indicating an anxiolytic-like effect. Moreover, sole intra-CA1 injection of SCH23390, dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, (0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/rat) and sulpiride, dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, (0.25,0.5 and 0.75 μg/rat) did not alter anxiety-like behaviors. Co-administration of subthreshold doses of SCH23390 (0.5 μg/rat) and MK801 (0.5 g/rat), induced anxiolytic-like behaviors. Furthermore, intra-CA1 administration of different doses of sulpiride (0.12, 0.5 and 0.75 μg/rat), 5 min before the injection of an effective dose of MK801 (2 μg/rat), decreased %OAT and %OAE, however did not alter other exploratory behaviors induced by MK801. Our results suggested a modulatory effect of the CA1 dopaminergic system on the anxiolytic-like effects induced by MK801.

  16. Meth Mouth-A Growing Epidemic in Dentistry?

    PubMed

    Pabst, Andreas; Castillo-Duque, Juan Carlos; Mayer, Axel; Klinghuber, Marcus; Werkmeister, Richard

    2017-10-30

    In the past two decades, the synthetic style and fashion drug "crystal meth" ("crystal", "meth"), chemically representing the crystalline form of the methamphetamine hydrochloride, has become more and more popular in the United States, in Eastern Europe, and just recently in Central and Western Europe. "Meth" is cheap, easy to synthesize and to market, and has an extremely high potential for abuse and dependence. As a strong sympathomimetic, "meth" has the potency to switch off hunger, fatigue and, pain while simultaneously increasing physical and mental performance. The most relevant side effects are heart and circulatory complaints, severe psychotic attacks, personality changes, and progressive neurodegeneration. Another effect is "meth mouth", defined as serious tooth and oral health damage after long-standing "meth" abuse; this condition may become increasingly relevant in dentistry and oral- and maxillofacial surgery. There might be an association between general methamphetamine abuse and the development of osteonecrosis, similar to the medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (MRONJ). Several case reports concerning "meth" patients after tooth extractions or oral surgery have presented clinical pictures similar to MRONJ. This overview summarizes the most relevant aspect concerning "crystal meth" abuse and "meth mouth".

  17. Synthetic bovine proline-rich-polypeptides generate hydroxyl radicals and fail to protect dopaminergic neurons against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Knaryan, Varduhi H; Samantaray, Supriti; Varghese, Merina; Srinivasan, Ambika; Galoyan, Armen A; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P

    2006-08-01

    Proline-rich-polypeptides (PRPs) isolated from bovine hypothalamus have been shown to render protection against neuronal injury of the brain and spinal cord. We examined two PRPs containing 15 and 10 amino acid residues (PRP-1 and PRP-4 synthetic polypeptide) for their effect, if any, on dopaminergic neuronal damage caused by the parkinsonian neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Effects of these PRPs on hydroxyl radical ((*)OH) generation in a Fenton-like reaction as well as from isolated mitochondria were monitored, employing a sensitive salicylate hydroxylation procedure. Balb/c mice treated (i.p., twice, 16 h apart) with MPTP (30 mg/kg) or PRP-1 (1.6 mg/kg), but not PRP-4 (1.6 mg/kg) showed significant loss of striatal dopamine and norepinephrine as assayed by an HPLC-electrochemical procedure. Pretreatment with the PRPs, 30 min prior to the neurotoxin administration failed to attenuate MPTP-induced striatal dopamine or norepinephrine depletion, but significantly attenuated the MPTP-induced decrease in dopamine turnover. A significant increase in the generation of (*)OH by the PRPs in a Fenton-like reaction or from isolated mitochondria suggests their pro-oxidant action, and explains their failure to protect against MPTP-induced parkinsonism in mice.

  18. alpha-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone attenuates methamphetamine-induced depletion of striatal dopamine without altering hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Cappon, G D; Broening, H W; Pu, C; Morford, L; Vorhees, C V

    1996-10-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) administration to adult rats (4 x 10 mg/kg s.c.) induces neurotoxicity predominately characterized by a persistent reduction of neostriatal dopamine (DA) content. Hyperthermia following MA administration potentiates the resulting DA depletion. DA-derived free radicals are postulated to be a mechanism through which MA-induced neurotoxicity is produced. The spin trapping agent PBN reacts with free radicals to form nitroxyl adducts, thereby preventing damaging free radical reactions with cellular substrates. MA with saline pretreatment (Sal-MA) reduced neostriatal DA by 55% (P < 0.01 vs. Sal-Sal). MA with PBN pretreatment (PBN-MA) at 36 or 60 mg/kg reduced neostriatal DA by 36 and 22%, respectively (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 vs Sal-MA) indicating partial protection. PBN pretreatment did not alter MA-induced hyperthermia. Thus, PBN does not attenuate MA-induced neurotoxicity by reducing MA-induced hyperthermia. These results support a role for free radicals in the generation of MA-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  19. Silibinin attenuates MPP⁺-induced neurotoxicity in the substantia nigra in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jung, Un Ju; Jeon, Min-Tae; Choi, Myung-Sook; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2014-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) pathway. The cause of neuronal death in PD is largely unknown, but it is becoming clear that inflammation plays a significant role in the pathophysiology of PD. Silibinin is a major flavonoid in milk thistle which has an anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated whether silibinin could have neuroprotective effects on DA neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-treated animal model of PD in vivo. To address this question, animals received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections 10, 50, or 100 mg/kg of silibinin, starting 1 day before MPP(+) injection and continued daily until 6 days post-lesion for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) staining, or until 1 hour prior to the MPP(+) injection to examine the expression levels of inflammatory proteins. Finally, their brains were harvested at the indicated time points for the analyses. Silibinin treatment with 10 mg/kg had no significantly neuroprotective effects in the substantia nigra (SN). However, 50 and 100 mg/kg of silibinin ameliorated the MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity in the SN in a dose-dependent manner, and the increased levels of inflammatory molecules such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by MPP(+) treatment were attenuated by treatment with 100 mg/kg of silibinin. These results indicate that silibinin could be a useful and beneficial natural product offering promise for the prevention of DA neuronal degeneration involved in PD.

  20. Bilirubin-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Preterm Neonate.

    PubMed

    Watchko, Jon F

    2016-06-01

    Bilirubin-induced neurotoxicity in preterm neonates remains a clinical concern. Multiple cellular and molecular cascades likely underlie bilirubin-induced neuronal injury, including plasma membrane perturbations, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and cell cycle arrest. Preterm newborns are particularly vulnerable secondary to central nervous system immaturity and concurrent adverse clinical conditions that may potentiate bilirubin toxicity. Acute bilirubin encephalopathy in preterm neonates may be subtle and manifest primarily as recurrent symptomatic apneic events. Low-bilirubin kernicterus continues to be reported in preterm neonates, and although multifactorial in nature, is often associated with marked hypoalbuminemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhancement of endocannabinoid signaling protects against cocaine-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vilela, Luciano R.; Gobira, Pedro H.; Viana, Thercia G.

    Cocaine is an addictive substance with a potential to cause deleterious effects in the brain. The strategies for treating its neurotoxicity, however, are limited. Evidence suggests that the endocannabinoid system exerts neuroprotective functions against various stimuli. Thus, we hypothesized that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main enzyme responsible for terminating the actions of the endocannabinoid anandamide, reduces seizures and cell death in the hippocampus in a model of cocaine intoxication. Male Swiss mice received injections of endocannabinoid-related compounds followed by the lowest dose of cocaine that induces seizures, electroencephalographic activity and cell death in the hippocampus. Themore » molecular mechanisms were studied in primary cell culture of this structure. The FAAH inhibitor, URB597, reduced cocaine-induced seizures and epileptiform electroencephalographic activity. The cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor selective agonist, ACEA, mimicked these effects, whereas the antagonist, AM251, prevented them. URB597 also inhibited cocaine-induced activation and death of hippocampal neurons, both in animals and in primary cell culture. Finally, we investigated if the PI3K/Akt/ERK intracellular pathway, a cell surviving mechanism coupled to CB{sub 1} receptor, mediated these neuroprotective effects. Accordingly, URB597 injection increased ERK and Akt phosphorylation in the hippocampus. Moreover, the neuroprotective effect of this compound was reversed by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the pharmacological facilitation of the anandamide/CB1/PI3K signaling protects the brain against cocaine intoxication in experimental models. This strategy may be further explored in the development of treatments for drug-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • Cocaine toxicity is characterized by seizures and hippocampal cell death. • The endocannabinoid anandamide acts as a brain protective mechanism. • Inhibition of anandamide

  2. WldS but not Nmnat1 protects dopaminergic neurites from MPP+ neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Antenor-Dorsey, Jo Ann V; O'Malley, Karen L

    2012-02-08

    The WldS mouse mutant ("Wallerian degeneration-slow") delays axonal degeneration in a variety of disorders including in vivo models of Parkinson's disease. The mechanisms underlying WldS -mediated axonal protection are unclear, although many studies have attributed WldS neuroprotection to the NAD+-synthesizing Nmnat1 portion of the fusion protein. Here, we used dissociated dopaminergic cultures to test the hypothesis that catalytically active Nmnat1 protects dopaminergic neurons from toxin-mediated axonal injury. Using mutant mice and lentiviral transduction of dopaminergic neurons, the present findings demonstrate that WldS but not Nmnat1, Nmnat3, or cytoplasmically-targeted Nmnat1 protects dopamine axons from the parkinsonian mimetic N-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+). Moreover, NAD+ synthesis is not required since enzymatically-inactive WldS still protects. In addition, NAD+ by itself is axonally protective and together with WldS is additive in the MPP+ model. Our data suggest that NAD+ and WldS act through separate and possibly parallel mechanisms to protect dopamine axons. As MPP+ is thought to impair mitochondrial function, these results suggest that WldS might be involved in preserving mitochondrial health or maintaining cellular metabolism.

  3. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene on dopaminergic cell death: involvement of CREB/Nrf2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Son, Beung Gu; Park, Young Hoon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2014-09-01

    As a part of ongoing studies to elucidate pharmacologically active components of Schisandra chinensis, we isolated and studied α-iso-cubebene. The neuroprotective mechanisms of α-iso-cubebene in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells were investigated. α-Iso-cubebene significantly inhibited cytotoxicity and apoptosis due to 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment of cells with α-iso-cubebene reduced intracellular accumulation of ROS and calcium in response to 6-OHDA. The neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene were found to result from protecting the mitochondrial membrane potential. Notably, α-iso-cubebene inhibited the release of apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria into the cytosol and nucleus after 6-OHDA treatment. α-Iso-cubebene also induced the activation of PKA/PKB/CREB/Nrf2 and suppressed 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. α-Iso-cubebene was found to induce phosphorylation of PKA and PKB and activate Nrf2 and CREB signaling pathways in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, α-iso-cubebene stimulated the expression of the antioxidant response genes NQO1 and HO-1. Finally, α-iso-cubebene-mediated neuroprotective effects were found to be reversible after transfection with CREB and Nrf2 small interfering RNAs.

  4. Effects of rutin on acrylamide-induced neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rutin is an important flavonoid that is consumed in the daily diet. The cytoprotective effects of rutin, including antioxidative, and neuroprotective have been shown in several studies. Neurotoxic effects of acrylamide (ACR) have been established in humans and animals. In this study, the protective effects of rutin in prevention and treatment of neural toxicity of ACR were studied. Results Rutin significantly reduced cell death induced by ACR (5.46 mM) in time- and dose-dependent manners. Rutin treatment decreased the ACR-induced cytotoxicity significantly in comparison to control (P <0.01, P < 0.001). Rutin (100 and 200 mg/kg) could prevent decrease of body weight in rats. In combination treatments with rutin (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg), vitamin E (200 mg/kg) and ACR, gait abnormalities significantly decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001). The level of malondialdehyde significantly decreased in the brain tissue of rats in both preventive and therapeutic groups that received rutin (100 and 200 mg/kg). Conclusion It seems that rutin could be effective in reducing neurotoxicity and the neuroprotective effect of it might be mediated via antioxidant activity. PMID:24524427

  5. A protective role of autophagy in TDCIPP-induced developmental neurotoxicity in zebrafish larvae.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruiwen; Zhang, Ling; Shi, Qipeng; Guo, Yongyong; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Bingsheng

    2018-06-01

    Tris (1, 3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCIPP), an extensively used organophosphorus flame retardant, is frequently detected in various environmental media and biota, and has been demonstrated as neurotoxic. Autophagy has been proposed as a protective mechanism against toxicant-induced neurotoxicity. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of TDCIPP exposure on autophagy, and its role in TDCIPP-induced developmental neurotoxicity. Zebrafish embryos (2-120 h post-fertilization [hpf]) were exposed to TDCIPP (0, 5, 50 and 500 μg/l) and a model neurotoxic chemical, chlorpyrifos (CPF, 100 μg/l). The developmental endpoints, locomotive behavior, cholinesterase activities, gene and protein expression related to neurodevelopment and autophagy were measured in the larvae. Our results demonstrate that exposure to TDCIPP (500 μg/l) and CPF causes developmental toxicity, including reduced hatching and survival rates and increased malformation rate (e.g., spinal curvature), as well as altered locomotor behavior. The expression of selected neurodevelopmental gene and protein markers (e.g., mbp, syn2a, and α1-tubulin) was significantly down-regulated in CPF and TDCIPP exposed zebrafish larvae. Treatment with CPF significantly inhibits AChE and BChE, while TDCIPP (0-500 μg/l) exerts no effects on these enzymes. Furthermore, the conversion of microtubule-associated protein I (LC3 I) to LC3 II was significantly increased in TDCIPP exposed zebrafish larvae. In addition, exposure to TDCIPP also activates transcription of several critical genes in autophagy (e.g. Becn1, atg3, atg5, map1lc3b and sqstm1). To further investigate the role of autophagy in TDCIPP induced developmental neurotoxicity, an autophagy inducer (rapamycin, Rapa, 1 nM) and inhibitor (chloroquine, CQ, 1 μM) were used. The results demonstrate that the hatching rate, survival rate, and the expression of mbp and а1-tubulin proteins were all significantly increased in larvae

  6. Ascorbic acid glucoside reduces neurotoxicity and glutathione depletion in mouse brain induced by nitrotriazole radiosensitazer.

    PubMed

    Cherdyntseva, Nadezda V; Ivanova, Anna A; Ivanov, Vladimir V; Cherdyntsev, Evgeny; Nair, Cherupally Krishnan Krishnan; Kagiya, Tsutomu V

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the potential of the anti-oxidant ascorbic acid glucoside (AA-2G) to modulate neurotoxicity induced by high doses of nitrotriazole radiosensitizer. Male and female C56Bl/6xCBA hybrid mice aged 8-14 weeks (weight 18-24 g) were used. Nitrotriazole drug radiosensitizer sanazole at a high dose of 2, 1 g/kg was per os administered to induce neurotoxicity at mice. Ascorbic acid glucoside was given 30 min before the sanazole administration. Serum ascorbic acid, brain glutathione level, as well as behavioral performance using open field apparatus were measured. Administration of high (non-therapeutic) doses of the nitrotriazole drug sanazole results in neurotoxicity in mice as evidenced from behavioral performance, emotional activity and depletion of the cellular antioxidant, glutathione, in the brain. The serum levels of ascorbic acid was also found reduced in high dose sanazole treated animals. Per os administration of ascorbic acid glucoside significantly reduced the neurotoxicity. This effect was associated with the prevention of glutathione depletion in mouse brain and restoring the ascorbic acid level in serum. Administration of ascorbic acid glucoside, but not ascorbic acid, before sanazole administration protected from sanazole-induced neurotoxicity by preventing the decrease in the brain reduced glutathione level and providing high level of ascorbic acid in plasma.

  7. Oxidative stress in MeHg-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, Marcelo, E-mail: farina@ccb.ufsc.br; Aschner, Michael; Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN

    2011-11-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is an environmental toxicant that leads to long-lasting neurological and developmental deficits in animals and humans. Although the molecular mechanisms mediating MeHg-induced neurotoxicity are not completely understood, several lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress represents a critical event related to the neurotoxic effects elicited by this toxicant. The objective of this review is to summarize and discuss data from experimental and epidemiological studies that have been important in clarifying the molecular events which mediate MeHg-induced oxidative damage and, consequently, toxicity. Although unanswered questions remain, the electrophilic properties of MeHg and its ability to oxidize thiols have beenmore » reported to play decisive roles to the oxidative consequences observed after MeHg exposure. However, a close examination of the relationship between low levels of MeHg necessary to induce oxidative stress and the high amounts of sulfhydryl-containing antioxidants in mammalian cells (e.g., glutathione) have led to the hypothesis that nucleophilic groups with extremely high affinities for MeHg (e.g., selenols) might represent primary targets in MeHg-induced oxidative stress. Indeed, the inhibition of antioxidant selenoproteins during MeHg poisoning in experimental animals has corroborated this hypothesis. The levels of different reactive species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide) have been reported to be increased in MeHg-exposed systems, and the mechanisms concerning these increments seem to involve a complex sequence of cascading molecular events, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium dyshomeostasis and decreased antioxidant capacity. This review also discusses potential therapeutic strategies to counteract MeHg-induced toxicity and oxidative stress, emphasizing the use of organic selenocompounds, which generally present higher affinity for MeHg when compared to the

  8. Minocycline attenuates colistin-induced neurotoxicity via suppression of apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Cappai, Roberto; Wang, Yang; Tang, Shusheng; Xiao, Xilong; Velkov, Tony

    2017-06-01

    Neurotoxicity is an adverse effect patients experience during colistin therapy. The development of effective neuroprotective agents that can be co-administered during polymyxin therapy remains a priority area in antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present study investigates the neuroprotective effect of the synergistic tetracycline antibiotic minocycline against colistin-induced neurotoxicity. The impact of minocycline pretreatment on colistin-induced apoptosis, caspase activation, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were investigated using cultured mouse neuroblastoma-2a (N2a) and primary cortical neuronal cells. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity in mouse N2a and primary cortical cells gives rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent cell death via apoptosis. Pretreatment of the neuronal cells with minocycline at 5, 10 and 20 μM for 2 h prior to colistin (200 μM) exposure (24 h), had an neuroprotective effect by significantly decreasing intracellular ROS production and by upregulating the activities of the anti-ROS enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase. Minocycline pretreatment also protected the cells from colistin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, caspase activation and subsequent apoptosis. Immunohistochemical imaging studies revealed colistin accumulates within the dendrite projections and cell body of primary cortical neuronal cells. To our knowledge, this is first study demonstrating the protective effect of minocycline on colistin-induced neurotoxicity by scavenging of ROS and suppression of apoptosis. Our study highlights that co-administration of minocycline kills two birds with one stone: in addition to its synergistic antimicrobial activity, minocycline could potentially ameliorate unwanted neurotoxicity in patients undergoing polymyxin therapy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions

  9. Methamphetamine Inhibits the Glucose Uptake by Human Neurons and Astrocytes: Stabilization by Acetyl-L-Carnitine

    PubMed Central

    Szlachetka, Adam M.; Haorah, James

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH), an addictive psycho-stimulant drug exerts euphoric effects on users and abusers. It is also known to cause cognitive impairment and neurotoxicity. Here, we hypothesized that METH exposure impairs the glucose uptake and metabolism in human neurons and astrocytes. Deprivation of glucose is expected to cause neurotoxicity and neuronal degeneration due to depletion of energy. We found that METH exposure inhibited the glucose uptake by neurons and astrocytes, in which neurons were more sensitive to METH than astrocytes in primary culture. Adaptability of these cells to fatty acid oxidation as an alternative source of energy during glucose limitation appeared to regulate this differential sensitivity. Decrease in neuronal glucose uptake by METH was associated with reduction of glucose transporter protein-3 (GLUT3). Surprisingly, METH exposure showed biphasic effects on astrocytic glucose uptake, in which 20 µM increased the uptake while 200 µM inhibited glucose uptake. Dual effects of METH on glucose uptake were paralleled to changes in the expression of astrocytic glucose transporter protein-1 (GLUT1). The adaptive nature of astrocyte to mitochondrial β-oxidation of fatty acid appeared to contribute the survival of astrocytes during METH-induced glucose deprivation. This differential adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes also governed the differential sensitivity to the toxicity of METH in these brain cells. The effect of acetyl-L-carnitine for enhanced production of ATP from fatty oxidation in glucose-free culture condition validated the adaptive nature of neurons and astrocytes. These findings suggest that deprivation of glucose-derived energy may contribute to neurotoxicity of METH abusers. PMID:21556365

  10. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neuron as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons as a human model for testing environmentally induced developmental neurotoxicity Ingrid L. Druwe1, Timothy J. Shafer2, Kathleen Wallace2, Pablo Valdivia3 ,and William R. Mundy2. 1University of North Carolina, Curriculum in Toxicology...

