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Sample records for methadone morphine oxycodone

  1. Morphine or oxycodone in cancer pain?

    PubMed

    Heiskanen, T E; Ruismäki, P M; Seppälä, T A; Kalso, E A

    2000-01-01

    Oxycodone is an opioid analgesic that closely resembles morphine. Oxymorphone, the active metabolite of oxycodone, is formed in a reaction catalyzed by CYP2D6, which is under polymorphic genetic control. The role of oxymorphone in the analgesic effect of oxycodone is not yet clear. In this study, controlled-release (CR) oxycodone and morphine were examined in cancer pain. CR oxycodone and morphine were administered to 45 adult patients with stable pain for 3-6 days after open-label titration in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. Twenty patients were evaluable. Both opioids provided adequate analgesia. The variation in plasma morphine concentrations was higher than that of oxycodone, consistent with the lower bioavailability of morphine. Liver dysfunction affected selectively either oxycodone or morphine metabolism. Three patients with markedly aberrant plasma opioid concentrations are presented. Significant individual variation in morphine and oxycodone metabolism may account for abnormal responses during treatment of chronic cancer pain.

  2. Evaluation of ongoing oxycodone abuse among methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Sigmon, Stacey C; McGee, Mark R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. This study presents results from an internal quality assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis-testing methods. One hundred five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic's usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, whereas the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration, and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. Although future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication-dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges.

  3. Analgesic studies of codeine and oxycodone in patients with cancer. II. Comparisons of intramuscular oxycodone with intramuscular morphine and codeine.

    PubMed

    Beaver, W T; Wallenstein, S L; Rogers, A; Houde, R W

    1978-10-01

    The relative analgesic potency of single graded intramuscular doses of oxycodone and morphine was evaluated in a double-blind study in patients with chronic pain due to cancer. When both intensity and duration of analgesia are considered (total analgesic effect), oxycodone was 2/3 to 3/4 as potent as morphine, while in terms of peak analgesia, it was 8/10 to equipotent. In doses producing equivalent peak effect, oxycodone had a shorter duration of action than morphine. Intramuscular oxycodone was also compared to intramuscular codeine in a similar patient group. In terms of total analgesic effect, oxycodone was 10 times as potent as codeine, while in terms of peak analgesia it was 12 times as potent. These relative potency relationships of oxycodone, taken in conjunction with the oral/parenteral potency ratios of codeine and oxycodone established in the previous paper and several previous relative potency assays involving morphine, oxymorphone and codeine, demonstrate a highly consistent pattern of analgesic structure-activity relationships encompassing morphine, oxymorphone, codeine and oxycodone. The results of these studies do not appear to support the hypothesis that, in man, the analgesic activity of codeine is due to its O-demethylation to morphine.

  4. Switching Opioid-Dependent Patients From Methadone to Morphine: Safety, Tolerability, and Methadone Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Glue, Paul; Cape, Gavin; Tunnicliff, Donna; Lockhart, Michelle; Lam, Fred; Gray, Andrew; Hung, Noelyn; Hung, C Tak; Harland, Sarah; Devane, Jane; Howes, John; Weis, Holger; Friedhoff, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to switch patients established on methadone opioid substitution therapy (OST) to morphine over 1 week. Subjects established on daily methadone OST (mean dose 60 mg/day) were switched to morphine slow-release capsules, dosed at 4× the previous total daily methadone dose, for 6 days, then given morphine syrup dosed q3h. All 27 subjects enrolled in this study completed the switch from methadone to morphine. Opioid withdrawal symptoms (OWS) peaked within 12-24 hours of starting morphine, and 24/27 subjects required higher daily morphine doses (mean 5.2× multiple). Pharmacokinetic evaluation showed that 91% of methadone was cleared during this time, with a mean elimination half-life of 59 hours. The most frequent treatment-emergent non-OWS adverse events were headache, nausea, constipation, and neck pain. The method described here appears to be a safe and acceptable approach to switch subjects from methadone to morphine. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Co-administration of morphine and oxycodone vaccines reduces the distribution of 6-monoacetylmorphine and oxycodone to brain in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, M; Raleigh, MD; Le Naour, M; Tucker, AM; Harmon, TM; Jones, JM; Birnbaum, AK; Portoghese, PS; Pentel, PR

    2012-01-01

    Opioid conjugate vaccines have shown promise in animal models as a potential treatment for opioid addiction. Individual vaccines are quite specific and each targets only a limited number of structurally similar opioids. Since opioid users can switch or transition between opioids, we studied a bivalent immunization strategy of combining 2 vaccines that could target several of the most commonly abused opioids; heroin, oxycodone and their active metabolites. Morphine (M) and oxycodone (OXY) haptens were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) through tetraglycine (Gly)4 linkers at the C6 position. Immunization of rats with M-KLH alone produced high titers of antibodies directed against heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine. Immunization with OXY-KLH produced high titers of antibodies against oxycodone and oxymorphone. Immunization with the bivalent vaccine produced consistently high antibody titers against both immunogens. Bivalent vaccine antibody titers against the individual immunogens were higher than with the monovalent vaccines alone owing, at least in part, to cross-reactivity of the antibodies. Administration of a single concurrent intravenous dose of 6-MAM and oxycodone to rats immunized with the bivalent vaccine increased 6-MAM, morphine and oxycodone retention in serum and reduced the distribution of 6-MAM and oxycodone to brain. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum antibody titers for both monovalent vaccines, alone or in combination. Efficacy of the individual vaccines was not compromised by their combined use. Consistent with the enhanced titers in the bivalent group, a trend toward enhanced pharmacokinetic efficacy with the bivalent vaccine was observed. These data support the possibility of co-administering two or more opioid vaccines concurrently to target multiple abusable opioids without compromising the immunogenicity or efficacy of the individual components. PMID:22583811

  6. Co-administration of morphine and oxycodone vaccines reduces the distribution of 6-monoacetylmorphine and oxycodone to brain in rats.

    PubMed

    Pravetoni, M; Raleigh, M D; Le Naour, M; Tucker, A M; Harmon, T M; Jones, J M; Birnbaum, A K; Portoghese, P S; Pentel, P R

    2012-06-29

    Opioid conjugate vaccines have shown promise in animal models as a potential treatment for opioid addiction. Individual vaccines are quite specific and each targets only a limited number of structurally similar opioids. Since opioid users can switch or transition between opioids, we studied a bivalent immunization strategy of combining 2 vaccines that could target several of the most commonly abused opioids; heroin, oxycodone and their active metabolites. Morphine (M) and oxycodone (OXY) haptens were conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) through tetraglycine (Gly)(4) linkers at the C6 position. Immunization of rats with M-KLH alone produced high titers of antibodies directed against heroin, 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and morphine. Immunization with OXY-KLH produced high titers of antibodies against oxycodone and oxymorphone. Immunization with the bivalent vaccine produced consistently high antibody titers against both immunogens. Bivalent vaccine antibody titers against the individual immunogens were higher than with the monovalent vaccines alone owing, at least in part, to cross-reactivity of the antibodies. Administration of a single concurrent intravenous dose of 6-MAM and oxycodone to rats immunized with the bivalent vaccine increased 6-MAM, morphine and oxycodone retention in serum and reduced the distribution of 6-MAM and oxycodone to brain. Vaccine efficacy correlated with serum antibody titers for both monovalent vaccines, alone or in combination. Efficacy of the individual vaccines was not compromised by their combined use. Consistent with the enhanced titers in the bivalent group, a trend toward enhanced pharmacokinetic efficacy with the bivalent vaccine was observed. These data support the possibility of co-administering two or more opioid vaccines concurrently to target multiple abusable opioids without compromising the immunogenicity or efficacy of the individual components.

  7. Methadone Reverses Analgesic Tolerance Induced by Morphine Pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Posa, Luca; Accarie, Alison; Marie, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Opiates such as morphine are the most powerful analgesics, but their protracted use is restrained by the development of tolerance to analgesic effects. Recent works suggest that tolerance to morphine might be due to its inability to promote mu opioid receptor endocytosis, and the co-injection of morphine with a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist like [D-Ala2,N-Me-Phe4,Gly-ol5]enkephalin reduces tolerance to morphine. So far, no studies have been conducted to evaluate the ability of methadone to reduce morphine tolerance in morphine-pretreated animals, a treatment sequence that could be encountered in opiate rotation protocol. We investigated the ability of methadone (a mu opioid receptor internalizing agonist used in therapy) to reverse morphine tolerance and the associated cellular mechanisms in the periaqueductal gray matter, a region involved in pain control. Methods: We measured analgesic response following a challenge dose of morphine in the hot plate test and investigated regulation of mu opioid receptor (coupling and endocytosis) and some cellular mechanisms involved in tolerance such as adenylate cyclase superactivation and changes in N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor subunits expression and phosphorylation state. Results: A chronic treatment with morphine promoted tolerance to its analgesic effects and was associated with a lack of mu opioid receptor endocytosis, adenylate cyclase overshoot, NR2A and NR2B downregulation, and phosphorylation of NR1. We reported that a methadone treatment in morphine-treated mice reversed morphine tolerance to analgesia by promoting mu opioid receptor endocytosis and blocking cellular mechanisms of tolerance. Conclusions: Our data might lead to rational strategies to tackle opiate tolerance in the frame of opiate rotation. PMID:26390873

  8. Correlation between the administration of morphine or oxycodone and the development of infections in patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miharu; Sakurada, Tomoya; Gotoh, Kazumi; Watanabe, Satoshi; Satoh, Nobunori

    2013-11-01

    Morphine and oxycodone are widely used in the therapy for cancer pain. Although some previous studies have reported that morphine induces immunosuppression and oxycodone does not, whether this is true for human infections is unclear. We performed a retrospective study on the correlation between the administration of morphine or oxycodone and the development of infections in patients with cancer pain. This study was undertaken in 841 inpatients receiving only 1 opioid continuously for more than 10 days. Development of infections was based on (1) antibiotic administration and (2) diagnosis of infections, positive microbial culture test, or increase in white blood cells or C-reactive protein. Liver, kidney, and hematological cancer, antineoplastic drugs, radiotherapy, steroid, immunosuppressive agents, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, and thyroid inhibitors were defined as the exclusion criteria in consideration of influence on immune system or metabolism and excretion of morphine and oxycodone. A total of 60 morphine and 74 oxycodone cases were included, which resulted in 18 and 10 infection cases. Significantly more patients treated with morphine developed infections than those patients treated with oxycodone (odds ratio = 3.60, 95% confidence interval = 1.40-9.26). No significant differences were seen in the other variables analyzed. Although perhaps some confounding variables were included because this was an observational rather than randomized study, these results suggested that morphine's immunosuppressive effect may contribute to the development of infections in patients with cancer pain.

  9. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    status need to be taken carefully into account when addressing pain in the elderly. World Health Organization step III opioids are the mainstay of pain treatment for cancer patients and morphine has been the most commonly used for decades. In general, high level evidence data (Ib or IIb) exist, although many studies have included only few patients. Based on these studies, all opioids are considered effective in cancer pain management (although parts of cancer pain are not or only partially opioid sensitive), but no well-designed specific studies in the elderly cancer patient are available. Of the 2 opioids that are available in transdermal formulation--fentanyl and buprenorphine--fentanyl is the most investigated, but based on the published data both seem to be effective, with low toxicity and good tolerability profiles, especially at low doses. 2. The use of opioids in noncancer-related pain: Evidence is growing that opioids are efficacious in noncancer pain (treatment data mostly level Ib or IIb), but need individual dose titration and consideration of the respective tolerability profiles. Again no specific studies in the elderly have been performed, but it can be concluded that opioids have shown efficacy in noncancer pain, which is often due to diseases typical for an elderly population. When it is not clear which drugs and which regimes are superior in terms of maintaining analgesic efficacy, the appropriate drug should be chosen based on safety and tolerability considerations. Evidence-based medicine, which has been incorporated into best clinical practice guidelines, should serve as a foundation for the decision-making processes in patient care; however, in practice, the art of medicine is realized when we individualize care to the patient. This strikes a balance between the evidence-based medicine and anecdotal experience. Factual recommendations and expert opinion both have a value when applying guidelines in clinical practice. 3. The use of opioids in

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Enhanced Analgesic Effect of Oxycodone Compared to Morphine in Chemotherapy-Induced Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B.; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone. PMID:24618941

  11. Molecular mechanisms underlying the enhanced analgesic effect of oxycodone compared to morphine in chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Thibault, Karine; Calvino, Bernard; Rivals, Isabelle; Marchand, Fabien; Dubacq, Sophie; McMahon, Stephen B; Pezet, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist, used for the treatment of a large variety of painful disorders. Several studies have reported that oxycodone is a more potent pain reliever than morphine, and that it improves the quality of life of patients. However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the therapeutic action of these two opioids are only partially understood. The aim of this study was to define the molecular changes underlying the long-lasting analgesic effects of oxycodone and morphine in an animal model of peripheral neuropathy induced by a chemotherapic agent, vincristine. Using a behavioural approach, we show that oxycodone maintains an optimal analgesic effect after chronic treatment, whereas the effect of morphine dies down. In addition, using DNA microarray technology on dorsal root ganglia, we provide evidence that the long-term analgesic effect of oxycodone is due to an up-regulation in GABAB receptor expression in sensory neurons. These receptors are transported to their central terminals within the dorsal horn, and subsequently reinforce a presynaptic inhibition, since only the long-lasting (and not acute) anti-hyperalgesic effect of oxycodone was abolished by intrathecal administration of a GABAB receptor antagonist; in contrast, the morphine effect was unaffected. Our study demonstrates that the GABAB receptor is functionally required for the alleviating effect of oxycodone in neuropathic pain condition, thus providing new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the sustained analgesic action of oxycodone.

  12. Oxycodone

    MedlinePlus

    ... this type of medication for at least one week. Oxycodone is in a class of medications called ... have stopped taking them within the past two weeks: isocarboxazid (Marplan), linezolid (Zyvox), methylene blue, phenelzine (Nardil), ...

  13. Enhancement of tolerance development to morphine in rats prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yao-Chang; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Lee, Cynthia Wei-Sheng; Yan, Jia-Ying; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2010-06-07

    Abuse of addictive substances is a serious problem that has a significant impact on areas such as health, the economy, and public safety. Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. However, there is a lack of information on effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on their offspring. In this study, an animal model was established to study effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on offspring. Female pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were sub-grouped to receive (1) vehicle, (2) 2-4 mg/kg morphine (1 mg/kg increment per week), (3) 7 mg/kg methadone, and (4) 3 mg/kg buprenorphine, subcutaneously, once or twice a day from E3 to E20. The experiments were conducted on animals 8-12 weeks old and with body weight between 250 and 350 g. Results showed that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine caused higher mortality than other tested substance groups. Although we observed a significantly lower increase in body weight in all of the opioid-administered dams, the birth weight of the offspring was not altered in all treated groups. Moreover, no obvious behavioral abnormality or body-weight difference was noted during the growing period (8-12 weeks) in all offspring. When the male offspring received morphine injection twice a day for 4 days, the prenatally opioid-exposed rats more quickly developed a tolerance to morphine (as shown by the tail-flick tests), most notably the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring. However, the tolerance development to methadone or buprenorphine was not different in offspring exposed prenatally to methadone or buprenorphine, respectively, when compared with that of the vehicle controlled group. Similar results were also obtained in the female animals. Animals prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine developed tolerance to morphine faster than their controlled mates. In our animal model, prenatal exposure to buprenorphine also resulted in higher mortality and much less sensitivity to

  14. Enhancement of tolerance development to morphine in rats prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Abuse of addictive substances is a serious problem that has a significant impact on areas such as health, the economy, and public safety. Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. However, there is a lack of information on effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on their offspring. In this study, an animal model was established to study effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on offspring. Methods Female pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were sub-grouped to receive (1) vehicle, (2) 2-4 mg/kg morphine (1 mg/kg increment per week), (3) 7 mg/kg methadone, and (4) 3 mg/kg buprenorphine, subcutaneously, once or twice a day from E3 to E20. The experiments were conducted on animals 8-12 weeks old and with body weight between 250 and 350 g. Results Results showed that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine caused higher mortality than other tested substance groups. Although we observed a significantly lower increase in body weight in all of the opioid-administered dams, the birth weight of the offspring was not altered in all treated groups. Moreover, no obvious behavioral abnormality or body-weight difference was noted during the growing period (8-12 weeks) in all offspring. When the male offspring received morphine injection twice a day for 4 days, the prenatally opioid-exposed rats more quickly developed a tolerance to morphine (as shown by the tail-flick tests), most notably the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring. However, the tolerance development to methadone or buprenorphine was not different in offspring exposed prenatally to methadone or buprenorphine, respectively, when compared with that of the vehicle controlled group. Similar results were also obtained in the female animals. Conclusions Animals prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine developed tolerance to morphine faster than their controlled mates. In our animal model, prenatal exposure to buprenorphine also resulted in higher

  15. Respiratory effects of chronic in utero methadone or morphine exposure in the neonatal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Rosemary T; Wallisch, Michael; Olsen, George D

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a neonatal guinea pig model to compare the effects of in utero methadone or morphine exposure upon breathing control. We hypothesize that in utero methadone exposure will result in similar respiratory disturbances to those seen in morphine exposed neonates, but that the onset will be slower and the duration longer, due to methadone's longer elimination half-life. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs received once-daily injections of methadone, morphine, or vehicle (saline) during the last half of gestation and pups were studied 3, 7, or 14 days after birth. In utero methadone or morphine exposure resulted in decreased birth weight compared to vehicle, and pups experienced a withdrawal syndrome which included increased locomotor activity and respiratory disturbances but no change in rectal temperature. Both opioid exposures increased inspiratory minute ventilation during CO(2) challenge at 3 days after birth, but only in morphine exposed pups was this withdrawal effect still present on day 7. Surprisingly, only morphine exposure increased inspiratory minute ventilation during room air breathing. We conclude that in utero methadone exposure is not equivalent to in utero morphine exposure. With respect to neonatal respiratory control, methadone-induced changes in respiration are only apparent during hypercapnia.

  16. Involvement of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and endothelin-A receptors in the effect of agmatine on morphine and oxycodone-induced hypothermia in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Andurkar, Shridhar V; Gulati, Anil

    2013-10-01

    Potentiation of opioid analgesia by endothelin-A (ET(A)) receptor antagonist, BMS182874, and imidazoline receptor/α₂-adrenoceptor agonists such as clonidine and agmatine are well known. It is also known that agmatine blocks morphine hyperthermia in rats. However, the effect of agmatine on morphine or oxycodone hypothermia in mice is unknown. The present study was carried out to study the role of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and ET(A) receptors in morphine and oxycodone hypothermia in mice. Body temperature was determined over 6 h in male Swiss Webster mice treated with morphine, oxycodone, agmatine, and combination of agmatine with morphine or oxycodone. Yohimbine, idazoxan, and BMS182874 were used to determine involvement of α₂-adrenoceptors, imidazoline, and ET(A) receptors, respectively. Morphine and oxycodone produced significant hypothermia that was not affected by α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine, imidazoline receptor/α₂ adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan, or ET(A) receptor antagonist, BMS182874. Agmatine did not produce hypothermia; however, it blocked oxycodone but not morphine-induced hypothermia. Agmatine-induced blockade of oxycodone hypothermia was inhibited by idazoxan and yohimbine. The blockade by idazoxan was more pronounced compared with yohimbine. Combined administration of BMS182874 and agmatine did not produce changes in body temperature in mice. However, when BMS182874 was administered along with agmatine and oxycodone, it blocked agmatine-induced reversal of oxycodone hypothermia. This is the first report demonstrating that agmatine does not affect morphine hypothermia in mice, but reverses oxycodone hypothermia. Imidazoline receptors and α₂-adrenoceptors are involved in agmatine-induced reversal of oxycodone hypothermia. Our findings also suggest that ET(A) receptors may be involved in blockade of oxycodone hypothermia by agmatine.

  17. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-03-01

    Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4-8, 8-12 and 12-24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period.

  18. Comparison of epidural oxycodone and epidural morphine for post-caesarean section analgesia: A randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sng, Ban Leong; Kwok, Sarah Carol; Mathur, Deepak; Ithnin, Farida; Newton-Dunn, Clare; Assam, Pryseley Nkouibert; Sultana, Rehena; Sia, Alex Tiong Heng

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Epidural morphine after caesarean section may cause moderate to severe pruritus in women. Epidural oxycodone has been shown in non-obstetric trials to reduce pruritus when compared to morphine. We hypothesised that epidural oxycodone may reduce pruritus after caesarean section. Methods: A randomised controlled trial was conducted in pregnant women at term who underwent caesarean section with combined spinal-epidural technique initiated with intrathecal fentanyl 15 μg. Women received either epidural morphine 3 mg or epidural oxycodone 3 mg via the epidural catheter after delivery. The primary outcome was the incidence of pruritus at 24 h after caesarean section. The secondary outcomes were the pruritus scores, treatment for post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV), pain scores and maternal satisfaction. Results: One hundred women were randomised (group oxycodone O = 50, morphine M = 50). There was no difference between Group O and M in the incidence of pruritus (n [%] 28 [56%] vs. 31 [62%], P = 0.68) and the worst pruritus scores (mean [standard deviation] 2.6 (2.8) vs. 3.3 [3.1], P = 0.23), respectively. Both groups had similar pain scores at rest (2.7 [2.3] vs. 2.0 [2.7], P = 0.16) and sitting up (5.0 [2.3] vs. 4.6 [2.4], P = 0.38) at 24 h. Pruritus scores were lower at 4–8, 8–12 and 12–24 h with oxycodone, but pain scores were higher. Both groups had a similar need for treatment of PONV and maternal satisfaction with analgesia. Conclusion: There was no difference in the incidence of pruritus at 24 h between epidural oxycodone and morphine. However, pruritus scores were lower with oxycodone between 4 and 24 h after surgery with higher pain scores in the same period. PMID:27053782

  19. Determination of α(2)-adrenoceptor and imidazoline receptor involvement in augmentation of morphine and oxycodone analgesia by agmatine and BMS182874.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Shaifali; Rapolaviciute, Vaide; Gulati, Anil

    2011-01-25

    Studies have demonstrated that clonidine (α(2)-adrenoceptor and imidazoline receptor agonist) and BMS182874 (endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonist) potentiate morphine and oxycodone analgesia. Agmatine, an endogenous clonidine-like substance, enhances morphine analgesia. However, its effect on oxycodone analgesia and its interaction with endothelin ET(A) receptor antagonists are not known. The present study was performed to determine the effect of agmatine on morphine and oxycodone analgesia and the involvement of α(2)-adrenoceptors, imidazoline receptors, opioid receptors, and endothelin receptors. Antinociception at various time intervals was determined by the tail-flick latency method in mice. Agmatine produced dose-dependent increase in tail-flick latency, while BMS182874 did not produce any change over the 360-min observation period. Agmatine significantly potentiated morphine as well as oxycodone analgesia which was not altered by BMS182874. BMS182874 pretreatment did not increase the analgesic effect produced by agmatine alone. Agmatine-induced potentiation of morphine and oxycodone analgesia was blocked by idazoxan (imidazoline receptor/α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist) and yohimbine (α(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist). BMS182874-induced potentiation of morphine or oxycodone analgesia was not affected by yohimbine. However, idazoxan blocked BMS182874-induced potentiation of oxycodone but not morphine analgesia. This is the first report demonstrating that agmatine potentiates not only morphine but also oxycodone analgesia in mice. Potentiation of morphine and oxycodone analgesia by agmatine appears to involve α(2)-adrenoceptors, imidazoline receptors, and opioid receptors. In addition, imidazoline receptors may be involved in BMS182874-induced potentiation of oxycodone but not morphine analgesia. It is concluded that agmatine may be used as an adjuvant in opiate analgesia. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Do Diuretics have Antinociceptive Actions: Studies of Spironolactone, Eplerenone, Furosemide and Chlorothiazide, Individually and with Oxycodone and Morphine.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Viljami; Lilius, Tuomas; Laitila, Jouko; Niemi, Mikko; Kambur, Oleg; Kalso, Eija; Rauhala, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Spironolactone, eplerenone, chlorothiazide and furosemide are diuretics that have been suggested to have antinociceptive properties, for example via mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism. In co-administration, diuretics might enhance the antinociceptive effect of opioids via pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic mechanisms. Effects of spironolactone (100 mg/kg, i.p.), eplerenone (100 mg/kg, i.p.), chlorothiazide (50 mg/kg, i.p.) and furosemide (100 mg/kg, i.p.) were studied on acute oxycodone (0.75 mg/kg, s.c.)- and morphine (3 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced antinociception using tail-flick and hot plate tests in male Sprague Dawley rats. The diuretics were administered 30 min. before the opioids, and behavioural tests were performed 30 and 90 min. after the opioids. Concentrations of oxycodone, morphine and their major metabolites in plasma and brain were quantified by mass spectrometry. In the hot plate test at 30 and 90 min., spironolactone significantly enhanced the antinociceptive effect (% of maximum possible effect) of oxycodone from 10% to 78% and from 0% to 50%, respectively, and that of morphine from 12% to 73% and from 4% to 83%, respectively. The brain oxycodone and morphine concentrations were significantly increased at 30 min. (oxycodone, 46%) and at 90 min. (morphine, 190%). We did not detect any independent antinociceptive effects with the diuretics. Eplerenone and chlorothiazide did not enhance the antinociceptive effect of either opioid. The results suggest that spironolactone enhances the antinociceptive effect of both oxycodone and morphine by increasing their concentrations in the central nervous system. © 2016 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  1. Respiratory Effects of Chronic in utero Methadone or Morphine Exposure in the Neonatal Guinea Pig

    PubMed Central

    Nettleton, Rosemary T.; Wallisch, Michael; Olsen, George D.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses a neonatal guinea pig model to compare the effects of in utero methadone or morphine exposure upon breathing control. We hypothesize that in utero methadone exposure will result in similar respiratory disturbances to those seen in morphine exposed neonates, but that the onset will be slower and the duration longer, due to methadone’s longer elimination half-life. Pregnant Dunkin-Hartley guinea pigs received once-daily injections of methadone, morphine, or vehicle (saline) during the last half of gestation and pups were studied 3, 7, or 14 days after birth. In utero methadone or morphine exposure resulted in decreased birth weight compared to vehicle, and pups experienced a withdrawal syndrome which included increased locomotor activity and respiratory disturbances but no change in rectal temperature. Both opioid exposures increased inspiratory minute ventilation during CO2 challenge at 3 days after birth, but only in morphine exposed pups was this withdrawal effect still present on day 7. Surprisingly, only morphine exposure increased inspiratory minute ventilation during room air breathing. We conclude that in utero methadone exposure is not equivalent to in utero morphine exposure. With respect to neonatal respiratory control, methadone-induced changes in respiration are only apparent during hypercapnia. PMID:18442893

  2. Opioid rotation in patients initiated on oxycodone or morphine: a register study

    PubMed Central

    Ericson, Lisa; Ambring, Anneli; Björholt, Ingela; Dahm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strong opioids are recommended for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. However, some patients do not achieve a successful treatment outcome due to intolerable adverse events and/or inadequate analgesia, thus may benefit from switching to another opioid, a procedure known as “opioid rotation.” The type of opioid at treatment initiation may influence the risk of opioid rotation and the objective of this study was to assess such rotation after treatment initiation with two alternative treatments, controlled-release (CR) oxycodone versus CR morphine in patients suffering from non-cancer pain. Method The study reported here was a real-life study based on Swedish register data: the Prescribed Drug, National Patient, and Cause of Death registers. The captured data cover the entire Swedish population treated in specialist care. A statistical analysis plan was agreed and signed before data were accessed. Results Data from 50,223 cases were included in the analyses. The risk of rotation was 19% higher in patients initiating treatment with morphine compared with oxycodone (hazard ratio 1.19; 95% confidence interval 1.11–1.27; P < 0.001), after adjusting for such baseline variables that were both significantly correlated with the outcome variable (time to rotation) and significantly different between the groups; age at index date, osteoarthritis and number of pain-related drugs. Conclusion Patients with non-cancer pain who initiated treatment with CR morphine had a higher risk of opioid rotation than patients initiated with CR oxycodone. PMID:23717049

  3. Morphine Versus Methadone Treatment for Neonatal Withdrawal and Impact on Early Infant Development.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sharon; Beckwith, Anna Malia

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Compare developmental outcomes in infants treated with morphine versus methadone. Method. Retrospective chart review of newborns identified through use of ICD-9 code for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Thirty-six infants were evaluated-17 treated with methadone and 19 treated with morphine. Assessment was completed following treatment using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-Third Edition (Bayley-III). Scores in Cognitive, Language, and Motor domains were compared. Results. Comparison of scores between morphine- and methadone-treated groups revealed differences in mean Cognitive Composite (91.3 vs 83.0; P = .03410) and mean Total Motor Composite Scores (96.3 vs 89.6; P = .0149). Conclusion. Newborns with NAS treated with morphine had significantly higher scores in Cognitive and Gross Motor domains compared to infants treated with methadone. Development screening should be pursued to determine if this difference persists throughout early childhood. Results may influence accepted treatment protocols for NAS.

  4. Morphine Versus Methadone Treatment for Neonatal Withdrawal and Impact on Early Infant Development

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Sharon; Beckwith, Anna Malia

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Compare developmental outcomes in infants treated with morphine versus methadone. Method. Retrospective chart review of newborns identified through use of ICD-9 code for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Thirty-six infants were evaluated—17 treated with methadone and 19 treated with morphine. Assessment was completed following treatment using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development–Third Edition (Bayley-III). Scores in Cognitive, Language, and Motor domains were compared. Results. Comparison of scores between morphine- and methadone-treated groups revealed differences in mean Cognitive Composite (91.3 vs 83.0; P = .03410) and mean Total Motor Composite Scores (96.3 vs 89.6; P = .0149). Conclusion. Newborns with NAS treated with morphine had significantly higher scores in Cognitive and Gross Motor domains compared to infants treated with methadone. Development screening should be pursued to determine if this difference persists throughout early childhood. Results may influence accepted treatment protocols for NAS. PMID:28804749

  5. Within-subject comparison of the psychopharmacological profiles of oral oxycodone and oral morphine in non-drug-abusing volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Lichtor, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale Nonmedical use and abuse of prescription opioids is a significant problem in the USA. Little attention has been paid to assessing the relative psychopharmacological profile (including abuse liability-related effects) of specific prescription opioids. Objectives The aim of this study is to directly compare the psychopharmacological profile of two oral opioids within the same subject. Methods A randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study was done in which 20 non-drug-abusing volunteers ingested 10 and 20 mg of oxycodone, 30 and 60 mg of morphine, and placebo in separate sessions. Drug doses were equated on an objective measure of opiate effects: miosis. Subjective, psychomotor, reinforcing, and physiological effects of the opioids were assessed. Results In general, the two opioids at equimiotic doses produced similar prototypic opiate-like effects and psychomotor impairment of similar magnitude. However, several effects were found only with 20 mg oxycodone. Both drugs produced abuse liability-related subjective effects but also dysphoric effects, particularly with 60 mg morphine. Neither drug at either dose functioned as a reinforcer, as measured by the Multiple Choice Procedure. Relative potency ratios indicated an average oxycodone:morphine ratio of 1:3. Conclusions The psychopharmacological profile of oxycodone and morphine at equimiotic doses had many similarities; however, differences were found in producing abuse liability-related and dysphoric effects. In the medical community, it is commonly accepted that oral oxycodone is 1.5 to 2 times as potent as oral morphine in producing analgesia; using this ratio, although patients may experience similar degrees of pain relief, those receiving oxycodone may be experiencing stronger and potentially different psychopharmacological effects. PMID:17899018

  6. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hwei-Hsien; Chiang, Yao-Chang; Yuan, Zung Fan; Kuo, Chung-Chih; Lai, Mei-Dan; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-Kang; Chen, Shao-Tsu

    2015-01-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3-20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light-dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light-dark transition in both male and female offsprings, the effects were less pronounced as compared to that of morphine. Methadone affected elevated plus-maze in both sex, but buprenorphine only affected the female offsprings. These findings suggest that buprenorphine and methadone maintenance therapy for pregnant women, like morphine, produced detrimental effects on cognitive function and social behaviors, whereas the offsprings of such women might have a lower risk of developing anxiety disorders.

  7. Methadone versus morphine for treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, M S; Hayes, M J; Thornton, L M

    2015-04-01

    Compare duration of treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome between methadone and morphine. A prospective, double-masked, randomized trial at a single site. Randomization of methadone or morphine was stratified for maternal treatment with methadone or buprenorphine. Inclusion criteria were (i) maternal treatment with prescribed methadone or buprenorphine, (ii) withdrawal treatment criteria, (iii) adjusted gestational age ⩾35(0/7) weeks and (iv) medically stable. Primary outcome was length of opioid treatment. From January 2011 through October 2012, 78 infants were eligible for the study: 41 methadone-exposed and 37 buprenorphine-exposed. Consent was obtained from 31 mothers, 13/41 (32%) methadone-treated and 18/37 (49%) buprenorphine-treated. Length of opioid treatment was significantly shorter for methadone than morphine treatment, median 14 versus 21 days (P=0.008). Methadone had a shorter length of neonatal withdrawal treatment compared with morphine. Owing to the smaller sample size and single site, a larger randomized study is needed.

  8. RAPID DOPAMINE TRANSMISSION WITHIN THE NUCLEUS ACCUMBENS DRAMATICALLY DIFFERS FOLLOWING MORPHINE AND OXYCODONE DELIVERY

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Omar S.; Lovic, Vedran; Singer, Bryan F.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Aragona, Brandon J.

    2014-01-01

    While most drugs of abuse increase dopamine neurotransmission, rapid neurochemical measurements show that different drugs evoke distinct dopamine release patterns within the nucleus accumbens. Rapid changes in dopamine concentration following psychostimulant administration have been well studied; however, such changes have never been examined following opioid delivery. Here, we provide novel measures of rapid dopamine release following intravenous infusion of two opioids, morphine and oxycodone, in drug naïve rats using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and rapid (1 min) microdialysis coupled with mass spectrometry. In addition to measuring rapid dopamine transmission, microdialysis HPLC-MS measures changes in GABA, glutamate, monoamines, monoamine metabolites, and several other neurotransmitters. Although both opioids increased dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, their patterns of drug-evoked dopamine transmission differed dramatically. Oxycodone evoked a robust and stable increase in dopamine concentration and a robust increase in the frequency and amplitude of phasic dopamine release events. Conversely, morphine evoked a brief (~ 1 min) increase in dopamine that was coincident with a surge in GABA concentration and then both transmitters returned to baseline levels. Thus, by providing rapid measures of neurotransmission, this study reveals previously unknown differences in opioid-induced neurotransmitter signaling. Investigating these differences may be essential for understanding how these two drugs of abuse could differentially usurp motivational circuitry and powerfully influence behavior. PMID:25208732

  9. Morphine versus methadone in the pain treatment of advanced-cancer patients followed up at home.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, S; Casuccio, A; Agnello, A; Serretta, R; Calderone, L; Barresi, L

    1998-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic and adverse effects and the doses of methadone in comparison to morphine. A prospective randomized study was performed in a sample of 40 patients with advanced cancer who required strong opioids for their pain management. Patients were treated with sustained-release morphine or methadone in doses titrated against the effect administered two or three times daily according to clinical need. Opioid doses, adjuvant medications, symptoms associated with opioid therapy, pain intensity, and pain mechanisms were recorded. The opioid escalation indices in percentage (OEI%) and milligrams (OEImg) were calculated. The effective analgesic score (EAS) that monitors the analgesic consumption-pain ratio was also calculated at fixed weekly intervals. differences in pain intensity were found. Patients treated with methadone reported values of OEI significantly less than those observed in patients treated with morphine. Seven patients in the methadone group maintained the same initial dosage until death, whereas only one patient in the morphine group did not require opioid dose escalation. A more stable analgesia in time in patients treated with methadone was shown by the low number of gaps in EASs reported. Symptom frequencies and intensities were similar in the two groups. Methadone is a drug of indisputable value in the treatment of cancer pain, and an unbalanced focus on the risks of inappropriate use rather than the benefits should not compromise the use of a relevant alternative to morphine in the management of cancer pain.

  10. Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Sim, S. K.

    1973-01-01

    Methadone and acetylmethadol, although possessing almost all of morphine's pharmacological properties, differ from other morphine-like drugs in their longer action, more gradual and less intense withdrawal syndrome, and blockade of euphoric effect of other opiates in addicts. A high percentage of patients maintained on methadone are better able to hold employment or to be otherwise socially productive than when dependent on heroin or morphine. A review of published results and procedures used in methadone maintenance treatment programs for heroin dependence is presented. Former heroin addicts are usually maintained on 80 to 120 mg. (high dose) or 20 to 60 mg. (low dose) oral methadone daily. Some programs are reported to have produced 80% success (patients employed or otherwise socially productive). Selection of patients, availability of allied therapeutic and rehabilitative facilities, strict control of supply, record keeping and periodic evaluation are considered essential. Different criteria (“drug-free” vs. “socially productive”) for judging “success” of treatment of heroin-dependent persons by methadone maintenance and administrative problems in large-scale treatment programs constitute the principal aspects of controversy. PMID:4599599

  11. Differential effects of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine on the responses of D2/D3 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Emery, Michael A; Bates, M L Shawn; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2015-05-01

    Oxycodone and hydrocodone are opioids which are widely used for pain management and are also commonly misused and abused. The exposure to opioid analgesics has been associated with altered responses of D2-like dopamine receptors (D2DRs). Our recent results suggest that various opioids will differentially modulate the responses of D2DRs. The D2DRs are known to be involved in the pathology of addiction and other mental illnesses, indicating the need to improve our understanding of the effects of opioid analgesics on the responses of the D2DRs. Thus, in this study, we first established equianalgesic oral doses of oxycodone, hydrocodone, and morphine using the tail withdrawal assay. Then, mice were orally administered (gavage) with the various opioids or saline once daily for 6 days. Twenty-four hours later, the mice were tested for their locomotor response to quinpirole, a D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist. Mice pretreated with oxycodone showed significantly greater locomotor supersensitivity to quinpirole than did morphine-pretreated mice, while hydrocodone-pretreated mice showed sensitivity in between that of mice treated with morphine and oxycodone. This finding suggests that various opioids differentially modulate the responses of D2DRs. It provides further evidence supporting of the notion that various opioids carry differential risks to the dopamine reward system.

  12. Chronic Methadone Treatment Shows a Better Cost/Benefit Ratio than Chronic Morphine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Enquist, Johan; Ferwerda, Madeline; Milan-Lobo, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Chronic treatment of pain with opiate drugs can lead to analgesic tolerance and drug dependence. Although all opiate drugs can promote tolerance and dependence in practice, the severity of those unwanted side effects differs depending on the drug used. Although each opiate drug has its own unique set of pharmacological profiles, methadone is the only clinically used opioid drug that produces substantial receptor endocytosis at analgesic doses. Here, we examined whether moderate doses of methadone carry any benefits over chronic use of equianalgesic morphine, the prototypical opioid. Our data show that chronic administration of methadone produces significantly less analgesic tolerance than morphine. Furthermore, we found significantly reduced precipitated withdrawal symptoms after chronic methadone treatment than after chronic morphine treatment. Finally, using a novel animal model with a degrading μ-opioid receptor we showed that, although endocytosis seems to protect against tolerance development, endocytosis followed by receptor degradation produces a rapid onset of analgesic tolerance to methadone. Together, these data indicated that opioid drugs that promote receptor endocytosis and recycling, such as methadone, may be a better choice for chronic pain treatment than morphine and its derivatives that do not. PMID:22062352

  13. Chronic methadone treatment shows a better cost/benefit ratio than chronic morphine in mice.

    PubMed

    Enquist, Johan; Ferwerda, Madeline; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2012-02-01

    Chronic treatment of pain with opiate drugs can lead to analgesic tolerance and drug dependence. Although all opiate drugs can promote tolerance and dependence in practice, the severity of those unwanted side effects differs depending on the drug used. Although each opiate drug has its own unique set of pharmacological profiles, methadone is the only clinically used opioid drug that produces substantial receptor endocytosis at analgesic doses. Here, we examined whether moderate doses of methadone carry any benefits over chronic use of equianalgesic morphine, the prototypical opioid. Our data show that chronic administration of methadone produces significantly less analgesic tolerance than morphine. Furthermore, we found significantly reduced precipitated withdrawal symptoms after chronic methadone treatment than after chronic morphine treatment. Finally, using a novel animal model with a degrading μ-opioid receptor we showed that, although endocytosis seems to protect against tolerance development, endocytosis followed by receptor degradation produces a rapid onset of analgesic tolerance to methadone. Together, these data indicated that opioid drugs that promote receptor endocytosis and recycling, such as methadone, may be a better choice for chronic pain treatment than morphine and its derivatives that do not.

  14. Comparison of methadone and slow-release morphine maintenance in pregnant addicts.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G; Jagsch, R; Eder, H; Gombas, W; Etzersdorfer, P; Schmidl-Mohl, K; Schatten, C; Weninger, M; Aschauer, H N

    1999-02-01

    To investigate whether the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is different in children born to women maintained on slow-release morphine, compared with those maintained on methadone, and to compare additional drug consumption in these groups of women. An open, randomized trial was conducted in an established clinic. Forty-eight pregnant women who presented to the clinic as opiate or polysubstance abusers were enrolled and maintained on either methadone (24 women) or slow-release morphine (24 women) up to and following delivery. The programme included psychosocial therapy and support for their opiate-addicted partners. Standard urinalysis methods were used to measure consumption of cocaine and benzodiazepines during pregnancy. Injection sites were monitored to indicate additional opiate use. NAS was measured according to Finnegan score and the amount of phenobarbiturates prescribed to alleviate the symptoms. No difference was found in the number of days that NAS was experienced by neonates born to methadone or morphine maintained mothers (mean = 16 and 21 days, respectively). All children were born healthy and no serious complications arose. Fewer benzodiazepines (p < 0.05) and fewer additional opiates (p < 0.05) were consumed by the morphine-maintained women compared with those who took methadone, but no difference was seen in cocaine consumption. Nicotine consumption was reduced significantly in both groups during pregnancy (p < 0.02). Both methadone and morphine are suitable maintenance agents for pregnant opiate addicts. Maintenance agents that result in a less prolonged NAS should be studied in further trials.

  15. GC-MS quantitation of codeine, morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone in blood.

    PubMed

    Meatherall, Robert

    2005-01-01

    A method is described for the simultaneous analysis of seven opiates, codeine, morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone, in blood samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). One milliliter of blood is combined with an internal standard mixture containing 200 ng of each of the seven deuterated opiates. Two milliliters of acetonitrile is added to precipitate the proteins and cellular material. After centrifugation, the clear supernatant is removed, and the acetonitrile is evaporated. The remaining aqueous portion is adjusted to pH 9 with sodium bicarbonate buffer, and the drugs are extracted into chloroform/ trifluoroethanol (10:1). The organic extractant is transferred and dried under nitrogen. The residue is reconstituted in dilute hydrochloric acid and washed consecutively with hexane and chloroform. The purified aqueous portion is adjusted to pH 9 with bicarbonate buffer, and the drugs are again extracted into chloroform/trifluoroethanol (10:1). The organic portion is removed from the aqueous fraction and dried under nitrogen. The residue is consecutively derivatized with methoxyamine and propionic anhydride using pyridine as a catalyst. The ketone groups on hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxycodone, and oxymorphone are converted to methoximes. Hydroxyl groups present at the O(3) and O(6) positions of codeine, morphine, 6-acetylmorphine, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone are converted to their respective propionyl esters. After a post-derivatization purification step, the extracts are analyzed by full scan GC-MS using electron impact ionization. The method is linear to at least 2000 ng/mL. Day-to-day precision (N = 15) at 500 ng/mL and 75 ng/mL were less than 10% for all seven targeted opiates. Extraction efficiencies at these two concentrations ranged from 50% to 68%. For each opiate, the limit of quantitation was 10 ng/mL, and the limit of detection was 2 ng/mL.

  16. Hospital morphine preparation for abstinence syndrome in newborns exposed to buprenorphine or methadone.

    PubMed

    Colombini, Nathalie; Elias, Riad; Busuttil, Muriel; Dubuc, Myriam; Einaudi, Marie-Ange; Bues-Charbit, Martine

    2008-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the adequacy of a hospital formulated oral morphine preparation for management of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and to compare clinical features in infants exposed to methadone or buprenorphine in utero. Between October 1998 and October 2004 all infants born to mothers treated with buprenorphine or methadone during pregnancy were enrolled into this prospective study. Morphine hydrochloride solution (0.2 mg/ml) was prepared without preservatives under a flow laminar air box (class 100). Morphine solution: quantitative and qualitative HPLC analysis and microbiological study at regular intervals during storage at 4 degrees C for 6 months. Maternal characteristics: age, opiate dose during pregnancy. Neonatal characteristics: gestational age at delivery, birth weight, Lipsitz scores. Morphine dose: daily morphine dose, maximum morphine dose, duration of NAS, and duration of treatment required to achieve stable Lipsitz scores below 4. Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison of median values. Microbiological and HPLC analysis showed that the morphine preparation remained stable for 6 months at 4 degrees C. Nine methadone-exposed infants and 13 buprenorphine-exposed infants were included in the study. All infants presented NAS requiring treatment with the morphine solution. Lipsitz scores at birth were significantly different in the methadone and buprenorphine groups (P < 0.05). The methadone group required significantly higher doses of morphine preparation than the buprenorphine group during the first 38 days of treatment (P < 0.05): 0.435 +/- 0.150 mg/kg/day vs. 0.257 +/- 0.083 mg/kg/day. This hospital morphine solution is adequate for management of NAS. Preparations showed good stability and doses could be adjusted with a margin of 0.02 mg. The onset of NAS occurred within 24 h after birth in methadone-exposed infants (range 6-24 h) and within 48 h after birth in buprenorphine-exposed infants (range 24-168 h). Due to the possibility

  17. Tolerability and efficacy of two synergistic ratios of oral morphine and oxycodone combinations versus morphine in patients with chronic noncancer pain.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia, Felix A; Pace, Gary W; Robinson, Gary L W G; Huang, Nuo-Yu; Stern, Warren; Richards, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Analgesic synergy and improved tolerability have been reported for flexible dose morphine and oxycodone combinations. This report describes two studies with similar double-blind, randomized, 7-day crossover designs (up to 7 days per arm) conducted to 1) explore the analgesic and safety benefit offixed ratio of morphine (M) and oxycodone (0) combinations (MOX) and 2) define the optimal ratio for morphine and oxycodone combination. Clinical study centers in Australia. Patients with chronic noncancer pain. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive flexible doses of either M or fixed ratio of MOX (M3:02 in study A; M1:02 in study B). The starting doses of M or MOX were the morphine equivalent doses (MEDs) converted from the analgesics received before entering double-blind treatment. At each crossover period, the doses were titrated to achieve analgesia at steady state, which was defined as when the same total daily dose (+/-10 percent) had been given consecutively for 3 days. The primary endpoint was the study medication dose (MED), which produced adequate pain control at steady state. Analgesic synergy in MOX was observed in both studies. On an MED basis, 61.6 percent (study A, M:0 = 3:2) or 46.8 percent (study B, M:0 = 1:2) more MED were needed forM monotherapy to achieve steady-state pain control when compared with MOX. Patient tolerability profiles were also generally better in the MOX groups. A 3:2 or 1:2 fixed ratio combination of morphine and oxycodone (MOX) produced analgesic synergy and a tolerability profile improvement in patients with chronic noncancer pain.

  18. Comparison of oxycodone and morphine on the proliferation, apoptosis and expression of related molecules in the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mi; Jin, Li; Li, Renqi; Zhu, Sihai; Ji, Muhuo; Li, Weiyan

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the effects of oxycodone and morphine hydrochloride on the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of A549 lung cancer cells. A549 human lung cancer cells were cultured in vitro and treated with oxycodone or morphine at various concentrations (10, 20 and 40 µg/ml). Cell migration was determined using a wound healing assay, whereas apoptosis was detected using flow cytometry. Reverse transcription quantitative-polymerase chain reaction was performed in order to assess the apoptosis-related gene expression levels, including p53, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax). The levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The expression levels of intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1 were determined by immunofluorescence. In the present study, oxycodone and morphine induced apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells with similar potency; however, >20 µg/ml oxycodone was more effective at inhibiting cell proliferation (P<0.05) and migration (P<0.05), as compared with morphine at the same concentration. Oxycodone induced a dose-dependent increase in the expression levels of p53 and Bax apoptosis-related genes, whereas it decreased the gene expression levels of Bcl-2. Furthermore, oxycodone decreased, whereas morphine increased, the expression levels of ICAM-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, at 40 µg/ml, the expression levels of VEGF and uPA in the morphine group were significantly higher than those demonstrated in the oxycodone group (P<0.05). In conclusion, oxycodone was more effective in inhibiting the proliferation and migration of A549 lung cancer cells, as compared with morphine. PMID:27446244

  19. Chemical stability of morphine and methadone, and of methadone in combination with acepromazine, medetomidine or xylazine, during prolonged storage in syringes.

    PubMed

    Lee, D Y; Watson, N; Whittem, T

    2017-08-01

    To assess the chemical and physical stability of morphine and methadone stored in syringes for 12 months and of methadone when mixed with acepromazine, medetomidine or xylazine. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique was developed and validated for the analysis of morphine and methadone. Morphine and methadone were dispensed into syringes and stored at 25°C/60% relative humidity (RH) and 40°C/75% RH. Solutions containing mixtures of methadone combined with acepromazine, medetomidine or xylazine were stored in syringes at 25°C/60%RH. At initiation, after 1 week and then 1, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months, samples were analysed by HPLC for the quantification of the morphine or methadone. Measured concentrations were assessed as a function of storage time and temperature using linear regression statistics to calculate stability. When stored at 40°C/75%RH as pre-dispensed syringes, severe physical and chemical changes were observed after the third month for both morphine and methadone. In contrast, at 25°C/60%RH both drugs remained chemically stable for 12 months, with concentration variations not exceeding a 5% change from initiation as stipulated in VICH stability guidelines. When in combination with acepromazine or xylazine, methadone also remained chemically stable, but the combination with medetomidine failed stability criteria prior to 6 months. Precipitation compromised the physical stability of methadone in all unsealed syringes prior to 9 months' storage. Pre-dispensing morphine or methadone into unsealed syringes compromises the drugs' physical stability. Mixing of methadone with other drugs can degrade its chemical stability. © 2017 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. Contrasting cardiovascular properties of the µ-opioid agonists morphine and methadone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tung, Kenneth H; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2015-09-05

    Morphine and methadone share the property of μ-opioid receptor agonism yet have markedly different cardiovascular actions suggesting additional properties are at play. We investigated the i.v. dose-response relationships of the opioids on cardiovascular metameters in anaesthetised rats in the absence or presence of H1- and H2-receptor antagonism and the μ-opioid antagonist naloxone. In vitro tissue assays were employed to define more clearly cardiac and vascular mechanisms of action. Morphine (9, 30, 90mg/kg i.v.) decreased heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) - responses that were blocked by naloxone pretreatment (10mg/kg i.v.). In contrast, methadone (3, 10, 30mg/kg i.v.) caused dramatic short-lived (1-3min) bradycardia, hypotension and lengthening of the QT interval before stabilising 5min after i.v. dosing. Only the steady-state responses of HR and MAP were blocked by naloxone. Mepyramine (10mg/kg i.v.) and cimetidine (100mg/kg i.v.) also blocked the naloxone-sensitive components. In isolated small mesenteric arteries precontracted by K(+) 62mM or endothelin-1, methadone (1-30μM) relaxed vessels while morphine (1-100μM) had no effect. Pretreatment with naloxone (10μM), indomethacin (30μM) or nitro-l-arginine (100μM) did not affect the relaxation to methadone. In rat isolated left atria, morphine and methadone inhibited inotropic responses at high concentrations (100μM). In rat papillary muscle and right atria, methadone was more than 30 times more potent at lengthening the refractory period and slowing the atrial rate than morphine. We conclude that methadone is a potent vasodilator agent, possibly through blocking L-type calcium channels.

  1. Discriminative stimulus effects of morphine and oxycodone in the absence and presence of acetic acid in male and female C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, Harshini; Ward, Sara Jane; Walker, Ellen Ann

    2015-08-01

    The use of prescription opioids for clinical management of pain remains problematic because of concerns about addiction associated with opioid use. Another difficulty in pain management is the increasing evidence for sex differences in pain behavior and opioid-induced behavioral effects. However, few studies have documented the abuse potential of prescription opioids as a function of pain in rodents, with significant gaps in the literature pertaining to sex differences in the interaction between pain and opioid effects. The present study evaluated the effects of an experimentally induced acute pain state (acetic acid injections) on the potency of morphine and oxycodone to produce discriminative stimulus effects in male and female C57Bl/6 mice trained to discriminate 3.2 mg/kg morphine from saline. Acetic acid injections attenuated the stimulus potency of morphine by 2.2-fold but not the stimulus potency of oxycodone in male mice. Acetic acid injections did not alter the discriminative stimulus effects of either morphine or oxycodone in female mice. The antinociceptive effects of the 2 opioids were evaluated using the acetic acid-induced stretching test. For antinociceptive effects, morphine was 2.0-fold less potent relative to oxycodone in male mice, whereas morphine and oxycodone were equipotent in female mice. Taken together, these results indicate that acetic acid-induced acute pain differentially modulates the discriminative stimulus effects of morphine in male and female mice and that this change may be related to the variable antinociceptive effectiveness of these opioids across sexes.

  2. Corrected QT interval prolongation after an overdose of escitalopram, morphine, oxycodone, zopiclone and benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Baranchuk, Adrian; Simpson, Christopher S; Methot, Michelle; Gibson, Kara; Strum, David

    2008-07-01

    Escitalopram is the recently marketed S-enantiomer of the widely used antidepressant citalopram. Data from intentional overexposure to this medication are limited. Twelve-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) effects from racemic citalopram have been described; however, the present report is the first, to the best of the authors' knowledge, that describes all the reported abnormalities in a single patient receiving escitalopram. A 52-year-old man with a history of depression treated with escitalopram 10 mg/day, extended-release morphine 30 mg/day and zopiclone 15 mg/day was found unconscious at his home. He was known to have attempted suicide three weeks previously. Partially emptied bottles of escitalopram, morphine, oxycodone, zopiclone, lorazepam and diazepam were found close to the patient. He was transferred to the emergency department, where airway management and other supportive care were initiated. The patient was transferred to the intensive care unit. The initial 12-lead ECG demonstrated junctional rhythm at 48 beats/min, a wide complex escape (145 ms) with right bundle branch morphology and a prolonged corrected QT interval at 650 ms. Cardiac monitoring was undertaken. No ventricular arrhythmias or torsade de pointes were detected. No specific treatment for shortening the QT was implemented. Another 12-lead ECG performed 48 h later demonstrated sinus tachycardia with a normal corrected QT, normal PR interval and normal QRS duration. The effects of the overdose of escitalopram on the ECG and its interactions with other drugs are reviewed.

  3. Potential P-glycoprotein pharmacokinetic interaction of telaprevir with morphine or methadone.

    PubMed

    Fudin, Jeffrey; Fontenelle, Dania Vanesta; Fudin, Hannah Rebecca; Carlyn, Cynthia; Hinden, Debra Ann; Ashley, Christopher C

    2013-08-01

    Telaprevir (TVR) effects on P-glycloprotein and cytochrome P450 (CYP) may significantly elevate serum levels of morphine and methadone. Recent literature points to major interactions when combining TVR with warfarin or rifampin. Opioid interactions are especially dangerous in hepatitis C patients, as coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) occurs in 50-90% of HIV-infected drug users that are prescribed opioids for chronic pain and/or methadone for maintenance. TVR has been shown to significantly inhibit the active transport enzyme pGP and may therefore increase intestinal morphine absorption. TVR also inhibits hepatic CYP3A4 that are responsible for metabolizing methadone. Patients requiring opioid analgesics must be carefully monitored because of potential for elevated opioid levels and overdose risk. Current recommendations minimize potential drug interactions between telaprevir and opioids, especially methadone, based on a single 7-day trial. We outline the various pharmacokinetic mechanisms involved when combining TVR with methadone or morphine and recommend that current data are not sufficiently robust to minimize the potentially significant interaction with opioids, especially methadone. Clinicians must be mindful of these understated interactions, know that the opioid dose may need to be significantly increased or reduced, and use caution during upward titration of opioids affected by these enzyme systems.

  4. Effect of estrogen on morphine- and oxycodone-induced antinociception in a female femur bone cancer pain model.

    PubMed

    Ono, Hiroko; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Shinohara, Shunji

    2016-02-15

    Although estrous cycle has been reported to influence antiociceptive effect of morphine in several pain conditions, its effect on cancer pain is not well established. We investigated the effect of estrogen on morphine antinociception using a bone cancer pain model and compared its potency with that of oxycodone. Female mice were ovariectomized (OVX) for preparation of a femur bone cancer pain (FBC) model. β-estradiol was subcutaneously (s.c.) administered and antinociceptive effects of opioids was assessed using the von Frey monofilament test. Although morphine (5-20mg/kg, s.c.) did have significant antinociceptive effects in the FBC-OVX group, its effects in the FBC-OVX+β-estradiol (OVX+E) group was limited. Oxycodone (1-5mg/kg, s.c.) exhibited significant effects in both groups. Expression changes in opioid-related genes (μ-, κ-, δ-opioid receptors, prodynorphin, proenkephalin, proopiomelanocortin) in the spinal and supraspinal sites were examined among the sham-OVX, sham-OVX+E, FBC-OVX, and FBC-OVX+E groups by in situ hybridization. These studies detected a significant increase in prodynorphin in the spinal dorsal horn of the FBC-OVX+E group. Spinal injection of a dynorphin-A antibody to FBC-OVX+E mice restored antinociception of morphine. In conclusion, we detected a differential effect of estrogen on morphine- and oxycodone-induced antinociception in a female FBC model. The effect of morphine was limited with estrogen exposure, which may be due to estrogen- and pain-mediated spinal expression of dynorphin-A.

  5. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    PubMed

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest.

  6. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2014-01-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70kg) in buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. Since a 3:1 morphine:oxycodone dose ratio had yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in non-dependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures, i.e. a drug vs. money and a drug vs. drug procedure, were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater compared to high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3:1 dose ratio of morphine:oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent subjects. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest. PMID:23839029

  7. Intravenous methadone for cancer pain unrelieved by morphine and hydromorphone: clinical observations.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, P L; Borsook, D; Chandler, S W; Payne, R

    1997-03-01

    Methadone is a very effective second-line opioid for treatment of cancer pain. However, the starting doses of methadone indicated on opioid conversion charts may over-estimate the dose of intravenous (i.v.) methadone needed. In this report, we describe four patients with cancer-related pain treated with continuous i.v. morphine and hydromorphone. Because of persistent pain and opioid side effects limiting increases in opioid dose, each patient was switched to i.v. methadone. All four patients had excellent pain relief without significant side effects at a dose that, according to the available conversion charts, was approximately 3% of the calculated equianalgesic dose of hydromorphone. When converting from continuous i.v. hydromorphone to continuous i.v. methadone, much lower doses than those suggested by the opioid conversion charts should be used as starting doses.

  8. G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3) channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effect of oxycodone, but not morphine, at supraspinal sites

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Fujita, Masahide; Ono, Hiroko; Hongo, Yoshie; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ogawa, Koichi; Morioka, Yasuhide; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kato, Akira; Hasegawa, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Oxycodone and morphine are μ-opioid receptor agonists prescribed to control moderate-to-severe pain. Previous studies suggested that these opioids exhibit different analgesic profiles. We hypothesized that distinct mechanisms mediate the differential effects of these two opioids and investigated the role of G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR3 also known as GIRK) channels in their antinociceptive effects. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Opioid-induced antinociceptive effects were assessed in mice, using the tail-flick test, by i.c.v. and intrathecal (i.t.) administration of morphine and oxycodone, alone and following inhibition of KIR3.1 channels with tertiapin-Q (30 pmol per mouse, i.c.v. and i.t.) and KIR3.1-specific siRNA. The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone and morphine were also examined after tertiapin-Q administration in the mouse femur bone cancer and neuropathic pain models. KEY RESULTS The antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, after both i.c.v. and i.t. administrations, were markedly attenuated by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In contrast, the antinociceptive effects of i.c.v. morphine were unaffected, whereas those induced by i.t. morphine were attenuated, by KIR3.1 channel inhibition. In the two chronic pain models, the antinociceptive effects of s.c. oxycodone, but not morphine, were inhibited by supraspinal administration of tertiapin-Q. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS These results demonstrate that KIR3.1 channels play a primary role in the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not those of morphine, at supraspinal sites and suggest that supraspinal KIR3.1 channels are responsible for the unique analgesic profile of oxycodone. PMID:24117458

  9. Recovery from Mu-opioid Receptor Desensitization following Chronic Treatment with Morphine and Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Quillinan, Nidia; Lau, Elaine; Virk, Michael; von Zastrow, Mark; Williams, John T

    2011-01-01

    Chronic treatment with morphine results in a decrease in mu-opioid receptor sensitivity, an increase in acute desensitization and a reduction in the recovery from acute desensitization in locus coeruleus neurons. With acute administration, morphine is unlike many other opioid agonists in that it does not mediate robust acute desensitization or induce receptor trafficking. This study compares mu-opioid receptor desensitization and trafficking in brain slices taken from rats treated for 6–7 days with a range of doses of morphine (60, 30, 15 mg/kg/day) and methadone (60, 30, 5 mg/kg/day) applied by subcutaneous implantation of osmotic mini pumps. Mice were treated with 45 mg/kg/day. In morphine treated animals, recovery from acute [Met]5enkephalin-induced desensitization and receptor recycling was diminished. In contrast, recovery and recycling were unchanged in slices from methadone treated animals. Remarkably the reduced recovery from desensitization and receptor recycling found in slices from morphine treated animals were not observed in animals lacking β-arrestin2. Further, pharmacological inhibition of GRK2, while not affecting the ability of [Met]5enkephalin to induce desensitization, acutely reversed the delay in recovery from desensitization produced by chronic morphine treatment. These results characterize a previously unidentified function of the GRK/arrestin system in mediating opioid regulation in response to chronic morphine administration. They also suggest that the GRK/arrestin system, rather then serving as a primary mediator of acute desensitization, controls recovery from desensitization by regulating receptor reinsertion to the plasma membrane after chronic treatment with morphine. The sustained GRK/arrestin dependent desensitization is another way in which morphine and methadone are distinguished. PMID:21430144

  10. Azole antifungal inhibition of buprenorphine, methadone and oxycodone in vitro metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2015-06-01

    Opioid-related mortality rates have escalated. Drug interactions may increase blood concentrations of the opioid. We therefore used human liver microsomes (HLMs) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs) to study in vitro inhibition of buprenorphine metabolism to norbuprenorphine (CYP3A4 and 2C8), oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone (CYP3A4 and 2C18) and oxymorphone (CYP2D6), and methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP; CYP3A4 and 2B6). In this study, we have examined the inhibitory effect of 12 (mostly antifungal) azoles. These compounds have a wide range of solubility; to keep organic solvent ≤1%, there was an equally wide range of highest concentration tested (e.g., itraconazole 5 µM to fluconazole 1000 µM). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLMs at three concentrations with or without preincubation of inhibitor with reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Posaconazole displayed evidence of TDI; metronidazole and albendazole had no significant effect. Azoles were next screened at the highest achievable concentration for non-CYP3A4 pathways. IC50 values (µM) were determined for most CYP3A4 pathways (ranges) and other pathways as dictated by screen results: clotrimazole (0.30 - 0.35; others >30 µM); econazole (2.2 - 4.9; 2B6 R-EDDP - 9.5, S-EDDP - 6.8; 2C8 - 6.0; 2C18 - 1.0; 2D6 - 1.2); fluconazole (7.7 - 66; 2B6 - 313, 361; 2C8 - 1240; 2C18 - 17; 2D6 - 1000); itraconazole (2.5 to >5; others >5); ketoconazole (0.032 - 0.094; 2B6 - 12, 31; 2C8 - 78; 2C18 - 0.98; 2D6 - 182); miconazole (2.3 - 7.6; 2B6 - 2.8, 2.8; 2C8 - 5.3; 2C18 - 3.1; 2D6 - 5.9); posaconazole (3.4 - 20; 2C18 - 3.8; others >30); terconazole (0.48 to >10; 2C18 - 8.1; others >10) and voriconazole (0.40 - 15; 2B6 - 2.4, 2.5; 2C8 - 170; 2C18 - 13; 2D6 >300). Modeling based on estimated Ki values and plasma concentrations from the literature suggest that the orally administered azoles, particularly

  11. [Cost-effective analysis of rotation from sustained-release morphine tablet to transdermal fentanyl of matrix type or sustained-release oxycodone tablet].

    PubMed

    Ise, Yuya; Wako, Tetsuya; Miura, Yoshihiko; Katayama, Shirou; Shimizu, Hisanori

    2009-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the pharmacoeconomics of switching from sustained-release morphine tablet to matrix type (MT) of transdermal fontanel or sustained-release Oxycodone tablet. Cost-effective analysis was performed using a simulation model along with decision analysis. The analysis was done from the payer's perspective. The cost-effective ratio/patient of transdermal MT fontanel (22, 539 yen)was lower than that of sustained -release Oxycodone tablet (23, 630 yen), although a sensitivity analysis could not indicate that this result was reliable. These results suggest the possibility that transdermal MT fontanel was much less expensive than a sustained-release Oxycodone tablet.

  12. Retrospective chart review comparing morphine and methadone in neonates treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Young, Mallory E; Hager, Shanna J; Spurlock, Darrell

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective was to determine whether oral morphine sulfate contributed to decreased length of stay, both in the hospital and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), when compared to oral methadone for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Secondary objectives included evaluation of NAS scores, opioid requirements, use of adjuvant therapy, and total cost of hospital stay. An equal number of neonates who received oral morphine sulfate and oral methadone as treatment for NAS were identified. Inclusion criteria included in utero exposure to opioids as determined by maternal history, toxicology reports during pregnancy or at the time of delivery, or infant urine toxicology reports and symptoms of NAS requiring pharmacological treatment. Exclusion criteria included neonates transferred to or from another facility during treatment, neonates discharged on NAS treatment, and neonates diagnosed with iatrogenic NAS due to postnatal exposure to opioids. Twenty six neonates met inclusion criteria. Statistically significant decreases in length of hospital and NICU stay, length of treatment, maximum opioid requirements, and total cost were found when neonates treated for NAS with oral morphine sulfate were compared to those treated with oral methadone. No statistically significant differences in average maximum NAS score or use of adjuvant therapy were found between the two groups. Oral morphine sulfate reduced length of NICU and hospital stay, length of treatment, and total cost of treatment for neonates treated for NAS. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Venlafaxine & Methadone Alone and in Combination with Spontaneous Morphine withdrawal Syndrome & Pain Sensation in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Fadaei-Kenarsary, Meisam; Farbood, Yaghoob; Taghi Mansouri, Seyed Mohammad; Fathi Moghaddam, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Methadone has been used as a drug to detoxify opioid tolerance. Naloxane precipitated morphine withdrawal behaviours were attenuated by venlafaxine as an antidepressant. On the contrary, after detoxifying the opioids, spontaneous withdrawal syndrome may occur with pain sensitivity. Therefore the present study aimed to examine the effects of chronic methadone (70 mg/kg, in drinking water, 7 days), venlafaxine (80 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally, 7 days) and their combinations with the spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome and pain sensitivity. Methods: Twenty eight young male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, venlafaxine treated, methadone treated and venlafaxine + methadone treated. Morphine sulfate (10 mg/kg/day, subcutaneously, 4 days) was injected to all animals. Then primary withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. The test was then followed by methadone or its vehicle administration. Second intervention was venlafaxine or its vehicle injection. Then final withdrawal behaviours and tail flick test were performed. Results: Combination of chronic methadone substitution and venlafaxine administration, significantly reduced freezing behaviour of spontaneous morphine withdrawal syndrome (P<0.01, 379±144%). Chronic methadone administration (P<0.05, 35±8% difference with venlafaxine treated group) induced hyperalgesia. A positive correlation (P=0.001, +63%) was observed between the animals final freezing scores and their response latencies to the painful stimulus. Discussion: Combination of chronic methadone and venlafaxine administrations reduces freezing withdrawal behaviour. Further investigations on analgesic interventions are needed to overcome this hyperalgesia. PMID:27504153

  14. [Correlation between insufficient methadone dosage and morphine positive urine on drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment].