  11. Pulling habits out of rats: adenosine 2A receptor antagonism in dorsomedial striatum rescues meth-amphetamine-induced deficits in goal-directed action.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Teri M; Supit, Alva S A; Corbit, Laura H; Killcross, Simon; Balleine, Bernard W

    2017-01-01

    Addiction is characterized by a persistent loss of behavioral control resulting in insensitivity to negative feedback and abnormal decision-making. Here, we investigated the influence of methamphetamine (METH)-paired contextual cues on decision-making in rats. Choice between goal-directed actions was sensitive to outcome devaluation in a saline-paired context but was impaired in the METH-paired context, a deficit that was also found when negative feedback was provided. Reductions in c-Fos-related immunoreactivity were found in dorsomedial striatum (DMS) but not dorsolateral striatum after exposure to the METH context suggesting this effect reflected a loss specifically in goal-directed control in the METH context. This reduction in c-Fos was localized to non-enkephalin-expressing neurons in the DMS, likely dopamine D1-expressing direct pathway neurons, suggesting a relative change in control by the D1-direct versus D2-indirect pathways originating in the DMS may have been induced by METH-context exposure. To test this suggestion, we infused the adenosine 2A receptor antagonist ZM241385 into the DMS prior to test to reduce activity in D2 neurons relative to D1 neurons in the hope of reducing the inhibitory output from this region of the striatum. We found that this treatment fully restored sensitivity to negative feedback in a test conducted in the METH-paired context. These results suggest that drug exposure alters decision-making by downregulation of the circuitry mediating goal-directed action, an effect that can be ameliorated by acute A 2A receptor inhibition in this circuit. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Atypical pattern of (meth)acrylate allergic contact dermatitis in dental professionals.

    PubMed

    Prasad Hunasehally, R Y; Hughes, T M; Stone, N M

    2012-09-01

    (Meth)acrylates in dental bonding agents are a common source of allergic contact dermatitis in dental professionals. The distribution of the contact dermatitis is commonly on finger tips, but is determined by individual habits as demonstrated by the two case reports in this article. Despite the site of contact dermatitis, the bonding agents are often not suspected as a source of contact allergy due to misconception regarding the protective effect of natural rubber latex gloves. With these case reports, we endeavour to emphasize the inadequacy of the latex gloves in protecting against the (meth)acrylate induced contact allergy and also list the measures a dental professional needs to incorporate in order to minimise the risks of sensitisation to (meth)acrylates.

  13. Glucose Metabolism and AMPK Signaling Regulate Dopaminergic Cell Death Induced by Gene (α-Synuclein)-Environment (Paraquat) Interactions.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Lei, Shulei; Levytskyy, Roman; Pappa, Aglaia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I; Cerny, Ronald L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Powers, Robert; Franco, Rodrigo

    2017-07-01

    While environmental exposures are not the single cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), their interaction with genetic alterations is thought to contribute to neuronal dopaminergic degeneration. However, the mechanisms involved in dopaminergic cell death induced by gene-environment interactions remain unclear. In this work, we have revealed for the first time the role of central carbon metabolism and metabolic dysfunction in dopaminergic cell death induced by the paraquat (PQ)-α-synuclein interaction. The toxicity of PQ in dopaminergic N27 cells was significantly reduced by glucose deprivation, inhibition of hexokinase with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), or equimolar substitution of glucose with galactose, which evidenced the contribution of glucose metabolism to PQ-induced cell death. PQ also stimulated an increase in glucose uptake, and in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and Na + -glucose transporters isoform 1 (SGLT1) proteins, but only inhibition of GLUT-like transport with STF-31 or ascorbic acid reduced PQ-induced cell death. Importantly, while autophagy protein 5 (ATG5)/unc-51 like autophagy activating kinase 1 (ULK1)-dependent autophagy protected against PQ toxicity, the inhibitory effect of glucose deprivation on cell death progression was largely independent of autophagy or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. PQ selectively induced metabolomic alterations and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in the midbrain and striatum of mice chronically treated with PQ. Inhibition of AMPK signaling led to metabolic dysfunction and an enhanced sensitivity of dopaminergic cells to PQ. In addition, activation of AMPK by PQ was prevented by inhibition of the inducible nitric oxide syntase (iNOS) with 1400W, but PQ had no effect on iNOS levels. Overexpression of wild type or A53T mutant α-synuclein stimulated glucose accumulation and PQ toxicity, and this toxic synergism was reduced by inhibition of glucose metabolism

  14. Neurochemical and Neurotoxic Effects of MDMA (Ecstasy) and Caffeine After Chronic Combined Administration in Mice.

    PubMed

    Górska, Anna Maria; Kamińska, Katarzyna; Wawrzczak-Bargieła, Agnieszka; Costa, Giulia; Morelli, Micaela; Przewłocki, Ryszard; Kreiner, Grzegorz; Gołembiowska, Krystyna

    2018-04-01

    MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) is a psychostimulant popular as a recreational drug because of its effect on mood and social interactions. MDMA acts at dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) and serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) and is known to induce damage of dopamine and serotonin neurons. MDMA is often ingested with caffeine. Caffeine as a non-selective adenosine A1/A2A receptor antagonist affects dopaminergic and serotonergic transmissions. The aim of the present study was to determine the changes in DA and 5-HT release in the mouse striatum induced by MDMA and caffeine after their chronic administration. To find out whether caffeine aggravates MDMA neurotoxicity, the content of DA and 5-HT, density of brain DAT and SERT, and oxidative damage of nuclear DNA were determined. Furthermore, the effect of caffeine on MDMA-induced changes in striatal dynorphin and enkephalin and on behavior was assessed. The DA and 5-HT release was determined with in vivo microdialysis, and the monoamine contents were measured by HPLC with electrochemical detection. DNA damage was assayed with the alkaline comet assay. DAT and SERT densities were determined by immunohistochemistry, while prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin were determined by quantitative PCR reactions. The behavioral changes were measured by the open-field (OF) test and novel object recognition (NOR) test. Caffeine potentiated MDMA-induced DA release while inhibiting 5-HT release in the mouse striatum. Caffeine also exacerbated the oxidative damage of nuclear DNA induced by MDMA but diminished DAT decrease in the striatum and worsened a decrease in SERT density produced by MDMA in the frontal cortex. Neither the striatal PDYN expression, increased by MDMA, nor exploratory and locomotor activities of mice, decreased by MDMA, were affected by caffeine. The exploration of novel object in the NOR test was diminished by MDMA and caffeine. Our data provide evidence that long-term caffeine administration has a

  15. Involvement of autophagy upregulation in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy')-induced serotonergic neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, I-Hsun; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Kao, Tzu-Jen; Lin, Yang-Yi; Weng, Shao-Ju; Yen, Ting-Yin; Chen, Lih-Chi; Huang, Yuahn-Sieh

    2016-01-01

    It has been suggested that autophagy plays pathogenetic roles in cerebral ischemia, brain trauma, and neurodegenerative disorders. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or ecstasy) is an illicit drug that causes long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity in the brain. Apoptosis and necrosis have been implicated in MDMA-induced neurotoxicity, but the role of autophagy in MDMA-elicited serotonergic toxicity has not been investigated. The present study aimed to examine the contribution of autophagy to neurotoxicity in serotonergic neurons in in vitro and in vivo animal models challenged with MDMA. Here, we demonstrated that in cultured rat serotonergic neurons, MDMA exposure induced LC3B-densely stained autophagosome formation, accompanying by a decrease in neurite outgrowth. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) significantly attenuated MDMA-induced autophagosome accumulation, and ameliorated MDMA-triggered serotonergic neurite damage and neuron death. In contrast, enhanced autophagy flux by rapamycin or impaired autophagosome clearance by bafilomycin A1 led to more autophagosome accumulation in serotonergic neurons and aggravated neurite degeneration. In addition, MDMA-induced autophagy activation in cultured serotonergic neurons might be mediated by serotonin transporter (SERT). In an in vivo animal model administered MDMA, neuroimaging showed that 3-MA protected the serotonin system against MDMA-induced downregulation of SERT evaluated by animal-PET with 4-[(18)F]-ADAM, a SERT radioligand. Taken together, our results demonstrated that MDMA triggers upregulation of autophagy in serotonergic neurons, which appears to be detrimental to neuronal growth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Lithium prevents acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yingjuan; Qin, Jian; Chen, Meihui; Chao, Xiaojuan; Chen, Ziwei; Ramassamy, Charles; Pi, Rongbiao; Jin, Minghua

    2014-04-01

    Acrolein is a highly electrophilic alpha, beta-unsaturated aldehyde to which humans are exposed in many situations and has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease. Lithium is demonstrated to have neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects in brain ischemia, trauma, neurodegenerative disorders, and psychiatric disorders. Previously we have found that acrolein induced neuronal death in HT22 mouse hippocampal cells. In this study, the effects of lithium on the acrolein-induced neurotoxicity in HT22 cells as well as its mechanism(s) were investigated. We found that lithium protected HT22 cells against acrolein-induced damage by the attenuation of reactive oxygen species and the enhancement of the glutathione level. Lithium also attenuated the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by acrolein. Furthermore, lithium significantly increased the level of phospho-glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β), the non-activated GSK-3β. Taken together, our findings suggest that lithium is a protective agent for acrolein-related neurotoxicity.

  17. The Dynamics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: How Neurotoxic Compounds and Neurotransmitters Interact

    PubMed Central

    Quaak, Ilona; Brouns, Madeleine R.; de Bor, Margot Van

    2013-01-01

    In recent years concern has risen about the increasing prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Accumulating evidence shows that exposure to neurotoxic compounds is related to ASD. Neurotransmitters might play a key role, as research has indicated a connection between neurotoxic compounds, neurotransmitters and ASD. In the current review a literature overview with respect to neurotoxic exposure and the effects on neurotransmitter systems is presented. The aim was to identify mechanisms and related factors which together might result in ASD. The literature reported in the current review supports the hypothesis that exposure to neurotoxic compounds can lead to alterations in the GABAergic, glutamatergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic system which have been related to ASD in previous work. However, in several studies findings were reported that are not supportive of this hypothesis. Other factors also might be related, possibly altering the mechanisms at work, such as time and length of exposure as well as dose of the compound. Future research should focus on identifying the pathway through which these factors interact with exposure to neurotoxic compounds making use of human studies. PMID:23924882

  18. Methamphetamine transiently increases the blood-brain barrier permeability in the hippocampus: role of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Martins, Tânia; Baptista, Sofia; Gonçalves, Joana; Leal, Ermelindo; Milhazes, Nuno; Borges, Fernanda; Ribeiro, Carlos F; Quintela, Oscar; Lendoiro, Elena; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Ambrósio, António F; Silva, Ana P

    2011-09-09

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a powerful stimulant drug of abuse that has steadily gained popularity worldwide. It is known that METH is highly neurotoxic and causes irreversible damage of brain cells leading to neurological and psychiatric abnormalities. Recent studies suggested that METH-induced neurotoxicity might also result from its ability to compromise blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. Due to the crucial role of BBB in the maintenance of brain homeostasis and protection against toxic molecules and pathogenic organisms, its dysfunction could have severe consequences. In this study, we investigated the effect of an acute high dose of METH (30mg/kg) on BBB permeability after different time points and in different brain regions. For that, young adult mice were sacrificed 1h, 24h or 72h post-METH administration. METH increased BBB permeability, but this effect was detected only at 24h after administration, being therefore a transitory effect. Interestingly, we also found that the hippocampus was the most susceptible brain region to METH, comparing to frontal cortex and striatum. Moreover, in an attempt to identify the key players in METH-induced BBB dysfunction we further investigated potential alterations in tight junction (TJ) proteins and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). METH was able to decrease the protein levels of zonula occludens (ZO)-1, claudin-5 and occludin in the hippocampus 24h post-injection, and increased the activity and immunoreactivity of MMP-9. The pre-treatment with BB-94 (30mg/kg), a matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor, prevented the METH-induced increase in MMP-9 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus. Overall, the present data demonstrate that METH transiently increases the BBB permeability in the hippocampus, which can be explained by alterations on TJ proteins and MMP-9. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Only extra-high dose of ketamine affects l-glutamate-induced intracellular Ca(2+) elevation and neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shibuta, Satoshi; Morita, Tomotaka; Kosaka, Jun; Kamibayashi, Takahiko; Fujino, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The neurotoxic effects of anesthetics on the developing brain are a concern. Although most of the anesthetics are GABAA agonists or NMDA antagonists, the differences in these effects on prospective glutamate-neurotoxicity in the brain is not fully understood. We examined the degree of L-glutamate-induced intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) elevation and neurotoxicity in neurons exposed to anesthetics. Primary cortical neurons from E17 rats were preincubated with 1-100 μM of ketamine or thiopental sodium (TPS) for the first 72 h of culturing. Two weeks later, the neurons were exposed to L-glutamate. The extent of glutamate toxicity was evaluated using Ca(2+)-imaging and morphological experiments. Preincubation with 100 μM ketamine but not with other concentrations of ketamine and TPS for the first 72 h in culture significantly enhanced L-glutamate-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation 2 weeks later. Morphology experiments showed that vulnerability to L-glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity was only altered in neurons preincubated with 100 μM ketamine but not with TPS. Although preincubation with high concentration of ketamine showed enhancement of L-glutamate-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation 2 weeks later, long-term exposure to TPS or ketamine at clinical doses during developmental periods may not result in a dose-related potentiation of exogenous glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, once the intravenous anesthetics are discontinued. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Lithium Chloride can Induce Differentiation of Human Immortalized RenVm Cells into Dopaminergic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Mitra; Ghasemi, Nazem

    2017-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a novel strategy for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The transplantation of fully differentiated cells instead of stem cells in order to decrease serious adverse complications of stem cell therapy is a new idea. In this study, the effect of lithium chloride on dopaminergic differentiation of human immortalized RenVm cells was investigated in order to access a population of fully differentiated cells for transplantation in Parkinson disease. The immortalized RenVm cells were induced to dopaminergic differentiation using a neurobasal medium supplemented with N2 and different concentrations (1, 3, 6 mM ) of Lithium Chloride (LiCl) for 4, 8 and 12 days. The efficiency of dopaminergic differentiation was evaluated using immunocytochemistry and western blot techniques for tyrosine hydroxylase and β-catenin marker expression. Our results indicated that LiCl can promote dopaminergic differentiation of RenVm cells in a dose-dependent manner. It can be concluded that LiCl is able to facilitate dopaminergic differentiation of cultured cells by affecting Wnt-frizzled signaling pathway.

  1. Poly(meth)acrylate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica

    2013-12-05

    Poly(meth)acrylate coatings for pharmaceutical applications were introduced in 1955 with the launch of EUDRAGIT(®) L and EUDRAGIT(®) S, two types of anionic polymers. Since then, by introducing various monomers into their polymer chains and thus altering their properties, diverse forms with specific characteristics have become available. Today, poly(meth)acrylates function in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and/or release the drug in a time-controlled manner. This article reviews the properties of various poly(meth)acrylates and discusses formulation issues as well as application possibilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Prolactin is a peripheral marker of manganese neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Marreilha dos Santos, AP; Lopes Santos, M; BatorÉu, Maria C; Aschner, M

    2011-01-01

    Excessive exposure to Mn induces neurotoxicity, referred to as manganism. Exposure assessment relies on Mn blood and urine analyses, both of which show poor correlation to exposure. Accordingly, there is a critical need for better surrogate biomarkers of Mn exposure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between Mn exposure and early indicators of neurotoxicity, with particular emphasis on peripheral biomarkers. Male Wistar rats (180–200 g) were injected intraperitoneally with 4 or 8 doses of Mn (10 mg/kg). Mn exposure was evaluated by analysis of Mn levels in brain and blood along with biochemical end-points (see below). Results Brain Mn levels were significantly increased both after 4 and 8 doses of Mn compared with controls (p<0.001). Blood levels failed to reflect a dose-dependent increase in brain Mn, with only the 8-dose treated group showing significant differences (p<0.001). Brain glutathione (GSH) levels were significantly decreased in the 8-dose-treated animals (p<0.001). A significant and dose-dependent increase in prolactin levels was found for both treated groups (p<0.001) compared to controls. In addition, a decrease in motor activity was observed in the 8-dose-treated group compared to controls. Conclusions 1) The present study demonstrates that peripheral blood level is a poor indicator of Mn brain accumulation and exposure; 2) Mn reduces GSH brain levels, likely reflecting oxidative stress; 3) Mn increases blood prolactin levels, indicating changes in the integrity of the dopaminergic system. Taken together these results suggest that peripheral prolactin levels may serve as reliable predictive biomarkers of Mn neurotoxicity. PMID:21262206

  3. Excessive ER stress and the resulting autophagic flux dysfunction contribute to fluoride-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiang; Chen, Jingwen; Xia, Tao; Li, Pei; Zhou, Guoyu; Xu, Chunyan; Zhao, Qian; Dong, Lixin; Zhang, Shun; Wang, Aiguo

    2018-02-01

    Fluoride is capable of inducing neurotoxicity, but its mechanisms remain elusive. This study aimed to explore the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in sodium fluoride (NaF)-induced neurotoxicity, focusing on the regulating role of ER stress in autophagy. The in vivo results demonstrated that NaF exposure impaired the learning and memory capabilities of rats, and resulted in histological and ultrastructural abnormalities in rat hippocampus. Moreover, NaF exposure induced excessive ER stress and associated apoptosis, as manifested by elevated IRE1α, GRP78, cleaved caspase-12 and cleaved-caspase-3, as well as defective autophagy, as shown by increased Beclin1, LC3-II and p62 expression in hippocampus. Consistently, the in vitro results further verified the findings of in vivo study that NaF induced excessive ER stress and defective autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells. Notably, inhibition of autophagy in NaF-treated SH-SY5Y cells with Wortmannin or Chloroquine decreased, while induction of autophagy by Rapamycin increased the cell viability. These results were correlated well with the immunofluorescence observations, thus confirming the pivotal role of autophagic flux dysfunction in NaF-induced cell death. Importantly, mitigation of ER stress by 4-phenylbutyrate in NaF-treated SH-SY5Y cells inhibited the expressions of autophagy markers, and decreased cell apoptosis. Taken together, these data suggest that neuronal death resulted from excessive ER stress and autophagic flux dysfunction contributes to fluoride-elicited neurotoxicity. Moreover, the autophagic flux dysfunction was mediated by excessive ER stress, which provided novel insight into a better understanding of fluoride-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. SciTech Connect

    Chen, Rui; Department of Forensic Medicine, Guangdong Medical University, Dongguan 523808; Wang, Bin

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an amphetamine-like psychostimulant that is commonly abused. Previous studies have shown that METH can induce damages to the nervous system and recent studies suggest that METH can also cause adverse and potentially lethal effects on the cardiovascular system. Recently, we demonstrated that DNA damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4) regulates METH-induced neurotoxicity. However, the role of DDIT4 in METH-induced cardiotoxicity remains unknown. We hypothesized that DDIT4 may mediate METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis, we examined DDIT4 protein expression in cardiomyocytes and in heart tissues of rats exposed to METH with Western blotting. We alsomore » determined the effects on METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis after silencing DDIT4 expression with synthetic siRNA with or without pretreatment of a mTOR inhibitor rapamycin in cardiomyocytes using Western blot analysis, fluorescence microscopy and TUNEL staining. Our results showed that METH exposure increased DDIT4 expression and decreased phosphorylation of mTOR that was accompanied with increased autophagy and apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These effects were normalized after silencing DDIT4. On the other hand, rapamycin promoted METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in DDIT4 knockdown cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that DDIT4 mediates METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis through mTOR signaling pathway in cardiomyocytes. - Highlights: • METH exposure increases DDIT4 expression in cardiomyocytes. • DDIT4 mediates METH-induced autophagy and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. • DDIT4 silencing protects cardiomyocytes against METH-caused autophagy and apoptosis.« less

  5. Effects of hyperthermia and calcium channel blocker co-therapy on mice injected with Meth A solid of Meth A ascites tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Prince, R.N.

    1986-01-01

    A study was made to determine the effectiveness of treating tumor-injected mice with verapamil, a calcium antagonist, and hyperthermia. The co-treatment reduced the incidence of tumors in animals injected with Meth A solid cells. It was shown that the decrease in tumors corresponded to increases in natural killer (NK) cell activity measured in a /sup 51/Cr release assay, in the amount of anti-Meth A antibody measured in an immunofluorescence assay, and a decrease in the amount of intra-tumor cyclic AMP measured by radioimmunoassay in co-treated compared to untreated sarcoma-injected animals. A role of the immune system for mediating the preventionmore » of sarcoma growth was indicated by Winn assays. Splenocytes sensitized in vivo against Meth A solid cells for 14 days exhibited an enhanced cytotoxic activity against syngeneic target cells compared to untreated tumor-sensitized splenocytes following heat-drug co-treatment. It was established that the stimulation of cytotoxic T cells against a histocompatibility antigen (H-2/sup d/) present on Meth A sarcoma cells resulted in tumor cell lysis. Animals bearing established Meth A solid sarcomas did not manifest tumor regressions following the administration of co-treatment alone or the adoptive transfer of co-treated tumor-sensitized splenocytes. The growth of Meth A ascites and Meth A ascites-derived solid sarcomas, unlike Meth A solid cell tumors, were not prevented in Winn assays. Additionally, the lifespan of animals injected with Meth A ascites cells was reduced by 50% compared to animals injected with Meth A solid sarcoma cells.« less

  6. MANF regulates dopaminergic neuron development in larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-C; Sundvik, M; Rozov, S; Priyadarshini, M; Panula, P

    2012-10-15

    Mesencephalic astrocyte derived neurotrophic factor (MANF) is recognized as a dopaminergic neurotrophic factor, which can protect dopaminergic neurons from neurotoxic damage. However, little is known about the function of MANF during the vertebrate development. Here, we report that MANF expression is widespread during embryonic development and in adult organs analyzed by qPCR and in situ hybridization in zebrafish. Knockdown of MANF expression with antisense splice-blocking morpholino oligonucleotides resulted in no apparent abnormal phenotype. Nevertheless, the dopamine level of MANF morphants was lower than that of the wild type larvae, the expression levels of the two tyrosine hydroxylase gene transcripts were decreased and a decrease in neuron number in certain groups of th1 and th2 cells in the diencephalon region in MANF morphants was observed. These defects were rescued by injection of exogenous manf mRNA. Strikingly, manf mRNA could partly restore the decrease of th1 positive cells in Nr4a2-deficient larvae. These results suggest that MANF is involved in the regulation of the development of dopaminergic system in zebrafish. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Contributions of dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neurons to VTA-stimulation induced neurovascular responses in brain reward circuits.

    PubMed

    Brocka, Marta; Helbing, Cornelia; Vincenz, Daniel; Scherf, Thomas; Montag, Dirk; Goldschmidt, Jürgen; Angenstein, Frank; Lippert, Michael

    2018-04-30

    Mapping the activity of the human mesolimbic dopamine system by BOLD-fMRI is a tempting approach to non-invasively study the action of the brain reward system during different experimental conditions. However, the contribution of dopamine release to the BOLD signal is disputed. To assign the actual contribution of dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic VTA neurons to the formation of BOLD responses in target regions of the mesolimbic system, we used two optogenetic approaches in rats. We either activated VTA dopaminergic neurons selectively, or dopaminergic and mainly glutamatergic projecting neurons together. We further used electrical stimulation to non-selectively activate neurons in the VTA. All three stimulation conditions effectively activated the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and triggered dopamine releases into the NAcc as measured by in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Furthermore, both optogenetic stimulation paradigms led to indistinguishable self-stimulation behavior. In contrast to these similarities, however, the BOLD response pattern differed greatly between groups. In general, BOLD responses were weaker and sparser with increasing stimulation specificity for dopaminergic neurons. In addition, repetitive stimulation of the VTA caused a progressive decoupling of dopamine release and BOLD signal strength, and dopamine receptor antagonists were unable to block the BOLD signal elicited by VTA stimulation. To exclude that the sedation during fMRI is the cause of minimal mesolimbic BOLD in response to specific dopaminergic stimulation, we repeated our experiments using CBF SPECT in awake animals. Again, we found activations only for less-specific stimulation. Based on these results we conclude that canonical BOLD responses in the reward system represent mainly the activity of non-dopaminergic neurons. Thus, the minor effects of projecting dopaminergic neurons are concealed by non-dopaminergic activity, a finding which highlights the importance of a careful

  8. Neurotoxicity of Vanadium.

    PubMed

    Ngwa, Hilary Afeseh; Ay, Muhammet; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2017-01-01

    Vanadium (V) is a transition metal that presents in multiple oxidation states and numerous inorganic compounds and is also an ultra-trace element considered to be essential for most living organisms. Despite being one of the lightest metals, V offers high structural strength and good corrosion resistance and thus has been widely adopted for high-strength steel manufacturing. High doses of V exposure are toxic, and inhalation exposure to V adversely affects the respiratory system. The neurotoxicological properties of V are just beginning to be identified. Recent studies by our group and others demonstrate the neurotoxic potential of this metal in the nigrostriatal system and other parts of the central nervous system (CNS). The neurotoxic effects of V have been mainly attributed to its ability to induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). It is noteworthy that the neurotoxicity induced by occupational V exposure commonly occurs with co-exposure to other metals, especially manganese (Mn). This review focuses on the chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, and neurotoxicity of V.

  9. Effects of the hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla on neurotoxicity in the 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin Sup; Kim, Hyo Geun; Ju, Mi Sun; Choi, Jin Gyu; Jeong, Seo Young; Oh, Myung Sook

    2009-11-12

    While the hook of Uncaria rhynchophylla (URH) is a traditional herb used in northeast Asia for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms such as tremor, it has not been experimentally evaluated in a PD model. We investigated the effects of URH on 6-hydroxydapamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in in vitro and in vivo models of PD. The cell viability, anti-oxidative activity, and anti-apoptotic activity of a water extract of URH (URE) were assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), total glutathione (GSH), and caspase-3 assays in PC12 cells stressed by 6-OHDA. We also investigated the behavioral recovery and dopaminergic neuron protection of URE using an apomorphine-induced rotation test and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry in the hemi-parkinsonian rat model of the unilateral 6-OHDA lesion of the medial forebrain bundle. In PC12 cells, URE significantly reduced cell death and the generation of ROS, increased GSH levels, and inhibited caspase-3 activity induced by 6-OHDA. In 6-OHDA-lesioned rats, posttreatment with URE (5 mg/kg/day for 14 days) significantly reduced apomorphine-induced rotation, and it lowered dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra pars compacta. URE possesses neuroprotective activity against 6-OHDA-induced toxicity through anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic activities in PD models.

  10. The Ganglioside GM-1 Inhibits Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Neuroblastoma Neuro2a Cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yujie; Ji, Jiemei; Lin, Yunan; He, Yajun; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-08-01

    Studies indicate that bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity results from apoptosis. Gangliosides have been shown to promote neuronal repair and recovery of neurological function after spinal cord injury. Previously, we confirmed that in vivo administration of the ganglioside GM-1 attenuated bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity in various animal models; however, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Cells of the neuroblastoma line N2a (Neuro2a cells) were divided into three experimental groups: control, bupivacaine-treated, and bupivacaine-treated with GM-1 pretreatment. Cell viability and apoptosis were assessed through CCK-8 assays, Hoechst staining, and flow cytometry analysis of Annexin-V/propidium iodide double labeling. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting assessed the expression of caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9. Bupivacaine-induced apoptosis worsened with increasing dose and exposure time. Bupivacaine induced increased expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9, but not caspase-8, indicating that the mitochondrial pathway but not the death receptor apoptosis pathway was activated. GM-1 pretreatment inhibited bupivacaine-induced apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in a dose-dependent manner. Bupivacaine induced neurotoxicity by activating apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway, and this was inhibited by GM-1 pretreatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Cyclooxygenase activity contributes to the monoaminergic damage caused by serial exposure to stress and methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Northrop, Nicole A.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) is a widely abused psychostimulant that causes long-term dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) depletions. Stress and Meth abuse are comorbid events in society and stress exacerbates Meth-induced monoaminergic terminal damage. Stress is also known to produce neuroinflammation. This study examined the role of the neuroinflammatory mediator, cyclooxygenase (COX), in the depletions of monoamines caused by serial exposure to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) and Meth. CUS produced an increase in COX-2 protein expression and enhanced Meth-induced monoaminergic depletions in the striatum and hippocampus. The enhanced DA and 5-HT depletions in the striatum, but not the hippocampus, were prevented by pretreatment with COX inhibitor, ketoprofen, during stress or during Meth; however, ketoprofen did not attenuate the monoaminergic damage caused by Meth alone. The COX-dependent enhancement by stress of Meth-induced monoaminergic depletions was independent of hyperthermia, as ketoprofen did not attenuate Meth-induced hyperthermia. In addition, the EP1 receptor antagonist, SC-51089, did not attenuate DA or 5-HT depletions caused by stress and Meth. These findings illustrate that COX activity, but not activation of the EP1 receptor, is responsible for the potentiation of Meth-induced damage to striatal monoamine terminals by stress and suggests the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for mitigating the neurotoxic effects associated with the combination of stress and Meth. PMID:23643743

  12. iTRAQ proteomics analysis reveals that PI3K is highly associated with bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Liu, Zhongjie; Yu, Xujiao; Lai, Luying; Li, Haobo; Liu, Zipeng; Li, Le; Jiang, Shan; Xia, Zhengyuan; Xu, Shi-yuan

    2016-02-01

    Bupivacaine, a commonly used local anesthetic, has potential neurotoxicity through diverse signaling pathways. However, the key mechanism of bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. Cultured human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were treated (bupivacaine) or untreated (control) with bupivacaine for 24 h. Compared to the control group, bupivacaine significantly increased cyto-inhibition, cellular reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, mitochondrial injury, apoptosis (increased TUNEL-positive cells, cleaved caspase 3, and Bcl-2/Bax), and activated autophagy (enhanced LC3II/LC3I ratio). To explore changes in protein expression and intercommunication among the pathways involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, an 8-plex iTRAQ proteomic technique and bioinformatics analysis were performed. Compared to the control group, 241 differentially expressed proteins were identified, of which, 145 were up-regulated and 96 were down-regulated. Bioinformatics analysis of the cross-talk between the significant proteins with altered expression in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity indicated that phosphatidyl-3-kinase (PI3K) was the most frequently targeted protein in each of the interactions. We further confirmed these results by determining the downstream targets of the identified signaling pathways (PI3K, Akt, FoxO1, Erk, and JNK). In conclusion, our study demonstrated that PI3K may play a central role in contacting and regulating the signaling pathways that contribute to bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. De Novo Synthesized Estradiol Protects against Methylmercury-Induced Neurotoxicity in Cultured Rat Hippocampal Slices

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Komatsu, Shota; Munetsuna, Eiji; Onizaki, Masahiro; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kawato, Suguru; Mukuda, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Background Estrogen, a class of female sex steroids, is neuroprotective. Estrogen is synthesized in specific areas of the brain. There is a possibility that the de novo synthesized estrogen exerts protective effect in brain, although direct evidence for the neuroprotective function of brain-synthesized estrogen has not been clearly demonstrated. Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that induces neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system. The neurotoxicity of MeHg is region-specific, and the molecular mechanisms for the selective neurotoxicity are not well defined. In this study, the protective effect of de novo synthesized 17β-estradiol on MeHg-induced neurotoxicity in rat hippocampus was examined. Methodology/Principal Findings Neurotoxic effect of MeHg on hippocampal organotypic slice culture was quantified by propidium iodide fluorescence imaging. Twenty-four-hour treatment of the slices with MeHg caused cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The toxicity of MeHg was attenuated by pre-treatment with exogenously added estradiol. The slices de novo synthesized estradiol. The estradiol synthesis was not affected by treatment with 1 µM MeHg. The toxicity of MeHg was enhanced by inhibition of de novo estradiol synthesis, and the enhancement of toxicity was recovered by the addition of exogenous estradiol. The neuroprotective effect of estradiol was inhibited by an estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, and mimicked by pre-treatment of the slices with agonists for ERα and ERβ, indicating the neuroprotective effect was mediated by ERs. Conclusions/Significance Hippocampus de novo synthesized estradiol protected hippocampal cells from MeHg-induced neurotoxicity via ERα- and ERβ-mediated pathways. The self-protective function of de novo synthesized estradiol might be one of the possible mechanisms for the selective sensitivity of the brain to MeHg toxicity. PMID:23405170

  14. Effects of salicylate on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Yeh, S Y

    1997-11-01

    The drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a serotonergic neurotoxicant that causes hyperthermia and depletion of serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxy-indole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) in the central nervous system. Formation of neurotoxic metabolites of MDMA, e.g., 2,4,5-trihydroxy-methamphetamine and 2,4,5-trihydroxyamphetamine, involves hydroxyl and/or superoxide free radicals. The present study was designed to determine whether the hydroxyl free-radical-trapping agent salicylate could provide protection against MDMA neurotoxicity in rats. In the acute studies, sodium salicylate (12.5-400 mg/kg, calculated as free acid) was injected interperitoneally (i.p.) 1 h before subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of MDMA (20 mg/kg as base). In the chronic studies, sodium salicylate (3.1-100 mg/kg) was injected i.p. 1 h before repeated s.c. injections of MDMA (10 mg/kg as base, twice daily, at 0830 and 1730 h for 4 consecutive days). Repeated MDMA administration depleted contents of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum. Coadministration of salicylate plus MDMA did not significantly alter MDMA-induced depletion of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in these tissues. Thus, salicylate, a hydroxyl free-radical-trapping agent, does not protect against MDMA-induced hyperthermia and depletion of 5-HT and 5-HIAA. These observations suggest that MDMA-induced neurotoxicity may occur mainly through the production of superoxide or other radicals rather than hydroxyl free radicals. Salicylate actually potentiated MDMA-induced hyperthermia and lethality, findings that might be of clinical relevance.

  15. Diallyl trisulfide attenuated n-hexane induced neurotoxicity in rats by modulating P450 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Ming; Wang, Xujing; Li, Xianjie; Yin, Hongyin; Jiang, Lulu; Han, Wenting; Irving, Gleniece; Zeng, Tao; Xie, Keqin

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to n-hexane can induce serious nerve system impairments without effective preventive medicines. Diallyl trisulfide (DATS) is a garlic-derived organosulfur compound, which has been demonstrated to have many beneficial effects. The current study was designed to evaluate whether DATS could restrain n-hexane induced neurotoxicity in rats and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Rats were treated with n-hexane (3 g/kg, p.o.) and different doses of DATS (10, 20 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) for 8 weeks. Behavioral assessment showed that DATS could inhibit n-hexane induced neurotoxicity, demonstrated by the improvement of the grip strength and decline of gait scores. Toxicokinetic analysis revealed that the C max and AUC 0-t of 2,5-hexanedione (product of n-hexane metabolic activation) and 2,5-hexanedione protein adducts in serum were significantly declined in DATS-treated rats, and the levels of pyrrole adducts in tissues were significantly reduced. Furthermore, DATS activated CYP1A1 and inhibited n-hexane induced increased expression and activity of CYP2E1 and CYP2B1. Collectively, these findings indicated that DATS protected the rats from n-hexane-induced neurotoxicity, which might be attributed to the modulation of P450 enzymes by DATS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X.; Jefferson, Amy M.; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J.; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Frazer, David G.; Antonini, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson’s disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m3; 3 h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas–metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their ne counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks. PMID:25549921

  18. Roles of Autophagy in MPP+-Induced Neurotoxicity In Vivo: The Involvement of Mitochondria and α-Synuclein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Lei, Yen-Ping; Lin, Anya Maan-yuh

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (also known as autophagy) is an intracellular self-eating mechanism and has been proposed as both neuroprotective and neurodestructive in the central nervous system (CNS) neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, the role of autophagy involving mitochondria and α-synuclein was investigated in MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium)-induced oxidative injury in chloral hydrate-anesthetized rats in vivo. The oxidative mechanism underlying MPP+-induced neurotoxicity was identified by elevated lipid peroxidation and heme oxygenase-1 levels, a redox-regulated protein in MPP+-infused substantia nigra (SN). At the same time, MPP+ significantly increased LC3-II levels, a hallmark protein of autophagy. To block MPP+-induced autophagy in rat brain, Atg7siRNA was intranigrally infused 4 d prior to MPP+ infusion. Western blot assay showed that in vivo Atg7siRNA transfection not only reduced Atg7 levels in the MPP+-infused SN but attenuated MPP+-induced elevation in LC3-II levels, activation of caspase 9 and reduction in tyrosine hydroxylase levels, indicating that autophagy is pro-death. The immunostaining study demonstrated co-localization of LC3 and succinate dehydrogenase (a mitochondrial complex II) as well as LC3 and α-synuclein, suggesting that autophagy may engulf mitochondria and α-synuclein. Indeed, in vivo Atg7siRNA transfection mitigated MPP+-induced reduction in cytochrome c oxidase. In addition, MPP+-induced autophagy differentially altered the α-synuclein aggregates in the infused SN. In conclusion, autophagy plays a prodeath role in the MPP+-induced oxidative injury by sequestering mitochondria in the rat brain. Moreover, our data suggest that the benefits of autophagy depend on the levels of α-synuclein aggregates in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of the rat brain. PMID:24646838

  19. Protective effect of arctigenin against MPP+ and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongwei; Liu, Qingping; Jia, Dong; Dou, Deqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Kang, Tingguo

    2014-01-01

    The potential protective effects of arctigenin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyride-induced neurotoxicity were examined, and the results indicated that arctigenin could improve the movement behaviors and upregulate dopamine and γ-aminobutyric acid levels in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyride-induced neurotoxicity mouse model. A further in vitro experiment showed that the pretreatment with arctigenin on cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells could obviously attenuate the decrease of cell survival rates caused by treatment with 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion by way of acting against cell apoptosis through the decrease of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-3, and by antioxidative action through reduction of the surplus reactive oxygen species production and downregulation of mitochondrial membrane potential. It is for the first time that a neuroprotective activity of arctigenin in both in vitro and in vivo experiments was reported, enlightening that arctigenin could be useful as a potential therapeutic agent for Parkinson's disease. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Prostaglandin-dependent modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission elicits inflammation-induced aversion in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Michael; Klawonn, Anna M.; Nilsson, Anna; Singh, Anand Kumar; Zajdel, Joanna; Björk Wilhelms, Daniel; Lazarus, Michael; Löfberg, Andreas; Jaarola, Maarit; Örtegren Kugelberg, Unn; Billiar, Timothy R.; Hackam, David J.; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Breyer, Matthew D.; Jakobsson, Johan; Schwaninger, Markus; Schütz, Günther; Rodriguez Parkitna, Jan; Saper, Clifford B.; Blomqvist, Anders; Engblom, David

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation causes malaise and general feelings of discomfort. This fundamental aspect of the sickness response reduces the quality of life for people suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases and is a nuisance during mild infections like common colds or the flu. To investigate how inflammation is perceived as unpleasant and causes negative affect, we used a behavioral test in which mice avoid an environment that they have learned to associate with inflammation-induced discomfort. Using a combination of cell-type–specific gene deletions, pharmacology, and chemogenetics, we found that systemic inflammation triggered aversion through MyD88-dependent activation of the brain endothelium followed by COX1-mediated cerebral prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis. Further, we showed that inflammation-induced PGE2 targeted EP1 receptors on striatal dopamine D1 receptor–expressing neurons and that this signaling sequence induced aversion through GABA-mediated inhibition of dopaminergic cells. Finally, we demonstrated that inflammation-induced aversion was not an indirect consequence of fever or anorexia but that it constituted an independent inflammatory symptom triggered by a unique molecular mechanism. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that PGE2-mediated modulation of the dopaminergic motivational circuitry is a key mechanism underlying the negative affect induced by inflammation. PMID:26690700

  1. (E)-2-Meth-oxy-9-(2-meth-oxy-9H-xanthen-9-yl-idene)-9H-xanthene.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xiang-Yu; Song, Qin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, C28H20O4, was synthesized by a bimolecular Zn-HCl reduction in glacial acetic acid using the meth-oxy-substituted xanthone as a starting material. The crystal structure shows that the 2,2'-meth-oxy-bixanthenyl-idene unit is an E-type conformation anti-folded conformer. The mol-ecule lies on an inversion center. The meth-oxy group is almost coplanar with the attached benzene ring, with a C-O-C-C torsion angle of 179.38 (14)°.