    PubMed

    Yao, T; Feng, D; Pan, M H; Cheng, Y P; Li, C X; Wang, J; Feng, Y L; Shi, J; Su, T; Chen, Q; Shi, S; Wang, S P

    2017-05-10

    Objective: To estimate the incidence of drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment and explore the correlation and interaction between insufficient methadone dosage and morphine positive urine on the drop out in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Methods: Face to face interview was conducted in 1 031 patients at 3 methadone maintenance treatment clinics in Guangxi. Results: The study included 1 031 participants, 40.6% of them (419/1 031) had stopped treatment. The drop out rates in urine morphine positive group and methadone dosage<100 mg/d group were 57.6% (99/172) and 37.4% (347/929) respectively, higher than those in urine morphine negative group and methadone dosage ≥100 mg/d group (42.3%, 363/859, and 26.5%, 27/102). Orderly logistic regression analysis results showed that after adjusted factors, such as gender, age, marital status, ethnic group, patients who received a dosage less than 100 mg/day (OR=3.05, 95%CI: 1.84-5.06) and had morphine positive urine (OR=2.25, 95%CI: 1.59-3.19) were more likely to drop out of the treatment. Interaction analysis showed that dosage less than 100 mg/d and morphine positive urine during treatment had additive interaction (RERI=256.46, AP=0.87, S= 8.05) and multiplication interaction (OR=2.45, 95%CI: 1.71-3.49). Conclusion: Insufficient dosage and morphine positive urine were significantly correlated with drop out of treatment in patients with access to methadone maintenance treatment.

  15. Ineffective morphine treatment regimen for the control of Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in buprenorphine- and methadone-exposed infants.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A L; Lopatko, O V; Haslam, R R; Stacey, H; Pearson, V; Woods, A; Fisk, A; White, J M

    2012-08-01

    This study aimed to determine if morphine is effective in ameliorating Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) symptoms to non-opioid-exposed control levels in methadone- and buprenorphine-exposed infants. A prospective, non-randomized comparison study with flexible dosing was undertaken in a large teaching maternity hospital in Australia. Twenty-five infants in the groups of buprenorphine-, methadone- and control non-opioid-exposed infants were compared (total n = 75 infants). Oral morphine sulphate (1 mg/ml) was administered every 4 h to opioid agonist-exposed infants. Modified Finnegan Withdrawal Scale (MFWS) scores determined dosing: score of 8-10: 0.5 mg/kg/day, 11-13: 0.7 mg/kg/day and 14+: 0.9 mg/kg/day. Withdrawal score, amount of morphine administered and length of hospital stay, were used to assess NAS over a 4-week follow-up period. No controls achieved a score higher than 7 on the MFWS. There was no significant difference in the percentage of infants requiring treatment between methadone (60%) and buprenorphine (48%) infants. For treated infants, significantly (P < 0.01) more morphine was administered to methadone (40.07 ± 3.95 mg) compared with buprenorphine infants (22.77 ± 4.29 mg) to attempt to control NAS. Following treatment initiation, significantly more (P < 0.01) methadone (87%) compared with buprenorphine infants (42%) continued to exceed scoring thresholds for morphine treatment requirement, and non-opioid-exposed control infant scores. For treated infants, there was no significant difference in length of hospital stay between methadone and buprenorphine infants. Morphine treatment was not entirely effective in ameliorating NAS to non-opioid-exposed control symptom levels in methadone or buprenorphine infants. The regimen may be less effective in methadone compared with buprenorphine infants.

  16. Bioavailability of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone following buccal administration in cats.

    PubMed

    Pypendop, B H; Ilkiw, J E; Shilo-Benjamini, Y

    2014-06-01

    Buccal administration of buprenorphine is commonly used to treat pain in cats. It has been argued that absorption of buprenorphine through the buccal mucosa is high, in part due to its pKa of 8.24. Morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone have a pKa between 8 and 9. This study characterized the bioavailability of these drugs following buccal administration to cats. Six healthy adult female spayed cats were used. Buccal pH was measured prior to drug administration. Morphine sulfate, 0.2 mg/kg IV or 0.5 mg/kg buccal; methadone hydrochloride, 0.3 mg/kg IV or 0.75 mg/kg buccal; hydromorphone hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg IV or 0.25 mg/kg buccal; or oxymorphone hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg IV or 0.25 mg/kg buccal were administered. All cats received all treatments. Arterial blood was sampled immediately prior to drug administration and at various times up to 8 h thereafter. Bioavailability was calculated as the ratio of the area under the time-concentration curve following buccal administration to that following IV administration, each indexed to the administered dose. Mean ± SE (range) bioavailability was 36.6 ± 5.2 (12.7-49.5), 44.2 ± 7.9 (18.7-70.5), 22.4 ± 6.9 (6.4-43.4), and 18.8 ± 2.0 (12.9-23.5)% for buccal administration of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone, respectively. Bioavailability of methadone was significantly higher than that of oxymorphone.

  17. Methadone-induced hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Faskowitz, Andrew J; Kramskiy, Vladimir N; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2013-05-01

    To determine if recent observations of hypoglycemia in patients receiving high-dose methadone extended to an animal model, we explored the effects of methadone and other mu-opioids on blood glucose levels in mice. Methadone lowered blood glucose in a dose-dependent manner with 20 mg/kg yielding a nadir in average glucose levels to 55 ± 6 mg/dL from a baseline of 172 ± 7 mg/dL, an effect that was antagonized by naloxone and mu selective antagonists β-funaltrexamine and naloxonazine. The effect was stereoselective and limited to only the l-isomer, while the d-isomer was ineffective. Despite the robust decrease in blood glucose produced by methadone, a series of other mu-opioids, including morphine, fentanyl, levorphanol, oxycodone or morphine-6β-glucuronide failed to lower blood glucose levels. Similar differences among mu-opioid agonists have been observed in other systems, suggesting the possible role of selected splice variants of the mu-opioid receptor gene Oprm1. This mouse model recapitulates our clinical observations and emphasizes the need to carefully monitor glucose levels when using high methadone doses, particularly intravenously, and the need for controlled clinical trials.

  18. Comparison of the transcriptional responses induced by acute morphine, methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Belkaï, Emilie; Crété, Dominique; Courtin, Cindie; Noble, Florence; Marie-Claire, Cynthia

    2013-07-05

    Despite their widespread use in opioid maintenance treatment and pain management, little is known about the intracellular effectors of methadone and buprenorphine and the transcriptional responses they induce. We therefore studied the acute effects of these two opioids in rats, comparing our observations with those for the reference molecule, morphine. We determined the analgesic ED50 of the three molecules in the tail flick test, to ensure that transcriptional effects were compared between doses of equivalent analgesic effect. We analysed changes in gene expression over time in three cerebral structures involved in several opioid behaviours-the dorsal striatum, thalamus and nucleus accumbens-by real-time quantitative PCR. We analysed the expression of genes encoding proteins of the endogenous opioid system in parallel with that of Fos, a marker of neuronal activation. The acute transcriptional effects of methadone resembled those of morphine more closely than did those of buprenorphine, in terms of kinetics and intensities. Our results provide the first evidence that these two drugs widely used in pain management and opioid maintenance treatment can disturb the regulation of endogenous opioid system genes and induce molecular outcomes different from those observed with morphine.

  19. Slow-release oral morphine for maintenance treatment of opioid addicts intolerant to methadone or with inadequate withdrawal suppression.

    PubMed

    Kastelic, Andrej; Dubajic, Goran; Strbad, Ervin

    2008-11-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy, safety and acceptability of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) in opioid addicts intolerant to methadone or with inadequate withdrawal suppression. Prospective, open, non-comparative multi-centre study. Twelve out-patient Centres for Prevention and Treatment of Drug Addiction in Slovenia. Male and female opioid addicts (age>18 years) under methadone maintenance therapy requiring a change of treatment in order to continue more effectively with maintenance. Maintenance therapy with methadone was switched to once-daily SROM. Efficacy evaluations were based on the reduction of side effects and on the degree of suppression of opiate craving, signs and symptoms of withdrawal. In addition, self-reported somatic and psychic symptoms (SCL-27) as well as World Health Organization quality of life-related (WHO QOL) parameters were monitored. Thirty-nine subjects intolerant to methadone and 28 subjects showing inadequate withdrawal suppression under methadone>or=90 mg/day were included as two separate groups in the efficacy analyses. Treatment was switched easily from methadone to SROM on a 1:8 ratio. Four-week SROM treatment resulted in significant reduction of side effects reported under methadone. Signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal as well as craving for opiates were improved significantly in patients with inadequate response to methadone. Physical and psychological wellbeing improved significantly under SROM treatment. SROM was tolerated very well. Maintenance treatment with SROM appears to be a clinically useful alternative treatment in subjects not tolerating methadone or with inadequate withdrawal suppression.

  20. Serum concentrations of opioids when comparing two switching strategies to methadone for cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Moksnes, Kristin; Kaasa, Stein; Paulsen, Ørnulf; Rosland, Jan Henrik; Spigset, Olav; Dale, Ola

    2012-08-01

    Our aim was to compare pharmacological aspects of two switching strategies from morphine/oxycodone to methadone; the stop and go (SAG) strategy in which methadone is started directly after the initial opioid has been stopped, and the 3-days switch (3DS), in which morphine/oxycodone is gradually changed to methadone by cross-tapering over 3 days. Forty-two cancer patients with pain and/or opioid side effects were assessed in this randomised trial. Trough serum concentrations of methadone, morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G), and oxycodone were measured on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 14. Primary outcome was number of patients with methadone concentrations in apparent C(SS) on day 4. Secondary outcomes were exposure to opioids during the first 3 days, interindividual variation of opioid concentrations, and correlation between methadone concentrations and pain intensity (PI) day 3. Thirty-five patients received methadone (16 in the SAG group, 19 in the 3DS group). The median preswitch morphine equivalent doses were 620 (range 350-2000) mg/day in the SAG group and 800 (range 90-3600) mg/day in the 3DS group (p = 0.43);42% reached C(SS) for methadone in the SAG group on day 4 compared with 22% in the 3DS group (p = 0.42). The SAG group was significantly less exposed to morphine/M6G/oxycodone and significantly more exposed to methadone in the first 3 days. Methadone showed a low correlation with PI. More patients dropped out after intervention in the SAG group than in the 3DS group (38% vs. 5%; p = 0.032). One SAG patient suffered from respiratory depression on day 5. The SAG group was initially more exposed to methadone and less to the replaced opioids but without observed clinical benefit and with a higher dropout rate. Patients switched to methadone should be followed closely for the first 5 days, regardless of switching strategy.

  1. Differential activation of the μ-opioid receptor by oxycodone and morphine in pain-related brain regions in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Minami, Kazuhisa; Kanbara, Tomoe; Tomii, Takako; Nishiyori, Atsushi; Narita, Minoru; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Kato, Akira

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bone cancer pain is chronic and often difficult to control with opioids. However, recent studies have shown that several opioids have distinct analgesic profiles in chronic pain. Experimental Approach To clarify the mechanisms underlying these distinct analgesic profiles, functional changes in the μ-opioid receptor were examined using a mouse femur bone cancer (FBC) model. Key Results In the FBC model, the Bmax of [3H]-DAMGO binding was reduced by 15–45% in the periaqueductal grey matter (PAG), region ventral to the PAG (vPAG), mediodorsal thalamus (mTH), ventral thalamus and spinal cord. Oxycodone (10−8–10−5 M) and morphine (10−8–10−5 M) activated [35S]-GTPγS binding, but the activation was significantly attenuated in the PAG, vPAG, mTH and spinal cord in the FBC model. Interestingly, the attenuation of oxycodone-induced [35S]-GTPγS binding was quite limited (9–26%) in comparison with that of morphine (46–65%) in the PAG, vPAG and mTH, but not in the spinal cord. Furthermore, i.c.v. oxycodone at doses of 0.02–1.0 μg per mouse clearly inhibited pain-related behaviours, such as guarding, limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour in the FBC model mice, while i.c.v. morphine (0.05–2.0 μg per mouse) had only partial or little analgesic effect on limb-use abnormalities and allodynia-like behaviour. Conclusion and Implications These results show that μ-opioid receptor functions are attenuated in several pain-related regions in bone cancer in an agonist-dependent manner, and suggest that modification of the μ-opioid receptor is responsible for the distinct analgesic effect of oxycodone and morphine. PMID:22889192

  2. Impact of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone or codeine on patient consciousness, appetite and thirst when used to treat cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2014-05-29

    There is increasing focus on providing high quality care for people at the end of life, irrespective of disease or cause, and in all settings. In the last ten years the use of care pathways to aid those treating patients at the end of life has become common worldwide. The use of the Liverpool Care Pathway in the UK has been criticised. In England the LCP was the subject of an independent review, commissioned by a Health Minister. The Neuberger Review acknowledged that the LCP was based on the sound ethical principles that provide the basis of good quality care for patients and families when implemented properly. It also found that the LCP often was not implemented properly, and had instead become a barrier to good care; it made over 40 recommendations, including education and training, research and development, access to specialist palliative care services, and the need to ensure care and compassion for all dying patients. In July 2013, the Department of Health released a statement that stated the use of the LCP should be "phased out over the next 6-12 months and replaced with an individual approach to end of life care for each patient".The impact of opioids was a particular concern because of their potential influence on consciousness, appetite and thirst in people near the end of life. There was concern that impaired patient consciousness may lead to an earlier death, and that effects of opioids on appetite and thirst may result in unnecessary suffering. This rapid review, commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research, used standard Cochrane methodology to examine adverse effects of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, and codeine in cancer pain studies as a close approximation to possible effects in the dying patient. To determine the impact of opioid treatment on patient consciousness, appetite and thirst in randomised controlled trials of morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone or codeine for treating cancer pain. We assessed adverse event data reported in

  3. Methadone, Morphine, or Oxycodone in Treating Pain in Patients With Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-11-09

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Pain; Precancerous Condition; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  4. Opioid addicts at admission vs. slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment participants.

    PubMed

    Giacomuzzi, S; Kemmler, G; Ertl, M; Riemer, Y

    2006-01-01

    With use of a randomized study design, quality of life (QOL) and physical symptoms of opioid addicts at admission were compared with slow-release oral morphine, methadone, and sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program participants after 6 months of treatment. The study was conducted from February to July 2004 in the outpatient drug user treatment center at University Department of Psychiatry at Innsbruck, providing maintenance treatment programs and detoxification in Tyrol, Austria. One hundred twenty opioid users seeking treatment were compared with 120 opioid-dependent patients retained for 6 months on a slow-release oral morphine, methadone, or sublingual buprenorphine maintenance program. The German version ("Berlin Quality of Life Profile") of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile was used, and illicit opioid use was determined by urinalysis. Physical symptoms were measured by using the Opioid Withdrawal Scale. Urinalyses revealed a significantly lower consumption of cocaine and opioids in all three substitution groups than in patients at admission (p < 0.001 and p < or = 0.004, respectively). Both the buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission for stomach cramps (p < or = 0.002), muscular tension (p < or = 0.027), general pain (p < or = 0.001), feelings of coldness (p < or = 0.000), heart pounding (p < or = 0.008), runny eyes (p < or = 0.047), and aggressions (p < or = 0.009). Patients who received slow-release oral morphine treatment generally showed the least favorable QOL scores compared with patients at admission or sublingual buprenorphine and methadone clients. Patients in the sublingual buprenorphine or methadone program showed nearly the same QOL scores. The buprenorphine and the methadone maintenance group showed significantly more favorable values than opioid clients at admission regarding leisure time (p < or = 0.019), finances (p < or = 0.014), mental health (p

  5. Randomized controlled study transitioning opioid-dependent pregnant women from short-acting morphine to buprenorphine or methadone.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendree E; Johnson, Rolley E; Jasinski, Donald R; Milio, Lorraine

    2005-04-04

    This study compared the safety and withdrawal discomfort associated with transitioning pregnant opioid-dependent women from short-acting morphine onto buprenorphine or methadone under well-controlled double-blind conditions. Participants (n=18) were patients in a comprehensive treatment setting and were part of a larger randomized controlled trial comparing the neonatal abstinence syndrome in mothers treated with individualized doses of sublingual buprenorphine or oral methadone. Methadone was first given to all patients within 24h of treatment admission. After written informed consent was signed (3-5 days post-admission), methadone was discontinued and Immediate Release Morphine (IRM) was initiated. The initial total daily dose of IRM was six times the last daily methadone dose. The daily dose of IRM was divided in four daily doses. Induction onto double-blind, double dummy (i.e., two medications were administered with only one being active) methadone or buprenorphine was accomplished over 3 days (i.e., induction). Withdrawal scores during the IRM and induction onto randomized medication were judged mild and not statistically different for both methadone (mean dose 53.5 mg) and buprenorphine (mean dose 10.9 mg). No significant differences between medication groups were observed when individual withdrawal items were examined. No observed differences in safety measures including fetal movement, maternal physiological parameters of body temperature, heart rate and blood pressure were observed between groups. Transitioning opioid-dependent pregnant women from IRM to methadone or buprenorphine during the second trimester of pregnancy can be conducted with similar comfort and safety.

  6. Perioperative dilemma: challenges of the management of a patient on mega doses of morphine and methadone.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Alan David; Alian, Aymen A; Vadivelu, Nalini; Chung, Keun Sam

    2014-01-01

    High doses of opioids are often needed in the management of cancer-related pain. A discussion of a patient's perioperative opioid management and mechanisms contributing to opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH) are presented. In the present case report, a patient on high doses of opioids, including morphine and methadone, with severe worsening back pain and a history of increasing opioid requirements for the last 2 months due to metastatic leiomyosarcoma to the femur, spine, and neck is described. Use of high dose opioids is associated with numerous challenges, including tolerance. The successful management of this patient was multimodal and included the use of potent analgesics, N-methyl-D-aspartatereceptor antagonists, and the α-2 agonist clonidine.

  7. Transferring methadone-stabilized pregnant patients to buprenorphine using an immediate release morphine transition: an open-label exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Suess, Patricia; Jasinski, Donald R; Johnson, Rolley E

    2006-01-01

    A transition from methadone to buprenorphine without intervening withdrawal symptoms is critical for advancing the treatment of opioid-dependent patients. Four pregnant inpatients were transferred from methadone (65-85 mg) to five days of immediate release morphine (IRM) and then to buprenorphine (12-28 mg). Withdrawal scores decreased during the five days of IRM and subsequently increased over the first three days on buprenorphine. The transitional use of IRM appears safe for both mother and fetus. Withdrawal symptoms appeared during buprenorphine induction; however, these data suggest that the intensity of withdrawal symptoms may be lessened by the dose and frequency of buprenorphine administration.

  8. A retrospective study of length of hospital stay in infants treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome with methadone versus oral morphine preparations.

    PubMed

    Lainwala, Shabnam; Brown, Elizabeth R; Weinschenk, Nancy P; Blackwell, Mary T; Hagadorn, James I

    2005-10-01

    Length of hospital stay (LOS) of infants treated for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) with methadone was compared to LOS of those treated with an oral morphine preparation (OMP, neonatal morphine solution, or deodorized tincture of opium). A retrospective review of medical records of infants treated for NAS due to in utero exposure to methadone and/or illicit drugs such as heroin or morphine was performed for birthweight, neonatal abstinence scores, infant and maternal illicit drug exposure history, maternal methadone dose (if any), and details of treatment. Length of stay was the primary outcome measure. Forty-six infants met the inclusion criteria. The median LOS of infants treated with methadone versus OMP was not significant (P > 0.05). Prolonged LOS was associated with larger pharmacological treatment doses required to control withdrawal symptoms, larger maternal methadone dose, and increased birthweight. After adjusting for these factors, exposure to opioids in utero, maternal nicotine use, hospital of treatment, severity of withdrawal symptoms, and foster care placement were not significantly associated with LOS in univariate or multivariate analyses. These results suggest that infants treated with OMP or methadone have similar LOS. Longer LOS is associated with both higher maternal methadone doses and higher opioid treatment dose requirements after birth. The potential effect of maternal methadone dose on neonatal LOS should be considered when treating expectant mothers on methadone maintenance therapy.

  9. Morphine and oxycodone, but not fentanyl, exhibit antinociceptive effects mediated by G-protein inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels in an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy rat model.

    PubMed

    Kanbara, Tomoe; Nakamura, Atsushi; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Kanemasa, Toshiyuki

    2014-09-19

    It has begun to be understood that μ-opioid receptor (MOR) produces ligand-biased agonism, which contributes to differential physiological functions of MOR agonists. We previously demonstrated that in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in rats, morphine and oxycodone exhibited antinociceptive effects while antinociception of fentanyl was partial, and such different efficacies might result from the different level of Gi/o protein activation. Based on our background, to reveal further mechanism, we focused on the role of Gi/o protein-related downstream signaling, the G-protein inwardly rectifying K(+)1 (GIRK1) channel. The GIRK1 channel blocker tertiapin-Q (30pmol) was intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) or intrathecally (i.t.) administered to rats with oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy. The antinociception of systemic morphine (3mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)) was suppressed only by pretreatment of i.t. tertiapin-Q, while supraspinal tertiapin-Q suppressed only the antinociception of systemic oxycodone (0.56mg/kg, s.c.). Partial antinocicpetion of fentanyl (0.017mg/kg, s.c.) was neither affected by i.c.v nor i.t. tertiapin-Q. These results demonstrated that GIRK1 channels differentially contribute to antinociceptive effects of MOR agonists, and that action site of GIRK1 channels is also different between morphine and oxycodone in oxaliplatin model. This study suggests the possibility that GIRK1 channels have a crucial role for antinociception of MOR agonists in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy.

  10. A Phase 3, Randomized, Double-Blind Comparison of Analgesic Efficacy and Tolerability of Q8003 vs Oxycodone or Morphine for Moderate-to-Severe Postoperative Pain Following Bunionectomy Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Patricia; Riff, Dennis; Kelen, Robin; Stern, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Objective Compare the efficacy and tolerability of the dual-opioid, Q8003® (morphine/oxycodone combination) 12 mg/8 mg to morphine 12 mg or oxycodone 8 mg in subjects following bunionectomy surgery. Design This was a randomized, double-blind study. Setting Hospitalized patients. Patients Healthy men or women aged ≥18 years with moderate or severe pain (score ≥2 on a 4-point Likert scale) and ≥4 on the 11-point numerical pain rating scale following surgery. Interventions Study medication was initiated after surgery and was given for 48 hours. Outcomes The primary efficacy variable was mean sum of the pain intensity difference (SPID) scores from the postsurgical baseline. Results Five hundred twenty-two subjects were randomized; 31 (5.9%) discontinued, including 19 (3.6%) for adverse events. The mean total morphine equivalent dose (MED) was 182.7 mg from Q8003 12 mg/8 mg, 92.4 mg for morphine 12 mg, and 92.1 mg for oxycodone 8 mg. SPID from baseline over 24 hours and SPID from baseline over 48 hours were significantly (P < 0.02) higher for Q8003 12 mg/8 mg vs morphine 12 mg or oxycodone 8 mg. Significantly (P < 0.015) fewer subjects in the Q8003 group required ibuprofen rescue medication, used lower doses of rescue medication, and had a longer median time to first use of rescue medication. Oxygen desaturation <90% occurred in 5.3% with Q8003, 2.8% with morphine 12 mg, and 2.3% with oxycodone 8 mg, and the cumulative median dose at first desaturation was twofold greater with Q8003. Conclusion Q8003 provided superior efficacy to its individual components at twice the MED with only a modest increase in the incidence of adverse events. PMID:23802706

  11. Methadone but not morphine inhibits lubiprostone-stimulated Cl- currents in T84 intestinal cells and recombinant human ClC-2, but not CFTR Cl- currents.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Tewari, Kirti; Malinowska, Danuta H

    2013-05-01

    In clinical trials, methadone, but not morphine, appeared to prevent beneficial effects of lubiprostone, a ClC-2 Cl(-) channel activator, on opioid-induced constipation. Effects of methadone and morphine on lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents were measured by short circuit current (Isc) across T84 cells. Whole cell patch clamp of human ClC-2 (hClC-2) stably expressed in HEK293 cells and in a high expression cell line (HEK293EBNA) as well as human CFTR (hCFTR) stably expressed in HEK293 cells was used to study methadone and morphine effects on recombinant hClC-2 and hCFTR Cl(-) currents. Methadone but not morphine inhibited lubiprostone-stimulated Isc in T84 cells with half-maximal inhibition at 100 nM. Naloxone did not affect lubiprostone stimulation or methadone inhibition of Isc. Lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents in hClC-2/HEK293 cells, but not forskolin/IBMX-stimulated Cl(-) currents in hCFTR/HEK293 cells, were inhibited by methadone, but not morphine. HEK293EBNA cells expressing hClC-2 showed time-dependent, voltage-activated, CdCl2-inhibited Cl(-) currents in the absence (control) and the presence of lubiprostone. Methadone, but not morphine, inhibited control and lubiprostone-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents with half-maximal inhibition at 100 and 200-230 nM, respectively. Forskolin/IBMX-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents were also inhibited by methadone. Myristoylated protein kinase inhibitor (a specific PKA inhibitor) inhibited forskolin/IBMX- but not lubiprostone-stimulated hClC-2 Cl(-) currents. Methadone caused greater inhibition of lubiprostone-stimulated currents added before patching (66.1 %) compared with after patching (28.7 %). Methadone caused inhibition of lubiprostone-stimulated Cl(-) currents in T84 cells and control; lubiprostone- and forskolin/IBMX-stimulated recombinant hClC-2 Cl(-) currents may be the basis for reduced efficacy of lubiprostone in methadone-treated patients.

  12. Oxycodone is associated with dose-dependent QTc prolongation in patients and low-affinity inhibiting of hERG activity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Fanoe, Søren; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Sjøgren, Per; Korsgaard, Mads P G; Grunnet, Morten

    2009-01-01

    AIMS During recent years some opioids have been associated with prolonged QT interval and torsade de pointes (TdP). In vitro patch clamp testing has shown that most opioids can block human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) channels that are known to underlie cardiac repolarizing IKr current. This indicates that QT prolongation and TdP could be a more general problem associated with the use of these drugs. The aims of this study were to evaluate the association between different opioids and the QTc among patients and measure hERG activity under influence by opioids in vitro. METHODS One hundred chronic nonmalignant pain patients treated with methadone, oxycodone, morphine or tramadol were recruited in a cross-sectional study. The QTc was estimated from a 12-lead ECG. To examine hERG activity in the presence of oxycodone, electrophysiological testing was conducted using Xenopus laevis oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing hERG channels. RESULTS There were no differences in gender distribution or age between the treatment groups. The known association between methadone dose and QTc was confirmed (R2 = 0.09; P = 0.02). Higher oxycodone dose was also associated with longer QTc (R2 = 0.21; P = 0.02). A 100 mg higher oxycodone dose was associated with a 10 ms1/2 (95% CI 2–19) longer QTc. Neither morphine nor tramadol dose was associated with the QTc. Electrophysiological testing revealed low-affinity inhibition of the potassium current through hERG channels expressed in HEK293 cells (IC50 = 171 µM oxycodone). CONCLUSIONS Among patients treated with methadone or oxycodone, higher doses were associated with longer QTc. Oxycodone is capable of inhibiting hERG channels in vitro. PMID:19159406

  13. Postoperative pain control in cats: clinical trials with pre-emptive lidocaine epidural co-administered with morphine or methadone.

    PubMed

    DeRossi, Rafael; Hermeto, Larissa Correa; Jardim, Paulo Henrique Affonseca; de Andrade Bicudo, Natalia; de Assis, Klebs Tavares

    2016-11-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of epidural lidocaine in combination with either methadone or morphine for postoperative analgesia in cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Methods Under general anesthesia, 24 cats that underwent ovariohysterectomy were randomly allocated into three treatment groups of eight each. Treatment 1 included 2% lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg); treatment 2 included lidocaine and methadone (4.0 mg/kg and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively); and treatment 3 included lidocaine and morphine (4.0 mg/kg and 0.1 mg/kg, respectively). All drugs were injected in a total volume of 0.25 ml/kg via the lumbosacral route in all cats. During the anesthetic and surgical periods, the physiologic variables (respiratory and heart rate, arterial blood pressure and rectal temperature) were measured at intervals of time zero, 10 mins, 20 mins, 30 mins, 60 mins and 120 mins. After cats had recovered from anesthesia, a multidimensional composite pain scale was used to assess postoperative analgesia 2, 4, 8, 12, 18 and 24 h after epidural. Results The time to first rescue analgesic was significantly ( P <0.05) prolonged in cats that received both lidocaine and methadone or lidocaine and morphine treatments compared with those that received lidocaine treatment alone. All cats that received lidocaine treatment alone required rescue analgesic within 2 h of epidural injections. All treatments produced significant cardiovascular and respiratory changes but they were within an acceptable range for healthy animals during the surgical period. Conclusions and relevance The two combinations administered via epidural allowed ovariohysterectomy with sufficient analgesia in cats, and both induced prolonged postoperative analgesia.

  14. Comparison of the Effects of Ketamine and Morphine on the Performance of Representative Military Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    notable area worth future development is the pharmacodynamic difference of the two enantiomers , S(+) and R(-). S(+) ketamine is noted to bear four...2005). With the potency of the S(+) enantiomer , lower doses could be employed for analgesia with fewer side effects. Finally, the inclusion of...aldesleukin • hydrocodone/ ibuprofen • ibuprofen /oxycodone • inhaled anesthetics • levocetirizine • memantine • methadone • mitotane • morphine

  15. In vitro inhibition of methadone and oxycodone cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism: reversible inhibition by H2-receptor agonists and proton-pump inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Moody, David E; Liu, Fenyun; Fang, Wenfang B

    2013-10-01

    In vitro inhibition of oxycodone metabolism to noroxycodone and oxymorphone and R- and S-methadone metabolism to R- and S-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was measured for four H2-receptor antagonists and five proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) using human liver microsomes (HLM) and cDNA-expressed human cytochrome P450s (rCYPs). Inhibitors were first incubated with HLM at three concentrations with and without preincubation of inhibitor, enzyme source and reducing equivalents to also screen for time-dependent inhibition (TDI). Cimetidine and famotidine (10-1,000 µM) inhibited all the four pathways >50%. Nizatidine and ranitidine did not. All the five PPIs (1-200 µM) inhibited one or more pathways >50%. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) were then determined using rCYPs. Cimetidine and famotidine both inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of noroxycodone and CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone, and famotidine inhibited CYP3A4-mediated formation of R- and S-EDDP, but IC50s were so high that only >10× therapeutic concentrations may have potential for reversible in vivo inhibition. The PPIs were more potent inhibitors; many have the potential for reversible in vivo inhibition at therapeutic concentrations. Omeprazole, esomeprazole and pantoprazole had greater effects on CYP3A4-mediated reactions, whereas lansoprazole was selective for CYP2D6-mediated formation of oxymorphone. Preincubation enhanced cimetidine inhibition of noroxycodone formation and rabeprazole inhibition of all pathways. Future studies will explore irreversible TDI.

  16. Comparison of medetomidine-morphine and medetomidine-methadone for sedation, isoflurane requirement and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing laparoscopy.

    PubMed

    Raillard, Mathieu; Michaut-Castrillo, Julien; Spreux, Damien; Gauthier, Olivier; Touzot-Jourde, Gwenola; Holopherne-Doran, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of intravenous (IV) medetomidine-morphine and medetomidine-methadone on preoperative sedation, isoflurane requirements and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Randomized, crossover trial. Twelve adult Beagle dogs weighing 15.1 ± 4.1 kg. Dogs were administered medetomidine (2.5 μg kg(-1)) IV 5 minutes before either methadone (MET) or morphine (MOR) (0.3 mg kg(-1)) IV. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol, maintained with isoflurane in oxygen, and depth was clinically assessed and adjusted by an anaesthetist blinded to the treatment. Animals underwent laparoscopic abdominal biopsies. Sedation and nausea scores, pulse rate (PR), respiratory rate (fR), noninvasive systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), rectal temperature (RT) and pain scores were recorded before drug administration, 5 minutes after medetomidine injection and 10 minutes after opioid administration. Propofol dose, PR, fR, SAP, oesophageal temperature (TOES), end-tidal carbon dioxide and end-tidal isoflurane concentration (Fe'Iso) were recorded intraoperatively. Pain scores, PR, fR, SAP and RT were recorded 10 minutes after extubation, every hour for 6 hours, then at 8, 18 and 24 hours. The experiment was repeated with the other drug 1 month later. Nine dogs completed the study. After opioid administration and intraoperatively, PR, but not SAP, was significantly lower in MET. Fe'Iso was significantly lower in MET. Temperature decreased in both treatments. Pain scores were significantly higher in MOR at 3 hours after extubation, but not at other time points. Two dogs required rescue analgesia; one with both treatments and one in MOR. At the dose used, sedation produced by both drugs when combined with medetomidine was equivalent, while volatile anaesthetic requirements and PR perioperatively were lower with methadone. Postoperative analgesia was deemed to be adequate for laparoscopy with either protocol, although methadone provided better analgesia 3

  17. Toward evidence-based prescribing at end of life: a comparative analysis of sustained-release morphine, oxycodone, and transdermal fentanyl, with pain, constipation, and caregiver interaction outcomes in hospice patients.

    PubMed

    Weschules, Douglas J; Bain, Kevin T; Reifsnyder, Joanne; McMath, Jill A; Kupperman, David E; Gallagher, Rollin M; Hauck, Walter W; Knowlton, Calvin H

    2006-01-01

    The primary goal of this investigation was to examine selected outcomes in hospice patients who are prescribed one of three sustained-release opioid preparations. The outcomes examined include: pain score, constipation severity, and ability of the patient to communicate with caregivers. This study included 12,000 terminally ill patients consecutively admitted to hospices and receiving pharmaceutical care services between the period of July 1 and December 31, 2002. We retrospectively examined prescribing patterns of sustained-release morphine, oxycodone, and transdermal fentanyl. We compared individual opioids on the aforementioned outcome markers, as well as patient gender, terminal diagnosis, and median length of stay. Patients prescribed a sustained-release opioid had similar average ratings of pain and constipation severity, regardless of the agent chosen. Patients prescribed transdermal fentanyl were reported to have more difficulty communicating with friends and family when compared with patients prescribed either morphine or oxycodone. On average, patients prescribed transdermal fentanyl had a shorter length of stay on hospice as compared with those receiving morphine or oxycodone. There was no difference in observed pain or constipation severity among patients prescribed sustained-release opioid preparations. Patients receiving fentanyl were likely to have been prescribed the medication due to advanced illness and associated dysphagia. Diminished ability to communicate with caregivers and a shorter hospice course would be consistent with this profile. Further investigation is warranted to examine the correlation between a patient's ability to interact with caregivers and pain control achieved.

  18. Normal-release and controlled-release oxycodone: pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and controversy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Varga, James; Dickerson, Duke; Walsh, Declan; LeGrand, Susan B; Lagman, Ruth

    2003-02-01

    Oxycodone has become one of the most popular opioids in the United States. It is superior to morphine in oral absorption and bioavailability, and similar in terms of protein binding and lipophilicity. Gender more than age influences oxycodone elimination. Unlike morphine, oxycodone is metabolized by the cytochrome isoenzyme CYP2D6, which is severely impaired by liver dysfunction. Controlled-release (CR) oxycodone has become one of the most frequently utilized sustained-release opioids in the United States. Both its analgesic benefits and its side effects are similar to those of CR morphine. CR oxycodone is similar to morphine and other opioids in its abuse potential. Deaths attributable to oxycodone are usually associated with polysubstance abuse in which oxycodone is combined with psychostimulants, other opioids, benzodiazepines or alcohol. Oxycodone's kappa receptor binding has little role in abuse or addiction. The cost of CR oxycodone is prohibitive for most American hospices.

  19. Maintenance treatment for opioid dependence with slow-release oral morphine: a randomized cross-over, non-inferiority study versus methadone

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Thilo; Haasen, Christian; Verthein, Uwe; Walcher, Stephan; Schuler, Christoph; Backmund, Markus; Ruckes, Christian; Reimer, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the efficacy of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) and methadone as maintenance medication for opioid dependence in patients previously treated with methadone. Design Prospective, multiple-dose, open label, randomized, non-inferiority, cross-over study over two 11-week periods. Methadone treatment was switched to SROM with flexible dosing and vice versa according to period and sequence of treatment. Setting Fourteen out-patient addiction treatment centres in Switzerland and Germany. Participants Adults with opioid dependence in methadone maintenance programmes (dose ≥50 mg/day) for ≥26 weeks. Measurements The efficacy end-point was the proportion of heroin-positive urine samples per patient and period of treatment. Each week, two urine samples were collected, randomly selected and analysed for 6-monoacetyl-morphine and 6-acetylcodeine. Non-inferiority was concluded if the two-sided 95% confidence interval (CI) in the difference of proportions of positive urine samples was below the predefined boundary of 10%. Findings One hundred and fifty-seven patients fulfilled criteria to form the per protocol population. The proportion of heroin-positive urine samples under SROM treatment (0.20) was non-inferior to the proportion under methadone treatment (0.15) (least-squares mean difference 0.05; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.08; P > 0.01). The 95% CI fell within the 10% non-inferiority margin, confirming the non-inferiority of SROM to methadone. A dose-dependent effect was shown for SROM (i.e. decreasing proportions of heroin-positive urine samples with increasing SROM doses). Retention in treatment showed no significant differences between treatments (period 1/period 2: SROM: 88.7%/82.1%, methadone: 91.1%/88.0%; period 1: P = 0.50, period 2: P = 0.19). Overall, safety outcomes were similar between the two groups. Conclusions Slow-release oral morphine appears to be at least as effective as methadone in treating people with opioid use disorder. PMID:24304412

  20. The Effect of Acepromazine Alone or in Combination with Methadone, Morphine, or Tramadol on Sedation and Selected Cardiopulmonary Variables in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Lilian Toshiko; Villela, Isadora Oliveira Junqueira; Carvalho, Leonardo Lamarca; Borges, Luisa Pucci Bueno; Silva, Marcos Augusto Machado; Mattos-Junior, Ewaldo

    2017-01-01

    The sedative and selected cardiopulmonary effects of acepromazine alone or in combination with methadone, morphine, or tramadol were compared in sheep. Six ewes were randomly assigned to treatments: A (0.05 mg/kg acepromazine), AM (A plus 0.5 mg/kg methadone), AMO (A plus 0.5 mg/kg morphine), and AT (A plus 5 mg/kg tramadol). Parameters were assessed before sedative drug administration (baseline) and every 15 minutes thereafter, for two hours. Treatments A and AM were associated with increases in sedation score for 60 minutes and treatments AMO and AT for 30 minutes; however, there were no significant differences between treatments. There was a decrease in mean arterial pressure compared to baseline values in treatment A at 15, 45, 60, and 90 minutes, in treatment AM at 15 minutes, and in treatment AT from 45 to 120 minutes. Arterial blood carbon dioxide pressure increased at all time points in all treatments. Arterial oxygen pressure decreased in treatment AMO at 15, 30, and 120 minutes and in treatment AT at 15-45, 105, and 120 minutes, compared to baseline. Acepromazine alone causes a level of sedation similar to that observed when it is coadministered with opioids methadone, morphine, and tramadol. These combinations did not cause clinical cardiopulmonary changes.

  1. The Effect of Acepromazine Alone or in Combination with Methadone, Morphine, or Tramadol on Sedation and Selected Cardiopulmonary Variables in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Lilian Toshiko; Villela, Isadora Oliveira Junqueira; Carvalho, Leonardo Lamarca; Borges, Luisa Pucci Bueno; Silva, Marcos Augusto Machado

    2017-01-01

    The sedative and selected cardiopulmonary effects of acepromazine alone or in combination with methadone, morphine, or tramadol were compared in sheep. Six ewes were randomly assigned to treatments: A (0.05 mg/kg acepromazine), AM (A plus 0.5 mg/kg methadone), AMO (A plus 0.5 mg/kg morphine), and AT (A plus 5 mg/kg tramadol). Parameters were assessed before sedative drug administration (baseline) and every 15 minutes thereafter, for two hours. Treatments A and AM were associated with increases in sedation score for 60 minutes and treatments AMO and AT for 30 minutes; however, there were no significant differences between treatments. There was a decrease in mean arterial pressure compared to baseline values in treatment A at 15, 45, 60, and 90 minutes, in treatment AM at 15 minutes, and in treatment AT from 45 to 120 minutes. Arterial blood carbon dioxide pressure increased at all time points in all treatments. Arterial oxygen pressure decreased in treatment AMO at 15, 30, and 120 minutes and in treatment AT at 15–45, 105, and 120 minutes, compared to baseline. Acepromazine alone causes a level of sedation similar to that observed when it is coadministered with opioids methadone, morphine, and tramadol. These combinations did not cause clinical cardiopulmonary changes. PMID:28480092

  2. The effect of chronic morphine or methadone exposure and withdrawal on clock gene expression in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus and AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Pačesová, D; Novotný, J; Bendová, Z

    2016-07-18

    The circadian rhythms of many behavioral and physiological functions are regulated by the major circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Long-term opiate addiction and drug withdrawal may affect circadian rhythmicity of various hormones or the sleep/activity pattern of many experimental subjects; however, limited research has been done on the long-term effects of sustained opiate administration on the intrinsic rhythmicity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and pineal gland. Here we compared the effects of repeated daily treatment of rats with morphine or methadone and subsequent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal on the expression of the Per1, Per2, and Avp mRNAs in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and on arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in the pineal gland. We revealed that 10-day administration and withdrawal of both these drugs failed to affect clock genes and Avp expression in the SCN. Our results indicate that opioid-induced changes in behavioral and physiological rhythms originate in brain structures downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus regulatory output pathway. Furthermore, we observed that acute withdrawal from methadone markedly extended the period of high night AA-NAT activity in the pineal gland. This suggests that withdrawal from methadone, a widely used drug for the treatment of opioid dependence, may have stronger impact on melatonin synthesis than withdrawal from morphine.

  3. Oxycodone controlled release in cancer pain management.

    PubMed

    Biancofiore, Giuseppe

    2006-09-01

    Oral opioids are the treatment of choice for chronic cancer pain. Morphine is the strong opioid of choice for the treatment of moderate to severe cancer pain according to guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). This recommendation by the WHO was derived from availability, familiarity to clinicians, established effectiveness, simplicity of administration, and relative inexpensive cost. It was not based on proven therapeutic superiority over other options. Patients who experience inadequate pain relief or intolerable side effects with one opioid may often be successfully treated with another agent or with the same agent administered by a different route. Opioid rotation, or switching to an alternative opioid, helps some patients achieve better pain control with fewer associated adverse effects. Oxycodone is a mu-opioid receptor specific ligand, with clear agonist properties. It is an active potent opioid, which is in part a kappa-receptor agonist. Like morphine and other pure agonists, there is no known ceiling to the analgesic effects of oxycodone. The active metabolites of oxycodone (eg, oxymorphone) could be important in oxycodone-mediated analgesia. The main pharmacokinetic difference between oxycodone and morphine is in oral bioavailability. The bioavailability of oxycodone is >60% and the bioavailability of morphine is 20%. Controlled-release oxycodone is absorbed in a bi-exponential fashion. There is a rapid phase with a mean half-life of 37 min, accounting for 38% of the dose, and a slow phase with a half-life of 6.2 h, which accounts for the residual 62%. Oxycodone elimination is impaired by renal failure because there are both an increased volume of distribution and reduced clearance. A lot of studies prove that the efficacy of controlled-release oxycodone in cancer-pain control is at least the same as morphine, immediate-release oxycodone and hydromorphone. Its toxicity profile seems better than that of morphine. There are actually several

  4. Decreased responsiveness to oxycodone: A case of a pharmacokinetic drug interaction?

    PubMed

    Pon, Doreen; Hwang, Joon; Lo, Teresa; Zyl, Carin Van

    2015-01-01

    Concurrent administration of oxycodone and phenytoin may cause, through induction of CYP3A4 enzymes, decreased analgesic effects of oxycodone. However, no descriptions of this interaction exist. A patient who was on oxycodone for chronic back pain was admitted to the hospital. Five days after initiating fosphenytoin, the patient experienced a dramatic escalation in his pain and lack of response to oxycodone breakthrough doses. Changing oxycodone to hydromorphone resulted in significantly improved analgesia. Concurrent use of fosphenytoin and oxycodone may increase the conversion of oxycodone to inactive metabolites, resulting in decreased analgesia. This may be avoided using hydromorphone, morphine, or oxymorphone.

  5. Development of sensitization to methamphetamine in offspring prenatally exposed to morphine, methadone and buprenorphine.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yao-Chang; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Ho, Ing-Kang

    2014-07-01

    Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. However, there is lack of information on the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to opioids on their offspring. Our previous study demonstrated that prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring showed a marked change in the cross-tolerance to morphine compared with other groups. In the current study, this animal model was used to study effects of methamphetamine (METH)-induced behavioral sensitization in the offspring at their adulthood. The results showed no differences in either basal or acute METH-induced locomotor activity in any of the groups of animals tested. When male offspring received METH injections of 2 mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 5 days, behavioral sensitization was induced, as determined by motor activity. Furthermore, the distance and rate of development (slope) of locomotor activity and conditioned place preference induced by METH were significantly increased in the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed animals compared with those in other groups. The dopamine D1 R in the nucleus accumbens of the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring had lower mRNA expression; but no significant changes in the μ-, κ-opioid, nociceptin, D2 R and D3 R receptors were noted. Furthermore, significant alterations were observed in the basal level of cAMP and the D1 R agonist enhanced adenylyl cyclase activity in the prenatally buprenorphine-exposed group. Overall, the study demonstrates that D1 R and its downregulated cAMP signals are involved in enhancing METH-induced behavioral sensitization in prenatally buprenorphine-exposed offspring. The study reveals that prenatal exposure to buprenorphine caused long-term effects on offspring and affected the dopaminergic system-related reward mechanism. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Oxycodone: a pharmacological and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez Gallego, A; González Barón, M; Espinosa Arranz, E

    2007-05-01

    Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid with an agonist activity on mu, kappa and delta receptors. Equivalence with regard to morphine is 1:2. Its effect commences one hour after administration and lasts for 12 h in the controlled-release formulation. Plasma halflife is 3-5 h (half that of morphine) and stable plasma levels are reached within 24 h (2-7 days for morphine). Oral bioavailability ranges from 60 to 87%, and plasma protein binding is 45%. Most of the drug is metabolised in the liver, while the rest is excreted by the kidney along with its metabolites. The two main metabolites are oxymorphone--which is also a very potent analgesic--and noroxycodone, a weak analgesic. Oxycodone metabolism is more predictable than that of morphine, and therefore titration is easier. Oxycodone has the same mechanism of action as other opioids: binding to a receptor, inhibition of adenylyl-cyclase and hyperpolarisation of neurons, and decreased excitability. These mechanisms also play a part in the onset of dependence and tolerance. The clinical efficacy of oxycodone is similar to that of morphine, with a ratio of 1/1.5-2 for the treatment of cancer pain. Long-term administration may be associated with less toxicity in comparison with morphine. In the future, both opioids could be used simultaneously at low doses to reduce toxicity. It does not appear that there are any differences between immediate and slow-release oxycodone, except their half-life is 3-4 h, and 12 h, respectively. In Spain, controlled-release oxycodone (OxyContin) is marketed as 10-, 20-, 40- or 80-mg tablets for b.i.d. administration. Tablets must be taken whole and must not be broken, chewed or crushed. There is no food interference. The initial dose is 10 mg b.i.d. for new treatments and no dose reduction is needed in the elderly or in cases of moderate hepatic or renal failure. Immediate-release oxycodone (OxyNorm) is also available in capsules and oral solution. Side effects are those common to opioids

  7. Comparison of the antinociceptive response to morphine and morphine-like compounds in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Elizabeth M; Traynor, John R

    2006-03-01

    Male rats are more sensitive to the antinociceptive effects of morphine than female rats. This difference is seen across several rat strains using a variety of nociceptive stimuli. However, the literature in regard to sex differences in antinociceptive responses to mu-opioids other than morphine is less consistent. The present study was designed to examine whether there is a structure-activity rationale that determines which mu-opioids will show a differential antinociceptive response between male and female rats. A series of morphinans closely related in structure to morphine, namely, codeine, heroin, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, were examined for their antinociceptive activity in male and female Sprague-Dawley rats and compared with the structurally unrelated mu-opioid agonists methadone and fentanyl. Antinociception was measured by the warm-water tail-withdrawal assay. The results show that morphine is more potent in males compared with females > hydromorphone = hydrocodone = oxymorphone, but there was no observable sex difference in the antinociceptive potency of codeine, heroin, oxycodone, methadone, or fentanyl. The potency to stimulate guanosine 5'-O-(3-[35 S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding and binding affinity of the various morphinans was compared in rat glioma C6 cells expressing the rat mu-opioid receptor; relative efficacy was also compared by stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS binding in slices of rat brain thalamus. The presence of a sex difference in antinociceptive responsiveness was not related to drug potency, efficacy, or affinity. Consequently, it is likely that differential metabolism of the opioid, possibly by glucuronidation, determines the presence or absence of a sex difference.

  8. Oral Human Abuse Potential of Oxycodone DETERx® (Xtampza® ER)

    PubMed Central

    Kopecky, Ernest A.; Levy‐Cooperman, Naama; O'Connor, Melinda; M. Sellers, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxycodone DETERx® (Collegium Pharmaceutical Inc, Canton, Massachusetts) is an extended‐release, microsphere‐in‐capsule, abuse‐deterrent formulation designed to retain its extended‐release properties after tampering (eg, chewing/crushing). This randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, triple‐dummy study evaluated the oral abuse potential of intact and chewed oxycodone DETERx capsules compared with crushed immediate‐release oxycodone. Subjects with a history of recreational opioid use who were nondependent/nontolerant to opioids were enrolled. Treatments included intact oxycodone DETERx (high‐fat, high‐calorie meal and fasted), chewed oxycodone DETERx (high‐fat, high‐calorie meal and fasted), crushed immediate‐release oxycodone (fasted), and placebo (high‐fat, high‐calorie meal). Plasma samples were collected to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The primary endpoint was drug liking at the moment; other endpoints included drug effects questionnaire scores, Addiction Research Center Inventory/Morphine Benzedrine Group score, pupillometry measurements, and safety. Thirty‐eight subjects completed the study. Chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx were bioequivalent, unlike crushed immediate‐release oxycodone, which yielded higher peak oxycodone plasma concentrations compared with all methods of oxycodone DETERx administration. The mean maximum (peak) effect (Emax) for drug liking was significantly lower for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx than for crushed immediate‐release oxycodone (P < .01). The time to Emax was significantly longer for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx than for crushed immediate‐release oxycodone (P < .0001). Scores for feeling high and Addiction Research Center Inventory/Morphine Benzedrine Group scores demonstrated lower abuse potential for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx compared with crushed immediate‐release oxycodone. Study treatments were well tolerated; no subjects experienced

  9. Oral Human Abuse Potential of Oxycodone DETERx(®) (Xtampza(®) ER).

    PubMed

    Kopecky, Ernest A; Fleming, Alison B; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; O'Connor, Melinda; M Sellers, Edward

    2017-04-01

    Oxycodone DETERx(®) (Collegium Pharmaceutical Inc, Canton, Massachusetts) is an extended-release, microsphere-in-capsule, abuse-deterrent formulation designed to retain its extended-release properties after tampering (eg, chewing/crushing). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, triple-dummy study evaluated the oral abuse potential of intact and chewed oxycodone DETERx capsules compared with crushed immediate-release oxycodone. Subjects with a history of recreational opioid use who were nondependent/nontolerant to opioids were enrolled. Treatments included intact oxycodone DETERx (high-fat, high-calorie meal and fasted), chewed oxycodone DETERx (high-fat, high-calorie meal and fasted), crushed immediate-release oxycodone (fasted), and placebo (high-fat, high-calorie meal). Plasma samples were collected to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The primary endpoint was drug liking at the moment; other endpoints included drug effects questionnaire scores, Addiction Research Center Inventory/Morphine Benzedrine Group score, pupillometry measurements, and safety. Thirty-eight subjects completed the study. Chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx were bioequivalent, unlike crushed immediate-release oxycodone, which yielded higher peak oxycodone plasma concentrations compared with all methods of oxycodone DETERx administration. The mean maximum (peak) effect (Emax ) for drug liking was significantly lower for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx than for crushed immediate-release oxycodone (P < .01). The time to Emax was significantly longer for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx than for crushed immediate-release oxycodone (P < .0001). Scores for feeling high and Addiction Research Center Inventory/Morphine Benzedrine Group scores demonstrated lower abuse potential for chewed and intact oxycodone DETERx compared with crushed immediate-release oxycodone. Study treatments were well tolerated; no subjects experienced serious adverse events. These results demonstrate

  10. Oxycodone. Pharmacological profile and clinical data in chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Coluzzi, F; Mattia, C

    2005-01-01

    Opioids are widely used as effective analgesic therapy for cancer pain. Despite years of controversy, their use has been also accepted in chronic non-cancer pain. Oxycodone alone and in combination has been used for over 80 years in the treatment of a variety of pain syndromes. As single agent, the controlled release (CR) oxycodone's market in the USA grew from 10% in 1996 to 53% in 2000 and it has become a leading opioid in the United States. Recent data showed that the fixed-combination oxycodone/acetaminophen (5 mg/325 mg) is the most often prescribed opioid across all the different chronic pain diagnoses. Compared with morphine, oxycodone has a higher oral bioavailability and is about twice as potent. Pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic data support oxycodone as a pharmacologically active opiod that does not require conversion to oxymoprhone for pharmacological activity. Seven studies addressed the safety and efficacy of oxycodone for the treatment of non-cancer pain (low back pain, osteoarthritis pain, and painful diabetic neuropathy). Both immediate release (IR) and CR oxycodone are equally effective and safe. Along these trials, mean daily dosage of oxycodone was approximately 40 mg, with a low incidence of intolerable typical opiate side effects. In cancer pain, oxycodone can be considered a valid alternative to oral morphine to be used for opioid rotation. No difference in analgesic efficacy between CR oxycodone and CR morphine was found. Controlled-release preparations, with a long duration of action, are attractive because they offer the advantage of longer dosing intervals and sustained analgesic effect.

  11. The addiction potential of oxycodone (Percodan).

    PubMed

    BLOOMQUIST, E R

    1963-08-01

    Dihydrohydroxycodeinone (oxycodone, Percodan(R)) is a useful analgesic. Its addiction potential, however, is comparable to that of morphine. This fact should be considered when it is prescribed. Because of increasing numbers of addicts to this drug in the State of California, the California Medical Association Committee on Dangerous Drugs and the House of Delegates has recommended that oxycodone-containing drugs be returned to the triplicate prescription list as they were originally in 1949. This recommendation was incorporated in Senate Bill 385, which failed to pass the legislature.

  12. A double-blind, randomized, parallel group study to compare the efficacy, safety and tolerability of slow-release oral morphine versus methadone in opioid-dependent in-patients willing to undergo detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Madlung-Kratzer, Ekkehard; Spitzer, Berhard; Brosch, Renate; Dunkel, Dirk; Haring, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Aims Evaluation of the efficacy and safety of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) compared with methadone for detoxification from methadone and SROM maintenance treatment. Design Randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, comparative multi-centre study with parallel groups. Setting Three psychiatric hospitals in Austria specializing in in-patient detoxification. Participants Male and female opioid dependents (age > 18 years) willing to undergo detoxification from maintenance therapy in order to reach abstinence. Interventions Abstinence was reached from maintenance treatment by tapered dose reduction of either SROM or methadone over a period of 16 days. Measurements Efficacy analyses were based on the number of patients per treatment group completing the study, as well as on the control of signs and symptoms of withdrawal [measured using Short Opioid Withdrawal Scale (SOWS)] and suppression of opiate craving. In addition, self-reported somatic and psychic symptoms (measured using Symptom Checklist SCL-90-R) were monitored. Findings Of the 208 patients enrolled into the study, 202 were eligible for analysis (SROM: n = 102, methadone: n = 100). Completion rates were 51% in the SROM group and 49% in the methadone group [difference between groups: 2%; 95% confidence interval (CI): −12% to 16%]. The rate of discontinuation in the study was high mainly because of patients voluntarily withdrawing from treatment. No statistically significant differences between treatment groups were found in terms of signs and symptoms of opiate withdrawal, craving for opiates or self-reported symptoms. SROM and methadone were both well tolerated. Conclusions Detoxification from maintenance treatment with tapered dose reduction of SROM is non-inferior to methadone. PMID:19686525

  13. Characterizing the subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects of oral oxycodone in non-drug-abusing volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zacny, James P; Gutierrez, Sandra

    2003-11-01

    The subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects of a widely prescribed and abused prescription opioid, oxycodone, have not been studied in a population of non-drug-abusing people. To characterize the effects of oxycodone in non-drug-abusing volunteers. Eighteen volunteers participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind study in which they received, all p.o., placebo, 10 mg oxycodone, 20 mg oxycodone, 30 mg oxycodone, 40 mg morphine, and 2 mg lorazepam. Measures were assessed before and for 300 min after drug administration. End-of-session and 24-h post-session measures were taken to assess residual drug effects and overall subjects' assessments of the drug effects. Subjective effects of oxycodone were dose related, with the majority of statistically significant effects limited to the two higher doses tested. Oxycodone produced a profile of subjective effects that included both pleasant and unpleasant effects. Morphine in general produced effects similar in magnitude to those of 10 mg and 20 mg oxycodone. Peak liking and drug-wanting ratings were increased by all doses of oxycodone and by morphine, and trough ratings of liking (dislike) were lower in the 20-mg and 30-mg oxycodone conditions, relative to the placebo condition. Post-session ratings of overall liking and drug wanting were not statistically significant, either at the end of the session or 24 h later. Cognitive and psychomotor impairment were obtained with the higher doses of oxycodone, but to a much lesser degree than that of lorazepam. Miosis and exophoria were increased in a dose-related manner by oxycodone. Oxycodone produced effects similar to those of other mu opioid agonists. Although oxycodone produced abuse liability-related subjective effects, it also produced unpleasant effects, a phenomenon we have observed in other opioid studies in non-drug-abusing volunteers.

  14. Site-, Technique-, and Time-Related Aspects of the Postmortem Redistribution of Diazepam, Methadone, Morphine, and their Metabolites: Interest of Popliteal Vein Blood Sampling.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Eric; Schmidt, Carl; Dubois, Nathalie; Denooz, Raphael; Charlier, Corinne; Boxho, Philippe

    2017-01-20

    Sampling site, technique, and time influence postmortem drug concentrations. In 57 cases, we studied drug concentration differences as follows: subclavian vein-dissection/clamping versus blind stick, femoral vein-dissection/clamping versus blind stick, right cardiac chamber, and popliteal vein-dissection and clamping only. Cases were distributed in group #1 (all cases with both techniques), group #2 (dissection/clamping), and group #3 (blind stick). Sampled drugs were diazepam, methadone, morphine, and their metabolites. To assess PMR, mean concentrations and ratios were calculated for each group. Time-dependent variations of blood concentrations and ratios were also assessed. Results indicate that site, method, and time may influence postmortem distribution interpretation in different ways. Popliteal blood seems less subject to PMR. In conclusion, our study is the first to evaluate concurrently three main aspects of PMR and confirms that the popliteal vein may represent a site that is more resistant to the changes seen as a result of PMR. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  15. 77 FR 55500 - Controlled Substances: Final Adjusted Aggregate Production Quotas for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ..., methadone intermediate, methylphenidate, morphine (for conversion), morphine (for sale), noroxymorphone (for..., methylphenidate, morphine (for sale), oxycodone (for conversion), oxycodone (for sale), and sufentanil required.... Regarding amphetamine (for sale), codeine (for conversion), codeine (for sale), morphine (for...

  16. Perspectives on Intravenous Oxycodone for Control of Postoperative Pain.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Seow-Choen, Francis; Wexner, Steven D; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Raffa, Robert B; Taylor, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Intravenous (IV) analgesia has particular advantages in the immediate postoperative period. For example, IV administration results in a faster onset of pain relief and results in more predictable pharmacokinetics than does administration by other routes. It also allows for convenient dosing before or during surgery, permitting the initiation of effective analgesia in the early phase of the postoperative period. In addition, when patients are able to tolerate oral intake, they can be switched from IV to oral dosing based on maintaining the predictable analgesia established by the IV route. IV morphine is widely used for the control of postoperative pain, but there is a trend toward the use of oxycodone. Oxycodone (which may be mediated partly through kappa- as well as mu-opioid receptors) offers several potential advantages. Published studies comparing IV oxycodone to other IV opioids for postsurgical pain report that oxycodone is a safe and effective analgesic. Some studies show that IV oxycodone may be associated with greater pain control, fewer or less severe adverse events, and faster onset of action, although the results are not consistent across all studies. Oxycodone has been reported to be safe in the geriatric and other special populations when adequate clinical adjustments are made. Thus, the clinical reports and oxycodone's pharmacologic profile make intravenous oxycodone a potentially important "new" old drug for postoperative pain control. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Antinociceptive Effects of Oxycodone and Hydrocodone.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Joanna C; Poklis, Justin L; Akbarali, Hamid I; Henderson, Graeme; Dewey, William L

    2017-07-01

    This study compared the development of tolerance to two orally bioavailable prescription opioids, oxycodone and hydrocodone, to that of morphine, and the reversal of this tolerance by ethanol. Oxycodone (s.c.) was significantly more potent in the mouse tail-withdrawal assay than either morphine or hydrocodone. Oxycodone was also significantly more potent in this assay than hydrocodone when administered orally. Tolerance was seen following chronic subcutaneous administration of each of the three drugs and by the chronic administration of oral oxycodone, but not following the chronic oral administration of hydrocodone. Ethanol (1 g/kg i.p.) significantly reversed the tolerance to the subcutaneous administration of each of the three opioids that developed when given 30 minutes prior to challenge doses. It took twice as much ethanol, when given orally, to reverse the tolerance to oxycodone. We investigated whether the observed tolerance to oxycodone and its reversal by ethanol were due to biodispositional changes or reflected a true neuronal tolerance. As expected, a relationship between brain oxycodone concentrations and activity in the tail-immersion test existed following administration of acute oral oxycodone. Following chronic treatment, brain oxycodone concentrations were significantly lower than acute concentrations. Oral ethanol (2 g/kg) reversed the tolerance to chronic oxycodone, but did not alter brain concentrations of either acute or chronic oxycodone. These studies show that there is a metabolic component of tolerance to oxycodone; however, the reversal of that tolerance by ethanol is not due to an alteration of the biodisposition of oxycodone, but rather is neuronal in nature. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  18. Methadone and metabolites in hair of methadone-assisted pregnant women and their infants.

    PubMed

    Himes, Sarah K; Goodwin, Robert S; Rock, Colleen M; Jones, Hendrée E; Johnson, Rolley E; Wilkins, Diana G; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2012-06-01

    Methadone is the recommended pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women. The primary aims of this study were to determine whether a dose-concentration relationship exists between cumulative maternal methadone dose, methadone and metabolite concentrations in maternal hair during pregnancy and whether maternal hair methadone and metabolite concentrations predict neonatal outcomes. Hair specimens were collected monthly from opioid-dependent mothers enrolled in methadone treatment and 4 of their infants. Hair specimens were segmented (3 cm), washed (maternal hair only), and analyzed for methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3,3-diphenylpyrroline by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. There was large intersubject variability and no dose-concentration relationship for cumulative methadone dose and methadone, EDDP, 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3,3-diphenylpyrroline, or total concentrations in hair. For individual women, a positive trend was noted for cumulative methadone dose and methadone and EDDP concentrations in hair. There was a positive linear trend for cumulative methadone dose and EDDP/methadone ratio in maternal hair, perhaps reflecting methadone's induction of its own metabolism. Maternal methadone concentrations were higher than those in infant hair, and infant EDDP hair concentrations were higher than those in maternal hair. Maternal methadone dose, and methadone and EDDP hair concentrations were not correlated with peak infant neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) scores, days to peak NAS, duration of NAS, time to NAS onset, birth length, head circumference, or amount of neonatal morphine pharmacotherapy. Maternal cumulative third trimester methadone dose was positively correlated with infant birth weight. Methadone and EDDP in pregnant women's hair are markers of methadone exposure and do not predict total methadone dose, nor neonatal outcomes from in utero methadone exposure.

  19. OXYCODONE COMBINATIONS FOR PAIN RELIEF

    PubMed Central

    Raffa, R.B.; Pergolizzi, J.V.; Segarnick, D.J.; Tallarida, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY No single analgesic drug provides the perfect therapeutic/adverse effect profile for every pain condition. In addition to convenience and possibly improved compliance, a combination of analgesic drugs offers the potential, requiring verification, of providing greater pain relief and/or reduced adverse effects than the constituent drugs when used individually. We review here analgesic combinations containing oxycodone. We found surprisingly little preclinical information about the analgesic or adverse effect profiles of the combinations (with acetaminophen, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, morphine, gabapentin or pregabalin). Clinical experience and studies suggest that the combinations are safe and effective and may offer certain advantages. As with all combinations, the profile of adverse effects must also be determined in order to provide the clinician with the overall benefit/risk assessment. PMID:20571607

  20. Methadone and Metabolites in Hair of Methadone-Assisted Pregnant Women and Their Infants

    PubMed Central

    Himes, Sarah K; Goodwin, Robert S; Rock, Colleen M; Jones, Hendrée E; Johnson, Rolley E; Wilkins, Diana G; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2012-01-01

    Methadone is the recommended pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women. The primary aims of this study were to determine whether a dose-concentration relationship exists between cumulative maternal methadone dose, methadone and metabolite concentrations in maternal hair during pregnancy and whether maternal hair methadone and metabolite concentrations predict neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods Hair specimens were collected monthly from opioid-dependent mothers enrolled in methadone treatment and 4 of their infants. Hair specimens were segmented (3cm), washed (maternal hair only) and analyzed for methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) and 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3,3-diphenylpyrroline (EMDP) by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results There was large inter-subject variability and no dose-concentration relationship for cumulative methadone dose and methadone, EDDP, EMDP or total concentrations in hair. For individual women, a positive trend was noted for cumulative methadone dose and methadone and EDDP concentrations in hair. There was a positive linear trend for cumulative methadone dose and EDDP/methadone ratio in maternal hair, perhaps reflecting methadone’s induction of its own metabolism. Maternal methadone concentrations were higher than those in infant hair, and infant EDDP hair concentrations were higher than those in maternal hair. Maternal methadone dose, and methadone and EDDP hair concentrations were not correlated with peak infant neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) scores, days to peak NAS, duration of NAS, time to NAS onset, birth length, head circumference or amount of neonatal morphine pharmacotherapy. Maternal cumulative 3rd trimester methadone dose was positively correlated with infant birth weight. Conclusion Methadone and EDDP in pregnant women’s hair are markers of methadone exposure and do not predict total methadone dose, nor neonatal outcomes from in utero methadone exposure. PMID

  1. The Addiction Potential of Oxycodone (Percodan®)

    PubMed Central

    Bloomquist, Edward R.

    1963-01-01

    Dihydrohydroxycodeinone (oxycodone, Percodan®) is a useful analgesic. Its addiction potential, however, is comparable to that of morphine. This fact should be considered when it is prescribed. Because of increasing numbers of addicts to this drug in the State of California, the California Medical Association Committee on Dangerous Drugs and the House of Delegates has recommended that oxycodone-containing drugs be returned to the triplicate prescription list as they were originally in 1949. This recommendation was incorporated in Senate Bill 385, which failed to pass the legislature. PMID:13971810

  2. Hydrocodone/oxycodone overdose

    MedlinePlus

    ... calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. Poisonous Ingredient Hydrocodone and oxycodone belong to a class of narcotic medicines called opiates. These medicines are ...

  3. Stereospecific antibodies to methadone. I. Radioimmunoassay of d,l-methadone in human serum.

    PubMed

    Bartos, F; Olsen, G D; Leger, R N; Bartos, D

    1977-01-01

    Anti-d,l-methadone antibodies were produced in rabbits immunized with d,l-methadol-hemisuccinate thyroglobulin conjugate. Using the antiserum, a radioimmunoasay (RIA) for determination of d,l-methadone in human serum has been developed and is described. Concentration of d,l-methadone of 1.4 pmol in a native serum sample (volume 0.1 ml or less) could be measured directly by RIA. The antibodies crossreact 100% with d,l-methadone, 50% with d-methadone, 50% with l-methadone and 100% with alpha-d-methadol. No crossreactivity was found with alpha 1-methadol, morphine, meperidine, dextropropoxyphene, 2-ethyl-5-methyl-3,3-diphenyl-l-pyrroline and 2-ethylidene-l, 5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidene. High sensitivity and small sample requirements make this method suitable for future monitoring of patients on methadone maintenance and for studies where other procedures have lack of sensitivity.