  2. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Rowe, James B.; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy alleviates basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, it often elicits involuntary movements, referred to as levodopa-induced peak-of-dose dyskinesias. Here, we used a novel pharmacodynamic neuroimaging approach to identify the changes in cortico-basal ganglia connectivity that herald the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51–84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who later developed levodopa-induced dyskinesias, but not patients without dyskinesias, showed a linear increase in connectivity between the putamen and primary motor cortex after levodopa intake during movement suppression. Individual dyskinesia severity was predicted by levodopa-induced modulation of striato-cortical feedback connections from putamen to the pre-supplementary motor area (Pcorrected = 0.020) and primary motor cortex (Pcorrected = 0.044), but not feed-forward connections from the cortex to the putamen. Our results identify for the first time, aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal-cortical connectivity as a neural signature of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans. We argue that excessive striato-cortical connectivity in response to levodopa produces an

  3. Widespread Increases in Malondialdehyde Immunoreactivity in Dopamine-Rich and Dopamine-Poor Regions of Rat Brain Following Multiple, High Doses of Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Kristen A.; Gilbert, Yamiece E.; Cline, Susan D.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment with multiple high doses of methamphetamine (METH) can induce oxidative damage, including dopamine (DA)-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which may contribute to the neurotoxic damage of monoamine neurons and long-term depletion of DA in the caudate putamen (CPu) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). Malondialdehyde (MDA), a product of lipid peroxidation by ROS, is commonly used as a marker of oxidative damage and treatment with multiple high doses of METH increases MDA reactivity in the CPu of humans and experimental animals. Recent data indicate that MDA itself may contribute to the destruction of DA neurons, as MDA causes the accumulation of toxic intermediates of DA metabolism via its chemical modification of the enzymes necessary for the breakdown of DA. However, it has been shown that in human METH abusers there is also increased MDA reactivity in the frontal cortex, which receives relatively fewer DA afferents than the CPu. These data suggest that METH may induce neuronal damage regardless of the regional density of DA or origin of DA input. The goal of the current study was to examine the modification of proteins by MDA in the DA-rich nigrostriatal and mesoaccumbal systems, as well as the less DA-dense cortex and hippocampus following a neurotoxic regimen of METH treatment. Animals were treated with METH (10 mg/kg) every 2 h for 6 h, sacrificed 1 week later, and examined using immunocytochemistry for changes in MDA-adducted proteins. Multiple, high doses of METH significantly increased MDA immunoreactivity (MDA-ir) in the CPu, SNpc, cortex, and hippocampus. Multiple METH administration also increased MDA-ir in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens. Our data indicate that multiple METH treatment can induce persistent and widespread neuronal damage that may not necessarily be limited to the nigrostriatal DA system. PMID:21602916

  4. Vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons is dependent on endogenous dopamine and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Yamamoto, Noriyuki; Matsuo, Takaaki; Wakita, Seiko; Takeuchi, Hiroki; Kume, Toshiaki; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Sawada, Hideyuki; Akaike, Akinori

    2009-07-01

    Dopaminergic neurons are more vulnerable than other types of neurons in cases of Parkinson disease and ischemic brain disease. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that endogenous dopamine plays a role in the vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons. Although glutamate toxicity contributes to the pathogenesis of these disorders, the sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to glutamate toxicity has not been clarified. In this study, we demonstrated that dopaminergic neurons were preferentially affected by glutamate toxicity in rat mesencephalic cultures. Glutamate toxicity in dopaminergic neurons was blocked by inhibiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 MAPK. Furthermore, depletion of dopamine by alpha-methyl-dl-p-tyrosine methyl ester (alpha-MT), an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), protected dopaminergic neurons from the neurotoxicity. Exposure to glutamate facilitated phosphoryration of TH at Ser31 by ERK, which contributes to the increased TH activity. Inhibition of ERK had no additive effect on the protection offered by alpha-MT, whereas alpha-MT and c-jun N-terminal kinase or p38 MAPK inhibitors had additive effects and yielded full protection. These data suggest that endogenous dopamine is responsible for the vulnerability to glutamate toxicity of dopaminergic neurons and one of the mechanisms may be an enhancement of dopamine synthesis mediated by ERK.

  5. 7, 8, 3′-Trihydroxyflavone Promotes Neurite Outgrowth and Protects Against Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in Mouse Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haohong; Luo, Xingjing

    2016-01-01

    Background 7, 8, 3′-trihydroxyflavone (THF) is a novel pro-neuronal small molecule that acts as a TrkB agonist. In this study, we examined the effect of THF on promoting neuronal growth and protecting anesthetics-induced neurotoxicity in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in vitro. Material/Methods Neonatal mouse DRG neurons were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of THF. The effect of THF on neuronal growth was investigated by neurite outgrowth assay and Western blot. In addition, the protective effects of THF on bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity were investigated by apoptosis TUNEL assay, neurite outgrowth assay, and Western blot, respectively. Results THF promoted neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons in dose-dependent manner, with an EC50 concentration of 67.4 nM. Western blot analysis showed THF activated TrkB signaling pathway by inducing TrkB phosphorylation. THF also rescued bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity by reducing apoptosis and protecting neurite retraction in DRG neurons. Furthermore, the protection of THF in bupivacaine-injured neurotoxicity was directly associated with TrkB phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent manner in DRG neurons. Conclusions THF has pro-neuronal effect on DRG neurons by promoting neurite growth and protecting against bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity, likely through TrkB activation. PMID:27371503

  6. Methamphetamine toxicity-induced calcineurin activation, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor of activated T-cells and elevation of cyclooxygenase 2 levels are averted by calpastatin overexpression in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Chetsawang, Jirapa; Nudmamud-Thanoi, Sutisa; Phonchai, Ruchee; Abubakar, Zuroida; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2018-06-23

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive stimulant drug that has many negative consequences, including toxic effects to the brain. Recently, the induction of inflammatory processes has been identified as a potential contributing factor to induce neuronal cell degeneration. It has been demonstrated that the expression of inflammatory agents, such as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), depends on the activation of calcineurin (CaN) and nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). Moreover, the excessive elevation in cytosolic Ca 2+ levels activates the cell death process, including calpain activation in neurons, which was diminished by the overexpression of the calpain inhibitor protein, calpastatin. However, it is unclear whether calpain mediates CaN-NFAT activation in the neurotoxic process. In the present study, we observed that the toxic high dose of METH-treated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells significantly decreased cell viability but increased apoptotic cell death, the active cleaved form of calcineurin, the nuclear translocation of NFAT, and COX-2 levels. Nevertheless, these toxic effects were diminished in METH-treated calpastatin-overexpressing SH-SY5Y cells. These findings might emphasize the role of calpastatin against METH-induced toxicity by a mechanism related to calpain-dependent CaN-NFAT activation-induced COX-2 expression. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The Protective Effects of Nigella sativa and Its Constituents on Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khazdair, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N. sativa) is an annual plant and widely used as medicinal plant throughout the world. The seeds of the plant have been used traditionally in various disorders and as a spice to ranges of Persian foods. N. sativa has therapeutic effects on tracheal responsiveness (TR) and lung inflammation on induced toxicity by Sulfur mustard. N. sativa has been widely used in treatment of various nervous system disorders such as Alzheimer disease, epilepsy, and neurotoxicity. Most of the therapeutic properties of this plant are due to the presence of some phenolic compounds especially thymoquinone (TQ), which is major bioactive component of the essential oil. The present review is an effort to provide a comprehensive study of the literature on scientific researches of pharmacological activities of the seeds of this plant on induced neurotoxicity. PMID:26604923

  8. Ketone bodies protection against HIV-1 Tat-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liang; Chen, Xuesong; Bhatt, Dhaval; Geiger, Nicholas H; Rosenberger, Thad A; Haughey, Norman J; Masino, Susan A; Geiger, Jonathan D

    2012-07-01

    HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is a syndrome that ranges clinically from subtle neuropsychological impairments to profoundly disabling HIV-associated dementia. Not only is the pathogenesis of HAND unclear, but also effective treatments are unavailable. The HIV-1 transactivator of transcription protein (HIV-1 Tat) is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of HAND, in part, because of its well-characterized ability to directly excite neurons and cause neurotoxicity. Consistent with previous findings from others, we demonstrate here that HIV-1 Tat induced neurotoxicity, increased intracellular calcium, and disrupted a variety of mitochondria functions, such as reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, increasing levels of reactive oxygen species, and decreasing bioenergetic efficiency. Of therapeutic importance, we show that treatment of cultured neurons with ketone bodies normalized HIV-1 Tat induced changes in levels of intracellular calcium, mitochondrial function, and neuronal cell death. Ketone bodies are normally produced in the body and serve as alternative energy substrates in tissues including brain and can cross the blood-brain barrier. Ketogenic strategies have been used clinically for treatment of neurological disorders and our current results suggest that similar strategies may also provide clinical benefits in the treatment of HAND. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  9. 9-Cis retinoic acid protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in nigrostriatal dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Reiner, David J; Yu, Seong-Jin; Shen, Hui; He, Yi; Bae, Eunkyung; Wang, Yun

    2014-04-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a drug of abuse as well as a dopaminergic neurotoxin. 9-Cis retinoic acid (9cRA), a biologically active derivative of vitamin A, has protective effects against damage caused by H(2)O(2) and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro as well as infarction and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dNTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) labeling in ischemic brain. The purpose of this study was to examine if there was a protective role for 9cRA against MA toxicity in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Primary dopaminergic neurons, prepared from rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue, were treated with MA. High doses of MA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity while increasing TUNEL labeling. These toxicities were significantly reduced by 9cRA. 9cRA also inhibited the export of Nur77 from nucleus to cytosol, a response that activates apoptosis. The interaction of 9cRA and MA in vivo was next examined in adult rats. 9cRA was delivered intracerebroventricularly; MA was given (5 mg/kg, 4×) one day later. Locomotor behavior was measured 2 days after surgery for a period of 48 h. High doses of MA significantly reduced locomotor activity and TH immunoreactivity in striatum. Administration of 9cRA antagonized these changes. Previous studies have shown that 9cRA can induce bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) expression and that administration of BMP7 attenuates MA toxicity. We demonstrated that MA treatment significantly reduced BMP7 mRNA expression in nigra. Noggin (a BMP antagonist) antagonized 9cRA-induced behavioral recovery and 9cRA-induced normalization of striatal TH levels. Our data suggest that 9cRA has a protective effect against MA-mediated neurodegeneration in dopaminergic neurons via upregulation of BMP.

  10. 9-cis retinoic acid protects against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in nigrostriatal dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reiner, David J; Yu, Seong-Jin; Shen, Hui; He, Yi; Bae, Eunkyung; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is a drug of abuse as well as a dopaminergic neurotoxin. 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA), a biologically active derivative of vitamin A, has protective effects against damage caused by H2O2 and oxygen-glucose deprivation in vitro as well as infarction and TUNEL labeling in ischemic brain. The purpose of this study was to examine if there was a protective role for 9cRA against MA toxicity in nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Primary dopaminergic neurons, prepared from rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue, were treated with MA. High doses of MA decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactivity while increasing TUNEL labeling. These toxicities were significantly reduced by 9cRA. 9cRA also inhibited the export of Nur77 from nucleus to cytosol, a response that activates apoptosis. The interaction of 9cRA and MA in vivo was next examined in adult rats. 9cRA was delivered intracerebroventricularly; MA was given (5 mg/kg, 4x) one day later. Locomotor behavior was measured two days after surgery for a period of 48 hours. High doses of MA significantly reduced locomotor activity and TH immunoreactivity in striatum. Administration of 9cRA antagonized these changes. Previous studies have shown that 9cRA can induce bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) expression and that administration of BMP7 attenuates MA toxicity. We demonstrated that MA treatment significantly reduced BMP7 mRNA expression in nigra. Noggin (a BMP antagonist) antagonized 9cRA-induced behavioral recovery and 9cRA-induced normalization of striatal TH levels. Our data suggest that 9cRA has a protective effect against MA -mediated neurodegeneration in dopaminergic neurons via upregulation of BMP. PMID:23884514

  11. Effects of prolonged abstinence from METH on the hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in methamphetamine-sensitized rats.

    PubMed

    Hajheidari, Samira; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Bandegi, Ahmad Reza; Miladi-Gorji, Hossein

    2017-04-03

    Methamphetamine (METH) use is associated with neuronal damage in various regions of brain, while effects of prolonged abstinence on METH-induced damage are not quite clear. This study evaluated serum and hippocampal BDNF levels, neuronal numbers and apoptosis in METH-sensitized and abstinent rats. Rats were sensitized to METH (2mg/kg, daily/18 days, s.c.). All rats were evaluated for neuron counting, the TUNEL test and serum and hippocampal BDNF levels after 30 days of forced abstinence from METH. The results showed that increased BDNF levels in the hippocampus and serum of METH-sensitized rats returned to control level after 30 days of abstinence. The number of neurons in the DG and CA1 of hippocampus and also, the total hippocampal perimeter and area in METH-sensitized rats were significantly lower than the saline rats. While, the number of neurons was not significantly increased in the hippocampus after prolonged abstinence from METH. Also, METH-sensitized rats showed a significant increase in TUNEL-positive cells, whereas METH-abstinent rats showed a slight but significant decrease in TUNEL-positive cells in the DG and CA3 of hippocampus. These results suggest that despite the reduction in BDNF levels, reducing the number of neurons, perimeter and area of the hippocampus were stable after abstinence. Thus, the degenerative effects of METH have been sustained even after prolonged abstinence in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Docosahexaenoic acid prevents paraquat-induced reactive oxygen species production in dopaminergic neurons via enhancement of glutathione homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyoung Jun; Han, Jeongsu; Jang, Yunseon

    Highlights: • DHA prevents PQ-induced dopaminergic neuronal loss via decreasing of excessive ROS. • DHA increases GR and GCLm derivate GSH pool by enhancement of Nrf2 expression. • Protective mechanism is removal of PQ-induced ROS via DHA-dependent GSH pool. • DHA may be a good preventive strategy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) therapy. - Abstract: Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels are reduced in the substantia nigra area in Parkinson’s disease patients and animal models, implicating docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) as a potential treatment for preventing Parkinson’s disease and suggesting the need for investigations into how DHA might protect against neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuronmore » loss. The herbicide paraquat (PQ) induces dopaminergic neuron loss through the excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that treatment of dopaminergic SN4741 cells with PQ reduced cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, but pretreatment with DHA ameliorated the toxic effect of PQ. To determine the toxic mechanism of PQ, we measured intracellular ROS content in different organelles with specific dyes. As expected, all types of ROS were increased by PQ treatment, but DHA pretreatment selectively decreased cytosolic hydrogen peroxide content. Furthermore, DHA treatment-induced increases in glutathione reductase and glutamate cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLm) mRNA expression were positively correlated with glutathione (GSH) content. Consistent with this increase in GCLm mRNA levels, Western blot analysis revealed that DHA pretreatment increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein levels. These findings indicate that DHA prevents PQ-induced neuronal cell loss by enhancing Nrf2-regulated GSH homeostasis.« less

  13. Neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids and paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Rita; Bielawski, Jacek; Kistner-Griffin, Emily; Othman, Alaa; Alecu, Irina; Ernst, Daniela; Kornhauser, Drew; Hornemann, Thorsten; Spassieva, Stefka

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a major dose-limiting side effect of paclitaxel and cisplatin chemotherapy. In the current study, we tested the involvement of a novel class of neurotoxic sphingolipids, the 1-deoxysphingolipids. 1-Deoxysphingolipids are produced when the enzyme serine palmitoyltransferase uses l-alanine instead of l-serine as its amino acid substrate. We tested whether treatment of cells with paclitaxel (250 nM, 1 µM) and cisplatin (250 nM, 1 µM) would result in elevated cellular levels of 1-deoxysphingolipids. Our results revealed that paclitaxel, but not cisplatin treatment, caused a dose-dependent elevation of 1-deoxysphingolipids levels and an increase in the message and activity of serine palmitoyltransferase (P < 0.05). We also tested whether there is an association between peripheral neuropathy symptoms [evaluated by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy-20 (CIPN20) instrument] and the 1-deoxysphingolipid plasma levels (measured by mass spectrometry) in 27 patients with breast cancer who were treated with paclitaxel chemotherapy. Our results showed that there was an association between the incidence and severity of neuropathy and the levels of very-long-chain 1-deoxyceramides such as C24 (P < 0.05), with the strongest association being with motor neuropathy (P < 0.001). Our data from cells and from patients with breast cancer suggest that 1-deoxysphingolipids, the very-long-chain in particular, play a role as molecular intermediates of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy.—Kramer, R., Bielawski, J., Kistner-Griffin, E., Othman, A., Alecu, I., Ernst, D., Kornhauser, D., Hornemann, T., Spassieva, S. Neurotoxic 1-deoxysphingolipids and paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26198449

  14. A Guide to Neurotoxic Animal Models of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurological movement disorder primarily resulting from damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. To elucidate the pathogenesis, mechanisms of cell death, and to evaluate therapeutic strategies for PD, numerous animal models have been developed. Understanding the strengths and limitations of these models can significantly impact the choice of model, experimental design, and data interpretation. The primary objectives of this article are twofold: First, to assist new investigators who are contemplating embarking on PD research to navigate through the available animal models. Emphasis will be placed on common neurotoxic murine models in which toxic molecules are used to lesion the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. And second, to provide an overview of basic technical requirements for assessing the pathology, structure, and function of the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID:22229125

  15. Role of L-thyroxin in counteracting rotenone induced neurotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Salama, Mohamed; Helmy, Basem; El-Gamal, Mohamed; Reda, Amr; Ellaithy, Amr; Tantawy, Dina; Mohamed, Mie; El-Gamal, Aya; Sheashaa, Hussein; Sobh, Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    A key feature of Parkinson's disease is the dopaminergic neuronal cell loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Many triggering pathways have been incriminated in the pathogenesis of this disease including inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Thyroid hormone is an essential agent for the growth and maturation of neurons; moreover, it has variable mechanisms for neuroprotection. So, we tested the efficacy of (L)-thyroxin as a neuroprotectant in rotenone model of Parkinson's disease in rats. Thirty Sprague Dawley rats aged 3 months were divided into 3 equal groups. The first received daily intraperitoneal injections of 0.5% carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) 3 mL/Kg. The second group received rotenone suspended in 0.5% CMC intraperitoneally at a dose of 3 mg/kg, daily. The third group received the same rotenone regimen subcutaneous l-thyroxine at a dose of 7.5 μg daily. All animals were evaluated regarding locomotor disturbance through blinded investigator who monitored akinesia, catalepsy, tremors and performance in open field test. After 35 days the animals were sacrificed and their brains were immunostained against anti-tyrosine hydroxylase and iba-1. Photomicrographs for coronal sections of the substantia nigra and striatum were taken and analyzed using image J software to evaluate cell count in SNpc and striatal fibers density and number of microglia in the nigrostriatal system. The results were then analyzed statistically. Results showed selective protective effects of thyroxin against rotenone induced neurotoxicity in striatum, however, failed to exert similar protection on SN. Moreover, microglial elevated number in nigrostriatal system that was induced by rotenone injections was diminished selectively in striatum only in the l-thyroxin treated group. One of the possible mechanisms deduced from this work was the selective regulation of microglia in striatal tissues. Thus, this study provides an insight into thyroxin neuroprotection