  4. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons and potent modulation by oxycodone in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ono, Hiroko; Tomii, Takako; Morioka, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We demonstrated previously that oxycodone has potent antinociceptive effects at supraspinal sites. In this study, we investigated changes in neuronal function and antinociceptive mechanisms of oxycodone at ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) neurons, which are a major site of opioid action, in a femur bone cancer (FBC) model with bone cancer-related pain. Experimental Approach We characterized the supraspinal antinociceptive profiles of oxycodone and morphine on mechanical hypersensitivity in the FBC model. Based on the disinhibition mechanism underlying supraspinal opioid antinociception, the effects of oxycodone and morphine on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in VLPAG neurons were evaluated in slices from the FBC model. Key Results The supraspinal antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not morphine, were abolished by blocking G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium1 (Kir3.1) channels. In slices from the FBC model, GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons was enhanced, as indicated by a leftward shift of the input–output relationship curve of evoked IPSCs, the increased paired-pulse facilitation and the enhancement of miniature IPSC frequency. Following treatment with oxycodone and morphine, IPSCs were reduced in the FBC model, and the inhibition of presynaptic GABA release by oxycodone, but not morphine was enhanced and dependent on Kir3.1 channels. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that Kir3.1 channels are important for supraspinal antinociception and presynaptic GABA release inhibition by oxycodone in the FBC model. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons in the FBC model is an important site of supraspinal antinociception by oxycodone via Kir3.1 channel activation. PMID:25521524

  5. Postoperative oxycodone toxicity in a patient with chronic pain and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, Bryant W; Kohan, Lynn R; Vorenkamp, Kevin E

    2015-02-15

    We present this case to review the metabolism of oxycodone and the effects of end-stage renal disease on the elimination of oxycodone and its metabolites. A 42-year-old female with end-stage renal disease who was dependent on hemodialysis presented for left hamstring posterior capsule release. She had been receiving methadone for 2 years for chronic leg pain. On postoperative day 1, the patient's medication was changed from IV hydromorphone to oral oxycodone to treat breakthrough pain. By the next day, the patient was unarousable with notable respiratory depression. She did not fully recover after urgent hemodialysis but did have full recovery after receiving an IV naloxone infusion for 22 hours. Further study of the safety of oxycodone in hemodialysis patients is warranted.

  6. Cytochrome P450-mediated changes in oxycodone pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Söderberg Löfdal, Karin C; Andersson, Marine L; Gustafsson, Lars L

    2013-05-01

    In recent years the use of the opioid oxycodone has increased markedly and replacing morphine as the first-line choice of opioid in several countries. There are formulations for oral immediate, oral extended release and intravenous use. The bioavailability is higher than for morphine and less variable. Oxycodone is primarily metabolized in the liver by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes with CYP3A as the major metabolic pathway and CYP2D6 as the minor metabolic pathway to noroxycodone, oxymorphone and noroxymorphone. Oxycodone exerts its analgesic effect via the µ-opioid receptor. The metabolism of CYP2D6 substrates varies to a large degree between individuals as a result of allele functionality. Poor metabolizers (PM) have two non-functional alleles, extensive metabolizers (EM) are homozygous with two functional alleles or heterozygous with one functional allele and ultrarapid metabolizers (UM) have more than two functional alleles. There are pronounced interethnic differences in the allele distribution. On the basis of studies performed thus far, oxycodone concentrations in comparison with EM are similar in PM and reduced in UM. The pharmacokinetics in UM are insufficiently investigated. Simultaneous inhibition of both CYP3A and CYP2D6 results in increased oxycodone concentrations and such a combination should be avoided. A similar effect is to be expected with use of a CYP3A inhibitor in CYP2D6 PM. Concomitant use of enzyme inducers such as rifampicin, St John's wort and carbamazepine should be avoided because of the risk of subtherapeutic concentrations of oxycodone. When the dosage of morphine may result in unpredictable bioavailability, like in patients with severe hepatic cirrhosis, oxycodone might be beneficial because it has higher and less variability in bioavailability between patients than morphine.

  7. Methadone enhances human influenza A virus replication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun-Hsiang; Wu, Kuang-Lun; Tsai, Ming-Ta; Chien, Wei-Hsien; Chen, Mao-Liang; Wang, Yun

    2017-01-01

    Growing evidence has indicated that opioids enhance replication of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus in target cells. However, it is unknown whether opioids can enhance replication of other clinically important viral pathogens. In this study, the interaction of opioid agonists and human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1) virus was examined in human lung epithelial A549 cells. Cells were exposed to morphine, methadone or buprenorphine followed by human H1N1 viral infection. Exposure to methadone differentially enhanced viral propagation, consistent with an increase in virus adsorption, susceptibility to virus infection and viral protein synthesis. In contrast, morphine or buprenorphine did not alter H1N1 replication. Because A549 cells do not express opioid receptors, methadone-enhanced H1N1 replication in human lung cells may not be mediated through these receptors. The interaction of methadone and H1N1 virus was also examined in adult mice. Treatment with methadone significantly increased H1N1 viral replication in lungs. Our data suggest that use of methadone facilitates influenza A viral infection in lungs and might raise concerns regarding the possible consequence of an increased risk of serious influenza A virus infection in people who receive treatment in methadone maintenance programs. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  8. The influence of pharmacogenetics on opioid analgesia: studies with codeine and oxycodone in the Sprague-Dawley/Dark Agouti rat model.

    PubMed

    Cleary, J; Mikus, G; Somogyi, A; Bochner, F

    1994-12-01

    In the Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat, the O-demethylation of codeine to morphine is catalyzed by cytochrome P4502D1 (CYP2D1), which is absent in the female Dark Agouti (DA) rat. Oxycodone is similar in structure to codeine but, in contrast, has an analgesic potency in humans similar to morphine. The aim of the study was to test whether the DA rat and the SD rat pretreated with the CYP2D1 inhibitor quinine showed attenuation in analgesia to codeine and oxycodone. With the use of the tail flick model, dose-response curves were constructed to codeine, morphine, oxycodone and oxymorphone (the O-demethylated metabolite of oxycodone) in both rat strains. Codeine did not induce analgesia in the DA rat and there was a 60% reduction in codeine analgesia in the SD rat pretreated with quinine in comparison to the untreated SD rat. In the DA rat, the ED50 to oxycodone was increased 10-fold but there was a significant (P = .0001) prolongation in the duration of analgesia in comparison to that in the untreated SD rat. In the quinine-pretreated SD rat, there was no reduction in oxycodone analgesia but the duration of analgesia was also prolonged. It was concluded that 1) codeine-mediated analgesia requires the formation of morphine through the functional activity of CYP2D1 and 2) oxycodone-mediated analgesia may only be partly dependent on CYP2D1.

  9. Trends in the consumption of opioid analgesics in Spain. Higher increases as fentanyl replaces morphine.

    PubMed

    Garcia del Pozo, Javier; Carvajal, Alfonso; Viloria, Jose Maria; Velasco, Alfonso; Garcia del Pozo, Victorina

    2008-04-01

    During the past few years there have been changes in the availability of opioids in Spain, and new policies on palliative care have been implemented. The aim of this study was to describe the new pattern of opioid consumption in Spain and the associated economic impact. A search in the ECOM (Especialidades Consumo de Medicamentos) database of the Ministry of Health and Consumer Affairs for the 1992-2006 period was carried out. This database contains information on prescriptions of primary care medicines that are covered by the National Health System in Spain. Since 1992, overall opioid consumption has increased 14-fold, from 0.3 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day to 4.4 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day. For the six drugs that require a special prescription form--morphine, methadone, oxycodone pethidine, tilidine and fentanyl--consumption increased from 0.1 DDD/1000 inhabitants per day in 1992 to 1.2 in 2006. During this same period, the total costs of these prescriptions increased by 36.8-fold, and the cost per day and per patient doubled. A huge increase in opioid consumption has occurred during the time period covered by this study, with fentanyl consumption accounting for most of that increase. Although oral morphine is the first-choice drug among strong opioids, fentanyl is currently the most consumed.

  10. Methadone-induced respiratory depression in the neonatal guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nettleton, Rosemary T; Ransom, Ty A; Abraham, Stephanie L; Nelson, Cole S; Olsen, George D

    2007-12-01

    Respiratory depression, the most serious side-effect of opioid treatment, is well documented for morphine, the most commonly used opioid in neonatal care. Less is known about methadone, a clinically relevant opioid analgesic, especially during neonatal development. This study was undertaken to determine the neonatal respiratory effects of methadone. We hypothesize that methadone is equipotent to morphine, compared to our previous morphine results in the same animal model, but has a much longer duration of action, due to its longer elimination half-life. Neonatal guinea pigs (3-14 days old) randomly received a single subcutaneous dose of methadone or saline. Using a non-invasive plethysmographic method, we measured ventilatory and metabolic parameters before injection and at intervals for 32 hr after injection while pups breathed "room air" or 5% CO(2) gas mixtures. Methadone-induced depression of ventilation was most evident during 5% CO(2) challenge. The onset of drug effects was within 15 min for all ages and doses, but the duration of action decreased with age. While the depth of methadone-induced respiratory depression did not depend on pup age, the control of breathing was different in 3-day-old pups, where inspiratory time increased fourfold; twice that of older pups. We conclude that methadone induces a naloxone reversible respiratory depression in guinea pig neonates and, in the very young, causes an abnormal breathing pattern due to changes in respiratory timing. Methadone is more potent than morphine with respect to neonatal respiratory depression, but surprisingly, the duration of methadone action was not longer than morphine.

  11. Induction of antibodies to methadone during methadone maintenance treatment of heroin addicts and its possible clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Gamaleya, N; Dmitrieva, I; Borg, S; Ericcson, N

    1999-03-26

    By means of two different types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques, antibodies to methadone were detected in blood plasma of heroin addicts on methadone maintenance treatment. In 11-15% of cases immunoglobulin (Ig) M antibodies were detected, while IgG antibodies were observed in 33-40%. At least two types of antibodies to methadone were induced-antibodies with high affinity to methadone and low-affinity antibodies more specific for morphine than for methadone. The methadone antibody-positive group of patients had a significantly higher plasma methadone concentration--440 ng/ml, than the antibody-negative group--250 ng/ml (P < 0.005) despite almost the same mean therapeutic doses of methadone. Of patients with all types of antibodies to methadone 52% were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive, whereas in the group without antibodies, HIV-positive reactions were observed in 10.5% only (P < 0.002). Alternatively, 87.5% of HIV-positive patients had antibodies to methadone, a fact which should be taken into consideration during methadone dose adjustment.

  12. Pain therapy with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release combination: case report.

    PubMed

    Błaszczyk, Feliks; Droń, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Pain afflicts patients suffering from many chronic diseases and is present in 80% of cases of patients with advanced cancer who suffer from persistent pain. The aim of the pain treatment is to achieve the maximum analgesic effect while minimizing side effects. The main analgesic agent - morphine is unfortunately a therapy associated with gastrointestinal side effects. It appears that the combination of oxycodone and naloxone available as Targin(®) (Mundipharma) is an alternative. The paper presents a case of a 45-year-old patient who was treated effectively with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets. This treatment has proven to be effective in providing pain and constipation control.

  13. Methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Russell-Taylor, W J

    1975-07-01

    Management of heroin addiction with oral methadone continues to create controversy. Since the first Dole-Nyswander experiments were reported almost a decade ago, methadone maintenance programs have been started in every major city in North America at an estimated public cost in the hundreds of millions of tax dollars. By the end of 1972, the United States alone spending at an annual rate in excess of $250 million, and an expenditure rate in excess of one billion dollars was occurring by the end of 1973. Despite the FDA investigational New Drug status of methadone when used for this purpose, objective data have still not been generated to substantiate the worth of Narcotic Substitution Therapy. Iatrogenic consequences are on the increase, and scepticism is growing among most pharmacologists. A critical evaluation of the entire methadone maintenance approach is being advocated by many and being attempted by some. Data currently being generated at the Philadelphia General Hospital suggest that many patients may have been better managed without methadone.

  14. Analgesic studies of codeine and oxycodone in patients with cancer. I. Comparisons of oral with intramuscular codeine and of oral with intramuscular oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Beaver, W T; Wallenstein, S L; Rogers, A; Houde, R W

    1978-10-01

    The relative analgesic potency of oral and intramuscular codeine was evaluated in a double-blind crossover comparison of graded single doses in patients with chronic pain due to cancer. When both duration and intensity of analgesia are considered (total effect), oral codeine was 6/10 as potent as the intramuscular form. This is a high oral/parenteral analgesic relative potency ratio compared with morphine, metopon and oxymorphone and correlates well with the results of recent studies which have determined the oral vs. intramuscular bioavailability of codeine in man. Oral and intramuscular oxycodone were also compared in a similar patient group. Like codeine, oxycodone retained at least 1/2 of its analgesic activity when administered orally. We hypothesize that the high oral/parenteral relative potency ratios of codeine and oxycodone relative to morphine and its congeners are not due to more efficient absorption after oral administration, but rather that methylation at position 3 in codeine and oxycodone protects these drugs from rapid first-pass metabolism.

  15. Evaluation of the usefulness of an oxycodone immunoassay in combination with a traditional opiate immunoassay for the screening of opiates in urine.

    PubMed

    Gingras, Marie; Laberge, Marie-Hélène; Lefebvre, Michel

    2010-03-01

    Oxycodone is a semisynthetic opioid analgesic largely prescribed for post-operative and chronic pain management. The introduction of a slow release formulation of oxycodone has led to its frequent abuse and to an increase in emergency cases related to oxycodone overdose. Until recently, oxycodone testing has been confined to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis because the widely used automated opiate immunoassays poorly react to this compound. We investigated the utility of a new oxycodone immunoassay as a screening procedure to eliminate inappropriate GC-MS testing of negative urine specimens. We analyzed 96 urine specimens using GC-MS and two immunoassays, CEDIA((R)) opiates and DRI((R)) oxycodone assays from Microgenics, on a Hitachi 917 analyzer. The GC-MS allowed us to detect codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone following enzymatic hydrolysis and derivation by acetylation. The combination of the two immunoassays gave the best performance (98% sensitivity and specificity) when considering a positive result from GC-MS for any of the opiates. Considering positive GC-MS results for oxycodone or oxymorphone only, the oxycodone immunoassay resulted in two false-positives and one false-negative (50 ng/mL cutoff). Using these immunoassays for screening before GC-MS analysis provides a reduced opiate GC-MS workload without compromising quality.

  16. Oxycodone N-oxide.

    PubMed

    Sonar, Vijayakumar N; Parkin, Sean; Crooks, Peter A

    2012-11-01

    The title compound, (5R,9R,13S,14S,17R)-14-hydroxy-3-methoxy-17-methyl-4,5-epoxymorphinan-6-one N-oxide, C(18)H(21)NO(5), has been prepared in a diastereomerically pure form by the reaction of oxycodone with 3-chloroperbenzoic acid and subsequent crystallization of the product from chloroform. The crystal packing shows that the molecule exhibits intramolecular O-H···O [D···A = 2.482 (2) Å] hydrogen bonding. In addition, there are weak intermolecular C-H...O interactions which, along with van der Waals forces, stabilize the structure. The new chiral center at the 17-position is demonstrated to be R.

  17. Oxycontin: the concept of a "ghost pill" and the postmortem tissue distribution of oxycodone in 36 cases.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Daniel T; Fritz, Kristina L; Muto, Joseph J

    2002-10-01

    Oxycodone is a semi-synthetic opioid that is structurally similar to codeine and equipotent to morphine in producing analgesic effects. Oxycodone has been prescribed in many immediate-release formulations including Percodan, Percocet, Tylox, Roxicodone, and Toxicet. In 1995, the Food and Drug Administration approved Oxycontin, a controlled-release form of oxycodone. Although the immediate-release forms of oxycodone can be prescribed in doses of 10-30 mg every 4 h, it is recommended that Oxycontin be prescribed in doses of 10-160 mg every 12 h. In a six-year period, the Los Angeles County Department of Coroner's Toxicology Laboratory detected oxycodone in 67 cases, 36 of which were determined to be the controlled-release form. The objectives of this paper are to provide general information about Oxycontin, including postmortem tissue distributions of oxycodone in cases in which the controlled-release form was identified, and to introduce the concept of ghost pills. A ghost pill is a seemingly intact but drug-free tablet that resembles an undigested pill. The isolation and identification of oxycodone from postmortem specimens was achieved using a basic, liquid-liquid extraction with screening and quantitation by gas chromatography-nitrogen-phosphorus detection and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Oxycodone-d3 was used as an internal standard for quantitation. The assays were linear from 0.10 to 5.0 mg/L. The tissue distribution ranges of oxycodone in the 36 case examples were heart blood 0.12-46 mg/L (36), femoral blood + < 0.10-13 mg/L (35), liver 0.11-6.1 mg/kg (16), urine 2.5-122 mg/L (22), bile 0.19-49 mg/L (15), vitreous 0.24-0.82 mg/L (6), and gastric 0.06-119 mg total (21).

  18. Patient-reported utilization patterns of fentanyl transdermal system and oxycodone hydrochloride controlled-release among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain.

    PubMed

    Ackerman, Stacey J; Mordin, Margaret; Reblando, Joseph; Xu, Xiao; Schein, Jeff; Vallow, Sue; Brennan, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Although use of long-acting opioid analgesics has increased for chronic nonmalignant pain management, little is known about patient-reported utilization patterns. To assess patient-reported utilization patterns of fentanyl transdermal system and oxycodone hydrochloride (HCl) controlled-release among patients with chronic nonmalignant pain and to compare these patterns to standard dose administration guidelines recommended in the manufacturers. prescribing information (PI). Cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study of English-speaking patients who were seeking chronic nonmalignant pain management from 6 outpatient pain clinics. The inclusion criteria for the study were (1) diagnosis of chronic nonmalignant pain, (2) prescription for and current use of either transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release, and (3) duration of use for either transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release of at least 6 weeks. Patients completed either an oxycodone HCl controlled-release or transdermal fentanyl utilization questionnaire. A conversion table was used to standardize opioid analgesic doses from transdermal fentanyl or oxycodone HCl controlled-release to daily oral morphine equivalents. The principal outcome measures were the average interval between oxycodone HCl controlled-release administrations, the number of days the current transdermal fentanyl patch would be worn, and the percentage of oxycodone HCl controlled-release and transdermal fentanyl patients whose administration frequency exceeded the standard recommendation in the manufacturer.s PI (every 12 hours for oxycodone HCl controlled-release or every 72 hours for transdermal fentanyl). Other outcome measures included the number of oxycodone HCl controlled-release tablets per administration, the daily dose of long-acting opioid, the duration of adequate pain relief, and the difference in daily oral morphine equivalents between transdermal fentanyl and oxycodone HCl controlled

  19. Effects of morphine in the isolated mouse urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, C G; Tamayo, L; Contreras, E

    1986-01-01

    Acute morphine increased the responses to acetylcholine of the isolated mouse urinary bladder. A chronic morphine treatment did not change the responses of the urinary bladder to acetylcholine or ATP. The acute administration of morphine did not modify the contractile response to ATP in the urinary bladders from untreated or chronically morphine treated mice. Methadone and ketocyclazocine decreased the responses to the electrical stimulation of the urinary bladder. These depressant effects were not modified by naloxone. The results suggest the nonexistence of opiate receptors in the mouse urinary bladder and the lack of direct effects of morphine on the neuroeffector junction.

  20. New depression diagnosis following prescription of codeine, hydrocodone or oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Scherrer, Jeffrey F; Salas, Joanne; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Schneider, F David; Burroughs, Thomas; Copeland, Laurel A; Sullivan, Mark D; Lustman, Patrick J

    2016-05-01

    Longer duration of prescription opioid use is associated with risk of major depression after controlling for daily morphine equivalent dose and pain. It is not known if risk of depression varies as a function of the type of opioid prescribed. A retrospective cohort design was used to model onset of new depression diagnosis among 11 462 Veterans Health Administration (VA) patients who were prescribed only codeine, only hydrocodone or only oxycodone for >30 days. Patients were free of prevalent opioid use and depression at baseline (2000-2001). Follow-up was 2002-2012. Propensity scores and weighting were used to balance covariates across opioid type. Cox-proportional hazard models were computed, using weighted data and additional adjustment for morphine equivalent dose (MED), duration of use, and pain after opioid initiation, to estimate the risk of new depression diagnosis among patients prescribed only codeine, only oxycodone vs. those prescribed only hydrocodone. After controlling for confounding, we observed that patients prescribed codeine, compared to hydrocodone, were significantly more likely to have a new depression diagnosis (HR = 1.27; 95%CI: 1.12-1.43). Oxycodone was significantly associated with onset of new depression diagnosis when exposure was modeled as total days exposed in post-hoc analysis, but not when exposure was duration of incident period of use. Although codeine is a less potent opioid, after controlling for MED, chronic use of this agent is associated with nearly a 30% greater risk of depression compared to hydrocodone. Additional research is needed to determine the mechanisms for this association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Discriminative stimulus, reinforcing, physical dependence, and antinociceptive effects of oxycodone in mice, rats, and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, Patrick M; Aceto, Mario D; Cook, Charles D; Bowman, Edward R; Newman, Jennifer L; Harris, Louis S

    2004-08-01

    Despite oxycodone's (4,5-epoxy-14-hydroxy-3-methoxy-17-methylmorphinan-6-one) history of clinical use and the attention it has received as a drug of abuse, few reports have documented its pharmacology's relevance to its abuse or its mechanism of action. The purposes of the present study were to further characterize the analgesic effects of oxycodone, its mechanism of action, and its effects in terms of its relevance to its abuse liability. The results indicate that oxycodone had potent antinociceptive effects in the mouse paraphenylquinone writhing, hot-plate, and tail-flick assays, in which it appeared to be acting as a mu-opioid receptor agonist. It generalized to the heroin discriminative stimulus and served as a positive reinforcer in rats and completely suppressed withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent rhesus monkeys. These results suggest that the analgesic and abuse liability effects of oxycodone are likely mediated through mu-opioid receptors and provide the first laboratory report of its discriminative stimulus, reinforcing, and morphine cross-dependency effects.

  2. Topical methadone and meperidine analgesic synergy in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Yuri A; Oksman, Galina; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2010-07-25

    Topical analgesics have many potential advantages over systemic administration. Prior work has shown potent analgesic activity of a number of topical opioids in the radiant heat tail-flick assay. The current study confirms the analgesic activity of morphine and extends it to two other mu opioids, methadone and meperidine. Combinations of topical morphine and lidocaine are synergistic. Similarly, the combination of methadone and lidocaine is synergistic. While there appeared to be some potentiation with the combination of meperidine and lidocaine, it did not achieve significance. Systemically, prior studies have shown that co-administration of morphine and methadone was synergistic. The combination of morphine and methadone was also synergistic when given topically. In contrast, the combination of morphine and meperidine was not synergistic systemically and it was not synergistic topically. Thus, the pharmacology of topical opioids mimics that seen with systemic administration. Their activity in the topical model supports their potential utility while the local limitation of their actions offers the possibility of a reduced side-effect profile.

  3. Route of administration influences substitution patterns in rats trained to discriminate methadone vs. vehicle.

    PubMed

    Vann, Robert E; Wise, Laura E; Varvel, Stephen A; Philibin, Scott D; Walentiny, D Matthew; Porter, Joseph H

    2009-08-01

    Replacement therapy with the synthetic mu-opioid agonist methadone is an efficacious treatment for opioid abuse. While much is known about methadone's pharmacology, its discriminative stimulus properties remain largely unexplored. The present study sought to establish methadone discrimination in rats. Moreover, some research suggests that route of administration alters the discriminative stimulus of methadone. Thus, the present study also compared intraperitoneal (i.p.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) routes of administration. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 3.0mg/kg methadone (i.p.) from vehicle in a two-lever discrimination procedure. Generalization tests were conducted with a variety of compounds administered i.p. and s.c. Methadone fully substituted for itself, yielding ED(50)s of 1.5mg/kg (i.p.) and 0.2mg/kg (s.c.). Naltrexone (i.p.), an opioid antagonist produced a dose-dependent reduction in methadone-appropriate responding. The methadone stereoisomers fully substituted for methadone when given s.c.; however, when administered i.p., (+) and (-) methadone produced partial and no substitution, respectively. Heroin fully generalized to methadone regardless of administration route, while morphine fully substituted when given s.c., but not i.p. The kappa-agonist U50-488 failed to generalize to methadone with either route of administration. These results demonstrated that methadone's discriminative stimulus is mediated through mu-opioid receptor activity and is similar to that of commonly abused opioids (heroin, morphine). Additionally, route of administration produced differential results for many of the drugs tested, suggesting decreased drug bioavailability following i.p. administration due to hepatic first pass metabolism. Taken together, these results suggest that methadone's shared subjective effects with abused opioids, as well as its unique metabolic properties contribute to its efficacy in opioid maintenance therapy.

  4. 75 FR 44287 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Codeine (9050) II Oxycodone (9143) II Hydromorphone (9150) II Hydrocodone (9193) II Methadone (9250) II Methadone intermediate (9254) II Dextropropoxyphene, bulk (non-dosage forms) II (9273). Morphine (9300)...

  5. Effects of Ibudilast on the Subjective, Reinforcing, and Analgesic Effects of Oxycodone in Recently Detoxified Adults with Opioid Dependence.

    PubMed

    Metz, Verena E; Jones, Jermaine D; Manubay, Jeanne; Sullivan, Maria A; Mogali, Shanthi; Segoshi, Andrew; Madera, Gabriela; Johnson, Kirk W; Comer, Sandra D

    2017-08-01

    Ibudilast, a nonselective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, is used clinically in Asia for the treatment of asthma and poststroke dizziness. Recent preclinical studies have suggested that it also inhibits glial cell activation in rodents, and may alter opioid-mediated effects, including analgesia and withdrawal symptoms. The effects of ibudilast on the abuse potential of opioids in humans are largely unknown. The present study was designed to examine the influence of ibudilast on subjective (including drug craving), reinforcing, and analgesic effects of oxycodone in human volunteers diagnosed with opioid dependence (equivalent to moderate-severe opioid use disorder). Non-treatment-seeking opioid-dependent male volunteers (n=11) underwent an in-patient detoxification with morphine, followed by maintenance on placebo (0 mg b.i.d.) and active ibudilast (50 mg b.i.d.). Under each maintenance dose, six experimental sample and choice sessions were completed involving oral oxycodone administration (0, 15, and 30 mg/70 kg, p.o.). Subjective effects of oxycodone and drug craving were measured with visual analog scales (VAS) and a Drug Effects Questionnaire. The cold pressor test was used to produce pain, and a modified progressive-ratio choice procedure was used to measure the reinforcing effects of oxycodone. Under the active ibudilast condition compared with the placebo condition, ratings of drug liking following 15 mg of oxycodone were decreased significantly. The mean drug breakpoint value was also significantly lower in the active vs the placebo ibudilast condition under the 15 mg oxycodone condition, but not significantly lower under the 30 mg oxycodone condition. Heroin craving was significantly reduced under active ibudilast vs placebo, and similar effects were observed for tobacco and cocaine craving. Furthermore, mean subjective ratings of pain were lower in the active ibudilast condition. Our data suggest that ibudilast may be useful for treating opioid

  6. Diazepam and methadone interactions in methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Preston, K L; Griffiths, R R; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1984-10-01

    Survey study data and high rates of diazepam use/abuse in methadone maintenance suggest that acute administration of diazepam with daily methadone doses may enhance methadone effects. Acute subjective and physiologic effects of single oral doses of placebo, diazepam (20 and 40 mg), methadone (100%, 150%, and 200% of the maintenance dose), and four diazepam-methadone dose combinations (20 and 40 mg diazepam in combination with 100% and 150% of the maintenance dose) were assessed under double-blind conditions. The subjects were five adult male patients on methadone maintenance with histories of diazepam abuse who were receiving 50 to 60 mg methadone a day. Physiologic measures were continuously monitored for 30 min before and for 2 hr after dosing. Pupil diameter and subjective responses were measured 15 min before dosing and 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after dosing. Methadone induced dose-dependent increases in pupil constriction and scores on a subjective opioid effects rating scale, but diazepam had no significant effect on either. The combination of methadone at 150% of the maintenance dose with 40 mg diazepam induced increases in these measures greater than those induced by either drug dose alone. Drug combinations, however, were more frequently identified as being benzodiazepine/barbiturate-like than as methadone-like. Thus although the subjective effects of the drug combination are distinguishable from those of methadone alone, diazepam with methadone in methadone maintenance appears to increase some physiologic and subjective opioid effects that may be related to the relatively great use/abuse of diazepam in this population.

  7. Toxicology and pathology of deaths related to methadone: retrospective review

    PubMed Central

    Karch, Steven B; Stephens, Boyd G

    2000-01-01

    Objectives To clarify the mechanisms and risk factors of methadone toxicity and to describe the findings of deaths related to methadone use Design Retrospective review of case notes in the records of the San Francisco Medical Examiner comparing the findings in cases where methadone was deemed the cause of death with findings in decedents where methadone was an incidental finding, and with 50 age-matched, disease and drug free, trauma victims. Results 38 cases out of the 3317 processed by our office during 1997-1998 were identified in which methadone had been detected. Cases were mostly male 28/38 (74%) and white, 28/38 (74%). In 17 of 38 cases death was deemed to have been caused by methadone toxicity. For the group the mean blood methadone concentration for all 38 patients, was 957 ng/ml SD =.681, SE =.14). The mean blood concentration of the main methadone metabolite (EDDP) was 253 ng/ml, SD = 529 ng/ml, SE =.089. The mean ratio of methadone in the blood to EDDP in the blood was 13.6:1 Values were not significantly different between cases in which methadone toxicity was the cause of death and in those in which it was an incidental finding. Cocaine, or the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine, was detected in the blood or urine of 16/38 cases (42%); morphine in one-third (13/38) and methamphetamine in only one. Pulmonary edema was evident in all cases, coronary artery disease in 9/38 (24%) and cirrhosis in 7/38 (18%) of the methadone users. Necrotizing fasciitis was the cause of death in 4 of the 38 methadone users (11%). Nationally, a sizeable percent of methadone deaths are from drugs diverted from treatment programs. Conclusions The presence of methadone is often an incidental finding during postmortem examination which is unrelated to the cause of death. Postmortem measurements of methadone or its metabolite, or both, cannot be used in isolation to identify which deaths are associated with methadone toxicity. PMID:10695434

  8. Morphine Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your doctor may adjust your dose of morphine injection during your treatment, depending on how well your pain is controlled and on the side effects that you experience. Talk to your doctor about how you are feeling ... with morphine injection.If you have used morphine injection for longer ...

  9. Optimum Methadone Compliance Testing

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis was to determine the diagnostic utility of oral fluid testing collected with the Intercept oral fluid collection device. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Opioids (opiates or narcotics) are a class of drugs derived from the opium poppy plant that typically relieve pain and produce a euphoric feeling. Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid used to treat opioid dependence and chronic pain. It prevents symptoms of opioid withdrawal, reduces opioid cravings and blocks the euphoric effects of short-acting opioids such as heroin and morphine. Opioid dependence is associated with harms including an increased risk of exposure to Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C as well as other health, social and psychological crises. The goal of methadone treatment is harm reduction. Treatment with methadone for opioid dependence is often a long-term therapy. The Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons estimates that there are currently 250 physicians qualified to prescribe methadone, and 15,500 people in methadone maintenance programs across Ontario. Drug testing is a clinical tool whose purpose is to provide objective meaningful information, which will reinforce positive behavioral changes in patients and guide further treatment needs. Such information includes knowledge of whether the patient is taking their methadone as prescribed and reducing or abstaining from using opioid and other drugs of abuse use. The results of drug testing can be used with behavior modification techniques (contingency management techniques) where positive reinforcements such as increased methadone take-home privileges, sustained employment or parole are granted for drug screens negative for opioid use, and negative reinforcement including loss of these privileges for drug screens positive for opioid used. Body fluids including blood, oral fluid, often referred to as saliva, and urine may contain metabolites and the

  10. Characterization of methadone as a β-arrestin-biased μ-opioid receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Doi, Seira; Mori, Tomohisa; Uzawa, Naoki; Arima, Takamichi; Takahashi, Tomoyuki; Uchida, Masashi; Yawata, Ayaka; Narita, Michiko; Uezono, Yasuhito; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Background Methadone is a unique µ-opioid receptor agonist. Although several researchers have insisted that the pharmacological effects of methadone are mediated through the blockade of NMDA receptor, the underlying mechanism by which methadone exerts its distinct pharmacological effects compared to those of other µ-opioid receptor agonists is still controversial. In the present study, we further investigated the pharmacological profile of methadone compared to those of fentanyl and morphine as measured mainly by the discriminative stimulus effect and in vitro assays for NMDA receptor binding, µ-opioid receptor-internalization, and µ-opioid receptor-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Results We found that fentanyl substituted for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone, whereas a relatively high dose of morphine was required to substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone in rats. Under these conditions, the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 did not substitute for the discriminative stimulus effects of methadone. In association with its discriminative stimulus effect, methadone failed to displace the receptor binding of MK801 using mouse brain membrane. Methadone and fentanyl, but not morphine, induced potent µ-opioid receptor internalization accompanied by the strong recruitment of β-arrestin-2 in µ-opioid receptor-overexpressing cells. Conclusions These results suggest that methadone may, at least partly, produce its pharmacological effect as a β-arrestin-biased µ-opioid receptor agonist, similar to fentanyl, and NMDA receptor blockade is not the main contributor to the pharmacological profile of methadone. PMID:27317580

  11. Impact of blended treatment literacy and psychoeducation on methadone maintenance treatment outcomes in Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Cai, Thomas; Yan, Zhihua; Mburu, Gitau; Wang, Bangyuan; Yang, Liping

    2016-02-26

    Outcomes of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in the management of opioid dependency can be impaired by poor adherence and retention, concomitant drug use, poor adjustment of methadone dosage, and low levels of awareness regarding methadone among drug users, among other factors. This study investigated the effects of intensive blended treatment literacy and psychoeducation on treatment compliance, methadone dose, and heroin use among MMT clients in China. A total of 492 MMT clients who tested positive for urine morphine at least once during a 12-week intervention period preceding the study were recruited from 16 MMT clinics. Employing a client-centred approach, a blended treatment literacy and psychoeducation intervention was then implemented between March and June 2014, comprising (1) intensified methadone treatment literacy sessions; (2) participatory goal setting; (3) continuous adherence monitoring and support; and (4) engagement of both peers and doctors in delivering psychoeducation. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to compare urine morphine positive rates, daily methadone dosage, and the number of days that clients successfully accessed methadone before and during the intervention. During the intervention, urine morphine positive rates reduced to 27% from 49.3% previously; p < 0.001. In response to client needs, methadone dosages increased among 74% of participants, remained unchanged among 12.0%, and reduced among 13.4% during the intervention. In addition, the average daily methadone dose increased from 63.0 to 72.6 mg; p < 0.001, while the average number of days that clients successfully accessed methadone increased from 69.4 to 73.9 over a period of 12 weeks; p < 0.001. Blended treatment literacy and psychoeducation delivered by a combination of peers and doctors was associated with reduced heroin use, improved treatment adherence, and higher methadone doses among our sample of MMT clients.

  12. Effects of an Oxycodone Conjugate Vaccine on Oxycodone Self-Administration and Oxycodone-Induced Brain Gene Expression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pravetoni, Marco; Pentel, Paul R.; Potter, David N.; Chartoff, Elena H.; Tally, Laura; LeSage, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid abuse is an increasing public health concern in the USA. A vaccine comprising a hapten (OXY) conjugated to the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (OXY-KLH) has been shown to attenuate the antinociceptive effects of oxycodone. Here, the vaccine's ability to prevent acquisition of intravenous (i.v.) oxycodone self-administration was studied in rats. Effects of vaccination on oxycodone-induced changes in the expression of several genes within the mesolimbic system, which are regulated by chronic opiate use, were also examined. Vaccination with OXY-KLH reduced the proportion of rats acquiring i.v. self-administration of oxycodone under a fixed ratio (FR) 3 schedule of reinforcement compared to control rats immunized with the unconjugated KLH carrier protein. Vaccination significantly reduced the mean number of infusions at FR3, total number of infusions, and total oxycodone intake during the entire protocol. Compared to oxycodone self-administering control rats immunized with the carrier alone, rats vaccinated with the OXY-KLH immunogen showed increased levels of adenylate cyclase 5 (Adcy5) and decreased levels of early growth response protein 2 (Egr2) and the early immediate gene c-Fos in the striatum. These data suggest that vaccination with OXY-KLH can attenuate the reinforcing effects of oxycodone at a clinically-relevant exposure level. Analysis of mRNA expression identified some addiction-relevant markers that may be of interest in understanding oxycodone effects or the protection provided by vaccination. PMID:25025380

  13. Methadone inhibits CYP2D6 and UGT2B7/2B4 in vivo: a study using codeine in methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained subjects

    PubMed Central

    Gelston, Eloise A; Coller, Janet K; Lopatko, Olga V; James, Heather M; Schmidt, Helmut; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To compare the O-demethylation (CYP2D6-mediated), N-demethylation (CYP3A4-mediated) and 6-glucuronidation (UGT2B4/7-mediated) metabolism of codeine between methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer subjects. METHODS Ten methadone- and eight buprenorphine-maintained subjects received a single 60 mg dose of codeine phosphate. Blood was collected at 3 h and urine over 6 h and assayed for codeine, norcodeine, morphine, morphine-3- and -6-glucuronides and codeine-6-glucuronide. RESULTS The urinary metabolic ratio for O-demethylation was significantly higher (P = 0.0044) in the subjects taking methadone (mean ± SD, 2.8 ± 3.1) compared with those taking buprenorphine (0.60 ± 0.43), likewise for 6-glucuronide formation (0.31 ± 0.24 vs. 0.053 ± 0.027; P < 0.0002), but there was no significant difference (P = 0.36) in N-demethylation. Similar changes in plasma metabolic ratios were also found. In plasma, compared with those maintained on buprenorphine, the methadone-maintained subjects had increased codeine and norcodeine concentrations (P < 0.004), similar morphine (P = 0.72) and lower morphine-3- and -6- and codeine-6-glucuronide concentrations (P < 0.008). CONCLUSION Methadone is associated with inhibition of CYP2D6 and UGTs 2B4 and 2B7 reactions in vivo, even though it is not a substrate for these enzymes. Plasma morphine was not altered, owing to the opposing effects of inhibition of both formation and elimination; however, morphine-6-glucuronide (analgesically active) concentrations were substantially reduced. Drug interactions with methadone are likely to include drugs metabolized by various UGTs and CYP2D6. PMID:22092298

  14. Cause of death conundrum with methadone use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Letsky, Michael C; Zumwalt, Ross E; Seifert, Steven A; Benson, Blaine E

    2011-06-01

    Deaths caused by a methadone intoxication or overdose are becoming more frequent. We report a case involving a patient who had extremely high methadone blood concentrations but whose cause of death may have been unrelated to the drug. A 51-year-old woman was found deceased in bed by her daughter. At the scene were numerous bottles of methadone, with the chronic dosage of 240 mg 3 times a day. There was no history of prior suicide attempts, there were no reports of suicidal ideation having been voiced and there was no suicide note. At autopsy, there were no pills found in the stomach. Microscopic tissue examination revealed lobar pneumonia of the right lower lobe. Postmortem lung cultures grew out Streptococcus pneumoniae. Femoral blood contained methadone, 5.7 mg/L; EDDP, 2.1 mg/L; oxycodone, 0.017 mg/L; doxylamine, 0.022 mg/L; and ethanol, 13.0 mg/dL. The postmortem methadone concentration was consistent with her known dose, plausible pharmacokinetics and conditions of discovery. Various causes of death, such as a methadone-related arrhythmia from QTc prolongation or the contribution of methadone to the development of the pneumonia, cannot be ruled out and may well have caused or contributed to death, but the pneumonia was felt to be a competent cause of death. Ultimately, the most likely cause(s) of death, is a decision left to the individual medical examiner. This case is illustrative of the growing number of similar cases facing forensic pathologists. The cause of death cannot be solely based on drug concentrations and it may not be possible to come to a conclusion as to "the" cause of death and the forensic pathologist must be content with "a" cause of death.

  15. Pain therapy with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release combination: case report

    PubMed Central

    Droń, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Pain afflicts patients suffering from many chronic diseases and is present in 80% of cases of patients with advanced cancer who suffer from persistent pain. The aim of the pain treatment is to achieve the maximum analgesic effect while minimizing side effects. The main analgesic agent – morphine is unfortunately a therapy associated with gastrointestinal side effects. It appears that the combination of oxycodone and naloxone available as Targin® (Mundipharma) is an alternative. The paper presents a case of a 45-year-old patient who was treated effectively with oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets. This treatment has proven to be effective in providing pain and constipation control. PMID:24592131

  16. Modified glasgow prognostic score predicting high conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl in patients with cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Shu-Shan; Shang, Li; Li, Ming-E; Zhao, Dong-Mei; Xu, Wen-Hua; Wang, Yao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to transdermal fentanyl (TDF) in patients with cancer pain. The participants of this study were 156 hospitalized cancer patients who underwent opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF at the Affiliated Hospital of Binzhou Medical University between January 1st, 2010 and March 31st, 2014. Patient characteristics, modified Glasgow Prognostic Score (mGPS), daily oxycodone dose, and reasons for opioid switching were retrospectively collected. The effect of variables on the conversion ratio was analyzed by multiple regression analysis to identify the predictive factors for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. The results showed that the mGPS (odds ratio [OR], 2.358; 95% CI 1.379-4.031; P = 0.002), the reason for opioid switching (OR, 0.497; 95% CI, 0.298-0.828; P = 0.007) and equivalent oral morphine dose (OR, 1.700; 95% CI, 1.008-2.867; P = 0.046) were found to be significant predictors requiring higher conversion ratio in opioid switching. This study indicates that higher mGPS, poor pain control before switching and higher equivalent oral morphine dose are significant predictors of a need for higher conversion ratio in opioid switching from oral oxycodone to TDF. These results could contribute to the establishment of evidence-based medicine in cancer pain relief. PMID:26221306

  17. Effects of ibudilast on oxycodone-induced analgesia and subjective effects in opioid-dependent volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Z D; Johnson, K W; Vosburg, S K; Sullivan, M A; Manubay, J; Martinez, D; Jones, J D; Saccone, P A; Comer, S D

    2017-09-01

    Opioid-induced glial activation is hypothesized to contribute to the development of tolerance to opioid-induced analgesia. This inpatient, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subject and between-groups pilot study investigated the dose-dependent effects of ibudilast, a glial cell modulator, on oxycodone-induced analgesia. Opioid-dependent volunteers were maintained on morphine (30mg, PO, QID) for two weeks and received placebo ibudilast (0mg, PO, BID) during the 1st week (days 1-7). On day 8, participants (N=10/group) were randomized to receive ibudilast (20 or 40mg, PO, BID) or placebo for the remainder of the study. On days 4 (week 1) and 11 (week 2), the analgesic, subjective, and physiological effects of oxycodone (0, 25, 50mg/70kg, PO) were determined. Analgesia was measured using the cold pressor test; participants immersed their hand in cold water (4°C) and pain threshold and pain tolerability were recorded. Oxycodone decreased pain threshold and tolerability in all groups during week 1. During week 2, the placebo group exhibited a blunted analgesic response to oxycodone for pain threshold and subjective pain ratings, whereas the 40mg BID ibudilast group exhibited greater analgesia as measured by subjective pain ratings (p≤0.05). Oxycodone also increased subjective drug effect ratings associated with abuse liability in all groups during week 1 (p≤0.05); ibudilast did not consistently affect these ratings. These findings suggest that ibudilast may enhance opioid-induced analgesia. Investigating higher ibudilast doses may establish the utility of pharmacological modulation of glial activity to maximize the clinical use of opioids. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Use of Chronic Methadone Before Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ferdinand J; Schwartz, Andrew M; Wong, Jason; Chen, Cynthia; Tiwari, Bharat; Kim, Sun Jin

    2017-07-01

    A subset of patients who undergo total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are on methadone maintenance. They require more and often unpredictable quantities of opioids to function as effective painkillers. This study aims to compare the opioid requirements and the immediate postoperative course for patients on methadone maintenance with those who are not, after a TKA. A retrospective, case-control study was performed. From 2005 to 2010, 36 patients, who underwent a unilateral TKA, on chronic methadone maintenance were identified. A control group matched for age, gender, and body mass index comprised patients from the same period, who did not self-report taking methadone. Chart review and analysis of patient demographics, type of anesthesia used, preoperative methadone use, inpatient opioid use (converted to oral morphine equivalent doses), need for in-house pain management consult, length of hospital stay, and need for reoperation were performed. Patients on chronic methadone maintenance used significantly more opioids than patients not on methadone during their entire inpatient stay (P < .001). This was demonstrated by a higher median daily usage of opioids and higher patient-controlled analgesia usage. Patients on methadone maintenance had a significantly longer postoperative inpatient hospitalization (P < .001). Finally, these patients required significantly more inpatient pain management referrals (P = .025). There is a significantly higher opioid requirement, length of stay, and pain management consults in patients on methadone maintenance compared with those who are not after a TKA. These patients may benefit from a nonroutine approach to perioperative care in TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A comparison of drug overdose deaths involving methadone and other opioid analgesics in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Paulozzi, Leonard J; Logan, Joseph E; Hall, Aron J; McKinstry, Edna; Kaplan, James A; Crosby, Alexander E

    2009-09-01

    To describe all people dying from unintentional overdoses of methadone or other opioid analgesics (OOA) in West Virginia in 2006. We analyzed medical examiner data supplemented by data from the state prescription drug monitoring program. We compared people whose deaths involved methadone with those whose deaths involved OOA. The methadone group included 87 decedents, and the OOA group included 163 decedents. Most were male. Decedents in the methadone group were significantly younger than those in the OOA group: more than a quarter were 18-24 years of age. For both groups, approximately 50% had a history of pain, and 80% had a history of substance abuse. There was no intergroup difference in the prevalence of benzodiazepines at post-mortem. Methadone was significantly less likely to have ever been prescribed than OOA. Among those with prescriptions, the proportion prescribed within 30 days of death was significantly greater for methadone than for hydrocodone, but not for oxycodone. Ten (11.5%) of the methadone decedents were enrolled in an opiate treatment program (OTP) at the time of death. The high prevalence of a substance abuse history and lack of prescriptions suggest that most of the deaths in both groups are related to substance abuse. There was no indication of a harmful effect from methadone's metabolic interaction with benzodiazepines, but provider or patient unfamiliarity with methadone may have been a risk factor. Prescribing methadone, especially to young males, requires extra care. Providers, OTPs and coroners/medical examiners should use state prescription drug monitoring programs to monitor the use of controlled substances by their patients.

  20. Use of Methadone for Prevention of Opioid Withdrawal in Critically Ill Children

    PubMed Central

    Jeffries, Sonia A; McGloin, Rumi; Pitfield, Alexander F; Carr, Roxane R

    2012-01-01

    Background Opioids are commonly administered to critically ill children for analgesia and sedation, but many patients experience opioid withdrawal upon discontinuation. The authors’ institution developed a protocol for using methadone to prevent opioid withdrawal in children who have received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives The primary objectives were to determine if opioids were tapered according to the protocol and to determine the conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone that was used. Secondary objectives were to describe the methadone dosage used and the clinical outcomes, to evaluate adjustments to methadone dosing, and to report the incidence of adverse effects. Methods A retrospective analysis of charts was conducted for pediatric patients who had received morphine by continuous IV infusion for 5 days or longer followed by methadone in the PICU between May 2008 and August 2009. Validated scoring systems (the Withdrawal Assessment Tool and the State Behavioral Scale) were used to assess symptoms of withdrawal and degree of sedation, respectively. Results Forty-three patients were included in the study, with median age of 8 months (range 0.25–201 months). For 31 patients (72%), the protocol was not used, and there were no patients for whom the protocol was followed to completion. The median duration of weaning was 10 days (range 0–91 days). The conversion ratio for IV morphine to oral methadone was 1:0.78 for anticipated 5-day weaning and 1:0.98 for anticipated 10-day weaning. During the first 10 days of weaning, 18 patients (42%) experienced withdrawal symptoms. The methadone dose was increased for 11 (26%) of the 43 patients. Patients were sedated for a median of 1 day (range 0–9 days), were comfortable for a median of 6.5 days (range 1–64 days), and were agitated for a median of 2.5 days (range 0–23 days). Naloxone was required for 2 patients. Conclusions

  1. Beneficial effects of co-treatment with dextromethorphan on prenatally methadone-exposed offspring.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yao-Chang; Ye, Li-Ci; Hsu, Kuei-Ying; Liao, Chien-Wei; Hung, Tsai-Wei; Lo, Wan-Jou; Ho, Ing-Kang; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2015-03-20

    Heroin use among young women of reproductive age has drawn much attention around the world. Although methadone is widely used in maintenance therapy for heroin/morphine addiction, the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to methadone and preventative therapy remain unclear. For revealing this question, female pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were sub-grouped to receive (1) vehicle, (2) methadone 5 mg/kg at embryonic day 3 (E3) and then 7 mg/kg from E4 to E20, (3) dextromethorphan (DM) 3 mg/kg, and (4) methadone + DM (the rats received methadone followed by DM treatment), subcutaneously, twice a day from E3 to E20. The body weight, natural withdrawal, pain sensitivity, ED50, conditioned place preference and water maze were conducted at different postnatal stages (P1 to P79) of offspring. The quantitative real-time RT-PCR and electrophysiology were also used to measure the gene expression of opioid receptors in the spinal cord and changes of LTP/LTD in the hippocampus, separately. Prenatal exposure to methadone or DM did not affect survival rate, body weight, water maze and LTP or LTD of offspring. However, prenatal methadone significantly increased the withdrawal symptoms, pain sensitivity, addiction liability and decreased the mRNA expression of pain related opioid receptors. Co-administration of DM with methadone in the maternal rats effectively prevented these abnormalities of offspring induced by methadone. Our study clearly showed that co-administration of dextromethorphan with methadone in the maternal rats prevented the adverse effects induced by prenatal methadone exposure. It implies that dextromethorphan may have a potential to be used in combination with methadone for maintenance treatment in pregnant heroin-addicted women to prevent the adverse effects induced by methadone on offspring.

  2. Alternative matrices for cocaine, heroin, and methadone in utero drug exposure detection.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; González-Colmenero, Eva; Lendoiro, Elena; Concheiro-Guisán, Ana; de Castro, Ana; Cruz-Landeira, Angelines; López-Rivadulla, Manuel

    2013-08-01

    Drug determination in biological matrices from the mother and the newborn is an objective measure of maternal and fetal drug exposure. The aim of this study was to compare maternal hair, meconium, umbilical cord, and placenta for detecting in utero drug exposure to cocaine, opiates, methadone, and amphetamines. Maternal hair, meconium, umbilical cord, and placenta were collected from 175 mother-newborn dyads. Maternal hair (segmented in trimesters) and meconium specimens were analyzed for cocaine, opiates, methadone, and amphetamines. If either maternal hair or meconium tested positive, umbilical cord and placenta were analyzed. Analyses were performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. In hair, 24 participants tested positive; 21 for cocaine [cocaine 20-50,605, benzoylecgonine (BE) 17-46,668 pg/mg], 7 for methadone (76-26,845 pg/mg), 2 for opiates (morphine 298-2398 pg/mg, codeine 65-914 pg/mg, 6-acetylmorphine 1635-15,657 pg/mg), and 1 for amphetamines (amphetamine 1990 pg/mg, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine 30 pg/mg, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine 294 pg/mg). In meconium, 6 were positive; 5 for methadone [methadone 88-3752, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) 642-25,179 ng/g], 3 for cocaine (cocaine 7, BE 79, hydroxybenzoylecgonine 5-135, ecgonine-methyl ester 2-56 ng/g), and 2 for opiates (morphine 152-1025, morphine-3-glucuronide 22-23, codeine 4-34 ng/g). Placenta and umbilical cord were positive in 5 and 6 cases, respectively; 5 for methadone in placenta (methadone 7-543, EDDP 10-51 ng/g) and cord (methadone 3-183, EDDP 2-109 ng/g); 1 for cocaine in placenta (cocaine 7, BE 2 ng/g) and cord (BE 6 ng/g); and 1 for opiates in placenta (morphine 6, morphine-3-glucuronide 48 ng/g), and 2 in cord (morphine 2, morphine-3-glucuronide 15-38, morphine-6-glucuronide 5 ng/g). Meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord only tested positive if hair concentrations were greater than Society of Hair Testing cutoffs. Maternal hair is the most

  3. Methadone for neuropathic pain in adults.

    PubMed

    McNicol, Ewan D; Ferguson, McKenzie C; Schumann, Roman

    2017-05-17

    This review replaces an earlier review, "Methadone for chronic non-cancer pain in adults". This review serves to update the original and includes only studies of neuropathic pain. Methadone belongs to a class of analgesics known as opioids, that are considered the cornerstone of therapy for moderate-to-severe postsurgical pain and pain due to life-threatening illnesses; however, their use in neuropathic pain is controversial. Methadone has many characteristics that differentiate it from other opioids, which suggests that it may have a different efficacy and safety profile. To assess the analgesic efficacy and adverse events of methadone for chronic neuropathic pain in adults. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (CRSO), MEDLINE (Ovid), and Embase (Ovid), and two clinical trial registries. We also searched the reference lists of retrieved articles. The date of the most recent search was 30 November 2016. We included randomised, double-blind studies of two weeks' duration or longer, comparing methadone (in any dose, administered by any route, and in any formulation) with placebo or another active treatment in chronic neuropathic pain. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Two review authors independently considered trials for inclusion in the review, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. There were insufficient data to perform pooled analyses. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence for each outcome using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. We included three studies, involving 105 participants. All were cross-over studies, one involving 19 participants with diverse neuropathic pain syndromes, the other two involving 86 participants with postherpetic neuralgia. Study phases ranged from 20 days to approximately eight weeks. All administered methadone orally, in doses ranging from 10 mg to 80 mg daily. Comparators were primarily placebo, but one study also included morphine and tricyclic antidepressants

  4. Buprenorphine Versus Methadone for Opioid Dependence in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Noormohammadi, Arezo; Forinash, Alicia; Yancey, Abigail; Crannage, Erica; Campbell, Kristin; Shyken, Jaye

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate maternal and neonatal safety outcomes for methadone and buprenorphine in the obstetric population. A literature search of PubMed (1966 to March 2016) and EMBASE (1973 to March 2016) was completed using the search terms buprenorphine, methadone, pregnancy, opioid, and neonatal abstinence syndrome Priority was given to randomized controlled trials and trials directly comparing buprenorphine and methadone during pregnancy. The bibliographies were reviewed for other relevant articles. All human studies published in English, that compared methadone and buprenorphine use in pregnancy were evaluated. Because of the limited number of obstetric studies, only 5 critical studies were found. Buprenorphine significantly improved or had similar outcomes to methadone for development of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), percentage of infants requiring treatment for NAS (20%-47% vs 45.5%-57%, respectively), total amount of morphine used to treat NAS (0.472-3.4 vs 1.862-10.4 mg, respectively), duration of NAS (4.1-5.6 vs 5.3-9.9 days, respectively), peak NAS (3.9-11 vs 4.9-12.8 score, respectively), infant hospital stay (6.8-10.6 vs 8.1-17.5 days, respectively), and gestational age at delivery (38.8-39.7 vs 37.9-38.8 weeks, respectively). No difference was found with other neonatal or maternal outcomes. Both methadone and buprenorphine are effective agents, with improved safety compared with continued nonmedical opioid use during pregnancy. There is evidence to suggest that buprenorphine should be considered as an equivalent option to methadone for use in pregnancy; however, larger studies are still needed to fully evaluate buprenorphine safety and advantages over methadone in the obstetric population. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Methadone conversion in infants and children: Retrospective cohort study of 199 pediatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Fife, Alexandra; Postier, Andrea; Flood, Andrew; Friedrichsdorf, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Methadone administration has increased in pediatric clinical settings. This review is an attempt to ascertain an equianalgesic dose ratio for methadone in the pediatric population using standard adult dose conversion guidelines. US tertiary children's hospital. Hospitalized pediatric patients, 0-18 years of age. A retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who were converted from their initial opioid therapy regimen (morphine, hydromorphone, and/or fentanyl) to methadone. The primary endpoint was whether or not a dose correction was needed for methadone in the 6 days following conversion using standard dose conversion charts for adults. Documented clinical signs of withdrawal, unrelieved pain, or oversedation were examined. The majority (53.7 percent) of the 199 children were converted to methadone on intensive care units prior extubation or postextubation. The mean conversion ratio was 23.7 mg of oral morphine to 1 mg of oral methadone (median, 18.8 mg:1 mg, SD=25.7). Most patients experienced an adequate conversion (n=115, 57.8 percent), while 83 (41.7 percent) appeared undermedicated, and one child was oversedated. There were no associations found with conversion ratios for initial morphine dose, days to conversion, or effect of withdrawal of concomitant agents with potential for withdrawal. Opioid conversion to methadone is commonly practiced at our institution; however, dosing was significantly lower compared to adult conversion ratios, and more than 40 percent of children were undermedicated. The majority of children in this study received opioids for sedation while intubated and ventilated; therefore, safe and efficacious pediatric methadone conversion rates remain unclear. Prospective studies are needed.

  6. The action of morphine and related substances on contraction and on acetylcholine output of coaxially stimulated guinea-pig ileum

    PubMed Central

    Paton, W. D. M.

    1957-01-01

    Morphine depresses the twitch and tetanus of stimulated guinea-pig ileum by reducing acetylcholine released from cholinergic nerve endings. Acetylcholine output per shock falls to roughly the same residual amount at varying stimulation rates. Since normal output per shock declines with increasing stimulus frequency, the proportionate effect of morphine diminishes as stimulus frequency rises. Acute “tolerance” to morphine and a state of “morphinedependence” can be produced. Phenadoxone, dihydromorphinone, metopon, methadone, and heroin are more active, codeine and pethidine less active, than morphine. Nalorphine also depresses the twitch and can desensitize the gut both to itself and to morphine. PMID:13413163

  7. Distribution of Oxycodone in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    Distribution of Oxycodone in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues Sabra R. Botch Robert D. Johnson Arvind K. Chaturvedi Russell J. Lewis Civil Aerospace...Title and Subtitle 5. Report Date June 2010 6. Performing Organization Code Distribution of Oxycodone in Postmortem Fluids and Tissues 7...16. Abstract Introduction: Oxycodone is a heavily used and abused analgesic agent. Its pharmacological effects, including euphoria, respiratory

  8. Prolonged-Release Oxycodone/Naloxone Improves Anal Sphincter Relaxation Compared to Oxycodone Plus Macrogol 3350.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Brock, Christina; Grønlund, Debbie; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans; Krogh, Klaus; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2017-10-06

    Opioid analgesics inhibit anal sphincter function and contribute to opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD). However, it is unknown whether the inhibition can be reduced by opioid antagonism with prolonged-release (PR) naloxone and how this compares to laxative treatment. To compare the effects of combined PR oxycodone/naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350 on anal sphincter function and gastrointestinal symptoms. A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial was conducted in 20 healthy men. Participants were treated for 5 days with combined PR oxycodone/naloxone or PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. Resting anal pressure, anal canal distensibility, and relaxation of the internal sphincter to rectal distension were evaluated before treatment (baseline) and on day 5. The Patient Assessment of Constipation Symptom (PAC-SYM) questionnaire, stool frequency, and stool consistency were assessed daily. Both PR oxycodone/naloxone and PR oxycodone plus macrogol treatment decreased sphincter relaxation compared to baseline (- 27.5%; P < 0.001 and - 14.7%; P = 0.01). However, sphincter relaxation was increased after PR naloxone/oxycodone treatment compared to macrogol (difference = + 17.6%; P < 0.001). Resting anal pressure and anal canal distensibility did not differ between treatments. PAC-SYM abdominal symptoms score was lower during PR naloxone compared to macrogol (0.2 vs. 3.2; P = 0.002). The number of bowel movements was lower during PR naloxone versus macrogol (4.2 vs. 5.4; P = 0.035). Relaxation of the internal anal sphincter was significantly better after PR oxycodone/naloxone treatment compared to PR oxycodone plus macrogol 3350. These findings highlight that OIBD may require specific therapy against the complex, pan-intestinal effects of opioids.

  9. Methadone and perinatal outcomes: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Brian J; Eogan, Maeve; O'Connell, Michael P; Fahey, Tom; Gallagher, Paul J; Clarke, Tom; White, Martin J; McDermott, Christine; O'Sullivan, Anne; Carmody, Deirdre; Gleeson, Justin; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2012-08-01

    Methadone use in pregnancy has been associated with adverse perinatal outcomes and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). This study aimed to examine perinatal outcomes and NAS in relation to (i) concomitant drug use and (ii) methadone dose.   Prospective cohort study.   Two tertiary care maternity hospitals.   A total of 117 pregnant women on methadone maintenance treatment recruited between July 2009 and July 2010.   Information on concomitant drug use was recorded with the Addiction Severity Index. Perinatal outcomes included pre-term birth (<37 weeks' gestation), small-for-gestational-age (<10th centile) and neonatal unit admission. NAS outcomes included: incidence of medically treated NAS, peak Finnegan score, cumulative dose of NAS treatment and duration of hospitalization.   Of the 114 liveborn infants 11 (9.6%) were born pre-term, 49 (42.9%) were small-for-gestational-age, 56 (49.1%) had a neonatal unit admission and 29 (25.4%) were treated medically for NAS. Neonates exposed to methadone-only had a shorter hospitalization than those exposed to methadone and concomitant drugs (median 5.0 days versus 6.0 days, P = 0.03). Neonates exposed to methadone doses ≥80 mg required higher cumulative doses of morphine treatment for NAS (median 13.2 mg versus 19.3 mg, P = 0.03). The incidence and duration of NAS did not differ between the two dosage groups.   The incidence and duration of the neonatal abstinence syndrome is not associated with maternal methadone dose, but maternal opiate, benzodiazepine or cocaine use is associated with longer neonatal hospitalization. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  10. Evaluation of poly-drug use in methadone-related fatalities using segmental hair analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Marie Katrine Klose; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2015-03-01

    In Denmark, fatal poisoning among drug addicts is often related to methadone. The primary mechanism contributing to fatal methadone overdose is respiratory depression. Concurrent use of other central nervous system (CNS) depressants is suggested to heighten the potential for fatal methadone toxicity. Reduced tolerance due to a short-time abstinence period is also proposed to determine a risk for fatal overdose. The primary aims of this study were to investigate if concurrent use of CNS depressants or reduced tolerance were significant risk factors in methadone-related fatalities using segmental hair analysis. The study included 99 methadone-related fatalities collected in Denmark from 2008 to 2011, where both blood and hair were available. The cases were divided into three subgroups based on the cause of death; methadone poisoning (N=64), poly-drug poisoning (N=28) or methadone poisoning combined with fatal diseases (N=7). No significant differences between methadone concentrations in the subgroups were obtained in both blood and hair. The methadone blood concentrations were highly variable (0.015-5.3, median: 0.52mg/kg) and mainly within the concentration range detected in living methadone users. In hair, methadone was detected in 97 fatalities with concentrations ranging from 0.061 to 211ng/mg (median: 11ng/mg). In the remaining two cases, methadone was detected in blood but absent in hair specimens, suggesting that these two subjects were methadone-naive users. Extensive poly-drug use was observed in all three subgroups, both recently and within the last months prior to death. Especially, concurrent use of multiple benzodiazepines was prevalent among the deceased followed by the abuse of morphine, codeine, amphetamine, cannabis, cocaine and ethanol. By including quantitative segmental hair analysis, additional information on poly-drug use was obtained. Especially, 6-acetylmorphine was detected more frequently in hair specimens, indicating that regular abuse of

  11. The effect of single-dose tramadol on oxycodone clearance.

    PubMed

    Curry, Steven C; Watts, David J; Katz, Kenneth D; Bikin, Dale; Bukaveckas, Bonny L

    2007-11-01

    We have noticed increased prescribing of tramadol by emergency physicians for breakthrough pain in patients chronically taking oxycodone. Both oxycodone and tramadol undergo oxidative metabolism by CYP2D6 and CYP3A4, suggesting the possibility that tramadol may compete with oxycodone for metabolism. A randomized controlled trial in 10 human volunteers was performed to determine if single-dose tramadol therapy would impair oxycodone clearance. Subjects were randomized whether to enter the control or experimental arm of the study first, with each subject serving as his or her own control. In the control arm, each subject received 10 mg immediate-release oxycodone orally and had serial plasma oxycodone and oxymorphone concentrations measured over 8 h. The experimental arm was identical except that 100 mg tramadol was ingested 1.5 h before oxycodone. Clearance divided by fraction absorbed (CL/f) was calculated using the dose and the area under the 8-h time-plasma oxycodone concentration curve. Peak plasma oxycodone concentrations (C(max)) and time until peak oxycodone concentrations (T(max)) were secondary outcome parameters. Group size was chosen to produce a power of 0.8 to detect a 20% difference in CL/f between study arms. Values for CL/f, C(max), and T(max) were compared between study arms using two-tailed, paired t-tests. No statistically significant difference between groups was demonstrated for any parameter. We failed to demonstrate that single doses of tramadol impaired oxycodone clearance.

  12. The Methadone Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lennard, Henry L.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    Methadone treatment for heroin addiction does not touch the roots of the drug problem" and to think that the use of another drug can solve the profound and complex task facing us is indeed an illusion." (Author/AL)

  13. Methadone maintenance: some client opinions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B S; Benn, G J; Jansen, D R

    1975-06-01

    The authors found similar attitudes toward methadone and methadone treatment programs in 75 detoxification and 115 methadone maintenance clients. Both groups expressed considerable ambivalence--although they viewed methadone as capable of helping them end their herioin addiction, they were concerned about possible methadone dependence and about side effects, both real and imagined. The authors stress the societal context of such concern and suggest that, althought they are not easily allayed, limiting the duration of methadone maintenace from the outset of treatment may be an ameliorative factor.

  14. Neonatal abstinence syndrome after methadone or buprenorphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Kaltenbach, Karol; Heil, Sarah H; Stine, Susan M; Coyle, Mara G; Arria, Amelia M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Selby, Peter; Martin, Peter R; Fischer, Gabriele

    2010-12-09

    Methadone, a full mu-opioid agonist, is the recommended treatment for opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, prenatal exposure to methadone is associated with a neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) characterized by central nervous system hyperirritability and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, which often requires medication and extended hospitalization. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid agonist, is an alternative treatment for opioid dependence but has not been extensively studied in pregnancy. We conducted a double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized, controlled study in which buprenorphine and methadone were compared for use in the comprehensive care of 175 pregnant women with opioid dependency at eight international sites. Primary outcomes were the number of neonates requiring treatment for NAS, the peak NAS score, the total amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, the length of the hospital stay for neonates, and neonatal head circumference. Treatment was discontinued by 16 of the 89 women in the methadone group (18%) and 28 of the 86 women in the buprenorphine group (33%). A comparison of the 131 neonates whose mothers were followed to the end of pregnancy according to treatment group (with 58 exposed to buprenorphine and 73 exposed to methadone) showed that the former group required significantly less morphine (mean dose, 1.1 mg vs. 10.4 mg; P<0.0091), had a significantly shorter hospital stay (10.0 days vs. 17.5 days, P<0.0091), and had a significantly shorter duration of treatment for the neonatal abstinence syndrome (4.1 days vs. 9.9 days, P<0.003125) (P values calculated in accordance with prespecified thresholds for significance). There were no significant differences between groups in other primary or secondary outcomes or in the rates of maternal or neonatal adverse events. These results are consistent with the use of buprenorphine as an acceptable treatment for opioid dependence in pregnant women. (Funded by the National Institute

  15. Prevention of morphine dependence and tolerance by Nepeta menthoides was accompanied by attenuation of Nitric oxide overproduction in male mice.