  16. Reduced prefrontal dopaminergic activity in valproic acid-treated mouse autism model.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuta; Takuma, Kazuhiro; Takano, Erika; Katashiba, Keisuke; Taruta, Atsuki; Higashino, Kosuke; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Ago, Yukio; Matsuda, Toshio

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies suggest that dysfunction of neurotransmitter systems is associated with the pathology of autism in humans and the disease model rodents, but the precise mechanism is not known. Rodent offspring exposed prenatally to VPA shows autism-related behavioral abnormalities. The present study examined the effect of prenatal VPA exposure on brain monoamine neurotransmitter systems in male and female mice. The prenatal VPA exposure did not affect the levels of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the prefrontal cortex and striatum, while it significantly reduced methamphetamine (METH) (1.0 mg/kg)-induced hyperlocomotion in male offspring. In vivo microdialysis study demonstrated that prenatal VPA exposure attenuated METH-induced increases in extracellular DA levels in the prefrontal cortex, while it did not affect those in extracellular NA and 5-HT levels. Prenatal VPA exposure also decreased METH-induced c-Fos expression in the prefrontal cortex and the mRNA levels of DA D1 and D2 receptors in the prefrontal cortex. These effects of VPA were not observed in the striatum. In contrast to male offspring, prenatal VPA exposure did not affect METH-induced increases in locomotor activity and prefrontal DA levels and the D1 and D2 receptor mRNA levels in the prefrontal cortex in female offspring. These findings suggest that prenatal VPA exposure causes hypofunction of prefrontal DA system in a sex-dependent way. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Curcumin Attenuated Bupivacaine-Induced Neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y Cells Via Activation of the Akt Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Fan, You-Ling; Li, Heng-Chang; Zhao, Wei; Peng, Hui-Hua; Huang, Fang; Jiang, Wei-Hang; Xu, Shi-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Bupivacaine is widely used for regional anesthesia, spinal anesthesia, and pain management. However, bupivacaine could cause neuronal injury. Curcumin, a low molecular weight polyphenol, has a variety of bioactivities and may exert neuroprotective effects against damage induced by some stimuli. In the present study, we tested whether curcumin could attenuate bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. Cell injury was evaluated by examining cell viability, mitochondrial damage and apoptosis. We also investigated the levels of activation of the Akt signaling pathway and the effect of Akt inhibition by triciribine on cell injury following bupivacaine and curcumin treatment. Our findings showed that the bupivacaine treatment could induce neurotoxicity. Pretreatment of the SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin significantly attenuated bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. Interestingly, the curcumin treatment increased the levels of Akt phosphorylation. More significantly, the pharmacological inhibition of Akt abolished the cytoprotective effect of curcumin against bupivacaine-induced cell injury. Our data suggest that pretreating SH-SY5Y cells with curcumin provides a protective effect on bupivacaine-induced neuronal injury via activation of the Akt signaling pathway.

  18. Methamphetamine (Meth)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Users also complain of sweating, headaches, blurred vision, dry mouth, hot flashes, and dizziness. Because the drug often decreases or even eliminates appetite, it has been used as a dangerous dieting strategy for people trying to lose weight quickly. "Meth mouth" is ...

  19. Age-dependent methamphetamine-induced alterations in vesicular monoamine transporter-2 function: implications for neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Truong, Jannine G; Wilkins, Diana G; Baudys, Jakub; Crouch, Dennis J; Johnson-Davis, Kamisha L; Gibb, James W; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2005-09-01

    Tens of thousands of adolescents and young adults have used illicit methamphetamine. This is of concern since its high-dose administration causes persistent dopaminergic deficits in adult animal models. The effects in adolescents are less studied. In adult rodents, toxic effects of methamphetamine may result partly from aberrant cytosolic dopamine accumulation and subsequent reactive oxygen species formation. The vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2) sequesters cytoplasmic dopamine into synaptic vesicles for storage and perhaps protection against dopamine-associated oxidative consequences. Accordingly, aberrant VMAT-2 function may contribute to the methamphetamine-induced persistent dopaminergic deficits. Hence, this study examined effects of methamphetamine on VMAT-2 in adolescent (postnatal day 40) and young adult (postnatal day 90) rats. Results revealed that high-dose methamphetamine treatment caused greater acute (within 1 h) decreases in vesicular dopamine uptake in postnatal day 90 versus 40 rats, as determined in a nonmembrane-associated subcellular fraction. Greater basal levels of VMAT-2 at postnatal day 90 versus 40 in this purified fraction seemed to contribute to the larger effect. Basal tissue dopamine content was also greater in postnatal day 90 versus 40 rats. In addition, postnatal day 90 rats were more susceptible to methamphetamine-induced persistent dopaminergic deficits as assessed by measuring VMAT-2 activity and dopamine content 7 days after treatment, even if drug doses were adjusted for age-related pharmacokinetic differences. Together, these data demonstrate dynamic changes in VMAT-2 susceptibility to methamphetamine as a function of development. Implications with regard to methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic deficits, as well as dopamine-associated neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease, are discussed.

  20. N-(4-Meth-oxy-phen-yl)-6-methyl-2-phenyl-5-{[4-(tri-fluoro-meth-yl)anilino]meth-yl}pyrimidin-4-amine.

    PubMed

    Cieplik, Jerzy; Pluta, Janusz; Bryndal, Iwona; Lis, Tadeusz

    2013-11-27

    The title compound, C26H23F3N4O, crystallizes with two symmetry-independent mol-ecules in the asymmetric unit, denoted A and B, which differ mainly in the rotation of the meth-oxy-phenyl ring. The -CF3 group of mol-ecule B is disordered by rotation, with the F atoms split over two sets of sites; the occupancy factor for the major component is 0.853 (4). The dihedral angles between the pyrimidine ring and the attached phenyl, meth-oxy-phenyl and tri-fluoro-methyl-phenyl rings are 8.1 (2), 37.5 (2) and 70.7 (2)°, respectively, in mol-ecule A, and 9.3 (2), 5.3 (2) and 79.7 (2)° in mol-ecule B. An intra-molecular N-H⋯N hydrogen bond occurs in each mol-ecule. In the crystal, two crystallographically independent mol-ecules associate into a dimer via a pair of N-H⋯N hydrogen bonds, with a resulting R 2 (2)(12) ring motif and π-π stacking inter-actions [centroid-centroid distance = 3.517 (4) Å] between the pyrimidine rings. For the A mol-ecules, there are inter-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds between an aryl C atom of meth-oxy-phenyl ring and a meth-oxy O atom of an adjacent mol-ecule. A similar inter-action is lacking in the B mol-ecules.

  1. Effects of L-carnitine pretreatment in methamphetamine and 3-nitropropionic acid-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Binienda, Zbigniew K; Przybyla, Beata D; Robinson, Bonnie L; Salem, Nadia; Virmani, Ashraf; Amato, Antonino; Ali, Syed F

    2006-08-01

    Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with 3-ni-tropropionic acid (3-NPA) at 30 mg/kg or methamphetamine (METH) at 20 mg/kg alone or following pretreatment with L-cartnitine (LC) at 100 mg/kg. Rectal temperature was measured before and 4 h following treatment. Animals were sacrificed at 4 h posttreatment. Monoamine neurotransmitters, dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT), and their metabolites were analyzed in the striatum using high-performance liquid chromatography method coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC/ED). Transcripts of several genes related to DA metabolism were quantified using real time reverse transciption polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Core temperature decreased significantly after 3-NPA acid and increased in METH-treated rats (P < 0.05). Temperature change at 4 h exhibited a significant LC effect for 3-NPA, preventing hypothermia (P < 0.05) and no effect for METH. Concentration of DA and 5-HT, and their metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), increased significantly in 3-NPA and decreased in METH-treated rats. An increase in DOPAC/DA turnover and serotonin observed after 3-NPA was abolished in LC-/3-NPA-treated rats. In both 3-NPA- and METH-treated rats, LC prevented an increase in DA receptor D(1) gene expression. It appears that carnitine effect preventing hypothermia after 3-NPA treatments may be related not only to its mitochondriotropic actions but also to inhibitory effect on the DA and 5-HT systems activated after the exposure to 3-NPA. The same effect observed at the transcriptional level, at least for the DA receptor D(1), may account for protection against METH toxicity.

  2. Repin-induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Robles, M; Choi, B H; Han, B; Santa Cruz, K; Kim, R C

    1998-07-01

    Russian knapweed is a perennial weed found in many parts of the world, including southern California. Chronic ingestion of this plant by horses has been reported to cause equine nigropallidal encephalomalacia (ENE), which is associated with a movement disorder simulating Parkinson's disease (PD). Repin, a principal ingredient purified from Russian knapweed, is a sesquiterpene lactone containing an alpha-methylenebutyrolactone moiety and epoxides and is a highly reactive electrophile that can readily undergo conjugation with various biological nucleophiles, such as proteins, DNA, and glutathione (GSH). We show in this study that repin is highly toxic to C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats and acutely induces uncoordinated locomotion associated with postural tremors, hypothermia, and inability to respond to sonic and tactile stimuli. We also show that repin intoxication reduces striatal and hippocampal GSH and increases total striatal dopamine (DA) levels in mice. Striatal microdialysis in rats, however, has demonstrated a significant reduction of extracellular DA levels. These findings, coupled with the absence of any demonstrable change in striatal DOPAC levels, suggest that repin acts by inhibiting DA release, a hypothesis that is further supported by our demonstration that, in cultured PC12 cells, repin inhibits the release of DA without affecting its uptake. We believe, therefore, that inhibition of DA release represents one of the earliest pathogenetic events in ENE, leading eventually to striatal extracellular DA denervation, oxidative stress, and degeneration of nigrostriatal pathways. Since the neurotoxic effects of repin appear to be mediated via oxidative stress, and since repin is a natural product isolated from a plant in our environment that can cause a movement disorder associated with degeneration of nigrostriatal pathways, clarification of the mechanism of repin neurotoxicity may provide new insights into our understanding of the pathogenesis of PD

  3. Exploration of Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced Neurotoxicity with Neuroimaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated...Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced Neurotoxicity with Neuroimaging 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0033 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Jeri...Janowsky, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: janowskj@ohsu.edu 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND

  4. Protection against MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY5Y cells by tormentic acid via the activation of PI3-K/Akt/GSK3β pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qing; Ye, Junli; Wei, Na; Fong, Chichun; Dong, Xiaoli

    2016-07-01

    The cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) could be ascribed to the progressive and selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, and thus molecules with neuroprotective ability may have therapeutic value against PD. In the current study, the neuroprotective effects and underlying mechanisms of tormentic acid (TA), a naturally occurring triterpene extracted from medicinal plants such as Rosa rugosa and Potentilla chinensis, were evaluated in a widely used cellular PD model in which neurotoxicity was induced by MPP(+) in cultured SH-SY5Y cells. We found that TA at 1-30 μM substantially protected against MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity, as evidenced by the increase in cell viability, decrease in lactate dehydrogenase release and the reduction in apoptotic nuclei. Moreover, TA effectively inhibited the elevated intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species as well as Bax/Bcl-2 ratio caused by MPP(+). Most importantly, TA markedly reversed the inhibition of protein expression of phosphorylated Akt (Ser 473) and phosphorylated GSK3β (Ser 9) caused by MPP(+). LY294002, the specific inhibitor of PI3-K, significantly abrogated the up-regulated phosphorylated Akt and phosphorylated GSK3β offered by TA, suggesting that the neuroprotection of TA was mainly dependent on the activation of PI3-K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway. The results taken together indicate that TA may be a potential candidate for further preclinical study aimed at the prevention and treatment of PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Zwitterionic 4-bromo-6-meth-oxy-2-{[tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)methyl]-iminiumyl-meth-yl}phenolate: crystal structure and Hirshfeld surface analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Mun; Lo, Kong Mun; Tan, Sang Loon; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-08-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C12H16BrNO5 [systematic name: 4-bromo-2-((1E)-{[1,3-dihy-droxy-2-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propan-2-yl]iminium-yl}meth-yl)-6-meth-oxy-benzen-1-olate], C12H16BrNO5, is found in the keto-amine tautomeric form, with an intra-molecular iminium-N-H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen bond and an E conformation about the C=N bond. Both gauche (two) and anti relationships are found for the methyl-hydroxy groups. In the crystal, a supra-molecular layer in the bc plane is formed via hy-droxy-O-H⋯O(hy-droxy) and charge-assisted hy-droxy-O-H⋯O(phenolate) hydrogen-bonding inter-actions; various C-H⋯O inter-actions provide additional cohesion to the layers, which stack along the a axis with no directional inter-actions between them. A Hirshfeld surface analysis confirms the lack of specific inter-actions in the inter-layer region.

  6. Poly(meth)acrylates obtained by cascade reaction.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Dragos; Keul, Helmut; Moeller, Martin

    2011-04-04

    Preparation, purification, and stabilization of functional (meth)acrylates with a high dipole moment are complex, laborious, and expensive processes. In order to avoid purification and stabilization of the highly reactive functional monomers, a concept of cascade reactions was developed comprising enzymatic monomer synthesis and radical polymerization. Transacylation of methyl acrylate (MA) and methyl methacrylate (MMA) with different functional alcohols, diols, and triols (1,2,6-hexanetriol and glycerol) in the presence of Novozyme 435 led to functional (meth)acrylates. After the removal of the enzyme by means of filtration, removal of excess (meth)acrylate and/or addition of a new monomer, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl (meth)acrylate the (co)polymerization via free radical (FRP) or nitroxide mediated radical polymerization (NMP) resulted in poly[(meth)acrylate]s with predefined functionalities. Hydrophilic, hydrophobic as well as ionic repeating units were assembled within the copolymer. The transacylation of MA and MMA with diols and triols carried out under mild conditions is an easy and rapid process and is suitable for the preparation of sensitive monomers. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Lack of CCR5 modifies glial phenotypes and population of the nigral dopaminergic neurons, but not MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Young; Lee, Myung Koo; Hong, Jin Tae

    2013-01-01

    Constitutive expression of C-C chemokine receptor (CCR) 5 has been detected in astrocytes, microglia and neurons, but its physiological roles in the central nervous system are obscure. The bidirectional interactions between neuron and glial cells through CCR5 and its ligands were thought to be crucial for maintaining normal neuronal activities. No study has described function of CCR5 in the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. In order to examine effects of CCR5 on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration, we employed CCR5 wild type (WT) and knockout (KO) mice. Immunostainings for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) exhibited that CCR5 KO mice had lower number of TH-positive neurons even in the absence of MPTP. Difference in MPTP (15mg/kg×4 times, 2hr interval)-mediated loss of TH-positive neurons was subtle between CCR5 WT and KO mice, but there was larger dopamine depletion, behavioral impairments and microglial activation in CCR5 deficient mice. Intriguingly, CCR5 KO brains contained higher immunoreactivity for monoamine oxidase (MAO) B which was mainly localized within astrocytes. In agreement with upregulation of MAO B, concentration of MPP+ was higher in the substantia nigra and striatum of CCR5 KO mice after MPTP injection. We found remarkable activation of p38 MAPK in CCR5 deficient mice, which positively regulates MAO B expression. These results indicate that CCR5 deficiency modifies the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal system and bidirectional interaction between neurons and glial cells via CCR5 might be important for dopaminergic neuronal survival. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. High molecular weight of polysaccharides from Hericium erinaceus against amyloid beta-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jai-Hong; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Lien, Yi-Yang; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Sheu, Shyang-Chwen

    2016-06-07

    Hericium erinaceus (HE) is a well-known mushroom in traditional Chinese food and medicine. HE extracts from the fruiting body and mycelia not only exhibit immunomodulatory, antimutagenic and antitumor activity but also have neuroprotective properties. Here, we purified HE polysaccharides (HEPS), composed of two high molecular weight polysaccharides (1.7 × 10(5) Da and 1.1 × 10(5) Da), and evaluated their protective effects on amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. HEPS were prepared and purified using a 95 % ethanol extraction method. The components of HEPS were analyzed and the molecular weights of the polysaccharides were determined using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The neuroprotective effects of the polysaccharides were evaluated through a 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay and an MTT assay and by quantifying reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (MMP) of Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in cells. Our results showed that 250 μg/ml HEPS was harmless and promoted cell viability with 1.2 μM Aβ treatment. We observed that the free radical scavenging rate exceeded 90 % when the concentration of HEPS was higher than 1 mg/mL in cells. The HEPS decreased the production of ROS from 80 to 58 % in a dose-dependent manner. Cell pretreatment with 250 μg/mL HEPS significantly reduced Aβ-induced high MMPs from 74 to 51 % and 94 to 62 % at 24 and 48 h, respectively. Finally, 250 μg/mL of HEPS prevented Aβ-induced cell shrinkage and nuclear degradation of PC12 cells. Our results demonstrate that HEPS exhibit antioxidant and neuroprotective effects on Aβ-induced neurotoxicity in neurons.

  9. Rotenone induces oxidative stress and dopaminergic neuron damage in organotypic substantia nigra cultures.

    PubMed

    Testa, Claudia M; Sherer, Todd B; Greenamyre, J Timothy

    2005-03-24

    Rotenone, a pesticide and complex I inhibitor, causes nigrostriatal degeneration similar to Parkinson disease pathology in a chronic, systemic, in vivo rodent model [M. Alam, W.J. Schmidt, Rotenone destroys dopaminergic neurons and induces parkinsonian symptoms in rats, Behav. Brain Res. 136 (2002) 317-324; R. Betarbet, T.B. Sherer, G. MacKenzie, M. Garcia-Osuna, A.V. Panov, J.T. Greenamyre, Chronic systemic pesticide exposure reproduces features of Parkinson's disease, Nat. Neurosci. 3 (2000) 1301-1306; S.M. Fleming, C. Zhu, P.O. Fernagut, A. Mehta, C.D. DiCarlo, R.L. Seaman, M.F. Chesselet, Behavioral and immunohistochemical effects of chronic intravenous and subcutaneous infusions of varying doses of rotenone, Exp. Neurol. 187 (2004) 418-429; T.B. Sherer, J.H. Kim, R. Betarbet, J.T. Greenamyre, Subcutaneous rotenone exposure causes highly selective dopaminergic degeneration and alpha-synuclein aggregation, Exp. Neurol. 179 (2003) 9-16.]. To better investigate the role of mitochondria and complex I inhibition in chronic, progressive neurodegenerative disease, we developed methods for long-term culture of rodent postnatal midbrain organotypic slices. Chronic complex I inhibition over weeks by low dose (10-50 nM) rotenone in this system lead to dose- and time-dependent destruction of substantia nigra pars compacta neuron processes, morphologic changes, some neuronal loss, and decreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein levels. Chronic complex I inhibition also caused oxidative damage to proteins, measured by protein carbonyl levels. This oxidative damage was blocked by the antioxidant alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). At the same time, alpha-tocopherol also blocked rotenone-induced reductions in TH protein and TH immunohistochemical changes. Thus, oxidative damage is a primary mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity in intact dopaminergic neurons. The organotypic culture system allows close study of this and other interacting mechanisms over a prolonged time period in

  10. Differentiation and Characterization of Dopaminergic Neurons From Baboon Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Grow, Douglas A; Simmons, DeNard V; Gomez, Jorge A; Wanat, Matthew J; McCarrey, John R; Paladini, Carlos A; Navara, Christopher S

    2016-09-01

    : The progressive death of dopamine producing neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta is the principal cause of symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Stem cells have potential therapeutic use in replacing these cells and restoring function. To facilitate development of this approach, we sought to establish a preclinical model based on a large nonhuman primate for testing the efficacy and safety of stem cell-based transplantation. To this end, we differentiated baboon fibroblast-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (biPSCs) into dopaminergic neurons with the application of specific morphogens and growth factors. We confirmed that biPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons resemble those found in the human midbrain based on cell type-specific expression of dopamine markers TH and GIRK2. Using the reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction, we also showed that biPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons express PAX6, FOXA2, LMX1A, NURR1, and TH genes characteristic of this cell type in vivo. We used perforated patch-clamp electrophysiology to demonstrate that biPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons fired spontaneous rhythmic action potentials and high-frequency action potentials with spike frequency adaption upon injection of depolarizing current. Finally, we showed that biPSC-derived neurons released catecholamines in response to electrical stimulation. These results demonstrate the utility of the baboon model for testing and optimizing the efficacy and safety of stem cell-based therapeutic approaches for the treatment of PD. Functional dopamine neurons were produced from baboon induced pluripotent stem cells, and their properties were compared to baboon midbrain cells in vivo. The baboon has advantages as a clinically relevant model in which to optimize the efficacy and safety of stem cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. Baboons possess crucial neuroanatomical and immunological similarities to humans, and baboon

  11. METHAMPHETAMINE TOXICITY AND MESSENGERS OF DEATH

    PubMed Central

    Krasnova, Irina N.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit psychostimulant that is widely abused in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic METH abuse leads to neurodegenerative changes in the human brain. These include damage to dopamine and serotonin axons, loss of gray matter accompanied by hypertrophy of the white matter and microgliosis in different brain areas. In the present review, we summarize data on the animal models of METH neurotoxicity which include degeneration of monoaminergic terminals and neuronal apoptosis. In addition, we discuss molecular and cellular bases of METH-induced neuropathologies. The accumulated evidence indicates that multiple events, including oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, hyperthermia, neuroinflammatory responses, mitochondrial dysfunction, endoplasmic reticulum stress converge to mediate METH-induced terminal degeneration and neuronal apoptosis. When taken together, these findings suggest that pharmacological strategies geared towards the prevention and treatment of the deleterious effects of this drug will need to attack the various pathways that form the substrates of METH toxicity. PMID:19328213

  12. (E)-1-[2-Hy-droxy-4,6-bis-(meth-oxy-meth-oxy)phen-yl]-3-phenyl-prop-2-en-1-one.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chao; Liu, Y Q; He, Y W; Aisa, H A

    2013-05-01

    The title compound, C19H20O6, consists of a tetra-substituted benzene ring with one substituent being an α,β-unsaturated cinnamoyl group, which forms an extended conjugated system in the mol-ecule. In addition, two meth-oxy-meth-oxy and one hy-droxy group are bonded to the central benzene ring. The dihedral angle between eh rings is 10.22 (10)°. An intra-molecular hydrogen bond is observed between the hy-droxy group and the carbonyl O atom. One of the meth-oxy-meth-oxy substituents is conformationally disordered over two sets of sites with site-occupation factors of 0.831 (3) and 0.169 (3).