    PubMed

    Rahmati, Batool; Beik, Ahmad

    2017-03-06

    Repeated administration of morphine for chronic pain leads to dependence and tolerance that limits clinical usage. Nepeta menthoides is commonly known as Iranian Ustukhuddoos and are administered in traditional medicine for gastrodynia, bone pain, blood depurative and restlessness. To investigate the effects of Nepeta menthoides on expression and acquisition of morphine dependence and tolerance in mice with regard to oxidative stress. Morphine dependence in mice was developed by administration of gradually increasing doses of morphine twice daily for 7 consecutive days. In experimental groups, administration of Nepeta menthoides (200 and 400mg/kg), methadone and their combination were performed 60min prior to each morphine injection (for acquisition) or the last injection of morphine on test day (for expression). Morphine tolerance was measured by the tail-immersion test before and after the administration of a single dose of morphine (100mg/kg; i.p.) on the test day (8th day). Morphine dependence was also evaluated by counting the number of jumps after the injection of naloxone (5mg/kg; i.p.). Nepeta menthoides, similar to methadone, significantly prevented the development (but not the expression) of morphine dependence, tolerance, and potentiated morphine antinociception and also reduced (23.23±1.15) Nitric oxide (NO) overproduction (35.23±3.36) (in compared with naloxone group (6.3±0.52)). However, single and repeated application of the extract could not change high single-dose morphine analgesia. It appears that Nepeta menthoides and methadone prevented morphine dependence and tolerance, partly through inhibition of the NO overproduction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Neonatal neurobehavior effects following buprenorphine versus methadone exposure.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Mara G; Salisbury, Amy L; Lester, Barry M; Jones, Hendrée E; Lin, Hai; Graf-Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Fischer, Gabriele

    2012-11-01

    To determine the effects of in utero exposure to methadone or buprenorphine on infant neurobehavior. Three sites from the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study, a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized clinical trial participated in this substudy. Medical Centers that provided comprehensive maternal care to opioid-dependent pregnant women in Baltimore, MD, Providence, RI and Vienna, Austria. Thirty-nine full-term infants. The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) was administered to a subgroup of infants on postpartum days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14-15 and 28-30. While neurobehavior improved for both medication conditions over time, infants exposed in utero to buprenorphine exhibited fewer stress-abstinence signs (P < 0.001), were less excitable (P < 0.001) and less over-aroused (P < 0.01), exhibited less hypertonia (P < 0.007), had better self-regulation (P < 0.04) and required less handling (P < 0.001) to maintain a quiet alert state relative to in utero methadone-exposed infants. Infants who were older when they began morphine treatment for withdrawal had higher self-regulation scores (P < 0.01), and demonstrated the least amount of excitability (P < 0.02) and hypertonia (P < 0.02) on average. Quality of movement was correlated negatively with peak NAS score (P < 0.01), number of days treated with morphine for NAS (P < 0.01) and total amount of morphine received (P < 0.03). Excitability scores were related positively to total morphine dose (P < 0.03). While neurobehavior improves during the first month of postnatal life for in utero agonist medication-exposed neonates, buprenorphine exposure results in superior neurobehavioral scores and less severe withdrawal than does methadone exposure. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Neonatal Neurobehavior Effects following Buprenorphine versus Methadone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Mara G.; Salisbury, Amy L.; Lester, Barry M.; Jones, Hendrée E.; Lin, Hai; Graf-Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Fisher, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the effects of in utero exposure to methadone or buprenorphine on infant neurobehavior. Design Three sites from the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study, a double-blind, double-dummy, randomized clinical trial participated in this sub-study. Setting Medical Centers that provided comprehensive maternal care to opioid-dependent pregnant women in Baltimore, MD, Providence, RI, and Vienna, Austria. Participants 39 full-term infants. Measurements The NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) was administered to a subgroup of infants on postpartum days 3, 5, 7, 10, 14-15 and 28-30. Findings While neurobehavior improved for both medication conditions over time, infants exposed in utero to buprenorphine exhibited fewer Stress-Abstinence signs (P<0.001), were less Excitable (P<0.001) and less Over-Aroused (P<0.01), exhibited less Hypertonia (P<0.007), and had better Self-Regulation (P<0.04) and required less Handling (P<0.001) to maintain a quiet alert state relative to in utero methadone-exposed infants. Infants who were older when they began morphine treatment for withdrawal had higher Self-Regulation scores (P<0.01), and demonstrated the least amount of Excitability (P<0.02) and Hypertonia (P<0.02) on average. Quality of Movement was negatively correlated with peak NAS score (P<0.01), number of days treated with morphine for NAS (P<0.01) and total amount of morphine received (P<0.03). Excitability scores were positively related to total morphine dose (P<0.03). Conclusion While neurobehavior improves during the first month of postnatal life for in utero agonist-medication-exposed neonates, buprenorphine exposure results in superior neurobehavioral scores and less severe withdrawal than does methadone exposure. PMID:23106928

  18. [Methadone treatment and its dangers].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara; Jodziūniene, Liucija; Lazauskas, Robertas

    2009-01-01

    Methadone is a long-acting synthetic opioid with high affinity for various opioid receptors, especially for m-opioid receptors. Methadone has been used as a successful pharmacologic intervention for the treatment of heroin dependence and acute and chronic pain. This treatment is effective for opiate addiction, reducing morbidity and mortality associated with heroin use. However, overdosing with methadone has become a growing phenomenon because of the increased availability of this drug. Patients enrolled in a methadone maintenance treatment program may become physically dependent and may experience methadone withdrawal symptoms. In this review article, there are discussed about pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of methadone, clinical symptoms of its overdose, dosage problems, detection of methadone in biological samples, treatment, and causes of methadone overdose-related deaths.

  19. Methadone Treatment: Overview and Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenfield, Lawrence; Tang, Beth Archibald

    This overview focuses on methadone treatment. Briefly, it describes the clinical uses of methadone for substance abuse treatment, explores dosage guidelines, and discusses counseling components. This overview also reviews research data on the application of methadone treatment to special populations, such as pregnant women, polydrug users, and…

  20. Forensic drug testing for opiates. VI. Urine testing for hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone with commercial opiate immunoassays and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, M L; Hughes, R O; Levine, B; Dickerson, S; Darwin, W D; Cone, E J

    1995-01-01

    Opiate testing for morphine and codeine is performed routinely in forensic urine drug-testing laboratories in an effort to identify illicit opiate abusers. In addition to heroin, the 6-keto-opioids, including hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone, have high abuse liability and are self-administered by opiate abusers, but only limited information is available on detection of these compounds by current immunoassay and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) methods. In this study, single doses of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone were administered to human subjects, and urine samples were collected before and periodically after dosing. Opiate levels were determined in a quantitative mode with four commercial immunoassays, TDx opiates (TDx), Abuscreen radioimmunoassay (ABUS), Coat-A-Count morphine in urine (CAC), and EMIT d.a.u. opiate assay (EMIT), and by GC-MS. GC-MS assay results indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone administration resulted in rapid excretion of parent drug and O-demethylated metabolites in urine. Peak concentrations occurred within 8 h after drug administration and declined below 300 ng/mL within 24-48 h. Immunoassay testing indicated that hydromorphone, hydrocodone, and oxycodone, but not oxymorphone, were detectable in urine by TDx and EMIT (300-ng/mL cutoff) for 6-24 h. ABUS detected only hydrocodone, and CAC failed to detect any of the four 6-keto-opioid analgesics. Generally, immunoassays for opiates in urine displayed substantially lower sensitivities for 6-keto-opioids compared with GC-MS. Consequently, urine samples containing low to moderate concentrations of hydromorphone, hydrocodone, oxymorphone, and oxycodone will likely go undetected when tested by conventional immunoassays.

  1. Opioid intoxication

    MedlinePlus

    ... use of opioid-based drugs. These include morphine, heroin, oxycodone, and synthetic (man-made) opioid narcotics. Prescription ... United States, the most commonly abused opioids are heroin and methadone. People who become addicted to these ...

  2. An update on oxycodone: lessons for death investigators in Australia.

    PubMed

    Pilgrim, Jennifer L; Yafistham, Sabrina Putrianita; Gaya, Sanjeev; Saar, Eva; Drummer, Olaf H

    2015-03-01

    Oxycodone is one of the most abused prescription drugs. Iatrogenic factors that lead to oxycodone-related death, such as mis-prescribing, present an opportunity for death prevention if identified early. This study investigated deaths involving oxycodone in Australia to explore potentially inappropriate prescribing and the coroner's investigation. The National Coronial Information System identified cases from 2001 to 2011 where oxycodone was detected by toxicological analysis. There were 806 oxycodone-related deaths, with a significant increase in the 11-year period, from 21 deaths in 2001, up almost sevenfold in 2011 (139 deaths). Most deaths were caused by combined drug toxicity (63.4%) or oxycodone toxicity alone (11.8%). Most individuals were male (59.1%), aged 35-44 years (26.7%), who died unintentionally (56.4%), with mental illness (52.1%) and/or a history of acute or chronic pain (46.2%). 312 cases (39%) described a legitimate prescription for oxycodone, of which most involved non-cancer related chronic pain. About three quarters of the indications were deemed appropriate. There were at least 43 different indications treated with oxycodone that were inappropriate. The majority of oxycodone-related cases involved minor to no description of the drugs involved (n = 600; 74.4%). A moderate description of oxycodone involvement was given in 162 cases (20.1%), while only 44 cases (5.5%) involved a thorough examination and recommendations from the coroners on oxycodone and other drugs involved in death. This study emphasized the need for medical practitioners to exercise caution when prescribing oxycodone and for coroners to provide more consistent and detailed information regarding drug use, in order to identify and implement preventive strategies.

  3. Therapeutic and recreational methadone cardiotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Lusetti, Monia; Licata, Manuela; Silingardi, Enrico; Reggiani Bonetti, Luca; Palmiere, Cristian

    2016-04-01

    Several classes of drugs have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and occurrence of arrhythmias potentially involved in sudden deaths in chronic users even at therapeutic doses. The study presented herein focuses on pathological changes involving the heart possibly due to methadone use. 60 cases were included in the study in total and were divided into three groups (therapeutic methadone users: 20 cases, recreational methadone users: 20 cases, and sudden death group in subjects who had never taken methadone: 20 cases). Autopsies, histology, biochemistry and toxicology were performed in all cases. Macroscopic and microscopic investigation results in therapeutic methadone users were similar to those observed in sudden, unexpected deaths in non-methadone users. In recreational methadone consumers, macroscopic and microscopic examination of the heart failed to provide results consistent with acute or chronic myocardial or coronary damage, thereby corroborating the hypothesis of death most likely following respiratory depression.

  4. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  5. Comparison of tincture of opium and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in a Thai treatment centre

    PubMed Central

    Jittiwutikarn, Jaroon; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Bochner, Felix; Somogyi, Andrew A; Foster, David J R

    2004-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the effectiveness of oral tincture of opium (TOP) and methadone to control opioid withdrawal in patients in northern Thailand. Methods Open label, parallel group study in an inpatient facility compared 15 former heroin users receiving methadone 5–20 mg 12 hourly with 15 former opium smokers receiving TOP (3.33–10 mg morphine equivalents 12 hourly). At 0, 1, 3 and 8 h, blood, withdrawal scores and subjective opioid effects were collected. Results There was a reciprocal association between withdrawal scores/direct subjective opioid effects and plasma (R)-methadone, but not plasma morphine, concentrations. Withdrawal scores at the time of dosing were higher in the TOP patients (9.1 ± 3) than in the methadone patients (4.5 ± 4.6) and in the TOP patients were significantly (P = 0.001) attenuated at 3 and 8 h. Conclusions At the doses used, TOP was inferior to methadone in suppressing withdrawal. It could prove to be a cost effective and valuable drug, but only after dose size and frequency are further investigated. PMID:15521902

  6. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lund, Ingunn O; Fitzsimons, Heather; Tuten, Michelle; Chisolm, Margaret S; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jones, Hendrée E

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically ompared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1) the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research) study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC), or (2) retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002), required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001), had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001), and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of days, on average (Means = 24.2 vs 7.0; P < 0.019). Compared with the buprenorphine maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 8.2 vs 0.2; P < 0.001) and significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 12.0 vs 3.9; P = 0.008). Findings suggest that it is possible for some opioid-dependent pregnant women to succeed with methadone-assisted withdrawal. Future research needs to more fully evaluate the potential benefits and

  7. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Ingunn O; Fitzsimons, Heather; Tuten, Michelle; Chisolm, Margaret S; O’Grady, Kevin E; Jones, Hendrée E

    2012-01-01

    Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically ompared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1) the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research) study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC), or (2) retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002), required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001), had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001), and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of days, on average (Means = 24.2 vs 7.0; P < 0.019). Compared with the buprenorphine maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 8.2 vs 0.2; P < 0.001) and significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 12.0 vs 3.9; P = 0.008). Findings suggest that it is possible for some opioid-dependent pregnant women to succeed with methadone-assisted withdrawal. Future research needs to more fully evaluate the potential benefits and

  8. Intrathecal Morphine Versus Extended-Release Epidural Morphine for Postoperative Pain Control in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Posterior Spinal Fusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mindy; Zuk, Jeannie; McKay, Nancy; Erickson, Mark; Pan, Zhaoxing; Galinkin, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Posterior spinal fusion for scoliosis is one of the most painful elective pediatric surgeries. Good postoperative pain control allows early ambulation and return of ability to tolerate oral intake. Options for analgesia in this patient population are suboptimal. We hypothesized that extended-release epidural morphine (EREM) would provide better pain control and less adverse effects compared to intrathecal (IT) morphine. The primary outcome was total IV morphine consumption during 0-48 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes included time until first patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) demand, pain scores, and adverse opioid effects. After institutional review board approval, 71 subjects undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis completed the study. The subjects were randomly allocated to 7.5 μg/kg IT morphine or 150 μg/kg EREM. The final IT morphine and EREM groups contained 37 and 34 subjects, respectively. Postoperative pain was treated with morphine PCA, ketorolac, oral oxycodone, and acetaminophen. Morphine consumption, pain scores, nausea and vomiting, pruritus, and respiratory depression were measured every 4 hours. Parents completed a caregiver questionnaire about their child's pain control regimen after the first postoperative day. There was no difference in total morphine consumption over the first 48 hours between subjects in the EREM and IT morphine groups: median (range) 42.2 (5.5-123.0) and 34.0 (4.5-128.8) mg, respectively (P = .27). EREM and IT morphine groups had no difference in time until first PCA demand. Pain scores were no different between the groups from 8 to 24 hours after surgery. Compared to IT morphine, EREM subjects had lower pain scores from 28 to 36 hours after surgery. The reported incidence of pruritus was lower in the EREM subjects. There was no difference in total morphine consumption or time until first PCA demand between the EREM and IT morphine groups. EREM provides a longer duration of analgesia after

  9. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assay for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, cocaine, opiates and metabolites in human umbilical cord.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana; Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2009-10-01

    A liquid chromatography mass spectrometric selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) method for methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and codeine quantification in human umbilical cord was developed and fully validated. Analytes were extracted from homogenized tissue (1g) by solid phase extraction. Linearity was 2.5-500ng/g, except for methadone (10-2000ng/g). Method imprecision was <12.7%CV with analytical recovery 85.9-112.7%, extraction efficiency >59.2%, matrix effect 4.5-39.5%, process efficiency 48.6-92.6% and stability >84.6%. Analysis of an umbilical cord following controlled methadone administration and illicit drug use contained in ng/g, 40.3 morphine, 3.6 codeine, 442 BE, 186 methadone and 45.9 EDDP.

  10. Development and validation of a liquid chromatography mass spectrometry assay for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, cocaine, opiates and metabolites in human umbilical cord

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    A liquid chromatography mass spectrometric selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM) method for methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), 6-acetylmorphine, morphine and codeine quantification in human umbilical cord was developed and fully validated. Analytes were extracted from homogenized tissue (1 g) by solid phase extraction. Linearity was 2.5–500 ng/g, except for methadone (10–2000 ng/g). Method imprecision was <12.7%CV with analytical recovery 85.9–112.7%, extraction efficiency >59.2%, matrix effect 4.5–39.5%, process efficiency 48.6–92.6% and stability >84.6%. Analysis of an umbilical cord following controlled methadone administration and illicit drug use contained in ng/g, 40.3 morphine, 3.6 codeine, 442 BE, 186 methadone and 45.9 EDDP. PMID:19656745

  11. Differences in the profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome signs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates

    PubMed Central

    Gaalema, Diann E.; Scott, Teresa Linares; Heil, Sarah H.; Coyle, Mara G.; Kaltenbach, Karol; Badger, Gary J.; Arria, Amelia M.; Stine, Susan M.; Martin, Peter R.; Jones, Hendrée E.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To compare the profile of signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed infants. Design, setting and participants Secondary analysis of NAS data from a multi-site, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized clinical trial. Data from a total of 129 neonates born to opioid-dependent women who had been assigned to receive methadone or buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy were examined. Measurements For 10 days after delivery, neonates (methadone = 72, buprenorphine = 57) were assessed regularly using a 19-item modified Finnegan scale. Data from neonates who required pharmacological treatment (methadone = 41, buprenorphine = 27) were included up to the time treatment was initiated. The incidence and mean severity of the total NAS score and each individual sign of NAS were calculated and compared between medication conditions, as was the median time until morphine treatment initiation among treated infants in each condition. Findings Two NAS signs (undisturbed tremors and hyperactive Moro reflex) were observed significantly more frequently in methadone-exposed neonates and three (nasal stuffiness, sneezing, loose stools) were observed more frequently in buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Mean severity scores on the total NAS score and five individual signs (disturbed and undisturbed tremors, hyperactive Moro reflex, excessive irritability, failure to thrive) were significantly higher among methadone-exposed neonates, while sneezing was higher among buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Among treated neonates, methadone-exposed infants required treatment significantly earlier than buprenorphine-exposed infants (36 versus 59 hours postnatal, respectively). Conclusions The profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome differs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates, with significant differences in incidence, severity and treatment initiation time. Overall, methadone-exposed neonates have a more severe neonatal

  12. Differences in the profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome signs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates.

    PubMed

    Gaalema, Diann E; Scott, Teresa Linares; Heil, Sarah H; Coyle, Mara G; Kaltenbach, Karol; Badger, Gary J; Arria, Amelia M; Stine, Susan M; Martin, Peter R; Jones, Hendrée E

    2012-11-01

    To compare the profile of signs of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed infants. Secondary analysis of NAS data from a multi-site, double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized clinical trial. Data from a total of 129 neonates born to opioid-dependent women who had been assigned to receive methadone or buprenorphine treatment during pregnancy were examined. For 10 days after delivery, neonates (methadone = 72, buprenorphine = 57) were assessed regularly using a 19-item modified Finnegan scale. Data from neonates who required pharmacological treatment (methadone = 41, buprenorphine = 27) were included up to the time treatment was initiated. The incidence and mean severity of the total NAS score and each individual sign of NAS were calculated and compared between medication conditions, as was the median time until morphine treatment initiation among treated infants in each condition. Two NAS signs (undisturbed tremors and hyperactive Moro reflex) were observed significantly more frequently in methadone-exposed neonates and three (nasal stuffiness, sneezing, loose stools) were observed more frequently in buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Mean severity scores on the total NAS score and five individual signs (disturbed and undisturbed tremors, hyperactive Moro reflex, excessive irritability, failure to thrive) were significantly higher among methadone-exposed neonates, while sneezing was higher among buprenorphine-exposed neonates. Among treated neonates, methadone-exposed infants required treatment significantly earlier than buprenorphine-exposed infants (36 versus 59 hours postnatal, respectively). The profile of neonatal abstinence syndrome differs in methadone- versus buprenorphine-exposed neonates, with significant differences in incidence, severity and treatment initiation time. Overall, methadone-exposed neonates have a more severe neonatal abstinence syndrome. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the

  13. Morphine Tolerance as a Function of Ratio Schedule: Response Requirement or Unit Price?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Pitts, Raymond C.; Dykstra, Linda A.

    2005-01-01

    Key pecking by 3 pigeons was maintained by a multiple fixed-ratio 10, fixed-ratio 30, fixed-ratio 90 schedule of food presentation. Components differed with respect to amount of reinforcement, such that the unit price was 10 responses per 1-s access to food. Acute administration of morphine, "l"-methadone, and cocaine dose-dependently decreased…

  14. Morphine Tolerance as a Function of Ratio Schedule: Response Requirement or Unit Price?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey C.; Pitts, Raymond C.; Dykstra, Linda A.

    2005-01-01

    Key pecking by 3 pigeons was maintained by a multiple fixed-ratio 10, fixed-ratio 30, fixed-ratio 90 schedule of food presentation. Components differed with respect to amount of reinforcement, such that the unit price was 10 responses per 1-s access to food. Acute administration of morphine, "l"-methadone, and cocaine dose-dependently decreased…

  15. Fentanyl tolerance in the treatment of cancer pain: a case of successful opioid switching from fentanyl to oxycodone at a reduced equivalent dose.

    PubMed

    Sutou, Ichiro; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Yoji

    2015-06-01

    Opioids are not generally deemed to have an analgesic ceiling effect on cancer pain. However, there have been occasional reports of tolerance to opioid development induced by multiple doses of fentanyl. The authors report a case of suspected tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioid, in which an increasing dose of fentanyl failed to relieve the patient's cancer pain symptoms, but opioid switching to oxycodone injections enabled a dose reduction to below the equivalent dose conversion ratio. The patient was a 60-year-old man diagnosed with pancreatic body carcinoma with multiple metastases. The base dose consisted of 12 mg/day of transdermal fentanyl patches (equivalent to 3.6 mg/day, 150 μg/h fentanyl injection), and rescue therapy consisted of 10 mg immediate-release oxycodone powders. Despite the total daily dose of fentanyl reaching 5.6 mg (equivalent to 560 mg oral morphine), the analgesic effect was inadequate; thus, an urgent adjustment was necessary. Due to the moderate dose of fentanyl, the switch to oxycodone injection was done incrementally at a daily dose equivalent to 25% of the fentanyl injection. The total dose of oxycodone was replaced approximately 53.5% of the dose of fentanyl prior to opioid switching.

  16. Short-term oxycodone treatment does not affect electrogenic ion transport in isolated mucosa from the human rectosigmoid colon.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Matias; Brock, Christina; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Bindslev, Niels; Hansen, Mark Berner; Louring Christrup, Lona; Drewes, A M

    2016-01-01

    Opioid therapy is associated with altered secretion and motility of the gut. The relative contribution of decreased secretion to the development of opioid-induced constipation remains unknown. Twenty-five healthy males were treated with oxycodone for 5 d in a placebo-controlled, randomised cross-over design. Gastrointestinal adverse effects were assessed with validated questionnaires (bowel function index and gastrointestinal symptom rating scale). Rectosigmoid mucosal biopsies were taken at baseline and on day 5 during both treatments and mounted in Ussing chambers. Electrogenic ion transport parameters (short circuit current (SCC) and slope conductance) were measured after addition of secretagogues (prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (6 μm), theophylline (400 μm)), and an inhibitor (ouabain (200 μm)). Additionally, morphine (50 μm) was added to investigate the direct opioid effect on colonic mucosa. Questionnaires showed pronounced bowel symptoms, including constipation during oxycodone treatment (eight-fold increase in bowel function index score from day 1 to day 5 (p < 0.001) while no significant change occurred during placebo treatment (p = 0.47). Basal SCC and slope conductance did not differ between treatments (all p > 0.05) and application with PGE2, theophylline, and ouabain yielded comparable results on all examinations (all p > 0.05). Morphine application consistently did not evoke a change in ion transport. Compared to placebo, epithelial electrogenic ion transport is not altered in mucosal biopsies from the rectosigmoid colon following 5-d oxycodone treatment. The secretory mechanisms in isolated mucosa appear to play a negligible role in the development of opioid-induced constipation.

  17. Prescription opioid dependence and treatment with methadone in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Sander, Stephanie C Eken; Hays, Lon R

    2005-01-01

    Prescription opioids are used medically to treat pain, but their diversion and abuse continues to escalate in the United States. Abuse of OxyContin (Purdue Pharma LP, Stamford, CT), a timed-release form of oxycodone, is a major focus of public health and law enforcement agencies. The rise in opioid abuse may lead to an increase in opioid dependence in pregnancy, which was a focus of this study. Our retrospective chart review examined the demographics and patterns of opioid addiction of pregnant women admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit in an academic medical center in central Kentucky. Charts of 94 women admitted from January 2001 to May 2004 were reviewed. Information obtained included demographics and details of their opioid use, including the specific opioid(s) used, route of administration, and duration of use. Treatment information included length of hospital stay, stabilizing dose of methadone, comorbid drug use, and concomitant Axis I diagnoses. Most women were in their mid-twenties and in the second trimester of pregnancy when they sought treatment. Benzodiazepines were the most common comorbid drugs of abuse and the most frequent medical complication of their drug use was hepatitis C, newly diagnosed in 11 patients. This study demonstrates the need for further research in prescription opioid dependency in pregnancy, methadone maintenance therapy, the safety of detoxification, and neonatal outcomes.

  18. Methadone and prescription drug overdose.

    PubMed

    Hendrikson, Hollie; Hansen, Melissa

    2014-12-01

    (1) Methadone accounted for 2 percent of painkiller prescriptions and more than 30 percent of prescription painkiller deaths in 2009. (2) Data suggest that the rise in deaths from methadone overdose is not related to its use in treating drug abuse but, rather, to its use for pain management. (3) Preferred drug lists in most Medicaid programs identify methadone as a preferred drug for managing chronic pain, but most experts do no recommend it as a first choice.

  19. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome.

  20. Buprenorphine and naloxone compared with methadone treatment in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Samantha L; Stringer, Elizabeth M; Stuebe, Alison M; Jones, Hendree; Seashore, Carl; Thorp, John

    2015-02-01

    To compare neonatal abstinence syndrome prevalence and characteristics among neonates born to women prescribed buprenorphine and naloxone compared with methadone during pregnancy. Retrospective cohort analysis of mother-neonate dyads treated with either buprenorphine and naloxone or methadone during pregnancy. Primary neonatal outcomes included diagnosis of neonatal abstinence syndrome, neonatal abstinence syndrome peak scores, total amount of morphine used to treat neonatal abstinence syndrome (mg), and duration of treatment for neonatal abstinence syndrome (days). Secondary outcomes included head circumference, birth weight, length, preterm birth, neonatal intensive care unit admission, Apgar scores, and overall length of hospitalization. From January 1, 2011, to November 30, 2013, we identified 62 mother-neonate dyads, 31 treated with methadone and 31 treated with buprenorphine and naloxone. Sixteen neonates (51.6%) in the methadone group were diagnosed with neonatal abstinence syndrome compared with eight (25.1%) in the buprenorphine and naloxone group (adjusted odds ratio 2.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-4.98, P = .01). The buprenorphine and naloxone-exposed neonates had lower peak neonatal abstinence syndrome scores (9.0 ± 4.4 compared with 10.7 ± 3.7, multivariate-adjusted mean difference = -2.77, 95% CI -4.99 to -0.56, P = .02) and shorter overall hospitalization (5.6 ± 5.0 compared with 9.8 ± 7.4 days, multivariate-adjusted mean difference = -3.90, 95% CI, -7.13 to -0.67, P = .02). We found no other differences in primary or secondary outcomes. In a cohort of pregnant patients treated with either methadone or buprenorphine and naloxone in pregnancy, newborns exposed to maternal buprenorphine and naloxone had less frequent neonatal abstinence syndrome. Additionally, neonates exposed to buprenorphine and naloxone had shorter overall hospitalization lengths.

  1. Neuroexcitatory effects of morphine and hydromorphone: evidence implicating the 3-glucuronide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Smith, M T

    2000-07-01

    1. Morphine is recommended by the World Health Organization as the drug of choice for the management of moderate to severe cancer pain. 2. Education of health professionals in the past decade has resulted in a large increase in the prescribing of opioids, such as morphine, and in the magnitude of the doses administered, resulting in an improvement in the quality of pain relief available for many cancer patients. 3. However, the reported incidence of neuroexcitatory side effects (allodynia, myoclonus, seizures) in patients administered large doses of systemic morphine or its structural analogue, hydromorphone (HMOR), has also increased. 4. Clinically, increasing the magnitude of the morphine or HMOR dose administered to patients already exhibiting neuroexcitatory opioid related side effects, results in an exacerbation rather than an attenuation of the excitatory behaviours. 5. In contrast, cessation of the opioid or rotation to a structurally dissimilar opioid (e.g. from morphine/HMOR to methadone or fentanyl), usually results in a restoration of analgesia and resolution of the neuroexcitatory opioid side effects over a period of hours to days. 6. To explain the clinical success of 'opioid rotation', it is essential to understand the in vivo metabolic fate of morphine and HMOR. 7. Following systemic administration, morphine and HMOR are metabolized primarily to the corresponding 3-glucuronide metabolites, morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) and hydromorphone-3-glucuronide (H3G), which are not only devoid of analgesic activity but evoke a range of dose-dependent excitatory behaviours, including allodynia, myoclonus and seizures, following intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration to rats. 8. Several studies have shown that, following chronic oral or subcutaneous morphine administration to patients with cancer pain, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of M3G exceed those of morphine and morphine-6-glucuronide (analgesically active morphine metabolite) by

  2. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Respiratory Depressant Effects of Morphine

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Rob; Lyndon, Abi; Withey, Sarah; Roberts, Joanne; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacLachlan, John; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Kelly, Eamonn; Bailey, Chris; Hickman, Matthew; Henderson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the most common drugs associated with unintentional drug overdose. Death results from respiratory depression. Prolonged use of opioids results in the development of tolerance but the degree of tolerance is thought to vary between different effects of the drugs. Many opioid addicts regularly consume alcohol (ethanol), and post-mortem analyses of opioid overdose deaths have revealed an inverse correlation between blood morphine and ethanol levels. In the present study, we determined whether ethanol reduced tolerance to the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Mice were treated with opioids (morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine) for up to 6 days. Respiration was measured in freely moving animals breathing 5% CO2 in air in plethysmograph chambers. Antinociception (analgesia) was measured as the latency to remove the tail from a thermal stimulus. Opioid tolerance was assessed by measuring the response to a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.). Tolerance developed to the respiratory depressant effect of morphine but at a slower rate than tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. A low dose of ethanol (0.3 mg/kg) alone did not depress respiration but in prolonged morphine-treated animals respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered with the morphine challenge. Ethanol did not alter the brain levels of morphine. In contrast, in methadone- or buprenorphine-treated animals no respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered along with the morphine challenge. As heroin is converted to morphine in man, selective reversal of morphine tolerance by ethanol may be a contributory factor in heroin overdose deaths. PMID:26171718

  3. Sophora alopecuroides L. var. alopecuroides alleviates morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice: involvement of alkaloid fraction and matrine

    PubMed Central

    Kianbakht, Saeed; Hashem Dabaghian, Fataneh

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Evaluation of the Sophora alopecuroides var. alopecuroides seed effects on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mice and determination of the alkaloid composition of the seed total extract. Materials and Methods: The effects of the seed total extract, alkaloid fraction and major compound matrine on the mice morphine withdrawal syndrome were compared to saline and methadone. Mice were made dependent on morphine by morphine sulfate injection 3 times a day for 3 days. The withdrawal jumping and diarrhea were induced by administration of naloxone 2 hr after the 10th injection of morphine sulfate on the day 4. The total extract (100, 200, 300 mg/kg), alkaloid fraction (5, 10, 20 mg/kg), matrine (5, 15, 30 mg/kg), methadone (10 mg/kg) or saline were injected 30 min before naloxone. All drugs were administered by subcutaneous injection. The total extract alkaloid composition was also determined by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-MS analysis. Results: All doses of the total extract, alkaloid fraction and matrine as well as methadone decreased jumping and diarrhea significantly compared to the saline. The effects of the total extract and alkaloid fraction were not significantly different from methadone. But, there were significant differences between the effects of matrine and methadone. Matrine, cytisine, sophoridine, n-methyl cytisine, sophocarpine and sophoramine were the major alkaloids. There was no nicotine in the total extract. Conclusion: S. alopecuroides var. alopecuroides suppresses opioid withdrawal with efficacy comparable to methadone. Matrine may be one of the alkaloids responsible for the effect of the plant. PMID:27872705

  4. Overall Survival among Cancer Patients Undergoing Opioid Rotation to Methadone Compared to Other Opioids.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Akhila; Schuler, Ulrich S; de la Cruz, Maxine; Yennurajalingam, Sriram; Wu, Jimin; Liu, Diane; Bruera, Eduardo

    2017-06-01

    Methadone has been associated with lower overall survival (OS) in patients with chronic pain. There are no data available on the association of methadone with OS in cancer patients. Our aim was to compare the OS in cancer outpatients undergoing opioid rotation (OR) to methadone and other strong opioids. Demographics, symptoms, and morphine equivalent daily dose (MEDD) were collected in patients who underwent OR from strong opioids to either methadone or other strong opioids and returned for a follow-up within six weeks. Nine hundred thirty-eight consecutive outpatients to the supportive care center of a tertiary cancer center were reviewed. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate survival. Of a total of 164 eligible patients, 54/76 patients who underwent OR to methadone and 48/88 patients who underwent OR to other opioids returned for a follow-up visit. The median age was 56 years, 54% were male, and 87% had advanced cancer. There were no significant differences between the two groups in patient characteristics, performance status, MEDD, and pain scores. The Kaplan-Meier curves revealed no significant difference in median OS between all patients undergoing OR to methadone and other opioids [3.75 months (95% confidence interval, CI, 2.30-6.46) vs. 2.62 months (95% CI 1.74-4.33); p = 0.35] and also among those who returned for a follow-up following an OR to methadone and other opioids [5.15 months (95% CI 3.64-7.41) vs. 5.90 months (95% CI 2.62-9.28); p = 0.89]. We observed no significant difference in OS in cancer patients in methadone group compared to other opioids.

  5. Morphine enhances macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Singhal, P C; Sharma, P; Kapasi, A A; Reddy, K; Franki, N; Gibbons, N

    1998-02-15

    Laboratory data indicate that morphine decreases the numbier of peritoneal and alveolar macrophages (Mphi) and compromises their phagocytic capability for immune complexes and bacteria. We hypothesize that morphine decreases the number of, as well as compromises the phagocytic capability of, Mphi by programming their death. We studied the effect of morphine on Mphi apoptosis in vivo as well as in vitro. Peritoneal Mphi harvested from morphine-treated rats showed DNA fragmentation. Morphine enhanced murine Mphi (J 774.16) apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Human monocytes treated with morphine showed a classic ladder pattern in gel electrophoretic and end-labeling studies. Morphine promoted nitric oxide (NO) production both under basal and LPS-activated states. N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine monoacetate (L-NMMA), inhibitors of NO synthase, attenuated the morphine-induced generation of NO by Mphi. Morphine also enhanced Mphi mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). Since morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis was inhibited by L-NAME and L-NMMA, it appears that morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis may be mediated through the generation of NO. Morphine promoted the synthesis of Bax and p53 proteins by Mphi. Moreover, IL-converting enzyme (ICE)-1 inhibitor attenuated morphine-induced Mphi apoptosis. These studies suggest that morphine activates the induction phase of the apoptotic pathway through accumulation of p53. The effector phase of morphine-induced apoptosis appears to proceed through the accumulation of Bax and activation of ICE-1. The present study provides a basis for a hypothesis that morphine may be directly compromising immune function by promoting Mphi apoptosis in patients with opiate addiction.

  6. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. Methods This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN. PMID:26185466

  7. Maternal Methadone Dose, Placental Methadone Concentrations, and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Gray, Teresa R.; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few investigations have used placenta as an alternative matrix to detect in utero drug exposure, despite its availability at the time of birth and the large amount of sample. Methadone-maintained opioid-dependent pregnant women provide a unique opportunity to examine the placental disposition of methadone and metabolite [2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP)], to explore their correlations with maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes, and to test the ability to detect in utero exposure to illicit drugs. METHODS We calculated the correlations of placental methadone and EDDP concentrations and their correlations with maternal methadone doses and neonatal outcomes. Cocaine- and opiate-positive placenta results were compared with the results for meconium samples and for urine samples collected throughout gestation. RESULTS Positive correlations were found between placental methadone and EDDP concentrations (r = 0.685), and between methadone concentration and methadone dose at delivery (r = 0.542), mean daily dose (r = 0.554), mean third-trimester dose (r = 0.591), and cumulative daily dose (r = 0.639). The EDDP/methadone concentration ratio was negatively correlated with cumulative daily dose (r = 0.541) and positively correlated with peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score (r = 0.513). Placental EDDP concentration was negatively correlated with newborn head circumference (r = 0.579). Cocaine and opiate use was detected in far fewer placenta samples than in thrice-weekly urine and meconium samples, a result suggesting a short detection window for placenta. CONCLUSIONS Quantitative methadone and EDDP measurement may predict NAS severity. The placenta reflects in utero drug exposure for a shorter time than meconium but may be useful when meconium is unavailable or if documentation of recent exposure is needed. PMID:21245372

  8. Maternal methadone dose, placental methadone concentrations, and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana; Jones, Hendreé E; Johnson, Rolley E; Gray, Teresa R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-03-01

    Few investigations have used placenta as an alternative matrix to detect in utero drug exposure, despite its availability at the time of birth and the large amount of sample. Methadone-maintained opioid-dependent pregnant women provide a unique opportunity to examine the placental disposition of methadone and metabolite [2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP)], to explore their correlations with maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes, and to test the ability to detect in utero exposure to illicit drugs. We calculated the correlations of placental methadone and EDDP concentrations and their correlations with maternal methadone doses and neonatal outcomes. Cocaine- and opiate-positive placenta results were compared with the results for meconium samples and for urine samples collected throughout gestation. Positive correlations were found between placental methadone and EDDP concentrations (r=0.685), and between methadone concentration and methadone dose at delivery (r=0.542), mean daily dose (r=0.554), mean third-trimester dose (r=0.591), and cumulative daily dose (r=0.639). The EDDP/methadone concentration ratio was negatively correlated with cumulative daily dose (r=-0.541) and positively correlated with peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score (r=0.513). Placental EDDP concentration was negatively correlated with newborn head circumference (r=-0.579). Cocaine and opiate use was detected in far fewer placenta samples than in thrice-weekly urine and meconium samples, a result suggesting a short detection window for placenta. Quantitative methadone and EDDP measurement may predict NAS severity. The placenta reflects in utero drug exposure for a shorter time than meconium but may be useful when meconium is unavailable or if documentation of recent exposure is needed.

  9. The place of oxycodone/naloxone in chronic pain management

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Opioid analgesics are usually effective in the management of severe chronic pain. However, symptoms of opioid-induced bowel dysfunction (OIBD) are common during opioid therapy. Opioid-induced bowel dysfunction is often unsuccessfully managed due to limited effectiveness and numerous adverse effects of traditional laxatives. Newer treatment possibilities directed at the pathomechanism of OIBD comprise combined prolonged-release oxycodone with prolonged-release naloxone (oxycodone/naloxone) tablets. Oxycodone/naloxone provides effective analgesia with limited impact on bowel function as oxycodone displays high oral bioavailability and naloxone act as local antagonist on opioid receptors in the gastrointestinal tract due to nearly complete inactivation in the liver. Oxycodone/naloxone is administered to opioid-naive patients with severe pain and those unsuccessfully treated with weak opioids. Oxycodone/naloxone may be also administered to patients treated with strong opioids who experience intense symptoms of OIBD. Studies conducted to date indicate that oxycodone/naloxone is an important drug in chronic pain management, prevention and treatment of OIBD. PMID:23788978

  10. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome after Methadone or Buprenorphine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hendrée E.; Kaltenbach, Karol; Heil, Sarah H.; Stine, Susan M.; Coyle, Mara G.; Arria, Amelia M.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Selby, Peter; Martin, Peter R.; Fischer, Gabriele

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Methadone, a full mu-opioid agonist, is the recommended treatment for opioid dependence during pregnancy. However, prenatal exposure to methadone is associated with a neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) characterized by central nervous system hyperirritability and autonomic nervous system dysfunction, which often requires medication and extended hospitalization. Buprenorphine, a partial mu-opioid agonist, is an alternative treatment for opioid dependence but has not been extensively studied in pregnancy. METHODS We conducted a double-blind, double-dummy, flexible-dosing, randomized, controlled study in which buprenorphine and methadone were compared for use in the comprehensive care of 175 pregnant women with opioid dependency at eight international sites. Primary outcomes were the number of neonates requiring treatment for NAS, the peak NAS score, the total amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, the length of the hospital stay for neonates, and neonatal head circumference. RESULTS Treatment was discontinued by 16 of the 89 women in the methadone group (18%) and 28 of the 86 women in the buprenorphine group (33%). A comparison of the 131 neonates whose mothers were followed to the end of pregnancy according to treatment group (with 58 exposed to buprenorphine and 73 exposed to methadone) showed that the former group required significantly less morphine (mean dose, 1.1 mg vs. 10.4 mg; P<0.0091), had a significantly shorter hospital stay (10.0 days vs. 17.5 days, P<0.0091), and had a significantly shorter duration of treatment for the neonatal abstinence syndrome (4.1 days vs. 9.9 days, P<0.003125) (P values calculated in accordance with prespecified thresholds for significance). There were no significant differences between groups in other primary or secondary outcomes or in the rates of maternal or neonatal adverse events. CONCLUSIONS These results are consistent with the use of buprenorphine as an acceptable treatment for opioid dependence in pregnant

  11. Noninterventional observational study using high-dose controlled-release oxycodone (CR oxycodone) for cancer pain management in outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Baek, Sun Kyung; Shin, Hye Won; Choi, Young Jin; Zang, Dae Young; Cho, Do-Yeun; Ryoo, Hun Mo; Baek, Jin Ho; Kim, Sam Yong; Song, Hong-Suk

    2013-12-01

    Efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL) for patients receiving larger doses of controlled-release oxycodone (CR oxycodone) in outpatient clinics are evaluated. The use of high-dose CR oxycodone and adjuvant drugs for pain management, pain intensity, parameters associated with quality of life, and adverse effects in cancer patients treated with high-dose CR oxycodone (≥80 mg/day) was prospectively observed for 8 weeks. Data from 486 cancer patients receiving high-dose CR oxycodone were collected from 44 hospitals during the period from February 2009 to March 2010. Three hundred eighteen of the total 486 patients treated with high-dose CR oxycodone were followed up for 8 weeks. Pain intensity significantly improved from a mean numeric rating scale (NRS) 5.49 to NRS 4.33 (P < 0.0001). Dosage of CR oxycodone increased from a mean of 130.0 to a mean of 174.9 (P < 0.0001). QoL including activity, walking, and sleeping significantly improved after 8 weeks. At baseline, 138 complained of adverse effects, of which constipation (30.2%) was the most common followed by dry mouth (8.8%) and dizziness (8.2%). After 8 weeks, 128 patients complained of adverse effects such as constipation (27.0%), nausea (5.7%), dry mouth (5.7%), and dizziness (5.0%). After 8 weeks of high-dose CR oxycodone, adverse effects did not increase. This study suggests that over an 8-week period, the use of high-dose CR oxycodone for cancer pain management is efficient, safe, and tolerable in outpatient clinics. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Antinociceptive effects of high-dose remifentanil in male methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Hay, Justin L; White, Jason M; Bochner, Felix; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2008-10-01

    The treatment of acute pain in patients maintained on methadone is difficult due to increased pain sensitivity (hyperalgesia) and cross-tolerance to other opioids. This study aimed to investigate whether remifentanil elicits antinociception in methadone-maintained subjects in a dose-dependent manner. Eight chronic methadone-maintained subjects attended the testing session approximately 20 h after their normal methadone dose (range 50-110 mgday(-1)). Following a 20 min saline infusion, subjects were administered intravenous remifentanil in seven increasing doses ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 microgkg(-1)min(-1), each for 2 0min. Testing was performed in the last 10 min of each infusion. The testing measures included nociception, as measured by the cold pressor test, withdrawal using the subjective opiate withdrawal scale (SOWS), and subjective opioid effects using the morphine-benzedrine group scale (MBG). Results showed dose-dependent increase in cold pressor tolerance time from baseline of 15.6+/-3.5 (mean+/-SEM)s up to 77.3+/-24.7s during this dosing protocol. During the infusion typical mu-opioid receptor agonist side effects were observed, but with no withdrawal. Methadone-maintained patients demonstrate significant tolerance to remifentanil and may require opioid doses 20-30 higher than required for the treatment of acute pain in opioid-naïve patients.

  13. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  14. Enhanced development of dispositional tolerance to methadone by desipramine given together with methadone

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.J.; Wang, R.I.H.

    1985-02-25

    Rats given 2-day oral administration of methadone (15 mg/kg, twice on day 1 and once on day 2) by gastric tube developed dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia as demonstrated by a decrease in analgesic response and by an increase in methadone metabolism. The increased metabolism of methadone was evidenced by a decrease in brain concentration of /sup 14/C-methadone and increases in the percentages of total /sup 14/C in liver or urine as /sup 14/C-water-soluble metabolites (/sup 14/C-WSM) after the rats were challenged with a test dose of /sup 14/C-methadone. Two-day pretreatment with a combination of desipramine (DMI) (10 mg/kg, ip) and methadone (15 mg/kg, po) enhanced the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone analgesia which was evidenced by a greater decrease in the brain concentration of methadone and a greater increase in methadone metabolism as compared to those changes in rats pretreated with only methadone. Repeated treatment with DMI alone neither decreased the analgesic effect of methadone nor stimulated methadone metabolism. It is suggested that DMI given together with methadone promoted the induction of methadone metabolism in the liver by prolonging the enzyme-stimulating state of methadone, thus enhancing the development of dispositional tolerance to methadone. 20 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  15. The demedicalization of methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, M

    1995-01-01

    The institution of methadone maintenance as a treatment modality for heroin addiction in the mid-1960s was part of the growing medicalization of social problems in the United States. The definition of deviance as "sickness" rather than "badness" set the stage for America's first harm-reduction strategy. By the 1970s methadone maintenance was seen as a way to reduce drug-related crime, and federally funded programs proliferated. Accompanying methadone's phenomenal expansion was increased regulation, bureaucratization, and criticism. The early 1980s brought the Reagan era, fiscal austerity, the new "just say no" abstinence morality, and demedicalization of methadone maintenance. By the time needle-sharing was recognized as a major contributing factor in the spread of HIV, methadone had been transformed into a largely fee-for-service, short-term, begrudgingly tolerated treatment modality. Ironically, while other countries were able to use methadone to curb the spread of AIDS, the United States refused to facilitate its expansion, and in fact impeded it. To the frustration of proponents and consumers, this original harm-reduction tool, with the potential to impact the epidemic, was demedicalized and remains marginalized.

  16. In vitro assessment of the potential for abuse via the intravenous route of oxycodone DETERx® microspheres.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Alison B; Scungio, Todd A; Grima, Michael P; Mayock, Stephen P

    2016-01-01

    Abuse of prescription analgesics is a well-recognized problem, with nearly 2 million people aged 12 years or older initiating nonmedical use of pain relievers in 2012. The prevalence of opioid abuse via intravenous (IV) injection has led to the development of dosage forms designed to deter abuse using different inactive ingredients and formulation strategies. This study evaluated the IV abuse potential for a novel, microsphere-encapsulated abuse-deterrent formulation of oxycodone, Xtampza™ ER (referred to as "oxycodone DETERx"). The extraction of oxycodone DETERx and two comparators, extended-release oxycodone (oxycodone ER) and immediate-release oxycodone (oxycodone IR), was evaluated in small volumes (5 and 10 mL) of water after manipulation of the dosage forms. The syringeability and injectability of these products were evaluated to determine the feasibility of using these products via IV injection. The extraction of oxycodone from oxycodone DETERx was nominal, with <12 percent extracted under any test condition. Oxycodone ER and oxycodone IR had as much as 83 and 98 percent oxycodone extracted, respectively. Injectability and syringeability analyses showed that injection of oxycodone DETERx microspheres in suspension is not feasible. In contrast, oxycodone ER and oxycodone IR suspensions were more easily drawn into and expelled from a syringe. Furthermore, injection of molten oxycodone DETERx microspheres was also shown to be ineffective. The chemical and physical properties of oxycodone DETERx provide barriers to manipulating the microspheres for the purpose of IV injection.

  17. [A study of 31 terminally ill cancer patients who received pure oxycodone injections at home].

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tsubasa; Kawagoe, Izumi

    2014-11-01

    Since the launch of pure oxycodone injections in May 2012, it has been possible to use oxycodone without opioid rotation. Although an extremely important step showing progress, very few studies regarding the use of pure oxycodone injections have been performed. In this study, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of pure oxycodone injections in 31 terminally ill cancer patients receiving home care. The difficulty in oral oxycodone intake was the main reason for changing to pure oxycodone injections. The mean administered period of subcutaneous pure oxycodone was 5.6 ± 6.7 days. One out of 5 patients receiving pure oxycodone injections complained of worsening sleepiness. However, other symptoms improved. In addition, in cases wherein pure oxycodone injection was the initiating opioid, 1 out of 6 patients showed no improvement of respiratory discomfort, while other symptoms improved. It was difficult to evaluate more patients because of the short period for administration. Although 5 patients experienced skin problems, they were successfully managed by changing the injection site. Of these 5 patients, 2 patients had sensitive skin, with a previous history of alcohol rash. In conclusion, our study suggests that pure oxycodone injections are beneficial over oral oxycodone treatment for terminally ill cancer patients. However, further evaluation of skin problems associated with pure oxycodone injections is required by performing larger studies.

  18. A fatal drug interaction between oxycodone and clonazepam.

    PubMed

    Burrows, David L; Hagardorn, Andrea N; Harlan, Gretel C; Wallen, Ellen D B; Ferslew, Kenneth E

    2003-05-01

    A case is presented of a fatal drug interaction caused by ingestion of oxycodone (Oxycontin) and clonazepam (Klonapin). Oxycodone is an opium alkaloid used in long-term pain management therapy. Clonazepam is a benzodiazepine used for the treatment of seizures and panic disorders. The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN) has reported an increase of 108% in the last two years of emergency department episodes related to Oxycontin. Six billion prescriptions were written for Oxycontin in the year 2000, an 18-fold increase from four years previous (1). Oxycontin has recently gained enormous notoriety at the local and national levels; however, there are very few previously documented cases of lethal drug interactions between oxycodone and clonazepam. Synergistic effects between these two drugs are postulated to arise from different agonistic mechanisms producing similar physiological changes. It is also theorized that clonazepam may inhibit the metabolism of oxycodone. A 38-year-old white female was found dead in Jefferson County, Tennessee in March of 2001. The deceased had physical evidence of previous drug abuse and positive serological findings of hepatitis B and C. Prescription pill bottles filled under the name of the deceased, as well as another name, were found with the body. Serum, urine and gastric contents from the deceased were screened for numerous drugs and metabolites using a combination of thin layer chromatography and immunoassay techniques (EMIT and FPIA). Analysis of biological specimens from the deceased revealed the presence of: benzodiazepines, opiates (oxycodone), and trazodone metabolites in the serum; cannabinoids, benzodiazepines, opiates (oxycodone), trazodone, trazodone metabolites, nicotine, and nicotine metabolite in the urine; and benzodiazepines, opiates (oxycodone), nicotine, and nicotine metabolite in the gastric contents. Quantitative analyses for clonazepam was performed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and revealed a

  19. Methadone maintenance treatment: outcomes from the Otago methadone programme.

    PubMed

    Dore, G M; Walker, J D; Paice, J R; Clarkson, S

    1999-11-26

    To provide information on methadone treatment outcomes for opiate-dependent individuals. Questionnaires and random urine tests were completed for 112 Otago clients comparing outcomes before and during methadone maintenance treatment. Treatment retention rates were high, with 86% of clients remaining on the programme six months or more. The number of clients on benefits reduced by almost 30% during treatment, with employment rates doubling from 19% to 40% (including attendance at educational programmes). For the 89 clients injecting opiates daily at initial presentation, 64% reported no opiate use in the three months prior to review. Of the remaining 36%, opiate use reduced significantly. Rates of sharing injecting equipment reduced by almost 90%. Almost 50% of cannabis users reduced their use from daily to less than daily use. Clients reporting no current use of illicit benzodiazepines increased by 85%. Heavy binge drinking weekly or more reduced by almost 75%. Use of other illicit drugs reduced by almost 90%. Drug-related convictions reduced by almost 60%, while accidental drug overdoses reduced by over 90%. The widespread benefits of methadone maintenance treatment demonstrated underline the importance of making quality methadone programmes readily accessible within the health system. Currently, there are long waiting lists and many individuals cannot gain access to active treatment. We believe the health system urgently needs to look at expanding existing services and/or establishing private methadone clinics similar to those in New South Wales.

  20. Methadone Recycling Sustains Drug Reservoir in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Linares, Oscar A; Fudin, Jeffrey; Daly, Annemarie; Schiesser, William E; Boston, Raymond C

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesize that there is a tissue store of methadone content in humans that is not directly accessible, but is quantifiable. Further, we hypothesize the mechanism by which methadone content is sustained in tissue stores involves methadone uptake, storage, and release from tissue depots in the body (recycling). Accordingly, we hypothesize that such tissue stores, in part, determine plasma methadone levels. We studied a random sample of six opioid-naïve healthy subjects. We performed a clinical trial simulation in silico using pharmacokinetic modeling. We found a large tissue store of methadone content whose size was much larger than methadone's size in plasma in response to a single oral dose of methadone 10 mg. The tissue store measured 13-17 mg. This finding could only be explained by the contemporaneous storage of methadone in tissue with dose recycling. We found that methadone recycles 2-5 times through an inaccessible extravascular compartment (IAC), from an accessible plasma-containing compartment (AC), before exiting irreversibly. We estimate the rate of accumulation (or storage) of methadone in tissue was 0.029-7.29 mg/h. We predict 39 ± 13% to 83 ± 6% of methadone's tissue stores "spillover" into the circulation. Our results indicate that there exists a large quantifiable tissue store of methadone in humans. Our results support the notion that methadone in humans undergoes tissue uptake, storage, release into the circulation, reuptake from the circulation, and re-release into the circulation, and that spillover of methadone from tissue stores, in part, maintain plasma methadone levels in humans.

  1. Choice between delayed food and immediate oxycodone in rats.

    PubMed

    Secci, Maria E; Factor, Julie A; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2016-12-01

    The choice to seek immediate drug effects instead of more meaningful but delayed rewards is a defining feature of addiction. To develop a rodent model of this behavior, we allowed rats to choose between immediate intravenous delivery of the prescription opioid oxycodone (50 μg/kg) and delayed delivery of palatable food pellets. Rats preferred food at delays up to 30 s, but they chose oxycodone and food equally at 60-s delay and preferred oxycodone over food at 120-s delay. Comparison of food-drug choice, food-only, and drug-only conditions indicated that food availability decreased drug intake, but drug availability increased food intake. In the food-only condition, food was effective as a reinforcer even when delayed by 120 s. Pre-session feeding with chow slowed acquisition of food and drug self-administration, but did not affect choice. To establish procedures for testing potential anti-addiction medications, noncontingent pre-treatment with oxycodone or naltrexone (analogous to substitution and antagonist therapies, respectively) were tested on a baseline in which oxycodone was preferred over delayed food. Naltrexone pre-treatment decreased drug intake and increased food intake. Oxycodone pre-treatment decreased drug intake, but also produced extended periods with no food or drug responding. These findings show that the contingencies that induce preference for drugs over more meaningful but less immediate rewards in humans can be modeled in rodents, and they suggest that the model could be useful for assessing the therapeutic potential of treatments and exploring the underlying behavioral and neural mechanisms involved in addiction.

  2. Morphine Antidependence of Erythroxylum cuneatum (Miq.) Kurz in Neurotransmission Processes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adenan, Mohd Ilham; Amom, Zulkhairi

    2016-01-01

    Opiate abuse has been studied to cause adaptive changes observed in the presynaptic release and the mediated-synaptic plasticity proteins. The involvement of neuronal SNARE proteins reveals the role of the neurotransmitter release in expressing the opioid actions. The present study was designed to determine the effect of the alkaloid extract of Erythroxylum cuneatum (E. cuneatum) against chronic morphine and the influences of E. cuneatum on neurotransmission processes observed in vitro. The human neuroblastoma cell line, SK-N-SH, was treated with the morphine, methadone, or E. cuneatum. The cell lysates were collected and tested for α-synuclein, calmodulin, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP 2), and synaptotagmin 1. The extract of E. cuneatum was observed to upregulate the decreased expression of dependence proteins, namely, α-synuclein and calmodulin. The effects were comparable to methadone and control. The expressions of VAMP 2 and synaptotagmin 1 were normalised by the plant and methadone. The extract of E. cuneatum was postulated to treat dependence symptoms after chronic morphine and improve the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor activating protein receptor (SNARE) protein involved in synaptic vesicle after. PMID:27974903

  3. Methadone and alcohol.

    PubMed

    Freedman, L Z

    1976-01-01

    We have demonstrated the dangers of alcoholism that complicate methadone treatment of heroin addiction. In future papers, we will attempt to identify contributory factors and suggest interventionist techniques. In the final analysis, however, rehabilitation programs, vocational programs, and, above all, alleviation of the dreadful socioeconomic deprivations related to, among other factors, the racial bias under which most of these people have been born and have suffered during their lives will, in the long run, prove the most satisfactory means of reducing the heroin problem, except for a minority whose psychologic problems will then provide the irreducible minimum from which the majority of the addicts will come. As has so often been stated, the great drug problem in this country is alcoholism. We know that legal prohibition does not prevent the rise of alcoholism, and we know to our sorrow that not only does it give rise to enormous wealth and power to criminals and criminal gangs but that some of them are now also profiting from the great wealth to be made by dealing in heroin.

  4. The methadone-maintained pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kandall, S R; Doberczak, T M; Jantunen, M; Stein, J

    1999-03-01

    Methadone treatment during pregnancy offers overwhelming advantages compared with the less acceptable option of medical detoxification or the unacceptably dangerous option of leaving heroin-addicted women dependent on street drugs. General agreement exists that pregnancy offers a unique opportunity to bring women into medical, obstetric, and drug treatment. Methadone maintenance in the setting of comprehensive service provision during pregnancy reduces maternal morbidity and mortality and promotes fetal stability and growth. With an accumulated experience of over 25 years, methadone maintenance has been shown to be an invaluable and often an essential ingredient in bettering the health of women during pregnancy, in improving the outcomes of those pregnancies, and in offering opiate-addicted women a chance to improve both their lives and the lives of their families.

  5. Differential cross-tolerance to opioid agonists in morphine-tolerant pigeons responding under a schedule of food presentation.

    PubMed

    Craft, R M; Picker, M J; Dykstra, L A

    1989-05-01

    Effects of the opioid agonists morphine, l-methadone, ethylketazocine, U50,488 [trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl) cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate hydrate], cyclazocine and bremazocine, and the nonopioid chlorpromazine were determined in pigeons responding under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule of food presentation before, during and after chronic morphine administration. Before chronic morphine administration, all drugs produced dose-dependent decreases in response rates. After daily administration of up to 56 mg/kg of morphine for 7 weeks, dose-effect curves for the mu agonists morphine and l-methadone, as well as the mu/kappa agonist ethylketazocine shifted to the right approximately 1 1/4, 3/4 and 1/2 log units, respectively. In contrast, dose-effect curves for the mixed agonist/antagonists cyclazocine and bremazocine each shifted to the left approximately 3/4 log unit, whereas dose-effect curves for the kappa agonist U50,488 and the nonopioid chlorpromazine did not shift during chronic morphine administration. Dose-effect curves for all drugs except bremazocine returned to their prechronic positions within the period 3 to 8 weeks after termination of chronic morphine administration. The present study demonstrates that repeated administration of morphine produces tolerance to its rate-decreasing effects as well as cross-tolerance selective to other opioids possessing mu agonist properties. The cross-tolerance to ethylketazocine observed in morphine-tolerant pigeons corroborates studies of the discriminative stimulus effects of ethylketazocine in pigeons, suggesting that in this species ethylketazocine possesses predominantly mu agonist properties.

  6. Neonatal withdrawal following pre- and postnatal exposure to methadone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Barr, G A; Zmitrovich, A; Hamowy, A S; Liu, P Y; Wang, S; Hutchings, D E

    1998-05-01

    Recent evidence has shown that infant rats undergo precipitated withdrawal following chronic postnatal injection of morphine. In this study we examined whether or not infants exposed to methadone prenatally via the placental blood supply and postnatally via the dam's milk would also experience precipitated withdrawal. Dam's were implanted on gestational day 14 with osmotic minipumps containing one of two concentrations of methadone to supply the opiate throughout gestation and the first postnatal week. Nontreated and pair-fed controls were used. On postnatal day 7, pups were injected with naltrexone and their locomotor activity and ultrasonic vocalizations measured. Methadone exposed pups were more active and vocalized more when injected with naltrexone than with saline. The controls did not show these behavioral changes. The milk of methadone-exposed dams apparently contains sufficient quantities of the opiate for dependence to develop. The results are consistent with other data that demonstrate that very young rat pups can experience an opiate abstinence syndrome that includes increased behavioral activation.

  7. Pharmacogenomics study on cadherin 2 network with regard to HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Hsiang-Wei; Shih, Chia-Lung; Tsung, Jieh-Hen; Liu, Sheng-Wen; Chu, Shih-Kai; Yang, Hsin-Chou; Tsou, Hsiao-Hui; Wang, Zih-Hsiang; Chen, Andrew C. H.; Liu, Yu-Li

    2017-01-01

    Heroin dependent patients have a high incidence of HIV infection. In contrast to the gene expression method, we developed a systemic correlation analysis method built upon the results of pharmacogenomics study in a methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) cohort consisting of 344 Taiwanese heroin dependent patients. We identified genetic variants and their encoding proteins that may be involved with HIV infection and MMT treatment outcome. Cadherin 2 (CDH2) genetic determinants were identified through the genome-wide pharmacogenomic study. We found significant correlations among HIV infection status, plasma levels of CDH2, cytokine IL-7, ADAM10, and the treatment responses to methadone. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms located within CDH2 gene showed associations with blood pressure and plasma CDH2 concentration. Plasma concentration of CDH2 showed correlations with the level of cytokine IL-7, status of HIV infection, and urine morphine test result. Plasma level of IL-7 was correlated with corrected QT interval (QTc) and gooseflesh skin withdrawal symptom score, while level of ADAM10 was correlated with plasma concentrations of vitamin D metabolite, nicotine metabolite, and R-methadone. The results suggest a novel network involving HIV infection and methadone treatment outcome. PMID:28358908

  8. Pharmacokinetic interaction between telaprevir and methadone.

    PubMed

    van Heeswijk, Rolf; Verboven, Peter; Vandevoorde, Ann; Vinck, Petra; Snoeys, Jan; Boogaerts, Griet; De Paepe, Els; Van Solingen-Ristea, Rodica; Witek, James; Garg, Varun

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody is present in most patients enrolled in methadone maintenance programs. Therefore, interactions between the HCV protease inhibitor telaprevir and methadone were investigated. The pharmacokinetics of R- and S-methadone were measured after administration of methadone alone and after 7 days of telaprevir (750 mg every 8 h [q8h]) coadministration in HCV-negative subjects on stable, individualized methadone therapy. Unbound R-methadone was measured in predose plasma samples before and during telaprevir coadministration. Safety and symptoms of opioid withdrawal were evaluated throughout the study. In total, 18 subjects were enrolled; 2 discontinued prior to receiving telaprevir. The minimum plasma concentration in the dosing interval (C(min)), the maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), and the area under the plasma concentration-time curve from h 0 (time of administration) to 24 h postdose (AUC(0-24)) for R-methadone were reduced by 31%, 29%, and 29%, respectively, in the presence of telaprevir. The AUC0-24 ratio of S-methadone/R-methadone was not altered. The median unbound percentage of R-methadone increased by 26% in the presence of telaprevir. The R-methadone median (absolute) unbound C(min) values in the absence (10.63 ng/ml) and presence (10.45 ng/ml) of telaprevir were similar. There were no symptoms of opioid withdrawal and no discontinuations due to adverse events. In summary, exposure to total R-methadone was reduced by approximately 30% in the presence of telaprevir, while the exposure to unbound R-methadone was unchanged. No symptoms of opioid withdrawal were observed. These results suggest that dose adjustment of methadone is not required when initiating telaprevir treatment. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00933283.).

  9. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of oxycodone after intramuscular and oral administration to healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pöyhiä, R; Seppälä, T; Olkkola, K T; Kalso, E

    1992-06-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of oxycodone were studied in nine healthy young volunteers in a cross-over study. Each subject received oxycodone chloride once intramuscularly (0.14 mg kg-1) and twice orally (0.28 mg kg-1) at intervals of 2 weeks. A double-blind randomized pretreatment with amitriptyline (10-50 mg a day) or placebo was given prior to oral oxycodone. 2. The concentrations of oxycodone, noroxycodone and oxymorphone in plasma and the 24 h urine recoveries of their conjugated and unconjugated forms were measured by gas chromatography. 3. No differences were found between treatments in mean Cmax and AUC values of oxycodone which varied from 34 to 38 ng ml-1 and from 208 to 245 ng ml-1 h, respectively. The median tmax of oxycodone was 1 h in all groups. The bioavailability of oral relative to i.m. oxycodone was 60%. The mean renal clearance of oxycodone was 0.07-0.08 l min-1. The kinetics of oxycodone were unaffected by amitriptyline. 4. The mean ratio of the AUC(0.24 h) values of unconjugated noroxycodone to oxycodone was 0.45 after i.m. oxycodone and 0.6-0.8 after oral oxycodone. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were below the limit of the assay. Eight to 14% of the dose of oxycodone was excreted in the urine as unconjugated and conjugated oxycodone over 24 h. Oxymorphone was excreted mainly as a conjugate whereas noroxycodone was recovered mostly in an unconjugated form.

  10. Can an immunoassay become a standard technique in detecting oxycodone and its metabolites?

    PubMed

    Abadie, Jude M; Allison, Kim H; Black, David A; Garbin, James; Saxon, Andrew J; Bankson, Daniel D

    2005-01-01

    Opiate toxicology testing is routinely performed in the hospital setting to identify abusers and/or to determine those patients who are not taking prescribed opiate analgesics such as oxycodone. Commercially available assays for opiate detection in urine have decreased sensitivity for oxycodone, which contributes to a high false-negative rate. Functioning as a beta site, our Veterans Affairs hospital evaluated a new enzyme immunoassay, DRI Oxycodone Assay, for its use in the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of oxycodone in urine. We hypothesize that an immunoassay for oxycodone with superior sensitivity and specificity, when compared to the traditional opiate assays, would reduce the need for more expensive and time-consuming confirmatory testing. We used the new liquid homogenous enzyme immunoassay to determine oxycodone results in a total of 148 urine samples from 4 different sample groups. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was subsequently used to confirm the presence or absence of oxycodone (or its primary metabolite, noroxycodone). We also evaluated within-run, between-run, and linearity studies and conducted a crossover study to establish a cutoff value for oxycodone. In our patient population, we used the new DRI immunoassay to evaluate 17,069 urine samples to estimate oxycodone misuse profiles (patients not taking prescribed oxycodone or taking oxycodone without a prescription) during a 4-month period. The sensitivity and specificity of the new oxycodone immunoassay were 97.7% and 100%, respectively, at the cutoff concentration of 300 ng/mL. The assay linearity was 1,250 ng/mL, and the sensitivity was 10 ng/mL. Within-run precision and between-run coefficient of variation were 2.3% and 1.8%, respectively. None of the 15 compounds that we evaluated for interference had crossover significant enough to produce a positive oxycodone result when using 300 ng/mL as the cutoff value. None of the 17,069 oxycodone immunoassays was followed with a request

  11. Reversal of oxycodone and hydrocodone tolerance by diazepam.

    PubMed

    Gonek, Maciej; Akbarali, Hamid I; Henderson, Graeme; Dewey, William L

    2017-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control has declared opioid abuse to be an epidemic. Overdose deaths are largely assumed to be the result of excessive opioid consumption. In many of these cases, however, opioid abusers are often polydrug abusers. Benzodiazepines are one of the most commonly co-abused substances and pose a significant risk to opioid users. In 2016, the FDA required boxed warnings - the FDA's strongest warning - for prescription opioid analgesics and benzodiazepines about the serious risks associated with using these medications at the same time. The point of our studies was to evaluate the interactions between these two classes of drugs. We investigated whether diazepam adds to the depressant effects of opioids or do they alter the levels of tolerance to opioids. In the present study, we have found that the antinociceptive tolerance that developed to repeated administration of oxycodone was reversed by an acute dose of diazepam. Antinociceptive tolerance to hydrocodone was also reversed by acute injection of diazepam; however, a fourfold higher dose of diazepam was required when compared to reversal of oxycodone-induced tolerance. These doses of diazepam did not potentiate the acute antinociceptive effect of either opioid. The same dose of diazepam that reversed oxycodone antinociceptive tolerance also reversed oxycodone locomotor tolerance while having no potentiating effects. These studies show that diazepam does not potentiate the acute effect of prescription opioids but reverses the tolerance developed after chronic administration of the drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Simultaneous Quantification of Methadone, Cocaine, Opiates, and Metabolites in Human Placenta by Liquid Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Concheiro, Marta; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    A validated method for quantifying methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, and codeine in human placenta by liquid chromatography–ion trap mass spectrometry is described. Specimens (1 g) were homogenized and subjected to solid-phase extraction. Chromatographic separation was performed on a Synergi Polar RP column with a gradient of 0.1% formic acid and acetonitrile. The method was linear from 10 to 2000 ng/g for methadone and 2.5 to 500 ng/g for other analytes. Limits of detection were 0.25–2.5 ng/g, imprecisions < 9.1%CV, analytical recoveries 84.4–113.3%, extraction efficiencies > 46%, matrix effects −8.0–129.9%, and process efficiencies 24.2–201.0%. Method applicability was demonstrated by analysis of five placenta specimens from opioid-dependent women receiving methadone pharmacotherapy, with methadone doses ranging from 65 to 95 mg on the day of delivery. These are the first data on placenta concentrations of methadone and metabolites after controlled drug administration. Detection of other common drugs of abuse in placenta will also improve our knowledge of the usefulness of this matrix for detecting in utero drug exposure and studying disposition of drugs in the maternal-fetal dyad. PMID:19671243

  13. Foucault on methadone: beyond biopower.

    PubMed

    Keane, Helen

    2009-09-01

    This essay reviews four texts which critically analyse methadone maintenance therapy using Foucault as a key theoretical framework: [Friedman, J., & Alicea, M. (2001). Surviving heroin: Interviews with women in methadone clinics. Florida: University Press of Florida], [Bourgois, P. (2000). Disciplining addictions: The bio-politics of methadone and heroin in the United States. Culture Medicine and Psychiatry, 24, 165-195], [Bull, M. (2008). Governing the heroin trade: From treaties to treatment. Ashgate: Aldershot], and [Fraser, S., & valentine, k. (2008). Substance & substitution: Methadone subjects in liberal societies. New York: Palgrave Macmillan]. Taken together these works demonstrate one trajectory in the development of critical drug studies over the past decade. While all four view MMT as a regulatory technology which aims to create productive and obedient subjects, their understandings of the power relations of the clinic are quite distinct. The first two texts emphasise the social control of drug users, the third, issues of governmentality and liberal political practice, while the fourth engages with ontological questions about substances themselves. Thus while Foucauldian analysis has become familiar in social studies of drugs and alcohol, new uses for its conceptual tools continue to emerge.