  13. Nanometer size diesel exhaust particles are selectively toxic to dopaminergic neurons: the role of microglia, phagocytosis, and NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Block, M L; Wu, X; Pei, Z; Li, G; Wang, T; Qin, L; Wilson, B; Yang, J; Hong, J S; Veronesi, B

    2004-10-01

    The contributing role of environmental factors to the development of Parkinson's disease has become increasingly evident. We report that mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures treated with diesel exhaust particles (DEP; 0.22 microM) (5-50 microg/ml) resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in dopaminergic (DA) neurons, as determined by DA-uptake assay and tyrosine-hydroxylase immunocytochemistry (ICC). The selective toxicity of DEP for DA neurons was demonstrated by the lack of DEP effect on both GABA uptake and Neu-N immunoreactive cell number. The critical role of microglia was demonstrated by the failure of neuron-enriched cultures to exhibit DEP-induced DA neurotoxicity, where DEP-induced DA neuron death was reinstated with the addition of microglia to neuron-enriched cultures. OX-42 ICC staining of DEP treated neuron-glia cultures revealed changes in microglia morphology indicative of activation. Intracellular reactive oxygen species and superoxide were produced from enriched-microglia cultures in response to DEP. Neuron-glia cultures from NADPH oxidase deficient (PHOX-/-) mice were insensitive to DEP neurotoxicity when compared with control mice (PHOX+/+). Cytochalasin D inhibited DEP-induced superoxide production in enriched-microglia cultures, implying that DEP must be phagocytized by microglia to produce superoxide. Together, these in vitro data indicate that DEP selectively damages DA neurons through the phagocytic activation of microglial NADPH oxidase and consequent oxidative insult.

  14. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the freemore » radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value

  15. Effect of inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase on MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Viveros-Paredes, J M; Gonzalez-Castañeda, R E; Escalante-Castañeda, A; Tejeda-Martínez, A R; Castañeda-Achutiguí, F; Flores-Soto, M E

    2017-01-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by balance problems, muscle rigidity, and slow movement due to low dopamine levels and loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc). The endocannabinoid system is known to modulate the nigrostriatal pathway through endogenous ligands such as anandamide (AEA), which is hydrolysed by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). The purpose of this study was to increase AEA levels using FAAH inhibitor URB597 to evaluate the modulatory effect of AEA on dopaminergic neuronal death induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Our study included 4 experimental groups (n = 6 mice per group): a control group receiving no treatment, a group receiving URB597 (0.2mg/kg) every 3 days for 30 days, a group treated with MPTP (30mg/kg) for 5 days, and a group receiving URB597 and subsequently MPTP injections. Three days after the last dose, we conducted a series of behavioural tests (beam test, pole test, and stride length test) to compare motor coordination between groups. We subsequently analysed immunoreactivity of dopaminergic cells and microglia in the SNpc and striatum. Mice treated with URB597 plus MPTP were found to perform better on behavioural tests than mice receiving MPTP only. According to the immunohistochemistry study, mice receiving MPTP showed fewer dopaminergic cells and fibres in the SNpc and striatum. Animals treated with URB597 plus MPTP displayed increased tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity compared to those treated with MPTP only. Regarding microglial immunoreactivity, the group receiving MPTP showed higher Iba1 immunoreactivity in the striatum and SNpc than did the group treated with URB597 plus MPTP. Our results show that URB597 exerts a protective effect since it inhibits dopaminergic neuronal death, decreases microglial immunoreactivity, and improves MPTP-induced motor alterations. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado

  16. Influence of interleukin 12 on p53 peptide vaccination against established Meth A sarcoma.

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Y; Richards, E C; Chen, Y T; Old, L J

    1995-01-01

    BALB/c murine sarcoma Meth A is known to have three missense point mutations in p53. We previously reported that a nonamer peptide containing the codon 234 mutational product (designated 234CM) elicited 234CM-specific cytotoxic T cells and that immunization with 234CM in adjuvant before tumor challenge inhibited Meth A growth. Because interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been shown to have antitumor activity against established tumors and immuno-modulatory activities, we analyzed its effect on p53 peptide immunization and Meth A growth. Multiple injections of IL-12 alone (4 times a week for 2 weeks) caused regression of established Meth A sarcoma, and this effect was dose dependent. IL-12 treatment prior to Meth A challenge had little or no antitumor activity. To evaluate the effect of IL-12 on the generation of 234CM-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with 234CM in adjuvant and injected with various doses of IL-12 were sensitized with 234CM in vitro. Multiple injections of 1 ng of IL-12 induced the highest cytotoxicity against target cells pulsed with 234CM. Higher doses of IL-12 suppressed 234CM-specific cytotoxic T-cell generation. Mice immunized with 234CM in QS-21 adjuvant and treated with 1 ng of IL-12 rejected established Meth A sarcoma. Mice comparably treated with 1 ng of IL-12 but immunized with 234CW peptide (the wild-type counterpart to 234CM) in QS-21 or with QS-21 alone showed progressive tumor growth. PMID:7892250

  17. TRPV4 inhibition prevents paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity in preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Boehmerle, Wolfgang; Huehnchen, Petra; Lee, Sabrina Lin Lin; Harms, Christoph; Endres, Matthias

    2018-04-30

    Paclitaxel is a cytotoxic drug which frequently causes sensory peripheral neuropathy in patients. Increasing evidence suggests that altered intracellular calcium (Ca 2+ ) signals play an important role in the pathogenesis of this condition. In the present study, we examined the interplay between Ca 2+ release channels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Ca 2+ permeable channels in the plasma membrane in the context of paclitaxel mediated neurotoxicity. We observed that in small to medium size dorsal root ganglia neurons (DRGN) the inositol-trisphosphate receptor (InsP 3 R) type 1 was often concentrated in the periphery of cells, which is in contrast to homogenous ER distribution. G protein-coupled designer receptors were used to further elucidate phosphoinositide mediated Ca 2+ signaling: This approach showed strong InsP 3 mediated Ca 2+ signals close to the plasma membrane, which can be amplified by Ca 2+ entry through TRPV4 channels. In addition, our results support a physical interaction and partial colocalization of InsP 3 R1 and TRPV4 channels. In the context of paclitaxel-induced neurotoxicity, blocking Ca 2+ influx through TRPV4 channels reduced cell death in cultured DRGN. Pretreatment of mice with the pharmacological TRPV4 inhibitor HC067047 prior to paclitaxel injections prevented electrophysiological and behavioral changes associated with paclitaxel-induced neuropathy. In summary, these results underline the relevance of TRPV4 signaling for the pathogenesis of paclitaxel-induced neuropathy and suggest novel preventive strategies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Neuroprotective effect of Demethoxycurcumin, a natural derivative of Curcumin on rotenone induced neurotoxicity in SH-SY 5Y Neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Muthu; Rajasankar, Srinivasagam; Gobi, Veerappan Venkatesh; Dhanalakshmi, Chinnasamy; Manivasagam, Thamilarasan; Justin Thenmozhi, Arokiasamy; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Kalandar, Ameer; Chidambaram, Ranganathan

    2017-04-18

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are the main toxic events leading to dopaminergic neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD) and identified as vital objective for therapeutic intercession. This study investigated the neuro-protective effects of the demethoxycurcumin (DMC), a derivative of curcumin against rotenone induced neurotoxicity. SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells are divided into four experimental groups: untreated cells, cells incubated with rotenone (100 nM), cells treated with DMC (50 nM) + rotenone (100 nM) and DMC alone treated. 24 h after treatment with rotenone and 28 h after treatment with DMC, cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay, and levels of ROS and MMP, plus expression of apoptotic protein were analysed. Rotenone induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells was significantly reduced by DMC pretreatment in a dose-dependent manner, indicating the potent neuroprotective effects of DMC. Rotenone treatment significantly increases the levels of ROS, loss of MMP, release of Cyt-c and expression of pro-apoptotic markers and decreases the expression of anti-apoptotic markers. Even though the results of the present study indicated that the DMC may serve as a potent therapeutic agent particularly for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases like PD, further pre-clinical and clinical studies are required.

  19. Fenpropathrin, a Widely Used Pesticide, Causes Dopaminergic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jing; Zhang, Xiaowei; Huang, Jinsha; Chen, Chunnuan; Chen, Zhenzhen; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guoxin; Yang, Jiaolong; Zhang, Zhentao; Zhang, Zhaohui; Lin, Zhicheng

    2017-01-01

    Fenpropathrin is one of the widely used pyrethroids in agriculture and household and also reported to have neurotoxic effects in rodent models. In our Parkinson’s disease (PD) clinic, there was a unique patient with a history of daily exposure to fenpropathrin for 6 months prior to developing Parkinsonian symptoms progressively. Since whether fenpropathrin is related to any dopaminergic degeneration was unknown, we aimed in this study to evaluate the neurotoxic effects of fenpropathrin on the dopaminergic system and associated mechanisms in vitro and in vivo. In cultured SH-SY5Y cells, fenpropathrin caused cell death, reactive oxygen species generation, Lewy body-associated proteins aggregation, and Lewy body-like intracytoplasmic inclusions formation. In rodent animals, two different injections of fenpropathrin were used for administrations, intraperitoneal (i.p), or stereotaxical (ST). The rats exhibited lower number of pokes 60 days after first i.p injection, while the rats in ST group showed a significant upregulation of apomorphine-evoked rotations 60 days after first injection. Dcreased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) immunoreactivity, while increased dopamine transporter (DAT) immunoreactivity were observed in rats of either i.p or ST group 60 days after the last exposure to fenpropathrin. However, the number of TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra was more reduced 120 days after the first i.p injection than those of 60 days. Our data demonstrated that exposure to fenpropathrin could mimic the pathologic and pathogenetic features of PD especially in late onset cases. These results imply fenpropathrin as a DA neurotoxin and a possible environmental risk factor for PD. PMID:25575680

  20. Protective effect of arctigenin on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jia; Xiao, Lan; Wei, Jing-Xiang; Shu, Ya-Hai; Fang, Shi-Qi; Wang, Yong-Tang; Lu, Xiu-Min

    2017-04-01

    As a neurotropic substance, ethanol can damage nerve cells through an increase in the production of free radicals, interference of neurotrophic factor signaling pathways, activation of endogenous apoptotic signals and other molecular mechanisms. Previous studies have revealed that a number of natural drugs extracted from plants offer protection of nerve cells from damage. Among these, arctigenin (ATG) is a lignine extracted from Arctium lappa (L.), which has been found to exert a neuroprotective effect on scopolamine‑induced memory deficits in mice with Alzheimer's disease and glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in primary neurons. As a result, it may offer beneficial effects on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. However, the effects of ATG on ethanol‑induced nerve damage remain to be elucidated. To address this issue, the present study used rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ATG on ethanol-induced cell damage by performing an MTT reduction assay, cell cycle analysis, Hoechst33342/propidium iodide fluorescence staining and flow cytometry to examine apoptosis. The results showed that 10 µM ATG effectively promoted the proliferation of damaged cells, and increased the distribution ratio of the cells at the G2/M and S phases (P<0.05). In addition, the apoptosis and necrosis of the PC12 cells were significantly decreased following treatment with ATG. Therefore, it was concluded that 10 µM ATG had a protective effect on ethanol‑induced injury in PC12 cells.

  1. Methamphetamine abuse and oral health: a pilot study of "meth mouth".

    PubMed

    Ravenel, Michele C; Salinas, Carlos F; Marlow, Nicole M; Slate, Elizabeth H; Evans, Zachary P; Miller, Peter M

    2012-03-01

    Abuse of methamphetamine (meth), a potent central nervous system stimulant, has been associated with significant dental disease. Current descriptions of "meth mouth" are limited in their scope and fail to illuminate the potential pathogenic mechanisms of meth for oral disease. The purpose of this pilot study was to characterize the oral health of subjects with a history of meth abuse as compared to nonabusing control subjects. A total of 28 meth abusers and 16 control subjects were enrolled. Interviews and surveys regarding meth abuse, dental history, oral hygiene, and diet were collected. A comprehensive oral cavity examination including salivary characterization was completed. We observed significantly higher rates of decayed surfaces, missing teeth, tooth wear, plaque, and calculus among meth abusers. No significant difference in salivary flow rates were noted, yet results showed significant trends for lower pH and decreased buffering capacity. These findings suggest that salivary quality may play a more important role in meth mouth than previously considered. Salivary analysis may be useful when managing a dental patient with history of methamphetamine abuse.

  2. Extracellular Zn2+ Influx into Nigral Dopaminergic Neurons Plays a Key Role for Pathogenesis of 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Parkinson's Disease in Rats.

    PubMed

    Tamano, Haruna; Nishio, Ryusuke; Morioka, Hiroki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2018-04-29

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurological disease characterized by a selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. The exact cause of the neuronal loss remains unclear. Here, we report a unique mechanism of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, in which extracellular Zn 2+ influx plays a key role for PD pathogenesis induced with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. 6-OHDA rapidly increased intracellular Zn 2+ only in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) of brain slices and this increase was blocked in the presence of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn 2+ chelator, and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX), an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptor antagonist, indicating that 6-OHDA rapidly increases extracellular Zn 2+ influx via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc. Extracellular Zn 2+ concentration was decreased under in vivo SNpc perfusion with 6-OHDA and this decrease was blocked by co-perfusion with CNQX, supporting 6-OHDA-induced Zn 2+ influx via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc. Interestingly, both 6-OHDA-induced loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and turning behavior to apomorphine were ameliorated by co-injection of intracellular Zn 2+ chelators, i.e., ZnAF-2DA and N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl)ethylenediamine (TPEN). Co-injection of TPEN into the SNpc blocked 6-OHDA-induced increase in intracellular Zn 2+ but not in intracellular Ca 2+ . These results suggest that the rapid influx of extracellular Zn 2+ into dopaminergic neurons via AMPA receptor activation in the SNpc induces nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration, resulting in 6-OHDA-induced PD in rats.

  3. (E)-4-Meth-oxy-N'-(2,4,5-tri-meth-oxy-benzyl-idene)benzohydrazide hemihydrate.

    PubMed

    Chantrapromma, Suchada; Boonnak, Nawong; Horkaew, Jirapa; Quah, Ching Kheng; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2014-02-01

    The title compound crystallizes as a hemihydrate, C18H20N2O5·0.5H2O. The mol-ecule exists in an E conformation with respect to the C=N imine bond. The 4-meth-oxy-phenyl unit is disordered over two sets of sites with a refined occupancy ratio of 0.54 (2):0.46 (2). The dihedral angles between the benzene rings are 29.20 (9) and 26.59 (9)°, respectively, for the major and minor components of the 4-meth-oxy-substituted ring. All meth-oxy substituents lie close to the plane of the attached benzene rings [the Cmeth-yl-O-C-C torsion angles range from -4.0 (12) to 3.9 (2)°]. In the crystal, the components are linked into chains propagating along [001] via N-H⋯O and O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds and weak C-H⋯O inter-actions.

  4. The neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on 5-hydroxytryptamine and dopamine in brain: evidence for the protective effect of chlormethiazole.

    PubMed

    Green, A R; De Souza, R J; Williams, J L; Murray, T K; Cross, A J

    1992-04-01

    Studies were undertaken in mice and rats on the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine on dopaminergic and 5-hydroxytryptaminergic neurones in the brain and the neuroprotective action of chlormethiazole. In initial studies, mice were injected with methamphetamine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at 2 hr intervals, to a total of 4 times. This procedure produced a 66% loss of striatal dopamine and a 50% loss of tyrosine hydroxylase activity 3 days later. Chlormethiazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.), given 15 min before each dose of methamphetamine, totally prevented the methamphetamine-induced loss of tyrosine hydroxylase activity and partly prevented the loss of dopamine. Phencyclidine (20 mg/kg, i.p.), given in place of chlormethiazole, also prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase. Administration to rats of 4 doses of methamphetamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) at 3 hr intervals resulted in a 75% loss of striatal dopamine 3 days later and a similar loss of 5-HT and 5-HIAA in cortex and hippocampus. Chlormethiazole (50 mg/kg, i.p.), given 15 min before each injection of methamphetamine, protected against the loss of dopamine and indoleamine content, in the respective regions. Pentobarbital (25 mg/kg, i.p.) also provided substantial protection but diazepam (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) was without effect. Confirming earlier studies, dizocilpine (1 mg/kg) also provided substantial protection against the methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. Preliminary data indicated that chlormethiazole was not neuroprotective because of a hypothermic action. These data therefore demonstrate that chlormethiazole is an effective neuroprotective agent against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity and extend the evidence for the possible value of this drug in preventing neurodegeneration.