  14. Drug Abuse: Methadone Becomes the Solution and the Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazell, Robert J.

    1973-01-01

    Methadone is used to divert heroin addicts from using stronger drugs. Rate of crimes committed by drug addicts has fallen considerably after putting them on methadone. Despite criticisms, methadone use seems to be encouraging for the future. (PS)

  15. Radioimmunological screening and gas chromatographic determination of morphine and related narcotic analgesics in post mortem blood.

    PubMed

    Cimbura, G; Koves, E

    1981-01-01

    A sensitive, reproducible, and relatively specific procedure is presented for the screening, identification, and quantitation of morphine, hydromorphone, codeine, oxycodone, and hydrocodone in autopsy blood. The drugs are isolated from whole blood by adsorption on an XAD-2 resin slurry and subsequent elution with an organic solvent mixture. Part of the resin extract is screened for morphine and related cross-reacting compounds by a commercially available radioimmunoassay (RIA) and the remainder of the same extract is analyzed by gas chromatography using a nitrogen/phosphorus detector (GC/NP). The procedure has been used frequently in forensic toxicological casework. Since toxic blood concentrations of hydrocodone have not been well documented, the results of toxicological examination of two fatalities involving this drug are presented.

  16. Efficacy of methadone versus methadone and guanfacine in the detoxification of heroin-addicted patients.

    PubMed

    San, L; Fernandez, T; Cami, J; Gossop, M

    1994-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind study, the clinical efficacy of methadone vs. methadone and guanfacine was assessed in terms of evolution of opioid withdrawal symptoms during inpatient detoxification. A total of 144 patients were included and randomly allocated to three different treatment groups: methadone alone, and two combined treatment schedules (methadone plus 3 or 4 mg of guanfacine). No differences were observed among the three groups with regard to retention rate throughout the study period. Both therapies, methadone and methadone plus guanfacine, determined a slight increase in withdrawal scores when methadone was discontinued. However, guanfacine was unable to effectively control methadone-associated withdrawal symptoms. These results indicate that guanfacine does not effectively reduce the opioid withdrawal symptoms.

  17. Metabolism of Oxycodone in Human Hepatocytes from Different Age Groups and Prediction of Hepatic Plasma Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Korjamo, Timo; Tolonen, Ari; Ranta, Veli-Pekka; Turpeinen, Miia; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-01-01

    Oxycodone is commonly used to treat severe pain in adults and children. It is extensively metabolized in the liver in adults, but the maturation of metabolism is not well understood. Our aim was to study the metabolism of oxycodone in cryopreserved human hepatocytes from different age groups (3 days, 2 and 5 months, 4 years, adult pool) and predict hepatic plasma clearance of oxycodone using these data. Oxycodone (0.1, 1, and 10 μM) was incubated with hepatocytes for 4 h, and 1 μM oxycodone also with CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole (1 μM). Oxycodone and noroxycodone concentrations were determined at several time points with liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry. In vitro clearance of oxycodone was used to predict hepatic plasma clearance, using the well-stirred model and published physiological parameters. Noroxycodone was the major metabolite in all batches and ketoconazole inhibited the metabolism markedly in most cases. A clear correlation between in vitro oxycodone clearance and CYP3A4 activity was observed. The predicted hepatic plasma clearances were typically much lower than the published median total plasma clearance from pharmacokinetic studies. The data suggests that there are no children-specific metabolites of oxycodone. Moreover, CYP3A activity seems to be the major determinant in metabolic clearance of oxycodone regardless of age group or individual variability in hepatocyte batches. PMID:22291644

  18. Behavioral and Neurochemical Changes Induced by Oxycodone Differ Between Adolescent and Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Picetti, Roberto; Butelman, Eduardo R; Schlussman, Stefan D; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    Nonmedical use of the prescription opioid analgesic oxycodone is a major problem in the United States, particularly among adolescents and young adults. This study characterized self-administration of oxycodone by adolescent and adult mice, and how this affects striatal dopamine levels. Male C57BL/6J mice (4 or 10 weeks old) were allowed to acquire oxycodone self-administration (0.25 mg/kg per infusion) for 9 days, and then tested with varying doses of oxycodone (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 mg/kg per infusion). On completion of the self-administration study, a guide cannula was implanted into the striatum of these mice. Six days later, microdialysis was conducted on the freely moving mouse. After collection of baseline samples, oxycodone was administered i.p. (1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg) and samples were collected for 1 h after each dose. Adult mice self-administered significantly more oxycodone across the doses tested. After 1 week, basal striatal dopamine levels were lower in mice of both ages that had self-administered oxycodone than in yoked saline controls. Oxycodone challenge increased striatal dopamine levels in a dose-dependent manner in both age groups. Of interest, the lowest dose of oxycodone led to increased striatal dopamine levels in the mice that had self-administered oxycodone during adolescence but not those that self-administered it as adults. The lower number of infusions of oxycodone self-administered by adolescent mice, and their later increased striatal dopamine in response to the lowest dose of oxycodone (not found in adults), suggest differential sensitivity to the reinforcing and neurobiological effects of oxycodone in the younger mice. PMID:18784649

  19. Detection of methadone, methadone metabolites, and other illicit drugs of abuse in hair of methadone-treatment subjects.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, B A; Darraj, A G; Caplan, Y H; Cone, E J

    1998-10-01

    The disposition of methadone, its metabolites, and other illicit drugs of abuse was investigated in head hair samples collected from heroin users (N = 20) enrolled in an outpatient detoxification study. Hair samples were assayed for methadone, methadone primary metabolite (2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine, EDDP), methadone secondary metabolite (2-ethyl-5-methyl-3,3-diphenylpyrroline, EMDP), cocaine, phencyclidine, heroin, and 6-acetylmorphine. Hair samples were cut, washed, and incubated in methanol. The methanolic hair wash and incubation fractions were purified with solid-phase extraction and assayed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methadone, methadone metabolites, cocaine, and phencyclidine were assayed quantitatively, and other drugs were measured qualitatively. The number of positive results and the corresponding concentration ranges were as follows: methadone, 0-15.0 ng/mg (N = 18); EDDP, trace (N = 13); EMDP, trace (N = 1); cocaine, 0->40 ng/mg (N = 14); phencyclidine, 0-1.5 ng/mg (N = 2); heroin, positive (N = 3); and 6-acetylmorphine, positive (N = 4). These data suggest that testing hair for methadone, methadone metabolites, and other illicit drugs of abuse may be useful to drug-treatment specialists as a means of verifying drug-use history, monitoring compliance, and providing a broad measure of drug exposure.

  20. Methadone-Induced Toxic Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Corré, Jérôme; Pillot, Jérôme; Hilbert, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    A 29-year-old man presented with comatose after methadone intoxication. Cerebral tomography only showed cortico-subcortical hypodense signal in the right cerebellar hemisphere. Brain MRI showed a rare imaging of FLAIR and DWI hyperintensities in the two cerebellar hemispheres as well as basal ganglia (globi pallidi), compatible with methadone overdose. To our knowledge this is the first reported case of both cerebellar and basal ganglia involvement in methadone overdose. PMID:23762729

  1. The quantitative analysis of heroin, methadone and their metabolites and the simultaneous detection of cocaine, acetylcodeine and their metabolites in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rook, Elisabeth J; Hillebrand, Michel J X; Rosing, Hilde; van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-09-25

    For a pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic study in opioid tolerant patients, who were treated with heroin in combination with methadone, a liquid chromatographic assay with tandem mass spectrometry detection (LC-MS/MS) was developed for the simultaneous determination of heroin, methadone, heroin metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, and morphine-6 and 3-glucuronide and methadone metabolite EMDP. To detect any abuse of substances besides the prescribed opioids the assay was extended with the detection of cocaine, its metabolites benzoylecgonine and norcocaine and illicit heroin adulterants acetylcodeine and codeine. Heroin-d6, morphine-d3, morphine-3-glucuronide-d3 and methadone-d9 were used as internal standards. The sample pre-treatment consisted of solid phase extraction using mixed mode sorbent columns (MCX Oasis). Chromatographic separation was performed at 25 degrees C on a reversed phase Zorbax column with a gradient mobile phase consisting of ammonium formate (pH 4.0) and acetonitrile. The run time was 15 min. MS with relatively mild electrospray ionisation under atmospheric pressure was applied. The triple quadrupole MS was operating in the positive ion mode and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) was used for drug quantification. The method was validated over a concentration range of 5-500 ng/mL for all analytes. The total recovery of heroin varied between 86 and 96% and of the heroin metabolites between 76 and 101%. Intra-assay and inter-assay accuracy and precision of all analytes were always within the designated limits (< or =20% at lower limit of quantification (LLQ) and < or =15% for other samples). This specific and sensitive assay was successfully applied in pharmacokinetic studies with medically prescribed heroin and toxicological cases.

  2. A new therapeutic option for postoperative pain management with oxycodone HCI injection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Fentanyl is the most commonly used opioid analgesic in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA) in Korea. IV oxycodone was approved for postoperative IV PCA by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety of Korea in 2013. The approved dosage regimen for postoperative pain relief with IV oxycodone is IV bolus loading of 2 mg followed by PCA composed of demand boluses of 1 mg and no background infusion with an oxycodone concentration of 1 mg/ml. However, a simulation study indicated that the minimum effective analgesic concentration (MEAC, as indicated by relief of pain by administering rescue analgesics) of oxycodone was reached most quickly with a higher loading dose of 0.1 mg/kg and IV PCA with background infusion. Oxycodone is a therapeutic option as an analgesic for postoperative pain management. It is necessary to reduce the analgesic dose of oxycodone in elderly patients because metabolic clearance decreases with age. PMID:27274364

  3. Methadone induced lysis of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Will, P C; Noteboom, W D

    1978-08-01

    Methadone induced lysis of human erythrocytes and mouse leukemic cells was studied. The cells lyse without prior swelling that is a necessary step of colloid osmotic lysis. Methadone is accumulated by both cell types, and is widely distributed intracellurly in mouse leukemic cells. The maximum lytic rate is roughly proportional to the amount of methadone uptake and the Q10 for lysis is equal to the Q10 for methadone partitioning between octanol and water. It is concluded that the cells lyse as a result of a non-specific disruption of the plasma membrane.

  4. Effects of Aprepitant on the Pharmacokinetics of Controlled-Release Oral Oxycodone in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Yutaka; Toyoda, Masanori; Chayahara, Naoko; Kiyota, Naomi; Shimada, Takanobu; Imamura, Yoshinori; Mukohara, Toru; Minami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Oxycodone is a µ-opioid receptor agonist widely used in the treatment of cancer pain. The predominant metabolic pathway of oxycodone is CYP3A4-mediated N-demethylation to noroxycodone, while a minor proportion undergoes 3-O-demethylation to oxymorphone by CYP2D6. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the mild CYP3A4 inhibitor aprepitant on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered controlled-release (CR) oxycodone. Method This study design was an open-label, single-sequence with two phases in cancer patients with pain who continued to be administered orally with multiple doses of CR oxycodone every 8 or 12 hours. Plasma concentration of oxycodone and its metabolites were measured up to 8 hours after administration as follows: on day 1, CR oxycodone was administered alone; on day 2, CR oxycodone was administered with aprepitant (125 mg, at the same time of oxycodone dosing in the morning). The steady-state trough concentrations (Css) were measured from day 1 to day 3. Results Aprepitant increased the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC0–8) of oxycodone by 25% (p<0.001) and of oxymorphone by 34% (p<0.001), as well as decreased the AUC0–8 of noroxycodone by 14% (p<0.001). Moreover, aprepitant increased Css of oxycodone by 57% (p = 0.001) and of oxymorphone by 36% (p<0.001) and decreased Css of noroxycodone by 24% (p = 0.02) at day 3 compared to day 1. Conclusions The clinical use of aprepitant in patients receiving multiple doses of CR oxycodone for cancer pain significantly altered plasma concentration levels, but would not appear to need modification of the CR oxycodone dose. Trial Registration UMIN.ac.jp UMIN000003580. PMID:25121773

  5. [A French experience with methadone].

    PubMed

    Deniker, P; Loo, H; Zarifian, E; Cuche, H

    1975-01-01

    Methadone chlorhydrate has been administred to opiate addicts either for a short period with a decreasing dosage as a withdrawal cure, or for longterm treatments as a basis of a maintenance program. The analysis of precise clinical criteria regarding the socio-professional states, the family-life, the general health and the psychopathological diagnosis, allows an evaluation of the success of the cure and of its elective indications. The study of the personnality of the drug-addicts shows the importance of this factor in the potential success of a methadone cure. Urinary biological controls are regularly performed. This limitations and promises of this treatment discussed form a basis of a year's experience.

  6. A randomized, double-blind study of hydromorphone hydrochloride extended-release tablets versus oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets for cancer pain: efficacy and safety in Japanese cancer patients (EXHEAL: a Phase III study of EXtended-release HydromorphonE for cAncer pain reLief).

    PubMed

    Inoue, Satoshi; Saito, Yoji; Tsuneto, Satoru; Aruga, Etsuko; Ide, Azusa; Kakurai, Yasuyuki

    2017-01-01

    In Japan, there are limited options for switching opioid analgesics. Hydromorphone is an opioid analgesic that is routinely used instead of morphine for cancer pain; however, it is not yet available in Japan. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of hydromorphone (DS-7113b) extended-release tablets in opioid-naïve patients with cancer pain not relieved by non-opioid analgesics. This was a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group trial. A double-dummy method was used for blinding. Each randomized subject received either hydromorphone extended-release tablets plus placebo oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets 4 mg/day (n=88) or placebo hydromorphone extended-release tablets plus oxycodone hydrochloride extended-release tablets 10 mg/day (n=93) orally for 7 days (once-daily dosing for hydromorphone and twice-daily dosing for oxycodone). The doses were adjusted as necessary. Efficacy was evaluated by change in visual analog scale (VAS) score from baseline to completion of treatment. The between-group difference in least squares mean changes in VAS score from baseline to completion or discontinuation of treatment was -0.4 mm (95% CI -5.9 to 5 mm) by analysis of covariance where the baseline VAS score was used as a covariate. The upper limit of the 95% CI was below 10 mm, which was predefined as the noninferiority limit. This verified the noninferiority of hydromorphone tablets relative to oxycodone tablets. The incidence of adverse events was 80.7% (71 of 88) in the hydromorphone group and 83.7% (77 of 93) in the oxycodone group. The most common adverse events were nausea, vomiting, somnolence, diarrhea, and constipation, most of which are commonly observed with opioid analgesics. The efficacy and safety of hydromorphone extended-release tablets were equivalent to those of the oxycodone extended-release formulation.

  7. One hundred seventy two deaths involving the use of oxycodone in Palm Beach County.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Lavezzi, Wendy A; Sullivan, Linda M; Flannagan, Lisa M

    2005-01-01

    Oxycodone is a potent semi-synthetic narcotic prescribed for the management of pain. Previous investigators have reported that the abuse of oxycodone is most frequently seen in conjunction with the abuse of other drugs, although fatalities have been reported with oxycodone alone. We undertook a retrospective review of cases investigated by the Palm Beach County Medical Examiner's Office in which postmortem toxicologic studies indicated the presence of oxycodone. A total of 172 consecutive cases were studied, including 18 in which death was attributed to oxycodone toxicity, 117 to combined drug toxicity, 23 to trauma, 9 to natural causes and 5 to another drug or drugs. The postmortem blood concentrations of oxycodone overlapped among the groups. The mean blood oxycodone concentration among the cases of oxycodone toxicity was 0.69 mg/L, combined drug toxicity 0.72 mg/L and trauma 0.62 mg/L. Concentrations were lower in cases of deaths attributed to natural causes and to another drug or drugs (mean each 0.087 mg/L). Benzodiazepines, detected in 96 cases, were the most common co-intoxicants in the cases of combined drug toxicity, followed by cocaine, which was found in 41. The most frequently encountered benzodiazepine was alprazolam. This study confirms that deaths in which oxycodone is a factor are most commonly cases of combined drug toxicity. The high incidence of alprazolam as a co-intoxicant has not been previously recognized.

  8. Premature Discharge from Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Schwartz, Robert P.; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin; Peterson, James A.; Kelly, Sharon M.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Marrari, Erica A.; Brown, Barry S.; Agar, Michael H.

    2008-01-01

    Longer retention in drug abuse treatment is associated with better patient outcomes and research indicates the first 12 months of methadone treatment are critical to patient success. Nevertheless, large-scale multi-site longitudinal studies over the past three decades indicate that the majority of patients drop out during the first year of methadone treatment. Through an examination of 42 qualitative interviews with patients prematurely discharged from six methadone treatment programs in Baltimore, this paper highlights factors patients describe as contributing to their reasons for being discharged within the first 12 months of the treatment. The two most consistent themes are program-related factors and incarceration. The former factors are richly described through patients’ words and underscore the ways in which patients’ perceptions of control exerted by the program and by the medication and misunderstandings of program structure can lead to premature discharge. Patients’ reasons for discharge were compared to counselors’ reasons as indicated in discharge summary forms. An analysis of the patterns of agreement and disagreement are presented. Patient-centered program and policy implications are discussed. PMID:19999682

  9. Maternal methadone dose and neonatal withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Berghella, Vincenzo; Lim, Pearl J; Hill, Mary K; Cherpes, Jennifer; Chennat, Jennifer; Kaltenbach, Karol

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal methadone dosage correlates with neonatal withdrawal in a large heroin-addicted pregnant population. A retrospective review of all maternal/neonatal records of pregnancies that were maintained on methadone therapy in our institution was conducted. After in-hospital stabilization, women were given daily methadone therapy under direct surveillance, with liberal dosage increases according to maternal withdrawal symptoms. Neonatal withdrawal was assessed objectively by the neonatal abstinence score. The average methadone dose in the last 12 weeks of pregnancy and the last methadone dose before delivery (cutoffs of 40, 60, or 80 mg) were correlated to various objective measures of neonatal withdrawal. One hundred mother/neonate pairs on methadone therapy were identified. Women who received an average methadone dose of <80 mg (n=50 women) had a trend toward a higher incidence of illicit drug abuse before delivery than women who received doses of >/=80 mg (n=50 women; 48% vs 32%; P=.1). Women who received an average methadone dose of <80 mg had similar highest neonatal abstinence score, need for neonatal treatment for withdrawal, and duration of withdrawal compared with women whose condition was maintained with dosages of >/=80 mg (score, 11.1 vs 11.5; 68% vs 66%; and 13.3 vs 13.6 days, respectively; all P>.5). For all cutoffs that were used for high versus low dose and for both the average and last methadone dosage analyses, neonatal withdrawal was similar. The maternal methadone dosage does not correlate with neonatal withdrawal; therefore, maternal benefits of effective methadone dosing are not offset by neonatal harm.

  10. Reduced methadone clearance during aromatase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wenjie Jessie; Thong, Nancy; Flockhart, David A

    2012-08-01

    Methadone is increasingly used in pain management and is a cornerstone in the treatment of opiate withdrawal. It is subject to highly variable clearance among patients. The complete metabolic disposition of methadone is likely to involve a number of enzymes, including specifically CYP2B6. Previous studies in vitro suggest that metabolism by aromatase may also contribute. Single-dose methadone pharmacokinetics (2 mg, intravenous) were studied in 15 healthy postmenopausal women in the presence and absence of a potent aromatase inhibitor, letrozole. A sequential design was used, involving a control period followed by treatment with letrozole (2.5 mg/d, 11 days), in which each subject served as her own control. On average, letrozole treatment reduced methadone systemic clearance by 22% (P = 0.001), increased methadone AUC by 23% (P = 0.007), and increased elimination half-life by 21% (P = 0.042). The plasma parent-to-metabolite ratio also increased (P = 0.009), and there was a linear relationship (R2 = 0.74) between change in this plasma ratio and change in methadone AUC0-∞. In contrast, there was no such association with change in apparent urinary methadone clearance. Letrozole did not change methadone distribution half-life or its volume of distribution. Overall, these data demonstrate a significant decrease in methadone clearance during coadministration of letrozole, consistent with decreased metabolism brought about by aromatase inhibition. An involvement of aromatase in the disposition of methadone may help explain the difficulty in methadone dosing and suggests a broader role for this catalyst of endogenous steroid metabolism in xenobiotic drug disposition.

  11. Differential cross-tolerance to mu and kappa opioid agonists in morphine-tolerant rats responding under a schedule of food presentation.

    PubMed

    Picker, M J; Negus, S S; Powell, K R

    1991-01-01

    If different populations of opioid receptors mediate the actions of mu and kappa opioid agonists, then tolerance induced by the chronic administration of a mu agonist should confer cross-tolerance to other mu agonists but not necessarily to those compounds whose effects are mediated by the kappa receptor. This hypothesis was evaluated in the present investigation by examining the effects of the mu agonists morphine, l-methadone and fentanyl, the kappa agonists U50,488 and bremazocine, and the mixed kappa/mu agonist ethylketocyclazocine in rats responding under a fixed-ratio 30 schedule of food presentation before, during and after exposure to a regimen of chronic morphine administration. For comparison, naloxone was evaluated as a representative mu antagonist and the phenothiazine chlorpromazine as a control drug. During all phases of the experiment, each of these compounds produced dose-related decreases in rate of responding. During the daily administration of 40 mg/kg morphine, tolerance developed to the rate-decreasing effects of morphine, l-methadone and fentanyl, and an enhanced sensitivity to the effects of naloxone. In contrast to the effects obtained with these mu opioids, there was no evidence that chronic morphine administration produced tolerance or enhanced sensitivity to the rate-decreasing effects of U50,488, bremazocine, ethylketocyclazocine and chlorpromazine. The present findings demonstrate that the chronic administration of morphine results in the selective development of tolerance to other mu agonists.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. The methadone epidemic: methadone-related deaths on the rise in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Madden, Michelle E; Shapiro, Steven L

    2011-06-01

    The prevalence of methadone-related overdose deaths is increasing worldwide and has been a topic of recent debate. Methadone-related deaths, to this point, have not been systematically reviewed in the state of Vermont. All of the methadone-related fatalities from 2001 to 2006 (total, 76 cases), which were examined by the Vermont Office of the Chief Medical Examiner were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the decedents was 36 years (range, 16-74 years), and 72% were male. The manners of death were classified as follows: 84% accident, 12% undetermined, and 4% suicide. The mean level of methadone was 457 ng/mL (range, 50-3793 ng/mL). The substances causing death were determined to be methadone alone in 26 (34%), methadone with only other prescribed medications in 29 (38%), methadone with only illicit drugs (excluding tetrahydrocannabinol) in 13 (17%), methadone with both illicit and prescribed medications in 5 (7%), and methadone with ethanol in 3 (4%). The methadone was obtained by illegal diversion (sale, gift, or theft) in 67% of cases. In the remaining cases (33%), the methadone was obtained by physician's prescription for chronic pain (60%), acute pain or injury (8%), methadone maintenance therapy for heroin dependence (8%), and unknown reasons (24%). The number of overdose deaths has increased 4-fold from 2001 (17 deaths) to 2006 (79 deaths). The proportion of methadone-related deaths has increased by 300% from 2001 (0.6% of reported deaths, 12% of overdose deaths) to 2006 (3% of reported deaths, 37% of overdose deaths). Methadone maintenance therapy for heroin dependence in our population comprises an insignificant number of the methadone-related deaths (3% of the decedents). In Vermont, the populations most at risk are those taking methadone for chronic pain and those obtaining diverted methadone for abuse. Education of clinicians regarding the increasing number of methadone-related deaths, the potential for abuse and diversion, and the pharmacokinetics

  13. A Placebo-Controlled Trial of Dextromethorphan as an Adjunct in Opioid-Dependent Patients Undergoing Methadone Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low-dose dextromethorphan (DM) might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12 week study, we investigated whether add-on dextromethorphan reduced cytokine levels and benefitted opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). Methods: Patients were randomly assigned to a group: DM60 (60mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), DM120 (120mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), or placebo (n = 66). Primary outcomes were the methadone dose required, plasma morphine level, and retention in treatment. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor–β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. Results: After 12 weeks, the DM60 group had significantly longer treatment retention and lower plasma morphine levels than did the placebo group. Plasma TNF-α was significantly decreased in the DM60 group compared to the placebo group. However, changes in plasma cytokine levels, BDNF levels, and the methadone dose required in the three groups were not significantly different. Conclusions: We provide evidence—decreased concomitant heroin use—of low-dose add-on DM’s efficacy for treating opioid-dependent patients undergoing MMT. PMID:25716777

  14. A placebo-controlled trial of dextromethorphan as an adjunct in opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chen, Po See; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Liang-Jen; Lee, I Hui; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Chen, Kao Chin; Yang, Yen Kuang; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Lu, Ru-Band

    2015-02-25

    Low-dose dextromethorphan (DM) might have anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic effects mechanistically remote from an NMDA receptor. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled 12 week study, we investigated whether add-on dextromethorphan reduced cytokine levels and benefitted opioid-dependent patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT). Patients were randomly assigned to a group: DM60 (60mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), DM120 (120mg/day dextromethorphan; n = 65), or placebo (n = 66). Primary outcomes were the methadone dose required, plasma morphine level, and retention in treatment. Plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, transforming growth factor-β1, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were examined during weeks 0, 1, 4, 8, and 12. Multiple linear regressions with generalized estimating equation methods were used to examine the therapeutic effect. After 12 weeks, the DM60 group had significantly longer treatment retention and lower plasma morphine levels than did the placebo group. Plasma TNF-α was significantly decreased in the DM60 group compared to the placebo group. However, changes in plasma cytokine levels, BDNF levels, and the methadone dose required in the three groups were not significantly different. We provide evidence-decreased concomitant heroin use-of low-dose add-on DM's efficacy for treating opioid-dependent patients undergoing MMT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  15. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  16. Methadone Maintenance Treatment and HIV Seropositivity,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a perspective on key issues in methadone maintenance treatment for opiod dependence and its role in the...seropositivity? The study describes and analyzes the development of methadone maintenance as a treatment modality for opiod dependence and reviews the

  17. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  18. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  19. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  20. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3620 - Methadone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Methadone test system. 862.3620 Section 862.3620....3620 Methadone test system. (a) Identification. A methadone test system is a device intended to measure methadone, an addictive narcotic pain-relieving drug, in serum and urine. Measurements obtained by...

  2. Extradural anesthesia with lidocaine combined with fentanyl or methadone to ovariohisterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Miriely Steim; Kanashiro, Gláucia Prada; Bernardi, Camila Angela; Nicácio, Gabriel Montoro; Cassu, Renata Navarro

    2013-07-01

    To compare the cardiopulmonary effects and the quality of anesthesia of the extradural lidocaine in combination with fentanyl or morphine in bitches undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Sixteen female dogs, were sedated with intramuscular acepromazine (0.05 mg kg-1), followed by anesthetic induction with intravenous propofol (4 mg kg-1), to perform the lumbosacral puncture. The animals were randomly assigned to two treatments: T-F (n=8) extradural administration of fentanyl (5 µg kg-1), T-M (n=8) extradural administration of methadone (0.3mg kg-1). In both treatment groups, opioids were combined with lidocaine, in order to make up a final volume of 0.4 mL kg-1. Heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP), intra-operative anesthetic supplementation, blood gases and adverse effects were investigated. HR, arterial pH and blood gases did not differ between treatments at any time point. RR and SABP decreased after epidural anesthesia, but the values were in terms of the physiological range of dogs. Intra-operative anesthetic supplementation was required in 50% and 62.5% of the fentanyl and methadone treated dogs, respectively. The extradural lidocaine in combination with fentanyl or morphine allowed cardiopulmonary stability, however sufficient sensitive blockade was not provided in 100% of the dogs.

  3. Methadone Medical Maintenance: An Early 21st-Century Perspective.

    PubMed

    Novick, David M; Salsitz, Edwin A; Joseph, Herman; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    Methadone medical maintenance is the treatment of stable methadone-maintained patients in primary care physicians' offices under an exemption from federal methadone regulations. Reports from seven such programs in six states show high retention and low frequencies of illicit drug use. Patients and physicians indicate high levels of satisfaction. Although methadone maintenance has a long history of safety and efficacy, most methadone medical maintenance programs are no longer operating or accepting new patients. Federal regulations for standard methadone clinics allow some features of methadone medical maintenance, and advocacy for state approval of these changes is strongly recommended.

  4. Methadone adverse reaction presenting with large increase in plasma methadone binding: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The use of methadone as an analgesic is on the increase, but it is widely recognized that the goal of predictable and reproducible dosing is confounded by considerable variability in methadone pharmacokinetics, and unpredictable side effects that include sedation, respiratory depression and cardiac arrhythmias. The mechanisms underlying these unpredictable effects are frequently unclear. Here, to the best of our knowledge we present the first report of an association between accidental methadone overexposure and increased plasma protein binding, a new potential mechanism for drug interactions with methadone. Case presentation We describe here the cases of two patients who experienced markedly different responses to the same dose of methadone during co-administration of letrozole. Both patients were post-menopausal Caucasian women who were among healthy volunteers participating in a clinical trial. Under the trial protocol both patients received 6 mg of intravenous methadone before and then after taking letrozole for seven days. One woman (aged 59) experienced symptoms consistent with opiate overexposure after the second dose of methadone that were reversed by naloxone, while the other (aged 49) did not. To understand the etiology of this event, we measured methadone pharmacokinetics in both patients. In our affected patient only, a fourfold to eightfold increase in methadone plasma concentrations after letrozole treatment was observed. Detailed pharmacokinetic analysis indicated no change in metabolism or renal elimination in our patient, but the percentage of unbound methadone in the plasma decreased 3.7-fold. As a result, the volume of distribution of methadone decreased approximately fourfold. The increased plasma binding in our affected patient was consistent with observed increases in plasma protein concentrations. Conclusions The marked increase in the total plasma methadone concentration observed in our patient, and the enhanced pharmacodynamic

  5. Reductions in reported deaths following the introduction of extended-release oxycodone (OxyContin) with an abuse-deterrent formulation†

    PubMed Central

    Sessler, Nelson E; Downing, Jerod M; Kale, Hrishikesh; Chilcoat, Howard D; Baumgartner, Todd F; Coplan, Paul M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Abuse of opioid analgesics for their psychoactive effects is associated with a large number of fatalities. The effect of making opioid tablets harder to crush/dissolve on opioid-related fatalities has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of introducing extended-release oxycodone (ERO [OxyContin®]) tablets containing physicochemical barriers to crushing/dissolving (reformulated ERO) on deaths reported to the manufacturer. Methods All spontaneous adverse event reports of death in the US reported to the manufacturer between 3Q2009 and 3Q2013 involving ERO were used. The mean numbers of deaths/quarter in the 3 years after reformulated ERO introduction were compared with the year before. Changes in the slope of trends in deaths were assessed using spline regression. Comparison groups consisted of non-fatal reports involving ERO and fatality reports involving ER morphine. Results Reports of death decreased 82% (95% CI: −89, −73) from the year before to the third year after (131 to 23 deaths per year) reformulation; overdose death reports decreased 87% (95% CI: −93, −78) and overdose deaths with mention of abuse-related behavior decreased 86% (95% CI:−92, −75). In contrast, non-fatal ERO reports did not decrease post-reformulation, and reported ER morphine fatalities remained unchanged. The ratio of ERO fatalities to all oxycodone fatalities decreased from 21% to 8% in the year pre-reformulation to the second year post-reformulation. Conclusions These findings, when considered in the context of previously published studies using other surveillance systems, suggest that the abuse-deterrent characteristics of reformulated ERO have decreased the fatalities associated with its misuse/abuse. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24916486

  6. Reductions in reported deaths following the introduction of extended-release oxycodone (OxyContin) with an abuse-deterrent formulation.

    PubMed

    Sessler, Nelson E; Downing, Jerod M; Kale, Hrishikesh; Chilcoat, Howard D; Baumgartner, Todd F; Coplan, Paul M

    2014-12-01

    Abuse of opioid analgesics for their psychoactive effects is associated with a large number of fatalities. The effect of making opioid tablets harder to crush/dissolve on opioid-related fatalities has not been assessed. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of introducing extended-release oxycodone (ERO [OxyContin(®) ]) tablets containing physicochemical barriers to crushing/dissolving (reformulated ERO) on deaths reported to the manufacturer. All spontaneous adverse event reports of death in the US reported to the manufacturer between 3Q2009 and 3Q2013 involving ERO were used. The mean numbers of deaths/quarter in the 3 years after reformulated ERO introduction were compared with the year before. Changes in the slope of trends in deaths were assessed using spline regression. Comparison groups consisted of non-fatal reports involving ERO and fatality reports involving ER morphine. Reports of death decreased 82% (95% CI: -89, -73) from the year before to the third year after (131 to 23 deaths per year) reformulation; overdose death reports decreased 87% (95% CI: -93, -78) and overdose deaths with mention of abuse-related behavior decreased 86% (95% CI:-92, -75). In contrast, non-fatal ERO reports did not decrease post-reformulation, and reported ER morphine fatalities remained unchanged. The ratio of ERO fatalities to all oxycodone fatalities decreased from 21% to 8% in the year pre-reformulation to the second year post-reformulation. These findings, when considered in the context of previously published studies using other surveillance systems, suggest that the abuse-deterrent characteristics of reformulated ERO have decreased the fatalities associated with its misuse/abuse. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2014 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Concurrent heroin use among methadone maintenance clients in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Wan, Dai; Zhang, Linglin; Lai, Wenhong

    2012-03-01

    The study examined concurrent illicit heroin use among methadone maintenance clients in China and its association with clients' demographic characteristics, treatment experience, and personal social network. Face-to-face surveys were conducted with 178 clients randomly recruited from six methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinics in Sichuan, China. Concurrent heroin use was measured based on self-report of heroin use during the past 30 days and a confirmatory urine morphine test. The participants' demographic characteristics and treatment factors were measured and examined. The drug use status of their family members and friends was also assessed. A total of 80 participants (44.9%) who either reported illicit heroin use in the past 30 days or had a positive urine test were defined as using heroin concurrently. Having drug-using friends was significantly associated with increased concurrent heroin use. Longer length of treatment (2 years or longer) was associated with increased concurrent heroin use. Among those who had both drug-using family members and friends, more women (71.4%) than men (50.0%) used heroin. For those who had no drug-using family members or friends, more men (34.8%) than women (20.8%) used heroin. Study findings indicate an urgent need to address concurrent illicit heroin use among MMT clients. Further examination of the influence of social networks on concurrent drug abuse behavior is encouraged. Results also highlight the importance of understanding gender differences in treatment seeking and behavioral changes, which is crucial to the development of gender-specific treatment strategies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural requirements in the reaction of morphine uridine diphosphate glucuronyltransferase with opioid substances.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, E; Del Villar, E; Tephly, T R

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the 3-hydroxyl and N-alkyl groups in the reactivity of narcotic compounds with morphine UDP-glucuronyltransferase was studied. Opioids possessing both, one or none of these groups were tested for inhibition of morphine glucuronidation in rabbit liver microsomal preparations. Compounds with only a 3-hydroxyl group (normorphine) or an N-methyl group (codeine, ethylmorphine) were less potent competitive inhibitors than those containing both groups (dextrorphan). Norcodeine, with neither of these groups, had no inhibitory effect. The synthetic narcotics (+)- and (-)-methadone, (-)-alpha-acetylmethadol and meperidine, with only an N-alkyl group, were effective competitive inhibitors. No stereoselectivity of the morphine glucuronyltransferase for opioid isomers was observed, and [methionine]enkephalin does not react with morphine glucuronyltransferase. Differences of pKa values and water/lipid solubility of narcotics could not explain the effects. Results indicate that the N-alkyl group plays a critical role in the interaction of narcotics with the morphine UDP-glucuronyltransferase. PMID:415737

  9. Activation of G-proteins by morphine and codeine congeners: insights to the relevance of O- and N-demethylated metabolites at mu- and delta-opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Chad M; Wojno, Heidi; Greiner, Elisabeth; May, Everette L; Rice, Kenner C; Selley, Dana E

    2004-02-01

    Phenotypic differences in analgesic sensitivity to codeine (3-methoxymorphine) results from polymorphisms in cytochrome P450-2D6, which catalyzes O-demethylation of codeine to morphine. However, O-demethylation reportedly is not required for analgesic activity of the 7,8-saturated codeine congeners dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, and oxycodone. This study determined the potency and efficacy of these compounds and their demethylated derivatives to stimulate mu- and delta-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation using agonist-stimulated guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thio)triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP gamma S) binding. Results showed that 7,8-saturated codeine congeners were more efficacious than codeine in activating mu-receptors, but only dihydrocodeine was more efficacious at delta-receptors. Hydrocodone and oxycodone were approximately 10-fold more potent than codeine and dihydrocodeine at either receptor. Morphine-like compounds with a 3-hydroxy group were approximately 30- to 100-fold more potent than their 3-methoxy analogs at the mu-receptor, and these compounds generally exhibited greater efficacy (e.g., morphine produced 2-fold greater maximal stimulation than codeine). Removal of the N-methyl group did not affect efficacy or potency of codeine congeners to activate mu-receptors, whereas this modification generally increased efficacy but decreased potency of morphine congeners. At the delta receptor, morphine congeners showed greater potency and structure-dependent differences in efficacy compared with codeine congeners, whereas removal of the N-methyl group had effects similar to those observed at the mu-receptor. These results demonstrate that 7,8-saturated codeine congeners are more efficacious than codeine, which may explain their lack of requirement for 3-O-demethylation in vivo. Nonetheless, because all 7,8-saturated codeine congeners were significantly less potent than their morphine derivatives, further research is needed to understand the relationship

  10. Comparison of Pain Tolerance between Opioid Dependent Patients on Methadone Maintenance Therapy (MMT) and Opioid Naive Individuals.

    PubMed

    Zahari, Zalina; Lee, Chee Siong; Ibrahim, Muslih Abdulkarim; Musa, Nurfadhlina; Mohd Yasin, Mohd Azhar; Lee, Yeong Yeh; Tan, Soo Choon; Mohamad, Nasir; Ismail, Rusli

    2016-01-01

    This study compared pain sensitivity among opioid dependent patients on methadone maintenance therapy (MMT) and opioid naive subjects. The three hundred participants comprised 152 opioid naive subjects and 148 opioid dependent patients. Opioid naive subjects had not taken any opioids including morphine and methadone to their best knowledge and were presumed so after two consecutive negative urine screenings for drugs. All opioid dependent patients were stabilized in treatment, defined as having been enrolled in the program for more than one month with no change of methadone dosage over the past one month. Excluded from the study were individuals with chronic or ongoing acute pain and individuals with a history of analgesics ingestion within 3 d before the cold pressor test (CPT). Pain tolerance to CPT was evaluated at 0 h, and at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h post-methadone dose. Patients exhibited a significantly shorter mean pain tolerance time of 34.17 s (95% CI 24.86, 43.49) versus 61.36 (52.23, 70.48) [p < 0.001] compared with opioid naive subjects. Time-dependent mean pain tolerance was also significantly different when naive subjects were compared to patients (p = 0.016). This study revealed hyperalgesia amongst patients on MMT, as manifested by their quicker hand withdrawal. The complaints of pain in this population should not be underestimated and the pain should be evaluated seriously and managed aggressively.

  11. The cost-effectiveness of methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Barnett, P G; Hui, S S

    2000-01-01

    Although methadone maintenance is effective in reducing injection drug use, needle sharing, and the overall mortality associated with opiate abuse, many health plans offer little or no access to methadone, and many methadone providers do not comply with treatment guidelines regarding dose, duration of treatment, or provision of ancillary services. Moral and political judgments have helped shape the U.S. treatment system. Evaluations of methadone cost-effectiveness may play a role in changing public policy. Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare a change, or changes, in treatment to that of current standard care. The cost of treatment and its effect on outcomes are used to find the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and determine whether the change(s) should be adopted. The literature on methadone maintenance is reviewed from an economic perspective, focusing on five policy questions: (1) whether methadone should be a health care benefit; (2) what level of ancillary services is optimal; (3) what methadone dose is appropriate; (4) what length of treatment is appropriate; and (5) whether contingency contracts should be employed. Expanded access to methadone maintenance has an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of less than $11,000 per Quality-Adjusted Life Year. This is more cost-effective than many widely used medical therapies, a finding that strongly supports the inclusion of methadone in the formulary of health care plans.Ancillary services have been shown to be an effective part of methadone maintenance therapy, especially during the beginning of a treatment episode, but there is not enough information available to tell whether the optimal amount of services is being used. There is extensive evidence that many treatment programs dispense inadequate doses of methadone. The cost of additional drugs is very small compared to the benefits of an adequate dose. Many methadone programs limit treatment to 6 months or less, but such short episodes are not

  12. Oxycodone-induced conditioned place preference and sensitization of locomotor activity in adolescent and adult mice

    PubMed Central

    Niikura, Keiichi; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Zhang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Nonmedical use of the prescription opioid oxycodone has become a major public health problem in the United States, with special concern for adolescents. Although adults and adolescents have different sensitivities for drugs, little is known about the rewarding effects of oxycodone in adolescents compared to adults, even in rodent models. Here, we investigate sensitivity to oxycodone by the conditioned place preference assay of conditioned reward, and effect on the locomotor activity in adolescent (4 weeks old) and adult (10 weeks old) C57BL/6J mice. Mice of both ages were trained with multiple doses of oxycodone (0, 0.3, 1, and 3 mg/kg) and showed conditioned preference in a dose-dependent manner. The adult mice developed conditioned preference to the lowest dose tested (0.3 mg/kg), but adolescent mice did not. Dose-dependent oxycodone-induced increases in locomotor activity were observed across the conditioning session. Interestingly, adolescent mice developed greater sensitization to the locomotor-activating effects of oxycodone than adult mice. Thus differences in sensitivity to oxycodone, such as the lower initial sensitivity for conditioned preference but greater locomotor sensitization in adolescent mice, may indicate contributing factors in oxycodone abuse and later addiction in human adolescents. PMID:23827650

  13. CYP2D6 pharmacogenetic and oxycodone pharmacokinetic association study in pediatric surgical patients.

    PubMed

    Balyan, Rajiv; Mecoli, Marc; Venkatasubramanian, Raja; Chidambaran, Vidya; Kamos, Nichole; Clay, Smokey; Moore, David L; Mavi, Jagroop; Glover, Chris D; Szmuk, Peter; Vinks, Alexander; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2017-03-01

    Oxycodone is partly metabolized to the active metabolite oxymorphone by hepatic CYP2D6 in the liver. Significant genetic variability in CYP2D6 activity affects oxymorphone formation. This study aimed to associate CYP2D6 genotype and oxycodone's metabolism. 30 children were administered oral oxycodone postoperatively. Plasma levels of oxycodone and oxymorphone, and CYP2D6 genotype were analyzed. CYP2D6 genotype and oxycodone metabolism phenotype were determined based on CYP2D6 total activity score (TAS) and metabolism phenotype: poor metabolizer (PM), intermediate metabolizer (IM), extensive metabolizer (EM) or ultrarapid metabolizer (UM). Compared with PM/IM subjects, significantly greater oxymorphone exposure was seen in EM subjects (p = 0.02 for Cmax, p = 0.016 for AUC0-6 and p = 0.026 for AUC0-24). Similarly, higher TAS value was found to be associated with greater oxymorphone exposure. Higher conversion of oxycodone to oxymorphone was observed in EM subjects compared with PM/IM subjects (p = 0.0007 for Cmax, p = 0.001 for AUC0-6 and p = 0.004 for AUC0-24). CYP2D6 phenotypes explain metabolism of oxycodone in children, and oxymorphone exposure is higher in CYP2D6 EM phenotype. Further studies are needed to predict the occurrence of adverse event and tailor oxycodone dose for a specific CYP2D6 phenotype.

  14. Behavioral flexibility and response selection are impaired after limited exposure to oxycodone

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows individuals to adapt to situations in which rewards and goals change. Potentially addictive drugs may impair flexible decision-making by altering brain mechanisms that compute reward expectancies, thereby facilitating maladaptive drug use. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested the effects of oxycodone exposure on rats in two complementary learning and memory tasks that engage distinct learning strategies and neural circuits. Rats were trained first in either a spatial or a body-turn discrimination on a radial maze. After initial training, rats were given oxycodone or vehicle injections in their home cages for 5 d. Reversal learning was tested 36 h after the final drug exposure. We hypothesized that if oxycodone impaired behavioral flexibility, then drug-exposed rats should learn reversals more slowly than controls. Oxycodone exposure impaired spatial reversal learning when reward contingencies changed rapidly, but not when they changed slowly. During rapid reversals, oxycodone-exposed rats required more trials to reach criterion, made more perseverative errors, and were more likely to make errors after correct responses than controls. Oxycodone impaired body-turn reversal learning in similar patterns. Limited exposure to oxycodone reduced behavioral flexibility when rats were tested in a drug-free state, suggesting that impaired decision-making is an enduring consequence of oxycodone exposure. PMID:25403457

  15. Pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration in Japanese patients with cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Kokubun, Hideya; Yoshimoto, Tetsusuke; Hojo, Minoru; Fukumura, Kazuya; Matoba, Motohiro

    2014-12-01

    ABSTRACT In Japan, Oxycodone hydrochloride injection formulation has been approved in 2012. However, its pharmacokinetics has been poorly studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone after intravenous and subcutaneous administration of oxycodone hydrochloride injection in Japanese patients with cancer pain. Noncompartmental analysis and population pharmacokinetic analysis were performed. We conducted a multicenter open-label study of oxycodone hydrochloride administered as constant infusion with the dose titrated individually according to the pain intensity in patients with cancer pain. Pharmacokinetic parameters for plasma oxycodone and its metabolites were estimated using pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was evaluated using a total of 344 plasma concentrations obtained from 89 patients. The estimated geometric mean clearance (CL) of oxycodone was 24.3 L per hour after constant intravenous infusion and 29.5 L per hour after constant subcutaneous infusion, respectively. Population pharmacokinetic analysis indicated that body surface area was the influencing factor on CL and there were no pharmacokinetic differences for CL between intravenous and subcutaneous infusion. These results provide important information for the clinical use of oxycodone injection.

  16. Behavioral flexibility and response selection are impaired after limited exposure to oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Seip-Cammack, Katharine M; Shapiro, Matthew L

    2014-12-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows individuals to adapt to situations in which rewards and goals change. Potentially addictive drugs may impair flexible decision-making by altering brain mechanisms that compute reward expectancies, thereby facilitating maladaptive drug use. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested the effects of oxycodone exposure on rats in two complementary learning and memory tasks that engage distinct learning strategies and neural circuits. Rats were trained first in either a spatial or a body-turn discrimination on a radial maze. After initial training, rats were given oxycodone or vehicle injections in their home cages for 5 d. Reversal learning was tested 36 h after the final drug exposure. We hypothesized that if oxycodone impaired behavioral flexibility, then drug-exposed rats should learn reversals more slowly than controls. Oxycodone exposure impaired spatial reversal learning when reward contingencies changed rapidly, but not when they changed slowly. During rapid reversals, oxycodone-exposed rats required more trials to reach criterion, made more perseverative errors, and were more likely to make errors after correct responses than controls. Oxycodone impaired body-turn reversal learning in similar patterns. Limited exposure to oxycodone reduced behavioral flexibility when rats were tested in a drug-free state, suggesting that impaired decision-making is an enduring consequence of oxycodone exposure.

  17. Comparison of opioid doctor shopping for tapentadol and oxycodone: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, M Soledad; Fife, Daniel; Vo, Lien; Mastrogiovanni, Gregory; Yuan, Yingli

    2013-02-01

    Obtaining opioids from multiple prescribers, known as doctor shopping, is 1 example of opioid abuse and diversion. The dual mechanism of action of tapentadol could make tapentadol less likely to be abused than other opioids. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to compare the risk of shopping behavior between tapentadol immediate release (IR) and oxycodone IR. Subjects exposed to tapentadol or oxycodone with no recent opioid use were included and followed for 1 year. The primary outcome was the proportion of subjects who developed shopping behavior defined as subjects who had opioid prescriptions written by >1 prescriber with ≥1 day of overlap filled at ≥3 pharmacies. The opioids involved in the shopping episodes were assessed. A total of 112,821 subjects were exposed to oxycodone and 42,940 to tapentadol. Shopping behavior was seen in .8% of the subjects in the oxycodone group and in .2% of the subjects in the tapentadol group, for an adjusted odds ratio of 3.5 (95% confidence interval, 2.8 to 4.4). In the oxycodone group, 28.0% of the shopping events involved exclusively oxycodone, whereas in the tapentadol group, .6% of the shopping events involved exclusively tapentadol. Results suggest that the risk of shopping behavior is substantially lower with tapentadol than with oxycodone. The risk of opioid doctor shopping, ie, obtaining opioid prescriptions from multiple prescribers, is lower with tapentadol than with oxycodone. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Toxicology and characteristics of fatal oxycodone toxicity cases in New South Wales, Australia 1999-2008.

    PubMed

    Darke, Shane; Duflou, Johan; Torok, Michelle

    2011-05-01

    All cases of fatal oxycodone toxicity presenting to the New South Wales Department of Forensic Medicine over the period January 1, 1999, to December 31, 2008, were retrieved. A total of 70 cases were identified. The mean age was 48.9 years, 58.6% were men, 21.4% were suicides, and in 30% oxycodone had not been prescribed to the decedent. Injecting drug users constituted 27.1% of cases, and oxycodone tablets were injected immediately prior to death by 21.4%. The mean blood oxycodone concentration was 0.40 mg/L (range 0.06-53.00 mg/L). In all cases, psychoactive substances other than oxycodone were also detected, most frequently hypnosedatives (68.6%), other opioids (54.3%), antidepressants (41.4%), and alcohol (32.9%). Preexisting systemic disease was common: cardiovascular (64.2%), pulmonary (49.3%), hepatic (66.7%), and renal (43.9%).

  19. Measuring compliance in methadone maintenance patients: use of a pharmacologic indicator to "estimate" methadone plasma levels.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K; Hay, A; Raistrick, D; Calvert, R; Feely, M

    1991-08-01

    A quantitative indicator of compliance is not available for methadone--the drug of choice for the treatment of opioid addiction. We successfully used low-dose phenobarbital (a valid pharmacologic indicator) to measure compliance by incorporating the drug into the methadone medication of patients attending an addiction unit. Plasma phenobarbital and methadone concentrations were measured in 20 (11 clinic-based and 9 community-based) patients receiving long-term treatment with the phenobarbital level-to-dose ratio, together with interviews, to validate methadone measurements and to monitor compliance. Patients attending the unit on a daily basis and who consumed their medication in the clinic were substantially more compliant than community-based patients. Laboratory measurements of phenobarbital and methadone helped to identify the use of illicit methadone, as well as incorrect self-administration, such as the consumption of several days' dosage at one time.

  20. Bidirectional transfer of methadone across human placenta.

    PubMed

    Nekhayeva, Ilona A; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Deshmukh, Sujal V; Zharikova, Olga L; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2005-01-01

    Methadone maintenance programs are considered the standard of care for the pregnant opiate addict. However, data on changes in methadone pharmacokinetics (PK) during pregnancy are limited and do not include its disposition by the placenta due to obvious ethical and safety considerations. Accordingly, investigations in our laboratory are focusing on human placental disposition of opiates including methadone. Recently, we reported on methadone metabolism by placental aromatase and provide here data on its bidirectional transfer across the tissue utilizing the technique of dual perfusion of placental lobule. The concentrations of the opiate transfused into the term placental tissue were those reported for its in vivo levels in the maternal serum of women under treatment with the drug. Data obtained indicated that the opiate has no adverse effects on placental viability and functional parameters and that it is retained by the tissue. Also, methadone transfer and its clearance index in the fetal to maternal direction (0.97+/-0.05) was significantly higher (P<0.05) than in the maternal to fetal (0.83+/-0.09). The observed asymmetry in methadone transfer could be explained by the unidirectional activity of the efflux transporter P glycoprotein (P-gp) that is highly expressed in variable amounts in trophoblast tissue. Therefore, placental disposition of methadone might be an important contributor to the regulation of its concentration in the fetal circulation and consequently may affect the incidence and intensity of neonatal abstinence syndrome for women treated with the drug during pregnancy.

  1. Methadone metabolism by early gestational age placentas.

    PubMed

    Hieronymus, Todd Lewis; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N; Deshmukh, Sujal V; Vargas, Ricardo; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the enzyme that metabolizes methadone in preterm placentas. Microsomal fractions were obtained from preterm (17 to 34 weeks) placentas (36 total; 12 per each gestational age group) and their activity in metabolizing methadone to 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was determined. The enzyme catalyzing the reaction was identified by using chemical inhibitors selective for various cytochrome P450 isozymes and monoclonal antibodies raised against them. The metabolism of methadone by microsomes revealed saturation kinetics. Methadone was N-demethylated to EDDP by aromatase. The affinity of methadone to aromatase (apparent Km) did not change with gestation, but the activity of the enzyme (Vmax) increased and varied widely between individual placentas. Aromatase/CYP19 is the placental enzyme metabolizing methadone during pregnancy. The variability in enzyme activity among individuals should be reflected by the concentration of methadone in the fetal circulation and might be one of the factors affecting the incidence and intensity of neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  2. Prenatal Oxycodone Exposure Alters CNS Endothelin Receptor Expression in Neonatal Rats.

    PubMed

    Devarapalli, M; Leonard, M; Briyal, S; Stefanov, G; Puppala, B L; Schweig, L; Gulati, A

    2016-05-01

    Prenatal opioid exposure such as oxycodone is linked to significant adverse effects on the developing brain. Endothelin (ET) and its receptors are involved in normal development of the central nervous system. Opioid tolerance and withdrawal are mediated through ET receptors. It is possible that adverse effect of oxycodone on the developing brain is mediated through ET receptors. We evaluated brain ETA and ETB receptor expression during postnatal development in rats with prenatal oxycodone exposure. Timed pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats received either oxycodone or placebo throughout gestation. After birth, male rat pups were sacrificed on postnatal day (PND) 1, 7, 14 or 28. Brain ETA and ETB receptor expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Oxycodone pups compared to placebo demonstrated congenital malformations of the face, mouth, and vertebrae at the time of birth [4/69 (5.7%) vs. 0/60 (0%); respectively] and intrauterine growth retardation [10/69 (15%) vs. 2/60 (3.3%); respectively]. On PND 28, oxycodone pups compared to placebo had lower body and kidney weight. ETA receptor expression in the oxycodone group was significantly higher compared to placebo on PND 1 (p=0.035), but was similar on PND 7, 14, or 28. ETB receptor expression decreased in oxycodone compared to placebo on PND 1 and 7 (p=0.001); and increased on PND 28 (p=0.002), but was similar on PND 14. Oxycodone-exposed rat pups had lower birth weight and postnatal weight gain and greater congenital malformations. ETB receptor expression is altered in the brain of oxycodone-treated rat pups indicating a possible delay in CNS development.

  3. Oxycodone physical dependence and its oral self-administration in C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Enga, Rachel M; Jackson, Asti; Damaj, M Imad; Beardsley, Patrick M

    2016-10-15

    Abuse of prescription opioids, such as oxycodone, has markedly increased in recent decades. While oxycodone's antinociceptive effects have been detailed in several preclinical reports, surprisingly few preclinical reports have elaborated its abuse-related effects. This is particularly surprising given that oxycodone has been in clinical use since 1917. In a novel oral operant self-administration procedure, C57BL/6J mice were trained to self-administer water before introducing increasing concentrations of oxycodone (0.056-1.0mg/ml) under post-prandial conditions during daily, 3-h test sessions. As the concentration of oxycodone increased, the numbers of deliveries first increased, then decreased in an inverted U-shape fashion characteristic of the patterns of other drugs self-administered during limited access conditions. After post-prandial conditions were removed, self-administration at the highest concentration was maintained suggesting oral oxycodone served as a positive reinforcer. In other mice, using a novel regimen of physical dependence, mice were administered increasing doses of oxycodone (9.0-33.0mg/kg, s.c.) over 9 days, challenged with naloxone (0.1-10.0mg/kg, s.c.), and then observed for 30min. Naloxone dose-dependently increased the observed number of somatic signs of withdrawal, suggesting physical dependence of oxycodone was induced under this regimen. This is the first report demonstrating induction of oral operant self-administration of oxycodone and dose-dependent precipitations of oxycodone withdrawal in C57BL/6J mice. The use of oral operant self-administration as well as the novel physical dependence regimen provides useful approaches to further examine the abuse- and dependence-related effects of this highly abused prescription opioid.

  4. Oxycodone/Naloxone PR: A Review in Severe Refractory Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frampton, James E

    2015-06-01

    An oral, fixed-dose combination of prolonged-release (PR) oxycodone with PR naloxone (Targin(®), Targiniq(®), Targinact(®); hereafter referred to as oxycodone/naloxone PR) is approved in Europe for the second-line symptomatic treatment of patients with severe to very severe idiopathic restless legs syndrome (RLS), after failure of dopaminergic therapy. Coadministration of naloxone represents a targeted approach to counteracting opioid-induced bowel dysfunction without compromising therapeutic efficacy; because of its very low oral bioavailability, naloxone blocks the action of oxycodone at opioid receptors locally in the gut. The efficacy of oxycodone/naloxone PR in patients with severe RLS inadequately controlled by previous (mainly dopaminergic) treatment has been demonstrated in RELOXYN, a 12-week, randomized, double-blind study with a 40-week open-label extension. In this pivotal study, oxycodone/naloxone PR significantly improved RLS symptoms compared with placebo from week 2 onwards; a beneficial effect of oxycodone/naloxone PR was maintained through 1 year of treatment. Furthermore, improvements in RLS symptoms in oxycodone/naloxone PR recipients were accompanied by similarly sustained improvements in disease-specific quality of life and subjective sleep variables. Oxycodone/naloxone PR was generally well tolerated, with a treatment-related adverse event profile (e.g. gastrointestinal disorders, CNS disorders, fatigue and pruritus) that was consistent with that expected for opioid therapy. Notably, there were no confirmed cases of augmentation among oxycodone/naloxone PR recipients throughout the course of the study. Results from the well-designed RELOXYN trial have thus demonstrated the value of oxycodone/naloxone PR as a second-line therapy for severe refractory RLS; further investigation of this combination product as a first-line treatment for severe RLS is now warranted.

  5. Ultra-low-dose naltrexone reduces the rewarding potency of oxycodone and relapse vulnerability in rats.

    PubMed

    Leri, Francesco; Burns, Lindsay H

    2005-10-01

    Ultra-low-dose opioid antagonists have been shown to enhance opioid analgesia and alleviate opioid tolerance and dependence. Our present studies in male Sprague-Dawley rats assessed the abuse potential of oxycodone+ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) versus oxycodone alone. The lowest NTX dose (1 pg/kg/infusion), but not slightly higher doses (10 and 100 pg/kg/infusion), enhanced oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion) intravenous self-administration, suggesting a reduced rewarding potency per infusion. During tests of reinstatement performed in extinction conditions, co-self-administration of any of these three NTX doses significantly reduced drug-seeking precipitated by priming injections of oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg, s.c.), a drug-conditioned cue, or foot-shock stress. During self-administration on a progressive-ratio schedule, animals self-administering oxycodone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion)+NTX (1 pg/kg/infusion) reached a "break-point" sooner and showed a trend toward less responding compared to rats self-administering oxycodone alone (0.1 mg/kg/infusion). In the final experiment, the addition of ultra-low-dose NTX (10 pg/kg, s.c.) enhanced the acute stimulatory effect of oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.), as well as locomotor sensitization produced by repeated oxycodone administration (7 x 1 mg/kg, s.c.). In summary, this work shows that ultra-low-dose NTX co-treatment augments the locomotor effects of oxycodone as it enhances opioid analgesia, but reduces oxycodone's rewarding potency and subsequent vulnerability to relapse.

  6. Effects of dextromethorphan and oxycodone on treatment of neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pao-Pao; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Huang, Eagle Yi-Kung; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H; Tao, Pao-Luh

    2015-09-22

    Neuropathic pain is a very troublesome and difficult pain to treat. Although opioids are the best analgesics for cancer and surgical pain in clinic, only oxycodone among opioids shows better efficacy to alleviate neuropathic pain. However, many side effects associated with the use of oxycodone render the continued use of it in neuropathic pain treatment undesirable. Hence, we explored whether dextromethorphan (DM, a known N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist with neuroprotective properties) could potentiate the anti-allodynic effect of oxycodone and underlying mechanisms regarding to glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) activation and proinflammatory cytokines release in a spinal nerve injury (SNL) mice model. Oxycodone produced a dose-dependent anti-allodynic effect. Co-administration of DM at a dose of 10 mg/kg (i.p.) (DM10) which had no anti-allodynic effect by itself enhanced the acute oxycodone (1 mg/kg, s.c.) effect. When the chronic anti-allodynic effects were examined, co-administration of DM10 also significantly enhanced the oxycodone effect at 3 mg/kg. Furthermore, oxycodone decreased SNL-induced activation of glial cells (astrocytes and microglia) and plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α). Co-administration of DM10 potentiated these effects of oxycodone. The combined use of DM with oxycodone may have therapeutic potential for decreasing the effective dose of oxycodone on the treatment of neuropathic pain. Attenuation of the glial activation and proinflammatory cytokines in the spinal cord may be important mechanisms for these effects of DM.

  7. HIV risk behavior in opioid dependent adults seeking detoxification treatment: an exploratory comparison of heroin and oxycodone users.

    PubMed

    Meade, Christina S; McDonald, Leah J; Weiss, Roger D

    2009-01-01

    Heroin users are at high risk for HIV infection, but little is known about HIV risk in oxycodone users. This study examined HIV risk behaviors in heroin (n = 27) and oxycodone (n = 23) users seeking inpatient detoxification at a private psychiatric hospital. Drug use histories were similar, except oxycodone users used marijuana more frequently. Injection drug risk occurred exclusively among heroin users. The rates of sexual activity (66%), unprotected intercourse (69%), sex while intoxicated (74%), and sex with strangers (24%) were similar, but more oxycodone users had multiple partners (39% vs. 6%, p < .05). HIV prevention efforts should target both heroin and oxycodone users.

  8. Clinical management of methadone dependence during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wilbourne, P; Wallerstedt, C; Dorato, V; Curet, L B

    2001-03-01

    This is a review of the literature regarding the clinical management of pregnant women maintained on methadone treatment. The prevalence of opiate use, definition of opiate dependence, common concerns regarding methadone use in pregnancy, and maternal/fetal harm are addressed. Recommendations for nurses are synthesized from the clinical literature, clinical experiences, and the empirical literature. These recommendations address: antepartum issues including treatment, dosage and pharmacological considerations, medical conditions and lab tests, intrapartum issues, postpartum concerns including breastfeeding, neonatal withdrawal, and developmental effects associated with methadone.

  9. Methadone and buprenorphine toxicity in children.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Edward W; McCance-Katz, Elinore F; Marcus, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Recent years have seen very large increases in the prescribing of methadone and buprenorphine formulations for treatment of opioid addiction as well as the increasing utilization of methadone for the treatment of chronic pain. Coincident with the rise in the prescribing of these drugs has been a substantial increase in pediatric opioid toxicities and adverse events. This review will address the current state of methadone- and buprenorphine-related adverse events in children in the United States. We will also discuss treatment of opioid toxicity in pediatric populations and make recommendations aimed at reducing these occurrences.

  10. Methadone's effect on nAChRs--a link between methadone use and smoking?

    PubMed

    Talka, Reeta; Tuominen, Raimo K; Salminen, Outi

    2015-10-15

    Methadone is a long-acting opioid agonist that is frequently prescribed as a treatment for opioid addiction. Almost all methadone maintenance patients are smokers, and there is a correlation between smoking habit and use of methadone. Methadone administration increases tobacco smoking, and heavy smokers use higher doses of methadone. Nevertheless, methadone maintenance patients are willing to quit smoking although their quit rates are low. Studies on nicotine-methadone interactions provide an example of the bedside-to-bench approach, i.e., observations in clinical settings have been studied experimentally in vivo and in vitro. In vivo studies have revealed the interplay between nicotine and the endogenous opioid system. At the receptor level, methadone has been shown to be an agonist of human α7 nAChRs and a non-competitive antagonist of human α4β2 and α3* nAChRs. These drugs do not have significant interactions at the level of drug metabolism, and thus the interaction is most likely pharmacodynamic. The net effect of the interaction may depend on individual characteristics because pharmacogenetic factors influence the disposition of both methadone and nicotine.

  11. Forensic Investigation of Methadone Concentrations in Deceased Breastfed Infants.

    PubMed

    Madadi, Parvaz; Kelly, Lauren E; Ross, Colin J; Kepron, Charis; Edwards, James N; Koren, Gideon

    2016-03-01

    There is a paucity of data to aid in assessing whether postmortem methadone findings in breastfed infants are clinically and/or toxicologically significant. Two cases are reported in which methadone was detected in deceased neonates whose mothers were enrolled in methadone maintenance programs and were breastfeeding. In addition to a complete autopsy and toxicological testing for alcohol, prescription medications, and drugs of abuse, pharmacogenetic analysis was performed for variants in genes related to methadone metabolism and response. In both cases, the postmortem methadone concentration measured in neonatal heart blood was higher than the maximum serum methadone concentration reported in living breastfed infants whose mothers were receiving methadone. However, additional analysis of antemortem blood indicated postmortem redistribution of methadone. Pharmacogenetic results were suggestive of a potential predisposition to methadone toxicity based on studies in adults; the significance of these findings in breastfed neonates requires further research. The medical cause of death was unascertained in both cases. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Involvement of exon 11-associated variants of the mu opioid receptor MOR-1 in heroin, but not morphine, actions.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying-Xian; Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Rossi, Grace C; Matulonis, Joshua E; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2009-03-24

    Heroin remains a major drug of abuse and is preferred by addicts over morphine. Like morphine, heroin has high affinity and selectivity for mu-receptors, but its residual analgesia in exon 1 MOR-1 knockout mice that do not respond to morphine suggests a different mechanism of action. MOR-1 splice variants lacking exon 1 have been observed in mice, humans, and rats, raising the possibility that they might be responsible for the residual heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G) analgesia in the exon 1 knockout mice. To test this possibility, we disrupted exon 11 of MOR-1, which eliminates all of the variants that do not contain exon 1. Morphine and methadone analgesia in the exon 11 knockout mouse was normal, but the analgesic actions of heroin, M6G, and fentanyl were markedly diminished in the radiant heat tail-flick and hot-plate assays. Similarly, the ability of M6G to inhibit gastrointestinal transit was greatly diminished in these exon 11 knockout mice, whereas the ability of morphine was unchanged. These findings identify receptors selectively involved with heroin and M6G actions and confirm the relevance of the exon 11-associated variants and raise important issues regarding the importance of atypical truncated G-protein-coupled receptors.

  13. Oxycodone combined with opioid receptor antagonists: efficacy and safety.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar; Goforth, Harold W; Gamier, Pam

    2013-05-01

    A mu receptor antagonist combined with oxycodone (OXY) may improve pain control, reduce physical tolerance and withdrawal, minimizing opioid-related bowel dysfunction and act as an abuse deterrent. The authors cover the use of OXY plus ultra-low-dose naltrexone for analgesia and the use of sustained-release OXY plus sustained-release naloxone to reduce the opioid bowel syndrome. The authors briefly describe the use of sustained-release OXY and naltrexone pellets as a drug abuse deterrent formulation. Combinations of ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY have been in separate trials involved in patients with chronic pain from osteoarthritis and idiopathic low back pain. High attrition and marginal differences between ultra-low-dose naltrexone plus OXY and OXY led to discontinuation of development. Prolonged-release (PR) naloxone combined with PR OXY demonstrates a consistent reduction in opioid-related bowel dysfunction in multiple randomized controlled trials. However, gastrointestinal side effects, including diarrhea, were increased in several trials with the combination compared with PR OXY alone. Analgesia appeared to be maintained although non-inferiority to PR OXY is not formally established. There were flaws to trial design and safety monitoring. Naltrexone has been combined with OXY in individual pellets encased in a capsule. This combination has been reported in a Phase II trial and is presently undergoing Phase III studies. Due to the lack of efficacy the combination of altered low-dose naltrexone with oxycodone should cease in development. The combination of sustained release oxycodone plus naloxone reduces constipation with a consistent benefit. Safety has been suboptimally evaluated which is a concern. Although the drug is commercially available in several countries, ongoing safety monitoring particularly high doses would be important.

  14. Oral Oxycodone for Acute Postoperative Pain: A Review of Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Ching Wong, Stanley Sau; Qiu, Qiu; Wang, Xianyu

    2017-02-01

    Opioids are the mainstay of pain management for acute postsurgical pain. Oral oxycodone is an opioid that can provide effective acute postoperative pain relief. To evaluate the use of oral oxycodone for acute postoperative pain management. This is a narrative review based on published articles searched in PubMed and Medline from 2003 to 2015 on oral oxycodone for acute postoperative pain management. Clinical trials related to the use of oral oxycodone for acute postoperative pain management were searched via PubMed and Medline from 2003 to 2015. The search terms used were "oral strong opioids," "postsurgical," "postoperative," "post-surgical," and "post-operative." Treatment interventions were compared for analgesic efficacy, rescue medication use, side effects, recovery, length of hospital stay, and patient satisfaction. There were 26 clinical trials included in the review. Oral oxycodone showed superior postoperative analgesic efficacy compared with placebo in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, abdominal or pelvic surgery, bunionectomy, breast surgery, and spine surgery. When compared with intravenous opioids, oral oxycodone provided better or comparable pain relief following knee arthroplasty, spine surgery, caesarean section, laparoscopic colorectal surgery, and cardiac surgery. One study of dental postsurgery pain reported inferior pain control with oral oxycodone versus rofecoxib. (withdrawn from the US market due to cardiac safety concerns). In many studies, the demand for rescue analgesia and total opioid consumption were reduced in the oxycodone treatment arm. Patients receiving oral oxycodone experienced fewer opioid-related side effects than those on other opioids, and had a similar occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting as patients on placebo. Furthermore, oral oxycodone did not prolong hospital stay and was associated with lower drug costs compared with epidural and intravenous analgesics. Oxycodone administered as part of a

  15. Relapsing thrombotic microangiopathy and intravenous sustained-release oxycodone

    PubMed Central

    Nataatmadja, Melissa; Divi, Dakshinamurthy

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) associated with injecting sustained-release oxymorphone, an opioid intended for oral use, has previously been reported. We report a case of TMA secondary to intravenous use of sustained-release oxycodone, and the first case to demonstrate relapsing disease due to persistent intravenous opioid use. In cases such as these, TMA is suspected to be due to a polyethylene oxide (PEO) coating found on these drugs, and the disease is likely due to a directly toxic effect of PEO to endothelial cells. We hypothesize that there are unidentified genetic predispositions causing some persons to be susceptible to developing this disease. PMID:27478601

  16. Methadone Maintenance as Law and Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heyman, Florence

    1972-01-01

    Argues that substitution of methadone for heroin would not rehabilitate the drug addict, but it may be used as a method of tranquilizing a potentially troublesome ghetto and poor white population. (RJ)

  17. Outpatient benzodiazepine detoxification procedure for methadone patients.

    PubMed

    McDuff, D R; Schwartz, R P; Tommasello, A; Tiegel, S; Donovan, T; Johnson, J L

    1993-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are used by a substantial minority of opioid addicts on methadone maintenance. Alprazolam, now the most widely prescribed benzodiazepine in the United States, appears to have supplanted diazepam as the benzodiazepine drug of choice in this population. Its greater addiction liability, shorter half-life, and more intense withdrawal symptoms make addiction to alprazolam more likely and its management in methadone patients more complicated. This article describes a slow outpatient tapered reduction procedure that was utilized to detoxify benzodiazepine dependent methadone patients seen over a two-year period. The reduction procedure was offered to 22 opioid addicts on methadone maintenance who were regularly ingesting low to moderate amounts of benzodiazepines, primarily alprazolam. Of the 22 patients, 4 patients refused outpatient detoxification, and 18 were started on a reduction procedure. Twelve patients completed the detoxification procedure which averaged 7.8 weeks. Comparisons are made between completers and non-completers and essential design features of the procedure are discussed.

  18. Mothers on methadone: care in the NICU.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Denise J

    2013-01-01

    When women addicted to opioids seek prenatal care, the treatment of choice is methadone. Methadone mediates the addiction by reducing fluctuations in maternal serum opioid levels and protecting the fetus from repeated withdrawal episodes. Methadone maintenance is associated with increased maternal weight gain, decreased illegal drug use, and improved compliance with prenatal care. Although the risks are less when compared with street drugs, the risk to the fetus is physical dependence. Despite the magnitude of this national problem, there is a dearth of literature to guide NICU nurses on how to best support mothers of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in the care of their infants. The purposes of this article are to review what is known about women in methadone treatment who have a history of opioid addiction and apply that evidence to guide neonatal nurses to support mothers of infants with NAS in the NICU.

  19. Cholestatic hepatitis as a possible new side-effect of oxycodone: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Vincent; Stewart, Maxwell; Boyd, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Oxycodone is a widely-used semisynthetic opioid analgesic that has been used for over eighty years. Oxycodone is known to cause side effects such as nausea, pruritus, dizziness, constipation and somnolence. As far as we are aware cholestatic hepatitis as a result of oxycodone use has not been reported so far in the world literature. Case presentation A 34-year-old male presented with cholestatic jaundice and severe pruritus after receiving oxycodone for analgesia post-T11 vertebrectomy. Extensive laboratory investigations and imaging studies did not reveal any other obvious cause for his jaundice and a liver biopsy confirmed canalicular cholestatis suggestive of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. The patient's symptoms and transaminases normalised on withdrawal of oxycodone confirming that oxycodone was the probable cause of the patient's hepatotoxicity. Conclusion We conclude that cholestatic hepatitis is possibly a rare side effect of oxycodone use. Physicians should be aware of the possibility of this potentially serious picture of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:18452597

  20. [Breast feeding during methadon- and buprenorphin therapy].

    PubMed

    Müller, M J; Lange, M; Paul, T; Seeliger, S

    2011-12-01

    The number of opiate addicted patients treated with opioid replacement therapy is continuously increasing. In Germany, 57.7% of these patients are treated with methadone and 18.6% with buprenorphine. This maintenance therapy provides several advantages while addicted pregnant women and their foetus have a high benefit from appropriate replacement therapy. However, the recommendations concerning breast feeding during an opioid replacement therapy are discussed controversially, because methadone as well as buprenorphine accumulate in breast milk. This accumulation might cause damages to the newborn's health; so, child benefits of breast feeding have to be balanced with possible health risks.This review provides an overview of a selective literature search based on the PubMed-database and german consensus recommendations. Used search terms included: (methadone*) AND (breastfeeding OR lactation), (methadone*) AND (human milk), (buprenorphine*) AND (breastfeeding OR lactation) and (buprenorphine*) AND (human milk).According to the available literature, addicted women, substinated with methadone or buprenorphine are allowed to breast feed their newborns. The advantages of breast feeding prevail the risks of an infant opiate intoxication caused by methadone or buprenorphine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. SELF ADMINISTRATION OF OXYCODONE BY ADOLESCENT AND ADULT MICE AFFECTS STRIATAL NEUROTRANSMITTER RECEPTOR GENE EXPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Mayer-Blackwell, B.; Schlussman, S. D.; Butelman, E. R.; Ho, A.; Ott, J.; Kreek, M. J.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Illicit use of prescription opioid analgesics (e.g., oxycodone) in adolescence is a pressing public health issue. Our goal was to determine whether oxycodone self administration differentially affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent compared to adult C57BL/6J mice. Groups of adolescent mice (4 weeks old, n= 12) and of adult mice (11 weeks old, n= 11) underwent surgery during which a catheter was implanted into their jugular veins. After recovering from surgery, mice self administered oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg/infusion) 2 h/day for 14 consecutive days or served as yoked saline controls. Mice were sacrificed within 1 h after the last self-administration session and the dorsal striatum was isolated for mRNA analysis. Gene expression was analyzed with real time PCR using a commercially available neurotransmitter receptor PCR array containing 84 genes. We found that adolescent mice self administered less oxycodone than adult mice over the 14 days. Monoamine oxidase A (Maoa) and neuropeptide Y receptor 5 mRNA levels were lower in adolescent mice than in adult mice without oxycodone exposure. Oxycodone self administration increased Maoa mRNA levels compared to controls in both age groups. There was a positive correlation of the amount of oxycodone self administered in the last session or across 14 sessions with Maoa mRNA levels. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mRNA showed a significant Drug × Age interaction, with point-wise significance. More genes in the dorsal striatum of adolescents (19) changed in response to oxycodone self administration compared to controls than in adult (4) mice. Overall, this study demonstrates that repeated oxycodone self administration alters neurotransmitter receptors gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent and adult mice. PMID:24220688

  2. Self administration of oxycodone by adolescent and adult mice affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Mayer-Blackwell, B; Schlussman, S D; Butelman, E R; Ho, A; Ott, J; Kreek, M J; Zhang, Y

    2014-01-31

    Illicit use of prescription opioid analgesics (e.g., oxycodone) in adolescence is a pressing public health issue. Our goal was to determine whether oxycodone self administration differentially affects striatal neurotransmitter receptor gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent compared to adult C57BL/6J mice. Groups of adolescent mice (4 weeks old, n=12) and of adult mice (11 weeks old, n=11) underwent surgery during which a catheter was implanted into their jugular veins. After recovering from surgery, mice self administered oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg/infusion) 2 h/day for 14 consecutive days or served as yoked saline controls. Mice were sacrificed within 1h after the last self-administration session and the dorsal striatum was isolated for mRNA analysis. Gene expression was analyzed with real time PCR using a commercially available neurotransmitter receptor PCR array containing 84 genes. We found that adolescent mice self administered less oxycodone than adult mice over the 14 days. Monoamine oxidase A (Maoa) and neuropeptide Y receptor 5 mRNA levels were lower in adolescent mice than in adult mice without oxycodone exposure. Oxycodone self administration increased Maoa mRNA levels compared to controls in both age groups. There was a positive correlation of the amount of oxycodone self administered in the last session or across 14 sessions with Maoa mRNA levels. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor mRNA showed a significant Drug × Age interaction, with point-wise significance. More genes in the dorsal striatum of adolescents (19) changed in response to oxycodone self administration compared to controls than in adult (4) mice. Overall, this study demonstrates that repeated oxycodone self administration alters neurotransmitter receptors gene expression in the dorsal striatum of adolescent and adult mice.

  3. Oxytrex: an oxycodone and ultra-low-dose naltrexone formulation.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R

    2007-08-01

    Oxytrex (Pain Therapeutics, Inc.) is an oral opioid that combines a therapeutic amount of oxycodone with an ultra-low dose of the antagonist naltrexone. Animal data indicate that this combination minimizes the development of physical dependence and analgesic tolerance while prolonging analgesia. Oxytrex is in late-stage clinical development by Pain Therapeutics for the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic pain. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of the oxycodone/naltrexone combination, three clinical studies have been conducted, one in healthy volunteers and the other two in patients with chronic pain. The putative mechanism of ultra-low-dose naltrexone is to prevent an alteration in G-protein coupling by opioid receptors that is associated with opioid tolerance and dependence. Opioid agonists are initially inhibitory but become excitatory through constant opioid receptor activity. The agonist/antagonist combination of Oxytrex may reduce the conversion from an inhibitory to an excitatory receptor, thereby decreasing the development of tolerance and physical dependence.

  4. Manifest and Latent Components in Methadone Maintenance: The Methadone Maintenance Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Charles H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses various difficulties which arise when the staff of a methadone maintenance clinic must come to grips with the manifest and latent issues in service delivery. A solution is suggested which involves severing the tie between methadone and the behaviors which are reinforced by its use. (Author)

  5. Manifest and Latent Components in Methadone Maintenance: The Methadone Maintenance Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Charles H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper discusses various difficulties which arise when the staff of a methadone maintenance clinic must come to grips with the manifest and latent issues in service delivery. A solution is suggested which involves severing the tie between methadone and the behaviors which are reinforced by its use. (Author)

  6. [Morphine--myths and facts].

    PubMed

    Weber, T; Zawiła, K; Macheta, A; Andres, J

    2001-01-01

    Morphine in the form of opium tincture accompanies the mankind for several thousands years. At the beginning of the twentieth century morphine has been isolated from opium and it was used initially to treat ... opium addicts. At present it plays an important role in the treatment of severe pain of different origins and (more seldom) in the premedication for general anaesthesia. Despite its side effects it is irreplaceable especially in the treatment of cancer pain. Nowadays the chronic use of oral morphine preparations has been supported by medical authorities who at the same time warn against incorrect dosage and combination with other drugs. Many clinical data concerning oral morphine show that it is safe and effective even in the patients with advanced cancer and poor performance status. Our paper lists myths and common mistakes connected with morphine use and confronts them with well established facts confirming its effectiveness in cancer pain treatment.

  7. Retention and its predictors among methadone maintenance treatment clients in China: a six-year cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaobin; Wu, Zunyou; Rou, Keming; Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Wang, Changhe; Luo, Wei; Pang, Lin; Yin, Wenyuan; Li, Jianhua

    2014-12-01

    To investigate factors associated with retention among the first cohort of drug users attending methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) clinics in China. A six-year cohort of 1511 drug users was enrolled in the first 8 MMT clinics in China in 2004 and followed between March, 2004 and December, 2010. Six-year retention rates were calculated and compared by methadone dosage, clinic location, and length of follow-up. Factors associated with retention were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. The overall retention rate over 6-year was 35.7%. Highest drop-out occurred within the first 12 months of treatment. The retention rates for the 6-year by low (≤ 30 mg/day), medium (31-60 mg/day), and high (>60 mg/day) methadone dosage groups were 20.8%, 34.8% and 53.2%, respectively (p < 0.001). The highest 6-year retention rate among eight clinics was 43.8%, while the lowest one was 17.7% (p < 0.001). The results from Cox proportional hazard models indicate that clients having >30 mg daily methadone dosage (p < 0.001), having relatives receiving MMT (p = 0.027), and having >10% urine morphine positive result (p < 0.001) were more likely to be retained in MMT over the six-year period. It has also found that drug injection (p = 0.005) and needle sharing (p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with better retention. Health workers should adjust individuals' methadone dosages as a method to prevent early treatment termination. Further studies are needed to explore the impact of severity of opiate addiction on long-term retention of MMT clients. Careful assessment of drug users upon MMT enrollment may be helpful for providing additional care to clients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Problems with the use of oxycodone compound in patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Maruta, T; Swanson, D W

    1981-12-01

    In a pain management program (200 patients), a group of daily users of oxycodone compound (29 patients) and a subgroup who were taking a "high dose" of oxycodone compound (13 patients) were compared with a group of 171 non-users of oxycodone compound. A significantly lower treatment success rate was observed in the users (P = 0.04) and high-dose users (P = 0.03). A similar trend was seen in preliminary data available in a larger sample (514 patients). Continued study of these findings is necessary. Meanwhile, in patients with chronic pain, there should be cautious use of this compound.

  9. Anaphylaxis following administration of papaveretum. Case report: Implication of IgE antibodies that react with morphine and codeine, and identification of an allergenic determinant.

    PubMed

    Harle, D G; Baldo, B A; Coroneos, N J; Fisher, M M

    1989-10-01

    IgE antibodies that reacted with morphine and codeine were detected in the serum of a subject who experienced a life-threatening anaphylactic reaction following the administration of Omnopon-Scopolamine (papaveretum-hyoscine). Hapten inhibition studies with morphine and a number of structurally-related analogues revealed that morphine and codeine were the most potent inhibitors of IgE binding to a morphine-solid phase. Nalorphine, meperidine, and methadone were also good inhibitors of IgE binding, but naltrexone, buprenorphine, and fentanyl proved to be poor inhibitors. From a detailed examination of structure-activity relationships, the authors conclude that the important structural features of the morphine allergenic (that is, IgE binding) determinant comprises the cyclohexenyl ring with a hydroxyl group at C-6 and, most important of all, a methyl substituent attached to the N atom. The authors' findings suggest that morphine analogues administered to such a patient may provoke clinical anaphylaxis. Hyoscine reacted weakly with IgE antibodies in the subject's serum, but this was thought to be due to weak cross-reaction between this compound and morphine.

  10. Methadone distribution and excretion into breast milk of clients in a methadone maintenance programme

    PubMed Central

    Wojnar-Horton, R. E.; Kristensen, J. H.; Yapp, P.; Ilett, K. F.; Dusci, L. J.; Hackett, L. P.

    1997-01-01

    Aims Methadone is widely used in maintenance programs for opioid-dependent subjects. The aims of the study were to quantify the distribution and excretion of methadone in human milk during the early postnatal period and to investigate exposure of breast fed infants to the drug. Methods Blood and milk samples were obtained from 12 breast feeding women who were taking methadone in daily doses ranging from 20–80 mg (0.3–1.14 mg kg−1 ). Blood was also obtained from eight of their infants. Methadone concentration in these samples was quantified by h.p.l.c. The infants were observed for withdrawal symptoms. Results The mean (95% CI) milk/plasma ratio was 0.44 (0.24–0.64). Exposure of the infants, calculated assuming an average milk intake of 0.15 l kg−1 day−1 and a bioavailability of 100% was 17.4 (10.8–24) μg kg−1 day−1. The mean infant dose expressed as a percentage of the maternal dose was 2.79 (2.07–3.51)%. Methadone concentrations in seven infants were below the limit of detection for the h.p.l.c. assay procedure, while one infant had a plasma methadone concentration of 6.5 μg l−1. Infant exposure to methadone via human milk was insufficient to prevent the development of a neonatal abstinence syndrome which was seen in seven (64%) infants. No adverse effects attributable to methadone in milk were seen. Conclusions We conclude that exposure of breast fed infants to methadone taken by their mothers is minimal and that women in methadone maintenance programs should not be discouraged from breast feeding because of this exposure. PMID:9431829

  11. Methadone distribution and excretion into breast milk of clients in a methadone maintenance programme.

    PubMed

    Wojnar-Horton, R E; Kristensen, J H; Yapp, P; Ilett, K F; Dusci, L J; Hackett, L P

    1997-12-01

    Methadone is widely used in maintenance programs for opioid-dependent subjects. The aims of the study were to quantify the distribution and excretion of methadone in human milk during the early postnatal period and to investigate exposure of breast fed infants to the drug. Blood and milk samples were obtained from 12 breast feeding women who were taking methadone in daily doses ranging from 20-80 mg (0.3-1.14 mg kg-1). Blood was also obtained from eight of their infants. Methadone concentration in these samples was quantified by h.p.l.c. The infants were observed for withdrawal symptoms. The mean (95% CI) milk/plasma ratio was 0.44 (0.24-0.64). Exposure of the infants, calculated assuming an average milk intake of 0.15 l kg-1 day-1 and a bioavailability of 100% was 17.4 (10.8-24) microg kg-1 day-1. The mean infant dose expressed as a percentage of the maternal dose was 2.79 (2.07-3.51)%. Methadone concentrations in seven infants were below the limit of detection for the h.p.l.c. assay procedure, while one infant had a plasma methadone concentration of 6.5 microg l-1. Infant exposure to methadone via human milk was insufficient to prevent the development of a neonatal abstinence syndrome which was seen in seven (64%) infants. No adverse effects attributable to methadone in milk were seen. We conclude that exposure of breast fed infants to methadone taken by their mothers is minimal and that women in methadone maintenance programs should not be discouraged from breast feeding because of this exposure.

  12. Methadone

    MedlinePlus

    ... fluvoxamine (Luvox); medications for glaucoma, irritable bowel disease, Parkinson's disease, ulcers, and urinary problems; certain medications for ... naltrexone (ReVia, Vivitrol, in Embeda); pentazocine (Talwin); phenobarbital; phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate, in ...

  13. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled study to assess the relative abuse potential of oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets compared with oxycodone alone in nondependent, recreational opioid users

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Rolleri, Robert L; Pixton, Glenn C; Sommerville, Kenneth W

    2012-01-01

    Background Abuse-deterrent formulations attempt to address public health and societal concerns regarding opioid abuse. Oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets combine oxycodone HCl with niacin and functional inactive excipients to create potential barriers to oral, intranasal, and intravenous abuse. This study compared the relative abuse potential of oral immediate-release oxycodone HCl-niacin with that of oral immediate-release oxycodone HCl and placebo in nondependent, recreational opioid users. Methods Forty-nine participants received oxycodone HCl-niacin 40/240 mg and 80/480 mg, oxycodone 40 mg and 80 mg, and placebo in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled and active-controlled, five-way crossover study. Primary endpoints based on a bipolar 100 mm visual analog scale for drug liking were area under effect curve (AUE0–1h, AUE0–2h, AUE0–3h), peak disliking, and effect at 0.5 hours post-dose (E0.5h). Other endpoints included take drug again assessment, overall drug liking, and pupillometry. Results There were statistically significant differences between oxycodone HCl-niacin and oxycodone HCl doses for all primary endpoints (P < 0.0001, all comparisons), suggesting reduced abuse potential with oxycodone HCl-niacin. Take drug again and overall drug liking showed greater liking of oxycodone alone. Oxycodone HCl-niacin 80/480 mg had consistently lower liking assessments than oxycodone HCl-niacin 40/240 mg, suggesting a dose-response to the aversive effects of niacin. Opioid-related adverse events were similar for equivalent oxycodone doses. The treatment-emergent adverse events most specifically associated with oxycodone HCl-niacin (ie, skin-burning sensation, warmth, and flushing) were consistent with the expected vasocutaneous effects of niacin. No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusion Oxycodone HCl-niacin tablets may, in a dose-dependent manner, decrease the potential for oral abuse of oxycodone without unexpected adverse events or clinically

  14. Intradialytic clearance of opioids: methadone versus hydromorphone.

    PubMed

    Perlman, Ryan; Giladi, Hili; Brecht, Krista; Ware, Mark A; Hebert, Terence E; Joseph, Lawrence; Shir, Yoram

    2013-12-01

    Opioids are commonly prescribed to patients with chronic pain associated with end-stage renal disease requiring hemodialysis. The stability of opioid analgesia during dialysis may vary among different opioids. No studies to date have corroborated this clinical observation by directly comparing plasma concentrations of different opioids during dialysis. We compared changes in peridialysis plasma concentrations of 2 pharmacokinetically distinct opioids, methadone and hydromorphone (HM). Fourteen dialysis patients with chronic pain received either methadone or HM for at least 2 weeks before beginning the study. Blood samples were obtained immediately before, during, and after hemodialysis in 2 separate dialysis sessions, 1 week apart, and were analyzed for opioid concentrations. Methadone plasma concentrations were more stable during hemodialysis compared to HM: the mean percent change of methadone plasma levels was 14.9% ± 8.2% (± SD) compared with 55.1% ± 8.1% in the HM treatment group, a difference of 40.2% (95% confidence interval 17.14 to 63.14). The mean plasma clearance of methadone was 19.9 ± 8.5 mL/min (± SD) compared with 105.7 ± 8.3 mL/min for HM, a difference of 85.7 mL/min (95% confidence interval 61.9 to 109.1). There were no differences between the 2 opioid groups in pain scores, side effect profile, and quality of life. Methadone therapy was not associated with an increased rate of adverse events. If confirmed by larger clinical studies, methadone could be considered as one of the opioids of choice in dialysis patients.

  15. "Influence of methadone on clopidogrel in addicts on methadone maintenance therapy" Drug interaction between methadone and clopidogrel

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Ferigol; Hamidikenari, Abolhasan; Sajadi, Seyed Navid; Sajadi, Seyed Rohollah; Shiran, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clopidogrel is a prodrug that converts in the liver to an active thiol metabolite, which irreversibly inhibits the platelet P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor. It seems that methadone as CYP2C19 inhibitor affects ticlopidine activity in vivo. This study aimed to test the ability of methadone in changing ticlopidine pharmacokinetics. Methods: We conducted a case–control study in 10 subjects. The cases (5 subjects) in our study were addicts who were receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for preventing opium withdrawal symptoms. The control group were opiate users before starting MMT. In both groups, the patients received clopidogrel (75mg/day) for 5 days. On the 6th day, the subjects returned to the clinic, blood samples were taken up to 12 hours following clopidogrel dosing in case and control groups. Plasma concentration of clopidogrel was measured by GC-MAS. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel software to estimate PK parameters. Results: In this study, methadone decreased clopidogrel clearance by 25% and increased the AUC0-inf nearly 1.3 fold during the coadministration of clopidogrel as an antiplatelet drug. Conclusion: A significant decrease in the clearance of clopidogrel during the coadministration of methadone consistent with a decrease in clopidogrel conversion to its active metabolite and this may decrease its efficacy and may have life-threatening consequences for the patients undergoing clopidogerel maintenance therapy. PMID:27386066

  16. "Influence of methadone on clopidogrel in addicts on methadone maintenance therapy" Drug interaction between methadone and clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Fallah, Ferigol; Hamidikenari, Abolhasan; Sajadi, Seyed Navid; Sajadi, Seyed Rohollah; Shiran, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Clopidogrel is a prodrug that converts in the liver to an active thiol metabolite, which irreversibly inhibits the platelet P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate receptor. It seems that methadone as CYP2C19 inhibitor affects ticlopidine activity in vivo. This study aimed to test the ability of methadone in changing ticlopidine pharmacokinetics. We conducted a case-control study in 10 subjects. The cases (5 subjects) in our study were addicts who were receiving methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for preventing opium withdrawal symptoms. The control group were opiate users before starting MMT. In both groups, the patients received clopidogrel (75mg/day) for 5 days. On the 6(th) day, the subjects returned to the clinic, blood samples were taken up to 12 hours following clopidogrel dosing in case and control groups. Plasma concentration of clopidogrel was measured by GC-MAS. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel software to estimate PK parameters. In this study, methadone decreased clopidogrel clearance by 25% and increased the AUC0-inf nearly 1.3 fold during the coadministration of clopidogrel as an antiplatelet drug. A significant decrease in the clearance of clopidogrel during the coadministration of methadone consistent with a decrease in clopidogrel conversion to its active metabolite and this may decrease its efficacy and may have life-threatening consequences for the patients undergoing clopidogerel maintenance therapy.

  17. Opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions: from the perspectives of evidence based on randomized controlled trials and clinical risk management.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiu-Qin; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Multimorbidity results in complex polypharmacy which may bear a risk of drug interactions. A better understanding of opioid analgesics combination therapy used for pain management could help warrant medication safety, efficacy, and economic relevance. Until now there has been no review summarizing the opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions from the perspective of evidence based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library, using a PRISMA flowchart. Fifty-two RCTs were included for data interpretation. Forty-two RCTs (80.8%) were conducted in healthy volunteers, whereas 10 RCTs (19.2%) enrolled true patients. None of the opioid-drug/herb pairs was listed as contraindications of opioids involved in this review. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as a precipitant drug include morphine-P2Y12 inhibitors, morphine-gabapentin, and methadone-zidovudine. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as an object drug include rifampin-opioids (morphine, tramadol, oxycodone, methadone), quinidine-opioids (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, codeine, dihydrocodeine, methadone), antimycotics-opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, tilidine, tramadol), protease inhibitors-opioids (ritonavir, ritonavir/lopinavir-oxycodone, ritonavir-fentanyl, ritonavir-tilidine), grapefruit juice-opioids (oxycodone, fentanyl, methadone), antidepressants-opioids (paroxetine-tramadol, paroxetine-hydrocodone, paroxetine-oxycodone, escitalopram-tramadol), metoclopramide-morphine, amantadine-morphine, sumatriptan-butorphanol nasal sprays, ticlopidine-tramadol, St John's wort-oxycodone, macrolides/ketolides-oxycodone, and levomepromazine-codeine. RCTs investigating the same combination, almost unanimously, drew consistent conclusions, except two RCTs on amantadine-intravenous morphine combination where a different amantadine dose was used and two RCTs on morphine

  18. Work Adjustment of the Methadone-Maintained Corporate Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankowitz, Robert; Randell, Joan

    1977-01-01

    The work adjustment of 26 methadone-maintained corporate employees was evaluated. Results indicated: (a) relative to their nonmethadone-maintained coworkers, the methadone-maintained employees had comparable job performance and superior punctuality and attendance; and (b) the methadone-maintained skilled laborers were satisfied with their…

  19. Going Through the Changes: Methadone in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Methadone has been defined as an agent to draw addicts out of the street life into "straight" society. However, the complementary perspective of the streets sees methadone as a new, widely available drug to be integrated into a subculture previously dominated by heroin. This article discusses the adaptation to methadone and its…

  20. Work Adjustment of the Methadone-Maintained Corporate Employee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankowitz, Robert; Randell, Joan

    1977-01-01

    The work adjustment of 26 methadone-maintained corporate employees was evaluated. Results indicated: (a) relative to their nonmethadone-maintained coworkers, the methadone-maintained employees had comparable job performance and superior punctuality and attendance; and (b) the methadone-maintained skilled laborers were satisfied with their…

  1. Going Through the Changes: Methadone in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agar, Michael

    1977-01-01

    Methadone has been defined as an agent to draw addicts out of the street life into "straight" society. However, the complementary perspective of the streets sees methadone as a new, widely available drug to be integrated into a subculture previously dominated by heroin. This article discusses the adaptation to methadone and its…

  2. CYP2D6 Genotype Dependent Oxycodone Metabolism in Postoperative Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stamer, Ulrike M.; Zhang, Lan; Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz E.; Stuber, Frank; Musshoff, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Background The impact of polymorphic cytochrome P450 CYP2D6 enzyme on oxycodone's metabolism and clinical efficacy is currently being discussed. However, there are only spare data from postoperative settings. The hypothesis of this study is that genotype dependent CYP2D6 activity influences plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites and impacts analgesic consumption. Methods Patients received oxycodone 0.05 mg/kg before emerging from anesthesia and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for the subsequent 48 postoperative hours. Blood samples were drawn at 30, 90 and 180 minutes after the initial oxycodone dose. Plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its metabolites oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone were analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization. CYP2D6 genotyping was performed and 121 patients were allocated to the following genotype groups: PM (poor metabolizer: no functionally active CYP2D6 allele), HZ/IM (heterozygous subjects, intermediate metabolizers with decreased CYP2D6 activity), EM (extensive metabolizers, normal CYP2D6 activity) and UM (ultrarapid metabolizers, increased CYP2D6 activity). Primary endpoint was the genotype dependent metabolite ratio of plasma concentrations oxymorphone/oxycodone. Secondary endpoint was the genotype dependent analgesic consumption with calculation of equianalgesic doses compared to the standard non-CYP dependent opioid piritramide. Results Metabolism differed between CYP2D6 genotypes. Mean (95%-CI) oxymophone/oxycodone ratios were 0.10 (0.02/0.19), 0.13 (0.11/0.16), 0.18 (0.16/0.20) and 0.28 (0.07/0.49) in PM, HZ/IM, EM and UM, respectively (p = 0.005). Oxycodone consumption up to the 12th hour was highest in PM (p = 0.005), resulting in lowest equianalgesic doses of piritramide versus oxycodone for PM (1.6 (1.4/1.8); EM and UM 2.2 (2.1/2.3); p<0.001). Pain scores did not differ between genotypes. Conclusions In this postoperative setting, the number of

  3. Methadone as first-line opioid treatment for cancer pain in a developing country palliative care unit.

    PubMed

    Peirano, Gabriela P; Mammana, Guillermo P; Bertolino, Mariela S; Pastrana, Tania; Vega, Gloria F; Russo, Jorgelina; Varela, Gabriela; Vignaroli, Ernesto; Ruggiero, Raúl; Armesto, Arnaldo; Camerano, Gabriela; Dran, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    The use of methadone for cancer pain is limited by the need of expertise and close titration due to variable half-life. Yet, it is a helpful palliative strategy in low-resources countries given its long-acting effect at low cost and worth additional study. Our aim was to describe the prescription and outcomes of methadone as a first-line treatment for cancer pain in a tertiary palliative care unit (PCU) in Argentina. Retrospective review of medical records of patients with moderate to severe cancer pain seen at the PCU in 1-year period, who initiated strong opioids at the first consultation. Data collected during the first month of treatment included disease and pain characteristics, initial and final opioid type and dose and need for opioid rotation. Methadone was the most frequent opioid both at the initial and last assessment (71 and 66 % of the prescriptions). In all, treatment with strong opioids provided considerable decrease in pain intensity (p < 0.001) with low and stable opioid dose. Median and interquartile range (IR) of oral morphine equivalent daily dose (OMEDD) was 26 (16-32) and 39 (32-55) mg for initial and final assessments, respectively (p = 0.3). In patients initiated with methadone, the median (IR) daily methadone dose was 5 (4-6) mg at first and 7.5 (6-10) mg at final assessment, and the median (IR) index of opioid escalation was 0 (0-4) mg; (p < 0.05). Patients on methadone underwent less percentage of opioid rotation (15 versus 50 %; p < 0.001) and longer time to rotation (20.6 ± 4.4 versus 9.0 ± 2.7 days; p < 0.001) than patients on other opioids. Results indicate the preference of methadone as first-line strong opioid treatment in a PCU, providing good pain relief at low doses with low need for rotation. Several considerations about the costs of strong opioids in the region are given.

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastrointestinal laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhen; Wang, Kaiguo; Wang, Baosheng; Zhou, Naibao; Li, Hao; Yan, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: It has been suggested that oxycodone is effective in relieving acute postoperative pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of oxycodone (O) versus fentanyl (F), and the adequate potency ratio of oxycodone and fentanyl in patients with intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after gastric laparotomy. Methods: In this double-blinded, randomized, controlled study, 60 patients undergoing elective gastric laparotomy were allocated to receive either oxycodone or fentanyl for postoperative intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (potency ratio 60:1). The patients received ketorolac 60 mg before the end of anesthesia and then continued with patient-controlled analgesia for 48 hours postsurgery. Pain severity, side effects and respiration rate were recorded 30 minutes, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after the surgery. Cumulative opioid requirements and patient satisfaction were also measured. Results: The median consumption more than 48 hours after operation of oxycodone was 50 mg (range: 40.0–62.4 mg) and fentanyl was 0.8 mg (range: 0.6–1.1 mg), and the percentage of patients requiring rescue medication was not statistically significant. Numeric rating scores at rest and upon movement were significantly lower in group O than in F (P < 0.05). Whereas the incidences of adverse events were similar between the groups (33.3% vs 27.6%, P = 0.64), a significant higher sedation scores were found in patients given fentanyl at 30 minutes after the surgery (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Oxycodone was comparable to fentanyl in the relief of postoperative pain following gastric laparotomy. Oxycodone not only provides better postoperative pain relief and less sedation, but also there was a tendency toward more side effects with oxycodone. PMID:27684835

  5. Investigation of the interactions between methadone and elvitegravir-cobicistat in subjects receiving chronic methadone maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bruce, R Douglas; Winkle, P; Custodio, J M; Wei, X; Rhee, M S; Kearney, B P; Ramanathan, S; Friedland, Gerald H

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between HIV and opioid dependence therapies are known to occur. We sought to determine if such interactions occurred between methadone and elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat (EVG/COBI). We performed a within-subject open-label pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic study of 11 HIV-seronegative subjects stabilized on at least 2 weeks of methadone. Subjects underwent baseline and steady-state evaluation of the effect of elvitegravir 150 mg once a day (QD) boosted with 150 mg QD of cobicistat (EVG/COBI) on methadone pharmacokinetic parameters. Safety and pharmacodynamics were monitored throughout the study. Compared to baseline values, the R-methadone mean area under the concentration-time curve to the end of the dosing period (AUCtau) (5,550 versus 6,210 h · ng/ml) and mean maximum concentration of drug in serum (Cmax) (316 versus 337 ng/ml) did not significantly increase in the presence of EVG/COBI. Compared to baseline values, the S-methadone mean AUCtau (7,040 versus 7,540 h · ng/ml) and mean Cmax (446 versus 452 ng/ml) did not significantly increase in the presence of EVG/COBI. The AUCtau, Cmax, and Ctau of elvitegravir and cobicistat did not significantly differ from those of historical controls. Opioid withdrawal or overdose was not observed among subjects in this study. The addition of EVG/COBI to stabilized patients receiving methadone did not affect methadone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These two agents can be safely coadministered.

  6. [Fatal methadone poisoning of a child].

    PubMed

    Klupp, N; Risser, D; Stichenwirth, M; Hönigschnabl, S; Stimpfl, T; Bauer, G

    2000-04-21

    The substance methadone is used for substitution therapy since the 1960s in the U.S. Mainly because of the endemic spread of HIV-1 infections among intravenous drug abusers methadone was made legally available through medical prescription in Austria in 1987. Legal authorities today also allow the patient to take home the necessary daily consumption for weekends or public holidays. The drug is distributed as a watery solution in tiny bottles, which are fitted with an ordinary screw cap. This kind of distribution may, however, have fatal consequences. This is demonstrated in the following case of accidental poisoning of an infant: A two-year-old girl whose parents were both participating in the substitution scheme was found dead in her bed in Vienna in 1997. Forensic autopsy revealed a methadone concentration in the liver tissue of 640 ng/g. The criminal investigation determined that the girl had opened a bottle of methadone solution and subsequently had taken the drug. Considering the circumstances of this accident, from the medical point of view safety devices for the screw caps of the methadone bottles should be required by law, in order to avoid future accidental poisoning.

  7. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  8. The Adverse Events of Oxycodone in Cancer-Related Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hu; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Lang; Zeng, Xian-Tao; Jin, Su-Han; Yue, Guo-Jun; Tian, Xu; Zhou, Jian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The adverse events (AEs) of oxycodone in cancer-related pain were controversial, so we conducted a meta-analysis to determine it. PubMed, Embase, CBM, CNKI, WanFang database, The Cochrane library, Web of Science, and the reference of included studies were searched to recognize pertinent studies. Relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for all AEs were all extracted. The fixed-effects model was used to calculate pooled RRs and 95% CIs. Power calculation was performed using macro embedded in SAS software after all syntheses were completed. We identified 11 eligible trials involving 1211 patients: 604 patients included in oxycodone group and 607 patients involved in control group. Our quantitative analysis included 8 AEs, and the pooled analyses indicated that oxycodone compared with other opioids in cancer-related pain were not significantly decreased RRs of all AEs (dizziness RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.69–1.30, Z = 0.35, P = 0.72; nausea RR = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.72–1.07, Z = 1.26, P = 0.21; vomiting RR = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.70–1.15, Z = 0.9, P = 0.37; sleepiness RR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.38–1.36, Z = 0.36, P = 0.72; constipation RR = 0.98, 95% CI: 0.81–1.19, Z = 0.21, P = 0.83; anorexia RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.58–1.62, Z = 0.11, P = 0.91; pruritus RR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.44–1.30, Z = 1.01, P = 0.31; dysuria RR = 0.33, 95% CI: 0.07–1.62, Z = 1.36, P = 0.1)]. The subgroup analysis shown that Ox controlled-release (CR) had less sleepiness compared with MS-contin (Mc) CR (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.25–0.90, P = 0.02). The power analysis suggests that all AEs have low statistical power. The present meta-analysis detected that no statistically significant difference were found among oxycodone and other opioids in all AEs, but Ox CR may had less sleepiness compared with Mc CR when subgroup analysis were conducted. PMID:27082588

  9. Acute Oxycodone Induces the Pro-Emetic Pica Response in RatsS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Vinita R.

    2011-01-01

    Oxycodone, a semisynthetic opioid analgesic, is frequently prescribed for the management of pain. Side effects of nausea and emesis affect patient compliance and limit its therapeutic use. The present study established that an antinociceptive dose of oxycodone (15 mg/kg; oral) induces the pica response. We found sex differences in the temporal course of pica, with females having a longer duration. Opioid receptors mediated the pica response, as 1.0 mg/kg naloxone transiently attenuated and 2.0 mg/kg naloxone blocked pica. A κ-selective antagonist failed to block the response, suggesting mediation by μ opioid receptor. For further validation, we used the well established kaolin intake model to assess pica with the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin as a positive control. Oxycodone and cisplatin significantly increased kaolin intake 4- to 7-fold, and the wet weight of stomach was elevated 2- to 3-fold. To examine the underlying neural circuitry, we investigated c-fos activation in the area postrema and nucleus of solitary tract (NTS). Oxycodone treatment significantly increased the number of c-fos-positive neurons in the area postrema and NTS compared with water controls. As expected, cisplatin also increased the number of c-fos-positive cells in these regions. In the area postrema, the oxycodone effect was greater than cisplatin, especially at 2 h. These results indicate that an antinociceptive dose of oxycodone is associated with the expression of pica, a pro-emetic response. PMID:21875950

  10. Stability indicating HPLC method for the estimation of oxycodone and lidocaine in rectal gel.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, M G; McClure, A F; Vlahakis, T L

    2001-07-31

    An HPLC method for the quantification of oxycodone and lidocaine in a gel matrix is described. The mobile phase consisted of methanol--water--acetic acid (35:15:1 v/v/v) and was delivered at 1.5 ml/min through a 4.6 x 250 mm Zorbax SB-C8 column. Oxycodone was detected at 285 nm and lidocaine at 264 nm. Linear calibration curves were obtained for oxycodone in the range of 0.05--1.5% (w/w) and for lidocaine in the range of 0.1--5.0% (w/w). Oxycodone and lidocaine were treated with hydrogen peroxide and the oxidation products were readily separated on the column. The method was applied to assess the stability of a gel containing oxycodone hydrochloride (0.3% w/w) and lidocaine (1.5% w/w). The gel was stored under refrigeration in ready-to-use syringes and under these conditions oxycodone and lidocaine were stable for at least 1 year. The gel is useful in the management of tenesmus in rectal cancer.

  11. Oxycodone/acetaminophen at low dosage: an alternative pain treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Raffaeli, William; Pari, Claudia; Corvetta, Angelo; Sarti, Donatella; Di Sabatino, Valentina; Biasi, Giovanni; Galeazzi, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    To assess efficacy and safety of the association oxycodone/acetaminophen (oxycodone/acetaminophen) for pain treatment and disability improvement in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Patients with RA (n = 29), suffering from moderate to severe pain for more than 3 months, were included in the study, except those under RA therapy with biological drugs. The treatment started with oxycodone/acetaminophen at the dosage of 5 mg/325 mg, and then the dosage was titrated until the attainment of good pain relief. Antiemetic and laxative therapy was used for the prophylaxis of known opioid-related adverse events. Patients continued their RA therapy without changing the dosages, reported reduced pain intensity and disease activity, and improvement of disability. Forty-two percent of patients had a good clinical response to oxycodone/acetaminophen treatment, according to European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) assessment criteria, and 50 percent of patients reached the American College of Rheumatology 20 percent improvement criteria (ACR20). At the end of the study, the mean (+/- SD) daily effective oxycodone/acetaminophen dose was 13.8 (+/- 6.8) mg/720.4 (+/- 291.0) mg. No serious adverse event was observed. Nausea, vomiting, and stipsis of mild-moderate intensity were the most common adverse events. Oxycodone/acetaminophen at low dosages for the treatment of chronic pain in RA patients can be a good alternative to non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), allowing the reduction of their consumption, while keeping RA therapy stable.

  12. A study on photodegradation of methadone, EDDP, and other drugs of abuse in hair exposed to controlled UVB radiation.

    PubMed

    Favretto, Donata; Tucci, Marianna; Monaldi, Alice; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Miolo, Giorgia

    2014-06-01

    The drug content of hair may be affected by washing, chemical or thermal treatments, the use of cosmetics, or exposure to the environment. Knowledge concerning the effect of natural or artificial light on drug content in hair can be helpful to the forensic toxicologist, in particular when investigating drug concentrations above or below pre-determined cut-offs. The photodegradation of methadone and its metabolite, 2-ethyl-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) was studied in authentic positive hair samples by comparing drug concentrations determined by liquid chromatrography-high resolution mass spectrometry before and after exposure to UVB light (in vivo study). The same approach was applied in order to investigate the light sensitivity of opiates (6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine) and cocainics (cocaine and benzoylecgonine) in true positive hair. The yields of photodegradation were calculated for each drug class in eight different positive hair samples irradiated by UVB at 300 J/cm(2) obtaining averages, ranges and standard deviations. In parallel, the photostability of all the compounds as 10(-5) -10(-4)  M standard solutions in methanol were examined by means of UVB light irradiation in the range 0-100 J/cm(2) followed by UV/Vis spectroscopic analysis and direct infusion electrospray ionization-high resolution mass spectrometry (in vitro study). In hair, methadone was shown to be significantly affected by light (photodegradation of 55% on average), while its metabolite EDDP proved to be more photostable (17%). 6-monoacetylmorphine, morphine, benzoylecgonine, and cocaine were more photostable than methadone in vivo (on average, 21%, 17%, 20%, and 11% of degradation, respectively). When irradiated in standard solutions, the target molecules exhibited a larger photodegradation than in vivo with the exception of cocaine (photodegradation for methadone up to 70%, 6-monoacetylmorphine and morphine up to 90%, benzoylecgonine up to 67%, cocaine up to 15

  13. Pharmacogenomics of methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Somogyi, Andrew A; Barratt, Daniel T; Ali, Robert L; Coller, Janet K

    2014-05-01

    Methadone is the major opioid substitution therapy for opioid dependence. Dosage is highly variable and is often controlled by the patient and prescriber according to local and national policy and guidelines. Nevertheless many genetic factors have been investigated including those affecting its metabolism (CYP2B6-consistent results), efflux transport (P-gp-inconsistent results), target μ-opioid receptor (μ-opioid receptor-inconsistent results) and a host of other receptors (DRD2) and signaling elements (GIRK2 and ARRB2; not replicated). None by themselves have been able to substantially explain dosage variation (the major but not sole end point). When multiple genes have been combined such as ABCB1, CYP2B6, OPRM1 and DRD2 a greater contribution to dosage variation was found but not as yet replicated. As stabilization of dosage needs to be made rapidly, it is imperative that larger internationally based studies be instigated so that genetic contribution to dosage can be properly assessed, which may or may not tailor to different ethnic groups and each country's policy towards an outcome that benefits all.

  14. Body Composition Changes Associated With Methadone Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sadek, Gamal E.; Chiu, Simon; Cernovsky, Zack Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methadone is associated with a statistically significant increase in BMI in the first 2 years of treatment. Objectives: To evaluate the changes of body composition (bone mass, % fat, % muscle mass, % water, and basal metabolic rate) related to this increase. Patients and Methods: Changes in body composition were monitored, via bioelectrical impedance, in 29 patients in methadone treatment for opiate dependency (age 18 to 44, mean = 29.3, SD = 7.0, 13 men, 16 women). Results: Within one year from admission to treatment, a statistically significant (t-tests, P < 0.05) increase was noted in their body mass index (BMI), % of body fat, average body mass, and average basal metabolic rate, and relative decrease in their % of muscle mass and % of bone mass. Neither absolute bone mass nor muscle mass changed significantly. Conclusions: Physicians involved in care of methadone patients should recommend dietary and lifestyle changes to improve their overall health. PMID:27162765

  15. Prenatal methadone exposure and neonatal neurobehavioral functioning

    PubMed Central

    Velez, Martha L.; Jansson, Lauren M.; Schroeder, Jennifer; Williams, Erica

    2009-01-01

    Opioid-exposed infants display a wide and variable range of dysregulated neurobehavioral functioning, but the regulatory difficulties experienced by these infants outside the defined clusters of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) have not been well described, and may have implications for the infant’s developmental course. This study describes the neurobehavioral functioning of neonates prenatally exposed to methadone using the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) and explores the relationships between maternal factors and infant functioning. The relationship between NNNS measures, NAS severity and need for pharmacotherapy for NAS were also evaluated. Infants who required pharmacological treatment for NAS showed more dysregulated behavior and signs of stress/abstinence as indicated by NNNS scores, but NNNS scores were not significantly correlated with maternal methadone dose. The determination of the range of the methadone exposed infant’s neurobehavioral repertoire could guide the optimal treatment of all such infants, particularly those requiring only non-pharmacological care. PMID:19690513

  16. A comparison of the antinociceptive and temperature responses to morphine and fentanyl derivatives in rats.

    PubMed

    Savić Vujović, Katarina R; Vučković, Sonja; Srebro, Dragana; Ivanović, Milovan; Došen-Mićović, Ljiljana; Vučetić, Čedomir; Džoljić, Eleonora; Prostran, Milica

    2013-04-01

    In addition to producing antinociception, opioids exert profound effects on body temperature. This study aimed at comparing antinociceptive and hyperthermic responses between two groups of μ-opioid receptor agonists: fentanyl (4-anilinopiperidine-type) and morphine (phenanthrene-type) derivatives in rats. Analgesic activity was assessed by tail immersion test and the body temperature by insertion of a thermometer probe into the colon. Fentanyl (F), (±)-cis-3-methyl fentanyl (CM), (±)-cis-3-carbomethoxy fentanyl (C), (±)trans-3-carbomethoxy fentanyl (T) and (±)-cis-3 butyl fentanyl (B) produced dose-dependent increase in antinociception and hyperthermia. The relative order of analgesic potency was: CM(11.27)>F(1)>C(0.35)≥T(0.11)≥B(0.056). Similar to this, the relative order of hyperthermic potency was: CM(8.43)>F(1)>C(0.46)≥T(0.11)≥B(0.076). Morphine (M), oxycodone (O), thebacon (T) and 6,14-ethenomorphinan-7-methanol, 4,5-epoxy-6-fluoro-3-hydroxy-α,α,17-trimethyl-, (5α,7α) (E) also produced dose-dependent increase in antinociception and hyperthermia. Among morphine derivatives the relative order of analgesic potency was: E(56)>O(5)≥T(2.6)>M(1), and similar to this, the relative order of hyperthermic potency was: E(37)>O(3)≥T(2.3)>M(1). Morphine (phenanthrene-type) and fentanyl (4-anilinopiperidine-type) derivatives produced hyperthermia in rats at doses about 2 times lower, and 6-11 times higher, than their median antinociceptive doses, respectively. This study is first to identify difference between these two classes of opioid drugs in their potencies in producing hyperthermia. Further studies are needed to clarify the significance of these findings.

  17. Systematic knockdown of morphine pathway enzymes in opium poppy using virus-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Wijekoon, Champa P; Facchini, Peter J

    2012-03-01

    Opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) remains the sole commercial source for several pharmaceutical alkaloids including the narcotic analgesics codeine and morphine, and the semi-synthetic drugs oxycodone, buprenorphine and naltrexone. Although most of the biosynthetic genes have been identified, the post-transcriptional regulation of the morphinan alkaloid pathway has not been determined. We have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a functional genomics tool to investigate the regulation of morphine biosynthesis via a systematic reduction in enzyme levels responsible for the final six steps in the pathway. Specific gene silencing was confirmed at the transcript level by real-time quantitative PCR (polymerase chain reaction), and at the protein level by immunoblot analysis using antibodies raised against salutaridine synthase (SalSyn), salutaridine reductase (SalR), salutaridine 7-O-acetyltransferase (SalAT), thebaine 6-O-demethylase (T6ODM), codeinone reductase (COR), and codeine O-demethylase (CODM). In some cases, silencing a specific biosynthetic gene resulted in a predictable accumulation of the substrate for the corresponding enzyme. Reduced SalSyn, SalR, T6ODM and CODM protein levels correlated with lower morphine levels and a substantial increase in the accumulation of reticuline, salutaridine, thebaine and codeine, respectively. In contrast, the silencing of genes encoding SalAT and COR resulted in the accumulation of salutaridine and reticuline, respectively, which are not the corresponding enzymatic substrates. The silencing of alkaloid biosynthetic genes using VIGS confirms the physiological function of enzymes previously characterized in vitro, provides insight into the biochemical regulation of morphine biosynthesis, and demonstrates the immense potential for metabolic engineering in opium poppy.

  18. Single-shot epidural-spinal anesthesia followed by oral oxycodone/naloxone and ketoprofen combination in patients undergoing total hip replacement: analgesic efficacy and tolerability.

    PubMed

    Scardino, M; Grappiolo, G; Gurgone, A; Mazziotta, G; Astore, F; Ferrari, M

    2015-01-01

    Many patients undergoing hip replacement have inadequate postoperative pain control, leading to suboptimal recovery. Oxycodone is effective in controlling pain, but is associated with adverse events such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). In patients with chronic pain, oral oxycodone-naloxone combination (OXN) provides comparable analgesia with fewer side effects. This retrospective, single-centre study evaluated analgesic effectiveness and tolerability of single-shot epidural spinal anaesthesia followed by OXN after total hip replacement. Consecutive patients received perioperative spinal-epidural anaesthesia, OXN 10/5 mg and oral ketoprofen 100 mg q 12h for 4 days. Efficacy and tolerability were assessed on the evening post surgery and days 1-3 after. Efficacy endpoints included pain intensity at rest and upon movement (Numerical Rating Scale [NRS] Score), rescue analgesia and patient satisfaction (0-3 point scale). Two hundred eighty-two patients were included in the observation (57.2% women, mean age 62.9±12 years). After surgery, pain intensity remained well controlled, both at rest (mean NRS: 1.1, 1.1, 1.2 and 1.2 on days 0-3 respectively; P=ns) and upon movement (2.1, 2.4, 2.1 and 2.0; P=ns). No patient reported severe pain throughout the observation. Rescue paracetamol was required on days 0-3 in 17.0%, 18.4%, 12.4% and 12.1% of patients, respectively (P<0.009); no patient required additional intravenous rescue morphine. Seventy-two percent of patients were 'very satisfied' with postoperative pain therapy. Single-shot epidural spinal anaesthesia followed by OXN-based analgesia after hip replacement provided effective pain management, with high patient satisfaction rates.

  19. Use of benzodiazepines and detoxification with methadone.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Negrei, C; Bălălău, D; Ciobanu, A M; Baconi, D; Bălălău, C

    2014-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are used as anti anxiety drugs, as well as in adjunct treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Abusive patterns of use were increasingly reported and building evidence points to prevalence of benzodiazepines abuse, on one hand as well as to their common abuse in combination with other drugs such as opioids, most frequently. The main objective of this research is to conduct a systematic study on the behavior profile of a patient admitted to a prison hospital, who is a benzodiazepines user consecutive to admission into a methadone administration program. Statistic values have been taken into account describing the distribution and the distribution form of the various variables studied to find the normality degree of distributions, regarding three measurements at the three moments: before the administration of methadone, immediately after its completion and two months after completion. The statistic results obtained speak of a strong positive correlation, allowing the support of the fact that persons diagnosed with prescribed/ unprescribed benzodiazepine, use the display association with the admission into a methadone administration program, based on the assumption which concerns a significant positive association between the use of reported benzodiazepine and the administration of methadone in the questioned patients on admission. As far as the second premise regarding the administration of methadone is concerned it brings about an improvement in the level of benzodiazepines used in research patients, which one may assert that, according to the results obtained, the initiation of methadone therapy in the detoxification program is conducive to the reduction of benzodiazepines use.

  20. Use of benzodiazepines and detoxification with methadone

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, G; Negrei, C; Bălălău, D; Ciobanu, AM; Baconi, D; Bălălău, C

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Benzodiazepines are used as anti anxiety drugs, as well as in adjunct treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Abusive patterns of use were increasingly reported and building evidence points to prevalence of benzodiazepines abuse, on one hand as well as to their common abuse in combination with other drugs such as opioids, most frequently. Objective: The main objective of this research is to conduct a systematic study on the behavior profile of a patient admitted to a prison hospital, who is a benzodiazepines user consecutive to admission into a methadone administration program. Methods and results: Statistic values have been taken into account describing the distribution and the distribution form of the various variables studied to find the normality degree of distributions, regarding three measurements at the three moments: before the administration of methadone, immediately after its completion and two months after completion. Conclusions and discussions: The statistic results obtained speak of a strong positive correlation, allowing the support of the fact that persons diagnosed with prescribed/ unprescribed benzodiazepine, use the display association with the admission into a methadone administration program, based on the assumption which concerns a significant positive association between the use of reported benzodiazepine and the administration of methadone in the questioned patients on admission. As far as the second premise regarding the administration of methadone is concerned it brings about an improvement in the level of benzodiazepines used in research patients, which one may assert that, according to the results obtained, the initiation of methadone therapy in the detoxification program is conducive to the reduction of benzodiazepines use. PMID:25870711

  1. Residential Treatment Modifications: Adjunctive Services to Accommodate Clients on Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, TeChieh; Masson, Carmen L.; Sorensen, James L.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objectives This article describes therapeutic community (TC) services modified to support methadone residents and their service utilization in a study of TC patients (N=231) receiving versus not receiving methadone. Methods Service utilization data is reported from providers (i.e., methadone support group counselor, acupuncturist, and consulting psychiatrist) for 12 months after admission. Descriptive statistics are used to report methadone residents use of methadone support group and acupuncture services. Pearson chi-square tests are used to compare methadone and non-methadone participants use of psychiatrist services. Additionally, such tests were used to compare both groups DSM-IV diagnoses. Results 97% of methadone patients attended at least one methadone support group; 52% used acupuncture services. Proportionally more non-methadone residents used psychiatric services (p < .05). Conclusion and Scientific Significance Services tailored to methadone residents were accessed by this group. However, while 32% of all participants met diagnostic criteria for a current psychiatric disorder, only 22% received onsite psychiatric care, which questions whether integrated care is being provided adequately for participants with co-occurring disorders. PMID:19259872

  2. [Economic efficiency of methadone maintenance and factors affecting it].

    PubMed

    Vanagas, Giedrius; Padaiga, Zilvinas; Subata, Emilis

    2004-01-01

    Methadone maintenance is effective in reducing injection drug use, needle sharing, and the overall mortality associated with opiate abuse. Scientific literature describes that efficiency of methadone maintenance program depends on many factors. Our analysis is based on description of economic research methods and on factors affecting economic efficiency of methadone maintenance. Computerized Medline data base was searched by key words: "economic evaluation", "cost-effectiveness", "cost-utility", "methadone", "methadone dosage", "ancillary services", "treatment duration". Review and analysis. Methadone maintenance therapy has higher economic efficiency with 80-100 mg per day methadone dose. Doses lower than 40 mg per day are considered as inefficient. Some methadone programs limit treatment to 90 days or less, but such short treatment episodes are not likely to be cost-effective. Ancillary services are more cost-effective at the beginning of methadone maintenance program, than in the later stages of the program. Economic efficiency is higher when program involves more participants, than when more ancillary services are provided. CONCLUSIONS. Effectiveness of Methadone maintenance program affects methadone dosage policy, treatment duration and ancillary services.

  3. Synergy between mu opioid ligands: evidence for functional interactions among mu opioid receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bolan, Elizabeth A; Tallarida, Ronald J; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2002-11-01

    Pharmacological differences among mu opioid drugs have been observed in in vitro and in vivo preclinical models, as well as clinically, implying that all mu opioids may not be working through the same mechanism of action. Here we demonstrate analgesic synergy between L-methadone and several mu opioid ligands. Of the compounds examined, L-methadone selectively synergizes with morphine, morphine-6beta-glucuronide, codeine, and the active metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. Morphine synergizes only with L-methadone. In analgesic assays, D-methadone was inactive alone and did not enhance morphine analgesia when the two were given together, confirming that L-methadone was not acting through N-methyl-D-aspartate mechanisms. Both L-methadone and morphine displayed only additive effects when paired with oxymorphone, oxycodone, fentanyl, alfentanyl, or meperidine. Although it displays synergy in analgesic assays, the L-methadone/morphine combination does not exhibit synergy in the gastrointestinal transit assay. This analgesic synergy of L-methadone with selective mu opioid drugs and the differences in opioid-mediated actions suggest that these drugs may be acting via different mechanisms. These findings provide further evidence for the complexity of the pharmacology of mu opioids.

  4. The relationship between maternal methadone dose at delivery and neonatal outcome: methodological and design considerations.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Jansson, Lauren M; O'Grady, Kevin E; Kaltenbach, Karol

    2013-01-01

    Compared to untreated opioid dependence, methadone maintenance treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women has been found to be associated with better maternal and neonatal outcomes. Secondary analysis of data from 73 maternal and neonatal participants in the MOTHER study (H. E. Jones et al., New England Journal of Medicine, 2010) found no relationship between maternal methadone dose at delivery and any of 9 neonatal outcomes--peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score, total amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, duration of neonatal hospital stay, duration of treatment for NAS, estimated gestational age at delivery, Apgar score at 5 min, and neonatal head circumference, length, and weight at birth. These results are consistent with a recent systematic review and meta-analysis (B. J. Cleary et al., Addiction, 2010) and extend findings to outcomes other than NAS. Methodological and design issues that might have adversely impacted the ability of researchers to establish the existence or non-existence of these relationships are considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The relationship between maternal methadone dose at delivery and neonatal outcome: Methodological and design considerations

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hendrée E.; Jansson, Lauren M.; O’Grady, Kevin E.; Kaltenbach, Karol

    2013-01-01

    Compared to untreated opioid dependence, methadone maintenance treatment of opioid-dependent pregnant women has been found to be associated with better maternal and neonatal outcomes. Secondary analysis of data from 73 maternal and neonatal participants in the MOTHER study (H. E. Jones et al., New England Journal of Medicine, 2010) found no relationship between maternal methadone dose at delivery and any of 9 neonatal outcomes – peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score, total amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, duration of neonatal hospital stay, duration of treatment for NAS, estimated gestational age at delivery, Apgar score at 5 minutes, and neonatal head circumference, length, and weight at birth. These results are consistent with a recent systematic review and meta-analysis (B. J. Cleary et al., Addiction, 2010) and extend findings to outcomes other than NAS. Methodological and design issues that might have adversely impacted the ability of researchers to establish the existence or non-existence of these relationships are considered. PMID:24099621

  6. Methadone intoxication in a child: toxic encephalopathy?

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Marisol; Campos Rainho, António; do Carmo Vale, Maria; Estrada, João; Valente, Rosalina; Correia, Manuela; Vieira, José Pedro; Barata, Deolinda

    2006-07-01

    Methadone is used in the treatment of opioid addiction. Acute intoxication can lead to severe consequences and can even be lethal. In several case reports and small series, a presumably toxic leukoencephalopathy is described resulting from inhalation of heroin. We present the case of a 3-year-old boy who ingested methadone accidentally. In a coma with acute obstructive hydrocephalus owing to massive cerebellar edema and supratentorial lesions, he was successfully treated with methylprednisolone and cerebrospinal fluid external drainage. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an encephalopathy associated with synthetic opioid intoxication.

  7. Prospective multicenter observational study of 260 infants born to 259 opiate-dependent mothers on methadone or high-dose buprenophine substitution.

    PubMed

    Lejeune, Claude; Simmat-Durand, Laurence; Gourarier, Laurent; Aubisson, Sandrine

    2006-05-20

    Specialized prenatal care and substitution programs improve the perinatal prognoses of pregnant drug-abusers and their infants. Although methadone is well documented, little is known about high-dose buprenorphine (HDB). This prospective, multicenter (n = 35) observational study included 259 women on maintenance during pregnancy: 39% on methadone and 61% on HDB. Major findings were: 46% of them received good prenatal care; 62% had peridural analgesia; 12.3% delivered prematurely (<37 weeks); mean gestational age, 38.6 weeks; mean birth weight, 2822g. Three-quarters of the newborns developed neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) beginning at a mean age of 40h, with the mean maximum Lipsitz score of 9.1 at 72 h; half of them were treated, mainly with morphine hydrochloride. No baby died. Newborns were discharged with their mothers (96%) or placed in foster care (4%). Comparing methadone with HDB, respectively, mean age at the maximum Lipsitz score was 81 h versus 66 h (P = 0.066). The perinatal medical and social prognoses for these 259 drug addicts and their infants appeared to be improved by specialized prenatal care and was similar for methadone or BHD substitution during pregnancy.

  8. Knowledge and stigma regarding methadone maintenance treatment among personnel of methadone maintenance treatment and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities in Israel.

    PubMed

    Shidlansik, Lia; Adelson, Miriam; Peles, Einat

    2017-01-01

    Stigma attached to methadone maintenance treatment is very common. The objective of the current article is to evaluate the presence of stigma and its relation to the extent of knowledge about methadone maintenance treatment. The authors conducted a survey among methadone maintenance treatment and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction therapists from different treatment centers in Israel, including methadone maintenance treatment clinics (Ministry of Health) and non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities (Ministry of Social Services), using an anonymous questionnaire about methadone maintenance treatment stigma and knowledge. There were 63 therapists from methadone maintenance treatment clinics (63%) and 46 therapists from the social services department (SSD) non-methadone maintenance treatment addiction facilities (9.2%) who responded. Methadone maintenance treatment versus social services department personnel were older (42.7 ± 12.8 versus 37.5 ± 8.2 years; p = 0.03), with fewer females (48 versus 75%; p = 0.006), and 50% were social workers compared to 100% social workers in the SSD group (p < 0.0005). Stigma score was lower among methadone maintenance treatment personnel compared to the social services department personnel (3 ± 2.5 versus 5.0 ± 3.5; p = 0.0001), while the knowledge score about methadone maintenance treatment was higher among the methadone maintenance treatment personnel (10.3 ± 2.9 versus 7.7 ± 2.8; p < 0.0005). The difference in both the stigma and knowledge scores remained significant after controlling for age, gender, and profession. There was a negative correlation between the stigma and knowledge scores among both the methadone maintenance treatment (R = -0.5, p < 0.0005) and the social services department personnel (R = -0.33, p = 0.03). These results revealed a significant correlation between the presence of stigma and the extent of education and knowledge about methadone maintenance treatment, with ignorance

  9. Successful interventions in decreasing oxycodone CR prescriptions within an underserved population.

    PubMed

    Shah, Nipa R; Haddad-Lacle, Judella; Hogan, Thanh

    2015-01-01

    To use fundamental population health and Patient Centered Medical Home guidelines to create an effective intervention that would decrease the quantity of inappropriate oxycodone controlled release (CR) prescriptions within an uninsured population. This was a prospective interventional study. Patients seen in the newly formed University of Florida Community Health and Family Medicine Department Total Care Clinic, for chronic nonmalignant pain. This clinic was designed to serve the uninsured patients of Jacksonville, FL. A structured, step-wise pain management protocol was introduced and implemented, and an improved Controlled Substance User Agreement was created and implemented. Pharmacists and primary care providers collaborated on care. The primary study outcome measures were the number of oxycodone CR prescriptions over an 8-month period. At the initiation of the program, the authors averaged over 40 oxycodone CR prescriptions per month. After 3 months, the number of prescriptions dropped to an average of 10 per month, a 75 percent decrease. More importantly, the number of oxycodone CR tablets saw a corresponding 75 percent drop from over 2,500 tablets per month to approximately 600 per month. Of course, the authors were concerned that the reduction of oxycodone CR may lead to increases in the use of other opioids. However, trends for hydrocodone/acetaminophen also showed a reduction in total usage as well as all other long-acting opioids. In addition, patient satisfaction did not change significantly, and no significant complaints from patients regarding this specific change were received. By implementing criteria for oxycodone CR prescribing in an innovative, comprehensive, and unified patient-centered practice model, the authors saw a significant decrease in the number of oxycodone CR tablets prescribed per month and also a decrease in total prescriptions per month.