  5. Protective effects of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) against manganese (Mn)-induced neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Marreilha dos Santos, A.P., E-mail: apsantos@ff.ul.pt; Lucas, Rui L.; Andrade, Vanda

    2012-02-01

    Chronic, excessive exposure to manganese (Mn) may induce neurotoxicity and cause an irreversible brain disease, referred to as manganism. Efficacious therapies for the treatment of Mn are lacking, mandating the development of new interventions. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of ebselen (Ebs) and para-aminosalicylic acid (PAS) in attenuating the neurotoxic effects of Mn in an in vivo rat model. Exposure biomarkers, inflammatory and oxidative stress biomarkers, as well as behavioral parameters were evaluated. Co-treatment with Mn plus Ebs or Mn plus PAS caused a significant decrease in blood and brain Mn concentrations (compared tomore » rats treated with Mn alone), concomitant with reduced brain E{sub 2} prostaglandin (PGE{sub 2}) and enhanced brain glutathione (GSH) levels, decreased serum prolactin (PRL) levels, and increased ambulation and rearing activities. Taken together, these results establish that both PAS and Ebs are efficacious in reducing Mn body burden, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and locomotor activity impairments in a rat model of Mn-induced toxicity. -- Highlights: ► The manuscript is unique in its approach to the neurotoxicity of Mn. ► The manuscript incorporates molecular, cellular and functional (behavioral) analyses. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in restoring Mn behavioral function. ► Both PAS and Ebs are effective in reducing Mn-induced oxidative stress. ► Both PAS and Ebs led to a decrease in Mn-induced neuro-inflammation.« less

  6. NAD+ Supplementation Attenuates Methylmercury Dopaminergic and Mitochondrial Toxicity in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Caito, Samuel W.; Aschner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxic contaminant of our fish supply that has been linked to dopaminergic (DAergic) dysfunction that characterizes Parkinson’s disease. We have previously shown that MeHg causes both morphological and behavioral changes in the Caenorhabditis elegans DAergic neurons that are associated with oxidative stress. We were therefore interested in whether the redox sensitive cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) may be affected by MeHg and whether supplementation of NAD + may prevent MeHg-induced toxicities. Worms treated with MeHg showed depletion in cellular NAD + levels, which was prevented by NAD + supplementation prior to MeHg treatment. NAD + supplementation also prevented DAergic neurodegeneration and deficits in DAergic-dependent behavior upon MeHg exposure. In a mutant worm line that cannot synthesize NAD + from nicotinamide, MeHg lethality and DAergic behavioral deficits were more sensitive to MeHg than wildtype worms, demonstrating the importance of NAD + in MeHg toxicity. In wildtype worms, NAD + supplementation provided protection from MeHg-induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. These data show the importance of NAD + levels in the response to MeHg exposure. NAD + supplementation may be beneficial for MeHg-induced toxicities and preventing cellular damage involved in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:26865665

  7. Deficient PKR in RAX/PKR Association Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Qi, Yuanlin; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Mingfang; Frank, Jacqueline A; Handshoe, Jonathan W; Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua; Chen, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal loss is closely related to the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol. The mechanism underlying ethanol neurotoxicity remains unclear. Our previous in vitro studies have shown that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) regulates neuronal apoptosis upon ethanol exposure and ethanol activates PKR through association with its intracellular activator RAX. However, the role of PKR and its interaction with RAX in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, by utilizing N-PKR-/- mice, C57BL/6J mice with a deficient RAX-binding domain in PKR, we determined the critical role of RAX/PKR association in PKR-regulated ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Our data indicate that while N-PKR-/- mice have a similar BAC profile as wild-type mice, ethanol induces less brain/body mass reduction as well as cerebellar neuronal loss. In addition, ethanol promotes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, and IL-1β is a master cytokine regulating inflammatory response. Importantly, ethanol-promoted IL-1β secretion is inhibited in the developing cerebellum of N-PKR-/- mice. Thus, RAX/PKR interaction and PKR activation regulate ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum, which may involve ethanol-induced neuroinflammation. Further, PKR could be a possible target for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD).

  8. Deficient PKR in RAX/PKR Association Ameliorates Ethanol-Induced Neurotoxicity in the Developing Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Chen, Jian; Qi, Yuanlin; Dai, Lu; Zhang, Mingfang; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Handshoe, Jonathan W.; Cui, Jiajun; Xu, Wenhua

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol-induced neuronal loss is closely related to the pathogenesis of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. The cerebellum is one of the brain areas that are most sensitive to ethanol. The mechanism underlying ethanol neurotoxicity remains unclear. Our previous in vitro studies have shown that the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-activated protein kinase (PKR) regulates neuronal apoptosis upon ethanol exposure and ethanol activates PKR through association with its intracellular activator RAX. However, the role of PKR and its interaction with RAX in vivo have not been investigated. In the current study, by utilizing N-PKR−/− mice, C57BL/6J mice with a deficient RAX-binding domain in PKR, we determined the critical role of RAX/PKR association in PKR-regulated ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum. Our data indicate that while N-PKR−/− mice have a similar BAC profile as wild-type mice, ethanol induces less brain/body mass reduction as well as cerebellar neuronal loss. In addition, ethanol promotes interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion, and IL-1β is a master cytokine regulating inflammatory response. Importantly, ethanol-promoted IL-1β secretion is inhibited in the developing cerebellum of N-PKR−/− mice. Thus, RAX/PKR interaction and PKR activation regulate ethanol neurotoxicity in the developing cerebellum, which may involve ethanol-induced neuroinflammation. Further, PKR could be a possible target for pharmacological intervention to prevent or treat fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). PMID:25592072

  9. Crystal structure of 2-[chloro-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)meth-yl]-2-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)-5,5-di-methyl-cyclo-hexane-1,3-dione.

    PubMed

    Chelli, Saloua; Troshin, Konstantin; Lakhdar, Sami; Mayr, Herbert; Mayer, Peter

    2016-03-01

    In the title compound, C23H25ClO4, the cyclo-hexane ring adopts a chair conformation with the 4-meth-oxy-phenyl substituent in an axial position and the chloro-(4-meth-oxy-phen-yl)methyl substituent in an equatorial position. The packing features inversion dimers formed by pairs of C-H⋯O contacts and strands along [100] and [010] established by further C-H⋯O and C-H⋯Cl contacts, respectively.

  10. Neurotoxicity Induced by Bupivacaine via T-Type Calcium Channels in SH-SY5Y Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xianjie; Xu, Shiyuan; Liu, Hongzhen; Zhang, Quinguo; Liang, Hua; Yang, Chenxiang; Wang, Hanbing

    2013-01-01

    There is concern regarding neurotoxicity induced by the use of local anesthetics. A previous study showed that an overload of intracellular calcium is involved in the neurotoxic effect of some anesthetics. T-type calcium channels, which lower the threshold of action potentials, can regulate the influx of calcium ions. We hypothesized that T-type calcium channels are involved in bupivacaine-induced neurotoxicity. In this study, we first investigated the effects of different concentrations of bupivacaine on SH-SY5Y cell viability, and established a cell injury model with 1 mM bupivacaine. The cell viability of SH-SY5Y cells was measured following treatment with 1 mM bupivacaine and/or different dosages (10, 50, or 100 µM) of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride, an antagonist of T-type calcium channels for 24 h. In addition, we monitored the release of lactate dehydrogenase, cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), cell apoptosis and caspase-3 expression. SH-SY5Y cells pretreated with different dosages (10, 50, or 100 µM) of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride improved cell viability, reduced lactate dehydrogenase release, inhibited apoptosis, and reduced caspase-3 expression following bupivacaine exposure. However, the protective effect of NNC 55-0396 dihydrochloride plateaued. Overall, our results suggest that T-type calcium channels may be involved in bupivacaine neurotoxicity. However, identification of the specific subtype of T calcium channels involved requires further investigation. PMID:23658789

  11. Dysregulated expression of secretogranin III is involved in neurotoxin-induced dopaminergic neuron apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Fengrui; Tian, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yishu; Zhu, Lanhui; Wang, Baojie; Ding, Mei; Pang, Hao

    2012-12-01

    The neurotoxins paraquat (PQ) and dopamine (DA or 6-OHDA) cause apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), reproducing an important pathological feature of Parkinson's disease (PD). Secretogranin III (SCG3), a member of the multifunctional granin family, plays a key role in neurotransmitter storage and transport and in secretory granule biogenesis, which involves the uptake of exogenous toxins and endogenous "toxins" in neuroendocrine cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of neurotoxin-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons and the role of SCG3-associated signaling pathways in neuroendocrine regulation are unclear. To address this, we used PQ- and DA-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y human dopaminergic cells as an in vitro model to investigate the association between SCG3 expression level and apoptosis. SCG3 was highly expressed in SH-SY5Y cells, and SCG3 mRNA and protein levels were dramatically decreased after PQ treatment. Apoptosis induced by PQ is associated with caspase activation and decreased SCG3 expression, and restoration of SCG3 expression is observed after treatment with caspase inhibitors. Overexpressed SCG3 in nonneuronal cells and endogenous SCG3 in SH-SY5Y cells are cleaved into specific fragments by recombinant caspase-3 and -7, but the fragments were not detected in PQ-treated SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, SCG3 may be involved in apoptosis signal transduction as a caspase substrate, leading to loss of its original biological functions. In addition, SCG3 may be a pivotal component of the neuroendocrine pathway and play an important role in neuronal communication and neurotransmitter release, possibly representing a new potential target in the course of PD pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Environmental Presence of Hexavalent but Not Trivalent Chromium Causes Neurotoxicity in Exposed Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pallavi; Chowdhuri, D Kar

    2017-07-01

    A number of environmental chemicals are known to cause neurotoxicity to exposed organisms. Chromium (Cr), one of the major elements in earth's crust, is a priority environmental chemical depending on its valence state, and limited information is available on its neurotoxic potential. We, therefore, explored the neurotoxic potential of environmentally present trivalent- (Cr(III)) and hexavalent-Cr (Cr(VI)) on tested brain cell types in a genetically tractable organism Drosophila melanogaster along with its organismal response. Third instar larvae of w 1118 were fed environmentally relevant concentrations (5.0-20.0 μg/ml) of Cr(III)- or Cr(VI)-salt-mixed food for 24 and 48 h, and their exposure effects were examined in different brain cells of exposed organism. A significant reduction in the number of neuronal cells was observed in organism that were fed Cr(VI)- but not Cr(III)-salt-mixed food. Interestingly, glial cells were not affected by Cr(III) or Cr(VI) exposure. The tested cholinergic and dopaminergic neuronal cells were affected by Cr(VI) only with the later by 20.0 μg/ml Cr(VI) exposure after 48 h. The locomotor activity was significantly affected by Cr(VI) in exposed organism. Concomitantly, a significant increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) coupled with increased oxidative stress led to apoptotic cell death in the tested brain cells of Cr(VI)-exposed Drosophila, which were reversed by vitamin C supplementation. Conclusively, the present study provides evidence of environmental Cr(VI)-induced adversities on the brain of exposed Drosophila along with behavioral deficit which would likely to have relevance in humans and recommends Drosophila as a model for neurotoxicity.

  13. Methamphetamine acutely inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels but chronically up-regulates L-type channels.

    PubMed

    Andres, Marilou A; Cooke, Ian M; Bellinger, Frederick P; Berry, Marla J; Zaporteza, Maribel M; Rueli, Rachel H; Barayuga, Stephanie M; Chang, Linda

    2015-07-01

    In neurons, calcium (Ca(2+) ) channels regulate a wide variety of functions ranging from synaptic transmission to gene expression. They also induce neuroplastic changes that alter gene expression following psychostimulant administration. Ca(2+) channel blockers have been considered as potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of methamphetamine (METH) dependence because of their ability to reduce drug craving among METH users. Here, we studied the effects of METH exposure on voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels using SH-SY5Y cells as a model of dopaminergic neurons. We found that METH has different short- and long-term effects. A short-term effect involves immediate (< 5 min) direct inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movements through Ca(2+) channels. Longer exposure to METH (20 min or 48 h) selectively up-regulates the expression of only the CACNA1C gene, thus increasing the number of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This up-regulation of CACNA1C is associated with the expression of the cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB), a known regulator of CACNA1C gene expression, and the MYC gene, which encodes a transcription factor that putatively binds to a site proximal to the CACNA1C gene transcription initiation site. The short-term inhibition of Ca(2+) ion movement and later, the up-regulation of Ca(2+) channel gene expression together suggest the operation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein- and C-MYC-mediated mechanisms to compensate for Ca(2+) channel inhibition by METH. Increased Ca(2+) current density and subsequent increased intracellular Ca(2+) may contribute to the neurodegeneration accompanying chronic METH abuse. Methamphetamine (METH) exposure has both short- and long-term effects. Acutely, methamphetamine directly inhibits voltage-gated calcium channels. Chronically, neurons compensate by up-regulating the L-type Ca(2+) channel gene, CACNA1C. This compensatory mechanism is mediated by transcription factors C-MYC and CREB, in which CREB is linked to the

  14. Detoxified extract of Rhus verniciflua stokes inhibits rotenone-induced apoptosis in human dopaminergic cells, SH-SY5Y.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Kumar; Kim, Seung; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2011-03-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS), traditionally used as a food supplement and in traditional herbal medicine for centuries in Korea, is known to possess various pharmacological properties. Environmental neurotoxins such as rotenone, a specific inhibitor of complex I provide models of Parkinson's disease (PD) both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of RVS against rotenone-induced toxicity in human dopaminergic cells, SH-SY5Y. Cells exposed to rotenone for 24 h-induced cellular injury and apoptotic cell death. Pretreatment of cells with RVS provided significant protection to SH-SY5Y cells. Further, RVS offered remarkable protection against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and markedly inhibited mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) disruption. RVS also attenuated the up-regulation of Bax, Caspase-9 and Caspase-3 and down-regulation of Bcl-2. Moreover, pretreatment with RVS prevented the decrease in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) levels in SH-SY5Y cells. Interestingly, RVS conferred profound protection to human dopaminergic cells by preventing the downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). These results suggest that RVS may protect dopaminergic neurons against rotenone-induced apoptosis by multiple functions and contribute to neuroprotection in neurodegenerative diseases, such as PD.

  15. Two decades of occupational (meth)acrylate patch test results and focus on isobornyl acrylate.

    PubMed

    Christoffers, Wietske A; Coenraads, Pieter-Jan; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A

    2013-08-01

    Acrylates constitute an important cause of occupational contact dermatitis. Isobornyl acrylate sensitization has been reported in only 2 cases. We encountered an industrial process operator with occupational contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate. (i) To investigate whether it is relevant to add isobornyl acrylate to the (meth)acrylate test series. (ii) To report patients with (meth)acrylate contact allergy at an occupational dermatology clinic. Our patch test database was screened for positive reactions to (meth)acrylates between 1993 and 2012. A selected group of 14 patients was tested with an isobornyl acrylate dilution series: 0.3%, 0.1%, 0.033%, and 0.01%. Readings were performed on D2, D3, and D7. One hundred and fifty-one patients were tested with our (meth)acrylate series; 24 had positive reactions. Most positive reactions were to 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate, and diethyleneglycol diacrylate. Hypothetical screening with 2-hydroxypropyl acrylate, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate, ethoxylated bisphenol A glycol dimethacrylate and trimethylolpropane triacrylate identified 91.7% of the 24 patients. No positive reactions were observed in 14 acrylate-positive patients tested with the isobornyl acrylate dilution series. The 0.3% isobornyl acrylate concentration induced irritant reactions in 3 patients. We report a rare case of allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate. However, this study provides insufficient support for isobornyl acrylate to be added to a (meth)acrylate series. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Phosphorylation of p53 by LRRK2 induces microglial tumor necrosis factor α-mediated neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Dong Hwan, E-mail: ethan2887@gmail.com; Seol, Wongi; Eun, Jin Hwan

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase (LRRK2), a major causal gene of Parkinson's disease (PD), functions as a kinase. The most prevalent mutation of LRRK2 is G2019S. It exhibits increased kinase activity compared to the wildtype LRRK2. Previous studies have shown that LRRK2 can phosphorylate p53 at T304 and T377 of threonine-X-arginine (TXR) motif in neurons. Reduction of LRRK2 expression or inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity has been shown to be able to alleviate LPS-induced neuroinflammation in microglia cells. In this study, we found that LRRK2 could also phosphorylate p53 in microglia model BV2 cells. Transfection of BV2 with phosphomimetic p53 T304/377D significantlymore » increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα compared to BV2 transfected with p53 wild type after LPS treatment. In addition, conditioned media from these transfected cells increased the death of dopaminergic neuronal SN4741 cells. Moreover, such neurotoxic effect was rescued by co-treatment with the conditioned media and etanercept, a TNFα blocking antibody. Furthermore, TNFα secretion was significantly increased in primary microglia derived from G2019S transgenic mice treated with LPS compared to that in cells derived from their littermates. These results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity in microglia can contribute to neuroinflammation in PD via phosphorylating p53 at T304 and T377 site. - Highlights: • LPS stimulates LRRK2-mediated p53 phosphorylation and its nuclear localization. • Phosphorylation of p53 by LRRK2 in microglia enhances TNFα expression. • Microglial TNFα via LRRK2-induced p53 phosphorylation decreases neuronal survival.« less

  17. Methylenedioxymethamphetamine inhibits mitochondrial complex I activity in mice: a possible mechanism underlying neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Puerta, Elena; Hervias, Isabel; Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Zhang, Steven F; Jordán, Joaquín; Starkov, Anatoly A; Aguirre, Norberto

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes a persistent loss of dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra of mice. Current evidence indicates that such neurotoxicity is due to oxidative stress but the source of free radicals remains unknown. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes by MDMA was assessed as a possible source. Experimental approach: Activities of mitochondrial complexes after MDMA were evaluated spectrophotometrically. In situ visualization of superoxide production in the striatum was assessed by ethidium fluorescence and striatal dopamine levels were determined by HPLC as an index of dopaminergic toxicity. Key results: 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine decreased mitochondrial complex I activity in the striatum of mice, an effect accompanied by an increased production of superoxide radicals and the inhibition of endogenous aconitase. α-Lipoic acid prevented superoxide generation and long-term toxicity independent of any effect on complex I inhibition. These effects of α-lipoic acid were also associated with a significant increase of striatal glutathione levels. The relevance of glutathione was supported by reducing striatal glutathione content with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, which exacerbated MDMA-induced dopamine deficits, effects suppressed by α-lipoic acid. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine, partially prevented MDMA-induced dopamine depletions, an effect reversed by L-arginine but not D-arginine. Finally, a direct relationship between mitochondrial complex I inhibition and long-term dopamine depletions was found in animals treated with MDMA in combination with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Conclusions and implications: Inhibition of mitochondrial complex I following MDMA could be the source of free radicals responsible for oxidative stress and the consequent neurotoxicity of this drug in mice. This article is commented on by Moncada, pp. 217

  18. Decay Accelerating Factor (CD55) Protects Neuronal Cells from Chemical Hypoxia-Induced Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-09

    Pavlakovic G, Isom GE: Dopaminergic neurotoxicity of cyanide: neurochemical, histological and behavioral characterization. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol...provided the original work is properly cited. ResearchDecay accelerating factor (CD55) protects neuronal cells from chemical hypoxia-induced injury...deposition of C3a/C5a and membrane attack complex (MAC or C5b-9) production. The present study investigates the ability of DAF to protect primary cultured

  19. Protective role of Cynodon dactylon in ameliorating the aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, Thangarajan; Shobana, Chandrasekar; Kumari, Balasubramanian Rathina; Nandhini, Devarajulu Nisha

    2011-12-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Poaceae) is a creeping grass used as a traditional ayurvedic medicine in India. Aluminium-induced neurotoxicity is well known and different salts of aluminium have been reported to accelerate damage to biomolecules like lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether the aqueous extract of C. dactylon (AECD) could potentially prevent aluminium-induced neurotoxicity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of the rat brain. Male albino rats were administered with AlCl(3) at a dose of 4.2 mg/kg/day i.p. for 4 weeks. Experimental rats were given C. dactylon extract in two different doses of 300 mg and 750 mg/keg/day orally 1 h prior to the AlCl(3) administration for 4 weeks. At the end of the experiments, antioxidant status and activities of ATPases in cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum of rat brain were measured. Aluminium administration significantly decreased the level of GSH and the activities of SOD, GPx, GST, Na(+)/K(+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase and increased the level of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in all the brain regions when compared with control rats. Pre-treatment with AECD at a dose of 750 mg/kg b.w increased the antioxidant status and activities of membrane-bound enzymes (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and Mg(2+) ATPase) and also decreased the level of LPO significantly, when compared with aluminium-induced rats. The results of this study indicated that AECD has potential to protect the various brain regions from aluminium-induced neurotoxicity.