  10. Intranasal oxycodone self-administration in non-dependent opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, L.S.; Lofwall, M.R.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Siegel, A.; Walsh, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    Oxycodone, an opioid with known abuse liability, is misused by the intranasal route. Our objective was to develop a model of intranasal oxycodone self-administration useful for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of opioids and potential pharmacotherapies for opioid use disorders. Healthy, sporadic intranasal opioid abusers (n=8; 7 M, 1 F) completed this inpatient 2.5-week, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Each intranasal oxycodone dose (0, 14 & 28 mg) was tested in a separate 3-day block of sessions. The first day of each block was a sample session in which the test dose was given. Two randomized progressive ratio sessions were conducted on the next 2 days: 1) subjects could work for the test dose over 7 trials (1/7th of total dose/trial), and 2) subjects could work for either a portion of the dose (1/7th) or money ($3) over 7 trials. Physiological and subjective measures were collected before and after drug administration for all sessions. Subjects never worked to self-administer placebo regardless of whether money was available. In both self-administration sessions, oxycodone self-administration was dose-dependent. Subjects worked less for drug (28 mg oxycodone) when money was available, but only modestly so. Oxycodone dose-dependently increased VAS ratings of positive drug effects (e.g., ‘like’) during sample sessions (p<0.05). These reports were positively correlated with self-administration behavior (e.g., ‘like’, r=0.65). These data suggest that both procedures are sensitive for detecting the reinforcing properties of intranasal oxycodone and may be employed to further explore the characteristics of opioid compounds and potential pharmacotherapies for treatment. PMID:22686495

  11. The genetic influences on oxycodone response characteristics in human experimental pain.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Anne E; Sato, Hiroe; Nielsen, Lecia M; Staahl, Camilla; Droney, Joanne; Gretton, Sophy; Branford, Ruth; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Riley, Julia; Ross, Joy

    2015-08-01

    Human experimental pain studies are of value to study basic pain mechanisms under controlled conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate whether genetic variation across selected mu-, kappa- and delta-opioid receptor genes (OPRM1, OPRK1and OPRD1, respectively) influenced analgesic response to oxycodone in healthy volunteers. Experimental multimodal, multitissue pain data from previously published studies carried out in Caucasian volunteers were used. Data on thermal skin pain tolerance threshold (PTT) (n = 37), muscle pressure PTT (n = 31), mechanical visceral PTT (n = 43) and thermal visceral PTT (n = 41) were included. Genetic associations with pain outcomes were explored. Nineteen opioid receptor genetic polymorphisms were included in this study. Variability in oxycodone response to skin heat was associated with OPRM1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs589046 (P < 0.0001) and rs563649 (P < 0.0001). Variability in oxycodone response to visceral pressure was associated with four OPRM1 SNPs: rs589046 (P = 0.015), rs1799971 (P = 0.045), rs9479757 (P = 0.009) and rs533586 (P = 0.046). OPRM1 SNPs were not associated with oxycodone visceral heat threshold, however, one OPRD1 rs419335 reached significance (P = 0.015). Another OPRD1 SNP rs2234918 (P = 0.041) was associated with muscle pressure. There were no associations with OPRK1 SNPs and oxycodone response for any of the pain modalities. Associations were found between analgesic effects of oxycodone and OPRM1 and OPRD1 SNPs; therefore, variation in opioid receptor genes may partly explain responder characteristics to oxycodone.

  12. Intranasal oxycodone self-administration in non-dependent opioid abusers.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Lisa S; Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Siegel, Anthony J; Walsh, Sharon L

    2012-08-01

    Oxycodone, an opioid with known abuse liability, is misused by the intranasal route. Our objective was to develop a model of intranasal oxycodone self-administration useful for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of opioids and potential pharmacotherapies for opioid use disorders. Healthy, sporadic intranasal opioid abusers (n = 8; 7 M, 1 F) completed this inpatient 2.5-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Each intranasal oxycodone dose (0, 14 & 28 mg) was tested in a separate 3-day block of sessions. The first day of each block was a sample session in which the test dose was given. Two randomized progressive ratio sessions were conducted on the next 2 days: (1) subjects could work for the test dose over 7 trials (1/7th of total dose/trial), and (2) subjects could work for either a portion of the dose (1/7th) or money ($3) over 7 trials. Physiological and subjective measures were collected before and after drug administration for all sessions. Subjects never worked to self-administer placebo regardless of whether money was available. In both self-administration sessions, oxycodone self-administration was dose-dependent. Subjects worked less for drug (28 mg oxycodone) when money was available but only modestly so. Oxycodone dose-dependently increased VAS ratings of positive drug effects (e.g., "like") during sample sessions (p < .05). These reports were positively correlated with self-administration behavior (e.g., "like," r = .65). These data suggest that both procedures are sensitive for detecting the reinforcing properties of intranasal oxycodone and may be used to further explore the characteristics of opioid compounds and potential pharmacotherapies for treatment.

  13. Abrupt decline in oxycodone-caused mortality after implementation of Florida's Prescription Drug Monitoring Program.

    PubMed

    Delcher, Chris; Wagenaar, Alexander C; Goldberger, Bruce A; Cook, Robert L; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M

    2015-05-01

    In Florida, oxycodone-caused deaths declined substantially in 2012. Multiple important law enforcement, pharmaceutical, policy, and public health actions occurred concurrently, including implementation of a statewide Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP). The effects of the PDMP on oxycodone-caused mortality in Florida were evaluated. A time-series, quasi-experimental research design with autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) statistical models, including internal and external covariates. Data included 120 repeated monthly observations. Monthly counts of oxycodone-caused deaths, obtained from the Florida Medical Examiners Commission (MEC) was the outcome variable. Models included market-entry of tamper-resistant oxycodone HC1 controlled release tablets (OxyContin(®)), enforcement crackdowns (Operation Pill Nation), and regulation by FL House Bill 7095, measured by the monthly count of Florida pain management clinics closed. Two approaches were used to test the PDMP's hypothesized effect: (1) a binary indicator variable (0=pre-implementation, 1=post-implementation), and (2) a continuous indicator consisting of the number of PDMP queries by health care providers. Oxycodone-caused mortality abruptly declined 25% the month after implementation of Florida's PDMP (p=0.008). The effect remained after integrating other related historical events into the model. Results indicate that for a system-wide increase of one PDMP query per health care provider, oxycodone-caused deaths declined by 0.229 persons per month (p=0.002). This is the first study to demonstrate that the PDMP had a significant effect in reducing oxycodone-caused mortality in Florida. Results have implications for national efforts to address the prescription drug epidemic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Methadone, Cocaine, Opiates and Metabolite Disposition in Umbilical Cord and Correlations to Maternal Methadone Dose and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    de Castro, Ana; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Gray, Teresa R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To explore methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) umbilical cord disposition, correlate with maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes, and evaluate the window of drug detection in umbilical cord of in utero illicit drug exposure. Methods Subjects, 19 opioid-dependent pregnant women from two clinical studies, one comparing methadone and buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependence treatment, and the second examining monetary reinforcement schedules to maintain drug abstinence. Correlations were calculated for methadone and EDDP umbilical cord concentrations and maternal methadone dose, and neonatal outcomes. Cocaine- and opiate-positive umbilical cord concentrations were compared to those in placenta and meconium, and urine specimens collected throughout gestation. Results Significant positive correlations were found for umbilical cord methadone concentrations and methadone mean daily dose, mean dose during the 3rd trimester and methadone cumulative daily dose. Umbilical cord EDDP concentrations and EDDP/methadone concentration ratios were positively correlated to newborn length, peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score and time-to-peak NAS score. Methadone concentrations and EDDP/methadone ratios in umbilical cord and placenta were positively correlated. Meconium identified many more cocaine and opiate positive specimens than umbilical cord. Conclusion Umbilical cord methadone concentrations were correlated to methadone doses. Also, our results indicate that methadone and EDDP concentrations might help to predict NAS severity. Meconium proved to be more suitable than umbilical cord to detect in utero exposure to cocaine and opiates; however, umbilical cord could be useful when meconium is unavailable due to in utero or delayed expulsion. PMID:21743375

  15. Methadone, cocaine, opiates, and metabolite disposition in umbilical cord and correlations to maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana; Jones, Hendreé E; Johnson, Rolley E; Gray, Teresa R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose was to explore methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) umbilical cord disposition, correlate with maternal methadone dose and neonatal outcomes, and evaluate the window of drug detection in umbilical cord of in utero illicit drug exposure. Subjects comprised 19 opioid-dependent pregnant women from 2 clinical studies, one comparing methadone and buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependence treatment and the second examining monetary reinforcement schedules to maintain drug abstinence. Correlations were calculated for methadone and EDDP umbilical cord concentrations and maternal methadone dose, and neonatal outcomes. Cocaine- and opiate-positive umbilical cord concentrations were compared with those in placenta and meconium, and urine specimens collected throughout gestation. Significant positive correlations were found for umbilical cord methadone concentrations and methadone mean daily dose, mean dose during the third trimester, and methadone cumulative daily dose. Umbilical cord EDDP concentrations and EDDP/methadone concentration ratios were positively correlated to newborn length, peak neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) score, and time-to-peak NAS score. Methadone concentrations and EDDP/methadone ratios in umbilical cord and placenta were positively correlated. Meconium identified many more cocaine- and opiate-positive specimens than did umbilical cord. Umbilical cord methadone concentrations were correlated to methadone doses. Also, our results indicate that methadone and EDDP concentrations might help to predict the NAS severity. Meconium proved to be more suitable than umbilical cord to detect in utero exposure to cocaine and opiates; however, umbilical cord could be useful when meconium is unavailable due to in utero or delayed expulsion.

  16. Influence of Ethanol on Oxycodone-induced Respiratory Depression: A Dose-escalating Study in Young and Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    van der Schrier, Rutger; Roozekrans, Margot; Olofsen, Erik; Aarts, Leon; van Velzen, Monique; de Jong, Merijn; Dahan, Albert; Niesters, Marieke

    2017-03-01

    Respiratory depression is a potentially fatal complication of opioid use, which may be exacerbated by simultaneous ethanol intake. In this three-way sequential crossover dose-escalating study, the influence of coadministration of oral oxycodone and intravenous ethanol was assessed on resting ventilation, apneic events and the hypercapnic ventilatory response in healthy young and older volunteers. Twelve young (21 to 28 yr) and 12 elderly (66 to 77 yr) opioid-naive participants ingested one 20 mg oxycodone tablet combined with an intravenous infusion of 0, 0.5, or 1 g/l ethanol. Resting respiratory variables and the primary outcome, minute ventilation at isohypercapnia (end-tidal partial pressure of carbon dioxide of 55 mmHg or VE55), were obtained at regular intervals during treatment. Oxycodone reduced baseline minute ventilation by 28% (P < 0.001 vs. control). Ethanol caused a further decrease of oxycodone-induced respiratory depression by another 19% at 1 g/l ethanol plus oxycodone (P < 0.01 vs. oxycodone). Ethanol combined with oxycodone caused a significant increase in the number of apneic events measured in a 6-min window with a median (range) increase from 1 (0 to 3) at 0 g/l ethanol to 1 (0 to 11) at 1 g/l ethanol (P < 0.01). Mean (95% CI) VE55 decreased from 33.4 (27.9 to 39.0) l/min (control) to 18.6 (15.6 to 21.6) l/min (oxycodone, P < 0.01 vs. control) and to 15.7 (12.7 to 18.6) l/min (oxycodone combined with ethanol, 1 g/l; P < 0.01 vs. oxycodone). Ethanol together with oxycodone causes greater ventilatory depression than either alone, the magnitude of which is clinically relevant. Elderly participants were more affected than younger volunteers.

  17. Sex differences in the pharmacokinetics, oxidative metabolism and oral bioavailability of oxycodone in the Sprague-Dawley rat.

    PubMed

    Chan, Samuel; Edwards, Stephen R; Wyse, Bruce D; Smith, Maree T

    2008-03-01

    1. The pharmacokinetics and oxidative metabolism of oxycodone were investigated following intravenous and oral administration in male and female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. 2. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-electrospray ionization (ESI)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) was used to quantify plasma concentrations of oxycodone and its oxidative metabolites noroxycodone and oxymorphone following administration of single bolus intravenous (5 mg/kg) and oral (10 mg/kg) doses of oxycodone. 3. The mean (+/-SEM) clearance of intravenous oxycodone was significantly higher in male than female SD rats (4.9 +/- 0.3 vs 3.1 +/- 0.3 L/h per kg, respectively; P < 0.01). Mean areas under the plasma concentration versus time curves (AUC) for oxycodone were significantly higher in female than male SD rats following intravenous (approximately 1.6-fold; P < 0.01) and oral (approximately sevenfold; P < 0.005) administration. 4. The oral bioavailability of oxycodone was low (at 1.2 and 5.0%, respectively) in male and female SD rats, a finding consistent with high first-pass metabolism. Noroxycodone : oxycodone AUC ratios were significantly higher in male than female SD rats after intravenous (approximately 2.4-fold; P < 0.005) and oral (approximately 12-fold; P < 0.005) administration. 5. Circulating oxymorphone concentrations remained very low following both routes of administration. Noroxycodone : oxymorphone AUC ratios were greater in male than female SD rats after intravenous (approximately 13- and fivefold, respectively) and oral (approximately 90- and sixfold, respectively) administration. 6. Sex differences were apparent in the pharmacokinetics, oxidative metabolism and oral bioavailability of oxycodone. Systemic exposure to oxycodone was greater in female compared with male SD rats, whereas systemic exposure to metabolically derived noroxycodone was higher in male than female SD rats. 7. Oral administration of oxycodone to the SD rat is a poor model of the human for

  18. [Impact of slow-release oral morphine on drug abusing habits in Austria].

    PubMed

    Beer, Beate; Rabl, Walter; Libiseller, Kathrin; Giacomuzzi, Salvatore; Riemer, Yvonne; Pavlic, Marion

    2010-01-01

    A well-established possibility to treat opiate addiction is the participation in opiate maintenance treatment programmes. For this purpose the opioids methadone and buprenorphine have been evaluated and are used nowadays in many countries. However, since 1998 also the use of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) has been legally permitted in Austria. Our data show that these morphine preparations are frequently abused and are dominating the black market in the meantime. Especially the intravenous consumption of SROM goes along with highly dangerous side effects that exceed the risks of needle sharing alone. Special galenics are supposed to ensure a 24 h effect of the otherwise quickly metabolised morphine. If dissolved and injected, insoluble contents such as talcum cause microembolisms, leading to severe damages of the inner organs. Furthermore, SROM, i.e. a drug prescribed by physicians, has been proved to be the main responsible substance in most drug related deaths since its permission and has nearly replaced heroin. Forensic physicians play a major role in the profound examination of these cases, including extensive toxicological analyses and interpretation of results. For instance, a differentiation between a recent morphine and heroin consumption is certainly possible, provided appropriate methods are used. A reliable estimation of the current situation of drug abusing habits is a premise for adequate therapeutic offers and preventive measures. Thus, well-founded and comparable data have to be collected. To facilitate data report a standardized report form has been developed that includes an obligatory statement regarding morphine or heroin consumption. This should help to enlighten the ongoing discussion on the role of SRM in drug abuse cases. Our results indicate that the prescription of SROM in opiate maintenance therapy has to be handled very strictly and should be reserved for special patients only. A slackening of the Austrian law concerning SROM is

  19. Morphine metabolism in the naturally morphine-tolerant afghan pika: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Coimbra-Farges, R; Puget, A; Monsarrat, B; Moisand, C; Meunier, J C

    1990-01-01

    The afghan pika (Ochotona rufescens), a lagomorph which is naturally tolerant to the analgesic action of morphine, metabolizes morphine into morphine 3-glucuronide apparently faster than does the rabbit, another lagomorph which is however normally responsive to morphine. In the two species, following morphine administration, another unidentified component appears very soon (5 min) in pika blood plasma and much later (60 min) in rabbit blood plasma. This unknown component which appears not to be morphine derived might be involved in the natural resistance of the Afghan pika to morphine.

  20. Methadone Maintenance: The Addict's Family Recreated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartzman, John; Bokos, Peter

    1979-01-01

    A study of four methadone clinics, the addicts treated at these clinics, and their families, reveals basic dissonances in treatment ideology and professional-paraprofessional relationships which, combined with the addict's particular mode of functioning, make significant change in his behavior improbable. (Author)

  1. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  2. Methadone maintenance and drug-related crime.

    PubMed

    Bell, J; Mattick, R; Hay, A; Chan, J; Hall, W

    1997-01-01

    Using data from an evaluation of methadone maintenance treatment, this study investigated factors associated with continued involvement in crime during treatment, and in particular whether there appeared to be differences in effectiveness of treatment between different methadone clinics. The methodology was an observational study, in which 304 patients attending three low-intervention, private methadone clinics in Sydney were interviewed on three occasions over a twelve month period. Outcome measures were self-reported criminal activity and police department records of convictions. By self-report, crime dropped promptly and substantially on entry to treatment, to a level of acquisitive crime about one-eighth that reported during the last addiction period. Analysis of official records indicated that rates of acquisitive convictions were significantly lower in the in-treatment period compared to prior to entry to treatment, corroborating the changes suggested by self-report. Persisting involvement in crime in treatment was predicted by two factors: the cost of persisting use of illicit drugs, particularly cannabis, and ASPD symptom count. Treatment factors also were independently predictive of continued involvement in crime. By both self-report and official records, and adjusting for subject factors, treatment at one clinic was associated with greater involvement in crime. This clinic operated in a chaotic and poorly organized way. It is concluded that crime during methadone treatment is substantially lower than during street addiction, although the extent of reduction depends on the quality of treatment being delivered.

  3. Maternal methadone treatment and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Liu, William F; Singh, Kultar; Faisal, Mohamed; Li, Shuang

    2015-09-01

    This article aims to describe neonatal outcomes, clinical correlates, and the rate for neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) for women on methadone maintenance therapy. This study is a retrospective review, which includes 119 mothers and 120 live newborns. Methadone mothers tends to be white, single, on government insurance, with increased tobacco use (73%) and hepatitis C (11%). Prematurity increased (28%), and the term infant had a higher risk for admission for respiratory symptoms (22, 7%, p < 0.001). Overall, 78% newborns developed NAS, with the onset of symptoms 4.3 ± 2.9 days, and average length of stay of 36.7 ± 26.4 days. There was a decreased overall gestational age for those infants who did not have NAS (36, 38 weeks, p = 0.04). Overall, 56% had possible illicit drug supplementation. Self-reporting had a 59% negative predictive value with a positive drug screen. No difference in maternal methadone dosage and newborns with and without NAS. Increasing gestational age will increase the odds for NAS. Newborns are at higher risk for prematurity and admission for respiratory symptoms. Utilizing a 7-day observation period, 78% of newborns were diagnosed with NAS with a mean onset of symptoms of 4.3 days. There was no difference in methadone dosage between babies with and without NAS. Increasing gestational age increases the risk for NAS. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Fatal methadone intoxication in an infant.

    PubMed

    Couper, Fiona J; Chopra, Kiran; Pierre-Louis, Marie Lydie Y

    2005-10-04

    Presented are the case history and toxicological findings of an infant fatality involving methadone. A mother found her 10-month-old infant unresponsive in a crib. The infant was taken to a hospital; however, she was cold and stiff on arrival and was pronounced dead. Few details regarding the case history were known at the time, and the autopsy findings were unremarkable. Specimens were submitted for a full toxicological analysis, including an alcohol analysis by headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection; a screen for drugs of abuse and several prescription drug classes using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique (ELISA); and a screen for basic compounds using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Positive findings were confirmed and quantitated using GC-MS. Methadone was detected in subclavian blood at a concentration of 0.67 mg/L. The cause of death was determined to be "methadone intoxication", and the manner of death was "homicide". A discussion of the case circumstances, the toxicology findings and methadone pharmacokinetics are presented.

  5. Randomized open-label phase II study comparing oxycodone-naloxone with oxycodone in early return of gastrointestinal function after laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Creamer, F; Balfour, A; Nimmo, S; Foo, I; Norrie, J D; Williams, L J; Fearon, K C; Paterson, H M

    2017-01-01

    Combined oral modified-release oxycodone-naloxone may reduce opioid-induced postoperative gut dysfunction. This study examined the feasibility of a randomized trial of oxycodone-naloxone within the context of enhanced recovery for laparoscopic colorectal resection. In a single-centre open-label phase II feasibility study, patients received analgesia based on either oxycodone-naloxone or oxycodone. Primary endpoints were recruitment, retention and protocol compliance. Secondary endpoints included a composite endpoint of gut function (tolerance of solid food, low nausea/vomiting score, passage of flatus or faeces). Eighty-two patients were screened and 62 randomized (76 per cent); the attrition rate was 19 per cent (12 of 62), leaving 50 patients who received the allocated intervention with 100 per cent follow-up and retention (modified intention-to-treat cohort). Protocol compliance was more than 90 per cent. Return of gut function by day 3 was similar in the two groups: 13 (48 per cent) of 27 in the oxycodone-naloxone group and 15 (65 per cent) of 23 in the control group (95 per cent c.i. for difference -10·0 to 40·7 per cent; P = 0·264). However, patients in the oxycodone-naloxone group had a shorter time to first bowel movement (mean(s.d.) 87(38) h versus 111(37) h in the control group; 95 per cent c.i. for difference 2·3 to 45·4 h, P = 0·031) and reduced total (oral plus parenteral) opioid consumption (mean(s.d.) 78(36) versus 94(56) mg respectively; 95 per cent c.i. for difference -10·2 to 42·8 mg, P = 0·222). High participation, retention and protocol compliance confirmed feasibility. Potential benefits of oxycodone-naloxone in reducing time to bowel movement and total opioid consumption could be tested in a randomized trial. Registration number: NCT02109640 (https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/). © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Maternal methadone dose during pregnancy and infant clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Wouldes, Trecia A; Woodward, Lianne J

    2010-01-01

    In recent decades there has been an increase in the methadone dosages prescribed for opioid dependent women during pregnancy. Using prospective longitudinal data from a cohort of 32 methadone exposed and 42 non-methadone exposed infants, this study examined the relationship between maternal methadone dose during pregnancy and a range of infant clinical outcomes. Of particular interest was the extent to which any observed associations might reflect the direct causal effects of maternal methadone dose and/or the confounding effects of adverse maternal lifestyle factors correlated with methadone use during pregnancy. Findings revealed the presence of clear linear relationships between the mean methadone dose prescribed for mothers during pregnancy and a range of adverse infant clinical outcomes. With increasing maternal methadone dose there was a corresponding increase in infants' risk of being born preterm, being symmetrically smaller, spending longer periods in hospital and the need for treatment for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. After due allowance for potentially confounding maternal health and lifestyle factors, maternal methadone dose during pregnancy remained a significant predictor of preterm birth, growth, and the duration of infant hospitalization post delivery. These findings suggest a need to examine more closely the potential impacts of recent trends towards the use of higher methadone dose levels during pregnancy.

  7. Quantitation of methadone and metabolite in patients under maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Diong, Shiau Hui; Mohd Yusoff, Nor Shuhadah; Sim, Maw Shin; Raja Aziddin, Raja Elina; Chik, Zamri; Rajan, Poppy; Abdul Rashid, Rusdi; Chemi, Norliza; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry quantitative method was developed to monitor concentrations of methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) in plasma and urine of patients. The developed method was simple, accurate and reproducible to quantify methadone and EDDP in plasma and urine samples in the concentration range of 15-1,000 and 50-2,000 ng/mL, respectively. The proposed analytical method was applied to plasma and urine samples obtained from 96 patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) with daily methadone doses of 2-120 mg/day. Urinary methadone excretion was observed to be significantly affected by pH, in which the ratio of methadone to EDDP was two times higher in acidic urine (P = 0.029). The findings of this study further enhance the guidelines for monitoring of methadone treatment among outpatients. Methadone-to-EDDP ratio in urine was found to be consistent at 24 and 4 h, hence suggesting the possibility that outpatients may be monitored with single urine sample in order to check for compliance. This study which provides data on peak concentrations of methadone and EDDP as well as the ratio of both compounds has added to the body of knowledge regarding pharmacokinetic properties of methadone among heroin-dependent patients under MMT.

  8. Effects of repeated oxycodone administration on its analgesic and subjective effects in normal, healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Ziva D; Sullivan, Maria A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Manubay, Jeanne M; Haney, Margaret; Foltin, Richard W; Evans, Suzette M; Kowalczyk, William J; Saccone, Phillip A; Comer, Sandra D

    2012-01-01

    Tolerance to the analgesic effects of opioids has been demonstrated in laboratory animals after repeated drug administration, yet this effect has been studied less frequently under controlled laboratory conditions in humans. This within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to determine if tolerance developed to the analgesic, subjective, and physiological effects of the commonly prescribed opioid oxycodone when it was administered daily for 5 days. The effects of oxycodone’s (0, 5, and 20 mg/70 kg, p.o.) were compared, using a within-session cumulative dosing procedure, on the 1st and 5th days of the ‘daily’ dosing phase to assess for tolerance; active oxycodone was administered on the 2nd-4th days of the daily dosing phase. Changes in the effects of oxycodone were also compared when the medication was only administered on the 1st and 5th day of a 5-day ‘intermittent’ dosing phase; placebo medication was administered on the 2nd–4th days of the intermittent dosing phase. A 9-day ‘washout’ period occurred between phases when no medication was administered. Healthy volunteers (N=10) with no history of drug dependence or current drug use participated in this outpatient study. Analgesia was assessed using the Cold-Pressor Test (CPT), pain and drug effects were measured using a variety of questionnaires, and pupil diameter was monitored as an index of physiological effects. When administered daily, no differences were observed in oxycodone-induced analgesia between the 1st and 5th days, but tolerance did develop to some of the positive subjective effects of oxycodone. In contrast, oxycodone-induced analgesia and participant ratings of some positive subjective drug effects were greater on the 5th day compared to the 1st day of the intermittent dosing phase. No differences in the miotic effects of oxycodone between the 1st and 5th days of either dosing phase were detected. Though obtained under limited experimental conditions, these

  9. Changes in oxycodone and heroin exposures in the National Poison Data System after introduction of extended-release oxycodone with abuse-deterrent characteristics.

    PubMed

    Coplan, Paul M; Kale, Hrishikesh; Sandstrom, Lauren; Landau, Craig; Chilcoat, Howard D

    2013-12-01

    Abuse and misuse of prescription opioids are serious public health problems. Abuse-deterrent formulations are an intervention to balance risk mitigation with appropriate patient access. This study evaluated the effects of physicochemical barriers to crushing and dissolving on safety outcomes associated with extended-release oxycodone (ERO) tablets (OxyContin) using a national surveillance system of poison centers. Other single-entity (SE) oxycodone tablets and heroin were used as comparators and to assess substitution effects. The National Poison Data System covering all US poison centers was used to measure changes in exposures in the year before versus the 2 years after introduction of reformulated ERO (7/2009-6/2010 vs 9/2010-9/2012). Outcomes included abuse, therapeutic errors affecting patients, and accidental exposures. After ERO reformulation, abuse exposures decreased 36% for ERO, increased 20% for other SE oxycodone, and increased 42% for heroin. Therapeutic errors affecting patients decreased 20% for ERO and increased 19% for other SE oxycodone. Accidental exposures decreased 39% for ERO, increased 21% for heroin, and remained unchanged for other SE oxycodone. During the study period, other interventions to reduce opioid abuse occurred, for example, educational and prescription monitoring programs. However, these have shown small effects and do not explain a drop for ERO exposures but not for other opioids. After ERO reformulation, calls to poison centers involving abuse, therapeutic errors affecting patients, and accidental exposures decreased for ERO, but not for comparator opioids. Abuse-deterrent formulations of opioid analgesics can reduce abuse, but switching to other accessible non abuse-deterrent opioids might occur. © 2013 The Authors. Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Separate and combined psychopharmacological effects of alprazolam and oxycodone in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zacny, James P.; Paice, Judith A.; Coalson, Dennis W.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are epidemiological data indicating that medical and/or nonmedical use of prescription opioids oftentimes involves concurrent use of other substances. One of those substances is benzodiazepines. It would be of relevance to characterize the effects of an opioid and a benzodiazepine when taken together to determine if measures related to abuse liability-related effects and psychomotor performance impairment are increased compared to when the drugs are taken alone. Methods Twenty volunteers participated in a crossover, randomized, double-blind study in which they received placebo, 0.5 mg alprazolam, 10mg oxycodone, and 0.5 mg alprazolam combined with 10mg oxycodone, all p.o. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the four sessions. Results Oxycodone by itself increased drug liking and “take again” ratings relative to placebo, but these ratings were not increased when oxycodone was taken with alprazolam, which by itself did not increase either of these ratings. The two drugs in combination produced stronger effects (larger in magnitude or longer lasting) than when either was taken alone on a number of measures, including psychomotor performance impairment. Conclusions In healthy volunteers, abuse liability-related subjective effects of oxycodone were not enhanced by alprazolam. There was enhanced behavioral toxicity when the drugs were taken together, and thus, this is of significant concern from a public safety standpoint. PMID:22365897

  11. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological effects of pregabalin alone and in combination with oxycodone in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Zacny, James P; Paice, Judith A; Coalson, Dennis W

    2012-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug indicated for neuropathic disorders and fibromyalgia. Some chronic pain patients suffering from these disorders take both this drug and an opioid for pain relief. Pregabalin is a scheduled drug under the Controlled Substances Act. The subjective effects of this drug have not been well-characterized, and the extent to which it alters the subjective effects of opioids has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 16 healthy volunteers were administered (in separate sessions) capsules containing placebo, 75 mg pregabalin, 150 mg pregabalin, 10 mg oxycodone, and 75 mg pregabalin combined with 10 mg oxycodone. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the five sessions. Pregabalin produced dose-related increases in some subjective effects and decreased respiration rate, but did not impact on psychomotor performance. Abuse liability-related subjective effects such as drug liking and desire to take the drug again were not increased by either pregabalin dose. Oxycodone produced increases in several subjective effects, including ratings of drug liking. When 75 mg pregabalin was combined with oxycodone some subjective effects were altered relative to placebo, in contrast to when each drug was tested alone. Liking of oxycodone was not increased by 75 mg pregabalin. However, recent studies have suggested that this drug is abused, and we would recommend that further psychopharmacological studies with pregabalin are warranted, including a study assessing its abuse liability across a range of doses in sedative abusers.

  12. Subjective, Psychomotor, and Physiological Effects of Pregabalin Alone and in Combination With Oxycodone in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Zacny, James P.; Paice, Judith A.; Coalson, Dennis W.

    2011-01-01

    Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant drug indicated for neuropathic disorders and fibromyalgia. Some chronic pain patients suffering from these disorders take both this drug and an opioid for pain relief. Pregabalin is a scheduled drug under the Controlled Substance Act. The subjective effects of this drug have not been well-characterized, and the extent to which it alters the subjective effects of opioids has not been studied to the best of our knowledge. Using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design, 16 healthy volunteers were administered (in separate sessions) capsules containing placebo, 75 mg pregabalin, 150 mg pregabalin, 10 mg oxycodone, and 75 mg pregabalin combined with 10 mg oxycodone. Subjective, psychomotor, and physiological measures were assessed during each of the five sessions. Pregabalin produced dose-related increases in some subjective effects and decreased respiration rate, but did not impact on psychomotor performance. Abuse liability-related subjective effects such as drug liking and desire to take the drug again were not increased by either pregabalin dose. Oxycodone produced increases in several subjective effects, including ratings of drug liking. When 75 mg pregabalin was combined with oxycodone some subjective effects were altered relative to placebo, in contrast to when each drug was tested alone. Liking of oxycodone was not increased by 75 mg pregabalin. However, recent studies have suggested that this drug is abused, and we would recommend that further psychopharmacological studies with pregabalin are warranted, including a study assessing its abuse liability across a range of doses in sedative abusers. PMID:22085697

  13. Effects of different dosages of oxycodone and fentanyl on the hemodynamic changes during intubation.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki-Bum; Ann, Junggun; Lee, Haemi

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of oxycodone compared with fentanyl for attenuating the hemodynamic response during endotracheal intubation. This study was conducted from June 2014 to February 2015 on healthy adults undergoing general anesthesia at the Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu, Republic of Korea. Ninety-five patients were randomly assigned to one of 3 groups to receive the following drugs; Group F: fentanyl 2 μg/kg; Group O/70: oxycodone 140 μg/kg; Group O/100: oxycodone 200 μg/kg. Five minutes after injection of the study drug, general anesthesia was induced with propofol 1.5 mg/kg and rocuronium 0.8 mg/kg. The mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2), and bispectral index (BIS) were compared before administration of the study drug (T1), just before endotracheal intubation (T2), one minute after endotracheal intubation (T3), and 7.5 minutes after endotracheal intubation (T4). Complications were assessed. The 2 oxycodone groups showed no significant differences in MBP, HR, SpO2, and BIS compared to Group F at the time points assessed. The incidence of complications was comparable among the groups.  Oxycodone could successfully be used to attenuate the sympathetic response during anesthetic induction. The hemodynamic profiles and incidence of complications were clinically similar among the groups, but Group O/70 tended to show a lower rate of complications of apnea.

  14. A randomized trial of six-month methadone maintenance with standard or minimal counseling versus 21-day methadone detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Valerie A.; Delucchi, Kevin L.; Kielstein, Anousheh; Batki, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Important questions remain regarding the necessary duration and intensity for methadone treatment to be effective. Methods As part of a clinical trial of tuberculosis chemoprophylaxis (Batki et al., 2002), patients with opioid dependence were recruited from an outpatient 21-day methadone detoxification program and were randomly assigned to one of three treatment conditions: 1) continuation in 21-day methadone detoxification; 2) transfer to six-month methadone maintenance with only minimal counseling; or 3) transfer to six-month methadone maintenance with standard twice monthly counseling and as-needed social work and psychiatric services. Both of the six-month maintenance treatments were followed by 1.5 months of detoxification. Urine drug tests and self-report measures were collected at baseline, months 1 through 6, and month 8.5. Results Compared to 21-day methadone detoxification, six-month methadone maintenance with either minimal or standard counseling resulted in fewer opiate positive urine tests and days of self-reported heroin and alcohol use. There was no change in cocaine use or other outcome measures. The increased counseling available in the standard counseling condition did not appear to reduce heroin use further than the minimal counseling condition, in contrast to the effect found for more structured counseling in long-term methadone maintenance (McLellan et al., 1993). Conclusions Six months of methadone maintenance, even with minimal counseling, reduces heroin and alcohol use more than 21-day methadone detoxification. PMID:18243585

  15. Mechanism of ritonavir changes in methadone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics: I. Evidence against CYP3A mediation of methadone clearance.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, E D; Bedynek, P S; Park, S; Whittington, D; Walker, A; Hoffer, C

    2008-10-01

    Ritonavir diminishes methadone plasma concentrations, an effect attributed to CYP3A induction, but the actual mechanisms are unknown. We determined ritonavir effects on stereoselective methadone pharmacokinetics and clinical effects (pupillary miosis) in healthy human immunodeficiency virus-negative volunteers. Subjects received intravenous plus oral (deuterium-labeled) racemic methadone after no ritonavir, short-term (3-day) ritonavir, and steady-state ritonavir. Acute and steady-state ritonavir, respectively, caused 1.5- and 2-fold induction of systemic and apparent oral R- and S-methadone clearances. Ritonavir increased renal clearance 40-50%, and stereoselectively (S > R) increased hepatic methadone N-demethylation 50-80%, extraction twofold, and clearance twofold. Bioavailability was unchanged despite significant inhibition of intestinal P-glycoprotein. Intestinal and hepatic CYP3A was inhibited > 70%. Ritonavir shifted methadone plasma concentration-miosis curves leftward and upward. Rapid ritonavir induction of methadone clearance results from increased renal clearance and induced hepatic metabolism. Induction of methadone metabolism occurred despite profound CYP3A inhibition, suggesting no role for CYP3A in clinical methadone metabolism and clearance. Ritonavir may alter methadone pharmacodynamics.

  16. Relationship between plasma concentrations of the l-enantiomer of methadone and response to methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Meini, Milo; Moncini, Marco; Daini, Laura; Giarratana, Tania; Scaramelli, Daniela; Chericoni, Silvio; Stefanelli, Fabio; Rucci, Paola

    2015-08-05

    This study evaluated the relationship between the plasma concentration of l-methadone and response to methadone in real-world patients, in order to identify a minimum plasma concentration above which methadone treatment is effective. Ninety-four patients with opioid dependence under maintenance methadone treatment were consecutively recruited. Response was defined as negative urine analyses in the three weeks prior to the blood sampling. The percentage of participants with a plasma l-methadone concentration between 100 and 250 ng/ml was 54.2% among those with a methadone dosage ≥60 mg/day. Plasma l-methadone concentrations were significantly higher in patients with negative urine analyses compared with those with positive urine analyses (median 93 vs. 77 ng/ml, Mann-Whitney test, P<0.05). Above plasma l-methadone concentrations of 200 ng/ml no heroin use was reported and urine analyses were negative. Moreover, above concentrations of 250 ng/ml craving was absent. Examination of demographic correlates of treatment outcome indicated that older age, a stable job and being married were protective against the use of heroin. Mean plasma l-methadone concentration was significantly lower in patients who used cannabis compared with those who did not use cannabis, after adjusting for methadone dosage. In conclusion our results identify specific cut-offs for plasma l-methadone concentrations about which therapeutic response is observed and provide new evidence that therapeutic response is associated with patient׳s demographic characteristics. This underscores the need to monitor plasma methadone concentrations as part of Drug Addiction Services routine practice, in order to provide an objective framework for changing the methadone dosage.

  17. Simultaneous determination of opiates, methadone, amphetamines, cocaine, and metabolites in human placenta and umbilical cord by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Ana; Díaz, Ariana; Piñeiro, Beatriz; Lendoiro, Elena; Cruz, Angelines; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Concheiro, Marta

    2013-05-01

    LC-MS/MS methods for the quantification of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, codeine, 6-acetylmorphine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, ecgonine methyl ester, hydroxybenzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methadone, and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine in human placenta and umbilical cord were developed and validated. Specimens (1 ± 0.02 g) were homogenized with the Ultra-Turrax T8 disperser and centrifuged, and the supernatant was submitted to solid-phase extraction with Oasis MCX cartridges. Chromatographic separation was performed using an Atlantis T3 analytical column (100 × 2.1 mm, 3 μm) and a gradient of 0.1 % formic acid and acetonitrile. Selectivity was verified in 10 different blank specimens. The method was linear from 1-5 to 100-500 ng/g, depending on the analyte. Limits of detection and quantification ranged from 0.5 to 2.5 ng/g and 1 to 5 ng/g, respectively. Method imprecision was ≤15.3 %, except for MDMA at low quality control (18.1 %); accuracy, 87.1 to 114 %; extraction efficiency, 16.3 to 154.0 % (%CV = 1.8-39.4 %); matrix effect, -75.7 to 449.9 % (%CV = 3.5-50 %); and process efficiency, 8.7 to 316.0 %. The method was applied to authentic placenta and umbilical cord specimens from drug-user pregnant women.

  18. The Disposition of Oxycodone and Metabolite in Human Hair.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Jones, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The disposition of oxycodone (OC) and metabolites in hair remains poorly characterized. We present a case involving a pharmacist in an impaired professionals' monitoring program in whom hair testing yielded OC on two occasions. On both occasions, his hair was negative for the oxymorphone (OM) metabolite at the cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. He claimed that, absent the detection of metabolite, the OC necessarily represented external contamination. This prompted a review of the laboratory's OC-positive hair results for the quarter April-June 2014. Overall, 466 specimens contained OC, with a mean (median) concentration of 2,375 (1,060) pg/mg. Of these OC-positive specimens, only 47 (10%) contained detectable OM. When OC was present at or below the mean (median) concentration, only 2.2% (1.3%) of specimens were OM-positive. In the setting of OC administration, the detection of OM in hair is unlikely at a cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. More consistent demonstration of OC metabolite(s) in hair will require the validation of methods to detect OM at lower concentrations and/or methods to detect noroxycodone.

  19. Minocycline suppresses morphine-induced respiratory depression, suppresses morphine-induced reward, and enhances systemic morphine-induced analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Northcutt, Alexis L.; Chao, Lindsey W.; Kearney, Jeffrey J.; Zhang, Yingning; Berkelhammer, Debra L.; Loram, Lisa C.; Rozeske, Robert R.; Bland, Sondra T.; Maier, Steven F.; Gleeson, Todd T.; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent data suggest that opioids can activate immune-like cells of the central nervous system (glia). This opioid-induced glial activation is associated with decreased analgesia, owing to the release of proinflammatory mediators. Here we examine in rats whether the putative microglial inhibitor, minocycline, may affect morphine-induced respiratory depression and/or morphine-induced reward (conditioned place preference). Systemic co-administration of minocycline significantly attenuated morphine-induced reductions in tidal volume, minute volume, inspiratory force and expiratory force, but did not affect morphine-induced reductions in respiratory rate. Minocycline attenuation of respiratory depression was also paralleled with significant attenuation by minocycline of morphine-induced reductions in blood oxygen saturation. Minocycline also attenuated morphine conditioned place preference. Minocycline did not simply reduce all actions of morphine, as morphine analgesia was significantly potentiated by minocycline co-administration. Lastly, morphine dose-dependently increased cyclooxygenase-1 gene expression in a rat microglial cell line, an effect that was dose-dependently blocked by minocycline. Together, these data support that morphine can directly activate microglia in a minocycline-suppressible manner and suggest a pivotal role for minocycline-sensitive processes in the mechanisms of morphine-induced respiration depression, reward, and pain modulation. PMID:18706994

  20. Rate of methadone use among Aboriginal opioid injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Evan; Montaner, Julio S.; Li, Kathy; Barney, Lucy; Tyndall, Mark W.; Kerr, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown elevated rates of health-related harms among Aboriginal people who use injection drugs such as heroin. Methadone maintenance therapy is one of the most effective interventions to address the harms of heroin injection. We assessed the rate of methadone use in a cohort of opioid injection drug users in Vancouver and investigated whether methadone use was associated with Aboriginal ethnic background. Methods Using data collected as part of the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (May 1996–November 2005), we evaluated whether Aboriginal ethnic background was associated with methadone use using generalized estimating equations and Cox regression analysis. We compared methadone use among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal injection drug users at the time of enrolment and during the follow-up period, and we evaluated the time to first methadone use among people not using methadone at enrolment. Results During the study period, 1603 injection drug users (435 Aboriginal, 1168 non-Aboriginal) were recruited. At enrolment, 54 (12.4%) Aboriginal participants used methadone compared with 247 (21.2%) non-Aboriginal participants (odds ratio [OR] 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38–0.73, p < 0.001). Among the 1351 (84.3%) participants who used heroin, Aboriginal people were less likely to use methadone throughout the follow-up period (adjusted OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.45–0.81, p < 0.001). Among people using heroin but who were not taking methadone at enrolment, Aboriginal ethnic background was associated with increased time to first methadone use (adjusted relative hazard 0.60, 95% CI 0.49–0.74, p < 0.001). Interpretation Methadone use was lower among Aboriginal than among non-Aboriginal injection drug users. Culturally appropriate interventions with full participation of the affected community are required to address this disparity. PMID:17606937

  1. Characteristics of methadone-related fatalities in Norway.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Jean-Paul; Khiabani, Hassan Z; Hilberg, Thor; Karinen, Ritva; Slørdal, Lars; Waal, Helge; Mørland, Jørg

    2015-11-01

    There are currently over 7000 patients enrolled in opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) programs in Norway. A rise in methadone-related deaths proportional to increasing methadone sales over the period 2000-2006 has been observed, but the causative factors for these fatalities have been elusive. In the present study, individual characteristics, methadone concentrations and additional toxicological findings were analyzed. Methadone intoxication deaths (n = 264) were divided into 3 groups according to toxicological findings in whole blood: group 1 - methadone detected alone, or together with one additional drug at low or therapeutic levels, or a low concentration of ethanol (<1 g/L) (n = 21); group 2 - multiple additional drugs/substances detected below lethal levels (n = 175); group 3 - one or more additional drugs/substances detected at lethal levels, or ethanol >3 g/L (n = 55). Methadone blood concentrations in decedents who had been enrolled in OMT were higher than for decedents not in treatment, in all groups. Blood methadone concentrations around 1 mg/L were present in fatal multi-drug intoxications in OMT patients. Results suggest that some patients may be at risk of dying when combining therapeutic concentrations of methadone with other psychoactive substances. Somatic disease was a common finding among deceased OMT patients. Concentrations in methadone users not enrolled in OMT were predominantly between 0.3 and 0.4 mg/L and were not related to the presence of other drugs. However, methadone concentrations below 0.1 mg/L may be associated with intoxication following methadone use, both alone and in combination with other drugs. Younger male users (mean age 34 years) seemed to have a higher susceptibility to methadone intoxication.

  2. Profile of extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen for acute pain

    PubMed Central

    Bekhit, Mary Hanna

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a historical and pharmacological overview of a new opioid analgesic that boasts an extended-release (ER) formulation designed to provide both immediate and prolonged analgesia for up to 12 hours in patients who are experiencing acute pain. This novel medication, ER oxycodone/acetaminophen, competes with current US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved opioid formulations available on the market in that it offers two benefits concurrently: a prolonged duration of action, and multimodal analgesia through a combination of an opioid (oxycodone) with a nonopioid component. Current FDA-approved combination analgesics, such as Percocet (oxycodone/acetaminophen), are available solely in immediate-release (IR) formulations. PMID:26527898

  3. The pharmacokinetics of morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolites after subcutaneous bolus injection and subcutaneous infusion of morphine.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Harris, R; Joel, S P; McDonald, P; Currow, D; Slevin, M L

    2000-03-01

    To investigate the pharmacokinetics of morphine, morphine-6-glucuronide (M6G) and morphine-3-glucuronide (M3G) in healthy volunteers after the administration of morphine by subcutaneous bolus injection (s.c.b.) and subcutaneous infusion (s.c. i.) over 4 h, and to compare the results with the intravenous bolus (i.v.) administration of morphine. Six healthy volunteers each received 5 mg morphine sulphate by i.v., s.c.b. and short s.c.i. over 4 h, on three separate occasions, in random order, each separated by at least 1 week. Plasma samples were assayed for morphine, M6G and M3G. After i.v. morphine, the concentrations of morphine, M6G and M3G and their pharmacokinetic parameters were similar to those we have observed previously, in other healthy volunteers (when standardized to nmol l- 1, for a 10 mg dose to a 70 kg subject). After s.c.b. morphine, similar results were obtained except that the median tmax values for morphine and M3G were significantly longer than after i.v. morphine (P< 0.001 and P< 0.05, respectively), with a trend to a longer tmax for M6G (P = 0. 09). The appearance half-lives after s.c.b. morphine for M6G and M3G were also significantly longer than after i.v. morphine (P = 0.03 and P< 0.05, respectively). Comparison of log-transformed AUC values indicated that i.v. and s.c.b. administration of morphine were bioequivalent with respect to morphine, M6G and M3G. In comparison with i.v. morphine, morphine by s.c.i. was associated with significantly longer median tmax values for morphine (P< 0.001), M6G (P< 0.001) and M3G (P< 0.05), and the mean standardized Cmax values significantly lower than after both i.v. and s.c.b. morphine (morphine P< 0.001, M6G P< 0.001 and M3G P< 0.01 for each comparison). Comparison of log-transformed AUC values after i.v. and s.c.i. morphine indicated that the two routes were not bioequivalent for morphine (log-transformed AUC ratio 0.78, 90% CI 0.66-0.93), M6G (0.72, 90% CI 0.63-0.82), or M3G (0.65, 90% CI 0.54-0.78). A

  4. Induction of xenobiotic receptors, transporters, and drug metabolizing enzymes by oxycodone.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Myers, Alan L; Lee, Insong J; Mason, Clifford W; Wang, Duan; Sinz, Michael W; Wang, Hongbing; Eddington, Natalie D

    2013-05-01

    Perturbations of the expression of transporters and drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) by opioids can be the locus of deleterious drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Many transporters and DMEs are regulated by xenobiotic receptors [XRs; e.g., pregnane X receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), and Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)]; however, there is a paucity of information regarding the influence of opioids on XRs. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of oxycodone administration (15 mg/kg intraperitoneally twice daily for 8 days) on liver expression of XRs, transporters, and DMEs in rats. Microarray, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunoblotting analyses were used to identify significantly regulated genes. Three XRs (e.g., PXR, CAR, and AhR), 27 transporters (e.g., ABCB1 and SLC22A8), and 19 DMEs (e.g., CYP2B2 and CYP3A1) were regulated (P < 0.05) with fold changes ranging from -46.3 to 17.1. Using MetaCore (computational platform), we identified a unique gene-network of transporters and DMEs assembled around PXR, CAR, and AhR. Therefore, a series of transactivation/translocation assays were conducted to determine whether the observed changes of transporters/DMEs are mediated by direct activation of PXR, CAR, or AhR by oxycodone or its major metabolites (noroxycodone and oxymorphone). Neither oxycodone nor its metabolites activated PXR, CAR, or AhR. Taken together, these findings identify a signature hepatic gene-network associated with repeated oxycodone administration in rats and demonstrate that oxycodone alters the expression of many transporters and DMEs (without direct activation of PXR, CAR, and AhR), which could lead to undesirable DDIs after coadministration of substrates of these transporters/DMEs with oxycodone.

  5. Additive analgesic effects of oxycodone and ibuprofen in the oral surgery model.

    PubMed

    Dionne, R A

    1999-06-01

    A traditional approach to achieve greater analgesic efficacy is to combine an efficacious dose of a nonopioid with a dose of an opioid sufficient to produce additive analgesia without a substantial increase in the incidence of adverse effects. This study evaluated the additive analagesic effects of the combination of ibuprofen and oxycodone. A dose of 400 mg ibuprofen was compared with 400 mg ibuprofen with oxycodone in doses of 2.5, 5, or 10 mg in the oral surgery model of acute pain. Analgesic efficacy was measured with category and visual analog scales at 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes and hourly up to 6 hours. Ibuprofen plus 10 mg oxycodone produced significantly greater analgesia compared with the other three groups, as measured by the visual analog scale from 15 minutes after drug administration up to the 2-hour observation. All four treatments were similar from 3 to 6 hours, with the area under the pain intensity difference curve being similar across groups. Neither the 2.5-mg nor the 5-mg oxycodone dose provided any additive analgesia over ibuprofen at any points. Addition of oxycodone resulted in a dose-related increase in the number of patients reporting adverse effects, with significantly greater drowsiness and vomiting at the 10-mg dose. These results indicate that additive analgesia can be achieved for the combination of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and an orally effective opioid, with faster onset of relief for the combination of 400 mg ibuprofen and 10 mg oxycodone over the first 2 hours after administration, but at the expense of an increased incidence of adverse events.

  6. Rate of community methadone treatment reporting at jail reentry following a methadone increased dose quality improvement effort.

    PubMed

    Harris, Andiea; Selling, Daniel; Luther, Charles; Hershberger, Jason; Brittain, Joan; Dickman, Samuel; Glick, Alvin; Lee, Joshua D

    2012-01-01

    The Rikers Island Key Extended Entry Program (KEEP) has offered methadone treatment for opioid dependent inmates incarcerated in New York City's jails since 1986. In response to a trend toward low-dose methadone maintenance prescribing, a quality improvement (QI) protocol trained KEEP counselors, physicians, and pharmacists in the evidence base supporting moderate-to-high methadone maintenance doses in order to maximize therapeutic effects and rates of successful reporting to community methadone treatment programs (MTPs) post release. Discharge dose level and length of incarceration data were analyzed for 2 groups of KEEP patients discharged pre/post-QI. Among patients incarcerated for 21 or more days, the proportion of those on moderate-to-high doses of methadone increased significantly. Patients who reached a moderate-to-high methadone dose demonstrated higher rates of reporting to community MTP versus lower doses, both pre- and post-QI. Overall, a higher proportion of all patients reported to community MTP post-QI.

  7. Morphine induces albuminuria by compromising podocyte integrity.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiqian; Rai, Partab; Chandel, Nirupama; Cheng, Kang; Lederman, Rivka; Saleem, Moin A; Mathieson, Peter W; Husain, Mohammad; Crosson, John T; Gupta, Kalpna; Malhotra, Ashwani; Singhal, Pravin C

    2013-01-01

    Morphine has been reported to accelerate the progression of chronic kidney disease. However, whether morphine affects slit diaphragm (SD), the major constituent of glomerular filtration barrier, is still unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine on glomerular filtration barrier in general and podocyte integrity in particular. Mice were administered either normal saline or morphine for 72 h, then urine samples were collected and kidneys were subsequently isolated for immunohistochemical studies and Western blot. For in vitro studies, human podocytes were treated with morphine and then probed for the molecular markers of slit diaphragm. Morphine-receiving mice displayed a significant increase in albuminuria and showed effacement of podocyte foot processes. In both in vivo and in vitro studies, the expression of synaptopodin, a molecular marker for podocyte integrity, and the slit diaphragm constituting molecules (SDCM), such as nephrin, podocin, and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP), were decreased in morphine-treated podocytes. In vitro studies indicated that morphine modulated podocyte expression of SDCM through opiate mu (MOR) and kappa (KOR) receptors. Since morphine also enhanced podocyte oxidative stress, the latter seems to contribute to decreased SDCM expression. In addition, AKT, p38, and JNK pathways were involved in morphine-induced down regulation of SDCM in human podocytes. These findings demonstrate that morphine has the potential to alter the glomerular filtration barrier by compromising the integrity of podocytes.

  8. Methadone-related deaths. A ten year overview.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Claudia; Stramesi, Cristiana; Morini, Luca; Pozzi, Fulvia; Groppi, Angelo

    2015-12-01

    Over the last 10 years we have registered in our district (about 500,000 inhabitants) 36 cases of fatal methadone poisoning, involving both patients on treatment and naive subjects: this is a significant increase of deaths due to methadone use, misuse or abuse compared with previous years. Twenty-four patients (66.7%) were on methadone maintenance programs for heroin detoxification, while 12 (33.3%) were taking the drug without a medical prescription. The average blood concentration of methadone in patients undergoing a maintenance program was 1.06 mg/L (0.21-3.37 mg/L), against 0.79 mg/L (0.2-3.15 mg/L) in those taking the non-prescribed drug. Since 111 heroin-related deaths were recorded in our district in the same period, the fact that there appear to be many methadone deaths (about a third of heroin-related deaths) cannot be overlooked. The aim of this work is to understand the possible reasons for such a large number of methadone-related deaths. On this subject, we have noticed that risks associated with methadone intake are often underestimated by clinicians prescribing the drug: sometimes methadone is prescribed without taking into account patient's tolerance to opiates, and a large number of subjects enrolled in methadone maintenance programs in Italy, have also been given take-home doses, thus increasing the risk of abuse and diversion.

  9. Methadone as a chemical weapon: two fatal cases involving babies.

    PubMed

    Kintz, Pascal; Villain, Marion; Dumestre-Toulet, Véronique; Capolaghi, Bernard; Cirimele, Vincent

    2005-12-01

    Methadone is largely used for the substitution management of opiate-dependent individuals but can also be easily found on the black market. The first cases involving repetitive sedation linked to the use of methadone and subsequent death of 2 babies are reported. At the autopsy, no particular morphologic changes were noted except for pulmonary and visceral congestion. There was no evidence of violence, and the pathologist in both cases found no needle marks. Toxicological analyses, as achieved by GC/MS, demonstrated both recent and repetitive methadone exposure. In case 1, a 14-month-old girl was found dead at home. Blood concentrations were 1071 and 148 ng/mL for methadone and EDDP, respectively. Hair (6 cm) tested positive at 1.91 and 0.82 ng/mg for methadone and EDDP, respectively. In case 2, a 5-month-old girl was taken to hospital in a pediatric unit for coma. Antemortem blood analysis demonstrated methadone exposure (142 ng/mL), and the baby was declared dead 12 days after admission. Hair analysis (5 cm) by segmentation was positive for methadone in the range 1.0 (root) to 21.3 ng/mg (end). The death of the babies was attributed to accidental asphyxia ina situation where methadone was considered as a chemical weapon. The mothers, who were the perpetrators in both cases, did not deny the use of methadone as a sedative drug.

  10. Mechanism of efavirenz influence on methadone pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kharasch, E D; Whittington, D; Ensign, D; Hoffer, C; Bedynek, P S; Campbell, S; Stubbert, K; Crafford, A; London, A; Kim, T

    2012-04-01

    Mechanisms by which efavirenz diminishes methadone plasma concentrations are unknown. This investigation determined efavirenz influence on clinical methadone disposition and miosis, intravenous and oral alfentanil clearance (hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P450 3A4/5 (CYP3A4/5) activity), fexofenadine disposition (intestinal transporters activity), and efavirenz clearance and 8-hydroxylation (CYP2B6 activity), and human hepatocyte effects. Efavirenz induced systemic and oral alfentanil clearances two- to fivefold and induced efavirenz 8-hydroxylation. Efavirenz stereoselectively decreased methadone plasma concentrations 50-70%. Methadone systemic and oral clearances, hepatic clearance and extraction ratio, N-demethylation, and metabolite formation clearance were stereoselectively increased two- to threefold. Bioavailability decreased. Efavirenz shifted methadone concentration-miosis curves leftward and upward. Efavirenz induced hepatocyte CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression, activity, and methadone N-demethylation. Results show that efavirenz coinduced hepatic CYP2B6 and CYP3A4/5, coinduced hepatic and intestinal CYP3A4/5, and coinduced gastrointestinal CYP3A4/5 and efflux transporters. Methadone disposition was most consistent with efavirenz induction of hepatic CYP2B6-mediated methadone N-demethylation. Efavirenz may alter methadone pharmacodynamics.

  11. Optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for attenuating hemodynamic changes after endotracheal intubation in healthy patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Hee; Lee, Seung-Hyuk; Lee, Oh Haeng; Kang, Hyun; Shin, Hwa-Yong; Baek, Chong-Wha; Jung, Yong Hun; Woo, Young Cheol

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Intravenous oxycodone has been used as an adjunct to anesthetic agents. This study aimed to assess the optimal dose of intravenous oxycodone for the attenuation of the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation. Methods: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was conducted. Ninety-five patients were randomly divided into 5 groups based on the oxycodone dose: 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 mg/kg. After administering the assigned dose of intravenous oxycodone, anesthesia was induced with thiopental. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline, before intubation, and 1, 2, and 3 minutes after intubation. The percentage increase of BP was calculated as (highest BP after intubation − baseline BP)/baseline BP × 100 (%). The percentage increase of HR was calculated in same formula as above. Hypertension was defined as a 15% increase of systolic BP from baseline, and probit analysis was conducted. Results: Hemodynamic data from 86 patients were analyzed. The percentage increase of mean arterial pressure after intubation in groups 0.05, 0.1, 0.15, and 0.2 was significantly different from that in the control (P < 0.001). For HR, the percentage increase was lower than control group when oxycodone was same or more than 0.1 mg/kg (P < 0.05). Using probit analysis, the 95% effective dose (ED95) for preventing hypertension was 0.159 mg/kg (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.122–0.243). In addition, ED50 was 0.020 mg/kg (95% CI, −0.037 to 0.049). However, oxycodone was not effective for maintaining the HR in our study dosage. There were no significant differences in the incidence of hypotension during induction between groups. Conclusions: Using 0.1 mg/kg of intravenous oxycodone is sufficient to attenuate the increase of BP and HR during induction period in healthy patients. The ED95, which was 0.159 mg/kg, can be useful to adjust the dosage of IV oxycodone for maintain stable BP

  12. Satisfaction With Methadone Among Heroin-Dependent Patients With Current Substance Use Disorders During Methadone Maintenance Treatment.

    PubMed

    Perez de Los Cobos, Jose; Trujols, Joan; Siñol, Núria; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Batlle, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) has long been used to treat heroin-dependent patients. However, satisfaction with methadone in this patient population is unknown. The aim of this cross-sectional case-control study was to evaluate satisfaction with methadone in heroin-dependent patients with current substance use disorders (SUDs). Cases included 152 methadone-maintained patients with current SUD, requiring inpatient detoxification treatment, and controls included 33 methadone-maintained patients in sustained full remission for SUD. Satisfaction with methadone as a medication to treat heroin addiction was measured by using the Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Medications for Addiction Treatment-methadone for heroin addiction (SASMAT-METHER). The SASMAT-METHER subscales assess the following domains: personal functioning and well-being, antiaddictive effect on heroin, and antiaddictive effect on other substances. Compared with patients with remitted SUD, patients with current SUD scored lower on all SASMAT-METHER assessments. In such patients, overall SASMAT-METHER scores were independently and negatively associated with downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month; although various sets of factors were independently associated with each of the SASMAT-METHER subscales, the only determinant of dissatisfaction on all subscales was the desire for downward adjustment of methadone dose. In summary, MMT patients with current SUD are less satisfied with methadone than MMT patients with remitted SUD. In patients with current SUD, downward desired adjustment of methadone dose and days of heroin use during last month are independently associated with overall dissatisfaction with methadone.

  13. Double-blind, randomized comparison of the analgesic and pharmacokinetic profiles of controlled- and immediate-release oral oxycodone in cancer pain patients.

    PubMed

    Stambaugh, J E; Reder, R F; Stambaugh, M D; Stambaugh, H; Davis, M

    2001-05-01

    Thirty patients with cancer pain completed a double-blind crossover study comparing controlled-release (CR) and immediate-release (IR) oxycodone. In open-label titration (2 to 21 days), these patients were stabilized on IR oxycodone qid. They were then randomized to double-blind treatment with CR oxycodone q12h or IR oxycodone qid for 3 to 7 days followed by crossover at the same daily dose. Mean (+/- SD) pain intensity (0 = none to 10 = severe) decreased from a baseline of 6.0 +/- 2.2 to 2.7 +/- 1.1 after titration with IR oxycodone dosed qid. Pain intensity remained stable throughout double-blind treatment: 2.7 +/- 1.9 with CR oxycodone and 2.8 +/- 1.9 with IR oxycodone. Acceptability of therapy and pain scores correlated with plasma oxycodone concentrations for each interval and were similar for both medications (IR and CR oxycodone). Adverse events were similar for both formulations. Following repeat dosing under double-blind conditions, oral CR oxycodone administered q12h provided analgesia comparable to IR oxycodone given qid.

  14. Effects of amphetamine, morphine, and CP 55, 940 on Go/No-Go task performance in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Koek, Wouter; Gerak, Lisa R; France, Charles P

    2015-08-01

    In humans, impulsivity measured as false alarms in a Go/No-Go task is reportedly decreased by amphetamine and is not affected by oxycodone and delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. To model these findings in animals, three rhesus monkeys were trained to perform a food-reinforced Go/No-Go task. In this task, amphetamine was found to decrease false alarms (i.e. responding during No-Go trials), but only at doses that also decreased hits (i.e. responding during Go trials). Morphine generally decreased hits but not false alarms. The cannabinoid receptor agonist CP 55, 940 decreased both false alarms and hits, but only at doses that also decreased the number of trials completed. Additional studies in animals and humans are necessary to delineate the conditions under which amphetamine and other psychoactive drugs affect impulsivity in Go/No-Go tasks.

  15. Pharmacotherapy in the Treatment of Addiction: Methadone

    PubMed Central

    Kreek, Mary Jeanne; Borg, Lisa; Ducat, Elizabeth; Ray, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment is the most widely available pharmacotherapy for opioid addiction and has been shown over a period of 40 years to be an effective and safe treatment. While women comprise approximately 40% of clients currently being treated in MMT programs, comparatively little research geared specifically toward this group has been published. This article begins with an overview of neurobiological studies on opioid addiction, including a discussion of gender differences, followed by a review of the pharmacology of methadone The authors then examine the particular needs and differences of women being treated in MMTs, including co-dependence with other substances, women’s health issues and psychosocial needs unique to this population. In conclusion, research shows that women have different substance abuse treatment needs in comparison to their male counterparts. One New York City MMT program that has attempted to address these differences is highlighted. PMID:20407977

  16. Patient perception of methadone dose adequacy in methadone maintenance treatment: The role of perceived participation in dosage decisions.

    PubMed

    Trujols, Joan; González-Saiz, Francisco; Manresa, María José; Alcaraz, Saul; Batlle, Francesca; Duran-Sindreu, Santiago; Pérez de Los Cobos, José

    2017-05-01

    In clinical practice, methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) entails tailoring the methadone dose to the patient's specific needs, thereby individualizing treatment. The aim of this study was to identify the independent factors that may significantly explain methadone dose adequacy from the patient's perspective. Secondary analysis of data collected in a treatment satisfaction survey carried out among a representative sample of MMT patients (n=122) from the region of La Rioja (Spain). As part of the original study protocol, participants completed a comprehensive battery to assess satisfaction with MMT, psychological distress, opinion of methadone as a medication, participation in dosage decisions, and perception of dose adequacy. Multivariate binary logistic regression showed that the only variable independently associated with the likelihood of a patient perceiving methadone dose as inadequate was the variable perceived-participation in methadone dosage decisions (OR=0.538, 95% CI=0.349-0.828). Patient participation in methadone dosage decisions was predictive of perceived adequacy of methadone dose beyond the contribution of other socio-demographic, clinical, and MMT variables. Patient participation in methadone dosage decision-making is valuable for developing a genuinely patient-centred MMT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methadone Anonymous: A 12-Step Program for Methadone Maintained Heroin Addicts.

    PubMed

    Gilman, Stephen M.; Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen

    2001-12-01

    Methadone Anonymous (MA) is a new 12-step fellowship developed for methadone maintained heroin addicts. A total of 53 MA members completed a survey assessing factors related to methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) entry, drug use, MA participation, beliefs concerning effectiveness of MMTP and MA, and level of social cohesiveness. Length of time in MA was associated with a decreased use of alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana. Clients rated components of MA to be significantly more helpful to recovery than MMTP treatment components. Affiliation to five MA members known best by the respondents was significantly greater than affiliation to non-MA members. Length of time in MA was positively associated with MA affiliation. Social affiliation and endorsement of 12-step principles were positively correlated. These findings suggest that MA participation has benefits not available in professionally driven MMTP, and should be further studied.

  18. An innovative approach to methadone detoxification.

    PubMed

    Milkman, H; Metcalf, D; Reed, P

    1980-11-01

    An atmosphere can be created in which the user's anxiety during methadone or heroin detoxification is reduced via the facilitation of adaptive, druglike experiences provided through behavioral and psychological means. The switch to a nondrug life-style is promoted by the continued satisfaction of underlying needs which, through appropriate dosage, can lead to a higher probability of self-reliance abd abstinence. The addictive dependency on the nondrug, need-gratifying therapy is resolved through clinically monitored and graded frustrations.