  20. Prenatal lipopolysaccharide induces hypothalamic dopaminergic hypoactivity and autistic-like behaviors: Repetitive self-grooming and stereotypies.

    PubMed

    Kirsten, Thiago B; Bernardi, Maria M

    2017-07-28

    Previous investigations by our group have shown that prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics infection by gram-negative bacteria, induces social, cognitive, and communication deficits. For a complete screening of autistic-like behaviors, the objective of this study was to evaluate if our rat model also induces restricted and repetitive stereotyped behaviors. Thus, we studied the self-grooming microstructure. We also studied the neurochemistry of hypothalamus and frontal cortex, which are brain areas related to autism to better understand central mechanisms involved in our model. Prenatal LPS exposure on gestational day 9.5 increased the head washing episodes (frequency and time), as well as the total self-grooming. However, body grooming, paw/leg licking, tail/genital grooming, and circling behavior/tail chasing did not vary significantly among the groups. Moreover, prenatal LPS induced dopaminergic hypoactivity (HVA metabolite and turnover) in the hypothalamus. Therefore, our rat model induced restricted and repetitive stereotyped behaviors and the other main symptoms of autism experimentally studied in rodent models and also found in patients. The hypothalamic dopaminergic impairments seem to be associated with the autistic-like behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Alkaloids from piper longum protect dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage induced by intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    He, Huan; Guo, Wei-Wei; Xu, Rong-Rong; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Zhang, Nan; Wu, Xia; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2016-10-24

    Alkaloids from Piper longum (PLA), extracted from P. longum, have potent anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PLA could protect dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated damage by inhibiting microglial activation using a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced dopaminergic neuronal damage rat model. The animal behaviors of rotational behavior, rotarod test and open-field test were investigated. The survival ratio of dopaminergic neurons and microglial activation were examined. The dopamine (DA) and its metabolite were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The effects of PLA on the expression of interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) were also estimated. We showed that the survival ratio of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and DA content in the striatum were reduced after a single intranigral dose of LPS (10 μg) treatment. The survival rate of TH-ir neurons in the SNpc and DA levels in the striatum were significantly improved after treatment with PLA for 6 weeks. The over-activated microglial cells were suppressed by PLA treatment. We also observed that the levels of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β were decreased and the excessive production of ROS and NO were abolished after PLA treatment. Therefore, the behavioral dysfunctions induced by LPS were improved after PLA treatment. This study suggests that PLA plays a significant role in protecting dopaminergic neurons against inflammatory reaction induced damage.

  2. Memory Enhancing Effect of Black Pepper in the AlCl3 Induced Neurotoxicity Mouse Model is Mediated Through Its Active Component Chavicine.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Ghazala; Iqbal, Anila; Mahboob, Aamra; Farhat, Syeda M; Ahmed, Touqeer

    Black pepper (Piper nigrum Linn.) has vital pharmacological properties with profound effects on central nervous system. Neurotoxic agents like Aluminum Chloride (AlCl3) cause the oxidative stress and result in improper processing of amyloid proteins leading to accumulation of amyloid β plaques. The study aimed to explore the neuroprotective potential of black pepper (BP) extract (12.5mg/kg/day) on memory enhancement and its effect on expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) isoforms (APP770 and APP695) in AlCl3 induced neurotoxicity (250mg/kg) mouse model. The study included the isolation and identification of pure compound from BP (chavicine) which was found pharmacologically active. Morris water maze test, elevated plus maze, fear conditioning, context and cue dependent test and social preference tests were performed to investigate the learning and memory. Gene expression (APP isoforms) and in-vitro and ex-vivo DPPH free radical scavenging activity were performed to evaluate the role of BP. BP significantly improved memory in AlCl3 induced neurotoxicity mouse model along with effectively decreasing the expression of APP770 (amyloidogenic) isoform and improved level of APP695 (non-amyloidogenic) in hippocampus, amygdala and cortex. Fear extinction learning was considerably improved in BP treated group (7.83±2.03) than AlCl3 induced neurotoxicity group (39.75±4.25). In the hippocampus, BP significantly reduced the expression of APP770 (0.37±0.05) as compared to AlCl3 induced neurotoxicity group (0.72±0.06), and effectively increased (34.80±1.39) the percentage inhibition of DPPH free radicals as compared to AlCl3 induced neurotoxicity group (14±2.68). The study revealed that BP improves memory and chavicine is a lead compound producing pharmacological effects of BP.

  3. Peripheral ammonia and blood brain barrier structure and function after methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Northrop, Nicole A; Halpin, Laura E; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2016-08-01

    An effect of the widely abuse psychostimulant, methamphetamine (Meth), is blood-brain-barrier (BBB) disruption; however, the mechanism by which Meth causes BBB disruption remains unclear. Recently it has been shown that Meth produces liver damage and consequent increases in plasma ammonia. Ammonia can mediate oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are known to cause BBB disruption. Therefore, the current studies examined the role of peripheral ammonia in Meth-induced disruption of BBB structure and function. A neurotoxic Meth regimen (10 mg/kg, ip, q 2 h, ×4) administered to rats increased plasma ammonia and active MMP-9 in the cortex 2 h after the last Meth injection, compared to saline treated rats. At 24 h after Meth treatment, decreased immunoreactivity of BBB structural proteins, occludin and claudin-5, and increased extravasation of 10,000 Da FITC-dextran were observed, as compared to saline controls. Pretreatment with lactulose (5.3 g/kg, po, q 12 h), a drug that remains in the lumen of the intestine and promotes ammonia excretion, prevented the Meth-induced increases in plasma ammonia. These results were paralleled by the prevention of decreases in BBB structural proteins, increases in extravasation of 10,000 Da FITC-dextran and increases in active MMP-9. The results indicate that Meth-induced increases in ammonia produce BBB disruption and suggest that MMP-9 activation mediates the BBB disruption. These findings identify a novel mechanism of Meth-induced BBB disruption that is mediated by plasma ammonia and are the first to identify a peripheral contribution to Meth-induced BBB disruption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THC Prevents MDMA Neurotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Touriño, Clara; Zimmer, Andreas; Valverde, Olga

    2010-02-10

    The majority of MDMA (ecstasy) recreational users also consume cannabis. Despite the rewarding effects that both drugs have, they induce several opposite pharmacological responses. MDMA causes hyperthermia, oxidative stress and neuronal damage, especially at warm ambient temperature. However, THC, the main psychoactive compound of cannabis, produces hypothermic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Therefore, THC may have a neuroprotective effect against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Mice receiving a neurotoxic regimen of MDMA (20 mg/kg x 4) were pretreated with THC (3 mg/kg x 4) at room (21 degrees C) and at warm (26 degrees C) temperature, and body temperature, striatal glial activation and DA terminal loss were assessed. To find out the mechanisms by which THC may prevent MDMA hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, the same procedure was carried out in animals pretreated with the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251 and the CB(2) receptor antagonist AM630, as well as in CB(1), CB(2) and CB(1)/CB(2) deficient mice. THC prevented MDMA-induced-hyperthermia and glial activation in animals housed at both room and warm temperature. Surprisingly, MDMA-induced DA terminal loss was only observed in animals housed at warm but not at room temperature, and this neurotoxic effect was reversed by THC administration. However, THC did not prevent MDMA-induced hyperthermia, glial activation, and DA terminal loss in animals treated with the CB(1) receptor antagonist AM251, neither in CB(1) and CB(1)/CB(2) knockout mice. On the other hand, THC prevented MDMA-induced hyperthermia and DA terminal loss, but only partially suppressed glial activation in animals treated with the CB(2) cannabinoid antagonist and in CB(2) knockout animals. Our results indicate that THC protects against MDMA neurotoxicity, and suggest that these neuroprotective actions are primarily mediated by the reduction of hyperthermia through the activation of CB(1) receptor, although CB(2) receptors may also contribute to

  5. THC Prevents MDMA Neurotoxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Touriño, Clara; Zimmer, Andreas; Valverde, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The majority of MDMA (ecstasy) recreational users also consume cannabis. Despite the rewarding effects that both drugs have, they induce several opposite pharmacological responses. MDMA causes hyperthermia, oxidative stress and neuronal damage, especially at warm ambient temperature. However, THC, the main psychoactive compound of cannabis, produces hypothermic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Therefore, THC may have a neuroprotective effect against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity. Mice receiving a neurotoxic regimen of MDMA (20 mg/kg ×4) were pretreated with THC (3 mg/kg ×4) at room (21°C) and at warm (26°C) temperature, and body temperature, striatal glial activation and DA terminal loss were assessed. To find out the mechanisms by which THC may prevent MDMA hyperthermia and neurotoxicity, the same procedure was carried out in animals pretreated with the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251 and the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630, as well as in CB1, CB2 and CB1/CB2 deficient mice. THC prevented MDMA-induced-hyperthermia and glial activation in animals housed at both room and warm temperature. Surprisingly, MDMA-induced DA terminal loss was only observed in animals housed at warm but not at room temperature, and this neurotoxic effect was reversed by THC administration. However, THC did not prevent MDMA-induced hyperthermia, glial activation, and DA terminal loss in animals treated with the CB1 receptor antagonist AM251, neither in CB1 and CB1/CB2 knockout mice. On the other hand, THC prevented MDMA-induced hyperthermia and DA terminal loss, but only partially suppressed glial activation in animals treated with the CB2 cannabinoid antagonist and in CB2 knockout animals. Our results indicate that THC protects against MDMA neurotoxicity, and suggest that these neuroprotective actions are primarily mediated by the reduction of hyperthermia through the activation of CB1 receptor, although CB2 receptors may also contribute to attenuate neuroinflammation in this

  6. Correlation of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine Neurotoxicity with Blood-Brain Barrier Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalaria, Rajesh N.; Mitchell, Mary Jo; Harik, Sami I.

    1987-05-01

    Systemic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) causes parkinsonism in humans and subhuman primates, but not in rats and many other laboratory animals; mice are intermediate in their susceptibility. Since MPTP causes selective dopaminergic neurotoxicity when infused directly into rat substantia nigra, we hypothesized that systemic MPTP may be metabolized by monoamine oxidase and/or other enzymes in rat brain capillaries and possibly other peripheral organs and thus prevented from reaching its neuronal sites of toxicity. We tested this hypothesis by assessing monoamine oxidase in isolated cerebral microvessels of humans, rats, and mice by measuring the specific binding of [3H]pargyline, an irreversible monoamine oxidase inhibitor, and by estimating the rates of MPTP and benzylamine oxidation. [3H]Pargyline binding to rat cerebral microvessels was about 10-fold higher than to human or mouse microvessels. Also, MPTP oxidation by rat brain microvessels was about 30-fold greater than by human microvessels; mouse microvessels yielded intermediate values. These results may explain, at least in part, the marked species differences in susceptibility to systemic MPTP. They also suggest the potential importance of ``enzyme barriers'' at the blood-brain interface that can metabolize toxins not excluded by structural barriers, and may provide biological bases for developing therapeutic strategies for the prevention of MPTP-induced neurotoxicity and other neurotoxic conditions including, possibly, Parkinson disease.

  7. Microarray expression profiling and co-expression network analysis of circulating LncRNAs and mRNAs associated with neurotoxicity induced by BPA.

    PubMed

    Pang, Wei; Lian, Fu-Zhi; Leng, Xue; Wang, Shu-Min; Li, Yi-Bo; Wang, Zi-Yu; Li, Kai-Ren; Gao, Zhi-Xian; Jiang, Yu-Gang

    2018-05-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-like industrial chemical, has adverse effects on the nervous system. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional behavior of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and mRNAs to provide the information to explore neurotoxic effects induced by BPA. By microarray expression profiling, we discovered 151 differentially expressed lncRNAs and 794 differentially expressed mRNAs in the BPA intervention group compared with the control group. Gene ontology analysis indicated the differentially expressed mRNAs were mainly involved in fundamental metabolic processes and physiological and pathological conditions, such as development, synaptic transmission, homeostasis, injury, and neuroinflammation responses. In the expression network of the BPA-induced group, a great number of nodes and connections were found in comparison to the control-derived network. We identified lncRNAs that were aberrantly expressed in the BPA group, among which, growth arrest specific 5 (GAS5) might participate in the BPA-induced neurotoxicity by regulating Jun, RAS, and other pathways indirectly through these differentially expressed genes. This study provides the first investigation of genome-wide lncRNA expression and correlation between lncRNA and mRNA expression in the BPA-induced neurotoxicity. Our results suggest that the elevated expression of lncRNAs is a major biomarker in the neurotoxicity induced by BPA.

  8. Caffeine induces differential cross tolerance to the amphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects of dopaminergic agonists.

    PubMed

    Jain, Raka; Holtzman, Stephen G

    2005-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if caffeine induces cross tolerance to the amphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects of dopaminergic drugs that act through distinct mechanisms (e.g., release, uptake inhibition, direct activation of dopamine D(1)- or D(2)-family receptors). Rats were trained to discriminate 1.0 mg/kg d-amphetamine from saline in a two-choice discrete-trial procedure. Stimulus-generalization curves were generated by cumulative dosing for d-amphetamine (0.1-1.0 mg/kg), methylphenidate (0.3-5.6 mg/kg), SKF 81297 (0.3-3.0 mg/kg), and R-(-)-propylnorapomorphine (NPA; 0.001-1.78 mg/kg), as well as for caffeine (3.0-56 mg/kg); curves were re-determined after twice daily injections of caffeine (30 mg/kg) for 3.5 days. The rats generalized dose dependently to the four dopaminergic drugs, but only to a limited extent to caffeine. Twice daily injections of caffeine induced significant cross tolerance (i.e., increased ED(50)) to the amphetamine-like discriminative effects of methylphenidate and SKF 81297, attenuated non-significantly the effects of NPA, and did not alter the effects of amphetamine. Thus, caffeine produces differential cross tolerance to the amphetamine-like discriminative effects of dopaminergic drugs, a phenomenon in which the dopamine D(1) receptor appears to have an important role.

  9. Silibinin pretreatment attenuates biochemical and behavioral changes induced by intrastriatal MPP+ injection in rats.

    PubMed

    Geed, Milind; Garabadu, Debapriya; Ahmad, Ausaf; Krishnamurthy, Sairam

    2014-02-01

    Silymarin commonly known for its hepatoprotective effect is reported to show protection against 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity. Silibinin forms the major active constituent of silymarin. Therefore, the neuroprotective effect of silibinin (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) was evaluated in the unilaterally injected 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity in male rats. A battery of tests such as elevated plus maze (EPM), narrow beam walk, open field, bar catalepsy, grip strength, and foot print analysis was performed to evaluate the behavioral symptoms of striatal dopaminergic toxicity. Furthermore, the mechanism of action of silibinin was investigated by evaluating the mitochondrial complex enzyme activities, mitochondrial integrity and oxidative status. Striatal caspase-3 and NFκB were expressed to evaluate the effect of silibinin on apoptosis and inflammation respectively. Silibinin (100 and 200 mg/kg) protected against MPP(+)-induced dopamine depletion in striatum. Silibinin reversed MPP(+)-induced decrease in transfer latency indicating memory consolidation in the EPM test. Silibinin (100 and 200 mg/kg) attenuated MPP(+)-induced motor deficits, such as fine motor movements and gait. MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of integrity and oxidative stress were attenuated by silibinin. Silibinin decreased striatal caspase-3 and NFκB expression indicating potential anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects respectively. Hence, silibinin exhibited neuroprotective effect in the MPP(+) induced striatal toxicity augmenting dopamine levels. The mechanism of action may be linked to maintenance of mitochondrial bioenergetics and integrity apart from anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ghrelin receptor antagonism of morphine-induced conditioned place preference and behavioral and accumbens dopaminergic sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Jerabek, Pavel; Havlickova, Tereza; Puskina, Nina; Charalambous, Chrysostomos; Lapka, Marek; Kacer, Petr; Sustkova-Fiserova, Magdalena

    2017-11-01

    An increasing number of studies over the past few years have demonstrated ghrelin's role in alcohol, cocaine and nicotine abuse. However, the role of ghrelin in opioid effects has rarely been examined. Recently we substantiated in rats that ghrelin growth hormone secretagogue receptors (GHS-R1A) appear to be involved in acute opioid-induced changes in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system associated with the reward processing. The aim of the present study was to ascertain whether a ghrelin antagonist (JMV2959) was able to inhibit morphine-induced biased conditioned place preference and challenge-morphine-induced accumbens dopaminergic sensitization and behavioral sensitization in adult male rats. In the place preference model, the rats were conditioned for 8 days with morphine (10 mg/kg s.c.). On the experimental day, JMV2959 (3 and 6 mg/kg i.p.) or saline were administered before testing. We used in vivo microdialysis to determine changes of dopamine and its metabolites in the nucleus accumbens in rats following challenge-morphine dose (5 mg/kg s.c.) with or without JMV2959 (3 and 6 mg/kg i.p.) pretreatment, administered on the 12th day of spontaneous abstinence from morphine repeated treatment (5 days, 10-40 mg/kg). Induced behavioral changes were simultaneously monitored. Pretreatment with JMV2959 significantly and dose dependently reduced the morphine-induced conditioned place preference and significantly and dose dependently reduced the challenge-morphine-induced dopaminergic sensitization and affected concentration of by-products associated with dopamine metabolism in the nucleus accumbens. JMV2959 pretreatment also significantly reduced challenge-morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Our present data suggest that GHS-R1A antagonists deserve to be further investigated as a novel treatment strategy for opioid addiction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomarkers of adult and developmental neurotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Slikker, William; Bowyer, John F.

    2005-08-07

    Neurotoxicity may be defined as any adverse effect on the structure or function of the central and/or peripheral nervous system by a biological, chemical, or physical agent. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary to assess adult and developmental neurotoxicity due to the complex and diverse functions of the nervous system. The overall strategy for understanding developmental neurotoxicity is based on two assumptions: (1) significant differences in the adult versus the developing nervous system susceptibility to neurotoxicity exist and they are often developmental stage dependent; (2) a multidisciplinary approach using neurobiological, including gene expression assays, neurophysiological, neuropathological, and behavioral function is necessarymore » for a precise assessment of neurotoxicity. Application of genomic approaches to developmental studies must use the same criteria for evaluating microarray studies as those in adults including consideration of reproducibility, statistical analysis, homogenous cell populations, and confirmation with non-array methods. A study using amphetamine to induce neurotoxicity supports the following: (1) gene expression data can help define neurotoxic mechanism(s) (2) gene expression changes can be useful biomarkers of effect, and (3) the site-selective nature of gene expression in the nervous system may mandate assessment of selective cell populations.« less

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediates Methamphetamine-Induced Blood–Brain Barrier Damage

    PubMed Central

    Qie, Xiaojuan; Wen, Di; Guo, Hongyan; Xu, Guanjie; Liu, Shuai; Shen, Qianchao; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Wenfang; Cong, Bin; Ma, Chunling

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) abuse causes serious health problems worldwide, and long-term use of METH disrupts the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Herein, we explored the potential mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in METH-induced BBB endothelial cell damage in vitro and the therapeutic potential of endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitors for METH-induced BBB disruption in C57BL/6J mice. Exposure of immortalized BMVEC (bEnd.3) cells to METH significantly decreased cell viability, induced apoptosis, and diminished the tightness of cell monolayers. METH activated ER stress sensor proteins, including PERK, ATF6, and IRE1, and upregulated the pro-apoptotic protein CHOP. The ER stress inhibitors significantly blocked the upregulation of CHOP. Knockdown of CHOP protected bEnd.3 cells from METH-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, METH elevated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induced the dysfunction of mitochondrial characterized by a Bcl2/Bax ratio decrease, mitochondrial membrane potential collapse, and cytochrome c. ER stress release was partially reversed by ROS inhibition, and cytochrome c release was partially blocked by knockdown of CHOP. Finally, PBA significantly attenuated METH-induced sodium fluorescein (NaFluo) and Evans Blue leakage, as well as tight junction protein loss, in C57BL/6J mice. These data suggest that BBB endothelial cell damage was caused by METH-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, which further induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and that PBA was an effective treatment for METH-induced BBB disruption. PMID:28959203

  13. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2017-12-01

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4 + T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + )-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with n