  19. Survey of methadone-drug interactions among patients of methadone maintenance treatment program in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although methadone has been used for the maintenance treatment of opioid dependence for decades, it was not introduced in China or Taiwan until 2000s. Methadone-drug interactions (MDIs) have been shown to cause many adverse effects. However, such effects have not been scrutinized in the ethnic Chinese community. Methods The study was performed in two major hospitals in southern Taiwan. A total of 178 non-HIV patients aged ≥ 20 years who had participated in the Methadone Maintenance Treatment Program (MMTP) ≥ 1 month were recruited. An MDI is defined as concurrent use of drug(s) with methadone that may result in an increase or decrease of effectiveness and/or adverse effect of methadone. To determine the prevalence and clinical characteristics of MDIs, credible data sources, including the National Health Insurance (NHI) database, face-to-face interviews, medical records, and methadone computer databases, were linked for analysis. Socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with MDIs and co-medications were also examined. Results 128 (72%) MMTP patients took at least one medication. Clinically significant MDIs included withdrawal symptoms, which were found among MMTP patients co-administered with buprenorphine or tramadol; severe QTc prolongation effect, which might be associated with use of haloperidol or droperidol; and additive CNS and respiratory depression, which could result from use of methadone in combination with chlorpromazine or thioridazine. Past amphetamine use, co-infection with hepatitis C, and a longer retention in the MMTP were associated with increased odds of co-medication. Among patients with co-medication use, significant correlates of MDIs included the male gender and length of co-medication in the MMTP. Conclusions The results demonstrate clinical evidence of significant MDIs among MMTP patients. Clinicians should check the past medical history of MMTP clients carefully before prescribing medicines. Because combinations of

  20. Trends in Methadone Distribution for Pain Treatment, Methadone Diversion, and Overdose Deaths - United States, 2002-2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Baldwin, Grant T; Manocchio, Teresa; White, Jessica O; Mack, Karin A

    2016-07-08

    Use of the prescription opioid methadone for treatment of pain, as opposed to treatment of opioid use disorder (e.g., addiction), has been identified as a contributor to the U.S. opioid overdose epidemic. Although methadone accounted for only 2% of opioid prescriptions in 2009 (1), it was involved in approximately 30% of overdose deaths. Beginning with 2006 warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), efforts to reduce methadone use for pain have accelerated (2,3). The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and CDC analyzed methadone distribution, reports of diversion (the transfer of legally manufactured methadone into illegal markets), and overdose deaths during 2002-2014. On average, the rate of grams of methadone distributed increased 25.1% per year during 2002-2006 and declined 3.2% per year during 2006-2013. Methadone-involved overdose deaths increased 22.1% per year during 2002-2006 and then declined 6.5% per year during 2006-2014. During 2002-2006, rates of methadone diversion increased 24.3% per year; during 2006-2009, the rate increased at a slower rate, and after 2009, the rate declined 12.8% per year through 2014. Across sex, most age groups, racial/ethnic populations, and U.S. Census regions, the methadone overdose death rate peaked during 2005-2007 and declined in subsequent years. There was no change among persons aged ≥65 years, and among persons aged 55-64 years the methadone overdose death rate continued to increase through 2014. Additional clinical and public health policy changes are needed to reduce harm associated with methadone use for pain, especially among persons aged ≥55 years.

  1. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  2. Implosive Therapy Treatment of Heroin Addicts during Methadone Detoxification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirt, Michael; Greenfield, Heywood

    1979-01-01

    Examined effectiveness of implosive therapy with heroin addicts during detoxification from methadone. Treatment groups received 12 sessions of implosive therapy or eclectic counseling and were followed for a six-week period. The implosive therapy group were the only ones to significantly reduce their methadone level during treatment and follow-up.…

  3. Methadone Diversion: Experiences and Issues. Services Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inciardi, James A.

    This report is a description of the phenomenon of methadone diversion as it exists now and places it in the context of prior research in this area. The intent here is to clarify issues around methadone diversion and to provide guidance to treatment administrators and program planners regarding efforts they can initiate to monitor this significant…

  4. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  5. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  6. Human Methadone Self-Administration and the Generalized Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiga, Ralph; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Meisch, Richard A.; Grabowski, John

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether in humans the generalized matching law described the relation between relative responding and relative drug intake by humans under concurrent variable interval variable interval (conc VI VI) schedules of drug reinforcement. Methadone-maintained patients, stabilized on 80 mg per day of methadone, were recruited…

  7. Methadone induces testosterone suppression in patients with opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Bawor, Monica; Dennis, Brittany B.; Samaan, M. Constantine; Plater, Carolyn; Worster, Andrew; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Marsh, David C.; Desai, Dipika; Steiner, Meir; Anglin, Rebecca; Coote, Margaret; Pare, Guillaume; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2014-01-01

    Sex hormones may have a role in the pathophysiology of substance use disorders, as demonstrated by the association between testosterone and addictive behaviour in opioid dependence. Although opioid use has been found to suppress testosterone levels in men and women, the extent of this effect and how it relates to methadone treatment for opioid dependence is unclear. The present multi-centre cross-sectional study consecutively recruited 231 patients with opioid dependence from methadone clinics across Ontario, Canada between June and December of 2011. We obtained demographic details, substance use, psychiatric history, and blood and urine samples from enrolled subjects. The control group included 783 non-opioid using adults recruited from a primary care setting in Ontario, Canada. Average testosterone level in men receiving methadone treatment was significantly lower than controls. No effect of opioids including methadone on testosterone level in women was found and testosterone did not fluctuate significantly between menstrual cycle phases. In methadone patients, testosterone level was significantly associated with methadone dose in men only. We recommend that testosterone levels be checked in men prior and during methadone and other opioid therapy, in order to detect and treat testosterone deficiency associated with opioids and lead to successful methadone treatment outcomes. PMID:25155550

  8. The metabolism of methadone by cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Will, P C; Noteboom, W D

    1978-02-15

    Rat hepatoma tissue culture cells and mouse leukemic cells were found to metabolize [1-3H] methadone to at least 2 unidentified radioactive compounds. These results suggest that cultured cells may be useful models for studying methadone metabolism by specific cell types.

  9. Decreasing Methadone Dose Via Anxiety Reduction: A Treatment Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kushner, Marlene; And Others

    This manual describes a Relaxation-Information Presentation program based on the clinical observation that anxiety is a serious barrier to detoxification for many methadone clients, and on experimental evidence indicating that expectations may play a greater role in the discomfort experienced during detoxification than the actual methadone dose.…

  10. Treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome with breast milk containing methadone.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Jeanne L

    2002-03-01

    This article addresses the management of pregnant women participating in a methadone maintenance program. An approach to management of the labor of a woman on a methadone maintenance program is described along with a summary of what to anticipate at delivery and postpartum, and options for management of the infant who manifests symptoms of the neonatal abstinence syndrome.

  11. Human Methadone Self-Administration and the Generalized Matching Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiga, Ralph; Maxwell, R. Stockton; Meisch, Richard A.; Grabowski, John

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined whether in humans the generalized matching law described the relation between relative responding and relative drug intake by humans under concurrent variable interval variable interval (conc VI VI) schedules of drug reinforcement. Methadone-maintained patients, stabilized on 80 mg per day of methadone, were recruited…

  12. Determining Effective Methadone Doses for Individual Opioid-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Trafton, Jodie A; Minkel, Jared; Humphreys, Keith

    2006-01-01

    Background Randomized clinical trials of methadone maintenance have found that on average high daily doses are more effective for reducing heroin use, and clinical practice guidelines recommend 60 mg/d as a minimum dosage. Nevertheless, many clinicians report that some patients can be stably maintained on lower methadone dosages to optimal effect, and clinic dosing practices vary substantially. Studies of individual responses to methadone treatment may be more easily translated into clinical practice. Methods and Findings A volunteer sample of 222 opioid-dependent US veterans initiating methadone treatment was prospectively observed over the year after treatment entry. In the 168 who achieved at least 1 mo of heroin abstinence, methadone dosages on which patients maintained heroin-free urine samples ranged from 1.5 mg to 191.2 mg (median = 69 mg). Among patients who achieved heroin abstinence, higher methadone dosages were predicted by having a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder or depression, having a greater number of previous opioid detoxifications, living in a region with lower average heroin purity, attending a clinic where counselors discourage dosage reductions, and staying in treatment longer. These factors predicted 42% of the variance in dosage associated with heroin abstinence. Conclusions Effective and ineffective methadone dosages overlap substantially. Dosing guidelines should focus more heavily on appropriate processes of dosage determination rather than solely specifying recommended dosages. To optimize therapy, methadone dosages must be titrated until heroin abstinence is achieved. PMID:16448216

  13. Methadone Diversion: Experiences and Issues. Services Research Monograph Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inciardi, James A.

    This report is a description of the phenomenon of methadone diversion as it exists now and places it in the context of prior research in this area. The intent here is to clarify issues around methadone diversion and to provide guidance to treatment administrators and program planners regarding efforts they can initiate to monitor this significant…

  14. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  15. Oxycodone lengthens reproductions of suprasecond time intervals in human research volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Gooch, Cynthia M.; Rakitin, Brian C.; Cooper, Ziva D; Comer, Sandra D.; Balsam, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    Oxycodone, a popularly used opioid for treating pain, is widely abused. Other drugs of abuse have been shown to affect time perception, which in turn may affect sensitivity to future consequences. This may contribute to continued use. The current study evaluated the effect of oxycodone on time perception in normal healthy volunteers. For this within-subject, double-blind design study, participants performed a temporal reproduction task before and after receiving placebo or oxycodone (15 mg, po) over 6 outpatient sessions. Participants were first trained with feedback to reproduce three standard intervals (1.1, 2.2, and 3.3 s) in separate blocks by matching response latency from a start signal to the duration of that block’s standard interval. During testing participants were instructed to reproduce the three intervals from memory without feedback before and after drug administration . Oxycodone significantly lengthened time estimations for the two longer intervals relative to placebo. These results suggest that opioids alter temporal processing for intervals greater than one second, raising questions about the effect of these drugs on valuation of future consequences. PMID:21750426

  16. Opioid withdrawal presenting only nausea during tapering of oxycodone after celiac plexus block: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Takayama, Hiroto; Mamiya, Keiko; Koizumi, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is an effective treatment for patients suffering pain. CPB may allow for a reduction in opioid dosage, and may alleviate some of the unwanted side effects of these drugs. However, there is a substantial risk of withdrawal symptoms after reduction of opioid dose. We describe a case of pancreatic cancer developing opioid withdrawal after CPB, who presented only nausea. A 70-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to severe pancreatic cancer pain. He was administered oxycodone (oxycontin®) at 240 mg per day, and presented nausea and anorexia as side effects. CPB was performed due to insufficient pain relief. His pain disappeared on the same day as treatment. Oxycodone was reduced to 160 mg/day, and further reduced two days later to 80 mg/day. However, he complained of more severe nausea and loss of appetite even after tapering of oxycodone. Physical examination, blood chemistry examination, and brain computed tomography (CT) showed no abnormalities. Administration of fast-release oxycodone (Oxinome®) at a dose of 10 mg immediately improved his nausea. There have been no previous reports of nausea as the sole symptom of opioid withdrawal. The present case indicates that unless opioid side effects improve after dosage reduction, the possibility that they may be withdrawal symptoms should also be considered.

  17. Design and in vivo evaluation of oxycodone once-a-day controlled-release tablets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Park, Chun-Woong; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Junsang; Lee, Moonseok; Seo, Jeong-Woong; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present study was to design oxycodone once-a-day controlled-release (CR) tablets and to perform in vitro/in vivo characterizations. Release profiles to achieve desired plasma concentration versus time curves were established by using simulation software and reported pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) 100,000 mPa·s was used as a release modifier because the polymer was found to be resistant to changes in conditions of the release study, including rotation speed of paddle and ion strength. The burst release of the drug from the CR tablets could be suppressed by applying an additional HPMC layer as a physical barrier. Finally, the oxycodone once-a-day tablet was comprised of two layers, an inert HPMC layer and a CR layer containing drug and HPMC. Commercial products, either 10 mg bis in die (bid [twice a day]) or once-a-day CR tablets (20 mg) were administered to healthy volunteers, and calculated pharmacokinetic parameters indicated bioequivalence of the two different treatments. The findings of the present study emphasize the potential of oxycodone once-a-day CR tablets for improved patient compliance, safety, and efficacy, which could help researchers to develop new CR dosage forms of oxycodone.

  18. 77 FR 40069 - Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Single-Ingredient, Immediate-Release Drug Products Containing Oxycodone for Oral Administration and Labeled for Human Use; Enforcement Action Dates AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency...

  19. Behavioral Flexibility and Response Selection Are Impaired after Limited Exposure to Oxycodone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seip-Cammack, Katharine M.; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows individuals to adapt to situations in which rewards and goals change. Potentially addictive drugs may impair flexible decision-making by altering brain mechanisms that compute reward expectancies, thereby facilitating maladaptive drug use. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested the effects of oxycodone exposure on…

  20. Behavioral Flexibility and Response Selection Are Impaired after Limited Exposure to Oxycodone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seip-Cammack, Katharine M.; Shapiro, Matthew L.

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral flexibility allows individuals to adapt to situations in which rewards and goals change. Potentially addictive drugs may impair flexible decision-making by altering brain mechanisms that compute reward expectancies, thereby facilitating maladaptive drug use. To investigate this hypothesis, we tested the effects of oxycodone exposure on…

  1. Design and in vivo evaluation of oxycodone once-a-day controlled-release tablets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Young; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Park, Chun-Woong; Rhee, Yun-Seok; Kim, Dong-Wook; Park, Junsang; Lee, Moonseok; Seo, Jeong-Woong; Park, Eun-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The aim of present study was to design oxycodone once-a-day controlled-release (CR) tablets and to perform in vitro/in vivo characterizations. Release profiles to achieve desired plasma concentration versus time curves were established by using simulation software and reported pharmacokinetic parameters of the drug. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) 100,000 mPa·s was used as a release modifier because the polymer was found to be resistant to changes in conditions of the release study, including rotation speed of paddle and ion strength. The burst release of the drug from the CR tablets could be suppressed by applying an additional HPMC layer as a physical barrier. Finally, the oxycodone once-a-day tablet was comprised of two layers, an inert HPMC layer and a CR layer containing drug and HPMC. Commercial products, either 10 mg bis in die (bid [twice a day]) or once-a-day CR tablets (20 mg) were administered to healthy volunteers, and calculated pharmacokinetic parameters indicated bioequivalence of the two different treatments. The findings of the present study emphasize the potential of oxycodone once-a-day CR tablets for improved patient compliance, safety, and efficacy, which could help researchers to develop new CR dosage forms of oxycodone. PMID:25678774

  2. Prenatal Oxycodone Exposure Impairs Spatial Learning and/or Memory in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chris P.; Franklin, La’Tonya M.; Johnson, Gabriel S.; Schrott, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Recent changes in demographic patterns of drug use have resulted in the increased non-medical use of prescription opiates. These users are younger and more likely to be female, which has the potential for increasing rates of in utero exposure. Therefore, we developed a rat model that simulates a prescription opiate-dependent woman who becomes pregnant. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated for 30 days via oral gavage with ascending doses of oxycodone HCl up to a final dose of 15 mg/kg/day, which was maintained during breeding and gestation. Controls were treated with water. The adult male offspring of these treated dams were tested on the radial arm maze, the Morris water maze (with a short and a long intertrial interval), and a spatial T-maze. Prenatal oxycodone exposure led to a deficit in the radial arm maze characterized by a greater number of reference memory errors, especially in the beginning of testing. In contrast, in the T-maze, prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats learned the task as well as well as the prenatal water controls. However, they had a modest deficit in retention of the task when assessed 5 days after acquisition training ended. For the Morris water maze, the intertrial interval affected the pattern of learning. While there was no deficit when the training had a short intertrial interval, when there was a long intertrial interval, prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats had poorer acquisition. The spatial learning deficit was characterized by and increased latency to find and a greater distance traveled to the platform in the prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats. These data were corroborated by analysis of the behavioral search strategy, which showed a decreased use of spatial strategies and an increase in non-spatial strategies, especially wall-hugging, in prenatal oxycodone-exposed rats as compared to prenatal water control rats on day 2 of acquisition. These results indicate that prenatal oxycodone exposure consistently impairs learning and memory

  3. Inflammatory response in heroin addicts undergoing methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuan-Yu; Yang, Szu-Nian; Lin, Jyh-Chyang; Chang, Junn-Liang; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lo, Wan-Yu

    2015-03-30

    Opioid addiction influences many physiological functions including reactions of the immune system. The objective of this study was to investigate the immune system function in heroin addicted patients undergoing methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) compared to healthy controls. We tested the cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α from a group of heroin addicts (n=34) and healthy controls (n=20). The results show that production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 was significantly higher in the group of methadone-maintained patients than in the healthy control group. Plasma TNF-α and IL-6 levels were significantly correlated with the dairy methadone dosage administered, and the IL-1β level was significantly correlated with the duration of methadone maintenance treatment. These findings suggest that methadone maintenance treatment influences the immune system functions of opioid-dependent patients and may also induce long-term systemic inflammation.

  4. Correlation of Subjective Effects with Systemic Opioid Exposure from Fixed-Dose Combinations of Oxycodone/Acetaminophen in Recreational Users of Prescription Drugs.

    PubMed

    Morton, Terri L; Devarakonda, Krishna; Kostenbader, Kenneth; Montgomery, Jeannie; Barrett, Thomas; Webster, Lynn

    2016-03-01

    To correlate abuse-related pharmacodynamic measures and pharmacokinetic measures after administering immediate-release/extended-release and immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen fixed-dose combination analgesicsDesign. Randomized, double-blind, active- and placebo-controlled, 7-way crossover studySetting. Contract research organizationSubjects. Nondependent recreational users of prescription opioids. Participants received single doses of intact immediate-release/extended-release and immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen 15/650 mg, intact immediate-release/extended-release and immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen 30/1,300 mg, crushed immediate-release/extended-release and immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen 30/1,300 mg, and placebo. Measures of pharmacodynamics (pupillometry, drug liking, drug high, good drug effects) and pharmacokinetics were assessed predose and up to 24 hours postdose, and correlations between pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamic data were explored. Of 61 participants, 55 completed all 7 treatments. Intact immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen produced 50% lower oxycodone peak plasma concentration (Cmax) than immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen. Median oxycodone time to Cmax (tmax) was significantly longer (P<0.001) for intact immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen than immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen. The pharmacokinetics of crushed immediate-release/extended-release and immediate-release oxycodone/acetaminophen (30/1,300 mg) followed a similar pattern. Crushing did not shorten the median oxycodone tmax for immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone/acetaminophen (30/1,300 mg). Strong correlations were observed between oxycodone Cmax and area under the curve from time 0 to time x peak effects and area under the subjective effect curve from time 0 to time x for all subjective effects (R(2)=0.711-0.997). Immediate-release/extended-release oxycodone

  5. Morphine Enhances HIV Infection of Neonatal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Merrill, Jeffrey D.; Mooney, Kathy; Song, Li; Wang, Xu; Guo, Chang-Jiang; Savani, Rashmin C.; Metzger, David S.; Douglas, Steven D.; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal transmission of HIV accounts for almost all new HIV infections in children. There is an increased risk of perinatal transmission of HIV with maternal illicit substance abuse. Little is known about neonatal immune system alteration and subsequent susceptibility to HIV infection after morphine exposure. We investigated the effects of morphine on HIV infection of neonatal monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Morphine significantly enhanced HIV infection of neonatal MDM. Morphine-induced HIV replication in neonatal MDM was completely suppressed by naltrexone, the opioid receptor antagonist. Morphine significantly up-regulated CCR5 receptor expression and inhibited the endogenous production of macrophage inflammatory protein-1β in neonatal MDM. Thus, morphine, most likely through alteration of β-chemokines and CCR5 receptor expression, enhances the susceptibility of neonatal MDM to HIV infection, and may have a cofactor role in perinatal HIV transmission and infection. PMID:12736382

  6. Concentrations of Methadone in Breast Milk and Plasma in the Immediate Perinatal Period

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, Lauren M.; Choo, Robin E.; Harrow, Cheryl; Velez, Martha; Schroeder, Jennifer R.; Lowe, Ross; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluates concentrations of methadone in breast milk and plasma among a sample of methadone-maintained women in the immediate perinatal period. Twelve methadone-maintained, lactating women provided blood and breast milk specimens 1, 2, 3, and 4 days after delivery. Specimens were collected at the time of trough (just before methadone dose) and peak (3 hours after dosing) maternal methadone levels. Paired specimens of foremilk (prefeed) and hindmilk (postfeed) were obtained at each sampling time. Although there was a significant increase in methadone concentration in breast milk over time for the peak postfeed sampling time, t(22) = 2.40, P = .0255, methadone concentrations in breast milk were small, ranging from 21 to 314 ng/mL, and were unrelated to maternal methadone dose. Results obtained from this study contribute to the recommendation of breastfeeding for methadone-maintained women regardless of methadone dose. PMID:17478871

  7. Excretion of methadone in sweat of pregnant women throughout gestation after controlled methadone administration.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Allan J; Brunet, Bertrand R; Choo, Robin E; Mura, Patrick; Johnson, Rolley E; Jones, Hendrée E; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-08-01

    Sweat patches (n = 350) were collected throughout gestation from 29 opioid-dependent pregnant women participating in an outpatient methadone-assisted therapy program. Volunteers provided informed consent to participate in institutional review board-approved protocols. Methadone was eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by solid-phase extraction and quantification by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (limit of quantification > or = 10 ng/patch). Methadone was present in all weekly patches (n = 311) in concentrations ranging from 10.2 to 12,129.7 nanograms per patch and in 92.3% of short-term patches (n = 39, worn for 12 or 24 hours) in concentrations up to 3303.9 nanograms per patch. Correlation between patch concentrations and total amount of drug administered (r = 0.224), and concentrations and duration of patch wear (r = 0.129) were both weak. Although there were large intra- and intersubject variations in sweat drug concentrations, sweat testing was an effective alternative technique to qualitatively monitor illicit drug use and simultaneously document methadone medication-assisted treatment.

  8. Methadone-related deaths in Palm Beach County.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Lavezzi, Wendy A; Sullivan, Linda M; Flannagan, Lisa M

    2004-03-01

    The authors reviewed cases investigated by the Palm Beach Medical Examiner's Office in which postmortem toxicologic studies indicated the presence of methadone over the period from 1998 to 2002, to examine the role of the drug in these deaths. There were 139 methadone-positive cases, including 75 in which the death was attributed to combined drug toxicity and 23 to methadone toxicity alone. Methadone was most frequently used in conjunction with other prescription or illicit drugs, most commonly benzodiazepines and/or cocaine. There was considerable overlap in the postmortem blood methadone concentrations among the groups. Concentrations ranged from 0.114 mg/L-1.939 mg/L (mean .0559 mg/L) in cases where death was attributed to methadone toxicity; 0.050 mg/L-1.903 mg/L (mean 0.411 mg/L) in cases of combined drug toxicity; 0.069 mg/L-0.644 mg/L (mean 0.224 mg/L) in deaths attributed to other drugs; 0.062 mg/L-1.090 mg/L (mean 0.344 mg/L) among deaths attributed to natural causes and 0.072 mg/L-2.7 mg/L (mean 0.605 mg/L) among deaths due to trauma. The concentrations of methadone detected indicate that it may not be possible to establish a lethal methadone range because some deaths occurred at methadone concentrations below previously reported lethal ranges, and because of the presence of other drugs. Determining the cause of death in methadone-positive cases necessitates correlation with autopsy results and investigative findings.

  9. Bioavailabilities of rectal and oral methadone in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Ola; Sheffels, Pamela; Kharasch, Evan D

    2004-01-01

    Aims Rectal administration of methadone may be an alternative to intravenous and oral dosing in cancer pain, but the bioavailability of the rectal route is not known. The aim of this study was to compare the absolute rectal bioavailability of methadone with its oral bioavailability in healthy humans. Methods Seven healthy subjects (six males, one female, aged 20–39 years) received 10 mg d5-methadone-HCl rectally (5 ml in 20% glycofurol) together with either d0-methadone intravenously (5 mg) or orally (10 mg) on two separate occasions. Blood samples for the LC-MS analyses of methadone and it's metabolite EDDP were drawn for up to 96 h. Noninvasive infrared pupillometry was peformed at the same time as blood sampling. Results The mean absolute rectal bioavalability of methadone was 0.76 (0.7, 0.81), compared to 0.86 (0.75, 0.97) for oral administration (mean (95% CI)). Rectal absorption of methadone was more rapid than after oral dosing with Tmax values of 1.4 (0.9, 1.8) vs. 2.8 (1.6, 4.0) h. The extent of formation of the metabolite EDDP did not differ between routes of administration. Single doses of methadone had a duration of action of at least 10 h and were well tolerated. Conclusions Rectal administration of methadone results in rapid absorption, a high bioavailability and long duration of action. No evidence of presystemic elimination was seen. Rectal methadone has characteristics that make it a potential alternative to intravenous and oral administration, particularly in cancer pain and palliative care. PMID:15255797

  10. Prenatal methadone exposure, meconium biomarker concentrations and neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gray, Teresa R; Choo, Robin E; Concheiro, Marta; Williams, Erica; Elko, Andrea; Jansson, Lauren M; Jones, Hendreé E; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2010-12-01

    Methadone is standard pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women, yet the relationship between maternal methadone dose and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) severity is still unclear. This research evaluated whether quantification of fetal methadone and drug exposure via meconium would reflect maternal dose and predict neonatal outcomes. Prospective clinical study. An urban drug treatment facility treating pregnant and post-partum women and their children. Forty-nine opioid-dependent pregnant women received 30-110 mg methadone daily. Maternal methadone dose, infant birth parameters and NAS assessments were extracted from medical records. Thrice-weekly urine specimens were screened for opioids and cocaine. Newborn meconium specimens were quantified for methadone, opioid, cocaine and tobacco biomarkers. There was no relationship between meconium methadone concentrations, presence of opioids, cocaine and/or tobacco in meconium, maternal methadone dose or NAS severity. Opioid and cocaine were also found in 36.7 and 38.8 of meconium specimens, respectively, and were associated with positive urine specimens in the third trimester. The presence of opioids other than methadone in meconium correlated with increased rates of preterm birth, longer infant hospital stays and decreased maternal time in drug treatment. Methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) concentrations in meconium did not predict infant birth parameters or NAS severity. Prospective urine testing defined meconium drug detection windows for opiates and cocaine as 3 months, rather than the currently accepted 6 months. The presence of opioids in meconium could be used as a biomarker for infants at elevated risk in the newborn period. © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction. No claim to original US government works.

  11. Prenatal Methadone Exposure, Meconium Biomarker Concentrations and Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Teresa R.; Choo, Robin E.; Concheiro, Marta; Williams, Erica; Elko, Andrea; Jansson, Lauren M.; Jones, Hendrée E.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Aims Methadone is standard pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women, yet the relationship between maternal methadone dose and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) severity is still unclear. This research evaluated whether quantification of fetal methadone and drug exposure via meconium would reflect maternal dose and predict neonatal outcomes. Design Prospective clinical study Setting An urban drug treatment facility treating pregnant and post-partum women and their children Participants Forty-nine opioid-dependent pregnant women received 30–110 mg methadone daily. Measurements Maternal methadone dose, infant birth parameters and NAS assessments were extracted from medical records. Thrice-weekly urine specimens were screened for opioids and cocaine. Newborn meconium specimens were quantified for methadone, opioid, cocaine and tobacco biomarkers. Findings There was no relationship between meconium methadone concentrations, presence of opioids, cocaine and/or tobacco in meconium, maternal methadone dose or NAS severity. Opioid, cocaine and tobacco biomarkers also were found in 36.7, 38.7 and 81.1% of meconium specimens, respectively, and were associated with positive urine specimens in the third trimester. The presence of opioids other than methadone in meconium correlated with increased rates of preterm birth, longer infant hospital stays and decreased maternal time in drug treatment. Conclusions Methadone and its metabolite 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP) concentrations in meconium did not predict infant birth parameters or NAS severity. Prospective urine testing defined meconium drug detection windows for opiates and cocaine as three months, rather than the currently accepted six months. The presence of opioids in meconium could be used as a biomarker for infants at elevated risk in the newborn period. PMID:20854338

  12. Methadone maintenance and breastfeeding in the neonatal period.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lauren M; Choo, Robin; Velez, Martha L; Harrow, Cheryl; Schroeder, Jennifer R; Shakleya, Diaa M; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-01-01

    In a sample of methadone-maintained breastfeeding women and a matched group of formula-feeding women, this study evaluated concentrations of methadone in breast milk among breastfeeding women and concentrations of methadone in maternal and infant plasma in both groups. Eight methadone-maintained (dose: 50-105 mg/day), lactating women provided blood and breast milk specimens on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 14, and 30 after delivery, at the times of trough and peak maternal methadone levels. Paired specimens of foremilk and hindmilk were obtained at each sampling time. Eight matched formula-feeding subjects provided blood samples on the same days. Infant blood samples for both groups were obtained on day 14. Urine toxicological screening between 36 weeks of gestation and 30 days after the birth confirmed that subjects were not using illicit substances in the perinatal period. Concentrations of methadone in breast milk were low (range: 21.0-462.0 ng/mL) and not related to maternal dose. There was a significant increase in methadone concentrations in breast milk over time for all 4 sampling times. Concentrations of methadone in maternal plasma were not different between groups and were unrelated to maternal dose. Concentrations of methadone in infant plasma were low (range: 2.2-8.1 ng/mL) in all samples. Infants in both groups underwent neurobehavioral assessments on days 3, 14, and 30; there were no significant effects of breastfeeding on neurobehavioral outcomes. Fewer infants in the breastfed group required pharmacotherapy for neonatal abstinence syndrome, but this was not a statistically significant finding. Results contribute to the recommendation of breastfeeding for methadone-maintained women.

  13. Abuse liability of oxycodone as a function of pain and drug use history.

    PubMed

    Comer, S D; Sullivan, M A; Vosburg, S K; Kowalczyk, W J; Houser, J

    2010-06-01

    The relationship between pain and prescription opioid abuse is poorly understood. Determining whether a patient is seeking additional opioid medications in order to alleviate pain or to abuse the drugs can be difficult. The present study was designed to evaluate two variables that may influence the abuse liability of opioids: drug use history and the presence or absence of experimentally induced pain. Eighteen healthy participants completed this outpatient study. One group was abusing prescription opioids (N=9) and one group had used prescription opioids medically but did not abuse them (N=9). All participants completed twelve sessions during which the effects of orally delivered oxycodone (0, 15, 30mg/70kg, PO) were examined. One dose was tested per day under double-blind conditions and sessions were separated by at least 48h. During the first "sample" session each week, participants were given $10 and the dose that was available later that week. During the second "choice" session, participants could self-administer either money or the previously sampled dose. Six sessions involved repeated hand immersions in cold water (4 degrees C) and six sessions involved immersions in warm water (37 degrees C). Most of the positive subjective effects of oxycodone were similar between the groups, but oxycodone self-administration significantly differed between groups. Non-abusers self-administered active doses of oxycodone only when they were in pain while abusers self-administered oxycodone regardless of the pain condition. These data suggest that an assessment of the reinforcing effects of opioids may be a sensitive method for differentiating opioid abusers from non-abusers. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxycodone versus fentanyl for intravenous patient-controlled analgesia after laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nan Seol; Lee, Jeong Seok; Park, Su Yeon; Ryu, Aeli; Chun, Hea Rim; Chung, Ho Soon; Kang, Kyou Sik; Chung, Jin Hun; Jung, Kyung Taek; Mun, Seong Taek

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Oxycodone, a semisynthetic thebaine derivative opioid, is widely used for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and side effects of oxycodone and fentanyl in the management of postoperative pain by intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV-PCA) in patients who underwent laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomy (LSH). Methods: The 127 patients were randomized to postoperative pain treatment with either oxycodone (n = 64, group O) or fentanyl group (n = 63, group F). Patients received 7.5 mg oxycodone or 100 μg fentanyl with 30-mg ketorolac at the end of anesthesia followed by IV-PCA (potency ratio 75:1) for 48 hours postoperatively. A blinded observer assessed postoperative pain based on the numerical rating scale (NRS), infused PCA dose, patient satisfaction, sedation level, and side effects. Results: Accumulated IV-PCA consumption in group O was less (63.5 ± 23.9 mL) than in group F (85.3 ± 2.41 mL) during the first 48 hours postoperatively (P = 0.012). The NRS score of group O was significantly lower than that of group F at 4 and 8 hours postoperatively (P < .001); however, the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), dizziness, and drowsiness was significantly higher in group O than in group F. Patient satisfaction was lower in group O than in group F during the 48 hours after surgery (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Oxycodone IV-PCA (potency ratio 1:75) provided superior analgesia to fentanyl IV-PCA after LSH; however, the higher incidence of side effects, including PONV, dizziness, and drowsiness, suggests that the doses used in this study were not equipotent. PMID:28272250

  15. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Bertrand R; Barnes, Allan J; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Mura, Patrick; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2008-09-01

    A sensitive and specific method is presented to simultaneously quantify methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat. Drugs were eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by SPE and quantification by GC/MS with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Daily calibration for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine methyl ester, cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), codeine, morphine, 6-acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin (5-1000 ng/patch) and methadone (10-1000 ng/patch) achieved determination coefficients of >0.995, and calibrators quantified to within +/-20% of the target concentrations. Extended calibration curves (1000-10,000 ng/patch) were constructed for methadone, cocaine, BE and 6AM by modifying injection techniques. Within (N = 5) and between-run (N = 20) imprecisions were calculated at six control levels across the dynamic ranges with coefficients of variation of <6.5%. Accuracies at these concentrations were +/-11.9% of target. Heroin hydrolysis during specimen processing was <11%. This novel assay offers effective monitoring of drug exposure during drug treatment, workplace and criminal justice monitoring programs.

  16. Development and validation of a solid-phase extraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantification of methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Bertrand R.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Mura, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    A sensitive and specific method is presented to simultaneously quantify methadone, heroin, cocaine and metabolites in sweat. Drugs were eluted from sweat patches with sodium acetate buffer, followed by SPE and quantification by GC/MS with electron impact ionization and selected ion monitoring. Daily calibration for anhydroecgonine methyl ester, ecgonine methyl ester, cocaine, benzoylecgonine (BE), codeine, morphine, 6-acetylcodeine, 6-acetylmorphine (6AM), heroin (5–1000 ng/patch) and methadone (10–1000 ng/patch) achieved determination coefficients of >0.995, and calibrators quantified to within ±20% of the target concentrations. Extended calibration curves (1000–10,000 ng/patch) were constructed for methadone, cocaine, BE and 6AM by modifying injection techniques. Within (N=5) and between-run (N=20) imprecisions were calculated at six control levels across the dynamic ranges with coefficients of variation of <6.5%. Accuracies at these concentrations were ±11.9% of target. Heroin hydrolysis during specimen processing was <11%. This novel assay offers effective monitoring of drug exposure during drug treatment, workplace and criminal justice monitoring programs. PMID:18607576

  17. Attenuation of Withdrawal Signs, Blood Cortisol, and Glucose Level with Various Dosage Regimens of Morphine after Precipitated Withdrawal Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Motaghinejad, Majid; Sadeghi-Hashjin, Goudarz; Koohi, Mohammad Kazem; Karimian, Seyed Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Morphine withdrawal usually results in unsuccessful outcomes. Despite partial benefits from alternative substances such as methadone, its use may not lead to the desired result due to the lack of mental tranquility during the withdrawal period. In this study, by means of an animal model, morphine itself was used to manage morphine dependence. Forty mice were divided into 5 groups, in which 4 groups became dependent by increasing daily doses of morphine for 7 days (15-45 mg/kg). Afterwards, the animals received morphine for 14 days by either of the following regimens: Once daily 45 mg/kg (positive controls)Increasing the interval (each time 6 hours longer than the previous interval)Irregular interval in every 36, 12 and 24 hours until the 21th day12, 24, 36 hours decreasing doses (each time 2.5 mg/kg less than the former dosage). Negative controls received saline solution only. On day 22, total withdrawal index (TWI) was determined by injecting 3 mg/kg of naloxone. Thereafter, blood samples were taken for the measurement of cortisol and glucose levels. TWI significantly decreased in all test groups in comparison with the positive control animals (P<0.001). Cortisol levels significantly decreased when either the dosage or the administration frequencies were decreased on a regular and gradual basis (P<0.005). Blood glucose levels significantly decreased in animals that received decreasing doses of morphine (P<0.005). This study suggests that no other measures may be required in clinical practice except for changing the dosage regimen of morphine for the cessation of self-administration. PMID:26722146

  18. Simultaneous determination of opiates, methadone, buprenorphine and metabolites in human urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huei-Ru; Chen, Chin-Lun; Huang, Chieh-Liang; Chen, Shao-Tsu; Lua, Ahai-Chuang

    2013-04-15

    For monitoring compliance of methadone or buprenorphine maintenance patient, a method for the simultaneous determination of methadone, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, opiates (morphine, codeine, 6-monoacetylmorphine) in urine by superficially porous liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated. After enzyme digestion and liquid-liquid extraction, reverse-phase separation was achieved in 5.2 min and quantification was performed by multiple reaction monitoring. Chromatographic separation was performed at 40 °C on a reversed phase Poroshell column with gradient elution. The mobile phase consisted of water and methanol, each containing 0.1% formic acid, at a flow rate of 0.32 mL/min. Intra-day and inter-day precision were less than 12.1% and accuracy was between -9.8% and 13.7%. Extraction efficiencies were more than 68%. Although ion suppression was detected, deuterated internal standards compensated for these effects. Carryover was minimal, less than 0.20%. All analytes were stable at room temperature for 16 h, 4 °C for 72 h, and after three freeze-thaw cycles. The assay also fulfilled compound identification criteria in accordance with the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. We analyzed 62 urine samples from patients received maintenance therapy and found that 54.8% of the patient samples tested were detected for morphine, codeine, or 6-monoacetylmorphine. This method provides a reliable and simultaneous quantification of opiates, maintenance drugs, and their metabolites in urine samples. It facilitates the routine monitoring in individuals prescribed the drug to ensure compliance and help therapeutic process.

  19. Immunoregulatory effects of morphine on human lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, M P; Schwartz, S A; Polasani, R; Hou, J; Sweet, A; Chadha, K C

    1997-01-01

    It is now well established that parenteral drug abuse is a significant risk factor for contracting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and subsequently developing AIDS. Earlier studies have shown that morphine can modulate various immune responses and therefore support the premise that morphine is a cofactor in susceptibility to and progression of HIV infection. Dysregulation of interferon (IFN) production, nonspecific apoptosis of T cells, and the immune response to soluble HIV gene products have been associated with potential mechanisms of pathogenesis in HIV disease. The present study was undertaken to examine the immunomodulatory role of morphine on HIV protein-induced lymphocyte proliferative responses, Sendai and Newcastle disease virus-induced alpha IFN (IFN-alpha) and IFN-beta production by lymphocytes and fibroblast cells, respectively, and induction of apoptosis of normal lymphocytes in vitro. Our results demonstrate that HIV protein-induced human lymphocyte proliferative responses were significantly inhibited by morphine in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, morphine significantly inhibited both IFN-alpha and IFN-beta production by normal lymphocytes and fibroblasts but induced apoptosis of normal lymphocytes. Inhibition of IFN-alpha production by morphine could be reversed by the opiate receptor antagonist naloxone. This suggests that the immunomodulatory effects of morphine are mediated through the opioid receptor. These studies support a role of morphine as a cofactor in the pathogenesis of HIV infection and describe some of the possible pathologic mechanisms which underlie the immunoregulatory effects of morphine. PMID:9067644

  20. Socially induced morphine pseudosensitization in adolescent mice.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Stephen R; Hofford, Rebecca S; Roberts, Kris W; Wellman, Paul J; Eitan, Shoshana

    2010-03-01

    Given that social influences are among the strongest predictors of adolescents' drug use, this study examined the effect of social interaction on morphine-induced hyperlocomotion in both adolescent and adult mice. Three experimental groups of adolescent and adult male mice were examined (i) morphine-treated mice (twice daily, 10-40 mg/kg, subcutaneous), (ii) saline-injected mice housed together with the morphine-treated mice ('saline cage-mates'), and (iii) saline-injected mice housed physically and visually separated from the morphine-treated mice ('saline alone'). After the treatment period, mice were tested individually for their locomotor response to 10 mg/kg morphine (subcutaneous). Adolescent saline cage-mates, though administered morphine for the very first time, exhibited an enhanced hyperlocomotion response similar to the locomotor sensitization response exhibited by the morphine-treated mice. This was not observed in adults. In adults, there were no significant differences in morphine-induced hyperlocomotion between saline alone and saline cage-mates. As expected, morphine-treated adults and adolescents both exhibited locomotor sensitization. These results show a vulnerability to social influences in adolescent mice, which does not exist in adult mice.

  1. Bioanalysis for cocaine, opiates, methadone, and amphetamines exposure detection during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Lendoiro, Elena; de Castro, Ana; Gónzalez-Colmenero, Eva; Concheiro-Guisan, Ana; Peñas-Silva, Patricia; Macias-Cortiña, Manuel; Cruz-Landeira, Angelines; López-Rivadulla, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Drug exposure during pregnancy constitutes a major legal issue and a public health concern. Drug and metabolite determination in biological matrices from mother and newborn is an objective indication of prenatal drug exposure. However, limited data are available regarding the interpretation of these analytical results in terms of window of detection and degree of exposure. We collected paired maternal hair, meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord from 727 mother-newborn dyads. We analyzed these specimens by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry for the determination of cocaine, opioids, methadone, and amphetamines, and compared the analytical results from the four different matrices. The cases were divided in non-exposure, low, and frequent exposure, based on maternal hair concentrations and segmental analysis by trimesters. For cocaine, 62 cases tested positive in hair, 9 in meconium, 6 in placenta and 7 in umbilical cord. In the case of opioids, 14 maternal hair cases were positive, 11 meconium and umbilical cord and 9 placenta samples. For methadone, 11 cases were positive in hair, 9 in meconium and 6 in placenta and umbilical cord. For amphetamines, 18 cases were positive according to maternal hair, but all meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord tested negative. Maternal hair was the most sensitive specimen to detect drug exposure during pregnancy. Meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord tested positive if hair concentrations showed frequent drug use during the whole pregnancy, especially during the third trimester. Meconium, placenta, and umbilical cord also tested positive for morphine and metabolites, if this drug was administered during labour and delivery. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Methadone related deaths compared to all prescription related deaths.

    PubMed

    Lev, Roneet; Petro, Sean; Lee, Ariella; Lee, Oren; Lucas, Jonathan; Castillo, Edward M; Egnatios, Jeremy; Vilke, Gary M

    2015-12-01

    Methadone is increasingly implicated in unintentional overdose deaths. Despite major interventions, rates continue to remain high. One primary intervention, Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMP) are limited in their ability to impact this epidemic due to federal law restricting Opioid Treatment Programs (OTPs) from sharing data to PDMPs, despite being a major source of Methadone dispensing. This retrospective, observational study analyzed all prescription-related deaths occurring in San Diego County during the year 2013 with a specific focus on methadone-related deaths. All patients designated by medical examiner to have died by unintentional prescription were then referenced in the California PDMP, the Controlled Substance Utilization Review and Evaluation System (CURES). As a whole, patients who died had a high number of average prescriptions, 21, and averaged 4.5 different providers, and three different pharmacies. Methadone-related deaths (MRD) accounted for 46 out of the 254 total patient deaths (18.1%). Methadone prescriptions were found in 14 patients with PDMP reports, 10 of who had methadone on toxicology report. Notably, 100% of methadone prescribed by primary care specialists. MRD patients were less likely to have toxicology reports matching PDMP data compared to other related drug deaths (20.6 vs. 61.2%, p<0.0001). Of the 46 methadone deaths, only 10 (29.4%) had prescriptions for methadone recorded in the database. Out of the 51 patients with only one drug recorded at death, methadone was most common (n=12; 23.5%). While all deaths had a notably high rate of chronic prescriptions at death (68.8% compared to 2% for all patients in CURES), there was no significant difference between MRD and other drug-related deaths (73.5 vs. 67.8%, p=0.68, respectively). MRD patients were less likely than other drug patients to have matching PDMP data without any illicit substance or alcohol (14.7 vs. 41.4%, p=0.003, respectively). Methadone is a long

  3. Opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions: from the perspectives of evidence based on randomized controlled trials and clinical risk management

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiu-qin; Zhu, Ling-ling; Zhou, Quan

    2017-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity results in complex polypharmacy which may bear a risk of drug interactions. A better understanding of opioid analgesics combination therapy used for pain management could help warrant medication safety, efficacy, and economic relevance. Until now there has been no review summarizing the opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions from the perspective of evidence based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Method A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library, using a PRISMA flowchart. Results Fifty-two RCTs were included for data interpretation. Forty-two RCTs (80.8%) were conducted in healthy volunteers, whereas 10 RCTs (19.2%) enrolled true patients. None of the opioid–drug/herb pairs was listed as contraindications of opioids involved in this review. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as a precipitant drug include morphine–P2Y12 inhibitors, morphine–gabapentin, and methadone–zidovudine. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as an object drug include rifampin–opioids (morphine, tramadol, oxycodone, methadone), quinidine–opioids (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, codeine, dihydrocodeine, methadone), antimycotics–opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, tilidine, tramadol), protease inhibitors–opioids (ritonavir, ritonavir/lopinavir–oxycodone, ritonavir–fentanyl, ritonavir–tilidine), grapefruit juice–opioids (oxycodone, fentanyl, methadone), antidepressants–opioids (paroxetine–tramadol, paroxetine–hydrocodone, paroxetine–oxycodone, escitalopram–tramadol), metoclopramide–morphine, amantadine–morphine, sumatriptan–butorphanol nasal sprays, ticlopidine–tramadol, St John’s wort–oxycodone, macrolides/ketolides–oxycodone, and levomepromazine–codeine. RCTs investigating the same combination, almost unanimously, drew consistent conclusions, except two RCTs on amantadine–intravenous morphine combination

  4. Slow-release oral morphine for opioid maintenance treatment: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Jegu, Jeremie; Gallini, Adeline; Soler, Pauline; Montastruc, Jean-Louis; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2011-01-01

    This review article summarizes the results of all available clinical trials considering the use of slow-release oral morphine (SROM) for opioid maintenance treatment (OMT). All studies published up to October 2010 and assessing SROM for OMT in adult patients are included. Three independent reviewers assessed the selected articles using a standardized checklist. Study design, study length and number of subjects included were recorded. Data about retention rate (proportion of participants remaining under maintenance treatment at the end of the study), quality of life, withdrawal symptoms, craving, additional drug consumption, driving capacity and adverse events were collected. We identified 13 articles corresponding to nine clinical trials considering the use of SROM for OMT. Among them, only one was a randomized trial and one was a controlled not randomized trial. All other studies were uncontrolled. Retention rates were good (from 80.6 to 95%) with SROM maintenance, but similar retention rates were obtained with methadone. Most of the studies showed that quality of life, withdrawal symptoms, craving and additional drug consumption improved with SROM. However, there was no comparison with other maintenance drugs. As most of the studies assessing SROM efficacy were uncontrolled, there is no definite evidence that SROM is an effective alternative to methadone for OMT. PMID:21265874

  5. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy due to iatrogenic methadone withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Saiful, Faisal B; Lafferty, James; Jun, Chin Hee; Teli, Sumaya; Duvvuri, Srinivas; Khattri, Saakshi; Bhat, Tariq

    2011-01-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a syndrome characterized by transient apical ballooning or reversible midventricular systolic dysfunction. Most cases occur in postmenopausal women and are typically triggered by an acute medical illness or emotional or physical stress. Its presentation is highly suggestive of myocardial ischemia, but there is little or no evidence of epicardial coronary artery disease. To our knowledge there are only three reported cases in the literature of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy induced by opioid agonist withdrawal in adults; ours is the first reported case of iatrogenic methadone withdrawal leading to Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

  6. The effects of CYP2D6 and CYP3A activities on the pharmacokinetics of immediate release oxycodone

    PubMed Central

    Samer, CF; Daali, Y; Wagner, M; Hopfgartner, G; Eap, CB; Rebsamen, MC; Rossier, MF; Hochstrasser, D; Dayer, P; Desmeules, JA

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: There is high interindividual variability in the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes catalysing the oxidation of oxycodone [cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6 and 3A], due to genetic polymorphisms and/or drug–drug interactions. The effects of CYP2D6 and/or CYP3A activity modulation on the pharmacokinetics of oxycodone remains poorly explored. Experimental approach: A randomized crossover double-blind placebo-controlled study was performed with 10 healthy volunteers genotyped for CYP2D6 [six extensive (EM), two deficient (PM/IM) and two ultrarapid metabolizers (UM)]. The volunteers randomly received on five different occasions: oxycodone 0.2 mg·kg−1 and placebo; oxycodone and quinidine (CYP2D6 inhibitor); oxycodone and ketoconazole (CYP3A inhibitor); oxycodone and quinidine+ketoconazole; placebo. Blood samples for plasma concentrations of oxycodone and metabolites (oxymorphone, noroxycodone and noroxymorphone) were collected for 24 h after dosing. Phenotyping for CYP2D6 (with dextromethorphan) and CYP3A (with midazolam) were assessed at each session. Key results: CYP2D6 activity was correlated with oxymorphone and noroxymorphone AUCs and Cmax (−0.71 < Spearman correlation coefficient ρs < −0.92). Oxymorphone Cmax was 62% and 75% lower in PM than EM and UM. Noroxymorphone Cmax reduction was even more pronounced (90%). In UM, oxymorphone and noroxymorphone concentrations increased whereas noroxycodone exposure was halved. Blocking CYP2D6 (with quinidine) reduced oxymorphone and noroxymorphone Cmax by 40% and 80%, and increased noroxycodone AUC∞ by 70%. Blocking CYP3A4 (with ketoconazole) tripled oxymorphone AUC∞ and reduced noroxycodone and noroxymorphone AUCs by 80%. Shunting to CYP2D6 pathway was observed after CYP3A4 inhibition. Conclusions and implications: Drug–drug interactions via CYP2D6 and CYP3A affected oxycodone pharmacokinetics and its magnitude depended on CYP2D6 genotype. PMID:20590587

  7. Oxycodone Induces Overexpression of P-Glycoprotein (ABCB1) and Affects Paclitaxel’s Tissue Distribution in Sprague Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    HASSAN, HAZEM E.; MYERS, ALAN L.; LEE, INSONG J.; COOP, ANDREW; EDDINGTON, NATALIE D.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulates the PK/PD of many compounds including opioid agonists and chemotherapeutic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone, the P-gp expression, and the paclitaxel’s tissue distribution in oxycodone-treated rats. P-gp ATPase assay, Caco-2 transepithelial permeability studies, and mdr1a/b (−/−) mice were used to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone. P-gp expression was determined by Western blot analysis while [14C] paclitaxel’s distributions in the liver, kidney, brain, and plasma tissues were determined by liquid scintillation counter. Oxycodone stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration-dependant manner. The Caco-2 secretory transport of oxycodone was reduced from 3.64 ×10−5 to 1.96 × 10−5 cm/s (p <0.05) upon preincubation with the P-gp inhibitor, verapamil. The brain levels of oxycodone in mdr1a/b (+/+) were not detectable (<15 ng/mL) while in mdr1a/b (−/−) the average levels were 115 ± 39 ng/mL. The P-gp protein levels were increased by 1.3–4.0 folds while paclitaxel’s tissue distributions were decreased by 38–90% (p <0.05) in oxycodone-treated rats. These findings display that oxycodone is a P-gp substrate, induces overexpression of P-gp, and affects paclitaxel’s tissue distribution in a manner that may influence its chemotherapeutic activity. PMID:17593551

  8. Self administration of oxycodone alters synaptic plasticity gene expression in the hippocampus differentially in male adolescent and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Brownstein, A J; Buonora, M; Niikura, K; Ho, A; Correa da Rosa, J; Kreek, M J; Ott, J

    2015-01-29

    Abuse and addiction to prescription opioids such as oxycodone (a short-acting Mu opioid receptor (MOP-r) agonist) in adolescence is a pressing public health issue. We have previously shown differences in oxycodone self-administration behaviors between adolescent and adult C57BL/6J mice and expression of striatal neurotransmitter receptor genes, in areas involved in reward. In this study, we aimed to determine whether oxycodone self-administration differentially affects genes regulating synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of adolescent compared to adult mice, since the hippocampus may be involved in learning aspects associated with chronic drug self administration. Hippocampus was isolated for mRNA analysis from mice that had self administered oxycodone (0.25 mg/kg/infusion) 2h/day for 14 consecutive days or from yoked saline controls. Gene expression was analyzed with real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using a commercially available "synaptic plasticity" PCR array containing 84 genes. We found that adolescent and adult control mice significantly differed in the expression of several genes in the absence of oxycodone exposure, including those coding for mitogen-activated protein kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gamma subunit, glutamate receptor, ionotropic AMPA2 and metabotropic 5. Chronic oxycodone self administration increased proviral integration site 1 (Pim1) and thymoma viral proto-oncogene 1 mRNA levels compared to controls in both age groups. Both Pim1 and cadherin 2 mRNAs showed a significant combined effect of Drug Condition and Age × Drug Condition. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of both cadherin 2 and cAMP response element modulators showed an experiment-wise significant difference between oxycodone and saline control in adult but not in adolescent mice. Overall, this study demonstrates for the first time that chronic oxycodone self-administration differentially alters synaptic plasticity gene expression in the hippocampus

  9. Analgesic efficacy, adverse effects, and safety of oxycodone administered as continuous intravenous infusion in patients after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Olczak, Bogumił; Kowalski, Grzegorz; Leppert, Wojciech; Zaporowska-Stachowiak, Iwona; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) causes extensive tissue damage and severe pain. This study aimed to assess the analgesic efficacy, adverse effects (AEs), and safety of continuous intravenous (iv) oxycodone infusion with ketoprofen (injected into the iv line) in patients after THA, and to assay serum oxycodone levels. Fourteen patients, aged 59‒82 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification I or III, underwent THA with intrathecal analgesia and sedation induced by iv propofol. After the surgery, oxycodone (continuous iv infusion) at a dose of 1 mg/h (five patients) or 2 mg/h (nine patients) with 100 mg ketoprofen (injected into the iv line) was administered to each patient every 12 h. Pain was assessed using a numerical rating scale (NRS: 0 - no pain, 10 - the most severe pain) at rest and during movement. AEs, including hemodynamic unsteadiness, nausea, vomiting, pruritus, cognitive impairment, and respiratory depression, were registered during the first 24 h after surgery. Oxycodone (continuous iv infusion) at a dose of 2 mg/h with ketoprofen (100 mg) administered every 12 h provided satisfactory analgesia in all nine patients without the need of rescue analgesics within the first 24 h after THA. In three out of five patients, oxycodone at 1 mg/h was effective. Oxycodone did not induce drowsiness, vomiting, pruritus, respiratory depression, or changes in blood pressure. Bradycardia appeared in two patients, and nausea was observed in one patient. Oxycodone infusion with ketoprofen administered by iv is effective in patients after THA. Intravenous infusion of oxycodone is a predictable, stable, and safe method of drug administration.

  10. Oxycodone induces overexpression of P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) and affects paclitaxel's tissue distribution in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Hazem E; Myers, Alan L; Lee, Insong J; Coop, Andrew; Eddington, Natalie D

    2007-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulates the PK/PD of many compounds including opioid agonists and chemotherapeutic agents. The objective of this study was to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone, the P-gp expression, and the paclitaxel's tissue distribution in oxycodone-treated rats. P-gp ATPase assay, Caco-2 transepithelial permeability studies, and mdr1a/b (-/-) mice were used to assess the P-gp affinity status of oxycodone. P-gp expression was determined by Western blot analysis while [(14)C] paclitaxel's distributions in the liver, kidney, brain, and plasma tissues were determined by liquid scintillation counter. Oxycodone stimulated the P-gp ATPase activity in a concentration-dependant manner. The Caco-2 secretory transport of oxycodone was reduced from 3.64 x 10(-5) to 1.96 x 10(-5) cm/s (p < 0.05) upon preincubation with the P-gp inhibitor, verapamil. The brain levels of oxycodone in mdr1a/b (+/+) were not detectable (<15 ng/mL) while in mdr1a/b (-/-) the average levels were 115 +/- 39 ng/mL. The P-gp protein levels were increased by 1.3-4.0 folds while paclitaxel's tissue distributions were decreased by 38-90% (p < 0.05) in oxycodone-treated rats. These findings display that oxycodone is a P-gp substrate, induces overexpression of P-gp, and affects paclitaxel's tissue distribution in a manner that may influence its chemotherapeutic activity.

  11. Comparison of the analgesic effect of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for pain management in patients undergoing colorectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyeo-Woon; Kang, Hyeon-Wook; Park, Chan-Hye; Choi, Byung-Hyun; Bang, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Han; Lee, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Byung-Moon; Noh, Gyu-Jeong

    2016-08-01

    Oxycodone is a μ-opioid receptor agonist and is generally indicated for the relief of moderate to severe pain. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of patient-controlled oxycodone and fentanyl for postoperative pain in patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Patients scheduled to undergo elective colorectal surgery (n=82) were allocated to receive oxycodone (n=41, concentration of 1 mg/mL) or fentanyl (n=41, concentration of 15 μg/mL) for postoperative pain management. After the operation, pain using a numerical rating scale (NRS), delivery to demand ratio, infused dose of patient-controlled analgesia (PCA), side effects, and sedation levels were evaluated. Median (25%-75%) cumulative PCA dose of oxycodone group at 48 hours (66.9, 58.4-83.7 mL) was significantly less than that of fentanyl group (80.0, 63.4-103.3 mL, P=.037). Six hours after surgery, the mean (SD) NRS scores of the oxycodone and fentanyl groups were 6.2 (2.4) and 6.8 (1.9), respectively (P=.216). The mean equianalgesic potency ratio of oxycodone to fentanyl was 55:1. The groups did not differ in postoperative nausea, vomiting, and level of sedation. Patient-controlled oxycodone provides similar effects for pain relief compared to patient-controlled fentanyl in spite of less cumulative PCA dose. Based on these results, oxycodone can be a useful alternative to fentanyl for PCA in patients after colorectal surgery. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour--maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure.

    PubMed

    Kokki, Merja; Franco, Maria Gonzalez; Raatikainen, Kaisa; Välitalo, Pyry; Sankilampi, Ulla; Heinonen, Seppo; Neuvonen, Pertti J; Kokki, Hannu

    2012-09-01

    Physiological changes during pregnancy may change pharmacokinetics of compounds. Oxycodone is an increasingly used opioid agonist in acute pain management but its pharmacokinetics in labouring women has not been established. We studied the maternal pharmacokinetics and neonatal exposure of intravenous oxycodone for pain relief in the first stage of labour. The study was prospective, open-labelled and with a control group. After informed consent, 15 nulliparous parturients and newborns, and newborns in a control group were studied. In the study group, oxycodone boluses of 1 mg i.v., up to a cumulative dose of 5 mg, was administered when labour pain score was 5/10 or higher. As the control group, 30 other newborns after uncomplicated deliveries with no systemic opioids were assessed for the neonatal outcome. In the study group, maternal pharmacokinetics of oxycodone was measured from plasma concentrations during labour, and neonatal exposure was assessed from umbilical plasma samples using population pharmacokinetic methods. Maternal plasma oxycodone concentration decreased with a median half-life of 2.6 hr (range, 1.8-2.8). Oxycodone concentrations in the umbilical plasma 2.7 μg/l (0.3-14.5) were similar as in maternal plasma 2.4 (0.1-14.8) μg/l at the time of birth. No severe or unexpected adverse effects were noted. To conclude, firstly, maternal elimination half-life of i.v. oxycodone was significantly shorter than that reported in non-pregnant women, and secondly, maternal plasma oxycodone at the birth correlated well with neonatal umbilical concentrations and may, thus, be used as an estimate of neonatal exposure.

  13. Differences in morphine-induced antinociception in male and female offspring born of morphine exposed mothers

    PubMed Central

    Biglarnia, Masoomeh; Karami, Manizheh; Hafshejani, Zahra Khodabakhshi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Antinociceptive effect of morphine in offspring born of mothers that received saline or morphine during the gestation period was investigated. Materials and Methods: Wistar rats (200-250 g) received saline, morphine 0.5 mg/kg or 5 mg/kg during gestation days 14-16. All pups after weaning were isolated treatment/sex dependently and were allowed to fully mature. The antinociceptive effect of morphine was assessed in formalin test. Morphine (0.5-7.5 mg/kg) or saline (1 ml/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 10 min before formalin (50 μl of 2.5% solution in right hind-paw). Results: Male offspring born of saline-treated mothers were less morphine-sensitive than females. On the contrary, male offspring exposed prenatally to morphine (5 mg/kg) were more sensitive to morphine-induced antinociceptive response in formalin test. However, no difference in antinociceptive effect was observed amongst offspring of either sex born of mothers treated with morphine 0.5 mg/kg, identifying a lower dose effect of the opioid. Conclusion: The exposure to morphine during the developmental period may result in altered development of tolerance to morphine and thus involved in drug abuse. PMID:23833363

  14. Positive and negative subjective effects of extended-release oxymorphone versus controlled-release oxycodone in recreational opioid users.

    PubMed

    Schoedel, Kerri A; McMorn, Stephen; Chakraborty, Bijan; Potts, Susan L; Zerbe, Kathleen; Sellers, Edward M

    2011-01-01

    To compare the subjective effects of oxymorphone extended release (OM-ER) versus oxycodone controlled release (OC-CR). Randomized, double-blind, crossover study. Inpatient unit. Healthy, nondependent recreational opioid users. Single intact oral tablets that were placebo or contained OM-ER (15 and 30 mg) or OC-CR (30 and 60 mg). Doses were representative of mid-range doses for chronic pain and were calculated using an established opioid conversion table. Visual Analog Scales, Subjective Drug Value (SDV), and Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI) measured positive, negative, and balance effects and pupillometry. Equianalgesic comparisons were between OM-ER 15 mg versus OC-CR 30 mg (low doses) and OM-ER 30 mg versus OC-CR 60 mg (high doses). Thirty-five subjects received all five treatments. Positive subjective effects were lower for OM-ER 15 mg versus OC-CR 30 mg and for OM-ER 30 mg versus OC-CR 60 mg in ARCI Morphine Benzedrine Group (< or = 0.01 for both), Good Effects (p < 0.001 for both), Rush (p < 0.001 for both), and High VAS (p < 0.001 for both). Nausea was higher with OC-CR (p < or = 0.02), and Bad Effects were higher for OC-CR 60 mg versus OM-ER 30 mg (p < 0.001). Balance effects were lower for OM-ER versus OC-CR (Drug Liking, p < 0.001; Overall Drug Liking, p < or = 0.006; SDV, p < or = 0.008), except for Take Drug Again (p < 0.001 for OC-CR 30 mg versus OM-ER 15 mg; p = 0.18 for high-dose group). Euphoric mood, nausea, somnolence, vomiting, and dizziness were more common with OC-CR than OM-ER. Single-dose design; use of healthy, recreational opioid users. At equianalgesic doses, single oral intact OM-ER produced lower positive, negative, and balance subjective effects than OC-CR, indicating that analgesic potency may not necessarily be reflected in subjective/objective effects.

  15. Contingent methadone delivery: effects on illicit-opiate use.

    PubMed

    Higgins, S T; Stitzer, M L; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1986-07-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent vs. non-contingent delivery of a methadone dose supplement on relapse to illicit opiate use in the context of a methadone outpatient detoxification program. Following a 3-week methadone stabilization period on 30 mg, patients (N = 39) were randomly assigned to a contingent, a non-contingent, or a control treatment group. All patients received identical gradual reductions in their assigned methadone dose. During the dose reduction period (weeks 4-11), members of the contingent (N = 13) and non-contingent groups (N = 13) could obtain daily methadone-dose supplements up to 20 mg, but contingent group members could obtain supplements only if their most recent urinalysis results were opiate negative. Control subjects (N = 13) did not have dose increases available. The contingent group presented significantly lower opiate-positive urines during weeks 8-11 (14% positive) of the detox than the non-contingent (38% positive) or control (50% positive) groups. Additionally, the availability of extra methadone improved treatment retention and increased clinic attendance above levels observed in the control group. The potential for further use of methadone's reinforcing properties in the treatment of opiate dependence is discussed.

  16. The effect of methadone dose regimen on neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Leamon, Martin H; Willits, Neil H; Salo, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of a multiple daily dose methadone regimen in pregnancy on neonatal outcomes. Although methadone maintenance has been the standard for the treatment of opioid dependence in pregnancy, there is no consensus on proper dosing. Single daily dosing is the most common strategy. Because of accelerated metabolism of methadone in pregnancy, this regimen may expose mother and fetus to daily episodes of withdrawal and possibly contribute to more severe Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). This study reports on a protocol that increased both methadone dose and dose frequency in response to maternal reports of withdrawal. Treatment of NAS was needed in 29% of neonates, compared to a published rate of 60% to 80%. The mean methadone dose was 152 mg at delivery, divided into 2 to 6 doses per day. Ninety-two percent of mothers were free of illicit drug use at delivery. There was no relationship between methadone dose and treatment of NAS. Female babies had a treatment rate of 16% versus 38% for male babies. Beyond abstinence symptoms, cohort outcomes in terms of gestational age, birth weight, prematurity, Caesarian sections, and breastfeeding equaled or approximated US population norms. The protocol was associated with low rates of treatment of NAS and high rates of maternal recovery. High rates of treatment for NAS reported in methadone-exposed neonates might relate in part to iatrogenic factors and be reduced through the use of divided daily doses and protocols that minimize maternal withdrawal.

  17. Methadone and perinatal outcomes: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Brian J; Donnelly, Jean M; Strawbridge, Judith D; Gallagher, Paul J; Fahey, Tom; White, Martin J; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among methadone maintenance treatment, perinatal outcomes, and neonatal abstinence syndrome. This was a retrospective cohort study of 61,030 singleton births at a large maternity hospital from 2000-2007. There were 618 (1%) women on methadone at delivery. Methadone-exposed women were more likely to be younger, to book late for antenatal care, and to be smokers. Methadone exposure was associated with an increased risk of very preterm birth <32 weeks of gestation (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.40-4.34), being small for gestational age <10th percentile (aOR, 3.27; 95% CI, 2.49-4.28), admission to the neonatal unit (aOR, 9.14; 95% CI, 7.21-11.57), and diagnosis of a major congenital anomaly (aOR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.10-3.43). There was a dose-response relationship between methadone and neonatal abstinence syndrome. Methadone exposure is associated with an increased risk of adverse perinatal outcomes, even when known adverse sociodemographic factors have been accounted for. Methadone dose at delivery is 1 of the determinants of neonatal abstinence syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A systematic review of the cardiotoxicity of methadone

    PubMed Central

    Alinejad, Samira; Kazemi, Toba; Zamani, Nasim; Hoffman, Robert S.; Mehrpour, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Methadone is one of the most popular synthetic opioids in the world with some favorable properties making it useful both in the treatment of moderate to severe pain and for opioid addiction. Increased use of methadone has resulted in an increased prevalence of its toxicity, one aspect of which is cardiotoxicity. In this paper, we review the effects of methadone on the heart as well as cardiac concerns in some special situations such as pregnancy and childhood. Methods: We searched for the terms methadone, toxicity, poisoning, cardiotoxicity, heart, dysrhythmia, arrhythmia, QT interval prolongation, torsade de pointes, and Electrocardiogram (ECG) in bibliographical databases including TUMS digital library, PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. This review includes relevant articles published between 2000 and 2013. The main cardiac effects of methadone include prolongation of QT interval and torsade de pointes. Other effects include changes in QT dispersion, pathological U waves, Taku-Tsubo syndrome (stress cardiomyopathy), Brugada-like syndrome, and coronary artery diseases. The aim of this paper is to inform physicians and health care staff about these adverse effects. Effectiveness of methadone in the treatment of pain and addiction should be weighed against these adverse effects and physicians should consider the ways to lessen such undesirable effects. This article presents some recommendations to prevent heart toxicity in methadone users. PMID:26869865

  19. HIV transmission and the cost-effectiveness of methadone maintenance.

    PubMed Central

    Zaric, G S; Barnett, P G; Brandeau, M L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study determined the cost-effectiveness of expanding methadone maintenance treatment for heroin addiction, particularly its effect on the HIV epidemic. METHODS: We developed a dynamic epidemic model to study the effects of increased methadone maintenance capacity on health care costs and survival, measured as quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). We considered communities with HIV prevalence among injection drug users of 5% and 40%. RESULTS: Additional methadone maintenance capacity costs $8200 per QALY gained in the high-prevalence community and $10,900 per QALY gained in the low-prevalence community. More than half of the benefits are gained by individuals who do not inject drugs. Even if the benefits realized by treated and untreated injection drug users are ignored, methadone maintenance expansion costs between $14,100 and $15,200 per QALY gained. Additional capacity remains cost-effective even if it is twice as expensive and half as effective as current methadone maintenance slots. CONCLUSIONS: Expansion of methadone maintenance is cost-effective on the basis of commonly accepted criteria for medical interventions. Barriers to methadone maintenance deny injection drug users access to a cost-effective intervention that generates significant health benefits for the general population. PMID:10897189

  20. Effects of cold pressor pain on the abuse liability of intranasal oxycodone in male and female prescription opioid abusers.

    PubMed

    Lofwall, Michelle R; Nuzzo, Paul A; Wal